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Sample records for effective tumor surveillance

  1. Subversion and coercion: the art of redirecting tumor immune surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, John B; Oft, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tumor immune surveillance and CD8+ T cells in particular appear capable of recognizing the antigenic properties of human tumor cells. However, those antigen specific T cells are often excluded from tumor tissue or are functionally limited in their cytotoxic capacity. Instead, the immune response provides proinflammatory cytokines and proteases promoting tumor growth and progression while subverting cytotoxic anti-tumor immunity. The cytokines and the inflammatory mechanisms driving tumor associated inflammation resemble tissue remodeling processes during wound healing and chronic inflammatory diseases. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge of how inflammatory cytokines may promote the deviation of anti-tumor immunity toward a tumor promoting, noncytotoxic inflammation.

  2. von Hippel-Lindau disease: surveillance strategy for endolymphatic sac tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Gimsing, Steen; Kosteljanetz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    : Up to 16% of patients with the hereditary von Hippel-Lindau disease develop endolymphatic sac tumors of the inner ear. Early diagnosis and treatment of endolymphatic sac tumors can prevent audiovestibular morbidity, but optimal endolymphatic sac tumor surveillance strategy has yet to be determi...... to be determined. We aimed to evaluate endolymphatic sac tumor surveillance to determine the best surveillance strategy.......: Up to 16% of patients with the hereditary von Hippel-Lindau disease develop endolymphatic sac tumors of the inner ear. Early diagnosis and treatment of endolymphatic sac tumors can prevent audiovestibular morbidity, but optimal endolymphatic sac tumor surveillance strategy has yet...

  3. Loss of STAT3 in Lymphoma Relaxes NK Cell-Mediated Tumor Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Eva Maria [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Hoelzl, Maria Agnes [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Baeck, Julia [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Clinical Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Schuster, Christian [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Reichholf, Brian [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Kern, Daniela; Aberger, Fritz [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, Salzburg 5020 (Austria); Sexl, Veronika; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.hoelbl@vetmeduni.ac.at [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria)

    2014-01-27

    The transcription factors and proto-oncogenes STAT3 and STAT5 are highly activated in hematological malignancies and represent promising therapeutic targets. Whereas the importance of STAT5 as tumor promoter is beyond doubt, the role of STAT3 in hematological cancers is less well understood. Both, enforced as well as attenuated expression of STAT3 were reported in hematopoietic malignancies. Recent evidence implicates STAT3 as key player for tumor immune surveillance as it both mediates the production of and response to inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of STAT3 deletion in a BCR/ABL-induced lymphoma model, which is tightly controlled by natural killer (NK) cells in vivo. Upon STAT3 deletion tumor growth is significantly enhanced when compared to STAT3-expressing controls. The increased tumor size upon loss of STAT3 was accompanied by reduced NK cell infiltration and decreased levels of the cytokine IFN-γ and the chemokine RANTES. Upon transplantation into NK cell-deficient mice differences in lymphoma size were abolished indicating that STAT3 expression in the tumor cells controls NK cell-dependent tumor surveillance. Our findings indicate that STAT3 inhibition in lymphoma patients will impair NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance, which needs to be taken into account when testing STAT3 inhibitors in preclinical or clinical trials.

  4. Aberrant paramagnetic signals outside the tumor volume on routine surveillance MRI of brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Inbar, Edna; Michaeli, Natalia; Limon, Dror; Siegal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    Late complications of cerebral radiation therapy (RT) involve vascular injury with acquired cavernous malformation, telangiectasias and damage to vascular walls which are well recognized in children. Its incidence in adults is unknown. Blood products and iron deposition that accompany vascular injury create paramagnetic effects on MRI. This study retrospectively investigated the frequency of paramagnetic lesions on routine surveillance MRI of adult brain tumor patients. MRI studies of 115 brain tumor patients were reviewed. Only studies containing sequences of either susceptibility weighted images or gradient echo or blood oxygenation level dependent imaging were included. Lesions inside the tumor volume were not considered. 68 studies fulfilled the above criteria and included 48 patients with previous RT (35 followed for >2 years and 13 for 1 year) and 20 patients who were not treated with RT. The median age at time of irradiation was 47 years. Aberrant paramagnetic lesions were found in 23/35 (65%) patients followed for >2 years after RT and in only 1/13 (8%) patients followed for 1-year after radiation (p = 0.03). The 1-year follow-up group did not differ from the control group [2/20 (9%)]. Most lesions were within the radiation field and none of the patients had related symptomatology. The number and incidence of these lesions increased with time and amounted to 75% over 3 years post RT. MRI paramagnetic signal aberrations are common findings in adult brain tumor patients that evolve over time after RT. The clinical significance of these lesions needs further investigation.

  5. Health effects and medical surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Source of ionizing radiations have innumerable applications in the work place. Usually, even where the work is performed safely, the employees involved inevitably receive small, regular exposures to radiation that are not manifestly harmful. This Module explains how ionizing radiations can interact with and affect human tissues, the various factors that influence the outcome and the detrimental effects that may result. The medical surveillance that is appropriate for those working with radiation sources, depending on the degree of hazard of the work, is described. The Manual will be of most benefit it if forms part of more comprehensive training or is supplemented by the advice of a medically qualified expert. Where medical surveillance is appropriate for radiation employees, the services of a qualified doctor, occupational physician or other trained medical staff will be required

  6. Health effects and medical surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Practical Radiation Technical Manual is one of a series which has been designed to provide guidance on radiological protection for employers, Radiation Protection Officers, managers and other technically competent persons who have a responsibility to ensure the safety of employees working with ionizing radiation. The Manual may be used with the appropriate IAEA Practical Radiation Safety Manuals to provide adequate training, instruction or information on health effects and medical surveillance for all employees engaged in work with ionizing radiation. Sources of ionizing radiations have a large number of applications in the workplace. Usually, even where the work is performed safely, the employees involved inevitably receive small, regular exposures to radiation that are not harmful. Some applications involve sources that could deliver more significant radiation doses, particularly when poor methods are practised or an accident occurs. The radiations cannot be seen, felt or sensed by the human body in any way and excessive exposures may cause detriment to the health of a worker in a way that is not immediately apparent. When the symptoms occur, weeks or possibly years later, an untrained worker or inexperienced medical staff probably cannot recognize the effects to be due to the radiation exposure. This Manual explains how ionizing radiations can interact with and affect human tissues, the various factors that influence the outcome and the detrimental effects that may result. The medical surveillance that is appropriate for those working with radiation sources, depending on the degree of hazard of the work, is described. The Manual will be of most benefit if it forms part of more comprehensive training or is supplemented by the advice of a medically qualified expert. Where medical surveillance is appropriate for radiation employees, the services of a qualified doctor, occupational physician or other trained medical staff will be required

  7. Utility of MRI versus tumor markers for post-treatment surveillance of marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Victoria; Segal, Devorah; Gardner, Sharon L; Zagzag, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H; Allen, Jeffrey C; Karajannis, Matthias A

    2016-09-01

    Patients with marker-positive central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors are typically monitored for tumor recurrence with both tumor markers (AFP and b-hCG) and MRI. We hypothesize that the recurrence of these tumors will always be accompanied by an elevation in tumor markers, and that surveillance MRI may not be necessary. We retrospectively identified 28 patients with CNS germ cell tumors treated at our institution that presented with an elevated serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumor marker at the time of diagnosis. We then identified those who had a tumor recurrence after having been in remission and whether each recurrence was detected via MRI changes, elevated tumor markers, or both. Four patients suffered a tumor recurrence. Only one patient had simultaneously elevated tumor markers and MRI evidence of recurrence. Two patients had evidence of recurrence on MRI without corresponding elevations in serum or CSF tumor markers. One patient had abnormal tumor markers with no evidence of recurrence on MRI until 6 months later. We conclude that in patients with marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors who achieve complete remission, continued surveillance imaging in addition to measurement of tumor markers is indicated to detect recurrences.

  8. Regulation of tumor immune surveillance and tumor immune subversion by tgf-Beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Young; Wakefield, Lalage M; Mamura, Mizuko

    2009-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a highly pleiotropic cytokine playing pivotal roles in immune regulation. TGF-beta facilitates tumor cell survival and metastasis by targeting multiple cellular components. Focusing on its immunosuppressive functions, TGF-beta antagonists have been employed for cancer treatment to enhance tumor immunity. TGF-beta antagonists exert anti-tumor effects through #1 activating effector cells such as NK cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells (CTLs), #2 inhibiting regulatory/suppressor cell populations, #3 making tumor cells visible to immune cells, #4 inhibiting the production of tumor growth factors. This review focuses on the effect of TGF-beta on T cells, which are differentiated into effector T cells or newly identified tumor-supporting T cells.

  9. Genetic predisposition to endocrine tumors: Diagnosis, surveillance and challenges in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, Elisabeth Joye; Else, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    Endocrine tumor syndromes, eg, multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2, were among the first recognized hereditary predisposition syndromes to tumor development. Over time, the number of endocrine tumor syndromes has significantly expanded, eg, with the recent inclusion of hereditary paraganglioma syndromes. Associations of non-endocrine tumors with hereditary endocrine tumor syndromes and endocrine tumors with non-classical endocrine tumor syndromes have emerged. These findings have certainly expanded the scope of care, necessitating a multidisciplinary approach by a team of medical professionals and researchers, integrating shared patient decision-making at every step of surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, multiple aspects of patient care remain individualized, based on a patient's clinical presentation and family pedigree. This is particularly important when determining a surveillance plan for unaffected or disease-free mutation carriers. In this review, we describe the main endocrine tumor manifestations found in familial cancer syndromes in an organ-based approach, focusing on adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, neuroendocrine tumors, differentiated thyroid cancer, and medullary thyroid cancer. We highlight the challenges in diagnosis, surveillance, and therapy unique to the patient population with hereditary syndromes. Furthermore, we underscore the importance of evaluating for genetic predisposition to tumor development, provide features that can identify index patients, and discuss the approach to screening surveillance for mutation carriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immune Surveillance Against a Solid Tumor Fails because of Immunological Ignorance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsenbein, Adrian F.; Klenerman, Paul; Karrer, Urs; Ludewig, Burkhard; Pericin, Marcus; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1999-03-01

    Many peripheral solid tumors such as sarcomas and carcinomas express tumor-specific antigens that can serve as targets for immune effector T cells. Nevertheless, overall immune surveillance against such tumors seems relatively inefficient. We studied immune surveillance against a s.c. sarcoma expressing a characterized viral tumor antigen. Surprisingly, the tumor cells were capable of inducing a protective cytotoxic T cell response if transferred as a single-cell suspension. However, if they were transplanted as small tumor pieces, tumors readily grew. Tumor growth correlated strictly with (i) failure of tumor cells to reach the draining lymph nodes and (ii) absence of primed cytotoxic T cells. Cytotoxic T cells were not tolerant or deleted because a tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell response was readily induced in lymphoid tissue by immunization with virus or with tumor cells even in the presence of large tumors. Established tumors were rejected by vaccine-induced effector T cells if effector T cells were maintained by prolonged or repetitive vaccination, but not by single-dose vaccination. Thus, in addition to several other tumor-promoting parameters, some antigenic peripheral sarcomas--and probably carcinomas--may grow not because they anergize or tolerize tumor-specific T cells, but because such tumors are immunologically dealt with as if they were in a so-called immunologically privileged site and are ignored for too long.

  11. [Immunological mechanisms of graft versus tumor effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ine, Shoji; Yamada, Minami; Miyamura, Koichi; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2003-09-01

    Lesson from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation demonstrated that donor immuno-surveillance system can eradicate tumor cells. This is so-call graft versus tumor(GVT) effect. Antigen presenting cells show peptide from minor antigen rather leukemic specific antigen in the context of major histocompatibility complex. The effector cells composed of CD8 T lymphocyte, CD4 T lymphocyte, natural killer cell and natural killer T cell. Death signal was transmitted from effector cells via granzyme/perforin system and FasL/Fas system, and recently TRAIL system seems most important for GVT effect.

  12. Risk effectiveness evaluation of surveillance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Martorell, S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    To address the concerns about nuclear power plant surveillance tests, i.e., their adverse safety impact due to negative effects and too burdensome requirements, it is necessary to evaluate the safety significance or risk effectiveness of such tests explicitly considering both negative and positive effects. This paper defines the negative effects of surveillance testing from a risk perspective, and then presents a methodology to quantify the negative risk impact, i.e., the risk penalty or risk increase caused by the test. The method focuses on two important kinds of negative effects, namely, test-caused transients and test-caused equipment degradations. The concepts and quantitative methods for the risk evaluation can be used in the decision-making process to establish the safety significance of the tests and to screen the plant-specific surveillance test requirements. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Clinical Management and Tumor Surveillance Recommendations of Inherited Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabori, Uri; Hansford, Jordan R; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Kratz, Christian P; Plon, Sharon E; Frebourg, Thierry; Brugières, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Replication proofreading is crucial to avoid mutation accumulation in dividing cells. In humans, proofreading and replication repair is maintained by the exonuclease domains of DNA polymerases and the mismatch repair system. Individuals harboring germline mutations in genes involved in this process are at increased risk of early cancers from multiple organs. Biallelic mutations in any of the four mismatch repair genes MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 , and PMS2 result in one of the most aggressive childhood cancer predisposition syndromes, termed constitutional mismatch repair deficiency or constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMRD). Data gathered in the last decade allow us to better define the clinical manifestations, tumor spectrum, and diagnostic algorithms for CMMRD. In this article, we summarize this information and present a comprehensive consensus surveillance protocol for these individuals. Ongoing research will allow for further definition of replication repair-deficient cancer syndromes, assessing the cost-effectiveness of such surveillance protocols and potential therapeutic interventions for these children and families. Clin Cancer Res; 23(11); e32-e37. ©2017 AACR See all articles in the online-only CCR Pediatric Oncology Series. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Toward the effective surveillance of hypospadias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, H; Vrijheid, M; Scott, JES; Addor, MC; Botting, B; de Vigan, C; de Walle, H; Garne, E; Loane, M; Pierini, A; Garcia-Minaur, S; Physick, N; Tenconi, R; Wiesel, A; Calzolari, E; Stone, D

    Concern about apparent increases in the prevalence of hypospadias-a congenital male reproductive-tract abnormality-in the 1960s to 1980s and the possible connection to increasing exposures to endocrine-disrupting chemicals have underlined the importance of effective surveillance of hypospadias

  15. Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtslund, Anders; Coeckelbergh, Mark; Matzner, Tobias

    Studying surveillance involves raising questions about the very nature of concepts such as information, technology, identity, space and power. Besides the maybe all too obvious ethical issues often discussed with regard to surveillance, there are several other angles and approaches that we should...... like to encourage. Therefore, our panel will focus on the philosophical, yet non-ethical issues of surveillance in order to stimulate an intense debate with the audience on the ethical implications of our enquiries. We also hope to provide a broader and deeper understanding of surveillance....

  16. Effective surveillance for homeland security balancing technology and social issues

    CERN Document Server

    Flammini, Francesco; Franceschetti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Effective Surveillance for Homeland Security: Balancing Technology and Social Issues provides a comprehensive survey of state-of-the-art methods and tools for the surveillance and protection of citizens and critical infrastructures against natural and deliberate threats. Focusing on current technological challenges involving multi-disciplinary problem analysis and systems engineering approaches, it provides an overview of the most relevant aspects of surveillance systems in the framework of homeland security. Addressing both advanced surveillance technologies and the related socio-ethical issues, the book consists of 21 chapters written by international experts from the various sectors of homeland security. Part I, Surveillance and Society, focuses on the societal dimension of surveillance-stressing the importance of societal acceptability as a precondition to any surveillance system. Part II, Physical and Cyber Surveillance, presents advanced technologies for surveillance. It considers developing technologie...

  17. Uptake of genetic testing and long-term tumor surveillance in von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chávez Mireya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by germline mutations in the VHL gene. Patients have significant morbidity and mortality secondary to vascular tumors. Disease management is centered on tumor surveillance that allows early detection and treatment. Presymptomatic genetic testing is therefore recommended, including in at-risk children. Methods We tested 17 families (n = 109 individuals for VHL mutations including 43 children under the age of 18. Personalized genetic counseling was provided pre and post-test and the individuals undergoing presymptomatic testing filled out questionnaires gathering socio-demographic, psychological and psychiatric data. Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of the VHL gene. Mutation-carriers were screened for VHL disease-related tumors and were offered follow-up annual examinations. Results Mutations were identified in 36 patients, 17 of whom were asymptomatic. In the initial screening, we identified at least one tumor in five of 17 previously asymptomatic individuals. At the end of five years, only 38.9% of the mutation-carriers continued participating in our tumor surveillance program. During this time, 14 mutation carriers developed a total of 32 new tumors, three of whom died of complications. Gender, education, income, marital status and religiosity were not found to be associated with adherence to the surveillance protocol. Follow-up adherence was also independent of pre-test depression, severity of disease, or number of affected family members. The only statistically significant predictor of adherence was being symptomatic at the time of testing (OR = 5; 95% CI 1.2 - 20.3; p = 0.02. Pre-test anxiety was more commonly observed in patients that discontinued follow-up (64.7% vs. 35.3%; p = 0.01. Conclusions The high initial uptake rate of genetic testing for VHL disease, including in minors, allowed the discontinuation of unnecessary screening

  18. A Tumor Surveillance Model: A Non-Coding RNA Senses Neoplastic Cells and Its Protein Partner Signals Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sun Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available nc886 (= pre-miR-886 or vtRNA2-1 is a non-coding RNA that has been recently identified as a natural repressor for the activity of PKR (Protein Kinase R. The suppression of nc886 activates PKR and thereby provokes a cell death pathway. When combined with the fact that nc886 is suppressed in a wide range of cancer cells, the nc886-PKR relationship suggests a tumor surveillance model. When neoplastic cells develop and nc886 decreases therein, PKR is released from nc886 and becomes the active phosphorylated form, which initiates an apoptotic cascade to eliminate those cells. The nc886-PKR pathway is distinct from conventional mechanisms, such as the immune surveillance hypothesis or intrinsic mechanisms that check/proofread the genomic integrity, and thus represents a novel example of tumor surveillance.

