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Sample records for effective width equations

  1. Level width broadening effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingshang

    2003-01-01

    In file-6 for double-differential cross sections, the level width broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg' uncertainty. Besides level width broadening effect, the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in fitting measurement procedure. In general, the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed. However, to do so in this way the energy balance could not be held. For this reason, the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced, with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could be held exactly in the analytical form. (author)

  2. Dispersive traveling wave solutions of the Equal-Width and Modified Equal-Width equations via mathematical methods and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dianchen; Seadawy, Aly R.; Ali, Asghar

    2018-06-01

    The Equal-Width and Modified Equal-Width equations are used as a model in partial differential equations for the simulation of one-dimensional wave transmission in nonlinear media with dispersion processes. In this article we have employed extend simple equation method and the exp(-varphi(ξ)) expansion method to construct the exact traveling wave solutions of equal width and modified equal width equations. The obtained results are novel and have numerous applications in current areas of research in mathematical physics. It is exposed that our method, with the help of symbolic computation, provides a effective and powerful mathematical tool for solving different kind nonlinear wave problems.

  3. Application of the Exp-function method to the equal-width wave equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biazar, J; Ayati, Z

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the Exp-function method is used to find an exact solution of the equal-width wave (EW) equation. The method is straightforward and concise, and its applications are promising. It is shown that the Exp-function method, with the help of symbolic computation, provides a very effective and powerful mathematical tool for solving the EW equation.

  4. Electrodynamics of finite width guideway maglev systems in an integral equation formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urankar, L [Siemens A.G., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Forschungslaboratorium

    1979-01-01

    A completely general, system-independent integral equation for the eddy current density is used to study the electrodynamics of finite guideway repulsive magleydsymaglev systems. For the first time a comparison of the transverse force measurements on a large-scale prototype vehicle (EET) with the theory is presented. The lateral displacement of the excitation magnet produces destabilizing transverse forces. The finite width of the guideway reduces the lift and increases the specific losses. The consequence is that for a given magnet width an adequate guideway overhang beyond the magnet width must be provided, so as not to suffer loss in the lift due to transverse edge effects and keep the lateral destabilizing force small.

  5. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V. G., E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.ru [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gitman, D. M., E-mail: gitman@if.usp.br [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A. D., E-mail: alevin@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A. S.; Saprykin, A. D. [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-25

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory.

  6. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Gitman, D. M.; Levin, A. D.; Loginov, A. S.; Saprykin, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory

  7. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); SB RAS, Institute of High Current Electronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gitman, D.M. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A.D. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A.S.; Saprykin, A.D. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory. (orig.)

  8. Runge-Kutta Integration of the Equal Width Wave Equation Using the Method of Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Banaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The equal width (EW equation governs nonlinear wave phenomena like waves in shallow water. Numerical solution of the (EW equation is obtained by using the method of lines (MOL based on Runge-Kutta integration. Using von Neumann stability analysis, the scheme is found to be unconditionally stable. Solitary wave motion and interaction of two solitary waves are studied using the proposed method. The three invariants of the motion are evaluated to determine the conservation properties of the generated scheme. Accuracy of the proposed method is discussed by computing the L2 and L∞ error norms. The results are found in good agreement with exact solution.

  9. Nuclear structure effects on alpha reduced widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, K.S.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.A.; Kim, H.J.; McConnell, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A review of α widths for s-wave transitions is presented together with a discussion of the following topics: (1) a new determination of the 218 Ra half-life and its relation to reflection asymmetry in nuclei near N = 130, (2) a measurement of the 194 Pb α-decay rate and the influence of the Z = 82 gap on neutron-deficient Pb nuclei, and (3) an up-date of α-decay-rate systematics for isotopes in the rare earth and medium-weight mass regions. 16 refs., 6 figs

  10. Stream water responses to timber harvest: Riparian buffer width effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Vegetated riparian buffers are critical for protecting aquatic and terrestrial processes and habitats in southern Appalachian ecosystems. In this case study, we examined the effect of riparian buffer width on stream water quality following upland forest management activities in four headwater catchments. Three riparian buffer widths were delineated prior to cutting; 0m...

  11. Solution of the pulse width modulation problem using orthogonal polynomials and Korteweg-de Vries equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, D V; Chudnovsky, G V

    1999-10-26

    The mathematical underpinning of the pulse width modulation (PWM) technique lies in the attempt to represent "accurately" harmonic waveforms using only square forms of a fixed height. The accuracy can be measured using many norms, but the quality of the approximation of the analog signal (a harmonic form) by a digital one (simple pulses of a fixed high voltage level) requires the elimination of high order harmonics in the error term. The most important practical problem is in "accurate" reproduction of sine-wave using the same number of pulses as the number of high harmonics eliminated. We describe in this paper a complete solution of the PWM problem using Pade approximations, orthogonal polynomials, and solitons. The main result of the paper is the characterization of discrete pulses answering the general PWM problem in terms of the manifold of all rational solutions to Korteweg-de Vries equations.

  12. Effect of step width manipulation on tibial stress during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Derrick, Timothy R

    2014-08-22

    Narrow step width has been linked to variables associated with tibial stress fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of step width on bone stresses using a standardized model of the tibia. 15 runners ran at their preferred 5k running velocity in three running conditions, preferred step width (PSW) and PSW±5% of leg length. 10 successful trials of force and 3-D motion data were collected. A combination of inverse dynamics, musculoskeletal modeling and beam theory was used to estimate stresses applied to the tibia using subject-specific anthropometrics and motion data. The tibia was modeled as a hollow ellipse. Multivariate analysis revealed that tibial stresses at the distal 1/3 of the tibia differed with step width manipulation (p=0.002). Compression on the posterior and medial aspect of the tibia was inversely related to step width such that as step width increased, compression on the surface of tibia decreased (linear trend p=0.036 and 0.003). Similarly, tension on the anterior surface of the tibia decreased as step width increased (linear trend p=0.029). Widening step width linearly reduced shear stress at all 4 sites (pstresses experienced by the tibia during running were influenced by step width when using a standardized model of the tibia. Wider step widths were generally associated with reduced loading of the tibia and may benefit runners at risk of or experiencing stress injury at the tibia, especially if they present with a crossover running style. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stochastic Mixed-Effects Parameters Bertalanffy Process, with Applications to Tree Crown Width Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras Rupšys

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic modeling approach based on the Bertalanffy law gained interest due to its ability to produce more accurate results than the deterministic approaches. We examine tree crown width dynamic with the Bertalanffy type stochastic differential equation (SDE and mixed-effects parameters. In this study, we demonstrate how this simple model can be used to calculate predictions of crown width. We propose a parameter estimation method and computational guidelines. The primary goal of the study was to estimate the parameters by considering discrete sampling of the diameter at breast height and crown width and by using maximum likelihood procedure. Performance statistics for the crown width equation include statistical indexes and analysis of residuals. We use data provided by the Lithuanian National Forest Inventory from Scots pine trees to illustrate issues of our modeling technique. Comparison of the predicted crown width values of mixed-effects parameters model with those obtained using fixed-effects parameters model demonstrates the predictive power of the stochastic differential equations model with mixed-effects parameters. All results were implemented in a symbolic algebra system MAPLE.

  14. Mathematical equation for prediction of cat mandibular canal height dimension based on canine tooth width measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Miguel; Carreira, L Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The present study was performed in a sample of 33 cats and aimed (1) to characterise the mandible height (Mh), mandibular canal height (MCh) and the distance between the interdental alveolar margin and the mandibular canal (dIAM-MC); and (2) to develop a mathematical model for dimension prediction of MCh using the patient's age, weight (Wg) and canine tooth width at the free gingival margin level (wCGM) that was easily accessible during the oral examination. Age, sex, breed, weight, skull type and the wCGM were the recorded variables for each patient. Right and left lateral view skull radiographs were made followed by measurements of the mandible anatomical structures, taken between the third premolar distal root and the fourth premolar proximal root. Results were considered statistically significant for P values <0.05, and statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. We observed a strong correlation only between wCGM and MCh, and a prediction mathematical model was developed to calculate the MCh, with a standard error of only 0.4 mm. Our study allows a surgeon to establish relationships between a physical parameter, such as wCGM, evaluated in an oral examination, and the mandibular canal, which is a very important anatomical structure to consider in surgical procedures. Ideally, surgeons should always plan their mandible work only after obtaining a final diagnosis achieved through the use of complementary imaging exams, such as intra- and extra-oral radiographs. Thus, this mathematical equation offers an additional tool, providing more information on the relationships between oral anatomical structures, reducing the risk of iatrogenic lesions and promoting patient safety. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  15. Effects of injection nozzle exit width on rotating detonation engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Shijie; Lin, Zhiyong; Cai, Jianhua

    2017-11-01

    A series of numerical simulations of RDE modeling real injection nozzles with different exit widths are performed in this paper. The effects of nozzle exit width on chamber inlet state, plenum flowfield and detonation propagation are analyzed. The results are compared with that using an ideal injection model. Although the ideal injection model is a good approximation method to model RDE inlet, the two-dimensional effects of real nozzles are ignored in the ideal injection model so that some complicated phenomena such as the reflected waves caused by the nozzle walls and the reversed flow into the nozzles can not be modeled accurately. Additionally, the ideal injection model overpredicts the block ratio. In all the cases that stabilize at one-wave mode, the block ratio increases as the nozzle exit width gets smaller. The dual-wave mode case also has a relatively high block ratio. A pressure oscillation in the plenum with the same main frequency with the rotating detonation wave is observed. A parameter σ is applied to describe the non-uniformity in the plenum. σ increases as the nozzle exit width gets larger. Under some condition, the heat release on the interface of fresh premixed gas layer and detonation products can be strong enough to induce a new detonation wave. A spontaneous mode-transition process is observed for the smallest exit width case. Due to the detonation products existing in the premixed gas layer before the detonation wave, the detonation wave will propagate through reactants and products alternately, and therefore its strength will vary with time, especially near the chamber inlet. This tendency gets weaker as the injection nozzle exit width increases.

  16. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian Morten

    2012-01-01

    Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received littl...

  17. Single event effects in pulse width modulation controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzin, S.H.; Crain, W.R.; Crawford, K.B.; Hansel, S.J.; Kirshman, J.F.; Koga, R.

    1996-01-01

    SEE testing was performed on pulse width modulation (PWM) controllers which are commonly used in switching mode power supply systems. The devices are designed using both Set-Reset (SR) flip-flops and Toggle (T) flip-flops which are vulnerable to single event upset (SEU) in a radiation environment. Depending on the implementation of the different devices the effect can be significant in spaceflight hardware

  18. Comparison of results using second-order moments with and without width correction to solve the advection equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.W.; Long, P.E.

    1978-01-01

    The method of moments is used with and without a a width-correction technique to solve the advection of a passive scalar. The method of moments is free of numerical dispersion but suffers from numerical diffusion (damping). In order to assess the effect of the width-correction procedure on reducing numerical diffusion, both versions are used to advect a passive scalar in straight-line and rotational wind fields. Although the width-correction procedure reduces numerical diffusion under some circumstances, the unmodified version of the second-moment procedure is better suited as a general method

  19. Effect of Pulse Width on Oxygen-fed Ozonizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Sho; Wang, Douyan; Namihira, Takao; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori

    Though general ozonizers based on silent discharge (barrier discharge) have been used to supply ozone at many industrial situations, there is still some problem, such as improvements of ozone yield. In this work, ozone was generated by pulsed discharge in order to improve the characteristics of ozone generation. It is known that a pulse width gives strong effect to the improvement of energy efficiency in exhaust gas processing. In this paper, the effect of pulse duration on ozone generation by pulsed discharge in oxygen would be reported.

  20. The effects of lane width, shoulder width, and road cross-sectional reallocation on drivers' behavioral adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecheri, Sami; Rosey, Florence; Lobjois, Régis

    2017-07-01

    Previous research has shown that lane-width reduction makes drivers operate vehicles closer to the center of the road whereas hard-shoulder widening induces a position farther away from the road's center. The goal of the present driving-simulator study was twofold. First, it was aimed at further investigating the respective effects of lane and shoulder width on in-lane positioning strategies, by examining vehicle distance from the center of the lane. The second aim was to assess the impact on safety of three possible cross-sectional reallocations of the width of the road (i.e., three lane-width reductions with concomitant shoulder widening at a fixed cross-sectional width) as compared to a control road. The results confirmed that lane-width reduction made participants drive closer to the road's center. However, in-lane position was affected differently by lane narrowing, depending on the traffic situation. In the absence of oncoming traffic, lane narrowing gave rise to significant shifts in the car's distance from the lane's center toward the edge line, whereas this distance remained similar across lane widths during traffic periods. When the shoulders were at least 0.50m wide, participants drove farther away from both the road center and the lane center. Road reallocation operations resulted in vehicles positioned farther away from the edge of the road and less swerving behavior, without generating higher driving speeds. Finally, it is argued that road-space reallocation may serve as a good low-cost tool for providing a recovery area for steering errors, without impairing drivers' behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis Of The Effect Of Flow Channel Width On The Performance Of PEMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Eker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, it was analysed the effect of different channel width on performance of PEM fuel cell. Current density were measured on the single cells of parallel flow fields that has 25 cm² active layer, using three different kinds of channel width. The cell width and the channel height remain constant.The results show that increasing the channel width while the cell width remains constant decreases the current density.

  2. Effects of curved midline and varying width on the description of the effective diffusivity of Brownian particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Yoshua; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2018-05-01

    Axial diffusion in channels and tubes of smoothly-varying geometry can be approximately described as one-dimensional diffusion in the entropy potential with a position-dependent effective diffusion coefficient, by means of the modified Fick–Jacobs equation. In this work, we derive analytical expressions for the position-dependent effective diffusivity for two-dimensional asymmetric varying-width channels, and for three-dimensional curved midline tubes, formed by straight walls. To this end, we use a recently developed theoretical framework using the Frenet–Serret moving frame as the coordinate system (2016 J. Chem. Phys. 145 074105). For narrow tubes and channels, an effective one-dimensional description reducing the diffusion equation to a Fick–Jacobs-like equation in general coordinates is used. From this last equation, one can calculate the effective diffusion coefficient applying Neumann boundary conditions.

  3. The effect of scattering interference term on the practical width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins do Amaral, C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The practical width Γ p has an important application in the characterization of the resonance type for the calculation of neutron average cross sections. Previous treatments ignore the interference term χζ,x for the Doppler broadening function in the practical width calculation. In the present paper, a rational approximation for the χζ,x function is derived, using a modified asymptotic Pade method. A new approximation for Γ p is obtained. The results which are presented here provide evidence that the practical width as a function of temperature varies considerably with the inclusion of the interference term χζ,x

  4. Finite-orbit-width effect and the radial electric field in neoclassical transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, S.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Beidler, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    Modeling and detailed simulation of neoclassical transport phenomena both in 2D and 3D toroidal configurations are shown. The emphasis is put on the effect of finiteness of the drift-orbit width, which brings a non-local nature to neoclassical transport phenomena. Evolution of the self-consistent radial electric field in the framework of neoclassical transport is also investigated. The combination of Monte-Carlo calculation for ion transport and numerical solver of ripple-averaged kinetic equation for electrons makes it possible to calculate neoclassical fluxes and the time evolution of the radial electric field in the whole plasma region, including the finite-orbit-width (FOW) effects and global evolution of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The simulation results show that the heat conductivity around the magnetic axis is smaller than that obtained from standard neoclassical theory and that the evolution of GAM oscillation on each flux surface is coupled with other surfaces if the FOW effect is significant. A global simulation of radial electric field evolution in a non-axisymmetric plasma is also shown. (author)

  5. Effect of pulse width on near-infrared supercontinuum generation in nonlinear fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Lei, Cheng-Min; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Wang, Ze-Feng; Hou, Jing

    2015-08-01

    The effect of pulse width on near-infrared supercontinuum generation in nonlinear fiber amplifier is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and adaptive split-step Fourier method are used to simulate the propagation of pulses with different pulse widths in the fiber amplifier, and the results show that a longer pulse is more profitable in near-infrared supercontinuum generation if the central wavelength of the input laser lies in the normal dispersion region of the gain fiber. A four-stage master oscillator power amplifier configuration is adopted and the output spectra under picosecond and nanosecond input pulses are compared with each other. The experimental results are in good accordance with the simulations which can provide some guidance for further optimization of the system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11404404 and 11274385) and the Outstanding Youth Fund Project of Hunan Province and the Fund of Innovation of National University of Defense Technology, China (Grant No. B120701).

  6. Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1λ. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

  7. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes. These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes.

  8. Dependence of effective spectrum width of synchrotron radiation on particle energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D.M. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A.D. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A.S.; Saprykin, A.D. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    In the classical theory of synchrotron radiation, for the exact quantitative characterization of spectral properties, the concept of effective spectral width is introduced. In the first part of our work, published in EJPC 75 (2015), the effective spectral width as a function of the energy E of the radiating particle was obtained only in the ultra-relativistic approximation. In this article, which can be considered as a natural continuation of this work, a complete investigation is presented of the dependence of the effective width of the synchrotron radiation spectrum on energy for any values of E and for all the polarization components of the radiation. Numerical calculations were carried out for an effective width not exceeding 100 harmonics. (orig.)

  9. Clinically insubstantial cognitive side effects of bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy at 0.5 msec pulse width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnell, Ronald L; Swartz, Conrad M; Thomson, Alice

    2011-11-01

    We measured cognitive side effects from bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) using stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width 900 milliamperes (mA). Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-21) were rated within 36 hours before and 36 hours after a series of 6 bitemporal ECT sessions on 15 patients age ≥45. MMSE remained high after ECT (pre-ECT mean 29, standard deviation [SD] 1.60, post-ECT mean 28.53, SD 1.36) with no significant change. The mean HRSD-21 fell from 27.5 to 16.3. Post-ECT MMSE was significantly and markedly higher than in previous studies of bitemporal ECT; all had used ECT stimuli of pulse width at least 1 msec. With stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA, 6 bitemporal ECTs did not decrease MMSE score. This result leaves no opportunity for further decrease in basic cognitive side effects, and complements published reports of stronger physiological effects with stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA. ECT stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA are more desirable than wider pulse widths. Six bitemporal ECT sessions using these stimuli generally will not have more cognitive side effects than treatments with other placements, allowing maintenance of full efficacy with clinically insubstantial side effects.

  10. Quark-mixing renormalization effects on the W-boson partial decay widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almasy, A.A.; Kniehl, B.A.; Sirlin, A.

    2008-10-01

    We briefly review existing proposals for the renormalization of the Cabibbo- Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and study their numerical effects on the W-boson partial decay widths. The differences between the decay widths predicted by the various renormalization schemes are generally negligible, while their deviations from the MS results are very small, except for W + → u anti b and W + →c anti b, where they reach approximately 4%. (orig.)

  11. Effects of Pulse Width and Electrode Placement on the Efficacy and Cognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackeim, Harold A.; Prudic, Joan; Nobler, Mitchell S.; Fitzsimons, Linda; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Payne, Nancy; Berman, Robert M.; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Perera, Tarique; Devanand, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression is effective, cognitive effects limit its use. Reducing the width of the electrical pulse and using the right unilateral electrode placement may decrease adverse cognitive effects, while preserving efficacy. METHODS In a double-masked study, we randomly assigned 90 depressed patients to right unilateral ECT at 6 times seizure threshold or bilateral ECT at 2.5 times seizure threshold, using either a traditional brief pulse (1.5 ms) or an ultrabrief pulse (0.3 ms). Depressive symptoms and cognition were assessed before, during, and immediately, two, and six months after therapy. Patients who responded were followed for a one-year period. RESULTS The final remission rate for ultrabrief bilateral ECT was 35 percent, compared with 73 percent for ultrabrief unilateral ECT, 65 percent for standard pulse width bilateral ECT, and 59 percent for standard pulse width unilateral ECT (all P’stherapy. Both the ultrabrief stimulus and right unilateral electrode placement produced less short- and long-term retrograde amnesia. Patients rated their memory deficits as less severe following ultrabrief right unilateral ECT compared to each of the other three conditions (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The use of an ultrabrief stimulus markedly reduces adverse cognitive effects, and when coupled with markedly suprathreshold right unilateral ECT, also preserves efficacy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00487500.) PMID:19756236

  12. Effective Schroedinger equations on submanifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsmuth, Jakob

    2010-02-11

    In this thesis the time dependent Schroedinger equation is considered on a Riemannian manifold A with a potential that localizes a certain class of states close to a fixed submanifold C, the constraint manifold. When the potential is scaled in the directions normal to C by a small parameter epsilon, the solutions concentrate in an epsilon-neighborhood of the submanifold. An effective Schroedinger equation on the submanifold C is derived and it is shown that its solutions, suitably lifted to A, approximate the solutions of the original equation on A up to errors of order {epsilon}{sup 3} vertical stroke t vertical stroke at time t. Furthermore, it is proved that, under reasonable conditions, the eigenvalues of the corresponding Hamiltonians below a certain energy coincide upto errors of order {epsilon}{sup 3}. These results holds in the situation where tangential and normal energies are of the same order, and where exchange between normal and tangential energies occurs. In earlier results tangential energies were assumed to be small compared to normal energies, and rather restrictive assumptions were needed, to ensure that the separation of energies is maintained during the time evolution. The most important consequence of this thesis is that now constraining potentials that change their shape along the submanifold can be treated, which is the typical situation in applications like molecular dynamics and quantum waveguides.

  13. Ionospheric propagation effects on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vallières

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available SuperDARN HF radars provide a global survey of the large-scale convection transversely to the Earth's magnetic field in the high-latitude ionosphere. In addition to the mean plasma velocity, this network also provides measurements of spectral widths which are related to the level of turbulence of the sounded plasma. There is an increasing interest in using spectral widths in geophysical studies, since they are used to monitor the footprints of several magnetospheric regions. In the present paper, we show the effect of radio wave propagation through a typical turbulent ionosphere on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN radars. This effect has already been evidenced experimentally in a previous paper. Here, we model the effects of meso-scale structures on a radar wave front and study their impact on a typical measurement. Numerical simulations reproduce the effect evidenced experimentally and show the role of meso-scale structures (1-10km in the systematic bias that affects spectral width values. As in experimental data, this effect is shown to be increasing with decreasing radar frequency.

  14. Ionospheric propagation effects on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vallières

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available SuperDARN HF radars provide a global survey of the large-scale convection transversely to the Earth's magnetic field in the high-latitude ionosphere. In addition to the mean plasma velocity, this network also provides measurements of spectral widths which are related to the level of turbulence of the sounded plasma. There is an increasing interest in using spectral widths in geophysical studies, since they are used to monitor the footprints of several magnetospheric regions. In the present paper, we show the effect of radio wave propagation through a typical turbulent ionosphere on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN radars. This effect has already been evidenced experimentally in a previous paper. Here, we model the effects of meso-scale structures on a radar wave front and study their impact on a typical measurement. Numerical simulations reproduce the effect evidenced experimentally and show the role of meso-scale structures (1-10km in the systematic bias that affects spectral width values. As in experimental data, this effect is shown to be increasing with decreasing radar frequency.

  15. Effects of finite pulse width on two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhichun; Crepeau, Richard H; Freed, Jack H

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ESR techniques, such as 2D-ELDOR, have considerably improved the resolution of ESR in studies of molecular dynamics in complex fluids such as liquid crystals and membrane vesicles and in spin labeled polymers and peptides. A well-developed theory based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) has been successfully employed to analyze these experiments. However, one fundamental assumption has been utilized to simplify the complex analysis, viz. the pulses have been treated as ideal non-selective ones, which therefore provide uniform irradiation of the whole spectrum. In actual experiments, the pulses are of finite width causing deviations from the theoretical predictions, a problem that is exacerbated by experiments performed at higher frequencies. In the present paper we provide a method to deal with the full SLE including the explicit role of the molecular dynamics, the spin Hamiltonian and the radiation field during the pulse. The computations are rendered more manageable by utilizing the Trotter formula, which is adapted to handle this SLE in what we call a "Split Super-Operator" method. Examples are given for different motional regimes, which show how 2D-ELDOR spectra are affected by the finite pulse widths. The theory shows good agreement with 2D-ELDOR experiments performed as a function of pulse width.

  16. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of buffer width, vegetation, and season

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  17. Effects of excitation spectral width on decay profile of weakly confined excitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, O.; Isu, T.; Ishi-Hayase, J.; Kanno, A.; Katouf, R.; Sasaki, M.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the effect due to a simultaneous excitation of several exciton states on the radiative decay profiles on the basis of the nonlocal response of weakly confined excitons in GaAs thin films. In the case of excitation of single exciton state, the transient grating signal has two decay components. The fast decay component comes from nonlocal response, and the long-lived component is attributed to free exciton decay. With an increase of excitation spectral width, the nonlocal component becomes small in comparison with the long-lived component, and disappears under irradiation of a femtosecond-pulse laser with broader spectral width. The transient grating spectra clearly indicates the contribution of the weakly confined excitons to the signal, and the exciton line width hardly changes by excitation spectral width. From these results, we concluded that the change of decay profile is attributed not to the many-body effect but to the effect of simultaneous excitation of several exciton states

  18. Antishadowing effects in the unitarized BFKL equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Jianhong; Shen Zhenqi; Yang Jifeng; Zhu Wei

    2007-01-01

    A unitarized BFKL equation incorporating shadowing and antishadowing corrections of the gluon recombination is proposed. This equation reduces to the Balitsky-Kovchegov evolution equation near the saturation limit. We find that the antishadowing effects have a sizable influence on the gluon distribution function in the preasymptotic regime

  19. Antishadowing effects in the unitarized BFKL equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan Jianhong [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Shen Zhenqi [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Yang Jifeng [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Zhu Wei [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)]. E-mail: weizhu@mail.ecnu.edu.cn

    2007-01-01

    A unitarized BFKL equation incorporating shadowing and antishadowing corrections of the gluon recombination is proposed. This equation reduces to the Balitsky-Kovchegov evolution equation near the saturation limit. We find that the antishadowing effects have a sizable influence on the gluon distribution function in the preasymptotic regime.

  20. Hydromorphodynamic effects of the width ratio and local tributary widening on discordant confluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén-Ludeña, S.; Franca, M. J.; Alegria, F.; Schleiss, A. J.; Cardoso, A. H.

    2017-09-01

    River training works performed in the last couple of centuries constrained the natural dynamics of channel networks in locations that include the confluences between tributaries and main channels. As a result, the dynamics of these confluences are currently characterized by homogeneous flow depths, flow velocities, and morphologic conditions, which are associated with impoverished ecosystems. The widening of river reaches is seen as a useful measure for river restoration, as it enhances the heterogeneity in flow depths, flow velocities, sediment transport, and bed substrates. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of local widening of the tributary mouth as well as the effects of the ratio between the width of the tributary and that of the main channel on the flow dynamics and bed morphology of river confluences. For that purpose, 12 experiments were conducted in a 70° laboratory confluence. In these experiments, three unit-discharge ratios were tested (qr = 0.37, 0.50, and 0.77) with two width ratios and two tributary configurations. The unit-discharge ratio is defined as the unit discharge in the tributary divided by that of the main channel, measured upstream of the confluence. The width ratio, which is defined as the width of the tributary divided by that of the main channel, was modified by changing the width of the main channel from 0.50 to 1.00 m (corresponding to Br = 0.30 and 0.15 respectively). The tributary configurations consisted of (i) a straight reach with a constant width (the so-called reference configuration) and (ii) a straight reach with a local widening at the downstream end (the so-called widened configuration). During the experiments, a uniform sediment mixture was continuously supplied to both channels. This experimental setup is novel among existing experimental studies on confluence dynamics, as it addresses new confluence configurations and includes a continuous sediment supply to both channels. The experiments were run

  1. Effects of Door Width and Human Body Size on Walking Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetthumrong Siwalee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Door width is one of the important factors to concern in layout or facilities design because it affects directly to traffic speed and overall traffic time simultaneously. Nowadays, common assessment method is computer simulation which is still not realistic due to the unchanged speed of model while walking through a door. This research aims to study an effect of door width to individual walking speed. Sixty subjects participated in the experiment and performed task by walking through the door that is set the width as 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 centimetres. The optical motion capture system was used to determine walking speed. The results showed that Fitts’ law was applied to the participants with high weight. Door width below 70 centimetres significantly affected to changing speed at 0-0.5 m. before the door. Additionally, human size also affected changing speed. The factors include shoulder breadth, weight and interaction between shoulder breadth and weight were found to be significant. These factors explained 54.2% of changing speed.

  2. Study of finite-orbit-width effect on neoclassical transport in tokamak core region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Shinsuke; Okamoto, Masao

    2004-01-01

    Neoclassical transport simulation using the δf Monte-Carlo method is carried out to investigate the finite-orbit-width (FOW) effect on the transport near the magnetic axis. The time evolution of the radial electric field to maintain the ambipolarity of the flux is calculated simultaneously. It is found that, in the near-axis region, the ion heat flux decreases from the value predicted by the standard neoclassical theory both in the banana and plateau regimes. Though the radial transport shows a strong dependence on the FOW effect, the ambipolar electric field profile at the steady state is similar to that calculated in the small-orbit-width limit approximation. (author)

  3. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  4. Effect of configuration widths on the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    We present the extension of the supertransition-array (STA) theory to include configuration widths in the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) plasmas. Exact analytic expressions for the moments of a STA are given, accounting for the detailed contributions of individual levels within the configurations that belong to a STA. The STA average energy is shifted and an additional term appears in its variance. Various cases are presented, demonstrating the effect of these corrections on the LTE spectrum

  5. Effect of heating scheme on SOL width in DIII-D and EAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Joint DIII-D/EAST experiments in the radio-frequency (RF heated H-mode scheme with comparison to that of neutral beam (NB heated H-mode scheme were carried out on DIII-D and EAST under similar conditions to examine the effect of heating scheme on scrape-off layer (SOL width in H-mode plasmas for application to ITER. A dimensionally similar plasma equilibrium was used to match the EAST shape parameters. The divertor heat flux and SOL widths were measured with infra-red camera in DIII-D, while with divertor Langmuir probe array in EAST. It has been demonstrated on both DIII-D and EAST that RF-heated plasma has a broader SOL than NB-heated plasma when the edge electrons are effectively heated in low plasma current and low density regime with low edge collisionality. Detailed edge and pedestal profile analysis on DIII-D suggests that the low edge collisionality and ion orbit loss effect may account for the observed broadening. The joint experiment in DIII-D has also demonstrated the strong inverse dependence of SOL width on the plasma current in electron cyclotron heated (ECH H-mode plasmas.

  6. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgari, P.; Signer, A.; Zuerich Univ.

    2013-03-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of Γ X /m X , with Γ X and m X the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting ∝Γ t /m t ∝1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  7. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  8. Chromospheric scaling laws, width-luminosity correlations, and the Wilson-Bappu effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    Simple scaling laws are developed to explain the thickness and mean electron density of late-type stellar chromospheres in an effort to understand why the emission cores of effectively thick resonance lines such as Ca II H and K broaden with increasing stellar luminosity (the Wilson-Bappu effect). It is shown that stellar chromospheres become thicker in mass column density as stellar gravity g decreases and that the mean chromospheric electric density n/sub e/ decreases if the chromospheric heating dF/dm is constant with height and if the total heating F/sup tot/ is independent of g. It is also shown that chromospheres becomes thicker and the mean electron density becomes larger than the total chromospheric heating increases. The predicted behavior of the K 1 minimum separation and full width at half-maximum of the Ca II emission core (W 0 ) based on the derived scaling laws agree quantitatively with the observed correlations of these widths with fundamental stellar parameters, particularly surface gravity. In addition, the predicted behavior of the K 2 peak separation and base emission width with increasing chromospheric heating is consistent with the behavior of the Ca II emission core shapes in solar plages. The analytical arguments suggest that the Wilson-Bappu effect is largely a consequence of hydrostatic equilibrium rather than chromospheric dynamics

  9. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Meng; Wang, Ning-Li; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Di-Ya; Li, Zhen; Cao, Yi-Wen

    2018-02-01

    In accordance with the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference theory, decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference can relieve glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Increased intracranial pressure can also reduce optic nerve damage in glaucoma patients, and a safe, effective and noninvasive way to achieve this is by increasing the intra-abdominal pressure. The purpose of this study was to observe the changes in orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure at elevated intra-abdominal pressure. An inflatable abdominal belt was tied to each of 15 healthy volunteers, aged 22-30 years (12 females and 3 males), at the navel level, without applying pressure to the abdomen, before they laid in the magnetic resonance imaging machine. The baseline orbital subarachnoid space width around the optic nerve was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe. The abdominal belt was inflated to increase the pressure to 40 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), then the orbital subarachnoid space width was measured every 10 minutes for 2 hours. After removal of the pressure, the measurement was repeated 10 and 20 minutes later. In a separate trial, the intraocular pressure was measured for all the subjects at the same time points, before, during and after elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Results showed that the baseline mean orbital subarachnoid space width was 0.88 ± 0.1 mm (range: 0.77-1.05 mm), 0.77 ± 0.11 mm (range: 0.60-0.94 mm), 0.70 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.62-0.80 mm), and 0.68 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.57-0.77 mm) at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe, respectively. During the elevated intra-abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width increased from the baseline and dilation of the optic nerve sheath was significant at 1, 3 and 9 mm behind the globe. After decompression of the abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width normalized and returned to the baseline value. There was no significant difference in the

  10. Combined effect of high curing temperature and crack width on chloride migration in reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkedrouci, L.; Diao, B.; Pang, S.; Li, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is a serious concern in the construction engineering, largely due to chloride induced corrosion of reinforcement. Chloride penetration is markedly influenced by one or several major factors at the same time such as cuing in combination with different crack widths which have spectacular effect on reinforced concrete structures. This research presents the results of an experimental investigation involving reinforced concrete beams with three different crack widths ranging from 0 to 0.2mm, curing temperatures of 20°C or 40°C and water-to-cement of 0.5. Chloride content profiles were determined under non-steady state diffusion at 20°C. Based on the obtained results, higher chloride content was obtained under condition of high curing temperature in combination with large crack more than 0.1mm and there are no significant differences between narrow crack width (less than 0.1 mm) and beams without crack (0 mm).

  11. Characterization of the range effect in synthetic aperture radar images of concrete specimens for width estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzeyadi, Ahmed; Yu, Tzuyang

    2018-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is an indispensable approach for the sustainability of critical civil infrastructure systems such as bridges and buildings. Recently, microwave/radar sensors are widely used for assessing the condition of concrete structures. Among existing imaging techniques in microwave/radar sensors, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging enables researchers to conduct surface and subsurface inspection of concrete structures in the range-cross-range representation of SAR images. The objective of this paper is to investigate the range effect of concrete specimens in SAR images at various ranges (15 cm, 50 cm, 75 cm, 100 cm, and 200 cm). One concrete panel specimen (water-to-cement ratio = 0.45) of 30-cm-by-30-cm-by-5-cm was manufactured and scanned by a 10 GHz SAR imaging radar sensor inside an anechoic chamber. Scatterers in SAR images representing two corners of the concrete panel were used to estimate the width of the panel. It was found that the range-dependent pattern of corner scatters can be used to predict the width of concrete panels. Also, the maximum SAR amplitude decreases when the range increases. An empirical model was also proposed for width estimation of concrete panels.

  12. Smartphone form factors: Effects of width and bottom bezel on touch performance, workload, and physical demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Chan; Cha, Min Chul; Hwangbo, Hwan; Mo, Sookhee; Ji, Yong Gu

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of two smartphone form factors (width and bottom bezel) on touch behaviors with one-handed interaction. User experiments on tapping tasks were conducted for four widths (67, 70, 72, and 74 mm) and five bottom bezel levels (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, and 12.5 mm). Task performance, electromyography, and subjective workload data were collected to examine the touch behavior. The success rate and task completion time were collected as task performance measures. The NASA-TLX method was used to observe the subjective workload. The electromyogram signals of two thumb muscles, namely the first dorsal interosseous and abductor pollicis brevis, were observed. The task performances deteriorated with increasing width level. The subjective workload and electromyography data showed similar patterns with the task performances. The task performances of the bottom bezel devices were analyzed by using three different evaluation criteria. The results from these criteria indicated that tasks became increasingly difficult as the bottom bezel level decreased. The results of this study provide insights into the optimal range of smartphone form factors for one-handed interaction, which could contribute to the design of new smartphones. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Stochastic effects on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flessas, G P; Leach, P G L; Yannacopoulos, A N

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a brief review of recent advances in the field of stochastic effects on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The article reviews rigorous and perturbative results. (review article)

  14. Evaluation of tension stiffening effect on the crack width calculation of flexural RC members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said M. Allam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Building codes consider the tension stiffening when calculating the crack width of the flexural members. A simple analytical procedure is proposed for the determination of forces, stresses and strains acting on a reinforced concrete section subjected to flexure considering the concrete contribution in tension up to tensile concrete strain corresponding to the cracking strength of concrete. This analytical method gives the minimum value (lower bound of tension stiffening. Also, a commercial Finite Element Program (ABAQUS 2007 was used to perform non-linear analysis in order to evaluate the total contribution of the tensioned concrete in carrying loads which may be considered as the upper bound of tension stiffening. In addition, a comparison is carried out among the different codes using four reinforced concrete rectangular models to compare and evaluate the tension stiffening with proposed analytical lower bound tension stiffening and upper bound as obtained by ABAQUS. The models include different percentages of flexural steel ratio. The comparison revealed that the codes’ equations always consider tension stiffening lying between lower and upper bound of tension stiffening proposed in this study. Also, the study showed that the tension stiffening decreases with the increase of the percentage of the flexural reinforcement ratio.

  15. Effects of ultra-thin Si-fin body widths upon SOI PMOS FinFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Yue-Gie; Chen, Chii-Wen; Liao, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Mu-Chun; Zou, Xuecheng

    2018-05-01

    Nano-node tri-gate FinFET devices have been developed after integrating a 14 Å nitrided gate oxide upon the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers established on an advanced CMOS logic platform. These vertical double gate (FinFET) devices with ultra-thin silicon fin (Si-fin) widths ranging from 27 nm to 17 nm and gate length down to 30 nm have been successfully developed with a 193 nm scanner lithography tool. Combining the cobalt fully silicidation and the CESL strain technology beneficial for PMOS FinFETs was incorporated into this work. Detailed analyses of Id-Vg characteristics, threshold voltage (Vt), and drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) illustrate that the thinnest 17 nm Si-fin width FinFET exhibits the best gate controllability due to its better suppression of short channel effect (SCE). However, higher source/drain resistance (RSD), channel mobility degradation due to dry etch steps, or “current crowding effect” will slightly limit its transconductance (Gm) and drive current.

  16. Effects of microwave pulse-width damage on a bipolar transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhen-Yang; Chai Chang-Chun; Ren Xing-Rong; Yang Yin-Tang; Chen Bin; Zhao Ying-Bo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the pulse-width effects on the damage process of a typical bipolar transistor caused by high power microwaves (HPMs) through the injection approach. The dependences of the microwave damage power, P, and the absorbed energy, E, required to cause the device failure on the pulse width τ are obtained in the nanosecond region by utilizing the curve fitting method. A comparison of the microwave pulse damage data and the existing dc pulse damage data for the same transistor is carried out. By means of a two-dimensional simulator, ISE-TCAD, the internal damage processes of the device caused by microwave voltage signals and dc pulse voltage signals are analyzed comparatively. The simulation results suggest that the temperature-rising positions of the device induced by the microwaves in the negative and positive half periods are different, while only one hot spot exists under the injection of dc pulses. The results demonstrate that the microwave damage power threshold and the absorbed energy must exceed the dc pulse power threshold and the absorbed energy, respectively. The dc pulse damage data may be useful as a lower bound for microwave pulse damage data. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  17. Effect of finite cavity width on flow oscillation in a low-Mach-number cavity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ke; Naguib, Ahmed M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The current study is focused on examining the effect of the cavity width and side walls on the self-sustained oscillation in a low Mach number cavity flow with a turbulent boundary layer at separation. An axisymmetric cavity geometry is employed in order to provide a reference condition that is free from any side-wall influence, which is not possible to obtain with a rectangular cavity. The cavity could then be partially filled to form finite-width geometry. The unsteady surface pressure is measured using microphone arrays that are deployed on the cavity floor along the streamwise direction and on the downstream wall along the azimuthal direction. In addition, velocity measurements using two-component Laser Doppler Anemometer are performed simultaneously with the array measurements in different azimuthal planes. The compiled data sets are used to investigate the evolution of the coherent structures generating the pressure oscillation in the cavity using linear stochastic estimation of the velocity field based on the wall-pressure signature on the cavity end wall. The results lead to the discovery of pronounced harmonic pressure oscillations near the cavity's side walls. These oscillations, which are absent in the axisymmetric cavity, are linked to the establishment of a secondary mean streamwise circulating flow pattern near the side walls and the interaction of this secondary flow with the shear layer above the cavity. (orig.)

  18. The ratio of effective building height to street width governs dispersion of local vehicle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Nico; Tan, Si; Venkatram, Akula

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of data collected in street canyons located in Hanover, Germany and Los Angeles, USA, suggests that street-level concentrations of vehicle-related pollutants can be estimated with a model that assumes that vertical turbulent transport of emissions dominates the governing processes. The dispersion model relates surface concentrations to traffic flow rate, the effective aspect ratio of the street, and roof level turbulence. The dispersion model indicates that magnification of concentrations relative to those in the absence of buildings is most sensitive to the aspect ratio of the street, which is the ratio of the effective height of the buildings on the street to the width of the street. This result can be useful in the design of transit oriented developments that increase building density to reduce emissions from transportation.

  19. Dosimetric effect of multileaf collimator leaf width on volumetric modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy for spine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoush, Ahmad, E-mail: aamoush@augusta.edu [Augusta University, 1120 15th St, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States); Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Long, Huang [University of Utah, 1950 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Subedi, Laxmi [Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44115 (United States); Qi, Peng; Djemil, Toufik; Xia, Ping [Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This work aimed to study the dosimetric effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths in treatment plans for patients receiving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Thirteen patients treated with spine SBRT were retrospectively selected for this study. The patients were treated following the protocol of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631 (RTOG 0631) for spine metastasis. The prescription dose was 16 Gy in 1 fraction to 90% of the target volume (V16 > 90%). The maximum spinal cord dose of 14 Gy and 10% of the spinal cord receiving < 10 Gy (V10) were the acceptable tolerance doses. For the purpose of this study, 2 dual-arc VMAT plans were created for each patient using 3 different MLC leaf widths: 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm. The compliance with the RTOG 0631 protocol, conformity index (CI), dose gradient index (DGI), and number of monitor units (MUs) were compared. The average V16Gy of the targets was 91.8 ± 1.2%, 92.2 ± 2.1%, and 91.7 ± 2.3% for 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm leaf widths, respectively (p = 0.78). Accordingly, the average CI was 1.45 ± 0.4, 1.47 ± 0.29, and 1.47 ± 0.31 (p = 0.98), respectively. The average DGI was 0.22 ± 0.04, 0.20 ± 0.06, and 0.22 ± 0.05, respectively (p = 0.77). The average maximum dose to the spinal cord was 12.45 ± 1.0 Gy, 12.80 ± 1.0 Gy, and 12.48 ± 1.1 (p = 0.62) and V10% of the spinal cord was 3.6 ± 2.1%, 5.6 ± 2.8%, and 5.5 ± 3.0% (p = 0.11) for 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm leaf widths, respectively. Accordingly, the average number of MUs was 4341 ± 500 MU, 5019 ± 834 MU, and 4606 ± 691 MU, respectively (p = 0.053). The use of 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm MLCs achieved similar VMAT plan quality as recommended by the RTOG 0631. The dosimetric parameters were also comparable for the 3 MLCs. In general, any of these leaf widths can be used for spine

  20. The effect of interaural-time-difference fluctuations on apparent source width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käsbach, Johannes; May, Tobias; Oskarsdottir, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    For the perception of spaciousness, the temporal fluctuations of the interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) provide important binaural cues. One major characteristic of spatial perception is apparent source width (ASW), which describes the perceived width of a ...

  1. Analysis of drift effects on the tokamak power scrape-off width using SOLPS-ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, E. T.; Goldston, R. J.; Kaveeva, E. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Mordijck, S.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Senichenkov, I. Yu; Voskoboynikov, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    SOLPS-ITER, a comprehensive 2D scrape-off layer modeling package, is used to examine the physical mechanisms that set the scrape-off width ({λq} ) for inter-ELM power exhaust. Guided by Goldston’s heuristic drift (HD) model, which shows remarkable quantitative agreement with experimental data, this research examines drift effects on {λq} in a DIII-D H-mode magnetic equilibrium. As a numerical expedient, a low target recycling coefficient of 0.9 is used in the simulations, resulting in outer target plasma that is sheath limited instead of conduction limited as in the experiment. Scrape-off layer (SOL) particle diffusivity (D SOL) is scanned from 1 to 0.1 m2 s-1. Across this diffusivity range, outer divertor heat flux is dominated by a narrow (˜3-4 mm when mapped to the outer midplane) electron convection channel associated with thermoelectric current through the SOL from outer to inner divertor. An order-unity up-down ion pressure asymmetry allows net ion drift flux across the separatrix, facilitated by an artificial mechanism that mimics the anomalous electron transport required for overall ambipolarity in the HD model. At {{D}\\text{SOL}}=0.1 m2 s-1, the density fall-off length is similar to the electron temperature fall-off length, as predicted by the HD model and as seen experimentally. This research represents a step toward a deeper understanding of the power scrape-off width, and serves as a basis for extending fluid modeling to more experimentally relevant, high-collisionality regimes.

  2. Effective field equations for expectation values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    We discuss functional methods which allow calculation of expectation values, rather than the usual in-out amplitudes, from a path integral. The technique, based on Schwinger's idea of summing over paths which go from the past to the future and then back to the past, provides effective field equations satisfied by the expectation value of the field. These equations are shown to be real and causal for a general theory up to two-loop order, and unitarity is checked to this order. These methods are applied to a simple quantum-mechanical example to illustrate the differences between the new formalism and the standard theory. When applied to the gravitational field, the new effective field equations should be useful for studies of quantum cosmology

  3. Effect of MLC leaf width on the planning and delivery of SMLC IMRT using the CORVUS inverse treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmeister, Jay; McDermott, Patrick N.; Bossenberger, Todd; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Levin, Kenneth; Forman, Jeffrey D.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans delivered via the segmented multileaf collimator (SMLC) technique. IMRT plans were calculated using the Corvus treatment planning system for three brain, three prostate, and three pancreas cases using leaf widths of 0.5 and 1 cm. Resulting differences in plan quality and complexity are presented here. Plans calculated using a 1 cm leaf width were chosen over the 0.5 cm leaf width plans in seven out of nine cases based on clinical judgment. Conversely, optimization results revealed a superior objective function result for the 0.5 cm leaf width plans in seven out of the nine comparisons. The 1 cm leaf width objective function result was superior only for very large target volumes, indicating that expanding the solution space for plan optimization by using narrower leaves may result in a decreased probability of finding the global minimum. In the remaining cases, we can conclude that we are often not utilizing the objective function as proficiently as possible to meet our clinical goals. There was often no apparent clinically significant difference between the two plans, and in such cases the issue becomes one of plan complexity. A comparison of plan complexity revealed that the average 1 cm leaf width plan required roughly 60% fewer segments and over 40% fewer monitor units than required by 0.5 cm leaf width plans. This allows a significant decrease in whole body dose and total treatment time. For very complex IMRT plans, the treatment delivery time may affect the biologically effective dose. A clinically significant improvement in plan quality from using narrower leaves was evident only in cases with very small target volumes or those with concavities that are small with respect to the MLC leaf width. For the remaining cases investigated in this study, there was no clinical advantage to reducing the MLC leaf width from 1 to 0.5 cm. In

  4. On bandlimited signals with minimal product of effective spatial and spectral widths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Venkatesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that signals (which could be functions of space or time belonging to 𝕃2-space cannot be localized simultaneously in space/time and frequency domains. Alternatively, signals have a positive lower bound on the product of their effective spatial andeffective spectral widths, for simplicity, hereafter called the effective space-bandwidthproduct (ESBP. This is the classical uncertainty inequality (UI, attributed to many, but, from a signal processing perspective, to Gabor who, in his seminal paper, established the uncertainty relation and proposed a joint time-frequency representation in which the basis functions have minimal ESBP. It is found that the Gaussian function is the only signal that has the lowest ESBP. Since the Gaussian function is not bandlimited, no bandlimited signal can have the lowest ESBP. We deal with the problem of determining finite-energy, bandlimited signals which have the lowest ESBP. The main result is as follows. By choosing the convolution product of a Gaussian signal (with σ as the variance parameter and a bandlimited filter with a continuous spectrum, we demonstrate that there exists a finite-energy, bandlimited signal whose ESBP can be made to be arbitrarily close (dependent on the choice of σ to the optimal value specified by the UI.

  5. The effect of crack width on the service life of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hung, Nguyen; Viet Hung, Vu; Viet, Tran Bao

    2018-04-01

    Reinforced concrete has become a widely used construction material around the world. Nowadays, the assessment of deterioration and life expectancy of reinforced concrete structure is very important and necessary as concrete is a complex material with brittle failure. Under the effect of load and over time, cracks occur in the structure, significantly reducing its performance and durability. Therefore, a number of models for predicting the penetration of chloride ions into the concrete were proposed to assess the durability of the structure. In the study performed by T B Viet (2016) [1], the author proposed a new theoretical model, especially considering the effects of macro and micro cracking on the diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in the cracked concrete. The following experimental results, in term of electrical indication of concrete’s ability to resist chloride ion penetration, are used to calculate the lifespan of a reinforced concrete structure according to Dura Crete approach [8] with different crack widths to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the above model in the range of concrete compressive strength of 30-70MPa.

  6. Interference effects of neutral MSSM Higgs bosons with a generalised narrow-width approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Elina

    2014-11-01

    Mixing effects in the MSSM Higgs sector can give rise to a sizeable interference between the neutral Higgs bosons. On the other hand, factorising a more complicated process into production and decay parts by means of the narrow-width approximation (NWA) simplifies the calculation. The standard NWA, however, does not account for interference terms. Therefore, we introduce a generalisation of the NWA (gNWA) which allows for a consistent treatment of interference effects between nearly mass-degenerate particles. Furthermore, we apply the gNWA at the tree and 1-loop level to an example process where the neutral Higgs bosons h and H are produced in the decay of a heavy neutralino and subsequently decay into a fermion pair. The h-H propagator mixing is found to agree well with the approximation of Breit-Wigner propagators times finite wave-function normalisation factors, both leading to a significant interference contribution. The factorisation of the interference term based on on-shell matrix elements reproduces the full interference result within a precision of better than 1% for the considered process. The gNWA also enables the inclusion of contributions beyond the 1-loop order into the most precise prediction.