  19. Cancer and Central Nervous System Tumor Surveillance in Pediatric Neurofibromatosis 2 and Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D Gareth R; Salvador, Hector; Chang, Vivian Y; Erez, Ayelet; Voss, Stephan D; Druker, Harriet; Scott, Hamish S; Tabori, Uri

    2017-06-15

    The neurofibromatoses consist of at least three autosomal-dominant inherited disorders: neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and schwannomatosis. For over 80 years, these conditions were inextricably tied together under generalized neurofibromatosis. In 1987, the localization of NF1 to chromosome 17q and NF2 (bilateral vestibular schwannoma) to 22q led to a consensus conference at Bethesda, Maryland. The two main neurofibromatoses, NF1 and NF2, were formally separated. More recently, the SMARCB1 and LZTR1 genes on 22q have been confirmed as causing a subset of schwannomatosis. The last 26 years have seen a great improvement in understanding of the clinical and molecular features of these conditions as well as insights into management. Childhood presentation of NF2 (often with meningioma) in particular predicts a severe multitumor disease course. Malignancy is rare in NF2, particularly in childhood; however, there are substantial risks from benign and low-grade central nervous system (CNS) tumors necessitating MRI surveillance to optimize management. At least annual brain MRI, including high-resolution images through the auditory meatus, and a clinical examination and auditory assessment are required from diagnosis or from around 10 to 12 years of age if asymptomatic. Spinal imaging at baseline and every 2 to 3 years is advised with more frequent imaging if warranted on the basis of sites of tumor involvement. The malignancy risk in schwannomatosis is not well defined but may include an increased risk of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in SMARCB1 Imaging protocols are also proposed for SMARCB1 and LZTR1 schwannomatosis and SMARCE1 -related meningioma predisposition. Clin Cancer Res; 23(12); e54-e61. ©2017 AACR See all articles in the online-only CCR Pediatric Oncology Series. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Effect of dependency in systems for multivariate surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Systems for multivariate on-line surveillance (e.g. outbreak detection), are investigated. Optimal systems for statistical surveillance are based on likelihood ratios. Three systems are compared; based on each marginal density, based on the joint density and based on the Hotelling?s T2. The effect of dependency between the monitored processes is investigated, and the effect of correlation between the change times. When the first change occurs immediately, the three methods...

  1. Modeling the Effect of Tumor Size in Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschraegen, Claire; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gábor; Gordon, Richard; Royce, Melanie E.; Vlastos, Georges; Tai, Patricia; Storme, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The purpose of this study was to determine the type of relationship between tumor size and mortality in early breast carcinoma. Methods: The data was abstracted from 83,686 cases registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of women diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma between 1988 and 1997 presenting with a T1–T2 lesion and no metastasis in whom axillary node dissection was performed: 58,070 women were node-negative (N0) and 25,616 were node-positive (N+). End point was death from any cause. Tumor size was modeled as a continuous variable by proportional hazards using a generalized additive models procedure. Results: Functionally, a Gompertzian expression exp(-exp(-(size-15)/10)) provided a good fit to the effect of tumor size (in millimeters) on mortality, irrespective of nodal status. Quantitatively, for tumor size between 3 and 50 mm, the increase of crude cumulative death rate (number of observed deaths divided by the number of patients at risk) increased with size from 10% to 25% for N0 and from 20% to 40% for N+. Conclusions: The functional relationship of tumor size with mortality is concordant with current knowledge of tumor growth. However, its qualitative and quantitative independence of nodal status is in contradiction with the prevailing concept of sequential disease progression from primary tumor to regional nodes. This argues against the perception that nodal metastases are caused by the primary tumor. PMID:15650642

  2. Cancer and Central Nervous System Tumor Surveillance in Pediatric Neurofibromatosis 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D Gareth R; Salvador, Hector; Chang, Vivian Y; Erez, Ayelet; Voss, Stephan D; Schneider, Kami Wolfe; Scott, Hamish S; Plon, Sharon E; Tabori, Uri

    2017-06-15

    Although the neurofibromatoses consist of at least three autosomal dominantly inherited disorders, neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2), and schwannomatosis, NF1 represents a multisystem pleiotropic condition very different from the other two. NF1 is a genetic syndrome first manifesting in childhood; affecting multiple organs, childhood development, and neurocognitive status; and presenting the clinician with often complex management decisions that require a multidisciplinary approach. Molecular genetic testing (see article for detailed discussion) is recommended to confirm NF1, particularly in children fulfilling only pigmentary features of the diagnostic criteria. Although cancer risk is not the major issue facing an individual with NF1 during childhood, the condition causes significantly increased malignancy risks compared with the general population. Specifically, NF1 is associated with highly elevated risks of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor as well as substantial risks of noninvasive pilocytic astrocytoma, particularly optic pathway glioma (OPG), which represent a major management issue. Until 8 years of age, clinical assessment for OPG is advised every 6 to 12 months, but routine MRI assessment is not currently advised in asymptomatic individuals with NF1 and no signs of clinical visual pathway disturbance. Routine surveillance for other malignancies is not recommended, but clinicians and parents should be aware of the small risks (<1%) of certain specific individual malignancies (e.g., rhabdomyosarcoma). Tumors do contribute to both morbidity and mortality, especially later in life. A single whole-body MRI should be considered at transition to adulthood to assist in determining approaches to long-term follow-up. Clin Cancer Res; 23(12); e46-e53. ©2017 AACR See all articles in the online-only CCR Pediatric Oncology Series . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Introduction to surveillance studies

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, JK

    2012-01-01

    Introduction & OverviewIntroduction Brief History of Surveillance Technologies & TechniquesOptical SurveillanceAerial Surveillance Audio Surveillance Radio-Wave SurveillanceGlobal Positioning Systems Sensors Computers & the Internet Data Cards Biochemical Surveillance Animal Surveillance Biometrics Genetics Practical ConsiderationsPrevalence of Surveillance Effectiveness of Surveillance Freedom & Privacy IssuesConstitutional Freedoms Privacy Safeguards & Intrusions ResourcesReferences Glossary Index

  4. Surveillance Recommendations for Children with Overgrowth Syndromes and Predisposition to Wilms Tumors and Hepatoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalish, Jennifer M.; Doros, Leslie; Helman, Lee J.; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Kuiper, Roland P.; Maas, Saskia M.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Nichols, Kim E.; Plon, Sharon E.; Porter, Christopher C.; Rednam, Surya; Schultz, Kris Ann P.; States, Lisa J.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Zelley, Kristin; Druley, Todd E.

    2017-01-01

    A number of genetic syndromes have been linked to increased risk for Wilms tumor (WT), hepatoblastoma (HB), and other embryonal tumors. Here, we outline these rare syndromes with at least a 1% risk to develop these tumors and recommend uniform tumor screening recommendations for North America.

  5. Information gaps in surveillance data and effects on the Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complete and accurate information on disease occurrence is crucial for effective public health response to disease outbreaks. In response to the 2014 Ebola epidemic in West Africa, Ghana intensified surveillance for the disease across the country. However, the case definition provided by the Ministry of Health ...

  6. Interval algebra: an effective means of scheduling surveillance radar networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Focke, RW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Interval Algebra provides an effective means to schedule surveillance radar networks, as it is a temporal ordering constraint language. Thus it provides a solution to a part of resource management, which is included in the revised Data Fusion...

  7. Cross-correlation enhanced stability in a tumor cell growth model with immune surveillance driven by cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Zhou Xiaofeng; Tao Shufen

    2009-01-01

    The transient properties of a tumor cell growth model with immune surveillance driven by cross-correlated multiplicative and additive noises are investigated. The explicit expression of extinction rate from the state of a stable tumor to the state of extinction is obtained. Based on the numerical computations, we find the following: (i) the intensity of multiplicative noise D and the intensity of additive noise α enhance the extinction rate for the case of λ ≤ 0 (i.e. λ denotes cross-correlation intensity between two noises), but for the case of λ > 0, a critical noise intensity D or α exists at which the extinction rate is the smallest; D and α at first weaken the extinction rate and then enhance it. (ii) The immune rate β and the cross-correlation intensity λ play opposite roles on the extinction rate, i.e. β enhances the extinction rate of the tumor cell, while λ weakens the extinction rate of the tumor cell. Namely, the immune rate can enhance the extinction of the tumor cell and the cross-correlation between two noises can enhance stability of the cancer state.

  8. Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; McDonald, Mark W.; Chang, Andrew L.; Esiashvili, Natia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation

  9. Comprehensive effective and efficient global public health surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNabb Scott JN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract At a crossroads, global public health surveillance exists in a fragmented state. Slow to detect, register, confirm, and analyze cases of public health significance, provide feedback, and communicate timely and useful information to stakeholders, global surveillance is neither maximally effective nor optimally efficient. Stakeholders lack a globa surveillance consensus policy and strategy; officials face inadequate training and scarce resources. Three movements now set the stage for transformation of surveillance: 1 adoption by Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]; 2 maturation of information sciences and the penetration of information technologies to distal parts of the globe; and 3 consensus that the security and public health communities have overlapping interests and a mutual benefit in supporting public health functions. For these to enhance surveillance competencies, eight prerequisites should be in place: politics, policies, priorities, perspectives, procedures, practices, preparation, and payers. To achieve comprehensive, global surveillance, disparities in technical, logistic, governance, and financial capacities must be addressed. Challenges to closing these gaps include the lack of trust and transparency; perceived benefit at various levels; global governance to address data power and control; and specified financial support from globa partners. We propose an end-state perspective for comprehensive, effective and efficient global, multiple-hazard public health surveillance and describe a way forward to achieve it. This end-state is universal, global access to interoperable public health information when it’s needed, where it’s needed. This vision mitigates the tension between two fundamental human rights: first, the right to privacy, confidentiality, and security of personal health information combined with the right of sovereign, national entities

  10. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soon Cho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications.

  11. [Surveillance as an effective approach to infectious diseases control and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L P; Cao, W C

    2017-04-10

    Infectious disease surveillance have played an important role in the national diseases prevention and control strategies. In line with the reporting system, infectious disease surveillance has been greatly improved and played pivotal role in preventing epidemics since 1949 in China. To date, surveillance remains an effective approach to infectious disease control and prevention because of the global serious situation. In this column "infectious disease surveillance" , we have involved articles as systematic analysis of surveillance data and solid evidence related to the development of strategies and measures for infectious diseases control and prevention.

  12. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  13. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  14. Effects of Smac on tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yanting; Zhang Pengfei; Liu Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods of tumor therapy. The radiosensitivity of tumor is closely related to inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and the second mitochondria-derived activator of Caspase (Smac). IAPs can inhibit apoptosis by binding and inhibiting Caspase-3, 7, 9. High expression of IAPs has been shown to interfere with the efficacy of radiotherapy. Smac, upon apoptotic stimuli, is released into the cytoplasm to inhibit the caspase-binding activity of IAPs. Therapies targeting of IAP proteins may show new perspectives to overcome radioresistance. In vitro and in vivo preclinical studies have demonstrated that the combination approach warranted further clinical investigation. Thus, combination protocols using IAPs antagonists together with radiotherapy may pave the avenue to more effective radiation-based treatment options for tumor patients. (authors)

  15. Added value of diffusion weighted imaging in pediatric central nervous system embryonal tumors surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Domenico; Severino, Mariasavina; Nozza, Paolo; Cama, Armando; Ravegnani, Marcello; D'Apolito, Gabriella; Raso, Alessandro; Milanaccio, Claudia; da Costa Leite, Claudia; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has an established role in primary CNS embryonal tumor (ET) characterization; however, its diagnostic utility in detecting relapse has never been determined. We aimed to compare DWI and conventional MRI sensitivity in CNS ET recurrence detection, and to evaluate the DWI properties of contrast-enhancing radiation induced lesions (RIL). Fifty-six patients with CNS ET (25 with disease relapse, 6 with RIL and 25 with neither disease relapse nor RIL) were retrospectively evaluated with DWI, conventional MRI (including both T2/FLAIR and post-contrast images), or contrast-enhanced MR imaging (CE-MRI) alone. MRI studies were independently reviewed by two neuroradiologists for detection and localization of potential brain relapses. Sensitivity for focal relapse detection was calculated for each image set on a lesion-by-lesion basis. A descriptive per subject analysis was also performed. Evaluation of follow-up MRI studies served as standard of reference. Focal recurrence detection sensitivity of DWI (96%) was significantly higher than conventional MRI (77%) and CE-MRI alone (51%) (p=0.0003 and p<0.0001). On per subject analysis there were not missed diagnoses for DWI. At the time of DWI relapse detection, conventional MRI missed 2 diagnoses, and CE-MRI 8. Analysis of medulloblastoma relapses revealed that DWI identified a higher number of focal lesions than CE-MRI in subjects with classic variant. All but one RIL did not show restricted diffusion. In conclusion, DWI is a valuable complementary technique allowing for improved detection of focal relapse in CNS ET patients, particularly in children with classic medulloblastoma, and may assist in differentiating recurrence from RIL. PMID:28947980

  16. Medical Surveillance System & Medical Effect Modeling Thrust Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fitzgerald, Angel A; Chotani, Rashid A

    2007-01-01

    .... The main objective is to combine modeling/simulation, medical surveillance, early warning detection and real-time epidemiology by not only embarking on novel technologies but also by evaluating...

  17. Predictive codes facilitate the surveillance of wall thinning effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, A.; Nopper, H.

    2015-01-01

    The surveillance of wall thinning effects in piping and vessels is one of the key issues for the safe operation of nuclear power plants, as wall thinning may cause spontaneously occurring component failures. Wall tinning is typically caused by the following flow-induced degradation mechanisms: Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), liquid droplet impingement erosion (LDI) and cavitation erosion (CE). Areas affected by wall thinning are difficult to locate, as this degradation process occurs only locally for specific conditions of flow, water chemistry and temperatures. For the safe identification of system areas which are sensitive to wall thinning, a comprehensive plant-wide strategy needs to be applied, considering the effects and superposition of different degradation modes. For this purpose AREVA provides the software tool COMSY which features lifetime analysis for various degradation mechanisms which are commonly experienced in mechanical components in the power generation industry. This includes a predictive degradation model for FAC, which has been further developed based on more than 30 years of research activities. Based on these predictive calculations a degradation potential can be pinpointed and quantified, subsequently targeted wall thickness inspections can be carried out. (authors)

  18. The effectiveness of classical swine fever surveillance programmes in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkenberg, D.; Nielen, M.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Consequences of classical swine fever (CSF) epidemics depend on the control measures, but also on the number of infected herds at the end of the high-risk period (HRP). Surveillance programmes aim to keep this number as low as possible, so the effectiveness of surveillance programmes can be measured

  19. The metastatic potential of renal tumors: Influence of histologic subtypes on definition of small renal masses, risk stratification, and future active surveillance protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Michael; Sedaghatpour, Dillon; Shapiro, Oleg; Vourganti, Srinivas; Kutikov, Alexander; Bratslavsky, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    The influence of histology in metastatic potential is often overlooked when discussing the management options of small renal masses (SRM), with size or growth rate often serving as the triggers for the intervention. We aim to re-examine the definition of a SRM by evaluating the metastatic potential of renal masses incorporating tumor size and histology to create metastatic risk tables. Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-18 registries database was queried for all cases of clear cell, papillary, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. There were 55,478 cases identified that included 43,783, 8,587, and 3,208 cases of clear cell, papillary, and chromophobe, respectively. Tumors were stratified using 1-cm increments to determine the metastatic potential by calculating the metastatic rate at presentation for different size intervals in histologic categories. For all 3 histologies, tumors measuring 5cm or less had a rate of metastatic RCC at presentation of less than 4%. The metastatic potential was highest for clear cell, followed by papillary and then chromophobe tumors. Setting a cutoff of no more than 3% for metastatic potential to be called a SRM, makes clear cell carcinoma and papillary carcinoma a SRM up to 4cm, whereas the chromophobe RCC would be considered a SRM up to 7cm. Although clinical staging and tumor size have been the key determinants in decision-making of patients with solid renal tumors, the histology-specific risks of metastatic potential are different for each mass. The definition of a SRM should be based on the metastatic potential and not on tumor size alone. This information could be helpful for counseling and managing patients with SRMs as well as for modifying active surveillance protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A rationale to unify measurements of effectiveness for animal health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbois, Vladimir; Häsler, Barbara; Peyre, Marisa; Hiep, Dao Thi; Vergne, Timothée

    2015-06-01

    Surveillance systems produce data which, once analysed and interpreted, support decisions regarding disease management. While several performance measures for surveillance are in use, no theoretical framework has been proposed yet with a rationale for defining and estimating effectiveness measures of surveillance systems in a generic way. An effective surveillance system is a system whose data collection, analysis and interpretation processes lead to decisions that are appropriate given the true disease status of the target population. Accordingly, we developed a framework accounting for sampling, testing and data interpretation processes, to depict in a probabilistic way the direction and magnitude of the discrepancy between "decisions that would be made if the true state of a population was known" and the "decisions that are actually made upon the analysis and interpretation of surveillance data". The proposed framework provides a theoretical basis for standardised quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of surveillance systems. We illustrate such approaches using hypothetical surveillance systems aimed at monitoring the prevalence of an endemic disease and at detecting an emerging disease as early as possible and with an empirical case study on a passive surveillance system aiming at detecting cases of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza cases in Vietnamese poultry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti-tumor effect of polysaccharides from rhizome of Curculigo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-tumor effect of PDC on cervical cancer was investigated in vivo in mice injected with Hela cells. The parameters measured were tumor volume and weight. In vitro anti-tumor effects of PDC were assessed by measuring expressions of caspase-3, caspase-9 and P53 proteins in Hela cells via ELISA assay. Thymus ...

  2. Lapatinib Plasma and Tumor Concentrations and Effects on HER Receptor Phosphorylation in Tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil L Spector

    Full Text Available The paradigm shift in cancer treatment from cytotoxic drugs to tumor targeted therapies poses new challenges, including optimization of dose and schedule based on a biologically effective dose, rather than the historical maximum tolerated dose. Optimal dosing is currently determined using concentrations of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in plasma as a surrogate for tumor concentrations. To examine this plasma-tumor relationship, we explored the association between lapatinib levels in tumor and plasma in mice and humans, and those effects on phosphorylation of human epidermal growth factor receptors (HER in human tumors.Mice bearing BT474 HER2+ human breast cancer xenografts were dosed once or twice daily (BID with lapatinib. Drug concentrations were measured in blood, tumor, liver, and kidney. In a randomized phase I clinical trial, 28 treatment-naïve female patients with early stage HER2+ breast cancer received lapatinib 1000 or 1500 mg once daily (QD or 500 mg BID before evaluating steady-state lapatinib levels in plasma and tumor.In mice, lapatinib levels were 4-fold higher in tumor than blood with a 4-fold longer half-life. Tumor concentrations exceeded the in vitro IC90 (~ 900 nM or 500 ng/mL for inhibition of HER2 phosphorylation throughout the 12-hour dosing interval. In patients, tumor levels were 6- and 10-fold higher with QD and BID dosing, respectively, compared to plasma trough levels. The relationship between tumor and plasma concentration was complex, indicating multiple determinants. HER receptor phosphorylation varied depending upon lapatinib tumor concentrations, suggestive of changes in the repertoire of HER homo- and heterodimers.Plasma lapatinib concentrations underestimated tumor drug levels, suggesting that optimal dosing should be focused on the site of action to avoid to inappropriate dose escalation. Larger clinical trials are required to determine optimal dose and schedule to achieve tumor concentrations that maximally

  3. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  4. Effectiveness of Antegrade Access in Bladder Tumors With Inaccessible Urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Abdul Rouf; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Maik, Sajad; Magray, Javaid; Bhat, Ashiq; Bhat, Arif Hameed; Wani, Mohd Saleem; Wazir, Baldev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Inaccessible urethra with no retrograde endoscopic access due to multiple/diffuse strictures or multiple urethrocutaneous fistulas with acute urinary retention due to posturethral instrumentation (transurethral resection of bladder tumor [TURBT], or TURBT with transurethral resection of the prostate [TURP]), is a rare entity. Management of such a case with a bladder tumor for TURBT/surveillance cystoscopy poses a great challenge. The authors present 12 cases of bladder tumor with inaccessible urethra, 10 cases due to multiple strictures (post-TURBT and/or TURP), and 2 cases due to urethrocutaneous fistulas (post-TURBT), who presented to our emergency department with acute urinary retention. Emergent suprapubic catheterization was used as a temporary treatment method.

  5. Oxygen diffusion and oxygen effect in tumor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, H.M.; Hehn, G.

    1979-06-01

    The diffusion of oxygen in tumor cords of bronchus carcinoma of the lung have been studied with refined computer methods for solving the diffusion equation in axis symmetric tumor structures. In this tumor configuration we may find three different regions consisting of euoxic cells, hypoxic tumor cells and necrotic parts. In the case of oxygen supply from a capillary inside a cylinder of tumor tissue with radius 200 μm or in a tumor cord of radius 300 μm with oxygen supply by capillaries outside, we get a relation of well oxygenated cells to hypoxic cells approximately as 1:8 or as 1:1.1 respectively. Of course most of the tumor cords observed in histological slices have smaller diameters, so that an average of approximately 20% hypoxic cells can be assumed. Based on the work of Ardenne, the diffusion of oxygen and glucose in a tumor of type DS-carcinosarcom has been investigated in both intact tumor and tumor treated with ionizing radiation. We can show that a strong reoxygenation effect takes place in that the well supplied regions may increase in some tumor configurations up to a factor of four by volume. The biological consequences of the oxygen pressure determined in tumor cells are discussed in detail. The investigation of oxygen diffusion in the intercapillary tumor region should give a quantitative physical basis for considering the oxygen effect with the aim to explain the advantages of neutron therapy against conventional radiotherapy. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub; Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors

  7. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun [Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors.

  8. Effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltani M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor shape and size effect on drug delivery to solid tumors are studied, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for predefined tumor geometries. The governing equations are solved using a numerical method, the element-based finite volume method. Interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are used to show the details of drug delivery in a solid tumor, under an assumption that drug particles flow with the interstitial fluid. Drug delivery problems have been most extensively researched in spherical tumors, which have been the simplest to examine with the analytical methods. With our numerical method, however, more complex shapes of the tumor can be studied. The numerical model of fluid flow in solid tumors previously introduced by our group is further developed to incorporate and investigate non-spherical tumors such as prolate and oblate ones. Also the effects of the surface area per unit volume of the tissue, vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivity on drug delivery are investigated.

  9. A Markov Chain Model for evaluating the effectiveness of randomized surveillance procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmunds, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    A Markov Chain Model has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of randomized surveillance procedures. The model is applicable for surveillance systems that monitor a collection of assets by randomly selecting and inspecting the assets. The model provides an estimate of the detection probability as a function of the amount of time that an adversary would require to steal or sabotage the asset. An interactive computer code has been written to perform the necessary computations.

  10. Risk-based surveillance: Estimating the effect of unwarranted confounder adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeberg, Preben; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Salman, Mo

    2011-01-01

    We estimated the effects of confounder adjustment as a part of the underlying quantitative risk assessments on the performance of a hypothetical example of a risk-based surveillance system, in which a single risk factor would be used to identify high risk sampling units for testing. The differences...... considered for their appropriateness, if the risk estimates are to be used for informing risk-based surveillance systems....

  11. Radiation effects on tumor-specific DTH response, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobusawa, Hiroshi; Hachisu, Reiko.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor-specific immunity was induced in C3H mice by immunizing with syngeneic MH134 hepatoma cells. Radiation sensitivity of anti-tumor activity of immunized spleen cells were examined and compared with the radiation sensitivity of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-response. The spleen cells were irradiated in vitro, then mixed with the tumor cells. DTH-response intensity was determined from the footpad increment twenty-four hours after inoculation of tumor cells with immunized spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of the spleen cells, based on growth inhibition of tumor cells, was measured by a cytostatic test in vivo with diffusion chambers. Tumor-specific DTH response was suppressed dose-dependently in the range of 12-24 Gy irradiation. No suppression was observed below 12 Gy. Without irradiation, growth of tumor cells was inhibited by immunized spleen cells more effectively than by normal spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of immunized and normal spleen cells was diminished by irradiation doses of 20 Gy and 10 Gy, respectively. Comparing our report with others that analyzed the type of anti-tumor effector cells induced in this experimental system, we concluded that tumor-specific anti-tumor activity (tumor growth inhibition in vivo) that was radiosensitive at 10-20 Gy depended on a DTH-response. (author)

  12. Effects of exercise on tumor physiology and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a potent regulator of a range of physiological processes in most tissues. Solid epidemiological data show that exercise training can reduce disease risk and mortality for several cancer diagnoses, suggesting that exercise training may directly regulate tumor physiology and metabolism....... Here, we review the body of literature describing exercise intervention studies performed in rodent tumor models and elaborate on potential mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology. Exercise has been shown to reduce tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity, and tumor growth across numerous......, exercise training has the potential to be a beneficial and integrated component of cancer management, but has yet to fully elucidate its potential. Understanding the mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology is warranted. Insight into these mechanistic effects is emerging, but experimental...

  13. Tumor necrosis factor induces tumor promoting and anti-tumoral effects on pancreatic cancer via TNFR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Chopra

    Full Text Available Multiple activities are ascribed to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF in health and disease. In particular, TNF was shown to affect carcinogenesis in multiple ways. This cytokine acts via the activation of two cell surface receptors, TNFR1, which is associated with inflammation, and TNFR2, which was shown to cause anti-inflammatory signaling. We assessed the effects of TNF and its two receptors on the progression of pancreatic cancer by in vivo bioluminescence imaging in a syngeneic orthotopic tumor mouse model with Panc02 cells. Mice deficient for TNFR1 were unable to spontaneously reject Panc02 tumors and furthermore displayed enhanced tumor progression. In contrast, a fraction of wild type (37.5%, TNF deficient (12.5%, and TNFR2 deficient mice (22.2% were able to fully reject the tumor within two weeks. Pancreatic tumors in TNFR1 deficient mice displayed increased vascular density, enhanced infiltration of CD4(+ T cells and CD4(+ forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+ regulatory T cells (Treg but reduced numbers of CD8(+ T cells. These alterations were further accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of IL4. Thus, TNF and TNFR1 are required in pancreatic ductal carcinoma to ensure optimal CD8(+ T cell-mediated immunosurveillance and tumor rejection. Exogenous systemic administration of human TNF, however, which only interacts with murine TNFR1, accelerated tumor progression. This suggests that TNFR1 has basically the capability in the Panc02 model to trigger pro-and anti-tumoral effects but the spatiotemporal availability of TNF seems to determine finally the overall outcome.

  14. Effect of a topical vasodilator on tumor hypoxia and tumor oxygen guided radiotherapy using EPR oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huagang; Abramovic, Zrinka; Lariviere, Jean P; Sentjurc, Marjeta; Swartz, Harold; Khan, Nadeem

    2010-05-01

    We sought to reduce tumor hypoxia by topical application of a vasodilator, benzyl nicotinate (BN), and investigated its effect on the growth of tumors irradiated at times when tumor pO(2) increased. EPR oximetry was used to follow the changes in the tissue pO(2) of subcutaneous radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors during topical applications of 1.25-8% BN formulations for 5 consecutive days. The RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a tissue pO(2) of 4.6-7.0 mmHg. A significant increase in tumor pO(2) occurred 10-30 min after BN application. The formulation with the minimal BN concentration that produced a significant increase in tumor pO(2) was used for the radiation study. The tumors were irradiated (4 Gy x 5) at the time of the maximum increase in pO(2) observed with the 2.5% BN formulation. The tumors with an increase in pO(2) of greater than 2 mmHg from the baseline after application of BN on day 1 had a significant growth inhibition compared to the tumors with an increase in pO(2) of less than 2 mmHg. The results indicate that the irradiation of tumors at the time of an increase in pO(2) after the topical application of the 2.5% BN formulation led to a significant growth inhibition. EPR oximetry provided dynamic information on the changes in tumor pO(2), which could be used to identify responders and non-responders and schedule therapy during the experiments.

  15. Analysis of glycodendrimers effect(s) in tumor mictoenvironment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišerová, Anna; Bezouška, Karel; Švábová, L.; Jedelský, P.; Pucová, S.; Luptovcová, M.; Luksan, O.; Vannucci, Luca; Pospíšil, Miloslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2003), s. 24 ISSN 0165-2478 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/98/K034; GA AV ČR IAA7020006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : glycodendrimers * effect * tumor Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.710, year: 2003

  16. Effects of exercise on tumor physiology and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Line; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a potent regulator of a range of physiological processes in most tissues. Solid epidemiological data show that exercise training can reduce disease risk and mortality for several cancer diagnoses, suggesting that exercise training may directly regulate tumor physiology and metabolism. Here, we review the body of literature describing exercise intervention studies performed in rodent tumor models and elaborate on potential mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology. Exercise has been shown to reduce tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity, and tumor growth across numerous different transplantable, chemically induced or genetic tumor models. We propose 4 emerging mechanistic effects of exercise, including (1) vascularization and blood perfusion, (2) immune function, (3) tumor metabolism, and (4) muscle-to-cancer cross-talk, and discuss these in details. In conclusion, exercise training has the potential to be a beneficial and integrated component of cancer management, but has yet to fully elucidate its potential. Understanding the mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology is warranted. Insight into these mechanistic effects is emerging, but experimental intervention studies are still needed to verify the cause-effect relationship between these mechanisms and the control of tumor growth.

  17. Analysis of different tumor volume thresholds of insignificant prostate cancer and their implications for active surveillance patient selection and monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hoon Lee

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: Although the TV thresholds of the two definitions of IPC vary only slightly, this difference was enough to result in different clinical course if Gleason grade 4/5 disease was present. Therefore, the updated IPC TV threshold should be carefully applied as clinical parameter for active surveillance.

  18. Multimodal Data Fusion for Effective Surveillance of Critical Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandylakis, Z.; Karantzalos, K.; Doulamis, A.; Karagiannidis, L.

    2017-10-01

    Monitoring critical infrastructures, especially those that are covering wide-zones, is of fundamental importance and priority for modern surveillance systems. The concurrent exploitation of multisensor systems, can offer additional capabilities, on day and night acquisitions and different environmental/illumination conditions. Towards this direction, we have designed a multi-sensor system based on thermal, shortwave infrared and hyperspectral video sensors. Based on advanced registration, dynamic background modelling and data association techniques, possible moving targets are detected on the thermal and shortwave infrared modalities. In order to avoid the computational intensive co-registration with the hyperspectral video streams, the detected targets are projected through a local coordinate system on the hypercube image plane. The final detected and verified targets are extracted through fusion and data association, based on temporal spectral signatures and target/background statistics. The developed multisensor system for the surveillance of critical infrastructure has been validated for monitoring wide-zones against different conditions showcasing abilities for detecting and tracking moving targets through fog and smoke.

  19. MULTIMODAL DATA FUSION FOR EFFECTIVE SURVEILLANCE OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kandylakis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring critical infrastructures, especially those that are covering wide-zones, is of fundamental importance and priority for modern surveillance systems. The concurrent exploitation of multisensor systems, can offer additional capabilities, on day and night acquisitions and different environmental/illumination conditions. Towards this direction, we have designed a multi-sensor system based on thermal, shortwave infrared and hyperspectral video sensors. Based on advanced registration, dynamic background modelling and data association techniques, possible moving targets are detected on the thermal and shortwave infrared modalities. In order to avoid the computational intensive co-registration with the hyperspectral video streams, the detected targets are projected through a local coordinate system on the hypercube image plane. The final detected and verified targets are extracted through fusion and data association, based on temporal spectral signatures and target/background statistics. The developed multisensor system for the surveillance of critical infrastructure has been validated for monitoring wide-zones against different conditions showcasing abilities for detecting and tracking moving targets through fog and smoke.

  20. Effects of delayed immune-response in tumor immune-system interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto d'Onofrio

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumors constitute a wide family of diseases kinetically characterized by the co-presence of multiple spatio-temporal scales. So, tumor cells ecologically interplay with other kind of cells, e.g. endothelial cells or immune system effectors, producing and exchanging various chemical signals. As such, tumor growth is an ideal object of hybrid modeling where discrete stochastic processes model agents at low concentrations, and mean-field equations model chemical signals. In previous works we proposed a hybrid version of the well-known Panetta-Kirschner mean-field model of tumor cells, effector cells and Interleukin-2. Our hybrid model suggested -at variance of the inferences from its original formulation- that immune surveillance, i.e. tumor elimination by the immune system, may occur through a sort of side-effect of large stochastic oscillations. However, that model did not account that, due to both chemical transportation and cellular differentiation/division, the tumor-induced recruitment of immune effectors is not instantaneous but, instead, it exhibits a lag period. To capture this, we here integrate a mean-field equation for Interleukins-2 with a bi-dimensional delayed stochastic process describing such delayed interplay. An algorithm to realize trajectories of the underlying stochastic process is obtained by coupling the Piecewise Deterministic Markov process (for the hybrid part with a Generalized Semi-Markovian clock structure (to account for delays. We (i relate tumor mass growth with delays via simulations and via parametric sensitivity analysis techniques, (ii we quantitatively determine probabilistic eradication times, and (iii we prove, in the oscillatory regime, the existence of a heuristic stochastic bifurcation resulting in delay-induced tumor eradication, which is neither predicted by the mean-field nor by the hybrid non-delayed models.

  1. Irradiation effects on the tumor and adjacent tissues of brain tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Maki, Yutaka; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi; Koike, Sachiko; Furukawa, Shigeo.

    1979-01-01

    C 3 H mice aged 56 - 70 days, weighing 27 - 37 g were used throughout this experiment. A transplantable fibrosarcoma arising spontaneously from C 3 H mice was used. For experiment, 10 4 tumor cells suspended in 0.025 ml of saline solution were injected into the cerebral hemisphere by a 26 gauge needle with a micrometer syringe under nembutal anesthesia. Whole brain irradiation was performed at 7 days after injection of the tumor cells and the radiation doses were 2,000 and 20,000 rads, respectively. The feature of x-rays were 200 kVp, 20 mA, 0.5 mm Cu + 0.5 mm Al filtration and TSD 20 cm. The dose-rate was 340 - 360 R/min. The articles of this study were as follows: a) Determination of LD 50 values for the mice, tumor-bearing in the brain or non-tumor-bearing; and b) Observation of clinical features and gross autopsy findings of the mice following irradiation. The LD 50 values for 2,000 rad irradiation in the tumor-bearing or non-tumor-bearing mice were 10.9 and 11.4 days, respectively. LD 50 values of 3.7 days and 4.3 days were the results for the tumor-bearing and non-tumor-bearing mice irradiated by 20,000 rad, respectively. On the other hand, the LD 50 value for the control group, i.e. non-irradiated mice, was 6.7 days. At postmortem examinations, gastrointestinal bleeding was observed frequently in mice bearing tumor in the brain. Whole brain irradiation is effective to prolong the life of tumor-bearing mice. However, in some instances, deaths have occurred earlier in tumor-bearing mice compared to the control group. (author)

  2. Biologic Effects of Dopamine on Tumor Vasculature in Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrthala Moreno-Smith

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sympathetic nervous system activation results in increased angiogenesis and tumor growth in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian carcinoma. However, the mechanistic effects of such activation on the tumor vasculature are not well understood. Dopamine (DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, regulates the functions of normal and abnormal blood vessels. Here, we examined whether DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, could block the effects of chronic stress on tumor vasculature and tumor growth. Exogenous administration of DA not only decreased tumor microvessel density but also increased pericyte coverage of tumor vessels following daily restraint stress in mice. Daily restraint stress resulted in significantly increased tumor growth in the SKOV3ip1 and HeyA8 ovarian cancer models. DA treatment blocked stress-mediated increases in tumor growth and increased pericyte coverage of tumor endothelial cells. Whereas the antiangiogenic effect of DA is mediated by dopamine receptor 2 (DR2, our data indicate that DA, through DR1, stimulates vessel stabilization by increasing pericyte recruitment to tumor endothelial cells. DA significantly stimulated migration of mouse 10T1/2 pericyte-like cells in vitro and increased cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP levels in these cells. Moreover, DA or the DR1 agonist SKF 82958 increased platinum concentration in SKOV3ip1 tumor xenografts following cisplatin administration. In conclusion, DA stabilizes tumor blood vessels through activation of pericyte cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway by DR1. These findings could have implications for blocking the stimulatory effects of chronic stress on tumor growth.