  7. Effect of channel-width and chirality on graphene field-effect transistor based real-time biomolecule sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letian Lyu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET hold promise in biomolecule sensing due to the outstanding properties of graphene materials. Charges in biomolecules are transduced into a change in the GFET current, which allows real-time monitoring of the biomolecule concentrations. Here we theoretically evaluate the performance of GFET based real-time biomolecule sensing, aiming to better understand the width-scaling limit in GFET based biosensors. In particular, we study the effect of the channel-width and the chirality on FET sensitivity by taking the percentage change of the FET current per unit charge density as the sensing signal. Firstly, GFETs made of graphene nanoribbons (GNR and graphene sheets (GS show comparable sensing signals to each other when gated at 1011 – 1012 cm-2 carrier densities. Sensing signals in GNRs are enhanced when gated near the sub-band thresholds, and increase their values in wider GNRs due to the change in device conductance and quantum capacitance. Secondly, the GNR chirality is found to fine tune the sensing signals. Armchair GNRs with smaller energy bandgaps appear to have an enhanced sensing signal close to 1011 cm-2 carrier densities. These results may help understand the scaling limit in GFET based biosensors along the width direction, and shed light on forming all-electrical bio-arrays.

  8. Effect of channel-width and chirality on graphene field-effect transistor based real-time biomolecule sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Letian; Jaswal, Perveshwer; Xu, Guangyu

    2018-03-01

    Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) hold promise in biomolecule sensing due to the outstanding properties of graphene materials. Charges in biomolecules are transduced into a change in the GFET current, which allows real-time monitoring of the biomolecule concentrations. Here we theoretically evaluate the performance of GFET based real-time biomolecule sensing, aiming to better understand the width-scaling limit in GFET based biosensors. In particular, we study the effect of the channel-width and the chirality on FET sensitivity by taking the percentage change of the FET current per unit charge density as the sensing signal. Firstly, GFETs made of graphene nanoribbons (GNR) and graphene sheets (GS) show comparable sensing signals to each other when gated at 1011 - 1012 cm-2 carrier densities. Sensing signals in GNRs are enhanced when gated near the sub-band thresholds, and increase their values in wider GNRs due to the change in device conductance and quantum capacitance. Secondly, the GNR chirality is found to fine tune the sensing signals. Armchair GNRs with smaller energy bandgaps appear to have an enhanced sensing signal close to 1011 cm-2 carrier densities. These results may help understand the scaling limit in GFET based biosensors along the width direction, and shed light on forming all-electrical bio-arrays.

  9. The effect of pulse width and contact configuration on paresthesia coverage in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsheimer, Jan; Buitenweg, Jan R; Das, John; de Sutter, Paul; Manola, Ljubomir; Nuttin, Bart

    2011-05-01

    In spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic, intractable pain, a satisfactory analgesic effect can be obtained only when the stimulation-induced paresthesias cover all painful body areas completely or partially. To investigate the effect of stimulus pulse width (PW) and contact configuration (CC) on the area of paresthesia (PA), perception threshold (VPT), discomfort threshold (VDT), and usage range (UR) in spinal cord stimulation. Chronic pain patients were tested during a follow-up visit. They were stimulated monopolarly and with the CC giving each patient the best analgesia. VPT, VDT, and UR were determined for PWs of 90, 210, and 450 microseconds. The paresthesia contours at VDT were drawn on a body map and digitized; PA was calculated; and its anatomic composition was described. The effects of PW and CC on PA, VPT, VDT, and UR were tested statistically. Twenty-four of 31 tests with low thoracic stimulation and 8 of 9 tests with cervical stimulation gave a significant extension of PA at increasing PW. In 14 of 18 tests (low thoracic), a caudal extension was obtained (primarily in L5-S2). In cervical stimulation the extension was predominantly caudal as well. In contrast to VPT and VDT, UR is not significantly different when stimulating with any CC. PA extends caudally with increasing PW. The mechanism includes that the larger and smaller dorsal column fibers have a different mediolateral distribution and that smaller dorsal column fibers have a smaller UR and can be activated only when PW is sufficiently large. A similar effect of CC on PA is unlikely as long as electrodes with a large intercontact distance are applied.

  10. Determination of optimum parameters effect on kerf width of 316L stainless steel tube in Nd:YAG laser cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J.M.; Kim, T.H. [Dept. of Metallurgical System Engineering, YONSEI Univ., Seoul (Korea); Kim, H.Y. [Korea Environment and Merchandise Testing Inst., Seoul (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    The effects of following four factors, which are laser power, assist gas pressure, cooling rate and scanning speed on the quality characteristics of laser cut 316L stainless steel tubes have been studied. 2{sup 4} full factorial design and central composite design were used to evaluate optimum condition of process parameters. Regression analysis was used to develop empirical models for the combined effects of the independent process parameters on laser cut quality. As the results, it was observed that laser power, assist gas pressure and scanning speeds did the major effects on kerf width. The smallest kerf width was obtained with the condition of low laser power, assist gas pressure, scanning speed and moderate cooling rate. Calculated regression model was kerf width = 64.47 + 0.91W + 1.25P + 0.41S + 0.41C{sup 2} - 0.45P{sup 2}. (orig.)

  11. The effect of spectral width on Goos–Hanchen and Imbert–Fedorov shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajapati, Chandravati; Ranganathan, D

    2013-01-01

    We study the Goos–Hanchen and Imbert–Fedorov shifts for quasi-monochromatic Gaussian beams near the Brewster angle, when the reflection is from a denser to a rarer medium. This is the case of interest in the usual experiments on reflectometry, etc. We have incorporated the effects of the finite linewidth of the quasi-monochromatic light and treated the cases of a Lorentzian and a Gaussian lineshape of the input light spectrum. This study of light with a finite spectral width was carried out for the more frequently studied case, namely reflection from a dense to a rare medium. We found that the shift is increased as compared to the monochromatic Gaussian beam, and is zero at the Brewster angle for a p polarized beam. The shift variation with angle of incidence near the Brewster and critical angles at different values of refractive index ratios is found. We also studied the shift variation for Hermite–Gauss beams around the Brewster angle when the reflection is from a rarer to a denser medium and compare this with our earlier results for the case when the reflection was from a denser to a rarer medium. (paper)

  12. Effects of walking speed on the step-by-step control of step width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Katy H; Heitkamp, Lauren N; Horne, Joscelyn S; Dean, Jesse C

    2018-02-08

    Young, healthy adults walking at typical preferred speeds use step-by-step adjustments of step width to appropriately redirect their center of mass motion and ensure mediolateral stability. However, it is presently unclear whether this control strategy is retained when walking at the slower speeds preferred by many clinical populations. We investigated whether the typical stabilization strategy is influenced by walking speed. Twelve young, neurologically intact participants walked on a treadmill at a range of prescribed speeds (0.2-1.2 m/s). The mediolateral stabilization strategy was quantified as the proportion of step width variance predicted by the mechanical state of the pelvis throughout a step (calculated as R 2 magnitude from a multiple linear regression). Our ability to accurately predict the upcoming step width increased over the course of a step. The strength of the relationship between step width and pelvis mechanics at the start of a step was reduced at slower speeds. However, these speed-dependent differences largely disappeared by the end of a step, other than at the slowest walking speed (0.2 m/s). These results suggest that mechanics-dependent adjustments in step width are a consistent component of healthy gait across speeds and contexts. However, slower walking speeds may ease this control by allowing mediolateral repositioning of the swing leg to occur later in a step, thus encouraging slower walking among clinical populations with limited sensorimotor control. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The effects of grip width on sticking region in bench press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomo, Olav; Van Den Tillaar, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of the sticking region by examining how three different grip widths affect the sticking region in powerlifters' bench press performance. It was hypothesised that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width, indicating a poor mechanical region for vertical force production at these joint angles. Twelve male experienced powerlifters (age 27.7 ± 8.8 years, mass 91.9 ± 15.4 kg) were tested in one repetition maximum (1-RM) bench press with a narrow, medium and wide grip. Joint kinematics, timing, bar position and velocity were measured with a 3D motion capture system. All participants showed a clear sticking region with all three grip widths, but this sticking region was not found to occur at the same joint angles in all three grip widths, thereby rejecting the hypothesis that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width. It is suggested that, due to the differences in moment arm of the barbell about the elbow joint in the sticking region, there still might be a poor mechanical region for total force production that is joint angle-specific.

  14. Rounded leaf end effect of multileaf collimator on penumbra width and radiation field offset: an analytical and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2015-01-01

    Penumbra characteristics play a significant role in dose delivery accuracy for radiation therapy. For treatment planning, penumbra width and radiation field offset strongly influence target dose conformity and organ at risk sparing. In this study, we present an analytical and numerical approach for evaluation of the rounded leaf end effect on penumbra characteristics. Based on the rule of half-value layer, algorithms for leaf position calculation and radiation field offset correction were developed, which were advantageous particularly in dealing with large radius leaf end. Computer simulation was performed based on the Monte Carlo codes of EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, with groups of leaf end radii and source sizes. Data processing technique of curve fitting was employed for deriving penumbra width and radiation field offset. Results showed that penumbra width increased with source size. Penumbra width curves for large radius leaf end were U-shaped. This observation was probably related to the fact that radiation beams penetrated through the proximal and distal leaf sides. In contrast, source size had negligible impact on radiation field offset. Radiation field offsets were found to be constant both for analytical method and numerical simulation. However, the overall resulting values of radiation field offset obtained by analytical method were slightly smaller compared with Monte Carlo simulation. The method we proposed could provide insight into the investigation of rounded leaf end effects on penumbra characteristics. Penumbra width and radiation field offset calibration should be carefully performed to commission multileaf collimator for intensity modulated radiotherapy

  15. Numerical Analysis of Through Transmission Pulsed Eddy Current Testing and Effects of Pulse Width Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Kil; Choi, Dong Myung

    2007-01-01

    By using numerical analysis methods, through transmission type pulsed eddy current (PEC) testing is modeled and PEC signal responses due to varying material conductivity, permeability, thickness, lift-off and pulse width are investigated. Results show that the peak amplitude of PEC signal gets reduced and the time to reach the peak amplitude is increased as the material conductivity, permeability, and specimen thickness increase. Also, they indicate that the pulse width needs to be shorter when evaluating the material conductivity and the plate thickness using the peak amplitude, and when the pulse width is long, the peak time is found to be more useful. Other results related to lift-off variation are reported as well

  16. Evaluation of the effects of red blood cell distribution width on survival in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : Data are available indicating that red blood cell distribution width (RDW is higher in cancer patients compared to healthy individuals or benign events. In our study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different RDW levels on survival in lung cancer patients. Material and methods: Clinical and laboratory data from 146 patients with lung cancer and 40 healthy subjects were retrospectively studied. RDW was recorded before the application of any treatment. Patients were categorised according to four different RDW cut-off values (median RDW, RDW determined by ROC curve analysis, the upper limit at the automatic blood count device, and RDW cut of value which used in previous studies. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to examine the effect of RDW on survival for each cut-off level. Results : The median age of patients was 56.5 years (range: 26–83 years. The difference in median RDW between patients and the control group was statistically significant (14.0 and 13.8, respectively, p = 0.04. There was no difference with regard to overall survival when patients with RDW ≥ 14.0 were compared to those with RDW < 14.0 (p = 0.70; however, overall survival was 3.0 months shorter in low values of its own group in each of the following cut-off values: ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.34, ≥ 14.5 (p = 0.25, ≥ 15 (p = 0.59, although no results were statistically significant. Discussion : We consider that the difference between low and high RDW values according to certain cut-off values may reflect the statistics of larger studies although there is a statistically negative correlation between RDW level and survival.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of red blood cell distribution width on survival in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Mehmet; Hocazade, Cemil; Kos, F Tugba; Uncu, Dogan; Karakas, Esra; Dogan, Mutlu; Uncu, Hikmet G; Ozdemir, Nuriye; Zengin, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Data are available indicating that red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is higher in cancer patients compared to healthy individuals or benign events. In our study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different RDW levels on survival in lung cancer patients. Clinical and laboratory data from 146 patients with lung cancer and 40 healthy subjects were retrospectively studied. RDW was recorded before the application of any treatment. Patients were categorised according to four different RDW cut-off values (median RDW, RDW determined by ROC curve analysis, the upper limit at the automatic blood count device, and RDW cut of value which used in previous studies). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to examine the effect of RDW on survival for each cut-off level. The median age of patients was 56.5 years (range: 26-83 years). The difference in median RDW between patients and the control group was statistically significant (14.0 and 13.8, respectively, p = 0.04). There was no difference with regard to overall survival when patients with RDW ≥ 14.0 were compared to those with RDW < 14.0 (p = 0.70); however, overall survival was 3.0 months shorter in low values of its own group in each of the following cut-off values: ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.34), ≥ 14.5 (p = 0.25), ≥ 15 (p = 0.59), although no results were statistically significant. We consider that the difference between low and high RDW values according to certain cut-off values may reflect the statistics of larger studies although there is a statistically negative correlation between RDW level and survival.

  18. The Analysis of the Effect of Coolant Channel Width on Fuel Loading of the RSG-GAS Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surbakti; Tukiran

    2004-01-01

    The RGS-GAS using uranium silicide fuel, plate type and 250 g U of loading is planned to increase the fuel loading to 300 g U even to 400 g U. The silicide fuel has advantages when increase the fuel loading in the same volume. Because of that case, it is necessary to analyze the effect of coolant channel width on fuel loading of the RSG-GAS core. Analyzing the effect the work which done is to generate cell and core calculation using WIMSD/4 and Batan-2DIFF codes. The WIMSD/4 code is used to generate cross section of core material and Batan-2DIFF is used to calculate the effective multiplication factor. The model that used in this calculation there are three kind of fuel loading namely, 250 g U, 300 g U and 400 g U. The coolant channel width is simulated from 1.75 mm to 2.55 mm. From that fuel loadings, it is analyzed which coolant channel width gave the best effective multiplication factor. From result of analysis showed that the best effective multiplication factor is on the coolant channel width of 2.55 mm for third of fuel loadings. (author)

  19. Determining effective riparian buffer width for nonnative plant exclusion and habitat enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin Ferris; Vincent D' Amico; Christopher K. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Nonnative plants threaten native biodiversity in landscapes where habitats are fragmented. Unfortunately, in developed areas, much of the remaining forested habitat occurs in fragmented riparian corridors. Because forested corridors of sufficient width may allow forest interior specializing native species to retain competitive advantage over edge specialist and...

  20. The effect of gap width on viscous stresses within the leakage across a bileaflet valve pivot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Brandon R; Andersen, Morten E; Fründ, Ernst Torben

    2008-01-01

    reported within the pivots in previous studies. Velocities measured experimentally were even larger than those estimated computationally. CONCLUSION: These experiments suggest that viscous stresses in leakage flow across a bileaflet mitral valve increase with gap width, and may contribute more to blood...

  1. Effects of riparian buffer width on wood loading in headwater streams after repeated forest thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia I. Burton; Deanna H. Olson; Klaus J. Puettmann

    2016-01-01

    Forested riparian buffer zones are used in conjunction with upland forest management, in part, to provide for the recruitment for large wood to streams. Small headwater streams account for the majority of stream networks in many forested regions. Yet, our understanding of how riparian buffer width influences wood dynamics in headwater streams is relatively less...

  2. Equalization of Skin Effect Loss Dominated Channels using Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) Pre-Emphasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, J.H.R.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Visschers, J.L.; Nauta, Bram

    2005-01-01

    A digital transmitter pre-emphasis technique is presented that is based on pulse-width modulation, instead of finite impulse response (FIR) filtering. The technique fits well to future high-speed low-voltage CMOS processes. A 0.13μm CMOS transmitter achieves more than 5Gb/s (2-PAM) over 25m of

  3. Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis: effect of bin width on the probability of linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slager, S L; Juo, S H; Durner, M; Hodge, S E

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed part of the Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data using Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods that are implemented in the computer program Loki. The MCMC method reports the "probability of linkage" (PL) across the chromosomal regions of interest. The point of maximum PL can then be taken as a "location estimate" for the location of the quantitative trait locus (QTL). However, Loki does not provide a formal statistical test of linkage. In this paper, we explore how the bin width used in the calculations affects the max PL and the location estimate. We analyzed age at onset (AO) and quantitative trait number 5, Q5, from 26 replicates of the general simulated data in one region where we knew a major gene, MG5, is located. For each trait, we found the max PL and the corresponding location estimate, using four different bin widths. We found that bin width, as expected, does affect the max PL and the location estimate, and we recommend that users of Loki explore how their results vary with different bin widths.

  4. Effects of the intrinsic layer width on the band-to-band tunneling current in p-i-n GaN-based avalanche photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ling; Bao, Xichang; Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Chao; Yuan, Yonggang; Xu, Jintong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2009-01-01

    Dark current is critical for GaN-based avalanche photodiodes because it significantly increases the noise current and limits the multiplication factor. It has been found that the band-to-band tunneling current is the dominant origin of the dark current for avalanche photodiodes at the onset of breakdown voltage. Experimentally, for GaN-based avalanche photodiodes with a thinner intrinsic layer, the dark current increases nearly exponentially with the applied voltage even at a lower bias voltage. In this paper, the intrinsic layer (i-layer) width of GaN-based avalanche photodiodes has been varied to study its effect on the band-to-band tunneling current. A widely used equation was used to calculate the band-to-band tunneling current of avalanche photodiodes with different i-layer widths (i-layer 0.1 µm, 0.2 µm and 0.4 µm). At −40 V, the band-to-band tunneling current significantly reduces by a magnitude of 10 −15 A with an increase in the i-layer width from 0.1 µm to 0.2 µm, and a magnitude of 10 −29 A with an increase in the i-layer width from 0.2 µm to 0.4 µm. Then, GaN-based avalanche photodiodes (i-layer 0.1 µm, 0.2 µm and 0.4 µm) with different-sized mesa were fabricated. Also, the measurement of dark current of all three different structures was performed, and their multiplication factors were given

  5. Effect of smectic A temperature width on the soft mode in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, A.; Kaur, S.; Prakash, J.; Sreenivas, K.; Bawa, S. S.; Biradar, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    The behavior of soft mode range with respect to the temperature width of smectic A (Sm A) phase has been studied in four different ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) materials in the frequency range 10Hz-10MHz. The studies have been carried out in a planarly well aligned cells at different temperatures and different bias fields in Sm C* and Sm A phases. Dielectric studies of these FLCs near Sm C*-Sm A phase transition show that the temperature range of soft mode relaxation frequency phenomenon varies with the temperature width of Sm A phase. The dependence of tilt angle on temperature shows the nature of the order of transition at Sm C*-Sm A phase. The coupling between order parameters of Sm C* and Sm A phase influences the soft mode and phase transition in Sm C* and Sm A phases.

  6. The Effect of Crack Width on Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Steel in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When subjected to loading or thermal shrinkage, reinforced concrete structures usually behave in a cracking state, which raises the risk of bar corrosion from the working environment. The influence of cover cracking on chloride-induced corrosion was experimentally investigated through a 654-day laboratory test on cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride solution. The concrete specimens have a dimension of 100 mm × 100 mm × 400 mm and a single prefabricated crack at the midspan. When the percentage concentration of chloride ion (0.6%, 1.2%, 2.1%, 3.0%, and 6.0% and crack width (uncracked, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mm are taken as variables, the experimental results showed that the corrosion rates for cracked specimens increased with increasing percentage concentration of chloride and increasing crack width. This study also showed the interrelationship between crack width and percentage concentration of chloride on the corrosion rate. In addition, an empirical model, incorporating the influence of the cover cracking and chloride concentration, was developed to predict the corrosion rate. This model allows the prediction of the maximum allowable wcr based on the given percentage concentration of chloride in the exposure condition.

  7. Combined Effect of Initial Curing Temperature and Crack Width on Chloride Penetration in Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkedrouci Lotfi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete (RC structures are gradually being degraded all over the world, largely due to corrosion of the embedded steel bars caused by an attack of chloride penetration. Initial curing would be regarded as one factor influencing chloride diffusion in concrete in combination with cover cracking that is also of great attention for reinforced structures. In this study, a non-steady state diffusion test of chloride ion involving RC beam specimens with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.5, initial curing temperatures of 5°C or 20°C and three types of crack widths ranging from 0 to 0.2mm was performed. Chloride content at 5°C or was determined. The results show that the higher chloride content was obtained in condition of crack width large than 0.1mm with low initial curing temperature and there are no obvious differences in chloride content when the crack width was not larger than 0.1mm.

  8. Effect of Pulse Width on Microstructure and Hardness of FeSiB Coatings by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GONG Yu-bing

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-density coating with FeSiB amorphous ribbons as cladding materials on the surface of mild steel was fabricated by laser cladding. The effect of different pulse widths on formability, microstructure and microhardness of the coatings was analyzed by optical microscope(OM, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM and microhardness tester. The results show that with the increase of the pulse width, the coating dilute rate rises; the tendency of crack increases and the crack originates from surface to the interface; the degree of crystallization increases and crystallization phases are α-Fe, Fe2B and Fe3Si, fusion zone width increases and the trend of columnar crystals along the epitaxial growth becomes bigger and bigger; the microhardness firstly increases and then decreases. When pulse width is 3.2ms, the structure of the coating is compact, no hole defects, the interface exhibits a good metallurgical combination and the dilute rate is low about 23.2%. Average microhardness of the coating reaches 1192HV, which is about 10 times as much as the substrate.

  9. Numerical study on the effect of width of single curtain on the performance of Savonius wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwono Triyogi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a preliminary results of the flow around the Savonius wind turbine with installing curtain plate in front of the returning blade turbine. It was investigated numerically in a uniform flow at Reynolds number of 30,000 and 90,000. The velocity vector and pressure distribution around the turbine were simulate by varying the width of curtain plate relative to the diameter of rotor blade (S/D of = 1.00, 1.02, 1.03, 1.15, 1.41, and 2.00, using STAR CCM++ Software. The k-ɛ realizable as turbulence model was used to visualize the flow phenomena occurred around the turbine, and where in this simulation, the rotor turbine was set static. The results show that it seems the width of the curtain installed in front of the returning blade of the turbine plays an important role in the performance of the turbine. In general, the installing of the curtain in front of the returning blade of the turbine is more effective to improve the turbine performance. This is not necessarily, but depends on the width of the curtain and the number of Reynolds (Re. For the width of the large curtain of S/D = 2 at Re = 90,000, the performance of the turbine is estimated lower than when the turbine without the curtain.

  10. The Kovacs effect: a master equation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, A.; Brey, J. J.

    2010-02-01

    The Kovacs or crossover effect is one of the peculiar behaviours exhibited by glasses and other complex, slowly relaxing systems. Roughly it consists of the non-monotonic relaxation to its equilibrium value of a macroscopic property of a system evolving at constant temperature, when starting from a non-equilibrium state. Here, this effect is investigated for general systems whose dynamics is described by a master equation. To carry out a detailed analysis, the limit of small perturbations in which linear response theory applies is considered. It is shown that, under very general conditions, the observed experimental features of the Kovacs effect are recovered. The results are particularized for a very simple model, a two-level system with dynamical disorder. An explicit analytical expression for its non-monotonic relaxation function is obtained, showing a resonant-like behaviour when the dependence on the temperature is investigated.

  11. The Kovacs effect: a master equation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prados, A; Brey, J J

    2010-01-01

    The Kovacs or crossover effect is one of the peculiar behaviours exhibited by glasses and other complex, slowly relaxing systems. Roughly it consists of the non-monotonic relaxation to its equilibrium value of a macroscopic property of a system evolving at constant temperature, when starting from a non-equilibrium state. Here, this effect is investigated for general systems whose dynamics is described by a master equation. To carry out a detailed analysis, the limit of small perturbations in which linear response theory applies is considered. It is shown that, under very general conditions, the observed experimental features of the Kovacs effect are recovered. The results are particularized for a very simple model, a two-level system with dynamical disorder. An explicit analytical expression for its non-monotonic relaxation function is obtained, showing a resonant-like behaviour when the dependence on the temperature is investigated

  12. Effects of large floods on channel width: recent insights from Italian rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Righini, Margherita; Amponsah, William; Crema, Stefano; Ciccarese, Giuseppe; Nardi, Laura; Zoccatelli, Davide; Borga, Marco; Cavalli, Marco; Comiti, Francesco; Corsini, Alessandro; Marchi, Lorenzo; Rinaldi, Massimo; Surian, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Variations of channel morphology occurring during large flood events (recurrence interval > 50-100 years.) are very often the cause of damages to buildings and infrastructures, as well as of casualties. However, our knowledge of such processes remains poor, as is our capability to predict them. Post-event campaigns documenting channel changes and linking them to hydrological and morphological factors thus bear an enormous value for both the scientific community and river management agencies. We present the results of an analysis on the geomorphic response associated to 4 large floods that occurred between October 2011 and September 2015, affecting several catchments in Northern Italy (Magra-Vara, Trebbia, Nure rivers) and Sardinia (Posada and Mannu di Bitti rivers), characterized by different climatic, lithological and geomorphological settings. The analysis considered more than 400 channel reaches characterized by a drainage area ranging from 39 to 1,100 km2 and featuring a wide range of lateral confinement, mostly within the partly- and unconfined conditions. The approach to flood analysis encompassed: (i) hydrological and hydraulic analysis; (ii) analysis of sediment delivery by landslides to the channel network; (iii) GIS-based and field assessment of morphological channel modifications. For the Nure River flood event (September 2015) a quantitative assessment on average bed level variations was also carried out. Return period for maximum hourly rainfall intensities and peak water discharges exceeded in all basins 100 yr, in some cases even 300 yr. Very high unit peak discharges were estimated, reaching 8.8 m3 s-1km-2 in the Nure River (205 km2) and up to 30 m3 s-1km-2in few Magra River tributaries (5-10 km2). Notable channel widening (post-flood width / pre-flood width > 1.1) occurred in 83% of studied reaches, and it was found more relevant in the channels with narrower initial width, i.e. along the relatively steep tributaries. For these tributaries, the

  13. Visual illusions and plate design: the effects of plate rim widths and rim coloring on perceived food portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, A D; van den Bos, W; Matheson, D; Desai, M; McClure, S M; Robinson, T N

    2014-05-01

    The Delboeuf Illusion affects perceptions of the relative sizes of concentric shapes. This study was designed to extend research on the application of the Delboeuf illusion to food on a plate by testing whether a plate's rim width and coloring influence perceptual bias to affect perceived food portion size. Within-subjects experimental design. Experiment 1 tested the effect of rim width on perceived food portion size. Experiment 2 tested the effect of rim coloring on perceived food portion size. In both experiments, participants observed a series of photographic images of paired, side-by-side plates varying in designs and amounts of food. From each pair, participants were asked to select the plate that contained more food. Multilevel logistic regression examined the effects of rim width and coloring on perceived food portion size. Experiment 1: participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 5% and the visual area of food portions by 10% on plates with wider rims compared with plates with very thin rims (Pfood portion sizes. Experiment 2: participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 1.5% and the visual area of food portions by 3% on plates with rim coloring compared with plates with no coloring (P=0.01). The effect of rim coloring was greater with smaller food portion sizes. The Delboeuf illusion applies to food on a plate. Participants overestimated food portion size on plates with wider and colored rims. These findings may help design plates to influence perceptions of food portion sizes.

  14. Linear mixed-effects models to describe individual tree crown width for China-fir in Fujian Province, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xu; Yujun, Sun; Xinjie, Wang; Jin, Wang; Yao, Fu

    2015-01-01

    A multiple linear model was developed for individual tree crown width of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook in Fujian province, southeast China. Data were obtained from 55 sample plots of pure China-fir plantation stands. An Ordinary Linear Least Squares (OLS) regression was used to establish the crown width model. To adjust for correlations between observations from the same sample plots, we developed one level linear mixed-effects (LME) models based on the multiple linear model, which take into account the random effects of plots. The best random effects combinations for the LME models were determined by the Akaike's information criterion, the Bayesian information criterion and the -2logarithm likelihood. Heteroscedasticity was reduced by three residual variance functions: the power function, the exponential function and the constant plus power function. The spatial correlation was modeled by three correlation structures: the first-order autoregressive structure [AR(1)], a combination of first-order autoregressive and moving average structures [ARMA(1,1)], and the compound symmetry structure (CS). Then, the LME model was compared to the multiple linear model using the absolute mean residual (AMR), the root mean square error (RMSE), and the adjusted coefficient of determination (adj-R2). For individual tree crown width models, the one level LME model showed the best performance. An independent dataset was used to test the performance of the models and to demonstrate the advantage of calibrating LME models.

  15. Impact of Spectral Notch Width on Neurophysiological Plasticity and Clinical Effectiveness of the Tailor-Made Notched Music Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wunderlich

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the ringing in the ears that is unrelated to any external source, causes a significant loss in quality of life, involving sleep disturbance and depression for 1 to 3% of the general population. While in the first place tinnitus may be triggered by damage to the inner ear cells, the neural generators of subjective tinnitus are located in central regions of the nervous system. A loss of lateral inhibition, tonotopical reorganization and a gain-increase in response to the sensory deprivation result in hypersensitivity and hyperactivity in certain regions of the auditory cortex. In the tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT patients listen to music from which the frequency spectrum of the tinnitus has been removed. This evokes strong lateral inhibition from neurons tuned to adjacent frequencies onto the neurons involved in the tinnitus percept. A reduction of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related neural activity was achieved with TMNMT in previous studies. As the effect of lateral inhibition depends on the bandwidth of the notch, in the current study we altered the notch width to find the most effective notch width for TMNMT. We compared 1-octave notch width with ½-octave and ¼-octave. Participants chose their favorite music for the training that included three month of two hours daily listening. The outcome was measured by means of standardized questionnaires and magnetoencephalography. We found a general reduction of tinnitus distress in all administered tinnitus questionnaires after the training. Additionally, tinnitus-related neural activity was reduced after the training. Nevertheless, notch width did not have an influence on the behavioral or neural effects of TMNMT. This could be due to a non-linear resolution of lateral inhibition in high frequencies.

  16. Effect of different methods of pulse width modulation on power losses in an induction motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, Alexander; Fokin, Dmitrii; Shuharev, Sergey; Ten, Evgenii

    2017-10-01

    We consider the calculation of modulation power losses in a system “induction motor-inverter” for various pulse width modulation (PWM) methods of the supply voltage. Presented values of modulation power losses are the result of modeling a system “DC link - two-level three-phase voltage inverter - induction motor - load”. In this study the power losses in a system “induction motor - inverter” are computed, as well as losses caused by higher harmonics of PWM supply voltage, followed by definition of active power consumed by the DC link for a specified value mechanical power on the induction motor shaft. Mechanical power was determined by the rotation speed and the torque on the motor shaft in various quasi-sinusoidal supply voltage PWM modes. These calculations reveal the best coefficient of performance (COP) in a system of a variable frequency drive (VFD) with independent voltage inverter controlled by induction motor PWM.

  17. Effects of ρ-meson width on pion distributions in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Huovinen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the finite width of ρ meson on the pion momentum distribution is studied quantitatively in the framework of the S-matrix approach combined with a blast-wave model to describe particle emissions from an expanding fireball. We find that the proper treatment of resonances which accounts for their production dynamics encoded in data for partial wave scattering amplitudes can substantially modify spectra of daughter particles originating in their two body decays. In particular, it results in an enhancement of the low-pT pions from the decays of ρ mesons which improves the quantitative description of the pion spectra in heavy ion collisions obtained by the ALICE collaboration at the LHC energy.

  18. Research of Effective Width of FRP U-shaped Hoop Reinforcement Properties of Concrete Beams by Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Baokun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste fiber reinforced composite material (hereinafter referred to as FRP U-shaped hoop of reinforced concrete beams interfacial debonding is an important reinforcement technology research. For the effective width of the CFRP U-shaped hoop reinforcement, it is still a lack of in-depth research, only relying on the test research huge workload, this article (ANSYS and the numerical simulation in the whole process of the shear load release properties of finite element calculation software. According to the results of finite element analysis, the author studied the CFRP U-shaped hoop to increase the width of the shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams by the impact.

  19. Study on conditional probability of surface rupture: effect of fault dip and width of seismogenic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N.

    2017-12-01

    The conditional probability of surface ruptures is affected by various factors, such as shallow material properties, process of earthquakes, ground motions and so on. Toda (2013) pointed out difference of the conditional probability of strike and reverse fault by considering the fault dip and width of seismogenic layer. This study evaluated conditional probability of surface rupture based on following procedures. Fault geometry was determined from the randomly generated magnitude based on The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion (2017) method. If the defined fault plane was not saturated in the assumed width of the seismogenic layer, the fault plane depth was randomly provided within the seismogenic layer. The logistic analysis was performed to two data sets: surface displacement calculated by dislocation methods (Wang et al., 2003) from the defined source fault, the depth of top of the defined source fault. The estimated conditional probability from surface displacement indicated higher probability of reverse faults than that of strike faults, and this result coincides to previous similar studies (i.e. Kagawa et al., 2004; Kataoka and Kusakabe, 2005). On the contrary, the probability estimated from the depth of the source fault indicated higher probability of thrust faults than that of strike and reverse faults, and this trend is similar to the conditional probability of PFDHA results (Youngs et al., 2003; Moss and Ross, 2011). The probability of combined simulated results of thrust and reverse also shows low probability. The worldwide compiled reverse fault data include low fault dip angle earthquake. On the other hand, in the case of Japanese reverse fault, there is possibility that the conditional probability of reverse faults with less low dip angle earthquake shows low probability and indicates similar probability of strike fault (i.e. Takao et al., 2013). In the future, numerical simulation by considering failure condition of surface by the source

  20. Influence of electrical sheet width on dynamic magnetic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalier, T; Cornut, B

    2000-01-01

    Effects of the width of electrical steel sheets on dynamic magnetic properties are investigated by solving diffusion equation on the cross-section of the sheet. Linear and non-linear cases are studied, and are compared with measurement on Epstein frame. For the first one an analytical solution is found, while for the second, a 2D finite element simulation is achieved. The influence of width is highlighted for a width thickness ratio lower than 10. It is shown that the behaviour modification in such cases is conditioned by the excitation signal waveform, amplitude and also frequency.

  1. Experimental study of heating scheme effect on the inner divertor power footprint widths in EAST lower single null discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, G. Z.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. J.; Liu, J. B.; Zhang, H.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Yan, N.; Feng, W.; Liu, H.; Xia, T. Y.; Zhang, B.; Shao, L. M.; Ming, T. F.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Gao, X.; Wang, L.

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive work of the effects of plasma current and heating schemes on divertor power footprint widths is carried out in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The divertor power footprint widths, i.e., the scrape-off layer heat flux decay length λ q and the heat spreading S, are crucial physical and engineering parameters for fusion reactors. Strong inverse scaling of λ q and S with plasma current have been demonstrated for both neutral beam (NB) and lower hybrid wave (LHW) heated L-mode and H-mode plasmas at the inner divertor target. For plasmas heated by the combination of the two kinds of auxiliary heating schemes (NB and LHW), the divertor power widths tend to be larger in plasmas with higher ratio of LHW power. Comparison between experimental heat flux profiles at outer mid-plane (OMP) and divertor target for NB heated and LHW heated L-mode plasmas reveals that the magnetic topology changes induced by LHW may be the main reason to the wider divertor power widths in LHW heated discharges. The effect of heating schemes on divertor peak heat flux has also been investigated, and it is found that LHW heated discharges tend to have a lower divertor peak heat flux compared with NB heated discharges under similar input power. All these findings seem to suggest that plasmas with LHW auxiliary heating scheme are better heat exhaust scenarios for fusion reactors and should be the priorities for the design of next-step fusion reactors like China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor.

  2. Effects of interventions on normalizing step width during self-paced dual-belt treadmill walking with virtual reality, a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Lansink, I L B; van Kouwenhove, L; Dijkstra, P U; Postema, K; Hijmans, J M

    2017-10-01

    Step width is increased during dual-belt treadmill walking, in self-paced mode with virtual reality. Generally a familiarization period is thought to be necessary to normalize step width. The aim of this randomised study was to analyze the effects of two interventions on step width, to reduce the familiarization period. We used the GRAIL (Gait Real-time Analysis Interactive Lab), a dual-belt treadmill with virtual reality in the self-paced mode. Thirty healthy young adults were randomly allocated to three groups and asked to walk at their preferred speed for 5min. In the first session, the control-group received no intervention, the 'walk-on-the-line'-group was instructed to walk on a line, projected on the between-belt gap of the treadmill and the feedback-group received feedback about their current step width and were asked to reduce it. Interventions started after 1min and lasted 1min. During the second session, 7-10days later, no interventions were given. Linear mixed modeling showed that interventions did not have an effect on step width after the intervention period in session 1. Initial step width (second 30s) of session 1 was larger than initial step width of session 2. Step width normalized after 2min and variation in step width stabilized after 1min. Interventions do not reduce step width after intervention period. A 2-min familiarization period is sufficient to normalize and stabilize step width, in healthy young adults, regardless of interventions. A standardized intervention to normalize step width is not necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Running-coupling effects in the triple-differential charmless semileptonic decay width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambino, Paolo; Gardi, Einan; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    We compute the fully-differential B-bar →X u lν-bar decay width to all orders in perturbation theory in the large-β 0 limit. Each of the five structure functions that build the hadronic tensor is expressed as a Borel integral, summing up O(C F β 0 n-1 α s n ) corrections for any n. We derive analytic expressions for the Borel transforms of both real and virtual diagrams with a single dressed gluon, and perform an all-order infrared subtraction, where the Borel parameter serves also as an infrared regulator. Expanding the result we recover the known triple-differential NLO coefficient, and obtain an explicit expression for the O(C F β 0 α s 2 ) triple-differential NNLO correction. This result can be used to improve the determination of V ub from inclusive B-bar →X u lν-bar measurements at the B factories with a variety of kinematic cuts

  4. The effect of shift work on red blood cell distribution width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2015-04-01

    Limited research demonstrates that shift work (e.g., evening shift, night shift, rotating shift) increases the risk of certain health outcomes, such as hypertriglyceridemia and metabolic syndrome. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW), which is commonly assessed and reported by physicians, is a novel biomarker of cardiovascular disease. However, no study has examined the association of shift work on RDW, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 2005-2010 NHANES were used. RDW was assessed from a blood sample; shift work was assessed from a questionnaire, and various demographic, behavioral/psychological, occupational, and biological parameters were included as covariates. The fully adjusted model showed that the odds of having an elevated RDW for women on rotating shift vs. day shift increased by 46% (OR=1.46; 95% CI: 1.03-2.08). Women on a rotating shift had increased odds of having an elevated RDW, which is concerning as elevated RDW increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Health care professionals are encouraged to include questions about organization of work schedules and their tolerance of such schedules during the patient's consultation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effective evolution equations from quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Leopold, Nikolai

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to provide a mathematical rigorous derivation of the Schrödinger-Klein-Gordon equations, the Maxwell-Schrödinger equations and the defocusing cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation in two dimensions. We study the time evolution of the Nelson model (with ultraviolet cutoff) in a limit where the number N of charged particles gets large while the coupling of each particle to the radiation field is of order N^{−1/2}. At time zero it is assumed that almost all charges a...

  6. Effective equations for the quantum pendulum from momentous quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Hector H.; Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua 31125 (Mexico); Departamento de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Mexico D. F. 01120 (Mexico)

    2012-08-24

    In this work we study the quantum pendulum within the framework of momentous quantum mechanics. This description replaces the Schroedinger equation for the quantum evolution of the system with an infinite set of classical equations for expectation values of configuration variables, and quantum dispersions. We solve numerically the effective equations up to the second order, and describe its evolution.

  7. Schroedinger equations with indefinite effective mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levai, G.; Znojil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The interaction of a particle with the medium around it is usually described by some potential function V (x). It is also often necessary to take into consideration the effects of this medium using a position-dependent effective mass. A wide variety of effective masses m(x) have been used in methodological studies and applications mainly restricted to one dimensional problems, including mass functions that vanish at certain locations or those reaching infinity in some limit. The common feature of these m(x) functions was that they were all non-negative. In our recent study on the PT -symmetric version of the Coulomb potential we found that an asymptotically negative effective mass is necessary for the stability of the energy spectrum. This result inspired us to investigate under which conditions can one apply mass functions that are negative at least in some domains of the coordinate space. For the sake of simplicity we considered the infinitely deep squarewell potential in one dimension V(x) = (+∞, /x/ > L > 1, 0, /x/ 0 , /x/ 0 the energy spectrum becomes unbounded from below. This is not surprising considering that with a negative mass the kinetic energy also becomes negative. In order to stabilize the spectrum we considered energy-dependent effective mass functions that kept the mass finite even for increasing values of the energy. Our first choice was m(x,E) = (1, /x/ ∈ (1,L), -tanh (E), /x/ 2 tanh λ(k) tan k(L - 1) = -1, where λ(k) = k √tanh k 2 . With this choice the energy spectrum was found to be bounded from below. Qualitatively similar results were found for our second example, where we considered a threshold energy E thr by m(x,E) = 1, /x/ ∈ (1,L) , -1, E ≥ E thr , +1, E thr ), /x/ 2 , /x/ 0 and b = b(E) > 0. This lead to the rescaled secular equation tan κa/b x tanh κ(L - a) = b. (3) This setting allowed the investigation of the special limit in which the m(x) turns into the Dirac delta function. We

  8. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, David; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Perez-Mercader, Juan; Visser, Matt

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this ''direct approach'' is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from QFT to the case of

  9. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, David [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA, Carratera Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850 Torrejon, Madrid, (Spain); Molina-Paris, Carmen [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Perez-Mercader, Juan [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Visser, Matt [Physics Department, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130-4899 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this ''direct approach'' is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from

  10. Quantum confinement effect in Bi anti-dot thin films with tailored pore wall widths and thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.; Hirose, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Nakao, S.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated quantum confinement effects in Bi anti-dot thin films grown on anodized aluminium oxide templates. The pore wall widths (w Bi ) and thickness (t) of the films were tailored to have values longer or shorter than Fermi wavelength of Bi (λ F  = ∼40 nm). Magnetoresistance measurements revealed a well-defined weak antilocalization effect below 10 K. Coherence lengths (L ϕ ) as functions of temperature were derived from the magnetoresistance vs field curves by assuming the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model. The anti-dot thin film with w Bi and t smaller than λ F showed low dimensional electronic behavior at low temperatures where L ϕ (T) exceed w Bi or t

  11. Quantum confinement effect in Bi anti-dot thin films with tailored pore wall widths and thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y., E-mail: youngok@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirose, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Hasegawa, T. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, JST, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakao, S. [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, JST, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Xu, J. [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2014-01-13

    We investigated quantum confinement effects in Bi anti-dot thin films grown on anodized aluminium oxide templates. The pore wall widths (w{sub Bi}) and thickness (t) of the films were tailored to have values longer or shorter than Fermi wavelength of Bi (λ{sub F} = ∼40 nm). Magnetoresistance measurements revealed a well-defined weak antilocalization effect below 10 K. Coherence lengths (L{sub ϕ}) as functions of temperature were derived from the magnetoresistance vs field curves by assuming the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model. The anti-dot thin film with w{sub Bi} and t smaller than λ{sub F} showed low dimensional electronic behavior at low temperatures where L{sub ϕ}(T) exceed w{sub Bi} or t.

  12. Effect of Differential Item Functioning on Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakal, Kübra Atalay; Kelecioglu, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of differential item functioning (DIF) items on test equating through multilevel item response models (MIRMs) and traditional IRMs. The performances of three different equating models were investigated under 24 different simulation conditions, and the variables whose effects were examined included sample size, test…

  13. The effect of pulse width and contact configuration on paresthesia coverage in spinal cord stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Das, John; de Sutter, Paul; Manola, L.; Nuttin, Bart

    Objective. To investigate the effect of stimulus pulsewidth (PW) and contact configuration (CC) on the area of paresthesia (PA), perception threshold (VPT), discomfort threshold (VDT) and usage range (UR) in spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Methods. Chronic pain patients were tested during a follow-up

  14. The effect of line-broadening on the overall width of transition arrays in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoarty, D.J.; Bentley, C.D.; Crowley, B.J.B.; Davidson, S.J.; Gales, S.G.; Graham, P.; Harris, J.W.O.; Iglesias, C.A.; James, S.F.; Smith, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have been performed, using the HELEN laser, to measure absorption spectra in the temperature range 20-60 eV and density range 0.5-3 g/cm 3 . K-shell spectra of aluminium were studied to investigate the effect of the plasma environment on the absorption spectrum. The experiments show the effect, at high-density, of array broadening and the merging of high series lines. Comparisons of the experimental absorption data to different opacity models are discussed. The experimental data are compared to calculations of the CASSANDRA opacity model, with and without the inclusion of electron impact broadening. The CASSANDRA code is in better agreement with experiment with electron impact broadening included. The data were also compared to the OPAL detailed term accounting model with reasonable agreement

  15. Barrier widths, barrier heights, and the origins of anomalous kinetic H/D isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, S.; Hoz, Shmaryahu; Kim, Chankyung; Yang, Kiyull

    1990-01-01

    Proton transfer between MeO - and HOMe has been studied using ab initio molecular orbital theory. At the highest level employed (MP2/6-31+G(d)//6-31G(d)+ZPE), -ΔH 298 and -ΔG 298 for the formation of the ion-molecule complex MeO - hor-ellipsis HOMe from the separated reactants are 26.3 and 15.2 kcal/mol, respectively. At the 6-31G(d)//6-31G(d) level of theory, the (MeO-H-OMe) - transition structure is 2.19 kcal/mol higher in energy than the ion-molecule complex (ΔE double-dagger = 2.19), but this barrier disappears when zero-point energies are taken into account. The performance of AM1 on this system is quantitatively different (-ΔH 298 = 13.3; -ΔG 298 = 6.9; ΔE double-dagger = 4.91; k H /k D = 5.13, increasing to 5.79 when quantum mechanical tunneling is invoked) but appears to be acceptable for the research envisaged in the title. The effect of an enforced separation of the heavy atoms upon proton transfer barriers and isotope effects (which simulates steric effects) has been studied briefly at the 6-31G(d) level and in some detail using AM1

  16. The Effect of the Width of an Aluminum Plate on a Bouncing Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hathaway

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the distance between clamping supports of an aluminum alloy plate on the coefficient of restitution of a bouncing steel ball was investigated. The plate was supported on two wooden blocks with a meter stick secured on either side. A steel ball was dropped from a constant height and a motion detector was used to find the coefficient of restitution. Measurements were made with the wooden blocks at a range of distances. It was found that as the distance between the wooden blocks increased, the coefficient of restitution decreased linearly

  17. Effect of length/width ratio of tapered beams on the performance of piezoelectric energy harvesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matova, S P; Renaud, M; Jambunathan, M; Goedbloed, M; Van Schaijk, R

    2013-01-01

    Tapering of the beams as a way to increase the generated output power of cantilever piezoelectric energy harvesters has gained popularity in recent years. The tapering increases the average strain in the beam and consequently the charge generated by the piezoelectric material. Different authors claim an improvement of up to 30% in the generated output power. We have investigated the possibility of using tapered beams in MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters. Numerical simulations did not suggest any increase in the generated output power and the lack of improvement was confirmed in practice. With the help of the numerical simulations it was further found that the tapering does work but only for certain design configurations, namely for cantilevers with long slender beams. For cantilevers with short wide beams, the tapering has no significant effect on the output power of the harvester. (paper)

  18. Effect of second harmonic in pulse-width-modulation-based DAC for feedback of digital fluxgate magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyayev, Serhiy; Ivchenko, Nickolay

    2018-04-01

    Digital fluxgate magnetometers employ processing of the measured pickup signal to produce the value of the compensation current. Using pulse-width modulation with filtering for digital to analog conversion is a convenient approach, but it can introduce an intrinsic source of nonlinearity, which we discuss in this design note. A code shift of one least significant bit changes the second harmonic content of the pulse train, which feeds into the pick-up signal chain despite the heavy filtering. This effect produces a code-dependent nonlinearity. This nonlinearity can be overcome by the specific design of the timing of the pulse train signal. The second harmonic is suppressed if the first and third quarters of the excitation period pulse train are repeated in the second and fourth quarters. We demonstrate this principle on a digital magnetometer, achieving a magnetometer noise level corresponding to that of the sensor itself.

  19. Smoothing effect of the thermal interface material on the temperature distribution in a stepwise varying width microchannel cooling device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Sara; Barrau, Jérôme; Rosell, Joan I.; Fréchette, Luc G.; Omri, Mohamed; Vilarrubí, Montse; Laguna, Gerard

    2017-09-01

    The impact of the thermal interface material (TIM) layer on the performance of a stepwise varying width microchannel cooling device is analysed. A numerical model shows that the TIM layer, besides its well known negative impact on the temperature, also generates a smoothing effect on the temperature distribution. In this study, an analytical model is used to define a nondimensional parameter, called Smoothing Resistance ratio, as the quotient between the origin of the temperature non uniformities and the TIM thermal resistance that flatten the temperature distribution. The relationship between the temperature uniformity of the cooled device, expressed through the temperature standard deviation, and the Smoothing Resistance ratio is shown to be linear. These results lead to the definition of a new design procedure for this kind of cooling device, which aims to reduce the Smoothing Resistance ratio. Two solutions are identified and their drawbacks are analysed.

  20. Effect of the Detector Width and Gas Pressure on the Frequency Response of a Micromachined Thermal Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Courteaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the design and the environmental conditions of a micromachined thermal accelerometer, based on convection effect, are discussed and studied in order to understand the behavior of the frequency response evolution of the sensor. It has been theoretically and experimentally studied with different detector widths, pressure and gas nature. Although this type of sensor has already been intensively examined, little information concerning the frequency response modeling is currently available and very few experimental results about the frequency response are reported in the literature. In some particular conditions, our measurements show a cut-off frequency at −3 dB greater than 200 Hz. By using simple cylindrical and planar models of the thermal accelerometer and an equivalent electrical circuit, a good agreement with the experimental results has been demonstrated.

  1. The Effects of Ridge Axis Width on Mantle Melting at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L.; Magni, V.; Gaina, C.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle upwelling in response to plate divergence produces melt at mid-ocean ridges. Melt starts when the solidus is crossed and stops when conductive cooling overcomes heat advection associated with the upwelling. Most mid-ocean ridge models assume that divergence takes place only in a narrow zone that defines the ridge axis, resulting in a single upwelling. However, more complex patterns of divergence are occasionally observed. The rift axis can be 20 km wide at ultraslow spreading center. Overlapping spreading center contain two parallel axes. Rifting in backarc basins is sometimes organized as a series of parallel spreading centers. Distributing plate divergence over several rifts reduces the intensity of upwelling and limits melting. Can this have a significant effect on the expected crustal thickness and on the mode of melt delivery at the seafloor? We address this question by modeling mantle flow and melting underneath two spreading centers separated by a rigid block. We adopt a non-linear rheology that includes dislocation creep, diffusion creep and yielding and include hydrothermal cooling by enhancing thermal conductivity where yielding takes place. The crustal thickness decreases if the rifts are separated by 30 km or more but only if the half spreading rate is between 1 and 2 cm/yr. At melting depth, a single upwelling remains the norm until the separation of the rifts exceeds a critical value ranging from 15 km in the fastest ridges to more than 50 km at ultraslow spreading centers. The stability of the central upwelling is due to hydrothermal cooling, which prevents hot mantle from reaching the surface at each spreading center. When hydrothermal cooling is suppressed, or the spreading centers are sufficiently separated, the rigid block becomes extremely cold and separates two distinct, highly asymmetric upwellings that may focus melt beyond the spreading center. In that case, melt delivery might drive further and further the divergence centers, whereas

  2. The effect of the negative binomial distribution on the line-width of the micromaser cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremid, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of negative binomial distribution (NBD) on the line-width of the negative binomial distribution (NBD) on the line-width of the micromaser is considered. The threshold of the micromaser is shifted towards higher values of the pumping parameter q. Moreover the line-width exhibits sharp dips 'resonances' when the cavity temperature reduces to a very low value. These dips are very clear evidence for the occurrence of the so-called trapping states regime in the micromaser. This statistics prevents the appearance of these trapping states, namely by increasing the negative binomial parameter q these dips wash out and the line-width becomes more broadening. For small values of the parameter q the line-width at large values of q randomly oscillates around its transition line. As q becomes large this oscillatory behavior occurs at rarely values of q. (author)

  3. Effective average action for gauge theories and exact evolution equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.; Wetterich, C.

    1993-11-01

    We propose a new nonperturbative evolution equation for Yang-Mills theories. It describes the scale dependence of an effective action. The running of the nonabelian gauge coupling in arbitrary dimension is computed. (orig.)

  4. Wong's equations and the small x effective action in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new form for the small x effective action in QCD. This form of the effective action is motivated by Wong's equations for classical, colored particles in non-Abelian background fields. We show that the BFKL equation, which sums leading logarithms in x, is efficiently reproduced with this form of the action. We argue that this form of the action may be particularly useful in computing next-to-leading-order results in QCD at small x

  5. Wong's equations and the small x effective action in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju

    2000-01-01

    We propose a new form for the small x effective action in QCD. This form of the effective action is motivated by Wong's equations for classical, colored particles in non-Abelian background fields. We show that the BFKL equation, which sums leading logarithms in x, is efficiently reproduced with this form of the action. We argue that this form of the action may be particularly useful in computing next-to-leading-order results in QCD at small x

  6. Effective action and the quantum equation of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branchina, V.; Faivre, H.; Zappala, D.

    2004-01-01

    We carefully analyze the use of the effective action in dynamical problems, in particular the conditions under which the equation (δΓ)/(δφ) = 0 can be used as a quantum equation of motion and illustrate in detail the crucial relation between the asymptotic states involved in the definition of Γ and the initial state of the system. Also, by considering the quantum-mechanical example of a double-well potential, where we can get exact results for the time evolution of the system, we show that an approximation to the effective potential in the quantum equation of motion that correctly describes the dynamical evolution of the system is obtained with the help of the wilsonian RG equation (already at the lowest order of the derivative expansion), while the commonly used one-loop effective potential fails to reproduce the exact results. (orig.)

  7. BHR equations re-derived with immiscible particle effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzkopf, John Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Horwitz, Jeremy A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Compressible and variable density turbulent flows with dispersed phase effects are found in many applications ranging from combustion to cloud formation. These types of flows are among the most challenging to simulate. While the exact equations governing a system of particles and fluid are known, computational resources limit the scale and detail that can be simulated in this type of problem. Therefore, a common method is to simulate averaged versions of the flow equations, which still capture salient physics and is relatively less computationally expensive. Besnard developed such a model for variable density miscible turbulence, where ensemble-averaging was applied to the flow equations to yield a set of filtered equations. Besnard further derived transport equations for the Reynolds stresses, the turbulent mass flux, and the density-specific volume covariance, to help close the filtered momentum and continuity equations. We re-derive the exact BHR closure equations which include integral terms owing to immiscible effects. Physical interpretations of the additional terms are proposed along with simple models. The goal of this work is to extend the BHR model to allow for the simulation of turbulent flows where an immiscible dispersed phase is non-trivially coupled with the carrier phase.

  8. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Soo Bak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  9. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    The widths of spaces between the thoracolumbar processi spinosi (interspinous spaces) are frequently assessed using radiography in sports horses; however effects of varying X-ray beam angles and geometric distortion have not been previously described. The aim of this prospective, observational...... study was to determine whether X-ray beam angle has an effect on apparent widths of interspinous spaces. Thoracolumbar spine specimens were collected from six equine cadavers and left-right lateral radiographs and sagittal and dorsal reconstructed computed tomographic (CT) images were acquired...... measurements. Effect of geometric distortion was evaluated by comparing the interspinous space in radiographs with sagittal and dorsal reconstructed CT images. A total of 49 interspinous spaces were sampled, yielding 274 measurements. X-ray beam angle significantly affected measured width of interspinous...

  10. Evaluation of the effect of red cell distribution width on the development of acute renal failure in patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Veysel Kara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical entity that is known to increase mortality in patients with sepsis. Erythrocyte maturation and proliferation are inhibited by pro-inflammatory cytokines; these cytokines exert effects on red cell distribution width (RDW well. Based on this knowledge; our aim in this study was to evaluate the impact of RDW on acute kidney injury in patients with sepsis. Methods: 120 patients diagnosed with sepsis and admitted to intesive care unit (ICU and treated between 2009-2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups as follows: group 1 (RDW≥16.8 and group 2 (RDW<16.8. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between RDW and AKI and mortality. Results: There was a statistically significant relationship between AKI and RDW (p<0.001, OR=11.52 but there were no statistically significant relationship between AKI and sex, age, serum lactate levels as well as SOFA score. Also, there were statistically significant relationship between mortality and RDW (p=0.044, OR=5, serum lactate levels (p=0.030 and SOFA score (p<0.001. RDW was found associated with both AKI and mortality. Conclusions: Results suggest that RDW is an important parameter for predicting development of AKI and mortality in ICU patients with sepsis.

  11. Schrodinger equations with indefinite effective mass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Znojil, Miloslav; Levai, G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 376, č. 45 (2012), s. 3000-3005 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/11/1433 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : quantum particle * effective mass * position dependence * energy dependence * stability * solvable models Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.766, year: 2012

  12. Zeta Functions, Renormalization Group Equations, and the Effective Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, D.; Perez-Mercader, J.; Molina-Paris, C.; Visser, M.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop renormalization group equations for arbitrary quantum field theories from knowledge of an appropriate Seeley-DeWitt coefficient. By formally solving the renormalization group equations to one loop, we renormalization group improve the classical action and use this to derive the leading logarithms in the one-loop effective action for arbitrary quantum field theories. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  13. Analyzing the effectiveness of flare dispensing programs against pulse width modulation seekers using self-organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Š.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared guided missile seekers utilizing pulse width modulation in target tracking is one of the threats against air platforms. To be able to achieve a "soft-kill" protection of own platform against these type of threats, one needs to examine carefully the seeker operating principle with its special electronic counter-counter measure (ECCM) capability. One of the cost-effective ways of soft kill protection is to use flare decoys in accordance with an optimized dispensing program. Such an optimization requires a good understanding of the threat seeker, capabilities of the air platform and engagement scenario information between them. Modeling and simulation is very powerful tool to achieve a valuable insight and understand the underlying phenomenology. A careful interpretation of simulation results is crucial to infer valuable conclusions from the data. In such an interpretation there are lots of factors (features) which affect the results. Therefore, powerful statistical tools and pattern recognition algorithms are of special interest in the analysis. In this paper, we show how self-organizing maps (SOMs), which is one of those powerful tools, can be used in analyzing the effectiveness of various flare dispensing programs against a PWM seeker. We perform several Monte Carlo runs for a typical engagement scenario in a MATLAB-based simulation environment. In each run, we randomly change the flare dispending program and obtain corresponding class: "successful" or "unsuccessful", depending on whether the corresponding flare dispensing program deceives the seeker or not, respectively. Then, in the analysis phase, we use SOMs to interpret and visualize the results.

  14. On the Effective Equation of State of Dark Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2010-01-01

    In an effective field theory model with an ultraviolet momentum cutoff, there is a relation between the effective equation of state of dark energy and the ultraviolet cutoff scale. It implies that a measure of the equation of state of dark energy different from minus one, does not rule out vacuum...... energy as dark energy. It also indicates an interesting possibility that precise measurements of the infrared properties of dark energy can be used to probe the ultraviolet cutoff scale of effective quantum field theory coupled to gravity. In a toy model with a vacuum energy dominated universe...... with a Planck scale cutoff, the dark energy effective equation of state is -0.96....

  15. An effective equation of state for dense matter with strangeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balberg, S.; Gal, A.

    1997-01-01

    An effective equation of state which generalizes the Lattimer-Swesty equation for nuclear matter is presented for matter at supernuclear densities including strange baryons. It contains an adjustable baryon potential energy density, based on models of local potentials for the baryon-baryon interactions. The features of the equation rely on the properties of nuclei for the nucleon-nucleon interactions, and mainly on experimental data from hypernuclei for the hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon interactions. The equation is used to calculate equilibrium compositions and thermodynamic properties of high density matter with strangeness in two astrophysical contexts: neutron star matter (transparent to neutrinos) and proto-neutron star matter (opaque to neutrinos). The effective equation of state reproduces typical properties of high density matter found in theoretical microscopic models. Of these, the main result is that hyperons appear in both types of matter at about twice the nuclear saturation density, and that their appearance significantly softens the equation of state. The range of maximal masses of neutron stars found in a comprehensive parameter survey is 1.4-1.7 M s un. Another typical result is that the maximal mass of a proto-neutron star with strange baryons is higher than that of an evolved neutron star (opposite to the case of nuclear matter), setting the stage for a ''delayed collapse'' scenario. (orig.)

  16. Effects of word width and word length on optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eTeramoto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether word width and length affect the optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words, using reading speed as a measure. In Experiment 1, three Japanese words, each consisting of 4 Hiragana characters, sequentially scrolled on a display screen from right to left. Participants, all Japanese native speakers, were instructed to read the words aloud as accurately as possible, irrespective of their order within the sequence. To quantitatively measure their reading performance, we used rapid serial visual presentation paradigm, where the scrolling rate was increased until the participants began to make mistakes. Thus, the highest scrolling rate at which the participants’ performance exceeded 88.9% correct rate was calculated for each character size (0.3, 0.6, 1.0, and 3.0° and scroll window size (5 or 10 character spaces. Results showed that the reading performance was highest in the range of 0.6° to 1.0°, irrespective of the scroll window size. Experiment 2 investigated whether the optimal character size observed in Experiment 1 was applicable for any word width and word length (i.e., the number of characters in a word. Results showed that reading speeds were slower for longer than shorter words and the word width of 3.6° was optimal among the word lengths tested (3, 4, and 6 character words. Considering that character size varied depending on word width and word length in the present study, this means that the optimal character size can be changed by word width and word length.

  17. Effects of Word Width and Word Length on Optimal Character Size for Reading of Horizontally Scrolling Japanese Words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Wataru; Nakazaki, Takuyuki; Sekiyama, Kaoru; Mori, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated, whether word width and length affect the optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words, using reading speed as a measure. In Experiment 1, three Japanese words, each consisting of four Hiragana characters, sequentially scrolled on a display screen from right to left. Participants, all Japanese native speakers, were instructed to read the words aloud as accurately as possible, irrespective of their order within the sequence. To quantitatively measure their reading performance, we used rapid serial visual presentation paradigm, where the scrolling rate was increased until the participants began to make mistakes. Thus, the highest scrolling rate at which the participants' performance exceeded 88.9% correct rate was calculated for each character size (0.3°, 0.6°, 1.0°, and 3.0°) and scroll window size (5 or 10 character spaces). Results showed that the reading performance was highest in the range of 0.6° to 1.0°, irrespective of the scroll window size. Experiment 2 investigated whether the optimal character size observed in Experiment 1 was applicable for any word width and word length (i.e., the number of characters in a word). Results showed that reading speeds were slower for longer than shorter words and the word width of 3.6° was optimal among the word lengths tested (three, four, and six character words). Considering that character size varied depending on word width and word length in the present study, this means that the optimal character size can be changed by word width and word length in scrolling Japanese words.

  18. Clinical evaluation of the effect of gingival thickness on increasing the width of keratinized and attached gingiva with and without preserving periosteum in an animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ebrahimi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The present study was performed in order to assess the effect of gingival thickness on amount of gingival augmentation with and without preserving periosteum. METHODS: The study was conducted on 8 ecotype dogs aged 1-5 years. At the beginning, clinical probing depth and keratinized and attached gingiva width were measured. Totally, 64 sites were operated in this study. Periosteal fenestration and denuded beds were randomly created on opposite sides of upper and lower jaws (4 sites each side. The thickness of gingiva was measured in mucogingival junction after preparation of the beds. The clinical parameters were evaluated 2 months after the surgery. The data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon, and Pearson correlation tests. RESULTS: The results showed the average increased width of keratinized and attached gingiva was 1.8 mm and 2 mm in periosteal fenestration sites and 1.9 mm and 2.3 mm in denudation sites, respectively at 2 months post-surgery. The difference between the width of keratinized gingiva and attached gingiva before and 2 months after operation was significant in both groups (P < 0.001. However, no significant difference was shown between the two groups in terms of attached and keratinized gingival width (P = 0.100 and P = 0.720, respectively. There was no correlation between the thickness of gingiva and the amount of increased width of keratinized and attached gingiva. CONCLUSION: A gingival thickness of 0.8 to 2 mm does not affect the increment of the attached and keratinized gingival width with and without preserving periosteum.

  19. The Quantum Effect on Friedmann Equation in FRW Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modified Friedmann equation in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with quantum effect. Our modified results mainly stem from the new entropy-area relation and the novel idea of Padmanabhan, who considers the cosmic space to be emerging as the cosmic time progresses, so that the expansion rate of the universe is determined by the difference of degrees of freedom between the holographic surface and the bulk inside. We also discuss the possibility of having bounce cosmological solution from the modified Friedmann equation in spatially flat geometry.

  20. A clinical and histologic evaluation of gingival fibroblasts seeding on a chitosan-based scaffold and its effect on the width of keratinized gingiva in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ghogha; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mofid, Rasoul; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Ghanavati, Farzin; Bagheban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Shariati, Ramin Pajoum

    2011-09-01

    Finding biocompatible matrix materials capable of enhancing the procedures of gingival augmentation is a major concern in periodontal research. This has prompted the investigation of a safe grafting technique by means of synthetic or natural polymers. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of a gingival fibroblast cultured on a naturally derived (i.e., chitosan-based) scaffold on the width of keratinized gingiva in dogs. Gingival fibroblasts were cultured from a small portion of hard palates of five dogs. A bilayered chitosan scaffold was seeded with the gingival fibroblasts and transferred to dogs. Surgery was performed bilaterally, and the regions were randomly divided into two groups: chitosan only (control site) and chitosan + fibroblast (test site). Periodontal parameters, including probing depth and width of keratinized and attached gingiva, were measured at baseline and 3 months after surgery. A histologic evaluation was also performed on the healed grafted sites. Comparison of width of keratinized and attached gingiva in control and test sites showed that the mean width of keratinized and attached gingiva increased in each group after surgery. However, the difference between control and test groups was not statistically significant. Concerning the existence of the keratinized epithelium, exocytosis, and epithelium thickness, no significant difference was observed in test and control sites. The difference was significant in relation to rete ridge formation. The tissue-engineered graft consisting of chitosan + fibroblast was applied to gingival augmentation procedures and generated keratinized tissue without any complications usually associated with donor-site surgery.

  1. Grasp and index finger reach zone during one-handed smartphone rear interaction: effects of task type, phone width and hand length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Songil; Kyung, Gyouhyung; Lee, Jungyong; Moon, Seung Ki; Park, Kyoung Jong

    2016-11-01

    Recently, some smartphones have introduced index finger interaction functions on the rear surface. The current study investigated the effects of task type, phone width, and hand length on grasp, index finger reach zone, discomfort, and muscle activation during such interaction. We considered five interaction tasks (neutral, comfortable, maximum, vertical, and horizontal strokes), two device widths (60 and 90 mm) and three hand lengths. Horizontal (vertical) strokes deviated from the horizontal axis in the range from -10.8° to -13.5° (81.6-88.4°). Maximum strokes appeared to be excessive as these caused 43.8% greater discomfort than did neutral strokes. The 90-mm width also appeared to be excessive as it resulted in 12.3% increased discomfort relative to the 60-mm width. The small-hand group reported 11.9-18.2% higher discomfort ratings, and the percent maximum voluntary exertion of their flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, pertaining to index finger flexion, was also 6.4% higher. These findings should be considered to make smartphone rear interaction more comfortable. Practitioner Summary: Among neutral, comfortable, maximum, horizontal, and vertical index finger strokes on smartphone rear surfaces, maximum vs. neutral strokes caused 43.8% greater discomfort. Horizontal (vertical) strokes deviated from the horizontal (vertical) axis. Discomfort increased by 12.3% with 90-mm- vs. 60-mm-wide devices. Rear interaction regions of five commercialised smartphones should be lowered 20 to 30 mm for more comfortable rear interaction.

  2. Effect of Dynamic Reheating Controlled by the Weaving Width on the Microstructure of GTA Bead-On-Pipe Weld Metal of 25% Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Joon Sung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW with three different heat inputs controlled by the weaving width was performed to understand their effects on the microstructural changes during bead-on-pipe welding of super duplex stainless steel. The microstructure of the weld metals was categorized into three different types of zones: non-reheated, reheated type, and reheating-free zone. Even though single-pass welding with different weaving widths was employed, a reheated microstructure was detected, which has been previously observed with multiple pass welding. This phenomenon was called “dynamic reheating”, because it was produced by the weaving operation during welding regardless of the weaving width. The categorized area fraction varied with the weaving width change. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD results at the edge (the area near the fusion line of the low-heat-input condition indicated a higher austenite volume fraction and a lower Cr2N fraction than that of the medium heat input condition. Thus, it described an inverse relationship, because higher heat input provided a lower austenite fraction. In addition, it was observed clearly that the austenite fraction at the medium heat input condition was dramatically increased by reheating, while the Cr2N fraction was reduced. Regardless of the weaving width, reheating contributed to the increase of the austenite fraction, further reducing the Cr2N quantity. The edge areas in the map showed an inverse relationship in the reheated area fraction between low heat input and medium heat input. For this reason, the austenite fraction on the weld metal was determined not only by the heat input, but also by the amount of reheating.

  3. Effective evolution equations from many-body quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedikter, Niels Patriz

    2014-01-01

    Systems of interest in physics often consist of a very large number of interacting particles. In certain physical regimes, effective non-linear evolution equations are commonly used as an approximation for making predictions about the time-evolution of such systems. Important examples are Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute Bose gases and degenerate Fermi gases. While the effective equations are well-known in physics, a rigorous justification is very difficult. However, a rigorous derivation is essential to precisely understand the range and the limits of validity and the quality of the approximation. In this thesis, we prove that the time evolution of Bose-Einstein condensates in the Gross-Pitaevskii regime can be approximated by the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation, a cubic non-linear Schroedinger equation. We then turn to fermionic systems and prove that the evolution of a degenerate Fermi gas can be approximated by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation (TDHF) under certain assumptions on the semiclassical structure of the initial data. Finally, we extend the latter result to fermions with relativistic kinetic energy. All our results provide explicit bounds on the error as the number of particles becomes large. A crucial methodical insight on bosonic systems is that correlations can be modeled by Bogolyubov transformations. We construct initial data appropriate for the Gross-Pitaevskii regime using a Bogolyubov transformation acting on a coherent state, which amounts to studying squeezed coherent states. As a crucial insight for fermionic systems, we point out a semiclassical structure in states close to the ground state of fermions in a trap. As a convenient language for studying the dynamics of fermionic systems, we use particle-hole transformations.

  4. Phase Diagram of the ν=5/2 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: Effects of Landau-Level Mixing and Nonzero Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiryl Pakrouski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Interesting non-Abelian states, e.g., the Moore-Read Pfaffian and the anti-Pfaffian, offer candidate descriptions of the ν=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state. But, the significant controversy surrounding the nature of the ν=5/2 state has been hampered by the fact that the competition between these and other states is affected by small parameter changes. To study the phase diagram of the ν=5/2 state, we numerically diagonalize a comprehensive effective Hamiltonian describing the fractional quantum Hall effect of electrons under realistic conditions in GaAs semiconductors. The effective Hamiltonian takes Landau-level mixing into account to lowest order perturbatively in κ, the ratio of the Coulomb energy scale to the cyclotron gap. We also incorporate the nonzero width w of the quantum-well and subband mixing. We find the ground state in both the torus and spherical geometries as a function of κ and w. To sort out the nontrivial competition between candidate ground states, we analyze the following four criteria: its overlap with trial wave functions, the magnitude of energy gaps, the sign of the expectation value of an order parameter for particle-hole symmetry breaking, and the entanglement spectrum. We conclude that the ground state is in the universality class of the Moore-Read Pfaffian state, rather than the anti-Pfaffian, for κ<κ_{c}(w, where κ_{c}(w is a w-dependent critical value 0.6≲κ_{c}(w≲1. We observe that both Landau-level mixing and nonzero width suppress the excitation gap, but Landau-level mixing has a larger effect in this regard. Our findings have important implications for the identification of non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall states.

  5. Non-linear effects in the Boltzmann equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, R.O.

    1985-01-01

    The Boltzmann equation is studied by defining an integral transformation of the energy distribution function for an isotropic and homogeneous gas. This transformation may be interpreted as a linear superposition of equilibrium states with variable temperatures. It is shown that the temporal evolution features of the distribution function are determined by the singularities of said transformation. This method is applied to Maxwell and Very Hard Particle interaction models. For the latter, the solution of the Boltzmann equation with the solution of its linearized version is compared, finding out many basic discrepancies and non-linear effects. This gives a hint to propose a new rational approximation method with a clear physical meaning. Applying this technique, the relaxation features of the BKW (Bobylev, Krook anf Wu) mode is analyzed, finding a conclusive counter-example for the Krook and Wu conjecture. The anisotropic Boltzmann equation for Maxwell models is solved as an expansion in terms of the eigenfunctions of the corresponding linearized collision operator, finding interesting transient overpopulation and underpopulation effects at thermal energies as well as a new preferential spreading effect. By analyzing the initial collision, a criterion is established to deduce the general features of the final approach to equilibrium. Finally, it is shown how to improve the convergence of the eigenfunction expansion for high energy underpopulated distribution functions. As an application of this theory, the linear cascade model for sputtering is analyzed, thus finding out that many differences experimentally observed are due to non-linear effects. (M.E.L.) [es

  6. Step dynamics and terrace-width distribution on flame-annealed gold films: The effect of step-step interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoni, Nira; Ayal, Shai; Millo, Oded

    2000-01-01

    Dynamics of atomic steps and the terrace-width distribution within step bunches on flame-annealed gold films are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. The distribution is narrower than commonly observed for vicinal planes and has a Gaussian shape, indicating a short-range repulsive interaction between the steps, with an apparently large interaction constant. The dynamics of the atomic steps, on the other hand, appear to be influenced, in addition to these short-range interactions, also by a longer-range attraction of steps towards step bunches. Both types of interactions promote self-ordering of terrace structures on the surface. When current is driven through the films a step-fingering instability sets in, reminiscent of the Bales-Zangwill instability

  7. Effects of the edge shape and the width on the structural and electronic properties of silicene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuling; Zhang Yan; Zhang Jianmin; Lu Daobang

    2010-01-01

    Under the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), the structural and electronic properties are studied for H-terminated silicene nanoribbons (SiNRs) with either zigzag edge (ZSiNRs) or armchair edge (ASiNRs) by using the first-principles projector-augmented wave potential within the density function theory (DFT) framework. The results show that the length of the Si-H bond is always 1.50 A, but the edge Si-Si bonds are shorter than the inner ones with identical orientation, implying a contraction relaxation of edge Si atoms. An edge state appears at the Fermi level E F in broader ZSiNRs, but does not appear in all ASiNRs due to their dimer Si-Si bond at edge. With increasing width of ASiNRs, the direct band gaps exhibit not only an oscillation behavior, but also a periodic feature of Δ 3n > Δ 3n+1 > Δ 3n+2 for a certain integer n. The charge density contours analysis shows that the Si-H bond is an ionic bond due to a relative larger electronegativity of H atom. However, all kinds of the Si-Si bonds display a typical covalent bonding feature, although their strength depends on not only the bond orientation but also the bond position. That is, the larger deviation of the Si-Si bond orientation from the nanoribbon axis as well as the closer of the Si-Si bond to the nanoribbon edge, the stronger strength of the Si-Si bond. Besides the contraction of the nanoribbon is mainly in its width direction especially near edge, the addition contribution from the terminated H atoms may be the other reason.

  8. Investigation the effect of lattice angle on the band gap width in 3D phononic crystals with rhombohedral(I) lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Aryadoust, M.; Shoushtari, M. Zargar

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystal of 3D with rhombohedral(I) lattice is studied theoretically. The crystal composite constituted of nickel spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and density of states are performed with the plane wave expansion method in the irreducible part of Brillouin zone. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of lattice angle on the band structure and width of the band gap rhombohedral(I) lattice in the irreducible part of the first Brillouin zone and its planes separately. The results show that more than one complete band gape are formed in the four planes of the irreducible part. The most complete band gaps are formed in the (111) plane and the widest complete band gap in (443) with an angle greater than 80. So, if the sound passes through the (111) and (443) planes for the lattice angle close to 90, the crystal phononic displays the excellent insulation behavior. Moreover, in the other planes, the lattice angle does not affect on the width and the number of band gaps. Also, for the filling fraction 5 %, the widest complete band gap is formed. These results are consistent with the effect of symmetry on the band gap width, because the (111) plane has the most symmetry.

  9. Stokes line width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiskov, A.I.; Ritus, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of Stokes line width is introduced for the asymptotic expansions of functions near an essential singularity. Explicit expressions are found for functions (switching functions) that switch on the exponentially small terms for the Dawson integral, Airy function, and the gamma function. A different, more natural representation of a function, not associated with expansion in an asymptotic series, in the form of dominant and recessive terms is obtained by a special division of the contour integral which represents the function into contributions of higher and lower saddle points. This division leads to a narrower, natural Stokes line width and a switching function of an argument that depends on the topology of the lines of steepest descent from the saddle point

  10. Explosive instabilities of reaction-diffusion equations including pinch effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Particular solutions of reaction-diffusion equations for temperature are obtained for explosively unstable situations. As a result of the interplay between inertial, diffusion, pinch and source processes certain 'bell-shaped' distributions may grow explosively in time with preserved shape of the spatial distribution. The effect of the pinch, which requires a density inhomogeneity, is found to diminish the effect of diffusion, or inversely to support the inertial and source processes in creating the explosion. The results may be described in terms of elliptic integrals or. more simply, by means of expansions in the spatial coordinate. An application is the temperature evolution of a burning fusion plasma. (au) (18 refs.)

  11. Effect of temperature and ridge-width on the lasing characteristics of InAs/InP quantum-dash lasers: A thermal analysis view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhazraji, E.; Khan, M. T. A.; Ragheb, A. M.; Fathallah, H.; Qureshi, K. K.; Alshebeili, S.; Khan, M. Z. M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the thermal characteristics of multi-stack chirped barrier thickness InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum-dash-in-a-well lasers of different ridge widths 2, 3, 4 and 15 μm. The effect of varying this geometrical parameter on the extracted thermal resistance and characteristic temperature, and their stability with temperature are examined. The results show an inverse relation of ridge-width with junction temperature with 2 μm device exhibiting the largest junction temperature buildup owing to an associated high thermal resistance of ∼45 °C/W. Under the light of this thermal analysis, lasing behavior of different ridge-width quantum-dash (Qdash) lasers with injection currents and operating temperatures, is investigated. Thermionic carrier escape and phonon-assisted tunneling are found to be the dominant carrier transport mechanisms resulting in wide thermal spread of carriers across the available transition states of the chirped active region. An emission coverage of ∼75 nm and 3 dB bandwidth of ∼55 nm is exhibited by the 2 μm device, thus possibly exploiting the inhomogeneous optical transitions to the fullest. Furthermore, successful external modulation of a single Qdash Fabry-Perot laser mode via injection locking is demonstrated with eye diagrams at bit rates of 2-12 Gbit/s incorporating various modulation schemes. These devices are being considered as potential light sources for future high-speed wavelength-division multiplexed optical communication systems.

  12. Muscle shortening maneuver and not topical anti-inflammatory therapy is effective in reducing the width of subacromial-subdeltoid bursa in shoulder impingement syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Lippi, Paolo; Marchi, Alberto; Maresca, Marco; Bravi, Riccardo; Eros, Quarta; Lazzerini, Patrizia; Bagni, Maria Angela

    2018-04-01

    Aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of a muscle shortening maneuver (MSM) with the efficacy of a topical NSAID (flurbiprofen) in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). The effects of these therapies were evaluated by sonographic exam (US). SIS was diagnosed by US in 78 patients with painful shoulder. Thirty patients (first group) were treated with topical flurbiprofen for 15 days. Forty-eight patients (second group) were treated with MSM, which was performed once. The shoulder was analyzed in all patients by US before and after treatment. Before treatment and 15 days after treatment, pain by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), range of motion (ROM) and Neer's Test were evaluated. Pain was decreased by both treatments. In only 8 patients of the first group, the encroachment of acromion into the rotator cuff was no more detectable by US after the treatment; ROM increased (> 45°) only in 11 patients (36%) and the width of subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (SSB) was not significantly reduced. At variance with the results obtained in the first group, in all patients of the second group the encroachment of acromion was no more detectable by US, ROM increased (> 45°) and the width of SSB was significantly reduced after the maneuver. Both topical flurbiprofen and MSM were helpful in pain control, but better results, with decrease of width of SSB assessed by US, were obtained by MSM.

  13. Effect of MLC Leaf Width and PTV Margin on the Treatment Planning of Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Radiosurgery (IMSRS) or Radiotherapy (IMSRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Jenghwa; Yenice, Kamil M.; Jiang Kailiu; Hunt, Margie; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of MLC (multileaf collimator) leaf width and PTV (planning target volume) margin on treatment planning of intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS) or radiotherapy (IMSRT). Twelve patients previously treated with IMSRS/IMSRT were retrospectively planned with 5- and 3-mm MLC leaf widths and 3- and 2-mm PTV margins using the already contoured clinical target volume and critical structures. The same beam arrangement, planning parameters, and optimization method were used in each of the 4 plans for a given patient. Each plan was normalized so that the prescription dose covered at least 99% of the PTV. Plan indices - D mean (mean dose), conformity index (CI), V 70 (volume receiving ≥ 70% of the prescription dose), and V 50 (volume receiving ≥ 50% of the prescription dose) - were calculated from the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the PTV, normal tissue, and organs at risk (OARs). Hypothesis testing was performed on the mean ratios of plan indices to determine the statistical significance of the relative differences. The PTV was well covered for all plans, as no significant differences were observed for D 95 , V 95 , D max , D min , and D mean of the PTV. The irradiated volume was ∼23% smaller when 2-mm instead of 3-mm PTV margin was used, but it was only reduced by ∼6% when the MLC leaf width was reduced from 5 mm to 3 mm. For normal tissue and brainstem, V 70 , V 50 , and D mean were reduced more effectively by a decrease in MLC width, while D mean of optic nerve and chiasm were more sensitive to a change in PTV margin. The DVH statistics for the PTV and normal structures from the treatment plan with 5-mm MLC and 2-mm PTV margin were equal to those with 3-mm MLC and 3-mm PTV margin. PTV margin reduction is more effective in sparing the normal tissue and OARs than a reduction in MLC leaf width. For IMSRS, where highly accurate setup and small PTV margins are routinely employed, the use of 5-mm MLC is therefore less desirable.

  14. Effect of Laser Power on Material Efficiency, Layer Height and Width of Laser Metal Deposited Ti6Al4V

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahamood, RM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available /sec) during deposition is   600  DFRP TPm ----------------------------------- (3) PFR is the powder flow rate in g/min and the 60 in equation 3 is a conversion factor for the powder flow rate to g/sec. The powder efficiency (μ) is given by:   100/ 0... Alloys for Aerospace Applications, in: Titanium and Titanium Alloys, Advanced Engineering Materials, 5, 2003, pp.419-427. [3] Y. Lu, H.B. Tang, Y.L. Fang, D. Liu, H.M. Wang, Microstructure evolution of sub-critical annealed laser deposited Ti–6Al–4V...

  15. Effect of acute intraocular pressure elevation on the minimum rim width in normal, ocular hypertensive and glaucoma eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sourabh; Tun, Tin A; Baskaran, Mani; Atalay, Eray; Thakku, Sri Gowtham; Liang, Zhang; Milea, Dan; Strouthidis, Nicholas G; Aung, Tin; Girard, Michael Ja

    2018-01-01

    To estimate and compare changes in the Bruch's membrane opening-minimum rim width (BMO-MRW) and area in normal, ocular hypertensive and glaucoma eyes following acute elevations in intraocular pressure (IOP). The optic nerve heads (ONHs) of 104 subjects (31 normals, 20 ocular hypertension (OHT) and 53 with primary glaucoma) were imaged using Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT; Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Germany). IOP was raised twice by applying a force (0.64 n then 0.9 n) to the anterior sclera using an ophthalmo-dynamometer. After each IOP increment, IOP was held constant, measured with a Tonopen (AVIA applanation tonometer, Reichert, Depew, New York, USA), and ONH was rescanned with OCT. In each OCT volume, BMO-MRW and area were calculated and at each IOP increment. The baseline MRW was significantly smaller in glaucoma subjects (174.3±54.3 µm) compared with normal (287.4±42.2 µm, pglaucoma subjects was significantly thinner at the first and second IOP elevations than that at baseline (both p0.05). Acute IOP elevation leads to compression of the nerve fibre layers of neuroretinal rim in glaucoma subjects only without changing ONH size. This suggests that the neural and connective tissues at ONH level in glaucoma subjects are more susceptible to acute IOP episodes than OHT or normal controls. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Pulse-width discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budyashov, Yu.G.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Zinov, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    A pulse duration discriminator is described which is intended for processing signals from multilayer scintillators. The basic elements of the scintillator are: an input gate, a current generator, an integrating capacitor, a Schmidt trigger and an anticoincidence circuit. The basic circuit of the discriminator and its time diagrams explaining its operating are given. The discriminator is based on microcircuits. Pulse duration discrimination threshold changes continuously from 20 to 100 ns, while its amplitude threshold changes within 20 to 100 mV. The temperature instability of discrimination thresholds (both in pulse width and in amplitude) is better than 0.1 per cent/deg C

  17. Backreaction effects on the matter side of Einstein's field equations

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have derived a novel and compact expression for how perturbations in the matter fields of the cosmological fluid can lead to deviations from the standard Friedmann equations. Remarkably, the dissipative damping of velocity perturbations by bulk and shear viscosity in the dark sector can modify the expansion history of the universe on arbitrarily large scales. In universes in which this effect is sufficiently sizeable, it could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion. But even if dark matter should be less viscous and if the effect would be correspondingly smaller, it may have observable consequences in the era of precision cosmology. Here, we review the origin of this backreaction effect and possibilities to constrain it further.

  18. The effect of the signal-to-noise ratio and window width on image information in intravenous DSA of various vascular regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Ertel, R.; Siemens A.G., Erlangen

    1986-01-01

    The diagnostic quality of DSA images depends on numerous factors related to the apparatus and the technique of examination. An improvement in image can be brought about by correct choice of the mask and injected frames, by subsequent correct manipulation of the images and by the choice of the signal-to-noise ratio and window width. In the present study, the effect of these factors was demonstrated on image quality of venous DSA studies in various vascular regions. Practical advice is given for the examination of particular regions and for various diagnostic problems. (orig.)

  19. The effect of nonlinearity on unstable zones of Mathieu equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... Abstract. Mathieu equation is a well-known ordinary differential equation in which the excitation term appears as the non-constant coefficient. The mathematical modelling of many dynamic systems leads to Mathieu equation. The determination of the locus of unstable zone is important for the control of ...

  20. Effects of Classroom Instruction on Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiyavutjamai, Pongchawee; Clements, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-one students in six Grade 9 classes in two government secondary schools located near Chiang Mai, Thailand, attempted to solve the same 18 quadratic equations before and after participating in 11 lessons on quadratic equations. Data from the students' written responses to the equations, together with data in the form of…

  1. Account of proton channels coupling in optical-shell description of partial proton widths of isobaric analog resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guba, V.G.; Urin, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of partial proton width of isobaric analog resonances (IAR) for magic and near-magic (by neutrons) nuclei (at proton scattering on sup(207, 208Pb, 140 Ce, 138 Ba, 90 Zr) is conducted. Optical-shell model of nuclear reactions has been used. Quantitative interpretation of width is suggested on the base of numerical solution of integral equations for effective Coulomb field with account relation of 0 + -configurations proton-neutron hole both with continuum and with multiparticle configurations. Accountancy of relation of proton channels results in systematic 1.3-2.0 fold decrease of calculated values of widths. It permits to coordinate experimental and calculated values of width at reasonable values of parameters of optical potential. The results of calculation of reduced width are stable to variation of parameters of the model

  2. Random-Effects Models for Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling: Review, Issues, and Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mike W.-L.; Cheung, Shu Fai

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) combines the techniques of meta-analysis and structural equation modeling for the purpose of synthesizing correlation or covariance matrices and fitting structural equation models on the pooled correlation or covariance matrix. Both fixed-effects and random-effects models can be defined in MASEM.…

  3. Data report of tight-lattice rod bundle thermal-hydraulic tests (2). Gap-width effect test using 37-rod bundle simulated water-cooled breeder reactor (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Liu, Wei; Akimoto, Hajime; Sato, Takashi; Watanabe, Hironori; Ohnuki, Akira

    2006-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been performing tight-lattice rod bundle thermal-hydraulic tests to realize essential technologies for the technological and engineering feasibility of super high burn-up water-cooled breeder reactor featured by a high breeding ratio and super high burn-up by reducing the core water volume in water-cooled reactor. The tests are performing to make clear the fundamental subjects related to the boiling transition (BT) (Subjects: BT criteria under a highly tight-lattice rod bundle, effects of gap-width between rods and of rod-bowing) using 37-rod bundles (Base case test section (1.3mm gap-width), Two parameter effect test sections (Gap-width effect one (1.0mm) and Rod-bowing one)). In the present report, we summarize the test results from the gap-width effect test section. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics were obtained for the critical power under the steady-state and transient conditions, the pressure drop and the wall heat transfer within a wide range of pressure, flow rate, etc. including normal operational conditions of the designed reactor. Then the gap-width effects were also obtained from the comparison between the results using the base case test section and the gap-width effect one. (author)

  4. Tourniquet pressures: strap width and tensioning system widths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Piper L; Coughlin, Ohmar; Rometti, Mary; Birkholz, Sarah; Gildemaster, Yvonne; Grulke, Lisa; Sahr, Sheryl; Buising, Charisse M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure distribution over tourniquet width is a determinant of pressure needed for arterial occlusion. Different width tensioning systems could result in arterial occlusion pressure differences among nonelastic strap designs of equal width. Ratcheting Medical Tourniquets (RMTs; m2 inc., http://www.ratcheting buckles.com) with a 1.9 cm-wide (Tactical RMT) or 2.3 cm-wide (Mass Casualty RMT) ladder were directly compared (16 recipients, 16 thighs and 16 upper arms for each tourniquetx2). Then, RMTs were retrospectively compared with the windlass Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T ["CAT"], http://combattourniquet.com) with a 2.5 cm-wide internal tensioning strap. Pressure was measured with an air-filled No. 1 neonatal blood pressure cuff under each 3.8 cm-wide tourniquet. RMT circumferential pressure distribution was not uniform. Tactical RMT pressures were not higher, and there were no differences between the RMTs in the effectiveness, ease of use ("97% easy"), or discomfort. However, a difference did occur regarding tooth skipping of the pawl during ratchet advancement: it occurred in 1 of 64 Tactical RMT applications versus 27 of 64 Mass Casualty RMT applications. CAT and RMT occlusion pressures were frequently over 300 mmHg. RMT arm occlusion pressures (175-397 mmHg), however, were lower than RMT thigh occlusion pressures (197-562 mmHg). RMT effectiveness was better with 99% reached occlusion and 1% lost occlusion over 1 minute versus the CAT with 95% reached occlusion and 28% lost occlusion over 1 minute. RMT muscle tension changes (up to 232 mmHg) and pressure losses over 1 minute (24±11 mmHg arm under strap to 40±12 mmHg thigh under ladder) suggest more occlusion losses may have occurred if tourniquet duration was extended. The narrower tensioning system Tactical RMT has better performance characteristics than the Mass Casualty RMT. The 3.8 cm-wide RMTs have some pressure and effectiveness similarities and differences compared with the CAT. Clinically

  5. Effective electrodiffusion equation for non-uniform nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Melchionna, Simone; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2013-06-28

    We derive a one-dimensional formulation of the Planck-Nernst-Poisson equation to describe the dynamics of a symmetric binary electrolyte in channels whose section is nanometric and varies along the axial direction. The approach is in the spirit of the Fick-Jacobs diffusion equation and leads to a system of coupled equations for the partial densities which depends on the charge sitting at the walls in a non-trivial fashion. We consider two kinds of non-uniformities, those due to the spatial variation of charge distribution and those due to the shape variation of the pore and report one- and three-dimensional solutions of the electrokinetic equations.

  6. Effects of V2O3 buffer layers on sputtered VO2 smart windows: Improved thermochromic properties, tunable width of hysteresis loops and enhanced durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Shiwei; Cao, Xun; Sun, Guangyao; Li, Ning; Chang, Tianci; Shao, Zewei; Jin, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is one of the most well-known thermochromic materials, which exhibits a notable optical change from transparent to reflecting in the infrared region upon a metal-insulator phase transition. For practical applications, VO2 thin films should be in high crystalline quality to obtain a strong solar modulation ability (ΔTsol). Meanwhile, narrow hysteresis loops and robust ambient durability are also indispensable for sensitivity and long-lived utilization, respectively. In this work, a series of high-quality V2O3/VO2 bilayer structures were grown on quartz glass substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. Basically, the bottom V2O3 acts as the buffer layer to improve the crystallinity of the top VO2, while the VO2 serves as the thermochromic layer to guarantee the solar modulation ability for energy-saving. We observed an obvious increase in ΔTsol of 76% (from 7.5% to 13.2%) for VO2 films after introducing V2O3 buffer layers. Simultaneously, a remarkable reduction by 79% (from 21.9 °C to 4.7 °C) in width of hysteresis loop was obtained when embedding 60 nm V2O3 buffer for 60 nm VO2. In addition, VO2 with non-stoichiometry of V2O3±x buffer demonstrates a broadening hysteresis loops width, which is derived from the lattice distortion caused by lattice imperfection. Finally, durability of VO2 has been significantly improved due to positive effects of V2O3 buffer layer. Our results lead to a comprehensive enhancement in crystallinity of VO2 and shed new light on the promotion of thermochromic property by homologous oxides for VO2.

  7. SU-F-T-402: The Effect of Extremely Narrow MLC Leaf Width On the Plan Quality of VMAT for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J; Park, S; Kim, J; Choi, C; Park, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) with leaf width of 1.25 mm on the plan quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer. Methods: A total of 20 patients with prostate cancer were retrospectively selected. Using a high definition MLC (HD MLC), primary and boost VMAT plans with two full arcs were generated for each patient (original plan). After that, by shifting patient CT images by 1.25 mm in the cranio-caudal direction between the 1st and the 2nd arc, we simulated fluences made with MLCs with leaf width of 1.25 mm. After shifting, primary and boost plans were generated for each patient (shifted plan). A sum plan was generated by summation of the primary and boost plan for each patient. Dose-volumetric parameters were calculated and compared. Results: Both homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) of the shifted plans were better than those of the original plans in primary plans (HI = 0.044 vs. 0.040 with p < 0.001 and CI = 1.056 vs. 1.044 with p = 0.006). Similarly, the shifted plans for boost target volume showed better homogeneity and conformity than did the original plans (HI = 0.042 vs. 0.037 with p = 0.006 and CI = 1.015 vs. 1.009 with p < 0.001). The total body volumes of the original plans irradiated by the prescription dose were larger than those of the shifted plans in sum plans (60.9 cc vs. 49.0 cc with p = 0.007). Conclusion: Use of extremely narrow MLCs could increase dose homogeneity and conformity of the target volume for prostate VMAT. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2015R1C1A1A02036331).

  8. Unexpected finite size effects in interfacial systems: Why bigger is not always better—Increase in uncertainty of surface tension with bulk phase width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longford, Francis G. J.; Essex, Jonathan W.; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Frey, Jeremy G.

    2018-06-01

    We present an unexpected finite size effect affecting interfacial molecular simulations that is proportional to the width-to-surface-area ratio of the bulk phase Ll/A. This finite size effect has a significant impact on the variance of surface tension values calculated using the virial summation method. A theoretical derivation of the origin of the effect is proposed, giving a new insight into the importance of optimising system dimensions in interfacial simulations. We demonstrate the consequences of this finite size effect via a new way to estimate the surface energetic and entropic properties of simulated air-liquid interfaces. Our method is based on macroscopic thermodynamic theory and involves comparing the internal energies of systems with varying dimensions. We present the testing of these methods using simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water forcefield and a Lennard-Jones fluid model of argon. Finally, we provide suggestions of additional situations, in which this finite size effect is expected to be significant, as well as possible ways to avoid its impact.

  9. The Effect of Tutoring With Nonstandard Equations for Students With Mathematics Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sarah R; Driver, Melissa K; Julian, Tyler E

    2015-01-01

    Students often misinterpret the equal sign (=) as operational instead of relational. Research indicates misinterpretation of the equal sign occurs because students receive relatively little exposure to equations that promote relational understanding of the equal sign. No study, however, has examined effects of nonstandard equations on the equation solving and equal-sign understanding of students with mathematics difficulty (MD). In the present study, second-grade students with MD (n = 51) were randomly assigned to standard equations tutoring, combined tutoring (standard and nonstandard equations), and no-tutoring control. Combined tutoring students demonstrated greater gains on equation-solving assessments and equal-sign tasks compared to the other two conditions. Standard tutoring students demonstrated improved skill on equation solving over control students, but combined tutoring students' performance gains were significantly larger. Results indicate that exposure to and practice with nonstandard equations positively influence student understanding of the equal sign. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  10. Regarding on the exact solutions for the nonlinear fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Melike

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have considered the modified simple equation (MSE method for obtaining exact solutions of nonlinear fractional-order differential equations. The space-time fractional equal width (EW and the modified equal width (mEW equation are considered for illustrating the effectiveness of the algorithm. It has been observed that all exact solutions obtained in this paper verify the nonlinear ordinary differential equations which was obtained from nonlinear fractional-order differential equations under the terms of wave transformation relationship. The obtained results are shown graphically.

  11. Effects of toe-in and toe-in with wider step width on level walking knee biomechanics in varus, valgus, and neutral knee alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Hunter J; Shen, Guangping; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2017-12-01

    Increased peak external knee adduction moments exist for individuals with knee osteoarthritis and varus knee alignments, compared to healthy and neutrally aligned counterparts. Walking with increased toe-in or increased step width have been individually utilized to successfully reduce 1st and 2nd peak knee adduction moments, respectfully, but have not previously been combined or tested among all alignment groups. The purpose of this study was to compare toe-in only and toe-in with wider step width gait modifications in individuals with neutral, valgus, and varus alignments. Thirty-eight healthy participants with confirmed varus, neutral, or valgus frontal-plane knee alignment through anteroposterior radiographs, performed level walking in normal, toe-in, and toe-in with wider step width gaits. A 3×3 (group×intervention) mixed model repeated measures ANOVA compared alignment groups and gait interventions (pstep width compared to normal gait. The 2nd peak adduction moment was increased in toe-in compared to normal and toe-in with wider step width. The adduction impulse was also reduced in toe-in and toe-in with wider step width compared to normal gait. Peak knee flexion and external rotation moments were increased in toe-in and toe-in with wider step width compared to normal gait. Although the toe-in with wider step width gait seems to be a viable option to reduce peak adduction moments for varus alignments, sagittal, and transverse knee loadings should be monitored when implementing this gait modification strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  13. A deterministic width function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Puente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of a deterministic fractal-multifractal (FM geometric method to model width functions of natural river networks, as derived distributions of simple multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions, is reported. It is first demonstrated that the FM procedure may be used to simulate natural width functions, preserving their most relevant features like their overall shape and texture and their observed power-law scaling on their power spectra. It is then shown, via two natural river networks (Racoon and Brushy creeks in the United States, that the FM approach may also be used to closely approximate existing width functions.

  14. Kinetic equations with pairing correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauser, R.

    1995-12-01

    The Gorkov equations are derived for a general non-equilibrium system. The Gorkov factorization is generalized by the cumulant expansion of the 2-particle correlation and by a generalized Wick theorem in the case of a perturbation expansion. A stationary solution for the Green functions in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism is presented taking into account pairing correlations. Especially the effects of collisional broadening on the spectral functions and Green functions is discussed. Kinetic equations are derived in the quasi-particle approximation and in the case of particles with width. Explicit expressions for the self-energies are given. (orig.)

  15. The generalized effective potential and its equations of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananikyan, N.S.; Savvidy, G.K.

    1980-01-01

    By means ot the Legendre transformations a functional GITA(PHI, G, S) is constructed which depends on PHI -a possible expectation value of the quantum field, G -a possible expectation value of the 2-point connected Green function and S= - a possible expectation value of the classical action. The motion equations for the functional GITA are derived on the example of the gPHI 3 theory and an iteration technique is suggested to solve them. A basic equation for GITA which is solved by means of iteration techniques is an ordinary and not a variation one, as it is the case at usual Legendre transformations. The developed formalism can be easily generalized as to other theories

  16. Temperature dependence of giant dipole resonance width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    The quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model extended to finite temperature within the framework of the thermo field dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ d own of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 12S n and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that the width Γ d own increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones existing in the literature

  17. Effective computation of stochastic protein kinetic equation by reducing stiffness via variable transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijin, E-mail: ljwang@ucas.ac.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-06-08

    The stochastic protein kinetic equations can be stiff for certain parameters, which makes their numerical simulation rely on very small time step sizes, resulting in large computational cost and accumulated round-off errors. For such situation, we provide a method of reducing stiffness of the stochastic protein kinetic equation by means of a kind of variable transformation. Theoretical and numerical analysis show effectiveness of this method. Its generalization to a more general class of stochastic differential equation models is also discussed.

  18. Theoretical insights into the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation over stepped Ni surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuiwei; Zhang, Minhua; Yu, Yingzhe

    2017-07-21

    Vicinal surfaces of Ni are model catalysts of general interest and great importance in computational catalysis. Here we report a comprehensive study conducted with density functional theory on Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n = 2, 3 and 4) surfaces to explore the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation, a probe reaction relevant to many industrial processes. The coordination numbers (CN), the generalized coordination numbers and the d band partial density of states (d-PDOS) of Ni are identified as descriptors to faithfully reflect the difference of the step edge region for Ni[n(111) × (100)]. Based on analysis of the energy diagrams for CO activation and dissociation as well as the structural features of the Ni(311), Ni(211) and Ni(533) surfaces, Ni(211) (n = 3) is proposed as a model of adequate representativeness for Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n≥ 3) surface groups in investigating small molecule activation over such stepped structures. Further, a series of Ni(211) surfaces with the step edge coverage ranging from 1/4 to 1 monolayer (ML) were utilized to assess their effect on CO activation. The results show that CO adsorption is not sensitive to the step edge coverage, which could readily approach 1 ML under a CO-rich atmosphere. In contrast, CO dissociation manifests strong coverage dependence when the coverage exceeds 1/2 ML, indicating that significant adsorbate-adsorbate interactions emerge. These results are conducive to theoretical studies of metal-catalyzed surface processes where the defects play a vital role.