  3. Surveillance after initial surgery for pediatric and adolescent girls with stage I ovarian germ cell tumors: report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billmire, Deborah F; Cullen, John W; Rescorla, Frederick J; Davis, Mary; Schlatter, Marc G; Olson, Thomas A; Malogolowkin, Marcio H; Pashankar, Farzana; Villaluna, Doojduen; Krailo, Mark; Egler, Rachel A; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2014-02-10

    To determine whether overall survival (OS) can be preserved for patients with stage I pediatric malignant ovarian germ cell tumor (MOGCT) with an initial strategy of surveillance after surgical resection. Between November 2003 and July 2011, girls age 0 to 16 years with stage I MOGCT were enrolled onto Children's Oncology Group study AGCT0132. Required histology included yolk sac, embryonal carcinoma, or choriocarcinoma. Surveillance included measurement of serum tumor markers and radiologic imaging at defined intervals. In those with residual or recurrent disease, chemotherapy with compressed PEB (cisplatin, etoposide, and bleomycin) was initiated every 3 weeks for three cycles (cisplatin 33 mg/m(2) on days 1 to 3, etoposide 167 mg/m(2) on days 1 to 3, bleomycin 15 U/m(2) on day 1). Survivor functions for event-free survival (EFS) and OS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Twenty-five girls (median age, 12 years) with stage I MOGCT were enrolled onto AGCT0132. Twenty-three patients had elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) at diagnosis. Predominant histology was yolk sac. After a median follow-up of 42 months, 12 patients had evidence of persistent or recurrent disease (4-year EFS, 52%; 95% CI, 31% to 69%). Median time to recurrence was 2 months. All patients had elevated AFP at recurrence; six had localized disease, two had metastatic disease, and four had tumor marker elevation only. Eleven of 12 patients experiencing relapse received successful salvage chemotherapy (4-year OS, 96%; 95% CI, 74% to 99%). Fifty percent of patients with stage I pediatric MOGCT can be spared chemotherapy; treatment for those who experience recurrence preserves OS. Further study is needed to identify the factors that predict recurrence and whether this strategy can be extended successfully to older adolescents and young adults.

  4. An effective surveillance strategy for reactor pressure vessel assessment in the long term operation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Gerard, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) irradiation embrittlement is monitored by means of surveillance capsules containing the RPV belt-line materials, inserted inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) before the start of operation. These capsules are placed at location where they receive a higher neutron flux than the vessel wall, by a factor of the order of 2 to 3. They are regularly retrieved and tested to evaluate the RPV irradiation embrittlement according to specific regulatory procedures and standards, in order to guarantee the safe operation of the RPV throughout its lifetime. These procedures are often relying on empirical but conservative concepts. In parallel, material research reactor (MTR) irradiations are often used to support the surveillance data and to develop a better understanding of irradiation effects, not only qualitatively but also quantitatively. Taking advantage of the increased understanding of irradiation effects, analytical tools were developed to improve the evaluation embrittlement and quality assurance of the RPV embrittlement assessment. In this framework, an alternative but complementary surveillance program assessment was developed in Belgium, the so-called enhanced surveillance, in order to benefit from the latest developments in the area of materials science and irradiation effects. The neutron flux and fracture properties of the surveillance materials can be reliably characterized and correlated to each other using physically-based rather than empirical concepts. The enhanced surveillance approach is complementary to the mandatory regulatory procedure and allows quantifying the conservatism of the regulatory approach. The enhanced surveillance approach that uses the reconstitution technology to fabricate additional small size specimens, appropriate modeling tools and microstructural examination when required, makes it possible to rationalize all available information in a physically-based way

  5. Acute diarrheal syndromic surveillance: effects of weather and holidays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, H J; Choi, S; Cho, J P; Min, Y G; Park, R W

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to identify and characterize the environmental factors that affect the number of patients with acute diarrheal (AD) syndrome, we developed and tested two regional surveillance models including holiday and weather information in addition to visitor records, at emergency medical facilities in the Seoul metropolitan area of Korea. With 1,328,686 emergency department visitor records from the National Emergency Department Information system (NEDIS) and the holiday and weather information, two seasonal ARIMA models were constructed: (1) The simple model (only with total patient number), (2) the environmental factor-added model. The stationary R-squared was utilized as an in-sample model goodness-of-fit statistic for the constructed models, and the cumulative mean of the Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) was used to measure post-sample forecast accuracy over the next 1 month. The (1,0,1)(0,1,1)7 ARIMA model resulted in an adequate model fit for the daily number of AD patient visits over 12 months for both cases. Among various features, the total number of patient visits was selected as a commonly influential independent variable. Additionally, for the environmental factor-added model, holidays and daily precipitation were selected as features that statistically significantly affected model fitting. Stationary R-squared values were changed in a range of 0.651-0.828 (simple), and 0.805-0.844 (environmental factor-added) with pprediction, the MAPE values changed within 0.090-0.120 and 0.089-0.114, respectively. The environmental factor-added model yielded better MAPE values. Holiday and weather information appear to be crucial for the construction of an accurate syndromic surveillance model for AD, in addition to the visitor and assessment records.

  6. Anti-tumor effect of polysaccharides from rhizome of Curculigo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-tumor effects of polysaccharides from Curculigo orchioides (PDC) on cervical cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Methods: A Box–Behnken design (BBD) was employed to optimize extraction conditions for PDC. The anti-tumor effect of PDC on cervical cancer was investigated in ...

  7. DVT surveillance program in the ICU: analysis of cost-effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai K Malhotra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Venous Thrombo-embolism (VTE--Deep venous thrombosis (DVT and/or pulmonary embolism (PE--in traumatized patients causes significant morbidity and mortality. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of DVT surveillance in reducing PE, and performs a cost-effectiveness analysis. METHODS: All traumatized patients admitted to the adult ICU underwent twice weekly DVT surveillance by bilateral lower extremity venous Duplex examination (48-month surveillance period--SP. The rates of DVT and PE were recorded and compared to the rates observed in the 36-month pre-surveillance period (PSP. All patients in both periods received mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis unless contraindicated. Total costs--diagnostic, therapeutic and surveillance--for both periods were recorded and the incremental cost for each Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY gained was calculated. RESULTS: 4234 patients were eligible (PSP--1422 and SP--2812. Rate of DVT in SP (2.8% was significantly higher than in PSP (1.3% - p<0.05, and rate of PE in SP (0.7% was significantly lower than that in PSP (1.5% - p<0.05. Logistic regression demonstrated that surveillance was an independent predictor of increased DVT detection (OR: 2.53 - CI: 1.462-4.378 and decreased PE incidence (OR: 0.487 - CI: 0.262-0.904. The incremental cost was $509,091/life saved in the base case, translating to $29,102/QALY gained. A sensitivity analysis over four of the parameters used in the model indicated that the incremental cost ranged from $18,661 to $48,821/QALY gained. CONCLUSIONS: Surveillance of traumatized ICU patients increases DVT detection and reduces PE incidence. Costs in terms of QALY gained compares favorably with other interventions accepted by society.

  8. Differential Effects of EGFL6 on Tumor versus Wound Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghee Noh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Angiogenesis inhibitors are important for cancer therapy, but clinically approved anti-angiogenic agents have shown only modest efficacy and can compromise wound healing. This necessitates the development of novel anti-angiogenesis therapies. Here, we show significantly increased EGFL6 expression in tumor versus wound or normal endothelial cells. Using a series of in vitro and in vivo studies with orthotopic and genetically engineered mouse models, we demonstrate the mechanisms by which EGFL6 stimulates tumor angiogenesis. In contrast to its antagonistic effects on tumor angiogenesis, EGFL6 blockage did not affect normal wound healing. These findings have significant implications for development of anti-angiogenesis therapies. : Noh et al. identify EGFL6 as an angiogenic target that is selectively present in tumor endothelial cells in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. EGFL6 blockade exerts robust anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects without affecting wound healing. These findings suggest an important approach for effectively targeting tumor angiogenesis. Keywords: tumor endothelial cells, ovarian cancer, chitosan nanoparticles, tumor vasculature, wound healing

  9. SIX2 Effects on Wilms Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janene Pierce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor (WT blastema retains gene expression profiles characteristic of the multipotent nephron progenitor pool, or cap mesenchyme (CM, in the developing kidney. As a result, WT blastema and the CM are believed to represent contextual analogues of one another. Sine oculis homeobox 2 (SIX2 is a transcription factor expressed specifically in the CM, provides a critical mechanism for CM self-renewal, and remains persistently active in WT blastema, although its purpose in this childhood malignancy remains unclear. We hypothesized that SIX2, analogous to its function in development, confers a survival pathway to blastema, the putative WT stem cell. To test its functional significance in WT biology, wild-type SIX2 was overexpressed in the human WT cell line, WiT49. After validating this model, SIX2 effects on anchorage-independent growth, proliferation, invasiveness, canonical WNT pathway signaling, and gene expression of specific WNT pathway participants were evaluated. Relative to controls, WiT49 cells overexpressing SIX2 showed significantly enhanced anchorage-independent growth and early-passage proliferation representing surrogates of cell survival. Interestingly, overexpression of SIX2 generally repressed TCF/LEF-dependent canonical WNT signaling, which activates and coordinates both differentiation and stem pathways, but significantly heightened canonical WNT signaling through the survivin promoter, a mechanism that exclusively maintains the stem state. In summary, when overexpressed in a human WT cell line, SIX2 enhances cell survival and appears to shift the balance in WNT/β-catenin signaling away from a differentiation path and toward a stem cell survival path.

  10. The step from a voluntary to a mandatory national nosocomial infection surveillance system: the influence on infection rates and surveillance effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The German national nosocomial infection surveillance system, KISS, has a component for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (called NEO-KISS) which changed from a system with voluntary participation and confidential data feedback to a system with mandatory participation and confidential feedback. Methods In order to compare voluntary and mandatory surveillance data, two groups were defined by the surveillance start date. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) parameters and infection rates of the NICUs in both groups were compared. In order to analyze the surveillance effect on primary bloodstream infection rates (BSI), all VLBW infants within the first three years of participation in both groups were considered. The adjusted effect measures for the year of participation were calculated. Results An increase from 49 NICUs participating in 2005 to 152 in 2006 was observed after the introduction of mandatory participation. A total of 4280 VLBW infants was included in this analysis. Healthcare-associated incidence densities rates were similar in both groups. Using multivariate analysis with the endpoint primary BSI rate and comparing the first and third year of participation lead to an adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 0.78 (CI95 0.66-0.93) for old (voluntary) and 0.81 (CI95 0.68-0.97) for new (mandatory) participants. Conclusions The step from a voluntary to a mandatory HCAI surveillance system alone may lead to substantial improvements on a countrywide scale. PMID:22958509

  11. Evaluation of effectiveness of CT diagnosis for cervical tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namiki, Ichiro; Shimada, Jun; Shoda, Hisanao [Meikai Univ., Sakado, Saitama (Japan). School of Dentistry] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Diagnosis of cervical tumors by visual examination and/or by palpation is limited practically due to the pathological peculiarity of the focal site. One of the efficient diagnostic probes is computed tomography (called CT), a generally applied methodology that aids diagnosis and decision regarding the type of treatment. Many cases of cervical tumor have been detected by utilizing CT method. However, sufficiently effective methodology and procedures for CT diagnoses have not been established, and further studies are necessary. Out of 85 clinical cases treated and examined by CT scanning from 1991 to 1993 in our cancer ward, 71 cases with a cervical tumor recognized at the first medical palpation were evaluated and we concluded the following: CT diagnosis is effective for differentiating the sites where abnormalities occur. CT diagnosis is useful/effective for detecting focal extension of cervical tumors. CT values allow tumors to be diagnosed qualitatively in some cases. PN (+) and (-) showed significant limbic morphological differences. (author).

  12. Quantitative evaluation in tumor SPECT and the effect of tumor size. Fundamental study with phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Takashi; Yui, Nobuharu; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Yanagisawa, Masamichi

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study with phantoms was performed in order to evaluate the effect of the tumor volume on the quantitative estimation in tumor SPECT. The ratio of mean count/pixel in the phantom to that of the background (T/N ratio) was well correlated with the size of the phantom; even when the concentration of the Tc-99m O 4 - solution of globular phantoms with diameters of 29, 37 and 46 mm was constant, the greater the size of the phantom, the higher was the T/N ratio. This study showed that we should understand that the T/N ratio was certainly affected by the reduction of the tumor size itself whenever we evaluate treatment response or assess tumor viability after treatment by reference to the T/N ratio. (author)

  13. Tumor evolution in space: the effects of competition colonization tradeoffs on tumor invasion dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Orlando

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We apply competition colonization tradeoff models to tumor growth and invasion dynamics to explore the hypothesis that varying selection forces will result in predictable phenotypic differences in cells at the tumor invasive front compared to those in the core. Spatially, ecologically, and evolutionarily explicit partial differential equation models of tumor growth confirm that spatial invasion produces selection pressure for motile phenotypes. The effects of the invasive phenotype on normal adjacent tissue determine the patterns of growth and phenotype distribution. If tumor cells do not destroy their environment, colonizer and competitive phenotypes coexist with the former localized at the invasion front and the latter, to the tumor interior. If tumors cells do destroy their environment, then cell motility is strongly selected resulting in accelerated invasion speed with time. Our results suggest that the widely observed genetic heterogeneity within cancers may not be the stochastic effect of random mutations. Rather, it may be the consequence of predictable variations in environmental selection forces and corresponding phenotypic adaptations.

  14. Cytostatic and apoptotic effects of paclitaxel in human ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenbaugh, N J; Gan, Y; Au, J L

    1998-01-01

    The present study evaluated the cytostatic and apoptotic effects of a 24-hr paclitaxel treatment in ovarian tumors. Three-dimensional histocultures of surgical specimens from patients (n = 17) were used. The cytostatic effect was measured by inhibition of 96-hr cumulative DNA precursor incorporation and induction of apoptosis was determined by morphological changes. Paclitaxel produced partial inhibition of DNA precursor incorporation in about 40% of tumors (maximum inhibition of approximately 30%) and induced apoptosis in about 90% of tumors (maximum apoptotic index of approximately 15%). In responsive tumors, maximum cytostatic and apoptotic effects were achieved at < or = 1 microM with no further enhancement by increasing the drug concentration to 10 microM. In individual tumors, the apoptotic effect inversely correlated with cytostatic effect (r2 = 0.27, p = 0.031), and the maximal apoptotic index correlated with the LI for the untreated controls (r2 = 0.38, p < 0.01). More than 95% of apoptotic cells after paclitaxel treatment were labeled with DNA precursor. The incomplete cytostatic and apoptotic effects of paclitaxel and the link between DNA synthesis and apoptosis in ovarian tumors are similar to our previous findings in other human solid tumors. These findings suggest that (a) apoptosis is the major paclitaxel effect in advanced ovarian tumors, (b) tumor sensitivity to drug-induced cytostatic effect is opposite to sensitivity to apoptotic effect, (c) paclitaxel-induced apoptosis increases with increased cell proliferation and is completed after DNA synthesis, and (d) further increasing the dose to elevate plasma concentration beyond 1 microM may not improve treatment outcome.

  15. Effect of SPG (Sonifilan) immunotherapy and PDT on murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbelik, M.; Krosl, G.; Dougherty, G.J.; Chaplin, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    PhotoDynamic Therapy of solid tumors is unique in eliciting a strong host immune response unparalleled in other cancer therapies. This immune response is manifested as an acute inflammatory reaction, and can be readily seen as redness and edema around the treated area. Destruction of typical solid tumor cannot be accomplished solely by direct phototoxic action. This was shown to be the case even with drugs more potent in this direct killing effect than Photofrin, the photosensitizer presently used in clinical PDT. Limiting factors seem to be regional insufficiencies in supply of molecular oxygen, needed for generation of phototoxic species. They can be ascribed to the existence of chronically and acute hypoxic tumor regions, oxygen consumption by the photodynamic process, and vascular shutdown induced during PDT. The remaining tumor mass is eradicated by an indirect effect, necrosis induced by destruction of tumor vasculature. Since most events in PDT treated tumor that lead to vascular collapse are, in fact, typical inflammatory manifestations, it was suggested that PDT-induced acute inflammatory reaction actually leads to vascular damage. In a related report characteristics are shown of cellular inflammatory infiltrate in PDT-treated murine tumor. This work examines the effect of combining PDT with immunotherapy, in an attempt to investigate a possibility of amplification of immune reaction to PDT and its direction towards more pervasive destruction of treated tumors. (authors). 6 refs

  16. Risk-based surveillance: Estimating the effect of unwarranted confounder adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeberg, Preben; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Salman, Mo

    2011-01-01

    We estimated the effects of confounder adjustment as a part of the underlying quantitative risk assessments on the performance of a hypothetical example of a risk-based surveillance system, in which a single risk factor would be used to identify high risk sampling units for testing. The differences...