  19. Quantum effects from topological conditions in solutions of Einstein equations

    CERN Document Server

    Patiño, L

    2003-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that Dirac's approach to the quantization of the electric charge can be extended to gravitational configurations by defining a phase-like object related to the curvature of the space-time. Using this phase-like object, Dirac's argument is applied to the Kerr-Newmann and the Taub-NUT solutions to Einstein equations. As a result of this procedure we obtain that certain functions of the parameters entering the metric become quantized. Also, the phase acquired by an observer traveling along a loop around a curvature singularity is quantized. (Author)

  20. Finite Orbit Width Features in the CQL3D Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Y. V.; Harvey, R., E-mail: petrov@compxco.com [CompX, Del Mar (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The CQL3D Fokker-Planck equation solver is being upgraded to allow for the Finite-Orbit- Width (FOW) capabilities, which will provide an accurate description for a neoclassical transport, losses to the walls, and transfer of particles, momentum, and heat to the scrape-off layer. Two different options are discussed for implementing the FOW capabilities. In one option, the Fokker-Planck equation is solved for the distribution function of orbits centered around given flux surface; in the other, the equation is solved for the local distribution function at the outer-most point of flux surface at the midplane. Both options use a fast lookup table that allows characterization of orbits without actually tracing them. The lookup table, in effect, performs mapping from the Constants-Of-Motion space onto the (R{sub o}, u{sub o}, {theta}{sub o}) computational space on the midplane. The FOW modifications have been implemented for the formations of neutral beam source, RF quasilinear diffusion operator, particle diagnostics and collisional operator, and internal boundary conditions are being refined. Initial test runs show that in general, the FOW modifications result in a broader profiles of power absorption and RF-driven current, and accurate description of the loss cone. (author)

  1. The Effect of Tutoring with Nonstandard Equations for Students with Mathematics Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sarah R.; Driver, Melissa K.; Julian, Tyler E.

    2015-01-01

    Students often misinterpret the equal sign (=) as operational instead of relational. Research indicates misinterpretation of the equal sign occurs because students receive relatively little exposure to equations that promote relational understanding of the equal sign. No study, however, has examined effects of nonstandard equations on the equation…

  2. Travelling wave solutions for the Richards equation incorporating non-equilibrium effects in the capillarity pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijn, C. J.; Mitra, K.; Pop, I. S.

    2018-01-01

    The Richards equation is a mathematical model for unsaturated flow through porous media. This paper considers an extension of the Richards equation, where non-equilibrium effects like hysteresis and dynamic capillarity are incorporated in the relationship that relates the water pressure and the

  3. Spherical bodies of constant width

    OpenAIRE

    Lassak, Marek; Musielak, Michał

    2018-01-01

    The intersection $L$ of two different non-opposite hemispheres $G$ and $H$ of a $d$-dimensional sphere $S^d$ is called a lune. By the thickness of $L$ we mean the distance of the centers of the $(d-1)$-dimensional hemispheres bounding $L$. For a hemisphere $G$ supporting a %spherical convex body $C \\subset S^d$ we define ${\\rm width}_G(C)$ as the thickness of the narrowest lune or lunes of the form $G \\cap H$ containing $C$. If ${\\rm width}_G(C) =w$ for every hemisphere $G$ supporting $C$, we...

  4. Development of a set of equations for incorporating disk flexibility effects in rotordynamical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, George T.; Ryan, Stephen G.

    1991-01-01

    Rotordynamical equations that account for disk flexibility are developed. These equations employ free-free rotor modes to model the rotor system. Only transverse vibrations of the disks are considered, with the shaft/disk system considered to be torsionally rigid. Second order elastic foreshortening effects that couple with the rotor speed to produce first order terms in the equations of motion are included. The approach developed in this study is readily adaptable for usage in many of the codes that are current used in rotordynamical simulations. The equations are similar to those used in standard rigid disk analyses but with additional terms that include the effects of disk flexibility. An example case is presented to demonstrate the use of the equations and to show the influence of disk flexibility on the rotordynamical behavior of a sample system.

  5. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  6. The effect of lithology on valley width, terrace distribution, and coarse sediment provenance in a tectonically stable catchment with flat-lying stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda Keen-Zebert,; Hudson, Mark R.; Stephanie L. Shepherd,; Evan A. Thaler,

    2017-01-01

    How rock resistance or erodibility affects fluvial landforms and processes is an outstanding question in geomorphology that has recently garnered attention owing to the recognition that the erosion rates of bedrock channels largely set the pace of landscape evolution. In this work, we evaluate valley width, terrace distribution, and sediment provenance in terms of reach scale variation in lithology in the study reach and discuss the implications for landscape evolution in a catchment with relatively flat2

  7. Wong's equations and the small x effective action in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju

    2000-07-13

    We propose a new form for the small x effective action in QCD. This form of the effective action is motivated by Wong's equations for classical, colored particles in non-Abelian background fields. We show that the BFKL equation, which sums leading logarithms in x, is efficiently reproduced with this form of the action. We argue that this form of the action may be particularly useful in computing next-to-leading-order results in QCD at small x.

  8. The hair-trigger effect for a class of nonlocal nonlinear equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelshtein, Dmitri; Tkachov, Pasha

    2018-06-01

    We prove the hair-trigger effect for a class of nonlocal nonlinear evolution equations on which have only two constant stationary solutions, 0 and . The effect consists in that the solution with an initial condition non identical to zero converges (when time goes to ) to θ locally uniformly in . We also find sufficient conditions for existence, uniqueness and comparison principle in the considered equations.

  9. Non-equilibrium effects upon the non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett quantum master equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, A.O.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Classical Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation. → Quantization process. → Quantum Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett equation. → A non-equilibrium quantum thermal force is predicted. - Abstract: We obtain a non-Markovian quantum master equation directly from the quantization of a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation describing the Brownian motion of a particle immersed in a generic environment (e.g. a non-thermal fluid). As far as the especial case of a heat bath comprising of quantum harmonic oscillators is concerned, we derive a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett master equation on the basis of which we work out the concept of non-equilibrium quantum thermal force exerted by the harmonic heat bath upon the Brownian motion of a free particle. The classical limit (or dequantization process) of this sort of non-equilibrium quantum effect is scrutinized, as well.

  10. Kinetic equations for clean superconductors: Application to the flux flow hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopnin, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetic equations for clean superconductors (l>>ζ) are derived. expanding the equations for the time dependent Green functions in the quasiclassical parameter, the new contributions are found which contain the derivatives of the distribution functions with respect to the quasiparticle momentum. The transition from the ultra-clean case (no relaxation) to a relaxation-dominated behavior, for which the kinetic equations coincide with the usual quasiclassical approximation, occurs for the relaxation time of the order of ℎE F /Δ 2 . The kinetic equations can be used for various dynamic processes in superconductors including the flux-flow Hall effect. The derived equations, after necessary modifications for the p-wave pairing, are especially suitable for nonstationary problems in the theory of superfluidity of 3 He

  11. Step width alters iliotibial band strain during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Campbell, Samuel; Derrick, Timothy R

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the effect of step width during running on factors related to iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 15 healthy recreational runners during overground running under various step width conditions (preferred and at least +/- 5% of their leg length). Strain and strain rate were estimated from a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. Greater ITB strain and strain rate were found in the narrower step width condition (p running, especially in persons whose running style is characterized by a narrow step width, may be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of running-related ITB syndrome.

  12. Tooth width predictions in a sample of Black South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M I; Seedat, A K; Hlongwa, P

    2007-07-01

    Space analysis during the mixed dentition requires prediction of the mesiodistal widths of the unerupted permanent canines and premolars and prediction tables and equations may be used for this purpose. The Tanaka and Johnston prediction equations, which were derived from a North American White sample, is one example which is widely used. This prediction equation may be inapplicable to other race groups due to racial tooth size variability. Therefore the purpose of this study was to derive prediction equations that would be applicable to Black South African subjects. One hundred and ten pre-treatment study casts of Black South African subjects were analysed from the Department of Orthodontics' records at the University of Limpopo. The sample was equally divided by gender with all subjects having Class I molar relationship and relatively well aligned teeth. The mesiodistal widths of the maxillary and mandibular canines and premolars were measured with a digital vernier calliper and compared with the measurements predicted with the Tanaka and Johnston equations. The relationship between the measured and predicted values were analysed by correlation and regression analyses. The results indicated that the Tanaka and Johnston prediction equations were not fully applicable to the Black South African sample. The equations tended to underpredict the male sample, while slight overprediction was observed in the female sample. Therefore, new equations were formulated and proposed that would be accurate for Black subjects.

  13. Effective electronic-only Kohn–Sham equations for the muonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    A set of effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham (EKS) equations are derived for the muonic molecules (containing a positively charged muon), which are completely equivalent to the coupled electronic-muonic Kohn-Sham equations derived previously within the framework of the Nuclear-Electronic Orbital density functional theory (NEO-DFT). The EKS equations contain effective non-coulombic external potentials depending on parameters describing muon vibration, which are optimized during the solution of the EKS equations making muon KS orbital reproducible. It is demonstrated that the EKS equations are derivable from a certain class of effective electronic Hamiltonians through applying the usual Hohenberg-Kohn theorems revealing a duality between the NEO-DFT and the effective electronic-only DFT methodologies. The EKS equations are computationally applied to a small set of muoniated organic radicals and it is demonstrated that a mean effective potential maybe derived for this class of muonic species while an electronic basis set is also designed for the muon. These computational ingredients are then applied to muoniated ferrocenyl radicals, which had been previously detected experimentally through adding muonium atom to ferrocene. In line with previous computational studies, from the six possible species the staggered conformer, where the muon is attached to the exo position of the cyclopentadienyl ring, is deduced to be the most stable ferrocenyl radical.

  14. Effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham equations for the muonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2018-03-28

    A set of effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham (EKS) equations are derived for the muonic molecules (containing a positively charged muon), which are completely equivalent to the coupled electronic-muonic Kohn-Sham equations derived previously within the framework of the nuclear-electronic orbital density functional theory (NEO-DFT). The EKS equations contain effective non-coulombic external potentials depending on parameters describing the muon's vibration, which are optimized during the solution of the EKS equations making the muon's KS orbital reproducible. It is demonstrated that the EKS equations are derivable from a certain class of effective electronic Hamiltonians through applying the usual Hohenberg-Kohn theorems revealing a "duality" between the NEO-DFT and the effective electronic-only DFT methodologies. The EKS equations are computationally applied to a small set of muoniated organic radicals and it is demonstrated that a mean effective potential may be derived for this class of muonic species while an electronic basis set is also designed for the muon. These computational ingredients are then applied to muoniated ferrocenyl radicals, which had been previously detected experimentally through adding a muonium atom to ferrocene. In line with previous computational studies, from the six possible species, the staggered conformer, where the muon is attached to the exo position of the cyclopentadienyl ring, is deduced to be the most stable ferrocenyl radical.

  15. Rotating black string and the effective Teukolsky equation in the braneworld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro

    2004-01-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum two-brane (RS1) model, a large Kerr black hole on the brane can be naturally identified with a section of a rotating black string. To estimate Kaluza-Klein (KK) corrections on gravitational waves emitted by perturbed rotating black strings, we give the effective Teukolsky equation on the brane, which is a separable equation and hence numerically manageable. In this process, we derive the master equation for the electric part of the Weyl tensor, E μν , which is also useful in discussing the transition from black strings to localized black holes triggered by Gregory-Laflamme instability

  16. Schrödinger equations with indefinite effective mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Znojil, Miloslav; Lévai, Géza

    2012-01-01

    The consistency of the concept of quantum (quasi)particles possessing effective mass which is both position- and excitation-dependent is analyzed via simplified models. It is shown that the system may be stable even when the effective mass m=m(x,E) itself acquires negative values in a limited range of coordinates x and energies E. -- Highlights: ► The new concept of the locally negative effective mass introduced and studied. ► Tests presented via a few exactly solvable toy models. ► Manifest energy dependence found to guarantee the stability of the system. ► The emergence of anomalous states found related to the decrease of the energy threshold. ► Most of the toy-model properties (localization, nodal number growth) found generic.

  17. On the maximal diphoton width

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into $\\gamma\\gamma$ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  18. Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations with steric effects - non-convexity and multiple stationary solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Nir

    2018-04-01

    We study the existence and stability of stationary solutions of Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations with steric effects (PNP-steric equations) with two counter-charged species. We show that within a range of parameters, steric effects give rise to multiple solutions of the corresponding stationary equation that are smooth. The PNP-steric equation, however, is found to be ill-posed at the parameter regime where multiple solutions arise. Following these findings, we introduce a novel PNP-Cahn-Hilliard model, show that it is well-posed and that it admits multiple stationary solutions that are smooth and stable. The various branches of stationary solutions and their stability are mapped utilizing bifurcation analysis and numerical continuation methods.

  19. Effective quadrature formula in solving linear integro-differential equations of order two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshkuvatov, Z. K.; Kammuji, M.; Long, N. M. A. Nik; Yunus, Arif A. M.

    2017-08-01

    In this note, we solve general form of Fredholm-Volterra integro-differential equations (IDEs) of order 2 with boundary condition approximately and show that proposed method is effective and reliable. Initially, IDEs is reduced into integral equation of the third kind by using standard integration techniques and identity between multiple and single integrals then truncated Legendre series are used to estimate the unknown function. For the kernel integrals, we have applied Gauss-Legendre quadrature formula and collocation points are chosen as the roots of the Legendre polynomials. Finally, reduce the integral equations of the third kind into the system of algebraic equations and Gaussian elimination method is applied to get approximate solutions. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods reveal that the proposed method is very effective and dominated others in many cases. General theory of existence of the solution is also discussed.

  20. Solution of four-nucleon integral equations using the effective UPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perne, R.; Sandhas, W.

    1978-01-01

    In the three-body case it is standard to either solve the (two-dimensional) Faddeev equations directly, or to reduce them first to one-dimensional equations by means of separable approximation (expansion) of the underlying two-body interactions. The basic four-body operator identities are reduced by the latter treatment to effective three-body equations only. These may be handled like their genuine three-body analoga, i.e., by directly solving them, or by expanding the effective interactions ocurring into separable terms. Such a procedure provides us in a second step with one-dimensional integral equations for the four-body problem, too. (orig./WL) [de

  1. The effect of KZK pressure equation on the sonoluminescence in water and fat tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheshlaghi, M.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Ghadirifar, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the produced light flashes from sonoluminescence (SL) on the fat tissue and water is studied. By using KZK equation as an essential equation for calculating the thermal source in bio-liquids, the effective bubble parameters in quasi-adiabatic model are calculated and compared in these systems. It is noticed that the temperature and the intensity for fat tissue are about 30% and 38% less than the ones for water respectively. These results are almost in good agreement with the only experimental measurement denoting less SL temperature in bio-liquids which present more suitable condition for using SL in such applications. - Highlights: • Coupling of acoustic pressure and the pressure's KZK equation for using Sonoluminescence equations. • The Sonoluminescence parameters (temperature, pressure and intensity) are calculated and Compared for water and fat tissue. • The high-intensity radiation of Sonoluminescence bubble is used in medical applications

  2. The effect of KZK pressure equation on the sonoluminescence in water and fat tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheshlaghi, M. [Payame Noor University, P.O.B. 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, 11365-91, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghadirifar, A. [Islamic Azad University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    The effect of the produced light flashes from sonoluminescence (SL) on the fat tissue and water is studied. By using KZK equation as an essential equation for calculating the thermal source in bio-liquids, the effective bubble parameters in quasi-adiabatic model are calculated and compared in these systems. It is noticed that the temperature and the intensity for fat tissue are about 30% and 38% less than the ones for water respectively. These results are almost in good agreement with the only experimental measurement denoting less SL temperature in bio-liquids which present more suitable condition for using SL in such applications. - Highlights: • Coupling of acoustic pressure and the pressure's KZK equation for using Sonoluminescence equations. • The Sonoluminescence parameters (temperature, pressure and intensity) are calculated and Compared for water and fat tissue. • The high-intensity radiation of Sonoluminescence bubble is used in medical applications.

  3. Solution of Wheeler-De Witt Equation, Potential Well and Tunnel Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongchang; Weng Gang

    2005-01-01

    This paper uses the relation of the cosmic scale factor and scalar field to solve Wheeler-De Witt equation, gives the tunnel effect of the cosmic scale factor a and quantum potential well of scalar field, and makes it fit with the physics of cosmic quantum birth. By solving Wheeler-De Witt equation we achieve a general probability distribution of the cosmic birth, and give the analysis of cosmic quantum birth.

  4. Narrow widths of old and new resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathy, J.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative measure of the suppression factors involved in the pionic decays of mesons phi(1019) and f'(1514) as compared to their kaonic psi(3100) and psi(3700) decays are explained using the two different approaches, viz., the phenomenological S matrix approach and the field theoretical approach. The importance of the O-Z-I rule is brought out. The partial width GAMMA(phi → 3π) has been calculated using the dual model for the scattering kappa kappa(bar) → rhoπ. The effective coupling psi rho π is evaluated. The partial widths for psi → e + e - and psi → hadrons is calculated on a field theoretical approach. In conclusion, it appears that there are no serious objections to interpreting psi and psi' as cc - states. Most of their properties can be understood in a qualitative and in semi-quantitative way. (A.K.)

  5. Analyses of glass transition phenomena by solving differential equation with delay effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Inoue, A.

    2007-01-01

    A linear differential equation for the analyses of glass transition phenomena has been proposed by taking into account the delay effect due to the change in transportation of atoms near the glass transition temperature (T g ). Under the condition maintaining the order of the differential equation as the second, the non-linear differential equation proposed by Van Den Beukel and Sietsma is modified to obtain the analytic solution for a linear equation by introducing the following points: the delay effect which is described with a term of Mackey-Glass model, a concept of effective free volume (x fe eff ) and its concentration expression (C fe eff ) which correspond to the equilibrium, and an additional term associated with C fe eff . In analyzing the linear equation, Doyle's p-function was used for the integral of reaction rate with respect to temperature (T). It is found that the linear equation proposed in the present study can describe the changes in free volume (x) with increasing temperature in the dx/dT-T chart, the sharp increase in free volume at T g , and over shooting phenomena of free volume slightly above the T g , as experimentally in thermal analyses for metallic glasses. The linear solution obtained in the present study is of great importance for the analyses of the glass transition because the change in free volume with increasing temperature on heating is described with fundamental functions

  6. The Schrödinger Equation, the Zero-Point Electromagnetic Radiation, and the Photoelectric Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, H. M.; Kamimura, A.; Barreto, G. A.

    2016-04-01

    A Schrödinger type equation for a mathematical probability amplitude Ψ( x, t) is derived from the generalized phase space Liouville equation valid for the motion of a microscopic particle, with mass M and charge e, moving in a potential V( x). The particle phase space probability density is denoted Q( x, p, t), and the entire system is immersed in the "vacuum" zero-point electromagnetic radiation. We show, in the first part of the paper, that the generalized Liouville equation is reduced to a simpler Liouville equation in the equilibrium limit where the small radiative corrections cancel each other approximately. This leads us to a simpler Liouville equation that will facilitate the calculations in the second part of the paper. Within this second part, we address ourselves to the following task: Since the Schrödinger equation depends on hbar , and the zero-point electromagnetic spectral distribution, given by ρ 0{(ω )} = hbar ω 3/2 π 2 c3, also depends on hbar , it is interesting to verify the possible dynamical connection between ρ 0( ω) and the Schrödinger equation. We shall prove that the Planck's constant, present in the momentum operator of the Schrödinger equation, is deeply related with the ubiquitous zero-point electromagnetic radiation with spectral distribution ρ 0( ω). For simplicity, we do not use the hypothesis of the existence of the L. de Broglie matter-waves. The implications of our study for the standard interpretation of the photoelectric effect are discussed by considering the main characteristics of the phenomenon. We also mention, briefly, the effects of the zero-point radiation in the tunneling phenomenon and the Compton's effect.

  7. Mass shifts and decay widths of ψ mesons due to OZI-allowed decay channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, N.; Kato, K.; Hirano, M.; Sakai, M.; Matsuda, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Using effective quark-quark interactions proposed by the Cornell group and by Barbour and Gilchrist, we study the open-channel effects of the ψ states. We take into account the meson-meson final-state interaction in open channels, which is derived microscopically from the quark-level one-boson-exchange model. By applying the complex scaling transformation to the coupled-channel equation, mass shifts and OZI-allowed decay widths of the ψ states are simultaneously evaluated. Agreement with the experimental data is improved considerably. Refs. 20 (author)

  8. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    addition to the well-defined parameter full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The distribution of ... optical side-lobes in the diffraction pattern resulting in steep central maxima [6], reduc- tion of effects of ... and broad central peak. The idea of.

  9. An efficient technique for the point reactor kinetics equations with Newtonian temperature feedback effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahla, Abdallah A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An efficient technique for the nonlinear reactor kinetics equations is presented. → This method is based on Backward Euler or Crank Nicholson and fundamental matrix. → Stability of efficient technique is defined and discussed. → This method is applied to point kinetics equations of six-groups of delayed neutrons. → Step, ramp, sinusoidal and temperature feedback reactivities are discussed. - Abstract: The point reactor kinetics equations of multi-group of delayed neutrons in the presence Newtonian temperature feedback effects are a system of stiff nonlinear ordinary differential equations which have not any exact analytical solution. The efficient technique for this nonlinear system is based on changing this nonlinear system to a linear system by the predicted value of reactivity and solving this linear system using the fundamental matrix of the homogenous linear differential equations. The nonlinear point reactor kinetics equations are rewritten in the matrix form. The solution of this matrix form is introduced. This solution contains the exponential function of a variable coefficient matrix. This coefficient matrix contains the unknown variable, reactivity. The predicted values of reactivity in the explicit form are determined replacing the exponential function of the coefficient matrix by two kinds, Backward Euler and Crank Nicholson, of the rational approximations. The nonlinear point kinetics equations changed to a linear system of the homogenous differential equations. The fundamental matrix of this linear system is calculated using the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors of the coefficient matrix. Stability of the efficient technique is defined and discussed. The efficient technique is applied to the point kinetics equations of six-groups of delayed neutrons with step, ramp, sinusoidal and the temperature feedback reactivities. The results of these efficient techniques are compared with the traditional methods.

  10. Masses, widths, and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovelock, D.M.J.; Horstkotte, J.E.; Klopfenstein, C.

    1985-01-01

    The masses, total widths, and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb-bar states UPSILON(4S), UPSILON(5S), and UPSILON(6S) are determined from measurements of the e + e - annihilation cross section into hadrons for 10.55< W<11.25 GeV. The resonances are identified from potential model results and their properties are obtained with the help of a simplified coupled-channels calculation. We find M(4S) = 10.577 GeV, GAMMA(4S) = 25 MeV, GAMMA/sub e/e(4S) = 0.28 keV; M(5S) = 10.845 GeV, GAMMA(5S) = 110 MeV, GAMMA/sub e/e(5S) = 0.37 keV; M(6S) = 11.02 GeV, GAMMA(6S) = 90 MeV, GAMMA/sub e/e(6S) = 0.16 keV

  11. Masses, widths and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopfenstein, C.; Lovelock, D.M.J.; Horstkotte, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The masses, total widths and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb-bar states Υ(4S), Υ(5S) and Υ(6S) are determined by unfolding the cross section features observed in the hadronic cross section in the √s region betweeen 10.55 to 11.25 GeV. Both the identification of the resonances and the deduction of their properties rely on the validity of potential models' description of heavy quarkonium states which lie close (<0.6 GeV) to the open flavor threshold. The authors find M(4S) = 10.5774 +- 0.0008 GeV, Γ(4S) = 23 +- 2.3 MeV, Γ/sub ee/(4S) = 0.28 +- 0.04 keV; M(5S) = 10.845 +- 0.02 GeV, Γ(5S) = 110 +- 15 MeV, Γ/sub ee/(5S) = 0.37 +- 0.06 keV; M(6S) = 11.02 +- 0.03 GeV, Γ(6S) = 90 +- 20 MeV, Γ/sub ee/(6S) = 0.16 +- 0.04 keV. All errors are statistical only

  12. Langevin equation in effective theory of interacting QCD pomerons in the limit of large Nc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, S.

    2007-01-01

    Effective field theory of interacting BFKL pomerons is investigated and Langevin equation for the theory, which arises after the introduction of additional auxiliary field, is obtained. The Langevin equations are considered for the case of interacting BFKL pomerons with both splitting and merging vertexes and for the interaction which includes additional 'toy' four pomeron interaction vertex. In the latest case an analogy with the Regge field theory in zero dimensions (RFT-0) was used in order to obtain this 'toy' vertex, which coincided with the four point function of two-dimensional conformal field theory obtained in [G.P. Korchemsky, Nucl. Phys. B 550 (1999) 397]. The comparison between the Langevin equations obtained in the frameworks of dipole and RFT approaches is performed, the interpretation of results is given and possible application of obtained equations is discussed

  13. Explicit frequency equations of free vibration of a nonlocal Timoshenko beam with surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Sheng; Zhang, Yao; Lie, Seng-Tjhen

    2018-02-01

    Considerations of nonlocal elasticity and surface effects in micro- and nanoscale beams are both important for the accurate prediction of natural frequency. In this study, the governing equation of a nonlocal Timoshenko beam with surface effects is established by taking into account three types of boundary conditions: hinged-hinged, clamped-clamped and clamped-hinged ends. For a hinged-hinged beam, an exact and explicit natural frequency equation is obtained. However, for clamped-clamped and clamped-hinged beams, the solutions of corresponding frequency equations must be determined numerically due to their transcendental nature. Hence, the Fredholm integral equation approach coupled with a curve fitting method is employed to derive the approximate fundamental frequency equations, which can predict the frequency values with high accuracy. In short, explicit frequency equations of the Timoshenko beam for three types of boundary conditions are proposed to exhibit directly the dependence of the natural frequency on the nonlocal elasticity, surface elasticity, residual surface stress, shear deformation and rotatory inertia, avoiding the complicated numerical computation.

  14. Meson widths from string worldsheet instantons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, Thomas; Liu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    We show that open strings living on a D-brane which lies outside an AdS black hole can tunnel into the black hole through worldsheet instantons. These instantons have a simple interpretation in terms of thermal quarks in the dual Yang-Mills (YM) theory. As an application we calculate the width of a meson in a strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma which is described holographically as a massless mode on a D7 brane in AdS 5 xS 5 . While the width of the meson is zero to all orders in the 1/√(λ) expansion with λ the 't Hooft coupling, it receives non-perturbative contributions in 1/√(λ) from worldsheet instantons. We find that the width increases quadratically with momentum at large momentum and comment on potential phenomenological implications of this enhancement for heavy ion collisions. We also comment on how this non-perturbative effect has important consequences for the phase structure of the YM theory obtained in the classical gravity limit

  15. The use of copulas to practical estimation of multivariate stochastic differential equation mixed effects models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupšys, P.

    2015-01-01

    A system of stochastic differential equations (SDE) with mixed-effects parameters and multivariate normal copula density function were used to develop tree height model for Scots pine trees in Lithuania. A two-step maximum likelihood parameter estimation method is used and computational guidelines are given. After fitting the conditional probability density functions to outside bark diameter at breast height, and total tree height, a bivariate normal copula distribution model was constructed. Predictions from the mixed-effects parameters SDE tree height model calculated during this research were compared to the regression tree height equations. The results are implemented in the symbolic computational language MAPLE

  16. Exact CTP renormalization group equation for the coarse-grained effective action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalvit, D.A.; Mazzitelli, F.D.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a scalar field theory in Minkowski spacetime and define a coarse-grained closed time path (CTP) effective action by integrating quantum fluctuations of wavelengths shorter than a critical value. We derive an exact CTP renormalization group equation for the dependence of the effective action on the coarse-graining scale. We solve this equation using a derivative expansion approach. Explicit calculation is performed for the λφ 4 theory. We discuss the relevance of the CTP average action in the study of nonequilibrium aspects of phase transitions in quantum field theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. The use of copulas to practical estimation of multivariate stochastic differential equation mixed effects models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupšys, P. [Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Studenų g. 11, Akademija, Kaunas district, LT – 53361 Lithuania (Lithuania)

    2015-10-28

    A system of stochastic differential equations (SDE) with mixed-effects parameters and multivariate normal copula density function were used to develop tree height model for Scots pine trees in Lithuania. A two-step maximum likelihood parameter estimation method is used and computational guidelines are given. After fitting the conditional probability density functions to outside bark diameter at breast height, and total tree height, a bivariate normal copula distribution model was constructed. Predictions from the mixed-effects parameters SDE tree height model calculated during this research were compared to the regression tree height equations. The results are implemented in the symbolic computational language MAPLE.

  18. The effect of KZK1 pressure equation on the sonoluminescence in water and fat tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheshlaghi, M.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Ghadirifar, A.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the produced light flashes from sonoluminescence (SL) on the fat tissue and water is studied. By using KZK equation as an essential equation for calculating the thermal source in bio-liquids, the effective bubble parameters in quasi-adiabatic model are calculated and compared in these systems. It is noticed that the temperature and the intensity for fat tissue are about 30% and 38% less than the ones for water respectively. These results are almost in good agreement with the only experimental measurement denoting less SL temperature in bio-liquids which present more suitable condition for using SL in such applications.

  19. The nonlinear Dirac equation and the study of effective many-particle interactions in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, D.C.

    1987-12-01

    The starting point of the discussion was extended Lagrangian density for the classical Dirac field. The considered additional terms we had thereby interpreted as effective interactions because the corresponding field theory was not renormalizable. A scalar coupling as well as a vectorial coupling were put into calculation. The equation of motion for the system was thereby a one-particle equation which separated for s 1/2 and p 1/2 states and led to a system of coupled differential equations for the radial part. The derived radial equations were studied on three different levels. First we considered ordinary systems from atomic physics with ordinal numbers Z ≤ 110 in order to obtain from precision experiments of quantum electrodynamics upper bounds for the coupling constants. Second we have studied the influence of these additional interactions on the energy levels of the superheavy systems with ordinal numbers 110 ≤ Z ≤ 190. Third we have searched for bound states of a nonlinear Dirac equation which should exist only because of the effective interaction. In the further study we have then changed to a field-quantized consideration because our hitherto analysis was purely classical. In this connection we have studied the (e + e - ) 2 system with a (anti ΨΓΨ) 2 interaction. From the corresponding many-particle equation we have then by means of the Hartree-Fock method derived the one-particle equation of the system. Finally we had studied the electron-positron interaction by exchange of a massive intermediate vector boson. (orig./HSI) [de

  20. Delay equations modeling the effects of phase-specific drugs and immunotherapy on proliferating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Maria Vittoria; Kuttler, Christina; Zinsl, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present a mathematical model for tumor growth based on the biology of the cell cycle. For an appropriate description of the effects of phase-specific drugs, it is necessary to look at the cell cycle and its phases. Our model reproduces the dynamics of three different tumor cell populations: quiescent cells, cells during the interphase and mitotic cells. Starting from a partial differential equations (PDEs) setting, a delay differential equations (DDE) model is derived for an easier and more realistic approach. Our equations also include interactions of tumor cells with immune system effectors. We investigate the model both from the analytical and the numerical point of view, give conditions for positivity of solutions and focus on the stability of the cancer-free equilibrium. Different immunotherapeutic strategies and their effects on the tumor growth are considered, as well.

  1. Comparison of Arch Width Changes Following Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-21

    Nov 21, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: The study was conducted with pre- and post-treatment digital models from ... or posterior arch width following orthodontic treatment ..... premolar extraction cases show significant arch width increases in ...

  2. The effect of feedback-controlled divertor nitrogen seeding on the boundary plasma and power exhaust channel width in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Kuang, A. Q.; McCarthy, W.; Terry, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    The scrape-off layer (SOL) power channel width, λq, is projected to be 0.5 mm in power reactors, based on multi-machine measurements of divertor target heat fluxes in H-mode at low levels of divertor dissipation. An important question is: does λq change with the level of divertor dissipation? We report results in which feedback controlled nitrogen seeding in the divertor was used to systematically vary divertor dissipation in a series of otherwise identical L-mode plasmas at three plasma currents: 0.55, 0.8 and 1.1 MA. Outer midplane profiles were recorded with a scanning Mirror Langmuir Probe; divertor plasma conditions were monitored with `rail' Langmuir probe and surface thermocouple arrays. Despite an order of magnitude reduction in divertor target heat fluxes (q// 400 MW m-2 to 40 MW m-2) and corresponding change in divertor regime from sheath-limited through high-recycling to near-detached, the upstream electron temperature profile is found to remain unchanged or to become slightly steeper in the near SOL and to drop significantly in the far SOL. Thus heat in the SOL appears to take advantage of this impurity radiation `heat sink' in the divertor by preferentially draining via the narrow (and perhaps an increasingly narrow) λq of the near SOL. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  3. Equations for effective nuclear fields taking account of 2p2h configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, S.P.

    1977-01-01

    Equations taking into account 1p1h and 2p2h configurations were obta+ned by means of effective fields in the nucleus. The consideration is restricted by the even-even Fermi system only with particle-hole interaction and by the first order with respect to an external field, which corresponds to the case of an even-even nucleus without pairing in a weak external field. The principal results of the investigation are as follows: a set of equations for effective fields V 2 and V 4 is obtained by the Green function method; the solutxon of the set makes it possible to consider 1p1h and 2p2h configurations consecutively and dispense with the Hartree-Fock self-consistence. The equations for V 2 and V 4 can be used to obtain quantum equations taking into account 2p2h configurations and their effect on 1p1h states. Allowance for integration regions far removed from the Fermi surface results in the appearance of the V 4 0 seed portion in the V 4 effective field. Taking into account 2p2h configurations at V 4 0 not equal to 0 changes the form of the seed multipole operator of a nucleus; a new term appears in the expression for transition probability. As a rule, the V 4 0 value was neglected in investigations dealing with the 2p2h configuration

  4. The Effect of Authentic Leadership on School Culture: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Engin; Oztekin-Bayir, Ozge

    2018-01-01

    In the study, the effect of school principals' authentic leadership behaviors on teachers' perceptions of school culture was tested with the structural equation model. The study was carried out with the correlation research design. Authentic leadership behavior was taken as the independent variable, and school culture was taken as the dependent…

  5. Exercise effects in a virtual type 1 diabetes patient: Using stochastic differential equations for model extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Schmidt, S.; Nørgaard, K.

    2013-01-01

    extension incorporating exercise effects on insulin and glucose dynamics. Our model is constructed as a stochastic state space model consisting of a set of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). In a stochastic state space model, the residual error is split into random measurement error...

  6. Multiplicity of solutions for Dirichlet boundary conditions of second-order quasilinear equations with impulsive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Shen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the multiplicity of solutions for Dirichlet boundary conditions of second-order quasilinear equations with impulsive effects. By using critical point theory, a new result is obtained. An example is given to illustrate the main result.

  7. Effect of disjoining pressure in a thin film equation with non-uniform forcing

    KAUST Repository

    MOULTON, D. E.; LEGA, J.

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effect of disjoining pressure on a thin film equation in the presence of a non-uniform body force, motivated by a model describing the reverse draining of a magnetic film. To this end, we use a combination of numerical investigations

  8. Dissipative Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation for Envelope Solitary Rossby Waves with Dissipation Effect in Stratified Fluids and Its Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We solve the so-called dissipative nonlinear Schrödinger equation by means of multiple scales analysis and perturbation method to describe envelope solitary Rossby waves with dissipation effect in stratified fluids. By analyzing the evolution of amplitude of envelope solitary Rossby waves, it is found that the shear of basic flow, Brunt-Vaisala frequency, and β effect are important factors to form the envelope solitary Rossby waves. By employing trial function method, the asymptotic solution of dissipative nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived. Based on the solution, the effect of dissipation on the evolution of envelope solitary Rossby wave is also discussed. The results show that the dissipation causes a slow decrease of amplitude of envelope solitary Rossby waves and a slow increase of width, while it has no effect on the propagation velocity. That is quite different from the KdV-type solitary waves. It is notable that dissipation has certain influence on the carrier frequency.

  9. Collisional width of giant resonances and interplay with Landau damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonasera, A.; Burgio, G.F.; Di Toro, M.; Wolter, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    We present a semiclassical method to calculate the widths of giant resonances. We solve a mean-field kinetic equation (Vlasov equation) with collision terms treated within the relaxation time approximation to construct a damped strength distribution for collective motions. The relaxation time is evaluated from the time evolution of distortions in the nucleon momentum distribution using a test-particle approach. The importance of an energy dependent nucleon-nucleon cross section is stressed. Results are shown for isoscalar giant quadrupole and octupole motions. A quite important interplay between self-consistent (Landau) and collisional damping is revealed

  10. Energy level broadening effect on the equation of state of hot dense Al and Au plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Yong; Jin Fengtao; Yuan Jianmin

    2007-01-01

    In the hot dense matter regime, the isothermal equation of state (EOS) of Al and Au is calculated using an average-atom (AA) model in which the broadening of energy levels of atoms and ions are accounted for by using with a Gaussian distribution of the density of states. The distribution of bound electrons in the energy bands is determined by the continuum Fermi-Dirac distribution. With a self-consistent field average atoms scheme, it is shown that the energy-level broadening has a significant effect on the isothermal equation of state (EOS) of Al and Au in the hot dense matter regime. The jumps in the equation of state (EOS) induced by pressure ionization of the one-electron orbital with the increase in density, which often occur in the normal average-atom model and have been avoided by generally introducing the pseudo-shape resonance states, disappear naturally

  11. Modification of the Hottel-Whillier-Bliss equation for cover absorption effects in solar collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijeysundera, N E

    1981-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation absorption and the thermal resistance of a solar collector cover system on the various factors which occur in the Hottel-Whillier-Bliss (HWB) equation are considered. It is shown that by extending the thermal network analogy to systems with distributed heat sources, the heat transfer analysis of the collector can be done with little computational effort. The analysis also leads to a simple form of the HWB equation, with additional factors to account for the source distribution and the thermal resistance of the cover system, and it is applicable to conventional flat plate collectors and to other thermal trap collectors. A series of calculations for multilayer systems is presented to show the relative importance of the various factors in the modified HWB equation for different cover configurations.

  12. The effect of pre-operative topical anaesthetic cream on the ablative width and coagulative depth of ablative fractional resurfacing laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyaratabandhu, Preawphan; Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Sitthinamsuwan, Panitta; Phothong, Weeranut; Eimpunth, Sasima; Lohsiriwat, Visnu; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2017-02-01

    Topical anaesthetic cream (TAC) is commonly used as a pre-treatment of ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) laser. Most of anaesthetic cream contains distilled water as major component. Therefore, pre-operative TAC may interfere the photothermal reaction in the skin treated with fractional carbon-dioxide (FCO 2 ) laser and fractional erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (FEr:YAG) laser. The objective of the study was to compare the ablative width (AW) and coagulative depth (CD) of AFR laser with and without pre-treatment with TAC. Four Thai females who underwent abdominoplasty were included in the study. The excised skin of each subject was divided into four areas. TAC (eutectic mixture of local anaesthesia; EMLA) with 1-h occlusion was applied only on the first and second areas. The first and third areas were treated with FCO 2 at 15 mj and 5% density. The second and fourth areas were treated with FEr:YAG at 28 J/cm 2 and 5% density. Six biopsied specimens were obtained from each area. A total of 96 specimens (24 specimens from each area) were collected from four patients and examined randomly by two dermatopathologists. The ablative width and coagulative depth from each specimen were determined. In FCO 2 -treated specimens, the mean AW of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 174.86 ± 24.57 and 188.52 ± 41.32 μm. The mean CD of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 594.96 ± 111.72 and 520.03 ± 147.40 μm. There were no significant differences in AW and CD between both groups (p = 0.53 and p = 0.15). In FEr:YAG-treated specimens, the mean AW of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 381.11 ± 48.02 and 423.65 ± 60.16 μm. The mean CD of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 86.03 ± 29.44 and 71.59 ± 18.99 μm. There were no significant differences in AW and CD between both groups (p = 0.16 and p = 0.24). The pre

  13. Effects of vacuum ultraviolet photons, ion energy and substrate temperature on line width roughness and RMS surface roughness of patterned 193 nm photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titus, M J; Graves, D B; Yamaguchi, Y; Hudson, E A

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparison of patterned 193 nm photoresist (PR) line width roughness (LWR) of samples processed in a well characterized argon (Ar) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system to RMS surface roughness and bulk chemical modification of blanket 193 nm PR samples used as control samples. In the ICP system, patterned and blanket PR samples are irradiated with Ar vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV) and Ar ions while sample temperature, photon flux, ion flux and ion energy are controlled and measured. The resulting chemical modifications to bulk 193 nm PR (blanket) and surface roughness are analysed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). LWR of patterned samples are measured with scanning electron microscopy and blanket portions of the patterned PRs are measured with AFM. We demonstrate that with no RF-bias applied to the substrate the LWR of 193 nm PR tends to smooth and correlates with the smoothing of the RMS surface roughness. However, both LWR and RMS surface roughness increases with simultaneous high-energy (≥70 eV) ion bombardment and VUV-irradiation and is a function of exposure time. Both high- and low-frequency LWR correlate well with the RMS surface roughness of the patterned and blanket 193 nm PR samples. LWR, however, does not increase with temperatures ranging from 20 to 80 deg. C, in contrast to the RMS surface roughness which increases monotonically with temperature. It is unclear why LWR remains independent of temperature over this range. However, the fact that blanket roughness and LWR on patterned samples, both scale similarly with VUV fluence and ion energy suggests a similar mechanism is responsible for both types of surface morphology modifications.

  14. Effects of vacuum ultraviolet photons, ion energy and substrate temperature on line width roughness and RMS surface roughness of patterned 193 nm photoresist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titus, M J; Graves, D B [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yamaguchi, Y; Hudson, E A, E-mail: graves@berkeley.edu [Lam Research Corporation, 4400 Cushing Parkway, Freemont, CA 94538 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    We present a comparison of patterned 193 nm photoresist (PR) line width roughness (LWR) of samples processed in a well characterized argon (Ar) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system to RMS surface roughness and bulk chemical modification of blanket 193 nm PR samples used as control samples. In the ICP system, patterned and blanket PR samples are irradiated with Ar vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV) and Ar ions while sample temperature, photon flux, ion flux and ion energy are controlled and measured. The resulting chemical modifications to bulk 193 nm PR (blanket) and surface roughness are analysed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). LWR of patterned samples are measured with scanning electron microscopy and blanket portions of the patterned PRs are measured with AFM. We demonstrate that with no RF-bias applied to the substrate the LWR of 193 nm PR tends to smooth and correlates with the smoothing of the RMS surface roughness. However, both LWR and RMS surface roughness increases with simultaneous high-energy ({>=}70 eV) ion bombardment and VUV-irradiation and is a function of exposure time. Both high- and low-frequency LWR correlate well with the RMS surface roughness of the patterned and blanket 193 nm PR samples. LWR, however, does not increase with temperatures ranging from 20 to 80 deg. C, in contrast to the RMS surface roughness which increases monotonically with temperature. It is unclear why LWR remains independent of temperature over this range. However, the fact that blanket roughness and LWR on patterned samples, both scale similarly with VUV fluence and ion energy suggests a similar mechanism is responsible for both types of surface morphology modifications.

  15. Effective equations for fluid-structure interaction with applications to poroelasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Donald; Popov, Peter V.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of fluid-solid interactions in porous media is a challenging and computationally demanding task. Due to the multiscale nature of the problem, simulating the flow and mechanics by direct numerical simulation is often not feasible and an effective model is preferred. In this work, we formally derive an effective model for Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI). In earlier work, assuming infinitesimal pore-scale deformations, an effective poroelastic model of Biot was derived. We extend this model to a nonlinear Biot model that includes pore-scale deformation into the effective description. The main challenge is the difference in coordinate systems of the fluid and solid equations. This is circumvented by utilizing the Arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE) formulation of the FSI equations, giving a unified frame in which to apply two-scale asymptotic techniques. In the derived nonlinear Biot model, the local cell problem are coupled to the macroscopic equations via the effective coefficients. These coefficients may be viewed as tabular functions of the macroscopic parameters. After simplifying this dependence, we assume the coefficients depend on macroscopic pressure only. Using a three dimensional pore geometry we calculate, as a proof-of-concept example, the effective permeability and Biot coefficients for various values or pressure. We observe that, for this geometry, a stronger pressure dependence on flow quantities than on mechanically based effective quantities. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Effective equations for fluid-structure interaction with applications to poroelasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Donald

    2012-11-05

    Modeling of fluid-solid interactions in porous media is a challenging and computationally demanding task. Due to the multiscale nature of the problem, simulating the flow and mechanics by direct numerical simulation is often not feasible and an effective model is preferred. In this work, we formally derive an effective model for Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI). In earlier work, assuming infinitesimal pore-scale deformations, an effective poroelastic model of Biot was derived. We extend this model to a nonlinear Biot model that includes pore-scale deformation into the effective description. The main challenge is the difference in coordinate systems of the fluid and solid equations. This is circumvented by utilizing the Arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE) formulation of the FSI equations, giving a unified frame in which to apply two-scale asymptotic techniques. In the derived nonlinear Biot model, the local cell problem are coupled to the macroscopic equations via the effective coefficients. These coefficients may be viewed as tabular functions of the macroscopic parameters. After simplifying this dependence, we assume the coefficients depend on macroscopic pressure only. Using a three dimensional pore geometry we calculate, as a proof-of-concept example, the effective permeability and Biot coefficients for various values or pressure. We observe that, for this geometry, a stronger pressure dependence on flow quantities than on mechanically based effective quantities. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  17. Influence of diffuse goiter on tracheal width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Sung Mo; Shon, Hyung Sun; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1980-01-01

    The radioisotopic scanning of the thyroid gland is well established method of demonstrating morphology of the thyroid gland and is used to measure the size, area and weight of thyroid gland. The purpose of this investigation is to observe the various effects of goiter to the regional trachea. Both radioisotopic scanning and roentgenogram were taken at the same time to evaluate size, area and weight of the thyroid glands, as well as to measure the width of soft tissue structure of the neck and the regional trachea in normal and goitrous patients. The clinical materials consisted of normal thyroid group for control (46 cases), diffuse simple goiter group (76 cases) and Graves' disease group (59 cases). The results were as follows; 1. The goiter causes some narrowing of the regional trachea to various degree which is not necessarily reflective of the size of goiter. 2. The goiter may increase the width of retrotracheal soft tissue space. 3. The lateral roentgenogram of the neck appear very useful in estimating the thyroid gland three dimensionally and the effect of goiter to the regional trachea

  18. Assessment of Effective Factor of Hydrogen Diffusion Equation Using FE Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2010-01-01

    The coupled model with hydrogen transport and elasto-plasticity behavior was introduced. In this paper, the effective factor of the hydrogen diffusion equation has been described. To assess the effective factor, finite element (FE) analyses including hydrogen transport and mechanical loading for boundary layer specimens with low-strength steel properties are carried out. The results of the FE analyses are compared with those from previous studies conducted by Taha and Sofronis (2001)

  19. Effect of Maximal Apnoea Easy-Going and Struggle Phases on Subarachnoid Width and Pial Artery Pulsation in Elite Breath-Hold Divers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel J Winklewski

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess changes in subarachnoid space width (sas-TQ, the marker of intracranial pressure (ICP, pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ and cardiac contribution to blood pressure (BP, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations throughout the maximal breath hold in elite apnoea divers. Non-invasive assessment of sas-TQ and cc-TQ became possible due to recently developed method based on infrared radiation, called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS.The experimental group consisted of seven breath-hold divers (six men. During testing, each participant performed a single maximal end-inspiratory breath hold. Apnoea consisted of the easy-going and struggle phases (characterised by involuntary breathing movements (IBMs. Heart rate (HR was determined using a standard ECG. BP was assessed using the photoplethysmography method. SaO2 was monitored continuously with pulse oximetry. A pneumatic chest belt was used to register thoracic and abdominal movements. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV was estimated by a 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasonic probe. sas-TQ and cc-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS. Wavelet transform analysis was performed to assess cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations.Mean BP and CBFV increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and were further augmented by IBMs. cc-TQ increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and remained stable during the IBMs. HR did not change significantly throughout the apnoea, although a trend toward a decrease during the easy phase and recovery during the IBMs was visible. Amplitudes of BP, CBFV and cc-TQ were augmented. sas-TQ and SaO2 decreased at the easy phase of apnoea and further decreased during the IBMs.Apnoea increases intracranial pressure and pial artery pulsation. Pial artery pulsation seems to be stabilised by the IBMs. Cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations does not

  20. The width of the giant dipole resonance at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.

    1992-01-01

    A method is proposed to evaluate the effect of the change of the Fermi sea on the width of the giant dipole resonance at finite temperature. In a schematic model it is found that, indeed, in 208 Pb the width increases very sharply up to about T=4 MeV but shows a much weaker variation for higher temperature. (author) 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Calibrated expressions for welding and their application to isotherm width in a thick plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentry Wood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces a possible solution to the limitations of modern trial and error solutions to welding procedure development. The difficulties of finding generalized solutions to Rosenthal´s equation are discussed and the Minimal Representation and Calibration approach is introduced as a promising procedure for developing these solutions. Dominant factors are identified, with effects from secondary phenomena being taken into account by correction factors. These correction factors are then calibrated and presented in a form that can be easily computed, and therefore be amendable to industry. The approach is then demonstrated by determining the isotherm width from Rosenthal´s thick plate solution. Comparison of the calibrated scaling equations to Rosenthal´s exact solution showed a maximum error of less than 0.8% for any isotherm.

  2. Multiscale Analysis of Effects of Additive and Multiplicative Noise on Delay Differential Equations near a Bifurcation Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klosek, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    We study effects of noisy and deterministic perturbations on oscillatory solutions to delay differential equations. We develop the multiscale technique and derive amplitude equations for noisy oscillations near a critical delay. We investigate effects of additive and multiplicative noise. We show that if the magnitudes of noise and deterministic perturbations are balanced, then the oscillatory behavior persists for long times being sustained by the noise. We illustrate the technique and its results on linear and logistic delay equations. (author)

  3. Non-linear mixed-effects pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling in NLME using differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The standard software for non-linear mixed-effect analysis of pharmacokinetic/phar-macodynamic (PK/PD) data is NONMEM while the non-linear mixed-effects package NLME is an alternative as tong as the models are fairly simple. We present the nlmeODE package which combines the ordinary differential...... equation (ODE) solver package odesolve and the non-Linear mixed effects package NLME thereby enabling the analysis of complicated systems of ODEs by non-linear mixed-effects modelling. The pharmacokinetics of the anti-asthmatic drug theophylline is used to illustrate the applicability of the nlme...