  17. Screening for Colorectal Cancer With Fecal Immunochemical Testing With and Without Postpolypectomy Surveillance Colonoscopy A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuter, Marjolein J. E.; de Klerk, Clasine M.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Dekker, Evelien; Coupé, Veerle M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Population-based screening to prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) death is effective, but the effectiveness of post-polypectomy surveillance is unclear. Objective: To evaluate the additional benefit in terms of costeffectiveness of colonoscopy surveillance in a screening setting. Design:

  18. An Effective Approach for Immunotherapy Using Irradiated Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, D.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    This study has been aimed to investigate the effect of injection of Irradiated Ehrlich tumor cells alone or concurrent with immunomodulator in mice before and after challenge with viable Ehrlich tumor cells for enhancement of immune system. This study includes the estimation of survival, tumor size, lymphocyte count, LDH, MTT, granzyme B, and DNA fragmentation. In order to fulfill the target of this study, a total of 120 female swiss albino mice were used. They were divided into two classes vaccinated (injection of vaccine before challenge) and therapeutic class (injection of vaccine after challenge). Each class was divided into four groups, group (1) mice injected with viable Ehrlich tumor cells (G1), group (2) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells (G2), group (3) mice injected with immunomodulator (G3), and group (4) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells + immunomodulator (G4). Results obtained from this study demonstrated that, the lymphocyte count and granzyme B activity were increased in both the vaccinated and therapeutic classes compared with control group. LDH activity was decreased in all groups of vaccinated class and also in G2 and G4 groups of therapeutic class compared with control group. There was a significant increase in percent apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with spleenocytes of the groups of vaccinated class as compared with control group. Cellular DNA from Ehrlich tumor cell line cultured with spleenocytes of immunized groups was fragmented into discrete bands of approximate multiples of 200 bp. Revealing significant apoptosis in tumor cells due to vaccination. It is concluded that, vaccination with irradiated tumor cells is an effective approach in stimulation of immune system against viable tumor cells.

  19. Effects of hyperthermia, radiotherapy and thermoradiotherapy on tumor microvasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kouji

    1987-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of hyperthermia (immersion of tumor-bearing leg in a water bath at 46 deg C for 60 min), radiotherapy (500 rad or 1000 rad) and thermoradiotherapy on VX-2 tumors of the rabbits were studied morphologically. Especially, vascular morphological changes and vascular permeability to ferritin after treatment were investigated by electron microscopy. As assessed by decrease in tumor volume, local hyperthermia potentiated the destructive effect of radiotherapy. The light microscopic pictures invariably suggested prolonged necrotic tendency of tumor cells following thermoradiotherapy. Electron microscopically, 1 day and 3 days after thermoradiotherapy, small blood vessels in the tumors showed swelling and protrusion of endothelial cells in the lumen. Similar morphological changes were obtained only at 3 days after radiotherapy. When vascular permeability to ferritin was examined by electron microscopy, an increase in tumor vascular permeability was occured at 1 day after hyperthermia or thermoradiotherapy, while at 3 days after radiotherapy. These results suggest that the early reaction of tumor microvasculature may be a contributing factor to delayed cell death in tumors after hyperthermia or thermoradiotherapy. (author)

  20. MORTICIA, a statistical analysis software package for determining optical surveillance system effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkilowan, A.; Griffith, D. J.

    2017-10-01

    Surveillance modelling in terms of the standard Detect, Recognise and Identify (DRI) thresholds remains a key requirement for determining the effectiveness of surveillance sensors. With readily available computational resources it has become feasible to perform statistically representative evaluations of the effectiveness of these sensors. A new capability for performing this Monte-Carlo type analysis is demonstrated in the MORTICIA (Monte- Carlo Optical Rendering for Theatre Investigations of Capability under the Influence of the Atmosphere) software package developed at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). This first generation, python-based open-source integrated software package, currently in the alpha stage of development aims to provide all the functionality required to perform statistical investigations of the effectiveness of optical surveillance systems in specific or generic deployment theatres. This includes modelling of the mathematical and physical processes that govern amongst other components of a surveillance system; a sensor's detector and optical components, a target and its background as well as the intervening atmospheric influences. In this paper we discuss integral aspects of the bespoke framework that are critical to the longevity of all subsequent modelling efforts. Additionally, some preliminary results are presented.

  1. Myeloid-derived cells in tumors: effects of radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatner, Ralph E; Formenti, Silvia C

    2015-01-01

    The discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo response to radiation is readily explained by the fact that tumors do not exist independently of the host organism; cancer cells grow in the context of a complex microenvironment composed of stromal cells, vasculature, and elements of the immune system. As the antitumor effect of radiotherapy depends in part on the immune system, and myeloid-derived cells in the tumor microenvironment modulate the immune response to tumors, it follows that understanding the effect of radiation on myeloid cells in the tumor is likely to be essential for comprehending the antitumor effects of radiotherapy. In this review, we describe the phenotype and function of these myeloid-derived cells, and stress the complexity of studying this important cell compartment owing to its intrinsic plasticity. With regard to the response to radiation of myeloid cells in the tumor, evidence has emerged demonstrating that it is both model and dose dependent. Deciphering the effects of myeloid-derived cells in tumors, particularly in irradiated tumors, is key for attempting to pharmacologically modulate their actions in the clinic as part of cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy: The Effect of Preoperative Tumor Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chia Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe our initial experience with preoperative tumor embolization for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Between September 2003 and August 2004, six patients with solid hypervascular renal rumors were treated with a combination of preoperative tumor embolization and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Ethanol (100% was used to preoperatively embolize all major vessels supplying the tumor. The laparoscopic partial nephrectomy procedure was performed without clamping the renal vessels. The mean tumor size was 2.9 cm (range, 2.0-4.0 cm. Mean estimated blood loss was 177 mL (range, 40-410 mL. Mean laparoscopy time was 243 minutes (range, 160-290 minutes. Histopathology demonstrated an infected cyst in one patient and a pTl renal cell carcinoma in five patients, including a specimen with a positive tumor margin. After a mean follow-up period of 30 months (range, 25-36 months, neither residual rumor nor recurrent tumor was identified by imaging studies in any of the six patients. Our initial experience suggests that preoperative embolization for the treatment of hypervascular renal rumors might reduce blood loss during subsequent laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, especially in procedures in which the renal vessels are not clamped. Preoperative tumor embolization may also help prevent the disastrous effect of incomplete tumor resection. A longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm efficacy.

  3. The anti-tumor effect of the quinoline-3-carboxamide tasquinimod: blockade of recruitment of CD11b+ Ly6Chi cells to tumor tissue reduces tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deronic, Adnan; Leanderson, Tomas; Ivars, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated immunomodulatory, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of the small molecule quinoline-3-carboxamide tasquinimod in pre-clinical cancer models. To better understand the anti-tumor effects of tasquinimod in transplantable tumor models, we have evaluated the impact of the compound both on recruitment of myeloid cells to tumor tissue and on tumor-induced myeloid cell expansion as these cells are known to promote tumor development. Mice bearing subcutaneous 4 T1 mammary carcinoma tumors were treated with tasquinimod in the drinking water. A BrdU-based flow cytometry assay was utilized to assess the impact of short-term tasquinimod treatment on myeloid cell recruitment to tumors. Additionally, long-term treatment was performed to study the anti-tumor effect of tasquinimod as well as its effects on splenic myeloid cells and their progenitors. Myeloid cell populations were also immune-depleted by in vivo antibody treatment. Short-term tasquinimod treatment did not influence the proliferation of splenic Ly6C hi and Ly6G hi cells, but instead reduced the influx of Ly6C hi cells to the tumor. Treatment with tasquinimod for various periods of time after tumor inoculation revealed that the anti-tumor effect of this compound mainly operated during the first few days of tumor growth. Similar to tasquinimod treatment, antibody-mediated depletion of Ly6C hi cells within that same time frame, caused reduced tumor growth, thereby confirming a significant role for these cells in tumor development. Additionally, long-term tasquinimod treatment reduced the splenomegaly and expansion of splenic myeloid cells during a later phase of tumor development. In this phase, tasquinimod normalized the tumor-induced alterations in myeloerythroid progenitor cells in the spleen but had only limited impact on the same populations in the bone marrow. Our results indicate that tasquinimod treatment reduces tumor growth by operating early after tumor

  4. Effects of radiotherapy on corticotrophic macro-tumors in dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornel, Pauline Marie-Josephe de

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate efficacy of low dose radiotherapy for treatment of pituitary corticotrophic macro-tumors in dogs. Twelve dogs with pituitary-dependent hyper-adrenocorticism and a large pituitary tumor treated with 36 Gy of radiation were included in this report. Radiation was delivered in twelve fractions of 3 Gy during a 4- week period. Effects of radiation therapy on tumor size were assessed by CT scans and a decrease was observed in ten dogs (decrease > 50% in four dogs). The mean and median survival times following the initiation of radiotherapy were 21,6 and 18 months, respectively. These cases support previous findings, based on high dose radiation, that radiotherapy is a valuable option in the treatment of pituitary corticotrophic macro-tumors in the dog. Use of smaller total dose and smaller dose fractions remains effective providing a cure with minimal side effects and allowing a second irradiation if necessary. (author) [fr

  5. Effect of fluosol and carbogen on rat brain tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.F.; Kimler, B.F.; Evans, R.G.; Morantz, R.A.; Vats, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used the 9L rat brain tumor model to investigate the efficacy of a perfluorochemical emulsion as a potentiator of brain tumor therapy with two effective treatment modalities; BCNU and radiation. Rats with intracerebral 9L brain tumors were injected i.v. with 10 ml/kg Fluosol-DA 20%, (Alpha Therepeutic Corp., Los Angeles, CA), and held in carbogen, (95% oxygen, 5% carbon dioxide), during treatment with BCNU or radiation. The combination of Fluosol, carbogen-breathing, and BCNU was significantly (p < 0.025) more effective at prolonging median survival time (MST) than was BCNU alone. The MST for the Fluosol/carbogen/BCNU combination treatment was 42 days vs 34 days for BCNU alone and 24 days for untreated controls. Fluosol without carbogen did not alter the effect of BCNU; and the Fluosol/carbogen combination without BCNU did not alter survival. Carbogen-breathing without Fluosol did not have significant effect on BCNU therapy. Fluosol and carbogen-breathing did not alter the effect of single doses of radiation on these tumors. These results support the hypothesis that 9L brain tumors contain few, if any, critical hypoxic cells. However, these tumors may contain cells which, although not radiobiologically hypoxic, are oxygen-deficient to the extent that BCNU therapy can be enhanced by Fluosol and carbogen-breathing

  6. Effect of pantethine on ovarian tumor progression and choline metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-France Penet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy among women in developed countries. New therapeutic strategies evaluated with relevant preclinical models are urgently needed to improve survival rates. Here we have assessed the effect of pantethine on tumor growth and metabolism using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in a model of ovarian cancer. To evaluate treatment strategies, it is important to use models that closely mimic tumor growth in humans. We therefore used an orthotopic model of ovarian cancer where a piece of tumor tissue, derived from an ovarian tumor xenograft, is engrafted directly onto the ovary of female mice, to maintain the tumor physiological environment. Treatment with pantethine, the precursor of vitamin B5 and active moiety of coenzyme A, was started when tumors were approximately 100 mm3, and consisted of a daily i.p. injection of 750 mg/kg in saline. Under these conditions, no side effects were observed. High-resolution 1H MRS was performed on treated and control tumor extracts. A dual-phase extraction method based on methanol/chloroform/water was used to obtain lipid and water-soluble fractions from the tumors. We also investigated effects on metastases and ascites formation. Pantethine treatment resulted in slower tumor progression, decreased levels of phosphocholine and phosphatidylcholine, and reduced metastases and ascites occurrence. In conclusion, pantethine represents a novel potential, well-tolerated, therapeutic tool in patients with ovarian cancer. Further in vivo preclinical studies are needed to confirm the beneficial role of pantethine and to better understand its mechanism of action.

  7. SOA-surveillance Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijlaarsdam J; Bosman A; Laar MJW van de; CIE

    2000-01-01

    In May 1999 a working group was started to evaluate the current surveillance systems for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and to make suggestions for a renewed effective and efficient STD surveillance system in the Netherlands. The surveillance system has to provide insight into the prevalence

  8. Containment and surveillance devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.; Johnson, C.S.; Stieff, L.R.

    The growing acceptance of containment and surveillance as a means to increase safeguards effectiveness has provided impetus to the development of improved surveillance and containment devices. Five recently developed devices are described. The devices include one photographic and two television surveillance systems and two high security seals that can be verified while installed

  9. Epidemiology of malignant cutaneous granular cell tumors: A US population-based cohort analysis using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Fatima N; Tuggle, Charles T; Zogg, Cheryl K; Mirza, Humza N; Narayan, Deepak

    2018-03-01

    Malignant cutaneous granular cell tumors (mcGCTs) are rare and associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. The literature includes single-institution studies. To examine the incidence, secondary malignancies, treatment, overall survival, and disease-specific survival (DSS) of patients with mcGCT. A population-based cohort analysis was conducted in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1973 to 2013 for patients with a diagnosis of mcGCT. Risk-adjusted associations between overall survival/DSS and patient characteristics and treatment modalities were assessed by Cox proportional hazard regression. Quantile regression was used to determine median survival times. The 5-year DSS rate was 62.8%. Patients demonstrated an increased risk for renal and pancreatic cancers. In risk-adjusted models, male sex (hazard ratio [HR], 0.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06-0.82; P = .02), advanced cancer stage (HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.40-3.72; P < .01), and surgical resection (HR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01-0.59; P = .02) predicted DSS. Median survival time in years increased for males (1.39), earlier stage (0.60), and surgical intervention (5.34). Absent or incorrect reporting in retrospective Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data is possible. The database is more likely to include academic centers. Some subanalyses may be underpowered because of the limited sample size for a rare cancer. Our study presents an in-depth assessment of factors that identify high-risk patients. Residency in a nonmetro area, black race, female sex, and no surgical resection were each associated with poorer DSS. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of bevacizumab and tumor targeted polymerized VEGF siRNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Goo; Jo, Sung Duk; Yhee, Ji Young; Lee, Beom Suk; Lee, So Jin; Park, Sung Gurl; Kang, Sun-Woong; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2017-07-15

    A variety of VEGF inhibitors have been reported to treat cancers by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal VEGF antibody, was the first FDA approved anti-angiogenic agent for cancer treatments. However, bevacizumab shows modest therapeutic efficiency and often cause resistant problem in significant populations of cancer patients. To solve these problem, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of siRNA drugs targeting VEGF and combination of the RNAi drug with bevacizumab for cancer treatments. For efficient VEGF siRNA delivery, chemically polymerized siRNAs were complexed with thiolated-glycol chitosan (psi(VEGF)/tGC). The poly-VEGF siRNA and thiolated-glycol chitosan formed stable nanoparticles via electrostatic interaction and chemical crosslinking, and showed high accumulation in tumor tissues resulting in efficient gene silencing. Both VEGF siRNA nanoparticles and bevacizumab had efficient therapeutic effects in tumor xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, most pronounced therapeutic efficacy was observed when the two distinct VEGF inhibitors were treated in combination revealing synergistic effects. The results showed that the psi(VEGF)/tGC nanoparticle mediated knockdown of VEGF exerts anti-tumor effects and the combination treatments with bevacizumab can extend the treatments options to conventional bevacizumab treatments for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Effect of Irradiation on Tumor Microenvironment and Bone Marrow Cell Migration in a Preclinical Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Jonathan L. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krueger, Sarah A.; Hanna, Alaa [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Raffel, Thomas R. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Madlambayan, Gerard J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: Brian.Marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the tumor microenvironment after standard radiation therapy (SRT) and pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) allografts. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous LLC tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice. Standard RT or PRT was given at 2 Gy/d for a total dose of 20 Gy using a 5 days on, 2 days off schedule to mimic clinical delivery. Radiation-induced tumor microenvironment changes were examined after treatment using flow cytometry and antibody-specific histopathology. Normal tissue effects were measured using noninvasive {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after naïve animals were given whole-lung irradiation to 40 Gy in 4 weeks using the same 2-Gy/d regimens. Results: Over the 2 weeks of therapy, PRT was more effective than SRT at reducing tumor growth rate (0.31 ± 0.02 mm{sup 3}/d and 0.55 ± 0.04 mm{sup 3}/d, respectively; P<.007). Histopathology showed a significant comparative reduction in the levels of Ki-67 (14.5% ± 3%), hypoxia (10% ± 3.5%), vascular endothelial growth factor (2.3% ± 1%), and stromal-derived factor-1α (2.5% ± 1.4%), as well as a concomitant decrease in CD45{sup +} bone marrow–derived cell (BMDC) migration (7.8% ± 2.2%) after PRT. The addition of AMD3100 also decreased CD45{sup +} BMDC migration in treated tumors (0.6% ± 0.1%). Higher vessel density was observed in treated tumors. No differences were observed in normal lung tissue after PRT or SRT. Conclusions: Pulsed RT–treated tumors exhibited slower growth and reduced hypoxia. Pulsed RT eliminated initiation of supportive mechanisms utilized by tumors in low oxygen microenvironments, including angiogenesis and recruitment of BMDCs.

  12. Investigation of the effects of tumor size and type of radionuclide on tumor curability in targeted radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ranjbar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Targeted radiotherapy is one of the important methods of radiotherapy that involves the use of beta-emitting radionuclides to deliver a dose of radiation to tumor cells. An important feature of this method is the tumor size and the finite range of beta particles emitted as a result of radionuclide disintegration those have significant effects for the curability of tumors. Material and Methods: Monte Carlo simulations and mathematical models have been used to investigate the relationship of curability to tumors size for tumors treated with targeted 131I and 90Y. The model assumed that radionuclides are distributed uniformly throughout tumors. Results: The results show that there is an optimal tumor size for cure. For any given cumulated activity, cure probability is greatest for tumors whose diameter is close to the optimum value. There is a maximum value of curability that occurs at a diameter of approximately 3.5 mm for 131I. For 90Y maximum curability occurs at a tumor diameter of approximately 3.5 cm. Tumors smaller than the optimal size are less vulnerable to irradiation from radionuclides because a significant proportion of the disintegration energy escapes and is deposited outside the tumor volume. Tumors larger than the optimal size are less curable because of greater clonogenic cell number. Conclusion: With single radionuclide targeted radiotherapy, there is an optimal tumor size for tumor cure. It is suggested that single agent targeted radiotherapy should not be used for treatment of disseminated disease when multiple tumors of differing size may be present. The use of several radionuclides concurrently would be more effective than reliance on single radionuclide. This approach of using combination of radionuclides with complementary properties could hopefully prepare new measures and improve the efficiency of tumor therapy.

  13. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  14. Insights from a Systematic Search for Information on Designs, Costs, and Effectiveness of Poliovirus Environmental Surveillance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J; Zimmermann, Marita; Pallansch, Mark A; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2017-12-01

    Poliovirus surveillance plays a critical role in achieving and certifying eradication and will play a key role in the polio endgame. Environmental surveillance can provide an opportunity to detect circulating polioviruses prior to the observation of any acute flaccid paralysis cases. We completed a systematic review of peer-reviewed publications on environmental surveillance for polio including the search terms "environmental surveillance" or "sewage," and "polio," "poliovirus," or "poliomyelitis," and compared characteristics of the resulting studies. The review included 146 studies representing 101 environmental surveillance activities from 48 countries published between 1975 and 2016. Studies reported taking samples from sewage treatment facilities, surface waters, and various other environmental sources, although they generally did not present sufficient details to thoroughly evaluate the sewage systems and catchment areas. When reported, catchment areas varied from 50 to over 7.3 million people (median of 500,000 for the 25% of activities that reported catchment areas, notably with 60% of the studies not reporting this information and 16% reporting insufficient information to estimate the catchment area population size). While numerous studies reported the ability of environmental surveillance to detect polioviruses in the absence of clinical cases, the review revealed very limited information about the costs and limited information to support quantitative population effectiveness of conducting environmental surveillance. This review motivates future studies to better characterize poliovirus environmental surveillance systems and the potential value of information that they may provide in the polio endgame.

  15. The Air Force Needs to Improve Cost-Effectiveness and Availability of the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    the Freedom of Information Act. The Air Force Needs to Improve Cost -Effectiveness and Availability of the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar... Target Attack Radar System Objective We determined whether the Air Force made cost -effective purchases on the performance-based logistics contract to...0263.000) Results in Brief The Air Force Needs to Improve Cost -Effectiveness and Availability of the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System

  16. A cost-effectiveness analysis evaluating endoscopic surveillance for gastric cancer for populations with low to intermediate risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastric cancer (GC surveillance based on oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD appears to be a promising strategy for GC prevention. By evaluating the cost-effectiveness of endoscopic surveillance in Singaporean Chinese, this study aimed to inform the implementation of such a program in a population with a low to intermediate GC risk. METHODS: USING A REFERENCE STRATEGY OF NO OGD INTERVENTION, WE EVALUATED FOUR STRATEGIES: 2-yearly OGD surveillance, annual OGD surveillance, 2-yearly OGD screening and 2-yearly screening plus annual surveillance in Singaporean Chinese aged 50-69 years. From a perspective of the healthcare system, Markov models were built to simulate the life experience of the target population. The models projected discounted lifetime costs ($, quality adjusted life year (QALY, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER indicating the cost-effectiveness of each strategy against a Singapore willingness-to-pay of $46,200/QALY. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to identify the influential variables and their associated thresholds, and to quantify the influence of parameter uncertainties respectively. RESULTS: With an ICER of $44,098/QALY, the annual OGD surveillance was the optimal strategy while the 2-yearly surveillance was the most cost-effective strategy (ICER = $25,949/QALY. The screening-based strategies were either extendedly dominated or cost-ineffective. The cost-effectiveness heterogeneity of the four strategies was observed across age-gender subgroups. Eight influential parameters were identified each with their specific thresholds to define the choice of optimal strategy. Accounting for the model uncertainties, the probability that the annual surveillance is the optimal strategy in Singapore was 44.5%. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic surveillance is potentially cost-effective in the prevention of GC for populations at low to intermediate risk. Regarding program implementation, a detailed

  17. A Quantitative Diffuse Reflectance Imaging (QDRI System for Comprehensive Surveillance of the Morphological Landscape in Breast Tumor Margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S Nichols

    Full Text Available In an ongoing effort to address the clear clinical unmet needs surrounding breast conserving surgery (BCS, our group has developed a next-generation multiplexed optical-fiber-based tool to assess breast tumor margin status during initial surgeries. Specifically detailed in this work is the performance and clinical validation of a research-grade intra-operative tool for margin assessment based on diffuse optical spectroscopy. Previous work published by our group has illustrated the proof-of-concept generations of this device; here we incorporate a highly optimized quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging (QDRI system utilizing a wide-field (imaging area = 17 cm(2 49-channel multiplexed fiber optic probe, a custom raster-scanning imaging platform, a custom dual-channel white LED source, and an astronomy grade imaging CCD and spectrograph. The system signal to noise ratio (SNR was found to be greater than 40 dB for all channels. Optical property estimation error was found to be less than 10%, on average, over a wide range of absorption (μa = 0-8.9 cm(-1 and scattering (μs' = 7.0-9.7 cm(-1 coefficients. Very low inter-channel and CCD crosstalk was observed (2% max when used on turbid media (including breast tissue. A raster-scanning mechanism was developed to achieve sub-pixel resolution and was found to be optimally performed at an upsample factor of 8, affording 0.75 mm spatially resolved diffuse reflectance images (λ = 450-600 nm of an entire margin (area = 17 cm(2 in 13.8 minutes (1.23 cm(2/min. Moreover, controlled pressure application at the probe-tissue interface afforded by the imaging platform reduces repeated scan variability, providing <1% variation across repeated scans of clinical specimens. We demonstrate the clinical utility of this device through a pilot 20-patient study of high-resolution optical parameter maps of the ratio of the β-carotene concentration to the reduced scattering coefficient. An empirical cumulative

  18. Proceedings of the 3. Muenster symposium on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willich, Normann; Boelling, Tobias (eds.) [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-08-15

    The volume on the 3rd Muenster Symposion on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence contains 7 contributions: Evaluation of side effects after radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence; from retrospective case reports to a perspective, multicentric and transnational approach; late effects surveillance system after childhood cancer in Germany, Austria and parts of Switzerland - update 2009; second malignant neoplasm after childhood cancer in Germany - results from the long-term follow-up of the German childhood cancer registry; secondary neoplasm after Wilm's tumor in Germany; second cancer after total-body irradiation (TBI) in childhood; late toxicity in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with TBI-containing conditioning regimens for hematological malignancies; radiation toxicity following busulfan/melphalan high-dose chemotherapy in the EURO-EWING-99-trials: review of GPOH data.

  19. Anti-tumor effect of polysaccharides isolated from Taraxacum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of extraction temperature, liquid-solid ratio and extraction time on the yield of PTM were investigated using a Box-Behnken design (BBD). The in vitro anti-tumor effect of PTM on MCF-7 cells was investigated by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while the mechanism of PTM-induced ...

  20. Effects of radiation on tumor hemodynamics and NF-kappaB in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Ning; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc; Li, Jian Jian

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to monitor in vivo the IR dose dependent response of NF-κB and tumor hemodynamics as a function of time. Material and Methods: An MDA-231 breast cancer cell line was stably transfected with a firefly luciferase gene within the NF-kappaB promoter. Tumors on the right flank irradiated with a single fractionated dose of 5Gy or 10Gy. Over two weeks, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PCT-S), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) was used to monitor hemoglobin status, NF-kappaB expression, and physiology, respectively. Results: From the BLI, an increase in NF-kappaB expression was observed in both the right (irradiation) and left (nonirradiated) tumors, which peaked at 8-12 hours, returned to basal levels after 24 hours, and increased a second time from 3 to 7 days. This data identifies both a radiation-induced bystander effect and a bimodal longitudinal response associated with NF-κB-controlled luciferase promoter. The physiological results from DCE-CT measured an increase in perfusion (26%) two days after radiation and both a decrease in perfusion and an increase in fp by week 1 (10Gy cohort). PCT-S measured increased levels of oxygen saturation two days post IR, which did not change after 1 week. Initially, NF-κB would modify hemodynamics to increase oxygen delivery after IR insult. The secondary response appears to modulate tumor angiogenesis. Conclusions: A bimodal response to radiation was detected with NF-kappaB-controlled luciferase reporter with a concomitant hemodynamic response associated with tumor hypoxia. Experiments are being performed to increase statistics.

  1. The Effectiveness of Ultrasound Surveillance for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Canadian Centre and Determinants of Its Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korosh Khalili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of surveillance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC using ultrasound (US in North America has been questioned due to the predominance of patients of Caucasian ethnicity and larger body habitus.

  2. Effects of charged particles on human tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Held

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles.

  3. Effects of a second heating on blood flow in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.W.; Chelstrom, L.M.; Sung, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The blood flow in RIF-1 tumors of C3H mice, as measured with the 86Rb uptake method, declined markedly after a single heating at 43.5 degrees C or 44.5 degrees C for 1 h. However, preheating at 42.5 degrees C for 1 h significantly lessened the decrease in tumor blood flow caused by subsequent heating at 43.5 degrees C or 44.5 degrees C for 1 h. Such an influence of preheating on the effect of reheating in decreasing the tumor blood flow was significant as early as 6 h after the preheating, peaked at 36 h, and then decayed the following 2-3 days. In fact, a reheating at 43.5 degrees C for 1 h applied 36 h after a preheating at 42.5 degrees C for 1 h resulted in an increase rather than a decrease in blood flow. The cause of such a profound impact of preheating on the effect of reheating on the blood flow is unclear. However, circumstantial evidence including the histopathological appearance of tumors suggests that thermotolerance is induced in the blood vessels of the tumor as a result of preheating

  4. Tumor hypoxia - A confounding or exploitable factor in interstitial brachytherapy? Effects of tissue trauma in an experimental rat tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP; van Geel, CAJF; van Hooije, CMC; van der Kleij, AJ; Visser, AG

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential effects of tumor hypoxia induced by afterloading catheter implantation on the effectiveness of brachytherapy in a rat tumor model. Methods and Materials: Afterloading catheters (4) Here implanted in subcutaneously growing R1M rhabdomyosarcoma in female Wag/Rij

  5. Combination effect of cisplatin and radiation in murine solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Shin; Lee, Kan-ei; Ishibashi, Akira; Komiyama, Hiroki; Umezawa, Iwao.

    1986-01-01

    The combination effect of cisplatin and radiation was studied using the two different murine systems of sarcoma 180 and Ehrlich solid tumors. In sarcoma 180 solid tumor the minimal effective doses (MED) of cisplatin and radiation were 19.5 mg/kg and 10375 rad respectively whereas these doses did not show any effective antitumor activity practically. Administration of cisplatin with a doses of 9 mg/kg given 24 hours before radiation (1000 rad), however, showed synergistic antitumor activity. In Ehrlich solid tumor the MED of cisplatin and radiation were 13.8 mg/kg and 2892 rad respectively. Treatment with cisplatin, 3, 6 or 9 mg/kg, given 24 hours before radiation (1000 rad) showed also synergistic antitumor activity also. Sodium thiosulfate (STS) rescue was effective in reducing toxicity of cisplatin on combined use of the drug with radiation. Cell kinetics of sarcoma 180 solid tumor in vivo after the combined treatment was analyzed by computer aided flowcytometry. Accumulation of cells in the radiosensitive G 2 + M phase was observed 18 to 42 hours after a single intraperitoneal administration of 9 mg/kg of cisplatin. It is strongly suggested that this synchronization is one of the mechanisms of the synergism in the combination therapy. (author)

  6. Anti-tumor effect of polysaccharides isolated from Taraxacum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Anti-tumor effect of polysaccharides isolated from. Taraxacum mongolicum Hand-Mazz on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hu Niu1,2, JunWei Fan3, ... leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide [1]. Currently, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in China,.

  7. The effect of one additional driver mutation on tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Johannes G; Bozic, Ivana; Allen, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Tumor growth is caused by the acquisition of driver mutations, which enhance the net reproductive rate of cells. Driver mutations may increase cell division, reduce cell death, or allow cells to overcome density-limiting effects. We study the dynamics of tumor growth as one additional driver mutation is acquired. Our models are based on two-type branching processes that terminate in either tumor disappearance or tumor detection. In our first model, both cell types grow exponentially, with a faster rate for cells carrying the additional driver. We find that the additional driver mutation does not affect the survival probability of the lesion, but can substantially reduce the time to reach the detectable size if the lesion is slow growing. In our second model, cells lacking the additional driver cannot exceed a fixed carrying capacity, due to density limitations. In this case, the time to detection depends strongly on this carrying capacity. Our model provides a quantitative framework for studying tumor dynamics during different stages of progression. We observe that early, small lesions need additional drivers, while late stage metastases are only marginally affected by them. These results help to explain why additional driver mutations are typically not detected in fast-growing metastases. PMID:23396615

  8. Effects of radiation on metastasis and tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta, Marta; Rafat, Marjan; Graves, Edward E

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that tumor cells migrate from the primary lesion to distant sites to form metastases and that these lesions limit patient outcome in a majority of cases. However, the extent to which radiation influences this process and to which migration in turn alters radiation response remains controversial. There are preclinical and clinical reports showing that focal radiotherapy can both increase the development of distant metastasis, as well as that it can induce the regression of established metastases through the abscopal effect. More recently, preclinical studies have suggested that radiation can attract migrating tumor cells and may, thereby, facilitate tumor recurrence. In this review, we summarize these phenomena and their potential mechanisms of action, and evaluate their significance for modern radiation therapy strategies.

  9. Oxyqen effect and radiotherapy of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmonenko, S.P.; Vajnson, A.A.; Magdon, Eh.

    1980-01-01

    One of actual problems of clinical radiobiology-development of approaches to improvement of local results of tumour treatment radioresistance of which is caused by hypoxic cells, is discussed. Condition, perspectives and limitations of the methods used with this purpose for overcoming resistance and selective alternation of tissue radiosensitivity, based on using heavy nuclear particles, as well as radiomodifying agents, primarily affecting nermal or tumourao tissues, are considered in a comparative aspect. Theoretical analysis of the problem is conducted, and experimental data, generalizing modern methods of treatment, taking into account the role of oxygen effect and tumoural resistance of tumours are presented [ru

  10. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors may predispose to significant increase in tuberculosis risk: a multicenter active-surveillance report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto; Valverde, Vicente Rodríguez; Mola, Emilio Martín; Montero, Maria Dolores

    2003-08-01

    The long-term safety of therapeutic agents that neutralize tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is uncertain. Recent evidence based on spontaneous reporting shows an association with active tuberculosis (TB). We undertook this study to determine and describe the long-term safety of 2 of these agents, infliximab and etanercept, in rheumatic diseases based on a national active-surveillance system following the commercialization of the drugs. We analyzed the safety data actively collected in the BIOBADASER (Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología) database, which was launched in February 2000 by the Spanish Society of Rheumatology. For the estimation of TB risk, the annual incidence rate in patients treated with these agents was compared with the background rate and with the rate in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) assembled before the era of anti-TNF treatment. Seventy-one participating centers sent data on 1,578 treatments with infliximab (86%) or etanercept (14%) in 1,540 patients. Drug survival rates (reported as the cumulative percentage of patients still receiving medication) for infliximab and etanercept pooled together were 85% and 81% at 1 year and 2 years, respectively. Instances of discontinuation were essentially due to adverse events. Seventeen cases of TB were found in patients treated with infliximab. The estimated incidence of TB associated with infliximab in RA patients was 1,893 per 100,000 in the year 2000 and 1,113 per 100,000 in the year 2001. These findings represent a significant increased risk compared with background rates. In the first 5 months of 2002, after official guidelines were established for TB prevention in patients treated with biologics, only 1 new TB case was registered (in January). Therapy with infliximab is associated with an increased risk of active TB. Proper measures are needed to prevent and manage this adverse event.

  11. Effects of human errors on the determination of surveillance test interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Dae Wook; Koo, Bon Hyun

    1990-01-01

    This paper incorporates the effects of human error relevant to the periodic test on the unavailability of the safety system as well as the component unavailability. Two types of possible human error during the test are considered. One is the possibility that a good safety system is inadvertently left in a bad state after the test (Type A human error) and the other is the possibility that bad safety system is undetected upon the test (Type B human error). An event tree model is developed for the steady-state unavailability of safety system to determine the effects of human errors on the component unavailability and the test interval. We perform the reliability analysis of safety injection system (SIS) by applying aforementioned two types of human error to safety injection pumps. Results of various sensitivity analyses show that; 1) the appropriate test interval decreases and steady-state unavailability increases as the probabilities of both types of human errors increase, and they are far more sensitive to Type A human error than Type B and 2) the SIS unavailability increases slightly as the probability of Type B human error increases, and significantly as the probability of Type A human error increases. Therefore, to avoid underestimation, the effects of human error should be incorporated in the system reliability analysis which aims at the relaxations of the surveillance test intervals, and Type A human error has more important effect on the unavailability and surveillance test interval

  12. Effectiveness of Implementation of Electronic Malaria Information System as the National Malaria Surveillance System in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background In moving toward malaria elimination, one strategy is to implement an active surveillance system for effective case management. Thailand has developed and implemented the electronic Malaria Information System (eMIS) capturing individualized electronic records of suspected or confirmed malaria cases. Objective The main purpose of this study was to determine how well the eMIS improves the quality of Thailand’s malaria surveillance system. In particular, the focus of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the eMIS in terms of the system users’ perception and the system outcomes (ie, quality of data) regarding the management of malaria patients. Methods A mixed-methods technique was used with the framework based on system effectiveness attributes: data quality, timeliness, simplicity, acceptability, flexibility, stability, and usefulness. Three methods were utilized: data records review, survey of system users, and in-depth interviews with key stakeholders. From the two highest endemic provinces, paper forms matching electronic records of 4455 noninfected and 784 malaria-infected cases were reviewed. Web-based anonymous questionnaires were distributed to all 129 eMIS data entry staff throughout Thailand, and semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 management-level officers. Results The eMIS is well accepted by system users at both management and operational levels. The data quality has enabled malaria personnel to perform more effective prevention and control activities. There is evidence of practices resulting in inconsistencies and logical errors in data reporting. Critical data elements were mostly completed, except for a few related to certain dates and area classifications. Timeliness in reporting a case to the system was acceptable with a delay of 3-4 days. The evaluation of quantitative and qualitative data confirmed that the eMIS has high levels of simplicity, acceptability, stability, and flexibility. Conclusions Overall, the

  13. Internet surveillance, regulation, and chilling effects online: a comparative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon W. Penney

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With internet regulation and censorship on the rise, states increasingly engaging in online surveillance, and state cyber-policing capabilities rapidly evolving globally, concerns about regulatory “chilling effects” online—the idea that laws, regulations, or state surveillance can deter people from exercising their freedoms or engaging in legal activities on the internet have taken on greater urgency and public importance. But just as notions of “chilling effects” are not new, neither is skepticism about their legal, theoretical, and empirical basis; in fact, the concept remains largely un-interrogated with significant gaps in understanding, particularly with respect to chilling effects online. This work helps fill this void with a first-of-its-kind online survey that examines multiple dimensions of chilling effects online by comparing and analyzing responses to hypothetical scenarios involving different kinds of regulatory actions—including an anti-cyberbullying law, public/private sector surveillance, and an online regulatory scheme, based on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA, enforced through personally received legal threats/notices. The results suggest not only the existence and significance of regulatory chilling effects online across these different scenarios but also evidence a differential impact—with personally received legal notices and government surveillance online consistently having the greatest chilling effect on people’s activities online—and certain online activities like speech, search, and personal sharing also impacted differently. The results also offer, for the first time, insights based on demographics and other similar factors about how certain people and groups may be more affected than others, including findings that younger people and women are more likely to be chilled; younger people and women are less likely to take steps to resist regulatory actions and defend themselves; and anti

  14. Anti-Tumor Effect of Steamed Codonopsis lanceolata in H22 Tumor-Bearing Mice and Its Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although previous studies confirmed that steaming and the fermentation process could significantly improve the cognitive-enhancement and neuroprotective effects of Codonopsis lanceolata, the anti-tumor efficacy of steamed C. lanceolata (SCL and what mechanisms are involved remain largely unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effect in vivo of SCL in H22 tumor-bearing mice. The results clearly indicated that SCL could not only inhibit the tumor growth, but also prolong the survival time of H22 tumor-bearing mice. Besides, the serum levels of cytokines, such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-2 (IL-2, were enhanced by SCL administration. The observations of Hoechst 33258 staining demonstrated that SCL was able to induce tumor cell apoptosis. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that SCL treatment significantly increased Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression of H22 tumor tissues in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, LC/MS analysis of SCL indicated that it mainly contained lobetyolin and six saponins. Taken all together, the findings in the present study clearly demonstrated that SCL inhibited the H22 tumor growth in vivo at least partly via improving the immune functions, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  15. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  16. The effects of synoptic weather on influenza infection incidences: a retrospective study utilizing digital disease surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Naizhuo; Cao, Guofeng; Vanos, Jennifer K.; Vecellio, Daniel J.