  4. Multiple solutions of steady-state Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations with steric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tai-Chia; Eisenberg, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Experiments measuring currents through single protein channels show unstable currents. Channels switch between ‘open’ or ‘closed’ states in a spontaneous stochastic process called gating. Currents are either (nearly) zero or at a definite level, characteristic of each type of protein, independent of time, once the channel is open. The steady state Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations with steric effects (PNP-steric equations) describe steady current through the open channel quite well, in a wide variety of conditions. Here we study the existence of multiple solutions of steady state PNP-steric equations to see if they themselves, without modification or augmentation, can describe two levels of current. We prove that there are two steady state solutions of PNP-steric equations for (a) three types of ion species (two types of cations and one type of anion) with a positive constant permanent charge, and (b) four types of ion species (two types of cations and their counter-ions) with a constant permanent charge but no sign condition. The excess currents (due to steric effects) associated with these two steady state solutions are derived and expressed as two distinct formulas. Our results indicate that PNP-steric equations may become a useful model to study spontaneous gating of ion channels. Spontaneous gating is thought to involve small structural changes in the channel protein that perhaps produce large changes in the profiles of free energy that determine ion flow. Gating is known to be modulated by external structures. Both can be included in future extensions of our present analysis. (paper)

  5. A Statistical study of the Doppler spectral width of high-latitude ionospheric F-region echoes recorded with SuperDARN coherent HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Villain

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The HF radars of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provide measurements of the E × B drift of ionospheric plasma over extended regions of the high-latitude ionosphere. We have conducted a statistical study of the associated Doppler spectral width of ionospheric F-region echoes. The study has been conducted with all available radars from the Northern Hemisphere for 2 specific periods of time. Period 1 corresponds to the winter months of 1994, while period 2 covers October 1996 to March 1997. The distributions of data points and average spectral width are presented as a function of Magnetic Latitude and Magnetic Local Time. The databases are very consistent and exhibit the same features. The most stringent features are: a region of very high spectral width, collocated with the ionospheric LLBL/cusp/mantle region; an oval shaped region of high spectral width, whose equator-ward boundary matches the poleward limit of the Holzworth and Meng auroral oval. A simulation has been conducted to evaluate the geometrical and instrumental effects on the spectral width. It shows that these effects cannot account for the observed spectral features. It is then concluded that these specific spectral width characteristics are the signature of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling phenomena.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  6. A Statistical study of the Doppler spectral width of high-latitude ionospheric F-region echoes recorded with SuperDARN coherent HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Villain

    Full Text Available The HF radars of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provide measurements of the E × B drift of ionospheric plasma over extended regions of the high-latitude ionosphere. We have conducted a statistical study of the associated Doppler spectral width of ionospheric F-region echoes. The study has been conducted with all available radars from the Northern Hemisphere for 2 specific periods of time. Period 1 corresponds to the winter months of 1994, while period 2 covers October 1996 to March 1997. The distributions of data points and average spectral width are presented as a function of Magnetic Latitude and Magnetic Local Time. The databases are very consistent and exhibit the same features. The most stringent features are: a region of very high spectral width, collocated with the ionospheric LLBL/cusp/mantle region; an oval shaped region of high spectral width, whose equator-ward boundary matches the poleward limit of the Holzworth and Meng auroral oval. A simulation has been conducted to evaluate the geometrical and instrumental effects on the spectral width. It shows that these effects cannot account for the observed spectral features. It is then concluded that these specific spectral width characteristics are the signature of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling phenomena.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  7. Effective Hamiltonians, two level systems, and generalized Maxwell-Bloch equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sczaniecki, L.

    1981-02-01

    A new method is proposed involving a canonical transformation leading to the non-secular part of time-independent perturbation calculus. The method is used to derive expressions for effective Shen-Walls Hamiltonians which, taken in the two-level approximation and on the inclusion of non-Hamiltonian terms into the dynamics of the system, lead to generalized Maxwell-Bloch equations. The rotating wave approximation is written anew within the framework of our formalism. (author)

  8. Stochastic Effects for the Reaction-Duffing Equation with Wick-Type Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hyuk Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct new explicit solutions of the Wick-type stochastic reaction-Duffing equation arising from mathematical physics with the help of the white noise theory and the system technique. Based on these exact solutions, we also discuss the influences of stochastic effects for dynamical behaviors according to functions h1(t, h2(t, and Brownian motion B(t which are the solitary wave group velocities.

  9. Effective self-similar expansion for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modugno, Michele; Pagnini, Gianni; Valle-Basagoiti, Manuel Angel

    2018-04-01

    We consider an effective scaling approach for the free expansion of a one-dimensional quantum wave packet, consisting in a self-similar evolution to be satisfied on average, i.e., by integrating over the coordinates. A direct comparison with the solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation shows that the effective scaling reproduces with great accuracy the exact evolution—the actual wave function is reproduced with a fidelity close to one—for arbitrary values of the interactions. This result represents a proof of concept of the effectiveness of the scaling ansatz, which has been used in different forms in the literature but never compared against the exact evolution.

  10. Description of width and spectra of two relativistic fermions bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, A.V.; Skachkov, N.B.

    1979-01-01

    The formalism for relativistic description of two particles with spin 1/2 is constructed. Used is the two-particle three-dimensional equation, obtained by quasipotential approach. Quasipotential equation in the relativistic configurational space with OBEP potential is reduced to the system of partial equations which is the analog of nonrelativistic Hamada-Jonston system. WKB approach is used to calculate mass spectra and leptonic width of mesons in quark model. The results of the study can be applied to the calculation of mass spectra and widths of electromagnetic decays of systems of e + e - , μ + μ - , c anti c, b anti b, N anti N type

  11. Constraints on dephasing widths and shifts in three-level quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, P.R.; O'Connell, Ross C.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the density matrix equations for a three-level quantum system interacting with external radiation fields can lead to negative populations if arbitrary dephasing rates and shifts are included in these equations. To guarantee non-negative populations, the equations themselves impose certain restrictions on the dephasing widths and shifts. The constraints on the widths are shown to be identical to those that can be derived from a model of Markovian dephasing events, independent of any atom-field interaction

  12. Stieltjes-moment-theory technique for calculating resonance width's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, A.U.

    1978-12-01

    A recently developed method for calculating the widths of atomic and molecular resonances is reviewed. The method is based on the golden-rule definition of the resonance width, GAMMA(E). The method uses only square-integrable, L 2 , basis functions to describe both the resonant and the non-resonant parts of the scattering wave function. It employs Stieltjes-moment-theory techniques to extract a continuous approximation for the width discrete representation of the background continuum. Its implementation requires only existing atomic and molecular structure codes. Many-electron effects, such as correlation and polarization, are easily incorporated into the calculation of the width via configuration interaction techniques. Once the width, GAMMA(E), has been determined, the energy shift can be computed by a straightforward evaluation of the required principal-value integral. The main disadvantage of the method is that it provides only the total width of a resonance which decays into more than one channel in a multichannel problem. A review of the various aspects of the theory is given first, and then representative results that have been obtained with this method for several atomic and molecular resonances are discussed. 28 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  13. Quark-nuclear hybrid star equation of state with excluded volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenborn, Mark Alexander Randolph; Bastian, Niels-Uwe Friedrich; Blaschke, David Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    A two-phase description of the quark-nuclear matter hybrid equation of state that takes into account the effect of excluded volume in both the hadronic and the quark-matter phases is introduced. The nuclear phase manifests a reduction of the available volume as density increases, leading to a stiffening of the matter. The quark-matter phase displays a reduction of the effective string tension in the confining density functional from available volume contributions. The nuclear equation of state is based upon the relativistic density-functional model DD2 with excluded volume. The quark-matter equation of state is based upon a quasiparticle model derived from a relativistic density-functional approach and will be discussed in greater detail. The interactions are decomposed into mean scalar and vector components. The scalar interaction is motivated by a string potential between quarks, whereas the vector interaction potential is motivated by higher-order interactions of quarks leading to an increased stiffening at high densities. As an application, we consider matter under compact star constraints of electric neutrality and β equilibrium. We obtain mass-radius relations for hybrid stars that form a third family, disconnected from the purely hadronic star branch, and fulfill the 2 M⊙ constraint.

  14. Cosmological model with viscosity media (dark fluid) described by an effective equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Jie; Meng Xinhe

    2006-01-01

    A generally parameterized equation of state (EOS) is investigated in the cosmological evolution with bulk viscosity media modelled as dark fluid, which can be regarded as a unification of dark energy and dark matter. Compared with the case of the perfect fluid, this EOS has possessed four additional parameters, which can be interpreted as the case of the non-perfect fluid with time-dependent viscosity or the model with variable cosmological constant. From this general EOS, a completely integrable dynamical equation to the scale factor is obtained with its solution explicitly given out. (i) In this parameterized model of cosmology, for a special choice of the parameters we can explain the late-time accelerating expansion universe in a new view. The early inflation, the median (relatively late time) deceleration, and the recently cosmic acceleration may be unified in a single equation. (ii) A generalized relation of the Hubble parameter scaling with the redshift is obtained for some cosmology interests. (iii) By using the SNe Ia data to fit the effective viscosity model we show that the case of matter described by p=0 plus with effective viscosity contributions can fit the observational gold data in an acceptable level

  15. Effective equations for matter-wave gap solitons in higher-order transversal states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, A Muñoz; Delgado, V

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that an important class of nonlinear stationary solutions of the three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) exhibiting nontrivial transversal configurations can be found and characterized in terms of an effective one-dimensional (1D) model. Using a variational approach we derive effective equations of lower dimensionality for BECs in (m,n(r)) transversal states (states featuring a central vortex of charge m as well as n(r) concentric zero-density rings at every z plane) which provides us with a good approximate solution of the original 3D problem. Since the specifics of the transversal dynamics can be absorbed in the renormalization of a couple of parameters, the functional form of the equations obtained is universal. The model proposed finds its principal application in the study of the existence and classification of 3D gap solitons supported by 1D optical lattices, where in addition to providing a good estimate for the 3D wave functions it is able to make very good predictions for the μ(N) curves characterizing the different fundamental families. We have corroborated the validity of our model by comparing its predictions with those from the exact numerical solution of the full 3D GPE.

  16. Effective two-body equations for the four-body problem with exact treatment of (2+2)-subsystem contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberzettl, H.; Sandhas, W.

    1981-01-01

    Noclear reactions: Four-body problem. Effective two-body equations with exact (2+2)-subsystem contributions. Relation to field-theoretical model by Fonseca and Shanley. Three-body propagator with exchange effects. (orig.)

  17. Analysis of the width correlation in 54Fe(nγ)55Fe reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knat'ko, V.A.; Shimanovich, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    To find out structural effects manifesting themselves in the form of correlation between widths of different channels of γ decay of levels and violation of Porter-Thomas distribution, calculated are partial widths of levels for 20 high-energy γ transitions in the 54 Fe(nγ) 55 Fe reaction. Calculations are carried out for widths in relation to γ transitions on 8 low p levels of 55 Fe, for 100 sets of partial γ widths (20 widths in a set). Results of analysis of theoretical values of partial γ widths of s resonances are presented in the form of the table. Results, obtained, show that consideration of contributions into γ decay of one-particle-vibrational configurations improve the accordance with experimental data, in comparison with calculations according to the model of valent capture. It is concluded that properties of γ widths of 55 Fe resonances, calculated in studied model, agree satisfactorily with properties of experimental γ widths [ru

  18. Coupled Dyson-Schwinger equations and effects of self-consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.S.; Zhang, H.X.; Yao, Y.J.

    2001-01-01

    Using the σ-ω model as an effective tool, the effects of self-consistency are studied in some detail. A coupled set of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the renormalized baryon and meson propagators in the σ-ω model is solved self-consistently according to the dressed Hartree-Fock scheme, where the hadron propagators in both the baryon and meson self-energies are required to also satisfy this coupled set of equations. It is found that the self-consistency affects the baryon spectral function noticeably, if only the interaction with σ mesons is considered. However, there is a cancellation between the effects due to the σ and ω mesons and the additional contribution of ω mesons makes the above effect insignificant. In both the σ and σ-ω cases the effects of self-consistency on meson spectral function are perceptible, but they can nevertheless be taken account of without a self-consistent calculation. Our study indicates that to include the meson propagators in the self-consistency requirement is unnecessary and one can stop at an early step of an iteration procedure to obtain a good approximation to the fully self-consistent results of all the hadron propagators in the model, if an appropriate initial input is chosen. Vertex corrections and their effects on ghost poles are also studied

  19. Interaction and collective effects in classical-equations-of-motion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss results obtained with the classical-equations-of-motion (CEOM) approach, with particular reference to interaction (potential energy) and collective effects in central collisions of equal mass nuclei. The essence of the CEOM approach is the classical calculation of all A = A/sub P/ + A/sub T/ trajectories using a 2-body potential V between all pairs of nucleons; V = V/sub short/ + V/sub long/ has a short range repulsion and a longer range attractive tail. In contrast to hydrodynamics, the CEOM approach is microscopic and includes transparency and nonequilibrium effects

  20. Modelling ventricular fibrillation coarseness during cardiopulmonary resuscitation by mixed effects stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Kenneth; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Eftestøl, Trygve; Kramer-Johansen, Jo

    2015-10-15

    For patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and being in a shockable rhythm, the coarseness of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is an indicator of the state of the patient. In the current work, we show how mixed effects stochastic differential equations (SDE) models, commonly used in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modelling, can be used to model the relationship between CPR quality measurements and ECG coarseness. This is a novel application of mixed effects SDE models to a setting quite different from previous applications of such models and where using such models nicely solves many of the challenges involved in analysing the available data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  2. Palindromic widths of nilpotent and wreath products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Palindromic width; commutator width; wreath products; nilpotent product. 2000 Mathematics ... An algorithm of the computation of the commutator length in free non-abelian .... It is clear that A(1)B = A × B is the direct sum. Let us list some ...

  3. Nanoscale roughness effect on Maxwell-like boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brull, S., E-mail: Stephane.Brull@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Charrier, P., E-mail: Pierre.Charrier@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Mieussens, L., E-mail: Luc.Mieussens@math.u-bordeaux.fr [University of Bordeaux, CNRS, Bordeaux INP, IMB, UMR 5251, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that the roughness of the wall has an effect on microscale gas flows. This effect can be shown for large Knudsen numbers by using a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. However, when the wall is rough at a nanometric scale, it is necessary to use a very small mesh size which is much too expansive. An alternative approach is to incorporate the roughness effect in the scattering kernel of the boundary condition, such as the Maxwell-like kernel introduced by the authors in a previous paper. Here, we explain how this boundary condition can be implemented in a discrete velocity approximation of the Boltzmann equation. Moreover, the influence of the roughness is shown by computing the structure scattering pattern of mono-energetic beams of the incident gas molecules. The effect of the angle of incidence of these molecules, of their mass, and of the morphology of the wall is investigated and discussed in a simplified two-dimensional configuration. The effect of the azimuthal angle of the incident beams is shown for a three-dimensional configuration. Finally, the case of non-elastic scattering is considered. All these results suggest that our approach is a promising way to incorporate enough physics of gas-surface interaction, at a reasonable computing cost, to improve kinetic simulations of micro- and nano-flows.

  4. Priors on the effective dark energy equation of state in scalar-tensor theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveri, Marco; Bull, Philip; Silvestri, Alessandra; Pogosian, Levon

    2017-10-01

    Constraining the dark energy (DE) equation of state, wDE, is one of the primary science goals of ongoing and future cosmological surveys. In practice, with imperfect data and incomplete redshift coverage, this requires making assumptions about the evolution of wDE with redshift z . These assumptions can be manifested in a choice of a specific parametric form, which can potentially bias the outcome, or else one can reconstruct wDE(z ) nonparametrically, by specifying a prior covariance matrix that correlates values of wDE at different redshifts. In this work, we derive the theoretical prior covariance for the effective DE equation of state predicted by general scalar-tensor theories with second order equations of motion (Horndeski theories). This is achieved by generating a large ensemble of possible scalar-tensor theories using a Monte Carlo methodology, including the application of physical viability conditions. We also separately consider the special subcase of the minimally coupled scalar field, or quintessence. The prior shows a preference for tracking behaviors in the most general case. Given the covariance matrix, theoretical priors on parameters of any specific parametrization of wDE(z ) can also be readily derived by projection.

  5. Virtual Photon Effects on Chaos in Generalized Lorenz-Haken Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Rui; Huang Hongbin; Yang Peng; Xie Xia; Zhao Huan

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of two-level atoms injected into a single-mode cavity is studied in the exact atom-field interaction situation, in which the counter-rotating terms describing the so-called virtual photon processes neglected in the rotating-wave approximation, are considered. The cavity mode is driven by the injected classical field, and the atom is prepared in a coherent superposition of the two levels. We first derive the generalized Lorenz-Haken equation by using the technique of quantum Langevin equation, and then numerically study the dynamics of this equation. We find that the virtual photon processes have strong effects on the dynamics, which can cause the trajectory in phase space of strange attractor spiral around four focus points, and the trajectory is modulated by virtual photon processes. The chaos region in parameter space is now enlarged. It should be stressed that the strange attractor can exist in optical bistability, and whether the atomic coherences and classical field can inhibit chaos depends on the laser frequency.

  6. Relativistic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1986-01-01

    Relativistic equations for two and three body scattering are discussed. Particular attention is paid to relativistic three body kinetics because of recent form factor measurements of the Helium 3 - Hydrogen 3 system recently completed at Saclay and Bates and the accompanying speculation that relativistic effects are important for understanding the three nucleon system. 16 refs., 4 figs

  7. Investigating size effects of complex nanostructures through Young-Laplace equation and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Analytical studies on the size effects of a simply-shaped beam fixed at both ends have successfully explained the sudden changes of effective Young's modulus as its diameter decreases below 100 nm. Yet they are invalid for complex nanostructures ubiquitously existing in nature. In accordance with a generalized Young-Laplace equation, one of the representative size effects is transferred to non-uniformly distributed pressure against an external surface due to the imbalance of inward and outward loads. Because the magnitude of pressure depends on the principal curvatures, iterative steps have to be adopted to gradually stabilize the structure in finite element analysis. Computational results are in good agreement with both experiment data and theoretical prediction. Furthermore, the investigation on strengthened and softened Young's modulus for two complex nanostructures demonstrates that the proposed computational method provides a general and effective approach to analyze the size effects for nanostructures in arbitrary shape

  8. Effect of localization states on the electroluminescence spectral width of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China and School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing University of Arts and Sciences, Chongqing 402160 (China); Zhao, De Gang, E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn; Jiang, De Sheng; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zong Shun; Zhu, Jian Jun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Dan Mei [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Jian Ping; Zhang, Shu Ming; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2015-11-15

    The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated. With increasing In content in InGaN well layers, the peak energy redshifts, the emission intensity reduces and the inhomogeneous broadening of the luminescence band increases. In addition, it is found that the EL spectra shrink with increasing injection current at low excitation condition, which may be ascribed to both Coulomb screening of polarization field and carrier transferring from shallower localization states to the deeper ones, while at high currents the state-filling effect in all localization states may become significant and lead to a broadening of EL spectra. However, surprisingly, for the MQW sample with much higher In content, the EL spectral bandwidth can be almost unchanged with increasing current at the high current range, since a large number of carriers may be captured by the nonradiative recombination centers distributed outside the localized potential traps and the state-filling effect in the localization states is suppressed.

  9. Effect of localization states on the electroluminescence spectral width of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, De Gang; Jiang, De Sheng; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zong Shun; Zhu, Jian Jun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Dan Mei; Liu, Jian Ping; Zhang, Shu Ming; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated. With increasing In content in InGaN well layers, the peak energy redshifts, the emission intensity reduces and the inhomogeneous broadening of the luminescence band increases. In addition, it is found that the EL spectra shrink with increasing injection current at low excitation condition, which may be ascribed to both Coulomb screening of polarization field and carrier transferring from shallower localization states to the deeper ones, while at high currents the state-filling effect in all localization states may become significant and lead to a broadening of EL spectra. However, surprisingly, for the MQW sample with much higher In content, the EL spectral bandwidth can be almost unchanged with increasing current at the high current range, since a large number of carriers may be captured by the nonradiative recombination centers distributed outside the localized potential traps and the state-filling effect in the localization states is suppressed

  10. The effects of fabric type, fabric width and model type on the cost of unit raw material in terms of apparel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, H.; Duru Baykal, P.

    2017-10-01

    The cost of the fabric which is the raw material of apparel constitutes approximately the half of the total product cost. So, it is highly important that the fabric should be used with the greatest productivity. Cost analysis are of great importance in terms of competitiveness of readymade clothing and apparel sector both in national and international markets. The proximity of costs to international average and the average cost of the countries that are competitors of Turkey in clothing market is essential for Turkey to sustain its effect in textile sector. In the contrary case, the sector won’t be able to maintain its competitive capacity sustainably [1].The main cost elements of textile and apparel sector consist of raw material, labor, energy and financing [2].

  11. The effective Schroedinger equation of the optical model of composite nuclei elastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, A.; Hernandez, E.

    1980-01-01

    An effective hamiltonian for elastic collisions between composite nuclei is obtained from the Schroedinger equation of the complete many-body system and its fully antisymmetric wave functions by means of a projection operator technique. This effective hamiltonian, defined in such a way that it has to reproduce the scattering amplitude in full detail, including exchange effects, is explicitly Galilean invariant. The effective interaction operator is a function of the relative distance between the centers of mass of the colliding nuclei and the constants of the motion of the whole system. The interaction operator of the optical model is obtained next, requiring as usual, that it reproduces the average over the energy of the scattering amplitude and keeping the Galilean invariance. The resulting optical potential operator has some terms identical to those obtained in the Resonating Group Method, and others coming from the elimination of all non elastic channels and the delayed elastic scattering. This result makes the relation existing among the projection operator method to the Feshbach and the cluster model equations of motion for positive energies (RGM) explicit. The additional interaction terms due to the flux loss in the elastic channel are non-local, and non-hermitean operators expressed in terms of the transition amplitudes and the density of states of the compound nucleus in such a way that an approximate evaluation, in a systematic fashion, seems possible. Theangular momentum dependence of the optical potential operator is discussed in some detail. (author)

  12. On the effects of the reactive terms in the Boltzmann equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Zamlutti

    Full Text Available The effects of the production and loss mechanisms that affect the Boltzmann equations are considered by the inclusion of a reactive term. The necessary elements to develop a proper form for this term are revised and the current trends analyzed. Although no accurate theoretical treatment of the problem is possible due to the many body nature of it, important relations can be derived which, besides being representative of the quantitative aspects of the matter, are illustrative of the qualitative features of the phenomenon. The overall procedure is detailed in this revision.

  13. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    We study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. The presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  14. Renormalization Group Equations of d=6 Operators in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The one-loop renormalization group equations for the Standard Model (SM) Effective Field Theory (EFT) including dimension-six operators are calculated. The complete 2499 × 2499 one-loop anomalous dimension matrix of the d=6 Lagrangian is obtained, as well as the contribution of d=6 operators to the running of the parameters of the renormalizable SM Lagrangian. The presence of higher-dimension operators has implications for the flavor problem of the SM. An approximate holomorphy of the one-loop anomalous dimension matrix is found, even though the SM EFT is not a supersymmetric theory.

  15. Modelling the widths of fission observables in GEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The widths of the mass distributions of the different fission channels are traced back to the probability distributions of the corresponding quantum oscillators that are coupled to the heat bath, which is formed by the intrinsic degrees of freedom of the fissioning system under the influence of pairing correlations and shell effects. Following conclusion from stochastic calculations of Adeev and Pashkevich, an early freezing due to dynamical effects is assumed. It is shown that the mass width of the fission channels in low-energy fission is strongly influenced by the zero-point motion of the corresponding quantum oscillator. The observed variation of the mass widths of the asymmetric fission channels with excitation energy is attributed to the energy-dependent properties of the heat bath and not to the population of excited states of the corresponding quantum oscillator.

  16. Pulse Width Affects Scalp Sensation of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Luber, Bruce; Westin, Gregory G; Lisanby, Sarah H

    Scalp sensation and pain comprise the most common side effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which can reduce tolerability and complicate experimental blinding. We explored whether changing the width of single TMS pulses affects the quality and tolerability of the resultant somatic sensation. Using a controllable pulse parameter TMS device with a figure-8 coil, single monophasic magnetic pulses inducing electric field with initial phase width of 30, 60, and 120 µs were delivered in 23 healthy volunteers. Resting motor threshold of the right first dorsal interosseus was determined for each pulse width, as reported previously. Subsequently, pulses were delivered over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at each of the three pulse widths at two amplitudes (100% and 120% of the pulse-width-specific motor threshold), with 20 repetitions per condition delivered in random order. After each pulse, subjects rated 0-to-10 visual analog scales for Discomfort, Sharpness, and Strength of the sensation. Briefer TMS pulses with amplitude normalized to the motor threshold were perceived as slightly more uncomfortable than longer pulses (with an average 0.89 point increase on the Discomfort scale for pulse width of 30 µs compared to 120 µs). The sensation of the briefer pulses was felt to be substantially sharper (2.95 points increase for 30 µs compared to 120 µs pulse width), but not stronger than longer pulses. As expected, higher amplitude pulses increased the perceived discomfort and strength, and, to a lesser degree the perceived sharpness. Our findings contradict a previously published hypothesis that briefer TMS pulses are more tolerable. We discovered that the opposite is true, which merits further study as a means of enhancing tolerability in the context of repetitive TMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fronts from integrodifference equations and persistence effects on the Neolithic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pérez-Losada, Joaquim; Isern, Neus

    2007-09-01

    We extend a previous model of the Neolithic transition in Europe [J. Fort and V. Méndez, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 867 (1999)] by taking two effects into account: (i) we do not use the diffusion approximation (which corresponds to second-order Taylor expansions), and (ii) we take proper care of the fact that parents do not migrate away from their children (we refer to this as a time-order effect, in the sense that it implies that children grow up with their parents, before they become adults and can survive and migrate). We also derive a time-ordered, second-order equation, which we call the sequential reaction-diffusion equation, and use it to show that effect (ii) is the most important one, and that both of them should in general be taken into account to derive accurate results. As an example, we consider the Neolithic transition: the model predictions agree with the observed front speed, and the corrections relative to previous models are important (up to 70%).

  18. Toward a muon-specific electronic structure theory: effective electronic Hartree-Fock equations for muonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2018-02-07

    An effective set of Hartree-Fock (HF) equations are derived for electrons of muonic systems, i.e., molecules containing a positively charged muon, conceiving the muon as a quantum oscillator, which are completely equivalent to the usual two-component HF equations used to derive stationary states of the muonic molecules. In these effective equations, a non-Coulombic potential is added to the orthodox coulomb and exchange potential energy terms, which describes the interaction of the muon and the electrons effectively and is optimized during the self-consistent field cycles. While in the two-component HF equations a muon is treated as a quantum particle, in the effective HF equations it is absorbed into the effective potential and practically transformed into an effective potential field experienced by electrons. The explicit form of the effective potential depends on the nature of muon's vibrations and is derivable from the basis set used to expand the muonic spatial orbital. The resulting effective Hartree-Fock equations are implemented computationally and used successfully, as a proof of concept, in a series of muonic molecules containing all atoms from the second and third rows of the Periodic Table. To solve the algebraic version of the equations muon-specific Gaussian basis sets are designed for both muon and surrounding electrons and it is demonstrated that the optimized exponents are quite distinct from those derived for the hydrogen isotopes. The developed effective HF theory is quite general and in principle can be used for any muonic system while it is the starting point for a general effective electronic structure theory that incorporates various types of quantum correlations into the muonic systems beyond the HF equations.

  19. Applicability of the Fokker-Planck equation to the description of diffusion effects on nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, M. V.; Dubinko, V. I.; Borodin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The nucleation of islands in a supersaturated solution of surface adatoms is considered taking into account the possibility of diffusion profile formation in the island vicinity. It is shown that the treatment of diffusion-controlled cluster growth in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation is justified only provided certain restrictions are satisfied. First of all, the standard requirement that diffusion profiles of adatoms quickly adjust themselves to the actual island sizes (adiabatic principle) can be realized only for sufficiently high island concentration. The adiabatic principle is essential for the probabilities of adatom attachment to and detachment from island edges to be independent of the adatom diffusion profile establishment kinetics, justifying the island nucleation treatment as the Markovian stochastic process. Second, it is shown that the commonly used definition of the "diffusion" coefficient in the Fokker-Planck equation in terms of adatom attachment and detachment rates is justified only provided the attachment and detachment are statistically independent, which is generally not the case for the diffusion-limited growth of islands. We suggest a particular way to define the attachment and detachment rates that allows us to satisfy this requirement as well. When applied to the problem of surface island nucleation, our treatment predicts the steady-state nucleation barrier, which coincides with the conventional thermodynamic expression, even though no thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed and the adatom diffusion is treated explicitly. The effect of adatom diffusional profiles on the nucleation rate preexponential factor is also discussed. Monte Carlo simulation is employed to analyze the applicability domain of the Fokker-Planck equation and the diffusion effect beyond it. It is demonstrated that a diffusional cloud is slowing down the nucleation process for a given monomer interaction with the nucleus edge.

  20. An effective method for finding special solutions of nonlinear differential equations with variable coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Maochang; Fan Guihong

    2008-01-01

    There are many interesting methods can be utilized to construct special solutions of nonlinear differential equations with constant coefficients. However, most of these methods are not applicable to nonlinear differential equations with variable coefficients. A new method is presented in this Letter, which can be used to find special solutions of nonlinear differential equations with variable coefficients. This method is based on seeking appropriate Bernoulli equation corresponding to the equation studied. Many well-known equations are chosen to illustrate the application of this method

  1. Hypersingular integral equations, waveguiding effects in Cantorian Universe and genesis of large scale structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovane, G.; Giordano, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we introduce the hypersingular integral equations and analyze a realistic model of gravitational waveguides on a cantorian space-time. A waveguiding effect is considered with respect to the large scale structure of the Universe, where the structure formation appears as if it were a classically self-similar random process at all astrophysical scales. The result is that it seems we live in an El Naschie's o (∞) Cantorian space-time, where gravitational lensing and waveguiding effects can explain the appearing Universe. In particular, we consider filamentary and planar large scale structures as possible refraction channels for electromagnetic radiation coming from cosmological structures. From this vision the Universe appears like a large self-similar adaptive mirrors set, thanks to three numerical simulations. Consequently, an infinite Universe is just an optical illusion that is produced by mirroring effects connected with the large scale structure of a finite and not a large Universe

  2. Assessment of the effect of visual impairment on mortality through multiple health pathways: structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Sharon L; Lee, David J; Lam, Byron L; Zheng, D Diane; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2008-08-01

    To estimate the direct effects of self-reported visual impairment (VI) on health, disability, and mortality and to estimate the indirect effects of VI on mortality through health and disability mediators. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a population-based annual survey designed to be representative of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population. The National Death Index of 135,581 NHIS adult participants, 18 years of age and older, from 1986 to 1996 provided the mortality linkage through 2002. A generalized linear structural equation model (GSEM) with latent variable was used to estimate the results of a system of equations with various outcomes. Standard errors and test statistics were corrected for weighting, clustering, and stratification. VI affects mortality, when direct adjustment was made for the covariates. Severe VI increases the hazard rate by a factor of 1.28 (95% CI: 1.07-1.53) compared with no VI, and some VI increases the hazard by a factor of 1.13 (95% CI: 1.07-1.20). VI also affects mortality indirectly through self-rated health and disability. The total effects (direct effects plus mediated effects) on the hazard of mortality of severe VI and some VI relative to no VI are hazard ratio (HR) 1.54 (95% CI: 1.28-1.86) and HR 1.23 (95% CI: 1.16-1.31), respectively. In addition to the direct link between VI and mortality, the effects of VI on general health and disability contribute to an increased risk of death. Ignoring the latter may lead to an underestimation of the substantive impact of VI on mortality.

  3. Pulse widths effects on scintillator saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, D.A.; Chase, L.F.

    1978-08-01

    A test was performed over an extensive range of irrradiance (approximately five orders of magnitude) to see to what extent organic scintillators responded linearly with x-ray input. At the highest levels of irradiance achievable with the experimental configuration, but only for pulses in the region of 4.0 ns or wider, a degree of nonlinear response was observed for some of the scintillators. The data suggest that at levels below 1 mJ/cm 2 -ns it is safe to asume that for pulses 6.5 ns and shorter there is no significant level of nonlinearity to x rays with spectrum. For the cases of undoped NE111 and NE111 doped with 10 percent benzophenone, experimental conditions were such that it was possible to accumulate data significantly above the 1 mJ/cm 2 -ns level of irradiance. It is with these cases that a nonlinear response was observed. It is assumed that the same nonlinearity would have also been noticed had experimental conditions been such that equivalent levels of irradiance could have been achieved at the time the other samples were studied

  4. Solution of the neutron point kinetics equations with temperature feedback effects applying the polynomial approach method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumelero, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.tumelero@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Goncalves, Glenio A.; Lazzari, Luana, E-mail: claudiopeteren@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gleniogoncalves@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: luana-lazzari@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (DME/UFPEL), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica e Matematica

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we present a solution of the Neutron Point Kinetics Equations with temperature feedback effects applying the Polynomial Approach Method. For the solution, we consider one and six groups of delayed neutrons precursors with temperature feedback effects and constant reactivity. The main idea is to expand the neutron density, delayed neutron precursors and temperature as a power series considering the reactivity as an arbitrary function of the time in a relatively short time interval around an ordinary point. In the first interval one applies the initial conditions of the problem and the analytical continuation is used to determine the solutions of the next intervals. With the application of the Polynomial Approximation Method it is possible to overcome the stiffness problem of the equations. In such a way, one varies the time step size of the Polynomial Approach Method and performs an analysis about the precision and computational time. Moreover, we compare the method with different types of approaches (linear, quadratic and cubic) of the power series. The answer of neutron density and temperature obtained by numerical simulations with linear approximation are compared with results in the literature. (author)

  5. Solution of the neutron point kinetics equations with temperature feedback effects applying the polynomial approach method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumelero, Fernanda; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Goncalves, Glenio A.; Lazzari, Luana

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a solution of the Neutron Point Kinetics Equations with temperature feedback effects applying the Polynomial Approach Method. For the solution, we consider one and six groups of delayed neutrons precursors with temperature feedback effects and constant reactivity. The main idea is to expand the neutron density, delayed neutron precursors and temperature as a power series considering the reactivity as an arbitrary function of the time in a relatively short time interval around an ordinary point. In the first interval one applies the initial conditions of the problem and the analytical continuation is used to determine the solutions of the next intervals. With the application of the Polynomial Approximation Method it is possible to overcome the stiffness problem of the equations. In such a way, one varies the time step size of the Polynomial Approach Method and performs an analysis about the precision and computational time. Moreover, we compare the method with different types of approaches (linear, quadratic and cubic) of the power series. The answer of neutron density and temperature obtained by numerical simulations with linear approximation are compared with results in the literature. (author)

  6. SUSY method for the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation with effective mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, M.V.; Kolevatova, E.V.; Nishnianidze, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SUSY intertwining relations for the 3-dim Schrödinger equation with effective mass were studied. • The general solution of these intertwining relations with first order supercharges was obtained. • Four different options for parameters values were considered separately to find the mass functions and partner potentials. - Abstract: The three-dimensional Schrödinger equation with a position-dependent (effective) mass is studied in the framework of Supersymmetrical (SUSY) Quantum Mechanics. The general solution of SUSY intertwining relations with first order supercharges is obtained without any preliminary constraints. Several forms of coefficient functions of the supercharges are investigated and analytical expressions for the mass function and partner potentials are found. As usual for SUSY Quantum Mechanics with nonsingular superpotentials, the spectra of intertwined Hamiltonians coincide up to zero modes of supercharges, and the corresponding wave functions are connected by intertwining relations. All models are partially integrable by construction: each of them has at least one second order symmetry operator.

  7. Morphodynamics structures induced by variations of the channel width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Gonzalo; Crosato, Alessandra; Tassi, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    In alluvial channels, forcing effects, such as a longitudinally varying width, can induce the formation of steady bars (Olesen, 1984). The type of bars that form, such as alternate, central or multiple, will mainly depend on the local flow width-to-depth ratio and on upstream conditions (Struiksma et al., 1985). The effects on bar formation of varying the channel width received attention only recently and investigations, based on flume experiments and mathematical modelling, are mostly restricted to small longitudinal sinusoidal variations of the channel width (e.g. Repetto et al., 2002; Wu and Yeh, 2005, Zolezzi et al., 2012; Frascati and Lanzoni, 2013). In this work, we analyze the variations in equilibrium bed topography in a longitudinal width-varying channel with characteristic scales of the Waal River (The Netherlands) using two different 2D depth-averaged morphodynamic models, one based on the Delft3D code and one on Telemac-Mascaret system. In particular, we explore the effects of changing the wavelength of sinusoidal width variations in a straight channel, focusing on the effects of the spatial lag between bar formation and forcing that is observed in numerical models and laboratory experiments (e.g. Crosato et al, 2011). We extend the investigations to finite width variations in which longitudinal changes of the width-to-depth ratio are such that they may affect the type of bars that become unstable (alternate, central or multiple bars). Numerical results are qualitatively validated with field observations and the resulting morphodynamic pattern is compared with the physics-based predictor of river bar modes by Crosato and Mosselman (2009). The numerical models are finally used to analyse the experimental conditions of Wu and Yeh (2005). The study should be seen as merely exploratory. The aim is to investigate possible approaches for future research aiming at assessing the effects of artificial river widening and narrowing to control bar formation in

  8. Level and width statistics for a decaying chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutori, S.; Zelevinsky, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    The random matrix ensemble of discretized effective non-hermitian hamiltonians is used for studying local correlations and fluctuations of energies and widths in a quantum system where intrinsic levels are coupled to the continuum via a common decay channel. With the use of analytical estimates and numerical simulations, generic properties of statistical observables are obtained for the regimes of weak and strong continuum coupling as well as for the transitional region. Typical signals of the transition (width collectivization, disappearance of level repulsion at small spacings and violation of uniformity along the energy axis) are discussed quantitatively. (orig.)

  9. Cause and effect analysis by fuzzy relational equations and a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotshtein, Alexander P.; Posner, Morton; Rakytyanska, Hanna B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes using a genetic algorithm as a tool to solve the fault diagnosis problem. The fault diagnosis problem is based on a cause and effect analysis which is formally described by fuzzy relations. Fuzzy relations are formed on the basis of expert assessments. Application of expert fuzzy relations to restore and identify the causes through the observed effects requires the solution to a system of fuzzy relational equations. In this study this search for a solution amounts to solving a corresponding optimization problem. An optimization algorithm is based on the application of genetic operations of crossover, mutation and selection. The genetic algorithm suggested here represents an application in expert systems of fault diagnosis and quality control

  10. Semiparametric mixed-effects analysis of PK/PD models using differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Eskridge, Kent M; Zhang, Shunpu

    2008-08-01

    Motivated by the use of semiparametric nonlinear mixed-effects modeling on longitudinal data, we develop a new semiparametric modeling approach to address potential structural model misspecification for population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. Specifically, we use a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with form dx/dt = A(t)x + B(t) where B(t) is a nonparametric function that is estimated using penalized splines. The inclusion of a nonparametric function in the ODEs makes identification of structural model misspecification feasible by quantifying the model uncertainty and provides flexibility for accommodating possible structural model deficiencies. The resulting model will be implemented in a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling setup for population analysis. We illustrate the method with an application to cefamandole data and evaluate its performance through simulations.

  11. Effect of disjoining pressure in a thin film equation with non-uniform forcing

    KAUST Repository

    MOULTON, D. E.

    2013-08-02

    We explore the effect of disjoining pressure on a thin film equation in the presence of a non-uniform body force, motivated by a model describing the reverse draining of a magnetic film. To this end, we use a combination of numerical investigations and analytical considerations. The disjoining pressure has a regularizing influence on the evolution of the system and appears to select a single steady-state solution for fixed height boundary conditions; this is in contrast with the existence of a continuum of locally attracting solutions that exist in the absence of disjoining pressure for the same boundary conditions. We numerically implement matched asymptotic expansions to construct equilibrium solutions and also investigate how they behave as the disjoining pressure is sent to zero. Finally, we consider the effect of the competition between forcing and disjoining pressure on the coarsening dynamics of the thin film for fixed contact angle boundary conditions. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013.

  12. Maxillary arch width and buccal corridor changes with Damon and conventional brackets: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, Corey; Kim, Sohyon Michelle; Burnheimer, John

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of Damon self-ligating and conventional bracket systems on buccal corridor widths and areas. A retrospective sample of consecutively treated patients using either conventional (CG, n  =  45) or Damon self-ligating (SL, n  =  39) brackets was analyzed to determine any differences in buccal corridor widths and areas both within and between groups. Pretreatment and posttreatment frontal photographs were transferred to Photoshop CC, standardized using intercanthal width, and linear and area measurements were performed with tools in Photoshop CC. Ratios were then calculated for statistical analysis. Relationships between arch widths and buccal corridors were also examined. There were no significant differences in the posttreatment intercanine or intermolar widths either within or between the CG and SL groups. There were no significant differences in any buccal corridor width or area measurement either within or between the CG and SL groups. There were strong correlations with the intercanine width and the corresponding buccal corridor smile width measurements. There was an inverse correlation with the buccal corridor area in relation to the canine and the total smile width. It is likely that posttreatment increases in arch width can be seen in patients treated with either a conventional bracket system or the Damon system. It is highly unlikely that there is any significant difference in buccal corridor width or area in patients treated with the Damon self-ligating system or a conventional bracket system.

  13. Effective dark energy equation of state in interacting dark energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avelino, P.P., E-mail: ppavelin@fc.up.pt [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Silva, H.M.R. da, E-mail: hilberto.silva@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-07-24

    In models where dark matter and dark energy interact non-minimally, the total amount of matter in a fixed comoving volume may vary from the time of recombination to the present time due to energy transfer between the two components. This implies that, in interacting dark energy models, the fractional matter density estimated using the cosmic microwave background assuming no interaction between dark matter and dark energy will in general be shifted with respect to its true value. This may result in an incorrect determination of the equation of state of dark energy if the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is not properly accounted for, even if the evolution of the Hubble parameter as a function of redshift is known with arbitrary precision. In this Letter we find an exact expression, as well as a simple analytical approximation, for the evolution of the effective equation of state of dark energy, assuming that the energy transfer rate between dark matter and dark energy is described by a simple two-parameter model. We also provide analytical examples where non-phantom interacting dark energy models mimic the background evolution and primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies of phantom dark energy models.

  14. Effective dark energy equation of state in interacting dark energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avelino, P.P.; Silva, H.M.R. da

    2012-01-01

    In models where dark matter and dark energy interact non-minimally, the total amount of matter in a fixed comoving volume may vary from the time of recombination to the present time due to energy transfer between the two components. This implies that, in interacting dark energy models, the fractional matter density estimated using the cosmic microwave background assuming no interaction between dark matter and dark energy will in general be shifted with respect to its true value. This may result in an incorrect determination of the equation of state of dark energy if the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is not properly accounted for, even if the evolution of the Hubble parameter as a function of redshift is known with arbitrary precision. In this Letter we find an exact expression, as well as a simple analytical approximation, for the evolution of the effective equation of state of dark energy, assuming that the energy transfer rate between dark matter and dark energy is described by a simple two-parameter model. We also provide analytical examples where non-phantom interacting dark energy models mimic the background evolution and primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies of phantom dark energy models.

  15. Quantifying the Effects of Noise on Diffuse Interface Models: Cahn-Hilliard-Cook equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Spencer; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation into the dynamics of phase separation through numerical simulations of the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook (CHC) equation. This model is an extension of the well-known Cahn- Hilliard equation, perturbed by an additive white noise. Studies have shown that random fluctuations are critical for proper resolution of physical phenomena. This is especially true for phase critical systems. We explore the transient behavior of the solution space for varying levels of noise. This is enabled by our massively scalable finite element-based numerical framework. We briefly examine the interplay between noise level and discretization (spatial and temporal) in obtaining statistically consistent solutions. We show that the added noise accelerates progress towards phase separation, but retards dynamics throughout subsequent coarsening. We identify a scaling exponent relating morphology metrics with the level of noise. We observe a very clear scaling effect of finite domain size, which is observed to be offset by increasing levels of noise. Domain scaling reveals a clear microstructural asymmetry at various stages of the evolution for lower noise levels. In contrast, higher noise levels tend to produce more uniform morphologies.

  16. Steric effects in the dynamics of electrolytes at large applied voltages. II. Modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Mustafa Sabri; Bazant, Martin Z; Ajdari, Armand

    2007-02-01

    In situations involving large potentials or surface charges, the Poisson-Boltzman (PB) equation has shortcomings because it neglects ion-ion interactions and steric effects. This has been widely recognized by the electrochemistry community, leading to the development of various alternative models resulting in different sets "modified PB equations," which have had at least qualitative success in predicting equilibrium ion distributions. On the other hand, the literature is scarce in terms of descriptions of concentration dynamics in these regimes. Here, adapting strategies developed to modify the PB equation, we propose a simple modification of the widely used Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations for ionic transport, which at least qualitatively accounts for steric effects. We analyze numerical solutions of these modified PNP equations on the model problem of the charging of a simple electrolyte cell, and compare the outcome to that of the standard PNP equations. Finally, we repeat the asymptotic analysis of Bazant, Thornton, and Ajdari [Phys. Rev. E 70, 021506 (2004)] for this new system of equations to further document the interest and limits of validity of the simpler equivalent electrical circuit models introduced in Part I [Kilic, Bazant, and Ajdari, Phys. Rev. E 75, 021502 (2007)] for such problems.

  17. An Empirical Investigation of the Universal Effectiveness of Quality Management Practices: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sik Cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Institutional theory argues that the isomorphic nature of quality management (QM practices leads to similar QM implementation and performance among QM-embedded firms. However, contingency theory questions such 'universal effectiveness of QM practices'. Considering these conflicting arguments, this study tests samples from the U.S. and China to examine whether the 'universal effectiveness of QM practices’ across national boundaries actually exists. First, the confirmatory factor analysis was performed to examine the validity of the survey instruments developed in this study. Then, the hypotheses were tested using the structural equation modeling (SEM analysis. The SEM test results indicated that the positive effect of behavioral QM on firm performance was more significant in the U.S. sample than in the China sample. The test results also presented that the relative effect of behavioral QM versus technical QM on firm performance was noticeably different in service firms, according to national economic maturity. The study’s findings demonstrated that a firm's contingency factors, such as national economic maturity and industry type, could result in the heterogeneous implementation of the firm’s TQM program; consequently, the findings weakened the 'universal effectiveness of QM practices'.

  18. Bohr effect of human hemoglobin: Separation of tertiary and quaternary contributions based on the Wyman equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonjo, Kehinde Onwochei

    2017-09-01

    As a prelude to separating tertiary from quaternary structure contributions to the Bohr effect, we employed the Wyman equation to analyze Bohr data for human hemoglobin to which 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, 2,3-BPG, is bound. Changes in the pK a s of the histidine Bohr groups result in a net reduction of their contributions to the Bohr effect at pH 7.4 compared to their contributions in stripped hemoglobin. The non-histidine 2,3-BPG binding groups - the β-chain terminal amino group and Lys82β - make negative and positive contributions, respectively, to the Bohr effect. The final result is that the Bohr effect at physiological pH is higher for 2,3-BPG bound compared to stripped hemoglobin. Contributions linked to His2β, His77β and His143β enable us to separate tertiary from quaternary Bohr contributions in stripped and in 2,3-BPG bound hemoglobin. Both contributions serve to make the Bohr effect for 2,3-BPG bound hemoglobin higher than for stripped hemoglobin at physiological pH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of mesoscopic fluctuations on equation of state in cluster-forming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ciach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Equation of state for systems with particles self-assembling into aggregates is derived within a mesoscopic theory combining density functional and field-theoretic approaches. We focus on the effect of mesoscopic fluctuations in the disordered phase. The pressure - volume fraction isotherms are calculated explicitly for two forms of the short-range attraction long-range repulsion potential. Mesoscopic fluctuations lead to an increased pressure in each case, except for very small volume fractions. When large clusters are formed, the mechanical instability of the system is present at much higher temperature than found in mean-field approximation. In this case phase separation competes with the formation of periodic phases (colloidal crystals. In the case of small clusters, no mechanical instability associated with separation into dilute and dense phases appears.

  20. Hypersingular integral equations, Kaehler manifolds and Thurston mirroring effect in ε (∞) Cantorian spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovane, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this work starting from some earlier results on hypersingular integral equations and analyzing a more realistic model of gravitational waveguides on a Cantorian spacetime we obtain a description of our Universe according to Kaehler manifold in the context of El Naschie's ε (∞) Cantorian space-time. In particular, we consider filamentary and planar large scale structures as possible refraction channels for electromagnetic radiation coming from cosmological structures. From this vision the Universe appears like a large self-similar adaptive mirrors set. This is made evident through numerical simulations. Consequently, an infinite Universe is just an optical illusion that is produced by mirroring effects connected to the large scale structure of a finite and not so large Universe

  1. A quantitative analysis of transtensional margin width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2018-06-01

    Continental rifted margins show variations between a few hundred to almost a thousand kilometres in their conjugated widths from the relatively undisturbed continent to the oceanic crust. Analogue and numerical modelling results suggest that the conjugated width of rifted margins may have a relationship to their obliquity of divergence, with narrower margins occurring for higher obliquity. We here test this prediction by analysing the obliquity and rift width for 26 segments of transtensional conjugate rifted margins in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. We use the plate reconstruction software GPlates (http://www.gplates.org) for different plate rotation models to estimate the direction and magnitude of rifting from the initial phases of continental rifting until breakup. Our rift width corresponds to the distance between the onshore maximum topography and the last identified continental crust. We find a weak positive correlation between the obliquity of rifting and rift width. Highly oblique margins are narrower than orthogonal margins, as expected from analogue and numerical models. We find no relationships between rift obliquities and rift duration nor the presence or absence of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs).

  2. Movement of dislocations through a random array of weak obstacles of finite width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labusch, R.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    The movement of a dislocation through a random array of weak obstacles of finite width has been simulated with the aid of a digital computer. Through a normalization of the equation of motion it is shown that in the absence of inertial effects the flow stress is a function of a single parameter eta 0 = (y 0 /l/sub s/)√(2 GAMMA/F/sub y/), where y 0 is the range of the dislocation-obstacle interaction force in the direction perpendicular to the dislocation, l/sub s/ is the average distance between obstacles, F/sub y/ is the strength of the interaction force, and GAMMA is the dislocation line tension. The calculations suggest a relation of the form sigma = A (1 + eta 0 B)/sup 1 / 3 / for the flow stress, where A and B are constants

  3. The decay width of stringy hadrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Sonnenschein

    2018-02-01

    We fit the theoretical decay width to experimental data for mesons on the trajectories of ρ, ω, π, η, K⁎, ϕ, D, and Ds⁎, and of the baryons N, Δ, Λ, and Σ. We examine both the linearity in L and the exponential suppression factor. The linearity was found to agree with the data well for mesons but less for baryons. The extracted coefficient for mesons A=0.095±0.015 is indeed quite universal. The exponential suppression was applied to both strong and radiative decays. We discuss the relation with string fragmentation and jet formation. We extract the quark–diquark structure of baryons from their decays. A stringy mechanism for Zweig suppressed decays of quarkonia is proposed and is shown to reproduce the decay width of ϒ states. The dependence of the width on spin and flavor symmetry is discussed. We further apply this model to the decays of glueballs and exotic hadrons.