    2018-01-01

    The environmental drivers and mechanisms of influenza dynamics remain unclear. The recent development of influenza surveillance-particularly the emergence of digital epidemiology-provides an opportunity to further understand this puzzle as an area within applied human biometeorology. This paper investigates the short-term weather effects on human influenza activity at a synoptic scale during cold seasons. Using 10 years (2005-2014) of municipal level influenza surveillance data (an adjustment of the Google Flu Trends estimation from the Centers for Disease Control's virologic surveillance data) and daily spatial synoptic classification weather types, we explore and compare the effects of weather exposure on the influenza infection incidences in 79 cities across the USA. We find that during the cold seasons the presence of the polar [i.e., dry polar (DP) and moist polar (MP)] weather types is significantly associated with increasing influenza likelihood in 62 and 68% of the studied cities, respectively, while the presence of tropical [i.e., dry tropical (DT) and moist tropical (MT)] weather types is associated with a significantly decreasing occurrence of influenza in 56 and 43% of the cities, respectively. The MP and the DP weather types exhibit similar close positive correlations with influenza infection incidences, indicating that both cold-dry and cold-moist air provide favorable conditions for the occurrence of influenza in the cold seasons. Additionally, when tropical weather types are present, the humid (MT) and the dry (DT) weather types have similar strong impacts to inhibit the occurrence of influenza. These findings suggest that temperature is a more dominating atmospheric factor than moisture that impacts the occurrences of influenza in cold seasons.

  17. Effects of the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 on tumor growth in HTLV-1 Tax transgenic mice and Tax tumor transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra-Kaushik, Shibani; Harding, John C; Hess, Jay L; Ratner, Lee

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) regulates critical survival pathways in a variety of cancers, including human T-cell leukemia/lymphotrophic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-transformed CD4 T cells. The activation of NF-kappaB is controlled by proteasome-mediated degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha). We investigated the effects of PS-341, a peptide boronate inhibitor of the proteasome in HTLV-1 Tax transgenic tumors in vitro and in vivo. In Tax transgenic mice, PS-341 administered thrice weekly inhibited tumor-associated NF-kappaB activity. Quantitation of proliferation, apoptosis, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-10 secretion by tumor cells in culture revealed that the effects of PS-341 on cell growth largely correlated with inhibition of pathways mediated by NF-kappaB. However, the effect of PS-341 on the growth of tumors in Tax transgenic mice revealed heterogeneity in drug responsiveness. The tumor tissues treated with PS-341 show no consistent inhibition of NFkappaB activation in vivo. Annexin V staining indicated that PS-341 response in vivo correlated with sensitivity to apoptosis induced by gamma irradiation. On the other hand, transplanted Tax tumors in Rag-1 mice showed consistent inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival in response to the same drug regimen. TUNEL staining indicated that PS-341 treatment sensitizes Tax tumors to DNA fragmentation.

  18. Epidemiological surveillance - air and health. Surveillance of effects on health linked to air pollution; Surveillance epidemiologique air et sante. Surveillance des effets sur la sante lies a la pollution atmospherique en milieu urbain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quenel, Ph.; Cassadou, S.; Eilstein, D.; Filleul, L.; Le Goaster, C.; Le Tertre, A.; Medina, S.; Pascal, L.; Prouvost, H.; Saviuc, Ph.; Zeghnoun, A. [Institut National de Veille Sanitaire, 94 - Saint Maurice (France); Declerq, Ch. [Observatoire Regional de Sante Nord Pas de Calais (France)

    1999-03-01

    In the field of air pollution, the France is the first country to be endowed with a device of epidemiological surveillance allowing to to evaluate and monitor the impact of urban air pollution on the health of population. This new approach is based on the analysis of relationship between pollution indicators and health indicators, it leads to confirm the partnership between actors of environment and health, at the national level as well at the local level. It confirms the development of assessment in the field of environmental health. (N.C.)

  19. Modeling the cost-effectiveness of the integrated disease surveillance and response (IDSR system: meningitis in Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zana C Somda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective surveillance for infectious diseases is an essential component of public health. There are few studies estimating the cost-effectiveness of starting or improving disease surveillance. We present a cost-effectiveness analysis the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR strategy in Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the impact of the IDSR in Africa, we used pre- and post- IDSR meningococcal meningitis surveillance data from Burkina Faso (1996-2002 and 2003-2007. IDSR implementation was correlated with a median reduction of 2 weeks to peak of outbreaks (25(th percentile 1 week; 75(th percentile 4 weeks. IDSR was also correlated with a reduction of 43 meningitis cases per 100,000 (25(th-40: 75(th-129. Assuming the correlations between reductions in time to peak of outbreaks and cases are related, the cost-effectiveness of IDSR was $23 per case averted (25(th-$30; 75(th--cost saving, and $98 per meningitis-related death averted (25(th-$140: 75(th--cost saving. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We cannot absolutely claim that the measured differences were due to IDSR. We believe, however, that it is reasonable to claim that IDSR can improve the cost-effectiveness of public health surveillance.

  20. Tetanus Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Surveillance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Reported tetanus ... date on their 10-year booster shots. National surveillance for tetanus is monitored by the National Notifiable ...

  1. Study on anti-tumor effect of total glycosides from radix paeoniae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the paper was to study the anti-tumor effect of total glycosides from Radix paeoniae rubra in S180 tumor-bearing mice, and to preliminarily explore its mechanism of action. Mice were made into S180 solid tumor model, grouped and administered with the extracts; tumor inhibition rate was measured by ...

  2. Estimating the effectiveness of early control measures through school absenteeism surveillance in observed outbreaks at rural schools in Hubei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yunzhou; Yang, Mei; Jiang, Hongbo; Wang, Ying; Yang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhixia; Yan, Weirong; Diwan, Vinod K; Xu, Biao; Dong, Hengjin; Palm, Lars; Liu, Li; Nie, Shaofa

    2014-01-01

    School absenteeism is a common data source in syndromic surveillance, which allows for the detection of outbreaks at an early stage. Previous studies focused on its correlation with other data sources. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of control measures based on early warning signals from school absenteeism surveillance in rural Chinese schools. A school absenteeism surveillance system was established in all 17 primary schools in 3 adjacent towns in the Chinese region of Hubei. Three outbreaks (varicella, mumps, and influenza-like illness) were detected and controlled successfully from April 1, 2012, to January 15, 2014. An impulse susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered model was used to fit the epidemics of these three outbreaks. Moreover, it simulated the potential epidemics under interventions resulting from traditional surveillance signals. The effectiveness of the absenteeism-based control measures was evaluated by comparing the simulated datasets. The school absenteeism system generated 52 signals. Three outbreaks were verified through epidemiological investigation. Compared to traditional surveillance, the school absenteeism system generated simultaneous signals for the varicella outbreak, but 3 days in advance for the mumps outbreak and 2-4 days in advance for the influenza-like illness outbreak. The estimated excess protection rates of control measures based on early signals were 0.0%, 19.0-44.1%, and 29.0-37.0% for the three outbreaks, respectively. Although not all outbreak control measures can benefit from early signals through school absenteeism surveillance, the effectiveness of early signal-based interventions is obvious. School absenteeism surveillance plays an important role in reducing outbreak spread.

  3. Use of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside during local hyperthermia: effects on tumor temperature and tumor response in a rat tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Dahl, Olav

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of a decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the tumor temperature during hyperthermia (HT), and on the cytotoxic effect of HT, was studied in the BT 4 An tumor transplanted to the hind limb of BD IX rats. Experiments with two different anesthetics, pentobarbital and the midazolam/fentanyl/fluanisone combination (MFF), were performed to secure reliable conclusions. Methods and Materials: In the tumor response experiments local waterbath HT at 44.0 deg. C was given for 60 min. Sodium nitroprusside was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion to lower the MAP to 60 or 80 mmHg during HT. In two other experiments the temperature at the base of the tumor during HT was measured before and during SNP infusion. In animals without tumor the temperature was measured subcutaneously on the foot during HT with or without SNP-induced hypotension. Results: When SNP was given to lower the MAP to 60 mmHg during HT in MFF anesthetized animals, the median tumor growth time (TGT) was 70 days, compared to 14.5 days in the HT alone group. The corresponding figures were 127 and 12.1 days with pentobarbital anesthesia. In the HT + SNP group, more than 40% cure was observed in both experiments. No cures were seen in any of the other groups. Hyperthermia alone prolonged the TGT slightly, whereas SNP given alone had no effect, compared to controls. When the MAP was lowered to 80 mmHg by SNP infusion during HT (MFF anesthesia), the median TGT was 19.9 days, which was significantly longer than that in the HT alone group (10.9 days). In the MAP range from 60 to 120 mmHg, a nearly linear relationship between the MAP and the tumor temperature was found during HT in MFF anesthetized animals. With both anesthetics, the median temperature at the base of the tumor was about 0.8 deg. C higher during HT when the MAP was lowered to 60 mmHg by SNP. In animals without tumors, the temperature subcutaneously on the foot was 0

  4. Safety and Antihypertensive Effect of Selara® (Eplerenone: Results from a Postmarketing Surveillance in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prospective postmarketing surveillance of Selara (eplerenone, a selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, was performed to confirm its safety and efficacy for hypertension treatment in Japan. The change in blood pressure after initiation of eplerenone treatment was also examined. Patients with essential hypertension who were eplerenone-naïve were recruited regardless of the use of other antihypertensive drugs. For examination of changes in blood pressure, patients were excluded if eplerenone was contraindicated or used off-label. Patients received 50–100 mg of eplerenone once daily and were observed for 12 weeks. No treatments including antihypertensive drugs were restricted during the surveillance period. Across Japan, 3,166 patients were included for safety analysis. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 2.4%. The major adverse drug reactions observed were hyperkalemia (0.6%, dizziness, renal impairment, and increased serum potassium (0.2% each. The mean systolic blood pressure decreased from 152.1±19.0 mmHg to 134.8±15.2 mmHg at week 12, and the mean diastolic blood pressure decreased from 85.8±13.7 mmHg to 77.7±11.4 mmHg. There were no significant new findings regarding the type or incidence of adverse reactions, and eplerenone had a clinically significant antihypertensive effect, leading to favorable blood pressure control.

  5. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  6. NKT Cell Subsets Can Exert Opposing Effects in Autoimmunity, Tumor Surveillance and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, Rachael; Ware, Randle; Maricic, Igor; Chaturvedi, Varun; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    The innate-like natural killer T (NKT) cells are essential regulators of immunity. These cells comprise at least two distinct subsets and recognize different lipid antigens presented by the MHC class I like molecules CD1d. The CD1d-dependent recognition pathway of NKT cells is highly conserved from mouse to humans. While most type I NKT cells can recognize αGalCer and express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR), a major population of type II NKT cells reactive to sulfatide utilizes an oligoclonal TCR. Furthermore TCR recognition features of NKT subsets are also distinctive with almost parallel as opposed to perpendicular footprints on the CD1d molecules for the type I and type II NKT cells respectively. Here we present a view based upon the recent studies in different clinical and experimental settings that while type I NKT cells are more often pathogenic, they may also be regulatory. On the other hand, sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells mostly play an inhibitory role in the control of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Since the activity and cytokine secretion profiles of NKT cell subsets can be modulated differently by lipid ligands or their analogs, novel immunotherapeutic strategies are being developed for their differential activation for potential intervention in inflammatory diseases. PMID:25288922

  7. Effective teaming of airborne and ground assets for surveillance and interdiction

    OpenAIRE

    Muratore, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited As Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) become more prevalent on the battlefield, ground forces will have to increasingly rely on them for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR), as well as target marking, and overwatch operations. The Situational Awareness for Surveillance and Interdiction Operations (SASIO) simulation analysis tool uses Design of Experiments (DOX) to study of aspects of UAV surveillance characteristics in co...

  8. Combined cytotoxic effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha with various cytotoxic agents in tumor cell lines that are drug resistant due to mutated p53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleijfer, S; Le, T. K. P.; de Jong, S.; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Withoff, S; Mulder, NH

    Several studies suggest that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is able to overcome drug resistance in tumors. Whether TNF is able to do so in tumor cell lines that are drug resistant due to a mutation in the tumor suppressor gene p53 is unclear. Therefore, we studied the in vitro cytotoxic effects

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Mobile Ear Screening and Surveillance Service versus an Outreach Screening, Surveillance and Surgical Service for Indigenous Children in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim-Huong; Smith, Anthony C; Armfield, Nigel R; Bensink, Mark; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Indigenous Australians experience a high rate of ear disease and hearing loss, yet they have a lower rate of service access and utilisation compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. Screening, surveillance and timely access to specialist ear, nose and throat (ENT) services are key components in detecting and preventing the recurrence of ear diseases. To address the low access and utilisation rate by Indigenous Australians, a collaborative, community-based mobile telemedicine-enabled screening and surveillance (MTESS) service was trialled in Cherbourg, the third largest Indigenous community in Queensland, Australia. This paper aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the MTESS service using a lifetime Markov model that compares two options: (i) the Deadly Ears Program alone (current practice involving an outreach ENT surgical service and screening program), and (ii) the Deadly Ears Program supplemented with the MTESS service. Data were obtained from the Deadly Ears Program, a feasibility study of the MTESS service and the literature. Incremental cost-utility ratios were calculated from a societal perspective with both costs (in 2013-14 Australian dollars) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) discounted at 5% annually. The model showed that compared with the Deadly Ears Program, the probability of an acceptable cost-utility ratio at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY was 98% for the MTESS service. This cost effectiveness arises from preventing hearing loss in the Indigenous population and the subsequent reduction in associated costs. Deterministic and probability sensitivity analyses indicated that the model was robust to parameter changes. We concluded that the MTESS service is a cost-effective strategy. It presents an opportunity to resolve major issues confronting Australia's health system such as the inequitable provision and access to quality healthcare for rural and remotes communities, and for Indigenous Australians. Additionally, it may

  10. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Mobile Ear Screening and Surveillance Service versus an Outreach Screening, Surveillance and Surgical Service for Indigenous Children in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim-Huong; Smith, Anthony C.; Armfield, Nigel R.; Bensink, Mark; Scuffham, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Indigenous Australians experience a high rate of ear disease and hearing loss, yet they have a lower rate of service access and utilisation compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. Screening, surveillance and timely access to specialist ear, nose and throat (ENT) services are key components in detecting and preventing the recurrence of ear diseases. To address the low access and utilisation rate by Indigenous Australians, a collaborative, community-based mobile telemedicine-enabled screening and surveillance (MTESS) service was trialled in Cherbourg, the third largest Indigenous community in Queensland, Australia. This paper aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the MTESS service using a lifetime Markov model that compares two options: (i) the Deadly Ears Program alone (current practice involving an outreach ENT surgical service and screening program), and (ii) the Deadly Ears Program supplemented with the MTESS service. Data were obtained from the Deadly Ears Program, a feasibility study of the MTESS service and the literature. Incremental cost-utility ratios were calculated from a societal perspective with both costs (in 2013–14 Australian dollars) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) discounted at 5% annually. The model showed that compared with the Deadly Ears Program, the probability of an acceptable cost-utility ratio at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY was 98% for the MTESS service. This cost effectiveness arises from preventing hearing loss in the Indigenous population and the subsequent reduction in associated costs. Deterministic and probability sensitivity analyses indicated that the model was robust to parameter changes. We concluded that the MTESS service is a cost-effective strategy. It presents an opportunity to resolve major issues confronting Australia’s health system such as the inequitable provision and access to quality healthcare for rural and remotes communities, and for Indigenous Australians. Additionally, it

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Mobile Ear Screening and Surveillance Service versus an Outreach Screening, Surveillance and Surgical Service for Indigenous Children in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim-Huong Nguyen

    Full Text Available Indigenous Australians experience a high rate of ear disease and hearing loss, yet they have a lower rate of service access and utilisation compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. Screening, surveillance and timely access to specialist ear, nose and throat (ENT services are key components in detecting and preventing the recurrence of ear diseases. To address the low access and utilisation rate by Indigenous Australians, a collaborative, community-based mobile telemedicine-enabled screening and surveillance (MTESS service was trialled in Cherbourg, the third largest Indigenous community in Queensland, Australia. This paper aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the MTESS service using a lifetime Markov model that compares two options: (i the Deadly Ears Program alone (current practice involving an outreach ENT surgical service and screening program, and (ii the Deadly Ears Program supplemented with the MTESS service. Data were obtained from the Deadly Ears Program, a feasibility study of the MTESS service and the literature. Incremental cost-utility ratios were calculated from a societal perspective with both costs (in 2013-14 Australian dollars and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs discounted at 5% annually. The model showed that compared with the Deadly Ears Program, the probability of an acceptable cost-utility ratio at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY was 98% for the MTESS service. This cost effectiveness arises from preventing hearing loss in the Indigenous population and the subsequent reduction in associated costs. Deterministic and probability sensitivity analyses indicated that the model was robust to parameter changes. We concluded that the MTESS service is a cost-effective strategy. It presents an opportunity to resolve major issues confronting Australia's health system such as the inequitable provision and access to quality healthcare for rural and remotes communities, and for Indigenous Australians

  12. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam

  13. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-09-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam.