  4. Reduced, three-dimensional, nonlinear equations for high-β plasmas including toroidal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, R.

    1980-11-01

    The resistive MHD equations for toroidal plasma configurations are reduced by expanding to the second order in epsilon, the inverse aspect ratio, allowing for high β = μsub(o)p/B 2 of order epsilon. The result is a closed system of nonlinear, three-dimensional equations where the fast magnetohydrodynamic time scale is eliminated. In particular, the equation for the toroidal velocity remains decoupled. (orig.)

  5. The decay width of stringy hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Jacob; Weissman, Dorin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we further develop a string model of hadrons by computing their strong decay widths and comparing them to experiment. The main decay mechanism is that of a string splitting into two strings. The corresponding total decay width behaves as Γ = π/2 ATL where T and L are the tension and length of the string and A is a dimensionless universal constant. We show that this result holds for a bosonic string not only in the critical dimension. The partial width of a given decay mode is given by Γi / Γ =Φi exp ⁡ (- 2 πCmsep2 / T) where Φi is a phase space factor, msep is the mass of the "quark" and "antiquark" created at the splitting point, and C is a dimensionless coefficient close to unity. Based on the spectra of hadrons we observe that their (modified) Regge trajectories are characterized by a negative intercept. This implies a repulsive Casimir force that gives the string a "zero point length". We fit the theoretical decay width to experimental data for mesons on the trajectories of ρ, ω, π, η, K*, ϕ, D, and Ds*, and of the baryons N, Δ, Λ, and Σ. We examine both the linearity in L and the exponential suppression factor. The linearity was found to agree with the data well for mesons but less for baryons. The extracted coefficient for mesons A = 0.095 ± 0.015 is indeed quite universal. The exponential suppression was applied to both strong and radiative decays. We discuss the relation with string fragmentation and jet formation. We extract the quark-diquark structure of baryons from their decays. A stringy mechanism for Zweig suppressed decays of quarkonia is proposed and is shown to reproduce the decay width of ϒ states. The dependence of the width on spin and flavor symmetry is discussed. We further apply this model to the decays of glueballs and exotic hadrons.

  6. Line width of Josephson flux flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Dmitriev, P.N.; Sobolev, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    to be proven before one initiates real FFO applications. To achieve this goal a comprehensive set of line width measurements of the FFO operating in different regimes has been performed. FFOs with tapered shape have been successfully implemented in order to avoid the superfine resonant structure with voltage...... spacing of about 20 nV and extremely low differential resistance, recently observed in the IVC of the standard rectangular geometry. The obtained results have been compared with existing theories and FFO models in order to understand and possibly eliminate excess noise in the FFO. The intrinsic line width...

  7. Equation of state, universal profiles, scaling and macroscopic quantum effects in warm dark matter galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, H.J. de [Sorbonne Universites, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie UPMC Paris VI, LPTHE CNRS UMR 7589, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Sanchez, N.G. [Observatoire de Paris PSL Research University, Sorbonne Universites UPMC Paris VI, Observatoire de Paris, LERMA CNRS UMR 8112, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    The Thomas-Fermi approach to galaxy structure determines self-consistently and non-linearly the gravitational potential of the fermionic warm dark matter (WDM) particles given their quantum distribution function f(E). This semiclassical framework accounts for the quantum nature and high number of DM particles, properly describing gravitational bounded and quantum macroscopic systems as neutron stars, white dwarfs and WDM galaxies. We express the main galaxy magnitudes as the halo radius r{sub h}, mass M{sub h}, velocity dispersion and phase space density in terms of the surface density which is important to confront to observations. From these expressions we derive the general equation of state for galaxies, i.e., the relation between pressure and density, and provide its analytic expression. Two regimes clearly show up: (1) Large diluted galaxies for M{sub h} >or similar 2.3 x 10{sup 6} M {sub CircleDot} and effective temperatures T{sub 0} > 0.017 K described by the classical self-gravitating WDM Boltzman gas with a space-dependent perfect gas equation of state, and (2) Compact dwarf galaxies for 1.6 x 10{sup 6} M {sub CircleDot} >or similar M{sub h} >or similar M{sub h,min} ≅ 3.10 x 10{sup 4} (2 keV/m){sup (16)/(5)} M {sub CircleDot}, T{sub 0} < 0.011 K described by the quantum fermionic WDM regime with a steeper equation of state close to the degenerate state. In particular, the T{sub 0} = 0 degenerate or extreme quantum limit yields the most compact and smallest galaxy. In the diluted regime, the halo radius r{sub h}, the squared velocity v{sup 2}(r{sub h}) and the temperature T{sub 0} turn to exhibit square-root of M{sub h} scaling laws. The normalized density profiles ρ(r)/ρ(0) and the normalized velocity profiles v{sup 2}(r)/v{sup 2}(0) are universal functions of r/r{sub h} reflecting the WDM perfect gas behavior in this regime. These theoretical results contrasted to robust and independent sets of galaxy data remarkably reproduce the observations. For

  8. Population stochastic modelling (PSM)-An R package for mixed-effects models based on stochastic differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klim, Søren; Mortensen, Stig Bousgaard; Kristensen, Niels Rode

    2009-01-01

    are often partly ignored in PK/PD modelling although violating the hypothesis for many standard statistical tests. This article presents a package for the statistical program R that is able to handle SDEs in a mixed-effects setting. The estimation method implemented is the FOCE1 approximation......The extension from ordinary to stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is an emerging field and has been motivated in a number of articles [N.R. Kristensen, H. Madsen, S.H. Ingwersen, Using stochastic differential equations for PK/PD model...... development, J. Pharmacokinet. Pharmacodyn. 32 (February(l)) (2005) 109-141; C.W. Tornoe, R.V Overgaard, H. Agerso, H.A. Nielsen, H. Madsen, E.N. Jonsson, Stochastic differential equations in NONMEM: implementation, application, and comparison with ordinary differential equations, Pharm. Res. 22 (August(8...

  9. Modeling of dislocation channel width evolution in irradiated metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Peter J.; Benensky, Kelsa M.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2018-02-01

    Defect-free dislocation channel formation has been reported to promote plastic instability during tensile testing via localized plastic flow, leading to a distinct loss of ductility and strain hardening in many low-temperature irradiated materials. In order to study the underlying mechanisms governing dislocation channel width and formation, the channel formation process is modeled via a simple stochastic dislocation-jog process dependent upon grain size, defect cluster density, and defect size. Dislocations traverse a field of defect clusters and jog stochastically upon defect interaction, forming channels of low defect-density. Based upon prior molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and in-situ experimental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, each dislocation encounter with a dislocation loop or stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) is assumed to cause complete absorption of the defect cluster, prompting the dislocation to jog up or down by a distance equal to half the defect cluster diameter. Channels are predicted to form rapidly and are comparable to reported TEM measurements for many materials. Predicted channel widths are found to be most strongly dependent on mean defect size and correlated well with a power law dependence on defect diameter and density, and distance from the dislocation source. Due to the dependence of modeled channel width on defect diameter and density, maximum channel width is predicted to slowly increase as accumulated dose increases. The relatively weak predicted dependence of channel formation width with distance, in accordance with a diffusion analogy, implies that after only a few microns from the source, most channels observed via TEM analyses may not appear to vary with distance because of limitations in the field-of-view to a few microns. Further, examinations of the effect of the so-called "source-broadening" mechanism of channel formation showed that its effect is simply to add a minimum thickness to the channel

  10. Excitonic effects in solids : time-dependent density functional theory versus the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagmeister, S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare two state-of-the-art methods for the investigation of excitonic effects in solids, namely Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT), for selected simple gap systems as well as semiconducting polymers. Within TDDFT, the linear response framework is used and the Dyson equation for the density-density response function is solved, whereas within MBPT, the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) for the electron-hole correlation function is solved. The dielectric function is obtained as a last step. Both techniques take into account the excitonic effects caused by the interaction of electron-hole pairs. In the former these effects are included in the exchange-correlation (xc) kernel, whereas in the latter they are located in the interaction kernel of the BSE. Kohn-Sham single-particle wave functions obtained from Density Functional Theory within the linearized augmented planewave (LAPW) method are used to calculate all relevant quantities of the formalism. For the simple systems GaAs, Si and LiF are chosen. The role of several approximations to the xc kernel is studied and it is found that for GaAs and Si simple semi-empirical models provide a dielectric function in accordance with the BSE. For the case of LiF, being a system with a weak screening and a strongly bound exciton, only an xc kernel derived from MBPT yields reasonable results but still a slight discrepancy to the BSE is observed. Finally, the semiconducting polymers poly-acetylene and poly(phenylene-vinylene) (PPV) are studied. For both materials the concept of semi-empirical approximations to the xc kernel turns out to be ambiguous due to their low-dimensional character. In the case of poly-acetylene, the xc kernel derived from MBPT yields a dielectric function which is in close but not exact agreement with the one obtained from the BSE. (author) [de

  11. Radiative width of molecular-cluster states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Gai, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular states are characterized by enhanced electromagnetic deexcitations of many different multipolarities. The expected enhancement of E1, E2, and E3 transitions is examined by deriving molecular sum rules for radiative deexcitation widths and via a dimensionality approach. The enhancement of the E1 transitions is the most striking

  12. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  13. Practical algorithms for linear boolean-width

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, C.B.; van Houten, F.J.P.; Bodlaender, H.L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we give a number of new exact algorithms and heuristics to compute linear boolean decompositions, and experimentally evaluate these algorithms. The experimental evaluation shows that significant improvements can be made with respect to running time without increasing the width of the

  14. Practical algorithms for linear Boolean-width

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, C.B.; van Houten, F.J.P.; Bodlaender, H.L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we give a number of new exact algorithms and heuristics to compute linear boolean decompositions, and experimentally evaluate these algorithms. The experimental evaluation shows that significant improvements can be made with respect to running time without increasing the width of the

  15. Time evolution of the fission-decay width under the influence of dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurado, B.; Schmidt, K.H.; Benlliure, J.

    2002-12-01

    Different analytical approximations to the time-dependent fission-decay width used to extract the influence of dissipation on the fission process are critically examined. Calculations with a new, highly realistic analytical approximation to the exact solution of the Fokker-Planck equation sheds doubts on previous conclusions on the dissipation strength made on the basis of less realistic approximations. (orig.)

  16. Correlation of H-mode density barrier width and neutral penetration length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Pedestal studies in DIII-D find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode particle barrier width(ne) and the neutral penetration length. These results are obtained by comparing experimental n e profiles to the predictions of an analytic model for the density profile, obtained from a solution of the particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. Initial bench-marking shows that the model is consistent with the fluid neutrals model of the UEDGE code. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 0.02-0.3 keV), the model quantitatively predicts the observed values of width(ne), the observed decrease of width(ne) as the pedestal density n e,ped increases, the observed increase of the gradient of n e with the square of n e,ped , and the observation that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same n e,ped have very similar widths. In the model, width(ne) depends on the fuelling source and on the plasma transport. Thus, these results provide evidence that the width of the particle barrier depends on both plasma physics and atomic physics. (author)

  17. Supernova equations of state including full nuclear ensemble with in-medium effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Shun; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse supernova simulations. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the relativistic mean field theory with the TM1 parameter set for nucleons, the quantum approach for d, t, h and α as well as the liquid drop model for the other nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the model of the light nuclei other than d, t, h and α based on the quasi-particle description. Furthermore, we modify the model so that the temperature dependences of surface and shell energies of heavy nuclei could be taken into account. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei and the Pauli- and self-energy shifts for d, t, h and α are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that nuclear composition is considerably affected by the modifications in this work, whereas thermodynamical quantities are not changed much. In particular, the washout of shell effect has a great impact on the mass distribution above T ∼ 1 MeV. This improvement may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores.

  18. Effect of taking dietary supplement on hematological and biochemical parameters in male bodybuilders an equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meamar, Rokhsareh; Maracy, Mohammad; Nematollahi, Shahrzad; Yeroshalmi, Shemouil; Zamani-Moghaddam, Ali; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye

    2015-01-01

    Background: The improved physical action following administration of supplements to bodybuilders was supported by changes in laboratory parameters. Despite the fact that these supplements are sometimes associated both advantage and side effects, this study were conducted for the purpose of evaluating the possible effects of some commonly used supplements in bodybuilders on the hematological and biochemical parameters. Materials and Methods: In this study, we included 40 male bodybuilders as cases and 40 controls in the age group of 20-40 years. They used different kinds of supplements for 1 year. In general, all the supplements used were classified into two groups: hormonal and non-hormonal. Laboratory tests were requested for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Results: In an equation model, we found that weight (P = 0.024), duration of bodybuilding (P bodybuilders. The available supplements are unchecked and not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). More studies should be designed for a better and precise administration of each supplement in athletes. PMID:26793253

  19. Effective methods of solving of model equations of certain class of thermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, J.

    1985-01-01

    A number of topics connected with solving of model equations of certain class of thermal systems by the method of successive approximations is touched. A system of partial differential equations of the first degree, appearing most frequently in practical applications of heat and mass transfer theory is reduced to an equivalent system of Volterra integral equations of the second kind. Among a few sample applications the thermal processes appearing in the fuel channel of nuclear reactor are solved. The theoretical analysis is illustrated by the results of numerical calculations given in tables and diagrams. 111 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs. (author)

  20. Population stochastic modelling (PSM)--an R package for mixed-effects models based on stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klim, Søren; Mortensen, Stig Bousgaard; Kristensen, Niels Rode; Overgaard, Rune Viig; Madsen, Henrik

    2009-06-01

    The extension from ordinary to stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is an emerging field and has been motivated in a number of articles [N.R. Kristensen, H. Madsen, S.H. Ingwersen, Using stochastic differential equations for PK/PD model development, J. Pharmacokinet. Pharmacodyn. 32 (February(1)) (2005) 109-141; C.W. Tornøe, R.V. Overgaard, H. Agersø, H.A. Nielsen, H. Madsen, E.N. Jonsson, Stochastic differential equations in NONMEM: implementation, application, and comparison with ordinary differential equations, Pharm. Res. 22 (August(8)) (2005) 1247-1258; R.V. Overgaard, N. Jonsson, C.W. Tornøe, H. Madsen, Non-linear mixed-effects models with stochastic differential equations: implementation of an estimation algorithm, J. Pharmacokinet. Pharmacodyn. 32 (February(1)) (2005) 85-107; U. Picchini, S. Ditlevsen, A. De Gaetano, Maximum likelihood estimation of a time-inhomogeneous stochastic differential model of glucose dynamics, Math. Med. Biol. 25 (June(2)) (2008) 141-155]. PK/PD models are traditionally based ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with an observation link that incorporates noise. This state-space formulation only allows for observation noise and not for system noise. Extending to SDEs allows for a Wiener noise component in the system equations. This additional noise component enables handling of autocorrelated residuals originating from natural variation or systematic model error. Autocorrelated residuals are often partly ignored in PK/PD modelling although violating the hypothesis for many standard statistical tests. This article presents a package for the statistical program R that is able to handle SDEs in a mixed-effects setting. The estimation method implemented is the FOCE(1) approximation to the population likelihood which is generated from the individual likelihoods that are approximated using the Extended Kalman Filter's one-step predictions.

  1. Unsteady free surface flow in porous media: One-dimensional model equations including vertical effects and seepage face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nucci, Carmine

    2018-05-01

    This note examines the two-dimensional unsteady isothermal free surface flow of an incompressible fluid in a non-deformable, homogeneous, isotropic, and saturated porous medium (with zero recharge and neglecting capillary effects). Coupling a Boussinesq-type model for nonlinear water waves with Darcy's law, the two-dimensional flow problem is solved using one-dimensional model equations including vertical effects and seepage face. In order to take into account the seepage face development, the system equations (given by the continuity and momentum equations) are completed by an integral relation (deduced from the Cauchy theorem). After testing the model against data sets available in the literature, some numerical simulations, concerning the unsteady flow through a rectangular dam (with an impermeable horizontal bottom), are presented and discussed.

  2. Effective two-body equations for the four-body problem with exact treatment of (2+2)-subsystem contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberzettl, H.; Sandhas, W.

    1981-01-01

    Effective two-body equations for the four-body problem are derived within the general N-body theory of Alt, Grassberger, and Sandhas. In contrast to usual treatments, the final expressions do not require separable (2+2) subamplitudes but incorporate these exactly. All four-body amplitudes can be calculated from the solution of a single integral equation for the reaction (3+1)→(3+1). With single-term separable approximations for the two-particle and the (3+1) subsystem amplitudes the driving terms of the final equations are seen to reduce to those of the field-theoretical model by Fonseca and Shanley. Since our results are based on an exact and complete N-body theory, the investigation of subsystem reaction mechanisms is facilitated. As a consequence, we are led to a three-particle propagator which has the right pole behavior and includes exchange effects

  3. Aggregate frequency width, nuclear hyperfine coupling and Jahn-Teller effect of Cu2+ impurity ion ESR in SrLaAlO4 dielectric resonator at 20 millikelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, M. A.; Le Floch, J.-M.; Krupka, J.; Tobar, M. E.

    2018-01-01

    The impurity paramagnetic ion, Cu2+ substitutes Al in the SrLaAlO4 single crystal lattice, this results in a CuO6 elongated octahedron, and the resulting measured g-factors satisfy four-fold axes variation condition. The aggregate frequency width of the electron spin resonance with the required minimum level of impurity concentration has been evaluated in this single crystal SrLaAlO4 at 20 millikelvin. Measured parallel hyperfine constants, A\\Vert Cu , were determined to be -155.7×10-4~cm-1, ~ -163.0×10-4~cm-1, ~ -178.3×10-4~cm-1 and -211.1×10-4~cm-1 at 9.072~GHz~(WGH4, 1, 1) for the nuclear magnetic quantum number M_I=+\\frac{3}{2}, +\\frac{1}{2}, -\\frac{1}{2} , and -\\frac{3}{2} respectively. The anisotropy of the hyperfine structure reveals the characteristics of the static Jahn-Teller effect. The second-order-anisotropy term, ˜ (\\fracspin{-orbit~coupling}{10D_q}){\\hspace{0pt}}2 , is significant and cannot be disregarded, with the local strain dominating over the observed Zeeman-anisotropy-energy difference. The Bohr electron magneton, β=9.23× 10-24 JT-1 , (within -0.43% so-called experimental error) has been found using the measured spin-Hamiltonian parameters. Measured nuclear dipolar hyperfine structure parameter P\\Vert=12.3×10-4~cm-1 shows that the mean inverse third power of the electron distance from the nucleus is ≃ 5.23 a.u. for Cu2+ ion in the substituted Al3+ ion site assuming nuclear electric quadruple moment Q=-0.211 barn.

  4. Threshold and flavor effects in the renormalization group equations of the MSSM. II. Dimensionful couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, Andrew D.; Tata, Xerxes

    2009-01-01

    We reexamine the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGEs) for the dimensionful parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with broken supersymmetry, allowing for arbitrary flavor structure of the soft SUSY-breaking parameters. We include threshold effects by evaluating the β-functions in a sequence of (nonsupersymmetric) effective theories with heavy particles decoupled at the scale of their mass. We present the most general form for high-scale, soft SUSY-breaking parameters that obtains if we assume that the supersymmetry-breaking mechanism does not introduce new intergenerational couplings. This form, possibly amended to allow additional sources of flavor-violation, serves as a boundary condition for solving the RGEs for the dimensionful MSSM parameters. We then present illustrative examples of numerical solutions to the RGEs. We find that in a SUSY grand unified theory with the scale of SUSY scalars split from that of gauginos and higgsinos, the gaugino mass unification condition may be violated by O(10%). As another illustration, we show that in mSUGRA, the rate for the flavor-violating t-tilde 1 →cZ-tilde 1 decay obtained using the complete RGE solution is smaller than that obtained using the commonly used 'single-step' integration of the RGEs by a factor 10-25, and so may qualitatively change expectations for topologies from top-squark pair production at colliders. Together with the RGEs for dimensionless couplings presented in a companion paper, the RGEs in Appendix 2 of this paper form a complete set of one-loop MSSM RGEs that include threshold and flavor-effects necessary for two-loop accuracy.

  5. Generation of ozone by Ns-width pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Naoyuki; Wakimoto, Masaya; Shinke, Yosuke; Nagata, Masayoshi; Namihira, Takao; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2002-01-01

    The demand of ozone will be increasing for wholesome and environment-conscious sterilizations. The generation of ozone using the pulsed power discharge will apply electron accelerations around the head of streamer discharge principally. The breakdown in reactor often limits the efficient generation. Therefore, the pulse shape should be controlled for dimension of the reactor. It is clear that a pulse shortening is one of effective approaches. Pulsed power voltage with ns-width applies for ozone generation. The effects, on concentration and efficiency of generation, of pulse shape, repetition rate of pulse, flow rate of oxygen gas, and dimension and configuration of reactor, are discussed. The dimension and configuration of the reactor are optimized for the pulse width

  6. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution.

  7. WAVE EQUATION DATUMING TO CORRECT TOPOGRAPHY EFFECT ON FOOTHILL SEISMIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes Vides Luis Alfredo

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The current seismic processing applies Static Corrections to overcome the effects associated to rough topography, based in the assumption that velocity in near surface is lower than in the substratum, which force going up rays travel near to vertical. However, when the velocity contrast between these layers is not large enough, the trajectory of the up going rays deviate from vertical raveling the reflectors erroneously. A better alternative to correct this is to continue the wave field to a datum, because it does not assume vertical ray trajectory and solves the acoustic wave equation to extrapolate sources and receivers. The Kirchhoff approach was tested in synthetic shots continuing their wave field to a datum and finally it was applied instead of Static Corrections in real data acquired in foothill zones. First shot and receiver gathers were downward continued to the base of weathering layer and later upward continued to a final flat datum. Comparing the obtained results we observed that continuation approach provides a noticeable enhancement of reflectors in seismic records, displaying a better continuity of the reflectors and an increment in frequency content.

  8. Equation of state of neutron-rich nuclear matter from chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Norbert; Strohmeier, Susanne [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Based on chiral effective field theory, the equation of state of neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated systematically. The contributing diagrams include one- and two-pion exchange together with three-body terms arising from virtual Δ(1232)-isobar excitations. The proper expansion of the energy per particle, anti E(k{sub f},δ) = anti E{sub n}(k{sub f}) + δB{sub 1}(k{sub f}) + δ{sup 5/3}B{sub 5/3}(k{sub f}) + δ{sup 2}B{sub 2}(k{sub f}) +.., for the system with neutron density ρ{sub n} = k{sub f}{sup 3}(1-δ)/3π{sup 2} and proton density ρ{sub p} = k{sub f}{sup 3}δ/3π{sup 2} is performed analytically for the various interaction contributions. One observes essential structural differences to the commonly used quadratic approximation. The density dependent coefficient B{sub 1}(k{sub f}) turns out to be unrelated to the isospin-asymmetry of nuclear matter. The coefficient B{sub 5/3}(k{sub f}) of the non-analytical δ{sup 5/3}-term receives contributions from the proton kinetic energy and from the one- and two-pion exchange interactions. The physical consequences for neutron star matter are studied.

  9. Effective equations for the precession dynamics of electron spins and electron–impurity correlations in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygorek, M; Axt, V M

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a quantum kinetic theory for the spin dynamics in diluted magnetic semiconductors, we derive simplified equations that effectively describe the spin transfer between carriers and magnetic impurities for an arbitrary initial impurity magnetization. Taking the Markov limit of these effective equations, we obtain good quantitative agreement with the full quantum kinetic theory for the spin dynamics in bulk systems at high magnetic doping. In contrast, the standard rate description where the carrier–dopant interaction is treated according to Fermi’s golden rule, which involves the assumption of a short memory as well as a perturbative argument, has been shown previously to fail if the impurity magnetization is non-zero. The Markov limit of the effective equations is derived, assuming only a short memory, while higher order terms are still accounted for. These higher order terms represent the precession of the carrier–dopant correlations in the effective magnetic field due to the impurity spins. Numerical calculations show that the Markov limit of our effective equations reproduces the results of the full quantum kinetic theory very well. Furthermore, this limit allows for analytical solutions and for a physically transparent interpretation. (paper)

  10. DIFFUSE DBD IN ATMOSPHERIC AIR AT DIFFERENT APPLIED PULSE WIDTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Alexandrovna Shershunova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the realization and the diagnostics of the volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in 1-mm air gap when applying high voltage rectangular pulses to the electrodes. The effect of the applied pulse width on the discharge dissipated energy was studied in detail. It was found experimentally, the energy stayed nearly constant with the pulse elongation from 600 ns to 1 ms.

  11. Temperature dependence of spreading width of giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storozhenko, A.N.; Vdovin, A.I.; Ventura, A.; Blokhin, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    The Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model extended to finite temperature within the framework of Thermo Field Dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ ↓ of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 120 Sn and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that Γ ↓ increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones, existing in the literature

  12. Technique for estimating relocated gap width for gap conductance calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klink, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    Thermally induced fuel fragmentation and relocation has been demonstrated to influence the thermal behavior of a fuel rod in two ways. The effective fuel pellet conductivity is decreased and pellet-to-cladding heat transfer is improved. This paper presents a correlation between as-built and relocated gap width which, used with the Ross and Stoute Gap Conductance Correlation and an appropriate fuel thermal expansion model, closely predicts the measured gap conductances

  13. Numerical simulation of distorted crystal Darwin width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Xu Zhongmin; Wang Naxiu

    2012-01-01

    A new numerical simulation method according to distorted crystal optical theory was used to predict the direct-cooling crystal monochromator optical properties(crystal Darwin width) in this study. The finite element analysis software was used to calculate the deformed displacements of DCM crystal and to get the local reciprocal lattice vector of distorted crystal. The broadening of direct-cooling crystal Darwin width in meridional direction was estimated at 4.12 μrad. The result agrees well with the experimental data of 5 μrad, while it was 3.89 μrad by traditional calculation method of root mean square (RMS) of the slope error in the center line of footprint. The new method provides important theoretical support for designing and processing of monochromator crystal for synchrotron radiation beamline. (authors)

  14. Exotic meson decay widths using lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, M. S.; Fiebig, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    A decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson h, with J PC =1 -+ , is presented for the channel h→πa 1 . This quenched lattice QCD simulation employs Luescher's finite box method. Operators coupling to the h and πa 1 states are used at various levels of smearing and fuzzing, and at four quark masses. Eigenvalues of the corresponding correlation matrices yield energy spectra that determine scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative πa 1 momenta. Although the phase shift data is sparse, fits to a Breit-Wigner model are attempted, resulting in a decay width of about 60 MeV when averaged over two lattice sizes having a lattice spacing of 0.07 fm

  15. Analysis of reduced widths and size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, H.C.; Ram Raj; Nath, N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent data on S-wave neutron reduced widths for a large number of nuclei have been analysed nucleus-wise and the calculations for the degree of freedom of the associated (chi) 2 -distribution have been made using the Porter and Thomas procedure. It is noted that a number of nuclei can be fitted by a (chi) 2 -distribution with degree of freedom one, while there are few which are identified to follow a (chi) 2 -distribution with degree of freedom two and even more than two. The present analysis thus contradicts the usual presumption according to which the degree of freedom is taken to be always unity. An analytical attempt has also been made to ascertain the suitability of the data on reduced widths to be used for the analysis. These considerations are likely to modify the neutron cross-section evaluations. (author)

  16. Analytical Solution of the Schrödinger Equation with Spatially Varying Effective Mass for Generalised Hylleraas Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debnath, S.; Maji, Smarajit; Meyur, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained exact solution of the effective mass Schrödinger equation for the generalised Hylleraas potential. The exact bound state energy eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions are presented. The bound state eigenfunctions are obtained in terms of the hypergeometric functions. Results are also given for the special case of potential parameter.

  17. Doses-effect regression equations for some growth indicators of rice plantules from CO60 irradiated seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.C.; Gonzalez, L.M.; Garcia, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, dose-effect regression equations for energy and percentage germination, size, root length and dry mass of plantules from which values of DL-50 middle lethal dose were calculated and likely or unlikely equivalencies among them were established

  18. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope : Physical Properties of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Clusters on the Celestial Equator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menanteau, F.; Sifon, Andalaft C.J.; Barrientos, L.; Battaglia, N.; Bond, J.; Crichton, D.; Das, S.; Devlin, M.; Dicker, S.; Dünner, R.; Gralla, M.; Hajian, A.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, M.; Hincks, A.; Hughes, J.; Infante, L.; Kosowsky, A.; Marriage, T.; Marsden, D.; Moodley, K.; Niemack, M.; Nolta, M.; Page, L.; Partridge, B.; Reese, E.; Schmitt, B.; Sievers, J.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S.; Switzer, E.; Wollack, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present the optical and X-ray properties of 68 galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect at 148 GHz by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). Our sample, from an area of 504 deg$^{2}$ centered on the celestial equator, is divided into two regions. The main region uses 270

  19. Structural Equation Model of Smartphone Addiction Based on Adult Attachment Theory: Mediating Effects of Loneliness and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    EunYoung Kim, PhD; Inhyo Cho, PhD; Eun Joo Kim, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the mediating effects of loneliness and depression on the relationship between adult attachment and smartphone addiction in university students. Methods: A total of 200 university students participated in this study. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, and structural equation modeling. Results: There were significant positive relationships between attachment anxiety, loneliness, depression, and smartphone addiction. ...

  20. PKPD model of interleukin-21 effects on thermoregulation in monkeys - Application and evaluation of stochastic differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Rune Viig; Holford, Nick; Rytved, K. A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To describe the pharmacodynamic effects of recombinant human interleukin-21 (IL-21) on core body temperature in cynomolgus monkeys using basic mechanisms of heat regulation. A major effort was devoted to compare the use of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with stochastic differentia...

  1. Width and partial widths of unstable particles in the light of the Nielsen identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, P.A.; Sirlin, A.; Kniehl, B.A.; Hamburg Univ.

    2001-09-01

    Fundamental properties of unstable particles, including mass, width, and partial widths, are examined on the basis of the Nielsen identities (NI) that describe the gauge dependence of Green functions. In particular, we prove that the pole residues and associated definitions of branching ratios and partial widths are gauge independent to all orders. A simpler, previously discussed definition of branching ratios and partial widths is found to be gauge independent through next-to-next-to-leading order. It is then explained how it may be modified in order to extend the gauge independence to all orders. We also show that the physical scattering amplitude is the most general combination of self-energy, vertex, and box contributions that is gauge independent for arbitrary s, discuss the analytical properties of the NI functions, and exhibit explicitly their one-loop expressions in the Z-γ sector of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  2. Width and partial widths of unstable particles in the light of the Nielsen identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Pietro A.; Kniehl, Bernd A.; Sirlin, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental properties of unstable particles, including mass, width, and partial widths, are examined on the basis of the Nielsen identities (NI) that describe the gauge dependence of Green functions. In particular, we prove that the pole residues and associated definitions of branching ratios and partial widths are gauge independent to all orders. A simpler, previously discussed definition of branching ratios and partial widths is found to be gauge independent through next-to-next-to-leading order. It is then explained how it may be modified in order to extend the gauge independence to all orders. We also show that the physical scattering amplitude is the most general combination of self-energy, vertex, and box contributions that is gauge independent for arbitrary s, discuss the analytical properties of the NI functions, and exhibit explicitly their one-loop expressions in the Z-γ sector of the standard model

  3. Alternative equations of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Neto, N.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown, trough a new formalism, that the quantum fluctuation effects of the gravitational field in Einstein's equations are analogs to the effects of a continuum medium in Maxwell's Electrodynamics. Following, a real example of the applications of these equations is studied. Qunatum fluctuations effects as perturbation sources in Minkowski and Friedmann Universes are examined. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Examining Potential Boundary Bias Effects in Kernel Smoothing on Equating: An Introduction for the Adaptive and Epanechnikov Kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Jaime A; von Davier, Alina A

    2015-05-01

    Test equating is a method of making the test scores from different test forms of the same assessment comparable. In the equating process, an important step involves continuizing the discrete score distributions. In traditional observed-score equating, this step is achieved using linear interpolation (or an unscaled uniform kernel). In the kernel equating (KE) process, this continuization process involves Gaussian kernel smoothing. It has been suggested that the choice of bandwidth in kernel smoothing controls the trade-off between variance and bias. In the literature on estimating density functions using kernels, it has also been suggested that the weight of the kernel depends on the sample size, and therefore, the resulting continuous distribution exhibits bias at the endpoints, where the samples are usually smaller. The purpose of this article is (a) to explore the potential effects of atypical scores (spikes) at the extreme ends (high and low) on the KE method in distributions with different degrees of asymmetry using the randomly equivalent groups equating design (Study I), and (b) to introduce the Epanechnikov and adaptive kernels as potential alternative approaches to reducing boundary bias in smoothing (Study II). The beta-binomial model is used to simulate observed scores reflecting a range of different skewed shapes.

  5. Classical kinetic equations for orientational effects with account for the two-particle correlation function of a crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ol'khovskij, I.I.; Sadykov, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of classical-statistical approach to the orientational effect theory with account of the influence of the two-particle correlation function of a crystal on diffusion processes. Peculiarities of fast particle movement in the crystal moving at small angles to crystallographic axes and planes are caused by a great number of correlated collisions of the beam particle with the crystal atoms during which the particle slightly deviates in each collision from the direction of its movement before the collision. Obtained is the kinetic equation for the distribution function over coordinates and velocities describing the movement of these particles in the crystal. Lacking the particle deceleration the equation describing movement of the beam particles in the averaged potential and their diffusion by velocities is also obtained. The main peculiarity of these equations is the fact that they take into account strong spatial non-uniformity in the crystal atom distribution [ru

  6. Modified model of neutron resonance widths distribution. Results of total gamma-widths approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    Functional dependences of probability to observe given Γ n 0 value and algorithms for determination of the most probable magnitudes of the modified model of resonance parameter distributions were used for analysis of the experimental data on the total radiative widths of neutron resonances. As in the case of neutron widths, precise description of the Γ γ spectra requires a superposition of three and more probability distributions for squares of the random normally distributed values with different nonzero average and nonunit dispersion. This result confirms the preliminary conclusion obtained earlier at analysis of Γ n 0 that practically in all 56 tested sets of total gamma widths there are several groups noticeably differing from each other by the structure of their wave functions. In addition, it was determined that radiative widths are much more sensitive than the neutron ones to resonance wave functions structure. Analysis of early obtained neutron reduced widths distribution parameters for 157 resonance sets in the mass region of nuclei 35 ≤ A ≤ 249 was also performed. It was shown that the experimental values of widths can correspond with high probability to superposition of several expected independent distributions with their nonzero mean values and nonunit dispersion

  7. Nonequilibrium behavior of fission gas bubbles with emphasis on the effects of the equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, W.G.

    1976-12-01

    The paper presents a computer code designed to estimate fission gas behavior during transient fuel conditions, allowing for nonequilibrium bubble states, with emphasis on equation of state sensitivity. The computer code is a modification of the original code by R. G. Esteves, A. R. Wazzan, and D. Okrent, which in its present form includes the following: resolution, coalescence, leakage to the grain boundary, bubble volume adjustment from a nonequilibrium state by vacancy diffusion, a choice of equation of state between the Van der Waals and the perfect gas equation, the incorporation of hydrostatic pressure values, if known, and conservation of gas atoms. Also, there is a version of the code that allows the existence of single gas atoms in solution in the lattice. The original code is discussed to provide a model of the physical processes and to show a general numerical approach to the estimation of the fission gas behavior. The incorporation of various new features into the original work, such as the option of the Van der Waals gas equation, is described. The various physical models are examined for sensitivity to equation of state for both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium bubble descriptions. Selected computer results of a transient simulation are also presented and general conclusions are drawn upon these results

  8. Reduced Dirac equation and Lamb shift as off-mass-shell effect in quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Guang-Jiong; Xu Jian-Jun; Lou Sen-Yue

    2011-01-01

    Based on the accurate experimental data of energy-level differences in hydrogen-like atoms, especially the 1S—2S transitions of hydrogen and deuterium, the necessity of introducing a reduced Dirac equation with reduced mass as the substitution of original electron mass is stressed. Based on new cognition about the essence of special relativity, we provide a reasonable argument for the reduced Dirac equation to have two symmetries, the invariance under the (newly defined) space-time inversion and that under the pure space inversion, in a noninertial frame. By using the reduced Dirac equation and within the framework of quantum electrodynamics in covariant form, the Lamb shift can be evaluated (at one-loop level) as the radiative correction on a bound electron staying in an off-mass-shell state—-a new approach eliminating the infrared divergence. Hence the whole calculation, though with limited accuracy, is simplified, getting rid of all divergences and free of ambiguity. (general)

  9. On the construction of coherent states of position dependent mass Schroedinger equation endowed with effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithiika Ruby, V.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to construct coherent states for an exactly solvable position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We use point canonical transformation method and obtain ground state eigenfunction of the position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We fix the ladder operators in the deformed form and obtain explicit expression of the deformed superpotential in terms of mass distribution and its derivative. We also prove that these deformed operators lead to minimum uncertainty relations. Further, we illustrate our algorithm with two examples, in which the coherent states given for the second example are new.

  10. Approximate Solutions to the Dirac Equation with Effective Mass for the Manning-Rosen Potential in N Dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahar, M.K.; Yasuk, F.

    2012-01-01

    The solutions of the effective mass Dirac equation for the Manning-Rosen potential with the centrifugal term are studied approximately in N dimension. The relativistic energy spectrum and two-component spinor eigenfunctions are obtained by the asymptotic iteration method. We have also investigated eigenvalues of the effective mass Dirac-Manning-Rosen problem for α = 0 or α = 1. In this case, the Manning-Rosen potential reduces to the Hulthen potential. (author)

  11. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Ahmed S.; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  12. Relationship Between Crack Growth Resistance KR Curve and Specimen Width for 2060 - T8E30 Lithium Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Di Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available KR crack growth resistance curve can be used to predict crack propagation behavior, estimate the crack component bearing capacity after the crack, so KR curve research occupies very important position in the fracture mechanics. Based on crack growth resistance KR test curve of 2060 - T8E30 lithium aluminum alloy under the same thickness for different width, studies have shown that under the same thickness, the influence of the width on the resistance curve of crack propagation can be neglected. Empirical equation of resistance curve of crack extension of the smaller width specimen is given. Extending the fitting equation to that of larger width, it can be found that it is highly coincided with the experimental results.

  13. Measurement of the mass and width of the W boson

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    The mass and width of the W boson are measured using e+e- -> W+W- events from the data sample collected by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 170 GeV and 209 GeV. The mass (mw) and width (gw) are determined using direct reconstruction of the kinematics of W+W- -> qqbarlv and W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. When combined with previous OPAL measurements using W+W- -> lvlv events and the dependence on mw of the WW production cross-section at threshold, the results are determined to be mw = 80.415 +- 0.042 +- 0.030 +- 0.009 GeV gw = 1.996 +- 0.096 +- 0.102 +- 0.003 GeV where the first error is statistical, the second systematic and the third due to uncertainties in the value of the LEP beam energy. By measuring mw with several different jet algorithms in the qqbarqqbar channel, a limit is also obtained on possible final-state interactions due to colour reconnection effects in W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. The consistency of the results for the W mass and width with those inferred from other ele...

  14. Balance (perceived and actual) and preferred stance width during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, John; Hsiao, Katherine T; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2008-05-01

    Pregnant women often remark that their balance degrades during pregnancy; however, it appears that no studies have documented the gravida's perception of her balance nor measured direction-specific changes in balance throughout pregnancy or after delivery. Thirty women, fifteen pregnant and fifteen non-pregnant controls, were tested monthly and through 6-month postpartum. For each session, perceived degradation in sense of balance, laboratory-based balance measures, stance width, and the number of falls since the previous session were recorded. Laboratory-based balance measures, quantified by direction-specific measures of postural sway, were computed from ten 30s quiet-standing trials on a stationary force platform. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t-tests, and Pearson correlations were use to examine group and time effects. For the pregnant group, perceived balance degradation and stance width were highly correlated (r = 0.94). Both increased during pregnancy (P r > 0.72) and also decreased significantly between the third trimester and postpartum (P pregnancy, but increased after delivery. Contrary to recent work suggesting fall rates of 25%, only 13% of our subjects (n = 2) fell during pregnancy. Perceived degradation in balance during pregnancy was strongly related to increasing postural sway instability in the anterior-posterior direction. Lateral stability was maintained during pregnancy and likely accomplished by increasing stance width.

  15. Statistical analysis of partial reduced width distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Quoc Thuong.

    1973-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop rigorous methods for analysing experimental event distributions according to a law in chi 2 and to check if the number of degrees of freedom ν is compatible with the value 1 for the reduced neutron width distribution. Two statistical methods were used (the maximum-likelihood method and the method of moments); it was shown, in a few particular cases, that ν is compatible with 1. The difference between ν and 1, if it exists, should not exceed 3%. These results confirm the validity of the compound nucleus model [fr

  16. Simple method for calculating island widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.; Hanson, J.D.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF. In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 30%. 7 refs

  17. Resolving single bubble sonoluminescence flask width

    OpenAIRE

    Arakeri, Vijay H

    1998-01-01

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL), first studied and observed by Gaitan et al., is the of light emission from a single gas bubble trapped at the pressure maximum of a resonant sound field in a liquid medium, generally water. One of the most striking aspects of SBSL was the estimated optical flash width being less than 50 picoseconds (ps)3; this upper estimate was based on the relative response of a SBSL flash in comparison to a 34 ps laser pulse using a microchannel platephotomultiplier ...

  18. Analytic smoothing effect for the cubic hyperbolic Schrodinger equation in two space dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaku Hoshino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the Cauchy problem for the cubic hyperbolic Schrodinger equation in two space dimensions. We prove existence of analytic global solutions for sufficiently small and exponential decaying data. The method of proof depends on the generalized Leibniz rule for the generator of pseudo-conformal transform acting on pseudo-conformally invariant nonlinearity.

  19. An Exploration of Metacognition and Its Effect on Mathematical Performance in Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Jarratt

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that students in certain contexts who are "metacognitively aware learners" demonstrate better academic performance (Shraw & Dennison, 1994; Md. Yunus & Ali, 2008). In this research, the metacognitive levels for two classes of differential equations students were studied. Students completed a survey adapted from…

  20. Silvicultural manipulation and site effect on above and belowground biomass equations for young Pinus radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubilar, Rafael A.; Allen, H. Lee; Alvarez, Jose S.; Albaugh, Timothy J.; Fox, Thomas R.; Stape, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little understanding of how silvicultural treatments, during the early stages of tree development, affect allometric relationships. We developed and compared stem, branch, foliage, coarse and fine root biomass, and leaf area estimation equations, for four-year-old genetically improved radiata pine trees grown on three contrasting soil-site conditions. At each site, selected trees were destructively sampled from a control (shovel planted, no weed control, fertilized with 2 g of boron), a shovel planted + weed control (2 first years) + complete fertilization (nitrogen + phosphorus + boron 2 first years + potassium 2nd year), and a soil tillage (subsoil at 60 cm) + weed control (first 2 years) + complete fertilization treatment. Tissues were separated into foliage, branch, stem, fine and coarse roots (>2 mm). Regression equations for each tree biomass tissue versus leaf area were fit for each site and compared among treatments and sites with the same genetic material. Our results indicated that individual tree biomasses for young plantations are affected by silvicultural treatment and site growing conditions. Higher variability in estimates was found for foliage and branches due to the ephemeral nature of these components. Stem biomass equations vary less, but differences in biomass equations were found among sites and treatments. Coarse root biomass estimates were variable but less than expected, considering the gradient among sites. Similar to stem biomass, a simple positive general linear relationship between root collar diameter, or diameter at breast height with coarse roots biomass was developed across sites and treatments.

  1. The Effect of Mini and Midi Anchor Tests on Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Çigdem Akin

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the test forms to the midi anchor test and the mini anchor test performance based on item response theory. The research was conducted with using simulated data which were generated based on Rasch model. In order to equate two test forms the anchor item nonequivalent groups (internal anchor test) was…

  2. A review of the effects on IRT item parameter estimates with a focus on misbehaving common items in test equating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis P Michaelides

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have investigated the topic of change or drift in item parameter estimates in the context of Item Response Theory. Content effects, such as instructional variation and curricular emphasis, as well as context effects, such as the wording, position, or exposure of an item have been found to impact item parameter estimates. The issue becomes more critical when items with estimates exhibiting differential behavior across test administrations are used as common for deriving equating transformations. This paper reviews the types of effects on IRT item parameter estimates and focuses on the impact of misbehaving or aberrant common items on equating transformations. Implications relating to test validity and the judgmental nature of the decision to keep or discard aberrant common items are discussed, with recommendations for future research into more informed and formal ways of dealing with misbehaving common items.

  3. A Review of the Effects on IRT Item Parameter Estimates with a Focus on Misbehaving Common Items in Test Equating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Michalis P

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the topic of change or drift in item parameter estimates in the context of item response theory (IRT). Content effects, such as instructional variation and curricular emphasis, as well as context effects, such as the wording, position, or exposure of an item have been found to impact item parameter estimates. The issue becomes more critical when items with estimates exhibiting differential behavior across test administrations are used as common for deriving equating transformations. This paper reviews the types of effects on IRT item parameter estimates and focuses on the impact of misbehaving or aberrant common items on equating transformations. Implications relating to test validity and the judgmental nature of the decision to keep or discard aberrant common items are discussed, with recommendations for future research into more informed and formal ways of dealing with misbehaving common items.

  4. A new evolution equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laenen, E.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolution equation for the gluon density relevant for the region of small x B . It generalizes the GLR equation and allows deeper penetration in dense parton systems than the GLR equation does. This generalization consists of taking shadowing effects more comprehensively into account by including multigluon correlations, and allowing for an arbitrary initial gluon distribution in a hadron. We solve the new equation for fixed α s . We find that the effects of multigluon correlations on the deep-inelastic structure function are small. (orig.)

  5. Integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2005-01-01

    Two distinct but related approaches hold the solutions to many mathematical problems--the forms of expression known as differential and integral equations. The method employed by the integral equation approach specifically includes the boundary conditions, which confers a valuable advantage. In addition, the integral equation approach leads naturally to the solution of the problem--under suitable conditions--in the form of an infinite series.Geared toward upper-level undergraduate students, this text focuses chiefly upon linear integral equations. It begins with a straightforward account, acco

  6. Orbit width scaling of TAE instability growth rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.V.; Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.

    1995-07-01

    The growth rate of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) driven unstable by resonant coupling of energetic charged particles is evaluated in the ballooning limit over a wide range of parameters. All damping effects are ignored. Variations in orbit width, aspect ratio, and the ratio of alfven velocity to energetic particle birth velocity, are explored. The relative contribution of passing and trapped particles, and finite Larmor radius effects, are also examined. The phase space location of resonant particles with interact strongly with the modes is described. The accuracy of the analytic results with respect to growth rate magnitude and parametric dependence is investigated by comparison with numerical results

  7. Orbit width scaling of TAE instability growth rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.V.; Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.

    1995-01-01

    The growth rate of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) driven unstable by resonant coupling of energetic charged particles is evaluated in the 'ballooning' limit over a wide range of parameters. All damping effects are ignored. Variations in orbit width, aspect ratio and the ratio of Alfven velocity to energetic particle 'birth' velocity are explored. The relative contribution of passing and trapped particles, and finite Larmor radius effects, are also examined. The phase space location of resonant particles that interact strongly with the modes is described. The accuracy of the analytic results with respect to growth rate magnitude and parametric dependence is investigated by comparison with numerical results. (author). 16 refs, 8 figs

  8. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slicker, James M.

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  9. The performance effect of the Lean package – a survey study using a structural equation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Borup; Israelsen, Poul

    Purpose - Our aim is to test and validate a system-wide approach using mediating relationships in a structural equation model in order to understand how the practices of Lean affect performance. Design/methodology/approach – A cross-sectional survey with 200 responding companies indicating...... that they use Lean. This is analyzed in a structural quation model setting. Findings - Previous quantitative research has shown mixed results for the performance of Lean because they have not addressed the system-wide mediating relations between Lean practices. We find that Companies using a system...... practices in creating improved performance. Hence, we develop a new systemwide structural equation model approach with multiple mediations, and we validate this with substantial tests....

  10. A Nonlinear differential equation model of Asthma effect of environmental pollution using LHAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, G. Arul; Balamuralitharan, S.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we investigated a nonlinear differential equation mathematical model to study the spread of asthma in the environmental pollutants from industry and mainly from tobacco smoke from smokers in different type of population. Smoking is the main cause to spread Asthma in the environment. Numerical simulation is also discussed. Finally by using Liao’s Homotopy analysis Method (LHAM), we found that the approximate analytical solution of Asthmatic disease in the environmental.

  11. Calculation of radiation effects in solids by direct numerical solution of the adjoint transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    The 'adjoint transport equation in its integro-differential form' is derived for the radiation damage produced by atoms injected into solids. We reduce it to the one-dimensional form and prepare it for a numerical solution by: --discretizing the continuous variables energy, space and direction, --replacing the partial differential quotients by finite differences and --evaluating the collision integral by a double sum. By a proper manipulation of this double sum the adjoint transport equation turns into a (very large) set of linear equations with tridiagonal matrix which can be solved by a special (simple and fast) algorithm. The solution of this set of linear equations contains complete information on a specified damage type (e.g. the energy deposited in a volume V) in terms of the function D(i,E,c,x) which gives the damage produced by all particles generated in a cascade initiated by a particle of type i starting at x with energy E in direction c. It is essential to remark that one calculation gives the damage function D for the complete ranges of the variables {i,E,c and x} (for numerical reasons of course on grid-points in the {E,c,x}-space). This is most useful to applications where a general source-distribution S(i,E,c,x) of particles is given by the experimental setup (e.g. beam-window and and target in proton accelerator work. The beam-protons along their path through the window--or target material generate recoil atoms by elastic collisions or nuclear reactions. These recoil atoms form the particle source S). The total damage produced then is eventually given by: D = (Σ)i ∫ ∫ ∫ S(i, E, c, x)*D(i, E, c, x)*dE*dc*dx A Fortran-77 program running on a PC-486 was written for the overall procedure and applied to some problems

  12. Body composition in elderly people: effect of criterion estimates on predictive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, R.N.; Heymsfield, S.B.; Lichtman, S.; Wang, J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine whether there are significant differences between two- and four-compartment model estimates of body composition, whether these differences are associated with aqueous and mineral fractions of the fat-free mass (FFM); and whether the differences are retained in equations for predicting body composition from anthropometry and bioelectric resistance. Body composition was estimated in 98 men and women aged 65-94 y by using a four-compartment model based on hydrodensitometry, 3 H 2 O dilution, and dual-photon absorptiometry. These estimates were significantly different from those obtained by using Siri's two-compartment model. The differences were associated significantly (P less than 0.0001) with variation in the aqueous fraction of FFM. Equations for predicting body composition from anthropometry and resistance, when calibrated against two-compartment model estimates, retained these systematic errors. Equations predicting body composition in elderly people should be calibrated against estimates from multicompartment models that consider variability in FFM composition

  13. Recalibrated Equations for Determining Effect of Oil Filtration on Rolling Bearing Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needelman, William M.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, Needelman and Zaretsky presented a set of empirically derived equations for bearing fatigue life (adjustment) factors (LFs) as a function of oil filter ratings. These equations for life factors were incorporated into the reference book, "STLE Life Factors for Rolling Bearings." These equations were normalized (LF = 1) to a 10-micrometer filter rating at Beta(sub x) = 200 (normal cleanliness) as it was then defined. Over the past 20 years, these life factors based on oil filtration have been used in conjunction with ANSI/ABMA standards and bearing computer codes to predict rolling bearing life. Also, additional experimental studies have been made by other investigators into the relationship between rolling bearing life and the size, number, and type of particle contamination. During this time period filter ratings have also been revised and improved, and they now use particle counting calibrated to a new National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reference material, NIST SRM 2806, 1997. This paper reviews the relevant bearing life studies and describes the new filter ratings. New filter ratings, Beta(sub x(c)) = 200 and Beta(sub x(c)) = 1000, are benchmarked to old filter ratings, Beta(sub x) = 200, and vice versa. Two separate sets of filter LF values were derived based on the new filter ratings for roller bearings and ball bearings, respectively. Filter LFs can be calculated for the new filter ratings.

  14. Analysis and parameter identification for characteristic equations of single- and double-effect absorption chillers by means of multivariable regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; López-Villada, Jesús; Bruno, Joan Carles

    2010-01-01

    Two approaches to the characteristic equation method have been compared in order to find a simple model that best describes the performance of thermal chillers. After comparing the results obtained using experimental data from a single-effect absorption chiller, we concluded that the adaptation o...... chillers. The characteristic parameters for these chillers are given and can be incorporated as a chiller module in thermal modelling and simulation packages....

  15. Prediction of width of un-erupted incisors, canines and premolars in a Ugandan population: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buwembo William

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of the space forms an important part of an orthodontic assessment in the mixed dentition. However the most commonly used methods of space analysis are based on data developed on Caucasian populations. In order to provide more accurate local data we set out to develop a formula for predicting the widths of un-erupted canines and premolars for a Ugandan population and to compare the predicted widths of the teeth from this formula with those obtained from Moyers’ tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Methods Dental casts were prepared using mandibular and maxillary arch impressions of 220 children (85 boys/135 girls aged 12–17 years recruited from schools in Kampala, Uganda. The mesio-distal width of the mandibular incisors, mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars were measured with a pair of digital calipers. Based on regression analysis, predictive equations were derived and the findings were compared with those presented in Moyers’ probability tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the tooth widths predicted by our equations and those from Moyers’ probability tables at the 65th and 75th percentile probabilities for the girls and at 75th level in boys in the mandibular arch. While in the maxillary arch no statistically significant differences at the 75th and 95th levels were noted in girls. There were statistically significant differences between predicted tooth sizes using equations from the present study and those predicted from the Tanaka and Johnston regression equations. Conclusions In this Ugandan population, Moyers’ probability tables could be used to predict tooth widths at specific percentile probabilities, but generally, Tanaka and Johnston technique tends to overestimate the tooth widths.

  16. BCS equations in the continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandulescu, N.; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of nuclei close to the drip line are significantly influenced by the continuum part of the single-particle spectrum. The main role is played by the resonant states which are largely confined in the region of nuclear potential and therefore stronger coupled with the bound states in an excitation process. Resonant states are also important in the nuclei beyond the drip line. In this case the decay properties of the nucleus can be directly related to the widths of the narrow resonances occupied by the unbound nucleons. The aim of this work is to propose an alternative for evaluating the effect of the resonant part of single-particle spectrum on the pairing correlations calculated within the BCS approximation. We estimated the role of resonances in the case of the isotope 170 Sn. The Resonant-BCS (RBCS) equations are solved for the case of a seniority force. The BCS approximation based on a seniority force cannot be applied in the case of a nucleus immersed in a box if all discrete states simulating the continuum are considered. In such a case the pairing correlations will increase with the number of states in the box. In our case one can still apply a seniority force with RBCS because the effect of the continuum appears here through a finite number of physical resonances, well defined by the given mean field. Because these resonances have a spatial distribution concentrated within the region of the nuclear potential, one expects that the localization probability of nucleons, far out from the nuclear surface, to be small. The gap obtained taking correctly the contribution of resonances, according to RBCS equations, is about 1.3 MeV, while pairing gap calculated only with the bound single-particle spectrum has the value Δ = 1.10 MeV. If we introduce also the resonant states, neglecting completely their widths, the gap will increase to the value Δ = 1.880 MeV. Therefore, one cannot estimate properly the pairing correlations by supplementing the spectrum

  17. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body

  18. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  19. Width lines of non hydrogenoid ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuccelli, D.; Bertuccelli, G.; Di Rocco, H.O.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive theoretical and experimental work was carried out on the ns-np and np-nd line widths (w) of noble gases after ionization (n=n 0 +1, were n 0 is the principal quantum number of the fundamental configuration). A high current 'pinch' discharge was used as source. Electron density and temperature were estimated to be N e =2.65x10 16 cm -3 and T=1.45x10 4 K respectively. Calculations were based on a semi-empirical approximation and the matrix elements (or transition probabilities) were evaluated in different approximation. Comparing our measurements with those of other authors, a systematic tendency, with a dependence on atomic number Z and ionization energy of the higher level L, was established. Finally, it has been established that for N e >10 17 cm -3 , w ∝ N e γ , where γ=5/6. (Author). 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. An inter-hemispheric, statistical study of nightside spectral width distributions from coherent HF scatter radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the Doppler spectral width parameter routinely observed by HF coherent radars has been conducted between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the nightside ionosphere. Data from the SuperDARN radars at Thykkvibær, Iceland and Syowa East, Antarctica have been employed for this purpose. Both radars frequently observe regions of high (>200 ms-1 spectral width polewards of low (<200 ms-1 spectral width. Three years of data from both radars have been analysed both for the spectral width and line of sight velocity. The pointing direction of these two radars is such that the flow reversal boundary may be estimated from the velocity data, and therefore, we have an estimate of the open/closed field line boundary location for comparison with the high spectral widths. Five key observations regarding the behaviour of the spectral width on the nightside have been made. These are (i the two radars observe similar characteristics on a statistical basis; (ii a latitudinal dependence related to magnetic local time is found in both hemispheres; (iii a seasonal dependence of the spectral width is observed by both radars, which shows a marked absence of latitudinal dependence during the summer months; (iv in general, the Syowa East spectral width tends to be larger than that from Iceland East, and (v the highest spectral widths seem to appear on both open and closed field lines. Points (i and (ii indicate that the cause of high spectral width is magnetospheric in origin. Point (iii suggests that either the propagation of the HF radio waves to regions of high spectral width or the generating mechanism(s for high spectral width is affected by solar illumination or other seasonal effects. Point (iv suggests that the radar beams from each of the radars are subject either to different instrumental or propagation effects, or different geophysical conditions due to their locations, although we suggest that this result is more likely to

  1. Soliton solution for nonlinear partial differential equations by cosine-function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.H.A.; Soliman, A.A.; Raslan, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    In this Letter, we established a traveling wave solution by using Cosine-function algorithm for nonlinear partial differential equations. The method is used to obtain the exact solutions for five different types of nonlinear partial differential equations such as, general equal width wave equation (GEWE), general regularized long wave equation (GRLW), general Korteweg-de Vries equation (GKdV), general improved Korteweg-de Vries equation (GIKdV), and Coupled equal width wave equations (CEWE), which are the important soliton equations

  2. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake polygon...

  3. Use of artificial neural networks on optical track width measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard J.; See, Chung W.; Somekh, Mike G.; Yacoot, Andrew

    2007-08-01

    We have demonstrated recently that, by using an ultrastable optical interferometer together with artificial neural networks (ANNs), track widths down to 60 nm can be measured with a 0.3 NA objective lens. We investigate the effective conditions for training ANNs. Experimental results will be used to show the characteristics of the training samples and the data format of the ANN inputs required to produce suitably trained ANNs. Results obtained with networks measuring double tracks, and classifying different structures, will be presented to illustrate the capability of the technique. We include a discussion on expansion of the application areas of the system, allowing it to be used as a general purpose instrument.

  4. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, R

    2010-07-21

    Chemical master equations provide a mathematical description of stochastic reaction kinetics in well-mixed conditions. They are a valid description over length scales that are larger than the reactive mean free path and thus describe kinetics in compartments of mesoscopic and macroscopic dimensions. The trajectories of the stochastic chemical processes described by the master equation can be ensemble-averaged to obtain the average number density of chemical species, i.e., the true concentration, at any spatial scale of interest. For macroscopic volumes, the true concentration is very well approximated by the solution of the corresponding deterministic and macroscopic rate equations, i.e., the macroscopic concentration. However, this equivalence breaks down for mesoscopic volumes. These deviations are particularly significant for open systems and cannot be calculated via the Fokker-Planck or linear-noise approximations of the master equation. We utilize the system-size expansion including terms of the order of Omega(-1/2) to derive a set of differential equations whose solution approximates the true concentration as given by the master equation. These equations are valid in any open or closed chemical reaction network and at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. In the limit of large volumes, the effective mesoscopic rate equations become precisely equal to the conventional macroscopic rate equations. We compare the three formalisms of effective mesoscopic rate equations, conventional rate equations, and chemical master equations by applying them to several biochemical reaction systems (homodimeric and heterodimeric protein-protein interactions, series of sequential enzyme reactions, and positive feedback loops) in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions. In all cases, we find that the effective mesoscopic rate equations can predict very well the true concentration of a chemical species. This provides a useful method by which one can quickly determine the

  5. Degradation and lifetime estimation of n-MOS SLS ELA polycrystalline TFTs during hot carrier stressing: effect of channel width in the region Vth ≤ VGS,stress ≤ VDS,stress/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontogiannopoulos, G P; Farmakis, F V; Kouvatsos, D N; Papaioannou, G J; Voutsas, A T

    2009-01-01

    The voltage bias stress induced degradation of sequential lateral solidification (SLS) polysilicon thin film transistors (TFTs) is studied. The aim of this work is the investigation of the types of damage arising from the electrical stressing in the gate voltage range around V th ≤ V GS,stress ≤ V DS,stress /2 and for different drain-bias voltages. It is shown that the drain on-current variation (%) with stressing time for a defined gate voltage obeys a power–time-dependent law of the form At n . The parameters A and n of this law were determined in order to gain insight on degradation mechanisms in different stress regimes and to estimate the time to failure of our devices. Devices with different channel widths were compared, and their lifetime to failure was extracted. It was found that the magnitude of stress was lower for devices with narrower channel widths. By monitoring the threshold voltage variation and the percentage change of transconductance maximum in the linear regime of operation, it was verified that the threshold voltage degradation was mainly due to the contribution of G m,max to V th rather than severe carrier trapping

  6. Evaluation of width and width uniformity of near-field electrospinning printed micro and sub-micrometer lines based on optical image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Libo; Xia, Yong; Hebibul, Rahman; Wang, Jiuhong; Zhou, Xiangyang; Hu, Yingjie; Li, Zhikang; Luo, Guoxi; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study using image processing to investigate width and width uniformity of sub-micrometer polyethylene oxide (PEO) lines fabricated by near-filed electrospinning (NFES) technique. An adaptive thresholding method was developed to determine the optimal gray values to accurately extract profiles of printed lines from original optical images. And it was proved with good feasibility. The mechanism of the proposed thresholding method was believed to take advantage of statistic property and get rid of halo induced errors. Triangular method and relative standard deviation (RSD) were introduced to calculate line width and width uniformity, respectively. Based on these image processing methods, the effects of process parameters including substrate speed (v), applied voltage (U), nozzle-to-collector distance (H), and syringe pump flow rate (Q) on width and width uniformity of printed lines were discussed. The research results are helpful to promote the NFES technique for fabricating high resolution micro and sub-micro lines and also helpful to optical image processing at sub-micro level.

  7. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, FG

    2013-01-01

    Based on his extensive experience as an educator, F. G. Tricomi wrote this practical and concise teaching text to offer a clear idea of the problems and methods of the theory of differential equations. The treatment is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students and addresses only questions that can be resolved with rigor and simplicity.Starting with a consideration of the existence and uniqueness theorem, the text advances to the behavior of the characteristics of a first-order equation, boundary problems for second-order linear equations, asymptotic methods, and diff

  8. The transformation of equation of the characteristic curves to widen the working area of the Hall effect sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmawan, D; Rahmawati, F; Suprayogi; Suhendi, A

    2017-01-01

    The ability of a measuring instrument is determined by the characteristics of the sensor used. One of the important characteristics of a sensor is its area of work. The working area of a sensor is determined by a linear relationship between the physical quantities to be measured with the actual measured physical quantity. A narrow sensor working area will limit the use of the instruments. Transformation equation of sensor characteristic curve is expected to widen the working area of this sensor. In this study, the magnitude of a magnetic field is used as an example of the physical quantity to be measured. Hall Effect sensors are used as sensing elements and the transformation equation performed on the sensor characteristic curve. Hall Effect sensor which is used as the object of widening the area of work is UGN3503UA while the reference sensor is A1302UA. The result of this equation transformation is embedded inside a micro-controller. The interpolation value of the magnetic field, as the result of the characteristic curve transformation, which compared to the actual value of the magnetic field provides an average relative error of measurement results of 3.83%. (paper)

  9. (2+1)-dimensional dissipation nonlinear Schrödinger equation for envelope Rossby solitary waves and chirp effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin-Yuan; Fang Nian-Qiao; Yuan Xiao-Bo; Zhang Ji; Xue Yu-Long; Wang Xue-Mu

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, the (1+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation had been derived for envelope Rossby solitary waves in a line by employing the perturbation expansion method. But, with the development of theory, we note that the (1+1)-dimensional model cannot reflect the evolution of envelope Rossby solitary waves in a plane. In this paper, by constructing a new (2+1)-dimensional multiscale transform, we derive the (2+1)-dimensional dissipation nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLS) to describe envelope Rossby solitary waves under the influence of dissipation which propagate in a plane. Especially, the previous researches about envelope Rossby solitary waves were established in the zonal area and could not be applied directly to the spherical earth, while we adopt the plane polar coordinate and overcome the problem. By theoretical analyses, the conservation laws of (2+1)-dimensional envelope Rossby solitary waves as well as their variation under the influence of dissipation are studied. Finally, the one-soliton and two-soliton solutions of the (2+1)-dimensional NLS equation are obtained with the Hirota method. Based on these solutions, by virtue of the chirp concept from fiber soliton communication, the chirp effect of envelope Rossby solitary waves is discussed, and the related impact factors of the chirp effect are given. (paper)

  10. Effect of trapping on transport coherence III: Dissipation in the stochastic Liouville equation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barvik, I [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Polasek, M [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Physics; Herman, P [Pedagogical Univ., Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    1995-08-01

    We used the formal stochastic Liouville equations within Haken-Strobl-Reineker parametrization for the description of the influence of the bath on the memory functions entering the GME for a dimer and a linear trimer with a trap (here modeled as a sink). The often used inclusion of the noncoherent regime in the MF by an exponentially damped prefactor (after Kenkre`s prescription) does not hold for finite systems. The analytical form of the MF is changed more pronouncely and the influence of the sink in the center of the trimer runs parallel with the influence of the bath in destroying the coherence. (author). 60 refs.

  11. Characterizing graphs of maximum matching width at most 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Jisu; Ok, Seongmin; Suh, Geewon

    2017-01-01

    The maximum matching width is a width-parameter that is de ned on a branch-decomposition over the vertex set of a graph. The size of a maximum matching in the bipartite graph is used as a cut-function. In this paper, we characterize the graphs of maximum matching width at most 2 using the minor o...

  12. Impulsive moving mirror model and the stability of Schroedinger equation with impulse effect in a Banach space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, S.I.; Petrov, G.

    1992-01-01

    From a special class of systems has been used a Schroedinger equation with impulse effect in Minkowski space field theory with time dependent boundary conditions, i.e. those of moving mirrors. The field theoretical approach for studying the properties of the vacuum starts from an analysis of the behaviour of local field quantities in Minkowski space with uniformly moving mirrors. For the impulsive moving mirror model is the real process of interaction between the quantum field and the external mirror a subject to disturbances in its evolution acting in time very short compared with the entire duration of the process. So the stability of the solution of the Schroedinger evolution equation for the process in the stability of the vacuum of Casimir. 8 refs

  13. CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENETRATION LENGTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GROEBNER, R.J.; MAHDAVI, M.A.; LEONARD, A.W.; OSBORNE, T.H.; WOLF, N.S.; PORTER, G.D.; STANGEBY, P.C.; BROOKS, N.H.; COLCHIN, R.J.; HEIDBRINK, W.W.; LUCE, T.C.; MCKEE, G.R.; OWEN, L.W.; WANG, G.; WHYTE, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENETRATION LENGTH. Pedestal studies in DIII-D find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode density barrier and the neutral penetration length. These results are obtained by comparing experimental density profiles to the predictions of an analytic model for the profile, obtained from the particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 40-500 eV), the analytic model quantitatively predicts the observed decrease of the width as the pedestal density increases, the observed strong increase of the gradient of the density as the pedestal density increases and the observation that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same pedestal density have very similar shapes. The width of the density barrier, measured from the edge of the electron temperature barrier, is the lower limit for the observed width of the temperature barrier. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling provides the dominant control for the size of the H-mode transport barrier

  14. CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENTRATION LENGTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GROEBNER, R.J.; MAHDAVI, M.A.; LEONARD, A.W.; OSBORNE, T.H.; WOLF, N.S.; PORTER, G.D.; STANGEBY, P.C.; BROOKS, N.H.; COLCHIN, R.J.; HEIDBRINK, W.W.; LUCE, T.C.; MCKEE, G.R.; OWEN, L.W.; WANG, G.; WHYTE, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENTRATION LENGTH. Pedestal studies in DIII-D find a good correlation between the width of the region of steep gradient in the H-mode density and the neutral penetration length. These results are obtained by comparing experimental density profiles to the predictions of an analytic model for the profile, obtained from the particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 40-500 eV), the analytic model quantitatively predicts the observed decrease of the width as the pedestal density increases, the observed strong increase of the gradient of the density as the pedestal density increases and the observation that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same pedestal density have very similar shapes. The width of the density barrier, measured from the edge of the electron temperature barrier, is the lower limit for the observed width of the temperature barrier. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling provides a dominant control for the size of the H-mode transport barrier

  15. A rapid technique for estimating the depth and width of a two-dimensional plate from self-potential data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehanee, Salah; Smith, Paul D; Essa, Khalid S

    2011-01-01

    Rapid techniques for self-potential (SP) data interpretation are of prime importance in engineering and exploration geophysics. Parameters (e.g. depth, width) estimation of the ore bodies has also been of paramount concern in mineral prospecting. In many cases, it is useful to assume that the SP anomaly is due to an ore body of simple geometric shape and to use the data to determine its parameters. In light of this, we describe a rapid approach to determine the depth and horizontal width of a two-dimensional plate from the SP anomaly. The rationale behind the scheme proposed in this paper is that, unlike the two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) SP rigorous source current inversions, it does not demand a priori information about the subsurface resistivity distribution nor high computational resources. We apply the second-order moving average operator on the SP anomaly to remove the unwanted (regional) effect, represented by up to a third-order polynomial, using filters of successive window lengths. By defining a function F at a fixed window length (s) in terms of the filtered anomaly computed at two points symmetrically distributed about the origin point of the causative body, the depth (z) corresponding to each half-width (w) is estimated by solving a nonlinear equation in the form ξ(s, w, z) = 0. The estimated depths are then plotted against their corresponding half-widths on a graph representing a continuous curve for this window length. This procedure is then repeated for each available window length. The depth and half-width solution of the buried structure is read at the common intersection of these various curves. The improvement of this method over the published first-order moving average technique for SP data is demonstrated on a synthetic data set. It is then verified on noisy synthetic data, complicated structures and successfully applied to three field examples for mineral exploration and we have found that the estimated depth is in good agreement with

  16. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbu, Viorel

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is a comprehensive treatment of ordinary differential equations, concisely presenting basic and essential results in a rigorous manner. Including various examples from physics, mechanics, natural sciences, engineering and automatic theory, Differential Equations is a bridge between the abstract theory of differential equations and applied systems theory. Particular attention is given to the existence and uniqueness of the Cauchy problem, linear differential systems, stability theory and applications to first-order partial differential equations. Upper undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics and systems theory with a background in advanced calculus will find this book particularly useful. Supplementary topics are covered in an appendix enabling the book to be completely self-contained.

  17. The nuclear equation of state in effective relativistic field theories and pion yields in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhofen, M.; Cubero, M.; Gering, M.; Sambataro, M.; Feldmeier, H.; Noerenberg, W.

    1989-06-01

    Within the framework of relativistic field theory for nucleons, deltas, scalar and vector mesons, a systematic study of the nuclear equation of state and its relation to pion yields in heavy-ion collisions is presented. Not the compressibility but the effective nucleon mass at normal nuclear density turns out to be the most sensitive parameter. Effects from vaccum fluctuations are well modelled within the mean-field no-sea approximation by self-interaction terms for the scalar meson field. Incomplete thermalization in the fireball may be the reason for the low pion yields observed in heavy-ion collisions. (orig.)

  18. On formal structure of constitutive equations for materials exhibiting shape memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobovsek, I.

    2000-01-01

    A derivation of constitutive equations in a general three-dimensional setting is described, based on an additive decomposition of the rate of deformation tensor. The rate of deformation tensor is assumed to consist of an elastic part, a thermoelastic part, a plastic part, a part due to shape memory transformation, and a part due to phase transformation. The thermoelastic part due to thermoelastic coupling accounts for the influence of temperature near phase transformation, while the plastic part is taken in the form of classical J 2 flow theory of plasticity with combined isotropic and kinematic hardening, where the back stress represents a tensor of orientational microstresses. It is assumed that the phase transformation part depends on the first and the second invariant of the tensor of crystallographic distortion, on the deviatoric part of the stress tensor, and on a special evolution parameter describing the rate of forming of a new phase. The elastic part of the rate of deformation tensor is connected with the objective rate of Cauchy stress through the tensor of elastic compliance. As a result, a general form of derived constitutive equations exhibits a similar structure as constitutive relations in finite deformation plasticity. (orig.)

  19. Effect of creatinine assay calibration on glomerular filtration rate prediction by MDRD equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Spessatto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evaluation of renal function should be performed with glomerular filtration rate (GFR estimation employing the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD study equation, which includes age, gender, ethnicity and serum creatinine. However, creatinine methods require traceability with standardized methods. Objective: To analyse the impact of creatinine calibration on MDRD calculated GFR. Methods: 140 samples of plasma with creatinine values <2,0 mg/dl were analysed by Jaffé’s reaction with Creatinina Modular P (Roche ®; method A; reference and Creatinina Advia 1650 (Bayer ®; method B; non-standardized. The results with the different methods were compared and aligned with standardized method through a conversion formula. MDRD GFR was estimated. Results: Values were higher for method B (1.03 ± 0.29 vs. 0.86 ± 0.32 mg/dl, P<0.001. This difference declined when methods were aligned with the equation y=1.07x -0.249, and the aligned values were 0,9 ± 0,31 mg/dl. Non-traceable creatinine methods misclassificaed chronic kidney disease in 10% more (false positive. This disagreement disappeared after the regression alignment. Conclusion: Creatinine method calibration has a large impact over the final results of serum creatinine and GFR. The alignment of the non-standardized results through conversion formulas is a reasonable alternative to harmonize serum creatinine results while waiting for the full implementation of international  standardization programs.

  20. The ρ radiative decay width: A measurement at 200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capraro, L.; Levy, P.; Querrou, M.; Hecke, B. van; Verbeken, M.; Amendolia, S.R.; Batignani, G.; Bedeschi, A.; Bellamy, E.H.; Bertolucci, E.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tonelli, G.; Beck, G.A.; Bologna, G.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Mannocchi, G.; Picchi, P.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati; Budinich, M.; Liello, F.; Paver, N.; Rolandi, L.; Green, M.G.; March, P.V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Strong, J.A.; Tenchini, R.

    1987-01-01

    The ρ - radiative decay width has been measured by studying the production of ρ - via the Primakoff effect by 200 GeV incident π - on Cu and Pb targets. This width was obtained by fitting the measured dσ/dt for ρ production with the theoretical coherent differential cross section including both the electromagnetic and strong contributions. The measured radiative width value is 81±4±4 keV: it is consistent with the ratio Γ(ρ → πγ)/Γ(ω → πγ) ∝ 1/9 as expected from the vector dominance and the quark model. (orig.)

  1. Production of extra quarks decaying to dark matter beyond the narrow width approximation at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Stefano; O'Brien, Dermot; Panizzi, Luca; Prager, Hugo

    2017-08-01

    This paper explores the effects of finite width in processes of pair production of an extra heavy quark with charge 2 /3 (top partner) and its subsequent decay into a bosonic dark matter (DM) candidate—either scalar or vector—and SM up-type quarks at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This dynamics has been ignored so far in standard experimental searches of heavy quarks decaying to DM and we assess herein the regions of validity of current approaches, based on the assumption that the extra quarks have a narrow width. Further, we discuss the configurations of masses, widths and couplings where the latter breaks down.

  2. Effect of the wire width and magnetic field on the detection efficiency of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors; Einfluss von Geometrie und magnetischem Feld auf die Effizienz supraleitender Nanodraht-Einzelphotonendetektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusche, Robert

    2015-06-24

    The aim of this thesis is to a gain deeper understanding of the single photon detection process in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). A detailed knowledge of the physical principles and mechanisms which the detection process is based on helps to improve specific detector parameters and hence the suitability of such detectors for various applications. Several theoretical models of the detection process have been compared to the results of measurements of photon and dark count rates in meander-type TaN- and NbN-SNSPDs with different wire-widths in a broad range of wavelengths, transport currents and magnetic fields. In the first part of the thesis, measurements of the photon and dark count rates of TaN- and NbN-SNSPDs with varying wire width are described. For each meander spectra of the intrinsic detection efficiency (IDE) were derived. The IDE represents the probability that the SNSPD generates a measurable voltage pulse upon absorption of a photon. The recorded IDE spectra have shown a characteristic cut-off wavelength up to which photons were detected with a probability of 100 per cent. Furthermore it was found that the cut-off wavelengths increases linearly with the increase in the inverse wire width. This observation is best explained by the refined hot spot model. The second part of the thesis describes the influence of magnetic field on the photon and dark count rates of NbN-SNSPDs. In order to apply magnetic fields to the meanders a continuous-flow inset for mobile 4He storage dewars was constructed. It was shown for the first time, that the photon count rate exhibits a magnetic field dependence. Furthermore it could be shown that the measured dependence of the photon and dark count rate on the magnetic field is in good agreement with the theoretical model of vortex-assisted photon detection in narrow superconducting lines. Hence, within this thesis it could be confirmed that magnetic vortices are involved in the single photon

  3. A Boltzmann equation approach to the damping of giant resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, P.; Winter, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Vlasov equation plus collision term (Boltzmann equation) represents an appropriate frame for the treatment of giant resonances (zero sound modes) in nuclei. With no adjustable parameters we obtain correct positions and widths for the giant quadrupole resonances. (author)

  4. A collective variable approach and stabilization for dispersion-managed optical solitons in the quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation as perturbations of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fewo, S I; Kenfack-Jiotsa, A; Kofane, T C

    2006-01-01

    With the help of the one-dimensional quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) as perturbations of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE), we derive the equations of motion of pulse parameters called collective variables (CVs), of a pulse propagating in dispersion-managed (DM) fibre optic links. The equations obtained are investigated numerically in order to view the evolution of pulse parameters along the propagation distance, and also to analyse effects of initial amplitude and width on the propagating pulse. Nonlinear gain is shown to be beneficial in stabilizing DM solitons. A fully numerical simulation of the one-dimensional quintic CGLE as perturbations of NLSE finally tests the results of the CV theory. A good agreement is observed between both methods

  5. Correction of the calculation of beam loading based in the RF power diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R. da.

    1980-01-01

    It is described an empirical correction based upon experimental datas of others authors in ORELA, GELINA and SLAC accelerators, to the calculation of the energy loss due to the beam loading effect as stated by the RF power diffusion equation theory an accelerating structure. It is obtained a dependence of this correction with the electron pulse full width half maximum, but independent of the electron energy. (author) [pt

  6. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  7. Beam-width spreading of vortex beams in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Li, Jinhong; Duan, Meiling

    2018-01-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function, the analytical expression for the beam-width spreading of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beams in free space are derived, and used to study the influence of beam parameters on the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams. With the increment of the propagation distance, the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams will increase; the bigger the topological charge, spatial correlation length, wavelength and waist width are, the smaller the beam-width spreading is.

  8. Narrow-width mechanism of a=5 Ξ-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai-Fuse, I.; Akaishi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Narrow-width mechanism of ≡ 5 H is discussed by calculating conversion widths to all its possible decay channels. Since the conversion processes have small reaction Q values, the three- and four- body decays are strongly suppressed owing to small phase volumes available. Decay widths to the two-body channels are significantly reduced by the distortion of emitted-particle waves. This mechanism brings about a narrow width of ≡ 5 H. The total width is estimated to be 0.87 MeV, in which the largest contribution comes from the decay into the Λ 4 H * +Λ channel. (author)

  9. Effective conductivity, dielectric constant, and diffusion coefficient of digitized composite media via first-passage-time equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torquato, S.; Kim, I.C.; Cule, D.

    1999-01-01

    We generalize the Brownian motion simulation method of Kim and Torquato [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 3892 (1990)] to compute the effective conductivity, dielectric constant and diffusion coefficient of digitized composite media. This is accomplished by first generalizing the first-passage-time equations to treat first-passage regions of arbitrary shape. We then develop the appropriate first-passage-time equations for digitized media: first-passage squares in two dimensions and first-passage cubes in three dimensions. A severe test case to prove the accuracy of the method is the two-phase periodic checkerboard in which conduction, for sufficiently large phase contrasts, is dominated by corners that join two conducting-phase pixels. Conventional numerical techniques (such as finite differences or elements) do not accurately capture the local fields here for reasonable grid resolution and hence lead to inaccurate estimates of the effective conductivity. By contrast, we show that our algorithm yields accurate estimates of the effective conductivity of the periodic checkerboard for widely different phase conductivities. Finally, we illustrate our method by computing the effective conductivity of the random checkerboard for a wide range of volume fractions and several phase contrast ratios. These results always lie within rigorous four-point bounds on the effective conductivity. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  10. PKPD model of interleukin-21 effects on thermoregulation in monkeys--application and evaluation of stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Rune Viig; Holford, Nick; Rytved, Klaus A; Madsen, Henrik

    2007-02-01

    To describe the pharmacodynamic effects of recombinant human interleukin-21 (IL-21) on core body temperature in cynomolgus monkeys using basic mechanisms of heat regulation. A major effort was devoted to compare the use of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modelling. A temperature model was formulated including circadian rhythm, metabolism, heat loss, and a thermoregulatory set-point. This model was formulated as a mixed-effects model based on SDEs using NONMEM. The effects of IL-21 were on the set-point and the circadian rhythm of metabolism. The model was able to describe a complex set of IL-21 induced phenomena, including 1) disappearance of the circadian rhythm, 2) no effect after first dose, and 3) high variability after second dose. SDEs provided a more realistic description with improved simulation properties, and further changed the model into one that could not be falsified by the autocorrelation function. The IL-21 induced effects on thermoregulation in cynomolgus monkeys are explained by a biologically plausible model. The quality of the model was improved by the use of SDEs.

  11. Attention demanding tasks during treadmill walking reduce step width variability in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Karen L

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The variability of step time and step width is associated with falls by older adults. Further, step time is significantly influenced when performing attention demanding tasks while walking. Without exception, step time variability has been reported to increase in normal and pathologically aging older adults. Because of the role of step width in managing frontal plane dynamic stability, documenting the influence of attention-demanding tasks on step width variability may provide insight to events that can disturb dynamic stability during locomotion and increase fall risk. Preliminary evidence suggests performance of an attention demanding task significantly decreases step width variability of young adults walking on a treadmill. The purpose of the present study was to confirm or refute this finding by characterizing the extent and direction of the effects of a widely used attention demanding task (Stroop test on the step width variability of young adults walking on a motorized treadmill. Methods Fifteen healthy young adults walked on a motorized treadmill at a self-selected velocity for 10 minutes under two conditions; without performing an attention demanding task and while performing the Stroop test. Step width of continuous and consecutive steps during the collection was derived from the data recorded using a motion capture system. Step width variability was computed as the standard deviation of all recorded steps. Results Step width decreased four percent during performance of the Stroop test but the effect was not significant (p = 0.10. In contrast, the 16 percent decrease in step width variability during the Stroop test condition was significant (p = 0.029. Conclusion The results support those of our previous work in which a different attention demanding task also decreased step width variability of young subjects while walking on a treadmill. The decreased step width variability observed while performing an attention

  12. Space-time Dependency of the Time and its Effect on the Relativistic Classical Equation of the String Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Amirshahkarami, Abdolazim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    In special relativity theory, time dilates in velocity of near light speed. Also based on ``Substantial motion'' theory of Sadra, relative time (time flux); R = f (mv , σ , τ) , for each atom is momentum of its involved fundamental particles, which is different from the other atoms. In this way, for modification of the relativistic classical equation of string theory and getting more precise results, we should use effect of dilation and contraction of time in equation. So we propose to add two derivatives of the time's flux to the equation as follows: n.tp∂/R ∂ τ +∂2Xμ/(σ , τ) ∂τ2 = n .tp (∂/R ∂ σ ) +c2∂2Xμ/(σ , τ) ∂σ2 In which, Xμ is space-time coordinates of the string, σ & τ are coordinates on the string world sheet, respectively space and time along the string, string's mass m , velocity of string's motion v , factor n depends on geometry of each hidden extra dimension which relates to its own flux time, and tp is Planck's time. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  13. Mixed Effects Modeling Using Stochastic Differential Equations: Illustrated by Pharmacokinetic Data of Nicotinic Acid in Obese Zucker Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leander, Jacob; Almquist, Joachim; Ahlström, Christine; Gabrielsson, Johan; Jirstrand, Mats

    2015-05-01

    Inclusion of stochastic differential equations in mixed effects models provides means to quantify and distinguish three sources of variability in data. In addition to the two commonly encountered sources, measurement error and interindividual variability, we also consider uncertainty in the dynamical model itself. To this end, we extend the ordinary differential equation setting used in nonlinear mixed effects models to include stochastic differential equations. The approximate population likelihood is derived using the first-order conditional estimation with interaction method and extended Kalman filtering. To illustrate the application of the stochastic differential mixed effects model, two pharmacokinetic models are considered. First, we use a stochastic one-compartmental model with first-order input and nonlinear elimination to generate synthetic data in a simulated study. We show that by using the proposed method, the three sources of variability can be successfully separated. If the stochastic part is neglected, the parameter estimates become biased, and the measurement error variance is significantly overestimated. Second, we consider an extension to a stochastic pharmacokinetic model in a preclinical study of nicotinic acid kinetics in obese Zucker rats. The parameter estimates are compared between a deterministic and a stochastic NiAc disposition model, respectively. Discrepancies between model predictions and observations, previously described as measurement noise only, are now separated into a comparatively lower level of measurement noise and a significant uncertainty in model dynamics. These examples demonstrate that stochastic differential mixed effects models are useful tools for identifying incomplete or inaccurate model dynamics and for reducing potential bias in parameter estimates due to such model deficiencies.

  14. GAP WIDTH STUDY IN LASER BUTT-WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    power : 2 and 2.6 kW and the focal point position : 0 and -1.2 mm. Quality of all the butt welds are destructively tested according to ISO 13919-1.Influences of the variable process parameters to the maximum allowable gap width are observed as (1) the maximum gap width is inversely related......In this paper the maximum allowable gap width in laser butt-welding is intensively studied. The gap width study (GWS) is performed on the material of SST of W1.4401 (AISI 316) under various welding conditions, which are the gap width : 0.00-0.50 mm, the welding speed : 0.5-2.0 m/min, the laser...... to the welding speed, (2) the larger laser power leads to the bigger maximum allowable gap width and (3) the focal point position has very little influence on the maximum gap width....

  15. Effects of QCD equation of state on the stochastic gravitational wave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Sampurn; Mohanty, Subhendra [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); Dey, Ujjal Kumar, E-mail: sampurn@prl.res.in, E-mail: ujjal@cts.iitkgp.ernet.in, E-mail: mohanty@prl.res.in [Centre for Theoretical Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2017-03-01

    Cosmological phase transitions can be a source of Stochastic Gravitational Wave (SGW) background. Apart from the dynamics of the phase transition, the characteristic frequency and the fractional energy density Ω{sub gw} of the SGW depends upon the temperature of the transition. In this article, we compute the SGW spectrum in the light of QCD equation of state provided by the lattice results. We find that the inclusion of trace anomaly from lattice QCD, enhances the SGW signal generated during QCD phase transition by ∼ 50% and the peak frequency of the QCD era SGW are shifted higher by ∼ 25% as compared to the earlier estimates without trace anomaly. This result is extremely significant for testing the phase transition dynamics near QCD epoch.

  16. Equations of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with effective finite-rank separable interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    Basic equations are derived for the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model for the finite-rank separable isoscalar and isovector multipole and spin-multipole and isovector tensor particle-hole and particle-particle interactions between quasiparticles. For even-even spherical nuclei it is shown that in the calculation of single-phonon states in the random phase approximation a significant complication arises due to the finite rank n max >1 of separable interactions. Taking into account separable interactions with n max >1 does not lead to significant difficulties in the calculation of fragmentation of quasiparticle and collective states. It is asserted that the model can be used as a basis for calculations of many characteristics of complex nuclei

  17. Anomalous hydrodynamical dispersion and the Coats-Smith equation: the finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caceres, Manuel O.

    2003-09-01

    We investigate a family of probability distributions that shows anomalous hydrodynamics dispersion, by solving a particular class of coupled generalized master equations. The Fourier-Laplace solution is obtained analytically in terms of the matrix Green function method; then the Coats-Smith concentration profile is revisited in a particular case. Two models of disorder are worked out explicitly, and the mean current is asymptotically calculated. We present an approximation method to calculate the first passage time distribution for this stochastic transport process, and as an example an exact Markovian result is worked out; scaling results are also shown. We discuss the comparison with other different methods to work out complex diffusion phenomena in the presence of disordered multiple transport paths. Extensions when the models are non diffusive can also be solved in the Fourier-Laplace representation. (author)

  18. A Comparison of Two-Stage Approaches for Fitting Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models with Mixed Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Bendezú, Jason J; Cole, Pamela M; Ram, Nilam

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches exist for estimating the derivatives of observed data for model exploration purposes, including functional data analysis (FDA; Ramsay & Silverman, 2005 ), generalized local linear approximation (GLLA; Boker, Deboeck, Edler, & Peel, 2010 ), and generalized orthogonal local derivative approximation (GOLD; Deboeck, 2010 ). These derivative estimation procedures can be used in a two-stage process to fit mixed effects ordinary differential equation (ODE) models. While the performance and utility of these routines for estimating linear ODEs have been established, they have not yet been evaluated in the context of nonlinear ODEs with mixed effects. We compared properties of the GLLA and GOLD to an FDA-based two-stage approach denoted herein as functional ordinary differential equation with mixed effects (FODEmixed) in a Monte Carlo (MC) study using a nonlinear coupled oscillators model with mixed effects. Simulation results showed that overall, the FODEmixed outperformed both the GLLA and GOLD across all the embedding dimensions considered, but a novel use of a fourth-order GLLA approach combined with very high embedding dimensions yielded estimation results that almost paralleled those from the FODEmixed. We discuss the strengths and limitations of each approach and demonstrate how output from each stage of FODEmixed may be used to inform empirical modeling of young children's self-regulation.

  19. dimensional Jaulent–Miodek equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (2+1)-dimensional Jaulent–Miodek equation; the first integral method; kinks; ... and effective method for solving nonlinear partial differential equations which can ... of the method employed and exact kink and soliton solutions are constructed ...

  20. Ion orbit loss and pedestal width of H-mode tokamak plasmas in limiter geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xiaotao; Liu Lei; Zhang Xiaodong; Wang Shaojie

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical model is proposed to analyze the effects of ion orbit loss on the edge radial electric field in a tokamak with limiter configuration. The analytically predicted edge radial electric field is consistent with the H-mode experiments, including the width, the magnitude, and the well-like shape. This model provides an explanation to the H-mode pedestal structure. Scaling of the pedestal width based on this model is proposed.

  1. Gratitude mediates the effect of emotional intelligence on subjective well-being: A structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the relationship among emotional intelligence, gratitude, and subjective well-being in a sample of university students. A total of 365 undergraduates completed the emotional intelligence scale, the gratitude questionnaire, and the subjective well-being measures. The results of the structural equation model showed that emotional intelligence is positively associated with gratitude and subjective well-being, that gratitude is positively associated with subjective well-being, and that gratitude partially mediates the positive relationship between emotional intelligence and subjective well-being. Bootstrap test results also revealed that emotional intelligence has a significant indirect effect on subjective well-being through gratitude.

  2. Using Curved Crystals to Study Terrace-Width Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Theodore L.

    Recent experiments on curved crystals of noble and late transition metals (Ortega and Juurlink groups) have renewed interest in terrace width distributions (TWD) for vicinal surfaces. Thus, it is timely to discuss refinements of TWD analysis that are absent from the standard reviews. Rather than by Gaussians, TWDs are better described by the generalized Wigner surmise, with a power-law rise and a Gaussian decay, thereby including effects evident for weak step repulsion: skewness and peak shifts down from the mean spacing. Curved crystals allow analysis of several mean spacings with the same substrate, so that one can check the scaling with the mean width. This is important since such scaling confirms well-established theory. Failure to scale also can provide significant insights. Complicating factors can include step touching (local double-height steps), oscillatory step interactions mediated by metallic (but not topological) surface states, short-range corrections to the inverse-square step repulsion, and accounting for the offset between adjacent layers of almost all surfaces. We discuss how to deal with these issues. For in-plane misoriented steps there are formulas to describe the stiffness but not yet the strength of the elastic interstep repulsion. Supported in part by NSF-CHE 13-05892.

  3. Wire Electrical Discharge Machining of a Hybrid Composite: Evaluation of Kerf Width and Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdil KUŞ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the machinability characteristics of Al/B4C-Gr hybrid composite were investigated using wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM. In the experiments, the machining parameters of wire speed, pulse-on time and pulse-off time were varied in order to explaiın their effects on machining performance, including the width of slit (kerf and surface roughness values (Rz and Rt. According to the Taguchi quality design concept, a L18 (21×32 orthogonal array was used to determine the S/N ratio, and analysis of variance (ANOVA and the F-test were used to indicate the significant machining parameters affecting the machining performance. From the ANOVA and F-test results, the significant factors were determined for each of the machining performance criteria of kerf, Rz and Rt. The variations of kerf, Rz and Rt with the machining parameters were statistically modeled via the regression analysis method. The optimum levels of the control factors for kerf, Rz and Rt were specified as A1B1C1, A1B1C2 and A1B1C2, respectively. The correlation coefficients of the predictive equations developed for kerf, Rz and Rt were calculated as 0.98, 0.828 and 0.855, respectively.

  4. An ordinary differential equation model for full thickness wounds and the effects of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, L G; Maini, P K; Moulton, D E; Tang, J B; Wang, X T; Liu, P Y; Byrne, H M

    2014-11-21

    Wound healing is a complex process in which a sequence of interrelated phases contributes to a reduction in wound size. For diabetic patients, many of these processes are compromised, so that wound healing slows down. In this paper we present a simple ordinary differential equation model for wound healing in which attention focusses on the dominant processes that contribute to closure of a full thickness wound. Asymptotic analysis of the resulting model reveals that normal healing occurs in stages: the initial and rapid elastic recoil of the wound is followed by a longer proliferative phase during which growth in the dermis dominates healing. At longer times, fibroblasts exert contractile forces on the dermal tissue, the resulting tension stimulating further dermal tissue growth and enhancing wound closure. By fitting the model to experimental data we find that the major difference between normal and diabetic healing is a marked reduction in the rate of dermal tissue growth for diabetic patients. The model is used to estimate the breakdown of dermal healing into two processes: tissue growth and contraction, the proportions of which provide information about the quality of the healed wound. We show further that increasing dermal tissue growth in the diabetic wound produces closure times similar to those associated with normal healing and we discuss the clinical implications of this hypothesised treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of floodgates operation on nitrogen transformation in a lake based on structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longji; Zhou, Haixuan; Xie, Xinyu; Li, Xueke; Zhang, Duoying; Jia, Liming; Wei, Qingbin; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Ma, Yingying

    2018-08-01

    Floodgates operation is one of the primary means of flood control in lake development. However, knowledge on the linkages between floodgates operation and nitrogen transformation during the flood season is limited. In this study, water samples from six sampling sites along Lake Xingkai watershed were collected before and after floodgates operation. The causal relationships between environmental factors, bacterioplankton community composition and nitrogen fractions were determined during flood season. We found that concentrations of nitrogen fractions decreased significantly when the floodgates were opened, while the concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and NO 3 - increased when the floodgates had been shut for a period. Further, we proposed a possible mechanism that the influence of floodgates operation on nitrogen transformation was largely mediated through changes in dissolved organic matter, dissolved oxygen and bacterioplankton community composition as revealed by structural equation modeling (SEM). We conclude that floodgates operation has a high risk for future eutrophication of downstream watershed, although it can reduce nitrogen content temporarily. Therefore, the environmental impacts of floodgates operation should be carefully evaluated before the floodwaters were discharged into downstream watershed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effective equation of state of hot and dense matter in nuclear collisions around FAIR energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravina L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and thermal equilibration in the central zone of heavy-ion collisions at energies around FAIR is studied within two microscopic models. Two systems are utilized for the analysis: (i central cubic cell of fixed volume V = 125 fm3 and (ii expanding central area of uniformly distributed energy density. It is found that kinetic, thermal, and chemical equilibration of the expanding hadronic matter are nearly approached in both systems for the period of 10–18 fm/c. The expansion proceeds almost isentropically. The extracted equation of state (EOS in P − ɛ plane has a linear dependence P = aɛ, where a ≡ c2s slightly increases with the collision energy from 0.12 to 0.145. Linear dependencies for the EOS are found also in T − μB and T − μS planes. The characteristic kinks observed in the last two phase diagrams are linked to inelastic freeze-out in the expanding fireball.

  7. Thermal conductivity engineering in width-modulated silicon nanowires and thermoelectric efficiency enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zianni, Xanthippi

    2018-03-01

    Width-modulated nanowires have been proposed as efficient thermoelectric materials. Here, the electron and phonon transport properties and the thermoelectric efficiency are discussed for dimensions above the quantum confinement regime. The thermal conductivity decreases dramatically in the presence of thin constrictions due to their ballistic thermal resistance. It shows a scaling behavior upon the width-modulation rate that allows for thermal conductivity engineering. The electron conductivity also decreases due to enhanced boundary scattering by the constrictions. The effect of boundary scattering is weaker for electrons than for phonons and the overall thermoelectric efficiency is enhanced. A ZT enhancement by a factor of 20-30 is predicted for width-modulated nanowires compared to bulk silicon. Our findings indicate that width-modulated nanostructures are promising for developing silicon nanostructures with high thermoelectric efficiency.

  8. Bernoulli's Equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    regarding nature of forces hold equally for liquids, even though the ... particle. Figure A. A fluid particle is a very small imaginary blob of fluid, here shown sche- matically in .... picture gives important information about the flow field. ... Bernoulli's equation is derived assuming ideal flow, .... weight acting in the flow direction S is.

  9. Development of nonperturbative nonlinear optics models including effects of high order nonlinearities and of free electron plasma: Maxwell–Schrödinger equations coupled with evolution equations for polarization effects, and the SFA-like nonlinear optics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorin, E; Bandrauk, A D; Lytova, M; Memarian, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the exploration of non-conventional nonlinear optics models for intense and short electromagnetic fields propagating in a gas. When an intense field interacts with a gas, usual nonlinear optics models, such as cubic nonlinear Maxwell, wave and Schrödinger equations, derived by perturbation theory may become inaccurate or even irrelevant. As a consequence, and to include in particular the effect of free electrons generated by laser–molecule interaction, several heuristic models, such as UPPE, HOKE models, etc, coupled with Drude-like models [1, 2], were derived. The goal of this paper is to present alternative approaches based on non-heuristic principles. This work is in particular motivated by the on-going debate in the filamentation community, about the effect of high order nonlinearities versus plasma effects due to free electrons, in pulse defocusing occurring in laser filaments [3–9]. The motivation of our work goes beyond filamentation modeling, and is more generally related to the interaction of any external intense and (short) pulse with a gas. In this paper, two different strategies are developed. The first one is based on the derivation of an evolution equation on the polarization, in order to determine the response of the medium (polarization) subject to a short and intense electromagnetic field. Then, we derive a combined semi-heuristic model, based on Lewenstein’s strong field approximation model and the usual perturbative modeling in nonlinear optics. The proposed model allows for inclusion of high order nonlinearities as well as free electron plasma effects. (paper)

  10. The Effects of Supervisors' Support and Mediating Factors on the Nurses' Job Performance Using Structural Equation Modeling: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravangard, Ramin; Yasami, Shamim; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Farhadi, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are the largest group and an important part of the providers in the health care systems that who a key role in hospitals. Any defect and deficiency in their work can result in irreversible outcomes. This study aimed to determine the effect of supervisors' support and mediating factors on the job performance (JOBPER) of 400 nurses working in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, using structural equation modeling. The results showed that the supervisor's support had a significant negative effect on work-family conflict (t = -2.57) and a positive effect on organizational commitment (t = 4.03); Work-family conflict had a significant positive effect on job stress (t = 11.24) and a negative effect on organizational commitment (t = -3.35) and JOBPER (t = -2.29). Family-work conflict had a positive effect on job stress (t = 4.48) and a negative effect on organizational commitment (t = -2.54). Finally, job stress had a negative effect (t = -3.30), and organizational commitment showed a positive effect (t = 5.96) on the studied nurses' JOBPER. According to the results, supervisor's support could influence JOBPER through reducing work-family conflict and increasing organizational commitment. Therefore, to improve the nurses' JOBPER in the hospitals, some strategies are recommended.

  11. The effect of boundaries on the asymptotic wavenumber of spiral wave solutions of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation

    KAUST Repository

    Aguareles, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we consider an oscillatory medium whose dynamics are modeled by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. In particular, we focus on n-armed spiral wave solutions of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in a disk of radius d with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. It is well-known that such solutions exist for small enough values of the twist parameter q and large enough values of d. We investigate the effect of boundaries on the rotational frequency of the spirals, which is an unknown of the problem uniquely determined by the parameters d and q. We show that there is a threshold in the parameter space where the effect of the boundary on the rotational frequency switches from being algebraic to exponentially weak. We use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to obtain explicit expressions for the asymptotic wavenumber as a function of the twist parameter and the domain size for small values of q. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of Off-Farm Employment on Forestland Transfers in China: A Simultaneous-Equation Tobit Model Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available China’s new round tenure reform has devolved collective forests to individuals on an egalitarian basis. To balance the equity–efficiency dilemma, forestland transfers are highly advocated by policymakers. However, the forestland rental market is still inactive after the reform. To examine the role of off-farm employment in forestland transfers, a simultaneous Tobit system of equations was employed to account for the endogeneity, interdependency, and censoring issues. Accordingly, the Nelson–Olson two-stage procedure, embedded with a multivariate Tobit estimator, was applied to a nationally representative dataset. The estimation results showed that off-farm employment plays a significantly negative role in forestland rent-in, at the 5% risk level. However, off-farm activities had no significant effect on forestland rent-out. Considering China’s specific situation, a reasonable explanation is that households hold forestland as a crucial means of social security against the risk of unemployment. In both rent-in and rent-out equations, high transaction costs are one of the main obstacles impeding forestland transfer. A remarkable finding was that forestland transactions occurred with a statistically significant factor equalization effect, which would be helpful to adjust the mismatched labor–land ratio and improve the land-use efficiency.

  13. The significance of biometric parameters in determining anterior teeth width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. An important element of prosthetic treatment of edentulous patients is selecting the size of anterior artificial teeth that will restore the natural harmony of one’s dentolabial structure as well as the whole face. The main objective of this study was to determine the correlation between the inner canthal distance (ICD and interalar width (IAW on one side and the width of both central incisors (CIW, the width of central and lateral incisors (CLIW, the width of anterior teeth (ATW, the width between the canine cusps (CCW, which may be useful in clinical practice. Methods. A total of 89 subjects comprising 23 male and 66 female were studied. Their age ranged from 19 to 34 years with the mean of 25 years. Only the subjects with the preserved natural dentition were included in the sample. All facial and intraoral tooth measurements were made with a Boley Gauge (Buffalo Dental Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn NY, USA having a resolution of 0.1mm. Results. A moderate correlation was established between the interalar width and combined width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.439, r = 0.374. A low correlation was established between the inner canthal distance and the width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.335, r = 0.303. The differences between the two genders were highly significant for all the parameters (p < 0.01. The measured facial distances and width of anterior teeth were higher in men than in women. Conclusion. The results of this study suggest that the examined interalar width and inner canthal distance cannot be considered reliable guidelines in the selection of artificial upper anterior teeth. However, they may be used as a useful additional factor combined with other methods for objective tooth selection. The final decision should be made while working on dentures fitting models with the patient’s consent.

  14. Equations for predicting diameter, height, crown width, and leaf area of San Joaquin Valley street trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.J. Peper; E.G. McPherson; S.M. Mori

    2001-01-01

    Although the modeling of energy-use reduction, air pollution uptake, rainfall interception, and microclimate modification associated with urban trees depends on data relating diameter at breast height (dbh) , crown height, crown diameter, and leaf area to tree age or dbh, scant information is available for common municipal tree species . I n this study , tree height ,...

  15. BAM: Bayesian AMHG-Manning Inference of Discharge Using Remotely Sensed Stream Width, Slope, and Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, M. W.; Gleason, C. J.; Durand, M. T.

    2017-11-01

    The forthcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) NASA satellite mission will measure water surface width, height, and slope of major rivers worldwide. The resulting data could provide an unprecedented account of river discharge at continental scales, but reliable methods need to be identified prior to launch. Here we present a novel algorithm for discharge estimation from only remotely sensed stream width, slope, and height at multiple locations along a mass-conserved river segment. The algorithm, termed the Bayesian AMHG-Manning (BAM) algorithm, implements a Bayesian formulation of streamflow uncertainty using a combination of Manning's equation and at-many-stations hydraulic geometry (AMHG). Bayesian methods provide a statistically defensible approach to generating discharge estimates in a physically underconstrained system but rely on prior distributions that quantify the a priori uncertainty of unknown quantities including discharge and hydraulic equation parameters. These were obtained from literature-reported values and from a USGS data set of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements at USGS stream gauges. A data set of simulated widths, slopes, and heights from 19 rivers was used to evaluate the algorithms using a set of performance metrics. Results across the 19 rivers indicate an improvement in performance of BAM over previously tested methods and highlight a path forward in solving discharge estimation using solely satellite remote sensing.

  16. Correlation of H-mode barrier width and neutral penetration length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, R.J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Leonard, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Pedestal studies in DIII-D find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode density barrier and the neutral penetration length. These results are obtained by comparing experimental density profiles to the predictions of an analytic model for the profile, obtained from the particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 40-500 eV), the analytic model quantitatively predicts the observed decrease of the width as the pedestal density increases, the observed strong increase of the gradient of the density as the pedestal density increases and the observation that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same pedestal density have very similar shapes. The width of the density barrier, measured from the edge of the electron temperature barrier, is the lower limit for the observed width of the temperature barrier. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling provides the dominant control for the size of the H-mode transport barrier. (author)

  17. Comparison of H-mode barrier width with a model of neutral penetration length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, R.J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Leonard, A.W.; Osborne, T.H.; Brooks, N.S.; Wolf, N.S.; Porter, G.D.; Stangeby, P.C.; Colchin, R.J.; Owen, L.W.

    2004-01-01

    Pedestal studies in DIII-D find that the width of the region of steep gradient in the H-mode density is comparable with the neutral penetration length, as computed from a simple analytic model. This model has analytic solutions for the edge plasma and neutral density profiles, which are obtained from the coupled particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 40 and 500 eV), the analytic model quantitatively predicts the observed decrease in the width as the pedestal density increases and the observed strong increase in the gradient of the density as the pedestal density increases. The model successfully predicts that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same pedestal density have gradients that differ by less than a factor of 2. The width of the density barrier, measured from the edge of the electron temperature barrier, is the lower limit for the observed width of the temperature barrier. These results support the hypothesis that particle fuelling is an important part of the physics that determines the structure of the H-mode transport barrier. (author)

  18. Effects of Personality on Conflict Resolution in Student Teams: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, William R; Tashchian, Armen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports results of a study of the effects of five personality dimensions on conflict resolution preferences in student teams. Two hundred and sixteen students provided self-reports of personality dimensions and conflict styles using the Neo-FFI and ROCI-II scales. Simultaneous effects of five personality dimensions on five conflict…

  19. Structural Equation Model of Smartphone Addiction Based on Adult Attachment Theory: Mediating Effects of Loneliness and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, EunYoung; Cho, Inhyo; Kim, Eun Joo

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the mediating effects of loneliness and depression on the relationship between adult attachment and smartphone addiction in university students. A total of 200 university students participated in this study. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, and structural equation modeling. There were significant positive relationships between attachment anxiety, loneliness, depression, and smartphone addiction. However, attachment anxiety was not significantly correlated with smartphone addiction. The results also showed that loneliness did not directly mediate between attachment anxiety and smartphone addiction. In addition, loneliness and depression serially mediated between attachment anxiety and smartphone addiction. The results suggest there are mediating effects of loneliness and depression in the relationship between attachment anxiety and smartphone addiction. The hypothesized model was found to be a suitable model for predicting smartphone addiction among university students. Future study is required to find a causal path to prevent smartphone addiction among university students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effects of Socioeconomic Status and Social Support on Violence against Pregnant Women: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marizélia Rodrigues Costa; Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura da; Alves, Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto E; Batista, Rosângela Fernandes Lucena; Ribeiro, Cecília Cláudia Costa; Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Bettiol, Heloisa; Barbieri, Marco Antônio

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have used structural equation modeling to analyze the effects of variables on violence against women. The present study analyzed the effects of socioeconomic status and social support on violence against pregnant women who used prenatal services. This was a cross-sectional study based on data from the Brazilian Ribeirão Preto and São Luís birth cohort studies (BRISA). The sample of the municipality of São Luís (Maranhão/Brazil) consisted of 1,446 pregnant women interviewed in 2010 and 2011. In the proposed model, socioeconomic status was the most distal predictor, followed by social support that determined general violence, psychological violence or physical/sexual violence, which were analyzed as latent variables. Violence was measured by the World Health Organization Violence against Women (WHO VAW) instrument. The São Luis model was estimated using structural equation modeling and validated with 1,378 pregnant women from Ribeirão Preto (São Paulo/Brazil). The proposed model showed good fit for general, psychological and physical/sexual violence for the São Luís sample. Socioeconomic status had no effect on general or psychological violence (p>0.05), but pregnant women with lower socioeconomic status reported more episodes of physical/sexual violence (standardized coefficient, SC = -0.136; p = 0.021). This effect of socioeconomic status was indirect and mediated by low social support (SC = -0.075; psocioeconomic status. Physical/sexual violence was more common for pregnant women with lower socioeconomic status and lower social support. Better social support contributed to reduction of all types of violence. Results were nearly the same for the validation sample of Ribeirão Preto except that SES was not associated with physical/sexual violence.

  1. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  2. Changes in soft tissue nasal widths associated with rapid maxillary expansion in prepubertal and postpubertal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bret M; McNamara, James A; Bandeen, Roger L; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate changes in the soft tissue width of the nose induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME). Data on greater alar cartilage (GAC) and alar base (AB) widths were compared with a normative sample within the same age range. This prospective study consisted of an RME sample of 79 patients treated with an RME protocol. Mean age at the start of RME treatment was 13.5 years; average duration of treatment was 6.7 months. Patients were grouped into prepubertal and postpubertal groups based on their cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stage. AB and GAC widths were determined at three separate time points. The normative sample consisted of 437 orthodontically untreated whites, aged 10-16 years. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine group differences. In addition, independent sample t-tests were used to compare posttreatment nasal width values vs the untreated normative sample. Increases in AB and GAC widths of the nose in the RME sample were less than 1.5 mm. No significant differences were noted in width changes between the prepubertal and postpubertal subgroups. Comparisons of T3 values showed that on average nasal width increases were greater in the RME group than in untreated norms by 1.7 mm for the GAC measure (statistically significant), and by less than 1 mm for the AB measure. RME has no significant clinical effects on the widths of the apical base and the greater alar cartilage of the nose; no differences were observed between the two maturational subgroups.

  3. Effects of system-bath coupling on a photosynthetic heat engine: A polaron master-equation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-07-01

    Stimulated by suggestions of quantum effects in energy transport in photosynthesis, the fundamental principles responsible for the near-unit efficiency of the conversion of solar to chemical energy became active again in recent years. Under natural conditions, the formation of stable charge-separation states in bacteria and plant reaction centers is strongly affected by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to a wide range of vibrational motions. These inspire and motivate us to explore the effects of the environment on the operation of such complexes. In this paper, we apply the polaron master equation, which offers the possibilities to interpolate between weak and strong system-bath coupling, to study how system-bath couplings affect the exciton-transfer processes in the Photosystem II reaction center described by a quantum heat engine (QHE) model over a wide parameter range. The effects of bath correlation and temperature, together with the combined effects of these factors are also discussed in detail. We interpret these results in terms of noise-assisted transport effect and dynamical localization, which correspond to two mechanisms underpinning the transfer process in photosynthetic complexes: One is resonance energy transfer and the other is the dynamical localization effect captured by the polaron master equation. The effects of system-bath coupling and bath correlation are incorporated in the effective system-bath coupling strength determining whether noise-assisted transport effect or dynamical localization dominates the dynamics and temperature modulates the balance of the two mechanisms. Furthermore, these two mechanisms can be attributed to one physical origin: bath-induced fluctuations. The two mechanisms are manifestations of the dual role played by bath-induced fluctuations depending on the range of parameters. The origin and role of coherence are also discussed. It is the constructive interplay between noise and coherent dynamics, rather

  4. Solution of the comoving-frame equation of transfer in spherically symmetric flows. III. Effect of aberration and advection terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalas, D.; Kunasz, P.B.; Hummer, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    We investigate the importance of the advection and aberration terms, which are of order V/c, in the comoving-frame transfer equation in spherical geometry. Characteristic trajectories are found which reduce the spatial derivatives to a perfect differential, and a generalization of the numerical procedure developed in the earlier papers of this series that permits the integration of the transfer equation on these characteristics is presented. For cases in which V/cvery-much-less-than1, a perturbation solution is developed which reduces the problem to that solved in the first paper in this series. For velocities of the form V (r) approx.r/subn/(n=0,1,2), it is shown that the magnitude of the effects arising from the advection and aberration terms is about 5V/c relative to the solution with these terms omitted. In stellar winds V/capproximately-less-than0.01; hence we conclude that aberration and advection terms may safely be ignored, and that consideration of the Doppler-shift term alone is adequate in the computation of spectra from such expanding atmospheres

  5. Dynamics of vector dark solitons propagation and tunneling effect in the variable coefficient coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musammil, N M; Porsezian, K; Subha, P A; Nithyanandan, K

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of vector dark solitons propagation using variable coefficient coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (Vc-CNLS) equation. The dark soliton propagation and evolution dynamics in the inhomogeneous system are studied analytically by employing the Hirota bilinear method. It is apparent from our asymptotic analysis that the collision between the dark solitons is elastic in nature. The various inhomogeneous effects on the evolution and interaction between dark solitons are explored, with a particular emphasis on nonlinear tunneling. It is found that the tunneling of the soliton depends on a condition related to the height of the barrier and the amplitude of the soliton. The intensity of the tunneling soliton either forms a peak or a valley, thus retaining its shape after tunneling. For the case of exponential background, the soliton tends to compress after tunneling through the barrier/well. Thus, a comprehensive study of dark soliton pulse evolution and propagation dynamics in Vc-CNLS equation is presented in the paper.

  6. Perturbation formalism for the complex poles and widths of the transition matrix with an application to intermediate structure phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R.B.; de Saussure, G.; Olsen, D.K.; Difilippo, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The complex poles and widths of the transition T matrix are determined by the trajectory equations which consist of a set of first order nonlinear differential equations. A hierarchy of approximate solutions to the trajectory equations is developed by iterative methods. The results of this formalism are compared with exact solutions for the case of some strongly interacting pairs of resonances in two iron isotopes. In the presence of intermediate structure the average neutron reaction cross section is interpreted in terms of a resonant strength function which exhibits peaks at neutron energies corresponding to ''doorways'' levels

  7. Computing generalized Langevin equations and generalized Fokker-Planck equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, Eric; Solomon, Jose; Kia, Amirali

    2009-07-07

    The Mori-Zwanzig formalism is an effective tool to derive differential equations describing the evolution of a small number of resolved variables. In this paper we present its application to the derivation of generalized Langevin equations and generalized non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equations. We show how long time scales rates and metastable basins can be extracted from these equations. Numerical algorithms are proposed to discretize these equations. An important aspect is the numerical solution of the orthogonal dynamics equation which is a partial differential equation in a high dimensional space. We propose efficient numerical methods to solve this orthogonal dynamics equation. In addition, we present a projection formalism of the Mori-Zwanzig type that is applicable to discrete maps. Numerical applications are presented from the field of Hamiltonian systems.

  8. Effects of Example Variability and Prior Knowledge in How Students Learn to Solve Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Peng; Yang, Ling-Yan; Ding, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have consistently demonstrated that multiple examples are better than one example in facilitating learning because the comparison evoked by multiple examples supports learning and transfer. However, research outcomes are unclear regarding the effects of example variability and prior knowledge on learning from comparing multiple…

  9. Bridging effective stress and soil water retention equations in deforming unsaturated porous media : A Thermodynamic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyghe, J. M.; Nikooee, E.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    The finite deformation of an unsaturated porous medium is analysed from first principles of mixture theory. An expression for Bishop’s effective stress is derived from (1) the deformation-dependent Brooks and Corey’s water retention curve and (2) the restrictions on the constitutive relationships of

  10. The effect of numerical techniques on differential equation based chaotic generators

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of the numerical solution accuracy on the digital implementation of differential chaos generators. Four systems are built on a Xilinx Virtex 4 FPGA using Euler, mid-point, and Runge-Kutta fourth order techniques

  11. A Comparison of Methods for Estimating Quadratic Effects in Nonlinear Structural Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Hsu, Jui-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Two Monte Carlo simulations were performed to compare methods for estimating and testing hypotheses of quadratic effects in latent variable regression models. The methods considered in the current study were (a) a 2-stage moderated regression approach using latent variable scores, (b) an unconstrained product indicator approach, (c) a latent…

  12. Hong's grading for evaluating anterior chamber angle width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok Hwan; Kang, Ja Heon; Park, Ki Ho; Hong, Chul

    2012-11-01

    To compare Hong's grading method with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), gonioscopy, and the dark-room prone-position test (DRPT) for evaluating anterior chamber width. The anterior chamber angle was graded using Hong's grading method, and Hong's angle width was calculated from the arctangent of Hong's grades. The correlation between Hong's angle width and AS-OCT parameters was analyzed. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for Hong's grading method when discriminating between narrow and open angles as determined by gonioscopy was calculated. Correlation analysis was performed between Hong's angle width and intraocular pressure (IOP) changes determined by DRPT. A total of 60 subjects were enrolled. Of these subjects, 53.5 % had a narrow angle. Hong's angle width correlated significantly with the AS-OCT parameters (r = 0.562-0.719, P < 0.01). A Bland-Altman plot showed relatively good agreement between Hong's angle width and the angle width obtained by AS-OCT. The ability of Hong's grading method to discriminate between open and narrow angles was good (AUC = 0.868, 95 % CI 0.756-0.942). A significant linear correlation was found between Hong's angle width and IOP change determined by DRPT (r = -0.761, P < 0.01). Hong's grading method is useful for detecting narrow angles. Hong's grading correlated well with AS-OCT parameters and DRPT.

  13. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  14. Intraflow width variations in Martian and terrestrial lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitersen, Matthew N.; Crown, David A.

    1997-03-01

    Flow morphology is used to interpret emplacement processes for lava flows on Earth and Mars. Accurate measurements of flow geometry are essential, particularly for planetary flows where neither compositional sampling nor direct observations of active flows may be possible. Width behavior may indicate a flow's response to topography, its emplacement regime, and its physical properties. Variations in width with downflow distance from the vent may therefore provide critical clues to flow emplacement processes. Flow width is also one of the few characteristics that can be readily measured from planetary mission data with accuracy. Recent analyses of individual flows at two terrestrial and four Martian sites show that widths within an individual flow vary by up to an order of magnitude. Width is generally thought to be correlated to topography; however, recent studies show that this relationship is neither straightforward nor easily quantifiable.

  15. Crack widths in concrete with fibers and main reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frede; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Brincker, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The main object of the research work presented in this paper is to establish design tools for concrete structures where main reinforcement is combined with addition of short discrete steel fibers. The work is concerned with calculating and measuring crack widths in structural elements subjected...... to bending load. Thus, the aim of the work is to enable engineers to calculate crack widths for flexural concrete members and analyze how different combinations of amounts of fibers and amounts of main reinforcement can meet a given maximum crack width requirement. A mathematical model including...... the ductility of the fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) is set up and experimental work is conducted in order to verify the crack width model. The ductility of the FRC is taken into account by using the stress crack width relation. The constitutive model for the FRC is based on the idea that the initial part...

  16. Effects of density and force discretizations on spurious velocities in lattice Boltzmann equation for two-phase flows

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2014-04-28

    Spurious current emerging in the vicinity of phase interfaces is a well-known disadvantage of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) for two-phase flows. Previous analysis shows that this unphysical phenomenon comes from the force imbalance at discrete level inherited in LBE (Guo et al 2011 Phys. Rev. E 83 036707). Based on the analysis of the LBE free of checkerboard effects, in this work we further show that the force imbalance is caused by the different discretization stencils: the implicit one from the streaming process and the explicit one from the discretization of the force term. Particularly, the total contribution includes two parts, one from the difference between the intrinsically discretized density (or ideal gas pressure) gradient and the explicit ones in the force term, and the other from the explicit discretized chemical potential gradients in the intrinsically discretized force term. The former contribution is a special feature of LBE which was not realized previously.

  17. The effect of numerical techniques on differential equation based chaotic generators

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2012-07-29

    In this paper, we study the effect of the numerical solution accuracy on the digital implementation of differential chaos generators. Four systems are built on a Xilinx Virtex 4 FPGA using Euler, mid-point, and Runge-Kutta fourth order techniques. The twelve implementations are compared based on the FPGA used area, maximum throughput, maximum Lyapunov exponent, and autocorrelation confidence region. Based on circuit performance and the chaotic response of the different implementations, it was found that less complicated numerical solution has better chaotic response and higher throughput.

  18. Application of salting-out effect equation to modelling of liquid-liquid distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitsch, H.K.

    1986-03-01

    Physicochemical interpretation of salting-out is reviewed and effects of the medium on liquid-liquid distribution equilibria are described by two non-specific parameters of salting-out agents: total concentration of species in the aqueous phase and water activity. Thus extraction of a given constituent in various media can be forecasted with few data. Different uranyl and technetium (VII) extraction systems are analyzed to show the potentiality of the method. Coextraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate by tributyl phosphate is used to show the possibility of modelling complex distribution systems in industrial conditions [fr

  19. The Effects of Transformational Leadership and Mediating Factors on the Organizational Success Using Structural Equation Modeling: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravangard, Ramin; Karimi, Sakine; Farhadi, Payam; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of transformational leadership (TL) and mediating factors on organizational success (OS) from the administrative, financial, and support employees' perspective in teaching hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences using structural equation modeling. Three hundred administrative and financial employees were selected, using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling. Data were collected using 5 questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS 21.0 and Lisrel 8.5 through Pearson correlation coefficient and path analysis and confirmatory factor analysis methods. Results showed that TL had significant positive effects on the 3 mediating factors, including organizational culture (t = 15.31), organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) (t = 10.06), and social capital (t = 10.25). Also, the organizational culture (t = 2.26), OCB (t = 3.48), and social capital (t = 7.41) had significant positive effects on OS. According to the results, TL had an indirect effect on OS. Therefore, organizations can achieve more success by strengthening organizational culture, OCB, and social capital through using transformational leadership style. Therefore, in order to increase OS, the following recommendations are made: supporting and encouraging new ideas in the organization, promoting teamwork, strengthening intergroup and intragroup relationships, planning to strengthen and enrich the social and organizational culture, considering the promotion of social capital in the employee training, establishing a system to give rewards to the employees performing extra-role activities, providing a suitable environment for creative employees, and so on.

  20. Problem on primary radiation filtration effect on form of coupling equations during X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrent'ev, Yu.G.; Kuznetsova, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified method for x-ray fluorescence analysis is given. It is shown that the system of coupling equations with constant coefficients and with the number of equations equal to the number of unknown elements allows to obtain the same accuracy of the analysis as with the considerably more complex equations with variable coefficients which take into account the filtration of the primary radiation in a direct way. The system can even be more simplified by using linear equations with constant coefficients. In order to test these systems and to compare them with known coupling equations experimental data for the determination of zirconium and niobium from 16 artificial preparations with fillers of variable composition are presented. The calculation of the absorption of the secondary as well as the primary radiation by means of the proposed equations with constant coefficients is sufficiently good

  1. Prediction of Mesiodistal Width of Unerupted Lateral Incisors, Canines and Premolars in Orthodontic Patients in Early Mixed Dentition Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Proper diagnosis and prevention of malocclusion are superior to treatment. Discrepancy between arch length and tooth size in mixed dentition period is a condition requiring timely diagnosis. Estimating the mesiodistal width of unerupted teeth according to the size of erupted ones can lead to earlier diagnosis of malocclusion. On the other hand, the best timing for serial extractions is before the eruption of lateral incisors. The aim of this study was to present prediction formulas for mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population based on the width of erupted permanent mandibular central incisors and maxillary first molars.Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dental models (60 males, 60 females of orthodontic patients between 11-25 years were evaluated in Yazd city. The measurements were made by a digital caliper on the widest mesiodistal width of teeth at the interproximal contacts. Data were analyzed to calculate the prediction equation.Results: The prediction equation in the upper jaw was y=0.57x+10.82 for males, y=0.7x+6.37 for females and y=0.64x+8.46 for both sexes. The equation for the lower jaw was y=0.76x+2.86 for males, y=0.74x+3.53 for females and y=0.77x+2.7 for both sexes.Conclusions: The prediction equations suggested in this study can predict the mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population in early mixed dentition period without taking radiographs.Keywords: Dentition, Mixed; Dentition, Permanent; Tooth, Unerupted

  2. Differential Equations Compatible with KZ Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felder, G.; Markov, Y.; Tarasov, V.; Varchenko, A.

    2000-01-01

    We define a system of 'dynamical' differential equations compatible with the KZ differential equations. The KZ differential equations are associated to a complex simple Lie algebra g. These are equations on a function of n complex variables z i taking values in the tensor product of n finite dimensional g-modules. The KZ equations depend on the 'dual' variable in the Cartan subalgebra of g. The dynamical differential equations are differential equations with respect to the dual variable. We prove that the standard hypergeometric solutions of the KZ equations also satisfy the dynamical equations. As an application we give a new determinant formula for the coordinates of a basis of hypergeometric solutions

  3. Evolution equation for the B-meson distribution amplitude in the heavy-quark effective theory in coordinate space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The B-meson distribution amplitude (DA) is defined as the matrix element of a quark-antiquark bilocal light-cone operator in the heavy-quark effective theory, corresponding to a long-distance component in the factorization formula for exclusive B-meson decays. The evolution equation for the B-meson DA is governed by the cusp anomalous dimension as well as the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi-type anomalous dimension, and these anomalous dimensions give the ''quasilocal'' kernel in the coordinate-space representation. We show that this evolution equation can be solved analytically in the coordinate space, accomplishing the relevant Sudakov resummation at the next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The quasilocal nature leads to a quite simple form of our solution which determines the B-meson DA with a quark-antiquark light-cone separation t in terms of the DA at a lower renormalization scale μ with smaller interquark separations zt (z≤1). This formula allows us to present rigorous calculation of the B-meson DA at the factorization scale ∼√(m b Λ QCD ) for t less than ∼1 GeV -1 , using the recently obtained operator product expansion of the DA as the input at μ∼1 GeV. We also derive the master formula, which reexpresses the integrals of the DA at μ∼√(m b Λ QCD ) for the factorization formula by the compact integrals of the DA at μ∼1 GeV.

  4. First-principles equation-of-state table of silicon and its effects on high-energy-density plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Gao, R.; Ding, Y.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.

    2017-04-01

    Using density-functional theory-based molecular-dynamics simulations, we have investigated the equation of state for silicon in a wide range of plasma density and temperature conditions of ρ =0.001 -500 g /c m3 and T =2000 -108K . With these calculations, we have established a first-principles equation-of-state (FPEOS) table of silicon for high-energy-density (HED) plasma simulations. When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS model (Table 3810), we find that the FPEOS-predicted Hugoniot is ˜20% softer; for off-Hugoniot plasma conditions, the pressure and internal energy in FPEOS are lower than those of SESAME EOS for temperatures above T ≈ 1-10 eV (depending on density), while the former becomes higher in the low-T regime. The pressure difference between FPEOS and SESAME 3810 can reach to ˜50%, especially in the warm-dense-matter regime. Implementing the FPEOS table of silicon into our hydrocodes, we have studied its effects on Si-target implosions. When compared with the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation using the SESAME 3810 EOS model, the FPEOS simulation showed that (1) the shock speed in silicon is ˜10% slower; (2) the peak density of an in-flight Si shell during implosion is ˜20% higher than the SESAME 3810 simulation; (3) the maximum density reached in the FPEOS simulation is ˜40% higher at the peak compression; and (4) the final areal density and neutron yield are, respectively, ˜30% and ˜70% higher predicted by FPEOS versus the traditional simulation using SESAME 3810. All of these features can be attributed to the larger compressibility of silicon predicted by FPEOS. These results indicate that an accurate EOS table, like the FPEOS presented here, could be essential for the precise design of targets for HED experiments.

  5. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Yamamura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students’ learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. Methods The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training, 5th (before practical training at clinical sites, and 6th (after all practical training years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. Results A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation, and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of ‘self-determination’ in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen’s d= 0.43. Conclusion Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on ‘self-determination’ among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  6. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Shigeo; Takehira, Rieko

    2017-01-01

    To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students' learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training), 5th (before practical training at clinical sites), and 6th (after all practical training) years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation), and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of 'self-determination' in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen's d = 0.43). Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on 'self-determination' among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  7. Bounding the Higgs Width at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John M. [Fermilab; Ellis, R. Keith [Fermilab; Williams, Ciaran [Bohr Inst.

    2014-08-07

    We present results for the Standard model description of the four-lepton production, mediated both by Higgs boson production and by other one-loop standard model processes. The description of four-lepton final states in MCFM v6.8 is reviewed, with special reference to the interference effects that can occur for identical species of leptons. We present results both for interference in the $l^+l^- l^- l^+$ and in the $l^-l^+ \

  8. On inclusive hadronic widths of beautiful particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoze, V.A.; Shifman, M.A.; Ural'tsev, N.G.; Voloshin, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Preasymptotic (in the heavy quark mass) corrections in the non-leptonic decay rates of beautiful mesons and baryons are considered. The effects of real and virtual gluon emission are taken into account. Main emphasis is put on the difference of the life-times of B s 0 mesons with different CP parity. This difference is found to be the largest in the b-family. Possibilities for experimental study of this phenomenon are briefly discussed

  9. K- nuclear states: Binding energies and widths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrtánková, Jaroslava; Mareš, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 015205. ISSN 2469-9985 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04301S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : K- nuclear * kaonic * states Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  10. Nightside studies of coherent HF Radar spectral width behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A previous case study found a relationship between high spectral width measured by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar and elevated electron temperatures observed by the EISCAT and ESR incoherent scatter radars in the post-midnight sector of magnetic local time. This paper expands that work by briefly re-examining that interval and looking in depth at two further case studies. In all three cases a region of high HF spectral width (>200 ms-1 exists poleward of a region of low HF spectral width (<200 ms-1. Each case, however, occurs under quite different geomagnetic conditions. The original case study occurred during an interval with no observed electrojet activity, the second study during a transition from quiet to active conditions with a clear band of ion frictional heating indicating the location of the flow reversal boundary, and the third during an isolated sub-storm. These case studies indicate that the relationship between elevated electron temperature and high HF radar spectral width appears on closed field lines after 03:00 magnetic local time (MLT on the nightside. It is not clear whether the same relationship would hold on open field lines, since our analysis of this relationship is restricted in latitude. We find two important properties of high spectral width data on the nightside. Firstly the high spectral width values occur on both open and closed field lines, and secondly that the power spectra which exhibit high widths are both single-peak and multiple-peak. In general the regions of high spectral width (>200 ms-1 have more multiple-peak spectra than the regions of low spectral widths whilst still maintaining a majority of single-peak spectra. We also find that the region of ion frictional heating is collocated with many multiple-peak HF spectra. Several mechanisms for the generation of high spectral width have been proposed which would produce multiple-peak spectra, these are discussed in relation to the data presented here. Since the

  11. Nightside studies of coherent HF Radar spectral width behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    Full Text Available A previous case study found a relationship between high spectral width measured by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar and elevated electron temperatures observed by the EISCAT and ESR incoherent scatter radars in the post-midnight sector of magnetic local time. This paper expands that work by briefly re-examining that interval and looking in depth at two further case studies. In all three cases a region of high HF spectral width (>200 ms-1 exists poleward of a region of low HF spectral width (<200 ms-1. Each case, however, occurs under quite different geomagnetic conditions. The original case study occurred during an interval with no observed electrojet activity, the second study during a transition from quiet to active conditions with a clear band of ion frictional heating indicating the location of the flow reversal boundary, and the third during an isolated sub-storm. These case studies indicate that the relationship between elevated electron temperature and high HF radar spectral width appears on closed field lines after 03:00 magnetic local time (MLT on the nightside. It is not clear whether the same relationship would hold on open field lines, since our analysis of this relationship is restricted in latitude. We find two important properties of high spectral width data on the nightside. Firstly the high spectral width values occur on both open and closed field lines, and secondly that the power spectra which exhibit high widths are both single-peak and multiple-peak. In general the regions of high spectral width (>200 ms-1 have more multiple-peak spectra than the regions of low spectral widths whilst still maintaining a majority of single-peak spectra. We also find that the region of ion frictional heating is collocated with many multiple-peak HF spectra. Several mechanisms for the generation of high spectral width have been proposed which would produce multiple-peak spectra, these are discussed in relation to

  12. The effect of boundaries on the asymptotic wavenumber of spiral wave solutions of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation

    KAUST Repository

    Aguareles, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider an oscillatory medium whose dynamics are modeled by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. In particular, we focus on n-armed spiral wave solutions of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in a disk of radius d

  13. Structural Equation Modeling of the Effects of Family, Preschool, and Stunting on the Cognitive Development of School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwakemi Rachel Ajayi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A recent study based on a sample of 1,580 children from five adjacent geographical locations in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, was carried out to examine the association of nutrition, family influence, preschool education, and disadvantages in geographical location with the cognitive development of school children. Data were collected on the children from 2009 to 2011 for this developmental study and included cognitive scores and information on the health and nutrition of the children. The current study analyzed the association of demographic variables (geographical location (site, child variables (sex, preschool education and socioeconomic status, parental level of education (maternal and paternal, child’s health (HIV status and hemoglobin level and anthropometric measures of nutritional status (height-for-age with children’s cognitive outcomes. The hypothesis is that the nutritional status of children is a pathway through which the indirect effects of the variables of interest exert influence on their cognitive outcomes. Factor analysis based on principal components was used to create a variable based on the cognitive measures, correlations were used to examine the bivariate association between the variables of interest in the preliminary analysis and a path analysis was constructed, which was used for the disaggregation of the direct and indirect effects of the predictors for each cognitive test in a structural equation model. The results revealed that nutritional status directly predicts cognitive test scores and is a path through which other variables indirectly influence children’s cognitive outcome and development.

  14. Finite temperature effects on anisotropic pressure and equation of state of dense neutron matter in an ultrastrong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayev, A. A.; Yang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spin-polarized states in dense neutron matter with the recently developed Skyrme effective interaction (BSk20 parametrization) are considered in the magnetic fields H up to 10 20 G at finite temperature. In a strong magnetic field, the total pressure in neutron matter is anisotropic, and the difference between the pressures parallel and perpendicular to the field direction becomes significant at H>H th ∼10 18 G. The longitudinal pressure decreases with the magnetic field and vanishes in the critical field 10 18 c 19 G, resulting in the longitudinal instability of neutron matter. With increasing temperature, the threshold H th and critical H c magnetic fields also increase. The appearance of the longitudinal instability prevents the formation of a fully spin-polarized state in neutron matter and only the states with moderate spin polarization are accessible. The anisotropic equation of state is determined at densities and temperatures relevant to the interiors of magnetars. The entropy of strongly magnetized neutron matter turns out to be larger than the entropy of nonpolarized matter. This is caused by some specific details in the dependence of the entropy on the effective masses of neutrons with spin up and spin down in a polarized state.

  15. Relationship between width of greater trochanters and width of iliac wings in tronchanteric bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viradia, Neal K; Berger, Alex A; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a common disorder that is characterized by inflammation of the bursa, superficial to the greater trochanter of the femur, leading to pain in the lateral hip, and often occurs because of acute trauma or repetitive friction involving the iliotibial band, the greater trochanter, and the bursa. In the study reported here, we hypothesized that the increased incidence of bursitis may be the result of the increased prominence of the trochanter in relation to the wings of the iliac crest. Distances between the outermost edges of trochanters and iliac wings were measured in 202 patients from the University of North Carolina Health Care System-101 without a known diagnosis and 101 with a clinical diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis. To determine significance, t tests for nonpaired data were used. Mean (SD) difference between trochanter and iliac wing widths was 28 (20) mm in the group diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and 17 (18) mm in the control group. The difference between the groups in this regard was significant (Pbursitis group and 1.05 (.06) in the control group. The difference between these groups was significant (Pbursitis.

  16. Linear intra-bone geometry dependencies of the radius: Radius length determination by maximum distal width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, S.F.; Krusche-Mandl, I.; Huf, W.; Mall, G.; Fialka, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate possible linear intra-bone geometry dependencies by determining the relation between the maximum radius length and maximum distal width in two independent populations and test for possible gender or age effects. A strong correlation can help develop more representative fracture models and osteosynthetic devices as well as aid gender and height estimation in anthropologic/forensic cases. Methods: First, maximum radius length and distal width of 100 consecutive patients, aged 20–70 years, were digitally measured on standard lower arm radiographs by two independent investigators. Second, the same measurements were performed ex vivo on a second cohort, 135 isolated, formalin fixed radii. Standard descriptive statistics as well as correlations were calculated and possible gender age influences tested for both populations separately. Results: The radiographic dataset resulted in a correlation of radius length and width of r = 0.753 (adj. R 2 = 0.563, p 2 = 0.592) and side no influence on the correlation. Radius length–width correlation for the isolated radii was r = 0.621 (adj. R 2 = 0.381, p 2 = 0.598). Conclusion: A relatively strong radius length–distal width correlation was found in two different populations, indicating that linear body proportions might not only apply to body height and axial length measurements of long bones but also to proportional dependency of bone shapes in general.

  17. Precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Sarah Alam

    2009-01-01

    A precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson is presented. The W bosons are produced in proton antiproton collisions occurring at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron accelerator. The data used for the analyses is collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and corresponds to an average integrated luminosity of 350 pb -1 for the W width analysis for the electron and muon channels and an average integrated luminosity of 2350 pb -1 for the W mass analysis. The mass and width of the W boson is extracted by fitting to the transverse mass distribution, with the peak of the distribution being most sensitive to the mass and the tail of the distribution sensitive to the width. The W width measurement in the electron and muon channels is combined to give a final result of 2032 ± 73 MeV. The systematic uncertainty on the W mass from the recoil of the W boson against the initial state gluon radiation is discussed. A systematic study of the recoil in Z → e + e - events where one electron is reconstructed in the central calorimeter and the other in the plug calorimeter and its effect on the W mass is presented for the first time in this thesis.

  18. Scale orientated analysis of river width changes due to extreme flood hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Krapesch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the morphological effects of extreme floods (recurrence interval >100 years and examines which parameters best describe the width changes due to erosion based on 5 affected alpine gravel bed rivers in Austria. The research was based on vertical aerial photos of the rivers before and after extreme floods, hydrodynamic numerical models and cross sectional measurements supported by LiDAR data of the rivers. Average width ratios (width after/before the flood were calculated and correlated with different hydraulic parameters (specific stream power, shear stress, flow area, specific discharge. Depending on the geomorphological boundary conditions of the different rivers, a mean width ratio between 1.12 (Lech River and 3.45 (Trisanna River was determined on the reach scale. The specific stream power (SSP best predicted the mean width ratios of the rivers especially on the reach scale and sub reach scale. On the local scale more parameters have to be considered to define the "minimum morphological spatial demand of rivers", which is a crucial parameter for addressing and managing flood hazards and should be used in hazard zone plans and spatial planning.

  19. The Width of High Burnup Structure in LWR UO2 Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Oh, Jae-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2007-01-01

    The measured data available in the open literature on the width of high burnup structure (HBS) in LWR UO 2 fuel were analyzed in terms of pellet average burnup, enrichment, and grain size. Dependence of the HBS width on pellet average burnup was shown to be divided into three regions; while the HBS width is governed by accumulation of fission damage (i.e., burnup) for burnup below 60 GWd/tU, it seems to be restricted to some limiting value of around 1.5 mm for burnup above 75 GWd/tU due to high temperature which might have caused extensive annealing of irradiation damage. As for intermediate burnup between 60 and 75 GWd/tU, although temperature would not have been so high as to induce extensive annealing, the microstructural damage could have been partly annealed, resulting in the reduction of the HBS width. It was found that both enrichment and grain size also affects the HBS width. However, as long as the pellet average burnup is lower than about 75 GWd/tU, the effect does not appear to be significant for the enrichment and grain size that are typically used in current LWR fuel. (authors)

  20. Enhancement of heat transfer using varying width twisted tape inserts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... experimental investigations of the augmentation of turbulent flow heat transfer in a horizontal tube by means of varying width twisted tape inserts with air as the working fluid.

  1. A fast integrated discriminator with continuously variable width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghesi, A.; Goggi, G.; Nardo, R.

    1976-01-01

    A simple dc-coupled discriminator with fast switching characteristics has been realized. Both input threshold and output width are continuously variable; the ECL design allows high speed and high density with ample fanout. (Auth.)

  2. Line Width Recovery after Vectorization of Engineering Drawings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gramblička Matúš

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vectorization is the conversion process of a raster image representation into a vector representation. The contemporary commercial vectorization software applications do not provide sufficiently high quality outputs for such images as do mechanical engineering drawings. Line width preservation is one of the problems. There are applications which need to know the line width after vectorization because this line attribute carries the important semantic information for the next 3D model generation. This article describes the algorithm that is able to recover line width of individual lines in the vectorized engineering drawings. Two approaches are proposed, one examines the line width at three points, whereas the second uses a variable number of points depending on the line length. The algorithm is tested on real mechanical engineering drawings.

  3. Estimates for the widths of weighted Sobolev classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, Anastasia A

    2010-01-01

    Estimates for the Kolmogorov widths in the L q,v -metric of weighted Sobolev classes as well as for the approximation numbers of the corresponding embedding operators are found. Bibliography: 33 titles.

  4. SM Higgs decay branching ratios and total Higgs width

    CERN Multimedia

    Daniel Denegri

    2001-01-01

    Upper: Higgs decay ratios as a function of Higgs mass. The largest branching ratio is not necessarily the most usefull one. The most usefull ones are gamma gamma bbar ZZ and WW as in those modes latter signal to background ratios can be achieved. Lower: Total Higgs decay width versus Higgs mass. At low masses the natural width is extremely small, thus observability depends on instrumental resolution primarily.

  5. Estimating the Spectral Width of a Narrowband Optical Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars; Skov Jensen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector.......Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector....

  6. Width of electromagnetic wave instability spectrum in tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkevich, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of high-frequency signal modulation and spectrum analysis of the envelope a measurement of spectrum width for electromagnetic wave instability was carried out under conditions of current pulse action on tungsten plate in magnetic field. The existence of amplitude-frequency wave modulation was revealed. The width of current disturbance spectrum in a specimen was evaluated. Current disturbances are shown to cause the instability of electromagnetic wave. 11 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Correlations for reduced-width amplitudes in 49V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, B.H.; Mitchell, G.E.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Westerfeldt, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement of the relative sign of inelastic proton-channel amplitudes permits the determination of amplitude correlations. Data were obtained for 45 5/2 + resonances in 49 V. Although the reduced widths in each channel followed a Porter-Thomas distribution, large amplitude correlations were observed. The results are compared with the reduced-width--amplitude distribution of Krieger and Porter. This is the first direct test of the Krieger-Porter distribution

  8. Quantum numbers and decay widths of the psi (3684)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luth, V.; Boyarski, A.M.; Lynch, H.L.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Feldman, G.J.; Fryberger, D.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Larsen, R.R.; Luke, D.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Tanenbaum, W.; Vannucci, F.; Abrams, G.S.; Chinowsky, W.; Friedberg, C.E.; Goldhaber, G.; Kadyk, J.A.; Litke, A.M.; Lulu, B.A.; Pierre, F.M.; Sadoulet, B.; Trilling, G.H.; Whitaker, J.S.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Cross sections for e + e - →hadrons, e + e - , and μ + μ - near 3684 MeV are presented. The psi(3684) resonance is established as having the assignment J/sup PC/=1 -- . The mass is 3684+-5 MeV. The partial width for decay to electrons is GAMMA/sube/=2.1+-0.3 keV and the total width is GAMMA=228+-56 keV

  9. Basic equations of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with the effects due to the Pauli principle and the phonon ground state correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang; Voronov, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    A system of basic equations of the quasiparticle-phonon model is obtained for energies and a structure of excited states described by the wave functions containing one- and two-phonon components. The effects due to the Pauli principle for two-phonon components and the phonon ground state correlations of a spherical nucleus are taken here into account. The quantitative estimations of these effects are given by a simplified scheme. The relation between these equations with the results from other theoretical approaches is discussed

  10. Damping width of giant dipole resonances of cold and hot nuclei: A macroscopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A phenomenological macroscopic model of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) damping width of cold and hot nuclei with ground-state spherical and near-spherical shapes is developed. The model is based on a generalized Fermi liquid model which takes into account the nuclear surface dynamics. The temperature dependence of the GDR damping width is accounted for in terms of surface and volume components. Parameter-free expressions for the damping width and the effective deformation are obtained. The model is validated with GDR measurements of the following nuclides: 39,40 K, 42 Ca, 45 Sc, 59,63 Cu, 109-120 Sn, 147 Eu, 194 Hg, and 208 Pb, and is compared with the predictions of other models

  11. Stability analysis of a boundary layer over a hump using parabolized stability equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, B; Park, D H; Park, S O, E-mail: sopark@kaist.ac.kr [Division of Aerospace Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Gusong-dong, Yusong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Parabolized stability equations (PSEs) were used to investigate the stability of boundary layer flows over a small hump. The applicability of PSEs to flows with a small separation bubble was examined by comparing the result with DNS data. It was found that PSEs can efficiently track the disturbance waves with an acceptable accuracy in spite of a small separation bubble. A typical evolution scenario of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave is presented. The adverse pressure gradient and the flow separation due to the hump have a strong effect on the amplification of the disturbances. The effect of hump width and height is also examined. When the width of the hump is reduced, the amplification factor is increased. The height of the hump is found to obviously influence the stability only when it is greater than the critical layer thickness.

  12. Stability analysis of a boundary layer over a hump using parabolized stability equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, B; Park, D H; Park, S O

    2011-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSEs) were used to investigate the stability of boundary layer flows over a small hump. The applicability of PSEs to flows with a small separation bubble was examined by comparing the result with DNS data. It was found that PSEs can efficiently track the disturbance waves with an acceptable accuracy in spite of a small separation bubble. A typical evolution scenario of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave is presented. The adverse pressure gradient and the flow separation due to the hump have a strong effect on the amplification of the disturbances. The effect of hump width and height is also examined. When the width of the hump is reduced, the amplification factor is increased. The height of the hump is found to obviously influence the stability only when it is greater than the critical layer thickness.

  13. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge. (paper)

  14. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2014-04-01

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge.

  15. A closed-form solution for the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation for electron transport in the range of Compton Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, B.D.A.; Vilhena, M.T.; Borges, V.; Hoff, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we solve the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, an alternative approach for the Boltzmann transport equation for charged particles in a rectangular domain. To construct the solution we begin applying the P N approximation in the angular variable and the Laplace Transform in the x-variable, thus obtaining a first order linear differential equation in y-variable, which the solution is straightforward. The angular flux of electrons and the parameters of the medium are used for the calculation of the energy deposited by the secondary electrons generated by Compton Effect. The remaining effects will not be taken into account. The results will be presented under absorbed energy form in several points of interested. We present numerical simulations and comparisons with results obtained by using Geant4 (version 8) program which applies the Monte Carlo's technique to low energy libraries for a two-dimensional problem assuming the screened Rutherford differential scattering cross-section

  16. The primary factor for suture configuration at rotator cuff repair: Width of mattress or distance from tear edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Hapa

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Bite size from the edge of the tendon seems to be more important than the width of the mattress. The curve of the suture passing device may also have an effect on the strength of the suture tendon interface.

  17. Identification and Quantification of Cause and Effects in Symbiosis of Corn with Arbuscular Mycorrehiza Fungus using Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jahan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering to necessity and importance of determining mycorrhizal symbiosis level and its effects on crop agroecological characteristics as well as other related factors affecting this relationship, beside, the lack of an assured method for this purpose, the present study designed based on new perspectives and insights for determining cause and effects relations, latent variables using structural equation modeling (SEM approach. A field experiment was conducted during 2 years. A split plots arrangement based on randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications was used. Treatments consisted four cropping systems (high, medium, and low input conventional as well as ecological system and four inoculations (mycorrhizae fungus: Glomus intraradices, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR: (Azospirillum brasilense, Azotobacter paspali, dual inoculation: (fungus plus bacteria, and no-inoculation (control, which were allocated to main plots and sub plots, respectively. At the first step, a confirmatory factor analyzing was conducted resulted to two distinguished factors, and then the variables which had the most loads (weight on one of these two factors were determined. At the second step, considering ecophysiological basis of crops growth and development, in order to continue analyzing, the first factor (including: leaf area index (LAI, root length colonization percent (RLCP, dry matter (DM, stem diameter (D, SPAD readings and the second factor (including: maximum photosynthesis (Amax, specific root length (SRL, canopy temperature (CT, plant height (H, soil respiration rate (SRR, variable chlorophyll fluorescence to maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm, plant tissue phosphorus content (%P determined resource capture latent construct and resource utilization latent construct, respectively. Correlation coefficients, squared multiple correlation coefficients, covariance matrices, direct and indirect path coefficients were calculated

  18. Dynamical equations for the optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    Dynamical equations for the optical potential are obtained starting from a wide class of N-particle equations. This is done with arbitrary multiparticle interactions to allow adaptation to few-body models of nuclear reactions and including all effects of nucleon identity. Earlier forms of the optical potential equations are obtained as special cases. Particular emphasis is placed upon obtaining dynamical equations for the optical potential from the equations of Kouri, Levin, and Tobocman including all effects of particle identity

  19. Conformational effect on small angle neutron scattering behavior of interacting polyelectrolyte solutions: a perspective of integral equation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang; Do, Changwoo; Hong, Kunlun; Liu, Yun; Porcar, Lionel; Smith, Gregory S; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2012-07-14

    We present small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of deuterium oxide (D(2)O) solutions of linear and star sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) as a function of polyelectrolyte concentration. Emphasis is on understanding the dependence of their SANS coherent scattering cross section I(Q) on the molecular architecture of single polyelectrolyte. The key finding is that for a given concentration, star polyelectrolytes exhibit more pronounced characteristic peaks in I(Q), and the position of the first peak occurs at a smaller Q compared to their linear counterparts. Based on a model of integral equation theory, we first compare the SANS experimental I(Q) of salt-free polyelectrolyte solutions with that predicted theoretically. Having seen their satisfactory qualitative agreement, the dependence of counterion association behavior on polyelectrolyte geometry and concentration is further explored. Our predictions reveal that the ionic environment of polyelectrolyte exhibits a strong dependence on polyelectrolyte geometry at lower polyelectrolyte concentration. However, when both linear and star polyelectrolytes exceed their overlap concentrations, the spatial distribution of counterion is found to be essentially insensitive to polyelectrolyte geometry due to the steric effect.

  20. Using Score Equating and Measurement Invariance to Examine the Flynn Effect in the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Nicholas; Beaujean, A Alexander; Taub, Gordon E

    2015-01-01

    The Flynn effect (FE; i.e., increase in mean IQ scores over time) is commonly viewed as reflecting population shifts in intelligence, despite the fact that most FE studies have not investigated the assumption of score comparability. Consequently, the extent to which these mean differences in IQ scores reflect population shifts in cognitive abilities versus changes in the instruments used to measure these abilities is unclear. In this study, we used modern psychometric tools to examine the FE. First, we equated raw scores for each common subtest to be on the same scale across instruments. This enabled the combination of scores from all three instruments into one of 13 age groups before converting raw scores into Z scores. Second, using age-based standardized scores for standardization samples, we examined measurement invariance across the second (revised), third, and fourth editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. Results indicate that while scores were equivalent across the third and fourth editions, they were not equivalent across the second and third editions. Results suggest that there is some evidence for an increase in intelligence, but also call into question many published FE findings as presuming the instruments' scores are invariant when this assumption is not warranted.