  14. Antitumor and immunomodulatory effects of salvigenin on tumor bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Shokoofe; Hassan, Zuhair M; Yaghmaei, Bahram; Dolatkhah, Milad

    2013-01-01

    Development of agents that specifically kill cancer cells and simultaneously elicit antitumor immune response is a step forward in cancer therapy. Immunostimulation can result in eliminating of the cancer cells; immunotherapy is a promising approach in balancing the immune response by Treg. In the present study, we investigated whether the administration of salvigenin contributes to the augmentation of antitumor immunity and the regression of tumor tissues in a mouse model of breast cancer. Salvigenin was purified from Tanacetum canescens, and its effect on the tumor volume was investigated. The splenocyte proliferation, shifting of cytokine profile, and the presence of naturally-occurring CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells were assessed to describe the anti-tumor immune response. Our results demonstrated that a significant decrease in the level of IL-4 and increase in the IFN-γ in the animals treated with salvigenin and significant decreased in the level of splenic CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. The cytotoxic and immunomodulatory properties of salvigenin were acknowledged in vivo. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Radiosensitizing effect of nitric oxide in tumor cells and experimental tumors irradiated with gamma rays and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policastro, Lucia L.; Duran, Hebe; Molinari, Beatriz L.; Somacal, Hector R.; Valda, Alejandro A.

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be a radiosensitizer of mammalian cells under hypoxic conditions. In a previous study, we demonstrated an enhancement in radiation response induced by NO in mouse tumor cells under aerobic conditions, with an increasing effect as a function of malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of NO in tumor cells and in experimental tumors irradiated with γ rays and proton beams. Irradiations were performed with a 137 Cs γ source and with proton beams generated by the TANDAR accelerator. Tumor cells were treated with the NO donor DETA-NO and the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was calculated using the α parameter of the survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model. Tumor cells irradiated with protons were radio sensitized by DETA-NO only in the more malignant cells irradiated with low LET protons (2.69±0.08 keV/μm). For higher LET protons there were no radiosensitizing effect. For human tumor cells pre-treated with DETA-NO and irradiated with γ rays, a significantly greater effect was demonstrated in the malignant cells (MCF-7) as compared with the near normal cells (HBL-100). Moreover, a significant decrease in tumor growth was demonstrated in mice pre-treated with the NO donor spermine and irradiated with γ rays and low LET protons as compared with mice irradiated without pre-treatment with the NO donor. In conclusion, we demonstrated a differential effect of NO as a radiosensitizer of malignant cells, both with γ rays and low LET protons. This selectivity, coupled to the in vivo inhibition of tumor growth, is of great interest for the potential use of NO releasing agents in radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Effect of irradiation on microviscosity of the cellular nuclear membrane of tumor and liver of tumor-carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tseva, E.L.; Goloshchapov, A.N.; Pal'mina, N.P.; Burlakova, E.B.

    1982-01-01

    Changes of microviscosity of the cellular nuclear membrane of tumor and liver of tumor-carriers with developing Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) at various terms after lethal irradiation (650 R) were studied by spin probe method. Two iminoxyl radicals localized mainly in lipid bilayer and near probein layers of membrane lipids were used. The character and the degree of microviscosity changes in different zones of nuclear membranes point to different responses towards effect of radiation of cells of tumor-carrier organ and tumor both in viscosity properties, and in change of lipid-protein relations. The significant contribution of near protein lipid layers into general change of nuclear membrane microviscosity is marked. Microviscosity of nuclear membrane causes different responses of cellular nuclear membranes of liver of tumor-carriers and healthy animals as well as considerable (3 times) dilution of nuclear membrane of EAT cells after irradiation. It is shown that temperature dependence of times of rotatory correlation of both probes is more expressed in EAT cells of irradiated tumor-carriers, than in liver

  17. Five-chlorodeoxycytidine, a tumor-selective enzyme-driven radiosensitizer, effectively controls five advanced human tumors in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Sheldon; Alvarez, Marcy; Mas, Marisol; Wozniak, Chandra; Arnold, David; Knapinska, Anna; Norris, Christina; Burk, Ronald; Aller, Alex; Dauphinee, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The study's goals were as follows: (1) to extend our past findings with rodent tumors to human tumors in nude mice, (2) to determine if the drug protocol could be simplified so that only CldC and one modulator, tetrahydrouridine (H 4 U), would be sufficient to obtain efficacy, (3) to determine the levels of deoxycytidine kinase and dCMP deaminase in human tumors, compared to adjacent normal tissue, and (4) to determine the effect of CldC on normal tissue radiation damage to the cervical spinal cord of nude mice. Methods and Materials: The five human tumors used were as follows: prostate tumors, PC-3 and H-1579; glioblastoma, SF-295; breast tumor, GI-101; and lung tumor, H-165. The duration of treatment was 3-5 weeks, with drugs administered on Days 1-4 and radiation on Days 3-5 of each week. The biomodulators of CldC were N-(Phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA), an inhibitor of aspartyl transcarbamoylase, 5-fluorodeoxycytidine (FdC), resulting in tumor-directed inhibition of thymidylate synthetase, and H 4 U, an inhibitor of cytidine deaminase. The total dose of focused irradiation of the tumors was usually 45 Gy in 12 fractions. Results: Marked radiosensitization was obtained with CldC and the three modulators. The average days in tumor regrowth delay for X-ray compared to drugs plus X-ray, respectively, were: PC-3 prostate, 42-97; H-1579 prostate, 29-115; glioblastoma, 5-51; breast, 50-80; lung, 32-123. Comparative studies with PC-3 and H-1579 using CldC coadministered with H 4 U, showed that both PALA and FdC are dispensable, and the protocol can be simplified with equal and possibly heightened efficacy. For example, PC-3 with X-ray and (1) no drugs, (2) CldC plus the three modulators, (3) a high dose of CldC, and (4) escalating doses of CldC resulted in 0/10, 3/9, 5/10, and 6/9 cures, respectively. The tumor regrowth delay data followed a similar pattern. After treating mice only 1((1)/(2)) weeks with CldC + H 4 U, 92% of the PC-3 tumor cells were found

  18. Effects of surveillance on the rule of law, due process and the presumption of innocence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galetta, Antonella; de Hert, Paul; Wright, D.; Kreissl, R.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the impact of surveillance on the rule of law, due process and the presumption of innocence, key values and principles of a democratic order. It illustrates how they are implemented and enforced in contemporary surveillance societies, while referring to European law and

  19. Cost-effectiveness of surveillance programs for families at high and moderate risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose Olsen, Kim; Bojesen, Stig E; Gerdes, Anne-Marie M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Surveillance programs are recommended to both families at high risk (Amsterdam-positive families with known- and unknown mutation) and moderate risk (families not fulfilling all Amsterdam criteria) of colorectal cancer (CRC). Cost-effectiveness has so far only been estimated...... to any surgical treatment. The risk of metachronous CRC is also modeled. RESULTS: Incremental costs per life year gained are estimated to be euro 980 when families at both high and moderate risk of HNPCC undergo surveillance (euro 508 for high risk and euro 1600 for moderate risk) and euro 1947 when...

  20. Method of hyperthermia and tumor size influence effectiveness of doxorubicin release from thermosensitive liposomes in experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Zengerle, Anja; Wachholz, Kirsten; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Koning, Gerben A; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H; Peller, Michael

    2016-01-28

    Systemic chemotherapy of solid tumors could be enhanced by local hyperthermia (HT) in combination with thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as drug carriers. In such an approach, effective HT of the tumor is considered essential for successful triggering local drug release and targeting of the drug to the tumor. To investigate the effect of HT method on the effectiveness of drug delivery, a novel laser-based HT device designed for the use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared systematically with the frequently used cold light lamp and water bath HT. Long circulating phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) with encapsulated doxorubicin (DOX) were used as drug carrier enabling intravascular drug release. Experiments were performed in male Brown Norway rats with a syngeneic soft tissue sarcoma (BN 175) located on both hind legs. One tumor was heated while the second tumor remained unheated as a reference. Six animals were investigated per HT method. DPPG2-TSL were injected i.v. at a stable tumor temperature above 40°C. Thereafter, temperature was maintained for 60min. Total DOX concentration in plasma, tumor tissue and muscle was determined post therapy by HPLC. Finally, the new laser-based device was tested in a MRI environment at 3T using DPPG2-TSL with encapsulated Gd-based contrast agent. All methods showed effective DOX delivery by TSL with 4.5-23.1ng/mg found in the heated tumors. In contrast, DOX concentration in the non-heated tumors was 0.5±0.1ng/mg. Independent of used HT methods, higher DOX levels were found in the smaller tumors. In comparison water bath induced lowest DOX delivery but still showing fourfold higher DOX concentrations compared to the non-heated tumors. With the laser-based applicator, a 13 fold higher DOX deposition was possible for large tumors and a 15 fold higher for the small tumors, respectively. Temperature gradients in the tumor tissue were higher with the laser and cold light lamp (-0.3°C/mm to -0.5°C/mm) compared to

  1. Combining surveillance systems: effective merging of U.S. Veteran and military health data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Pavlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA and Department of Defense (DoD had more than 18 million healthcare beneficiaries in 2011. Both Departments conduct individual surveillance for disease events and health threats. METHODS: We performed joint and separate analyses of VA and DoD outpatient visit data from October 2006 through September 2010 to demonstrate geographic and demographic coverage, timeliness of influenza epidemic awareness, and impact on spatial cluster detection achieved from a joint VA and DoD biosurveillance platform. RESULTS: Although VA coverage is greater, DoD visit volume is comparable or greater. Detection of outbreaks was better in DoD data for 58% and 75% of geographic areas surveyed for seasonal and pandemic influenza, respectively, and better in VA data for 34% and 15%. The VA system tended to alert earlier with a typical H3N2 seasonal influenza affecting older patients, and the DoD performed better during the H1N1 pandemic which affected younger patients more than normal influenza seasons. Retrospective analysis of known outbreaks demonstrated clustering evidence found in separate DoD and VA runs, which persisted with combined data sets. CONCLUSION: The analyses demonstrate two complementary surveillance systems with evident benefits for the national health picture. Relative timeliness of reporting could be improved in 92% of geographic areas with access to both systems, and more information provided in areas where only one type of facility exists. Combining DoD and VA data enhances geographic cluster detection capability without loss of sensitivity to events isolated in either population and has a manageable effect on customary alert rates.

  2. [Winter surveillance of cold exposure effects on health among the homeless population in the Paris area: data from the Coordinated Health Surveillance of Emergency Department network (Organisation de la surveillance coordonnée des urgences [Oscour(®)])].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouquette, A; Mandereau-Bruno, L; Baffert, E; Laaidi, K; Josseran, L; Isnard, H

    2011-12-01

    A program for helping homeless individuals in winter is implemented from November 1(st) to March 31(st) each year in France. Its aim is to prevent morbidity and mortality in this population during cold spells and periods of severe cold. A health surveillance system of the homeless population in the Paris area has been proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program and to alert decision-makers if an unusual increase in cold-weather effects is observed. The goal of this study was the creation of an indicator for the proposed surveillance system based on emergency department activity in the Paris area (Oscour(®) Network - Organisation de la surveillance coordonnée des urgences). The winter 2007-2008 computer medical files of 11 emergency departments in the Paris area were examined to confirm diagnosis and ascertain patient-homelessness for each patient visit which was selected from the Oscour(®) database by the patient chief-complaint or diagnosis code referring to hypothermia or frostbites. The proposed indicator is based on the maximization of three criteria: the positive predictive value, the proportion of people identified as being homeless and the number of emergency department visits. A Shewhart control chart was applied to the indicator for the four winters between 2005 and 2009 in the Paris area. Values beyond the statistical threshold would indicate a need for an adjustment to the program strategy. Two hundred and sixteen medical files were analyzed. An indicator was created, "number of emergency department visits of 15 to 69-years-old persons with chief-complaint or diagnosis code referring to hypothermia". It had a positive predictive value estimated near 85 % and identified 61.7 % people as being homeless. In the winter of 2008-2009, the statistical threshold was reached in December during the first cold spell, and again at the beginning of January during a period of severe cold. Our results support the use of this health indicator

  3. HCV tumor promoting effect is dependent on host genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naama Klopstock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the major risk factors for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Nevertheless, transgenic mice which express the whole HCV polyprotein (HCV-Tg do not develop HCC. Whereas chronic HCV infection causes inflammation in patients, in HCV-Tg mice, the host immune reaction against viral proteins is lacking. We aimed to test the role of HCV proteins in HCC development on the background of chronic inflammation in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We crossed HCV-Tg mice that do not develop HCC with the Mdr2-knockout (Mdr2-KO mice which develop inflammation-associated HCC, to generate Mdr2-KO/HCV-Tg mice. We studied the effect of the HCV transgene on tumor incidence, hepatocyte mitosis and apoptosis, and investigated the potential contributing factors for the generated phenotype by gene expression and protein analyses. The Mdr2-KO/HCV-Tg females from the N2 generation of this breeding (having 75% of the FVB/N genome and 25% of the C57BL/6 genome produced significantly larger tumors in comparison with Mdr2-KO mice. In parallel, the Mdr2-KO/HCV-Tg females had an enhanced inflammatory gene expression signature. However, in the N7 generation (having 99.2% of the FVB/N genome and 0.8% of the C57BL/6 genome there was no difference in tumor development between Mdr2-KO/HCV-Tg and Mdr2-KO animals of both sexes. The HCV transgene was similarly expressed in the livers of Mdr2-KO/HCV-Tg females of both generations, as revealed by detection of the HCV transcript and the core protein. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the HCV transgene accelerated inflammation-associated hepatocarcinogenesis in a host genetic background-dependent manner.

  4. Surveillance Pleasures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtslund, Anders

    and leisure have not been studied with the same intensity as e.g. policing, civil liberties and social sorting. This paper offers a study of trends in surveillance pleasures, i.e. watching and eavesdropping in popular culture. My focus is the existential aspects and ethical dilemmas of surveillance...

  5. Surveillance Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    What does it mean to live in a world full of surveillance? In this documentary film, we take a look at everyday life in Denmark and how surveillance technologies and practices influence our norms and social behaviour. Researched and directed by Btihaj Ajana and Anders Albrechtslund....

  6. The anti-tumor effect and biological activities of the extract JMM6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Juglans mandshurica Maxim is a traditional herbal medicines in China, and its anti-tumor bioactivities are of research interest. Bioassay-guided fractionation method was employed to isolate anti-tumor compounds from the stem barks of the Juglans mandshurica Maxim. The anti-tumor effect and biological activities of the ...

  7. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  8. [A Case of Malignant Phyllodes Tumor Effectively Treated by Radiation Therapy as a Palliative Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazuka, Tetsutaro; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kanada, Yoko; Tohnosu, Noriyuki; Yoshiwara, Chisato; Aruga, Takashi; Iwata, Kanae; Sasahara, Natsumi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaya; Otsuka, Ryota; Yanagihara, Akitoshi; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Maruyama, Takashi; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-11-01

    The current report presents the case of a 46-year-old woman with phyllodes tumor metastasis to the anterior chest wall treated by radiation therapy. Although the lesion was not controlled with surgery and chemotherapy, the tumor size markedly reduced after radiation therapy, and bleeding and foul odor from the tumor stopped. Radiation therapy for phyllodes tumor appears to be an effective treatment and should be recognized as one choice of palliative medicine.

  9. An investigation into the effect of surveillance drones on textile evidence at crime scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknell, Alistair; Bassindale, Tom

    2017-09-01

    With increasing numbers of Police forces using drones for crime scene surveillance, the effect of the drones on trace evidence present needs evaluation. In this investigation the effect of flying a quadcopter drone at different heights over a controlled scene and taking off at different distances from the scene were measured. Yarn was placed on a range of floor surfaces and the number lost or moved from their original position was recorded. It was possible to estimate "safe" distances above and take off distance from the bath mat (2m and 1m respectively), and carpet tile (3m and 1m) which were the roughest surfaces. The maximum distances tested of 5m above and 2m from was not far enough to prevent significant disturbance with the other floor surfaces. This report illustrates the importance of considering the impact of new technologies into a forensic workflow on established forensic evidence prior to implementation. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intradermal immunization with combined baculovirus and tumor cell lysate induces effective antitumor immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Mamoru; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Although tumor lysate contains all the potential helper and killer epitopes capable of stimulating T cells, it is difficult to use as a cancer vaccine because it suppresses dendritic cell (DC) function. We report that wild-type baculovirus possesses an adjuvant effect to improve the immunogenicity of tumor lysate. When mice were administered CT26 tumor cell lysate combined with baculovirus intradermally, antitumor immunity was induced and rejection of CT26 tumor growth was observed in 40% of the immunized mice. In contrast, such antitumor immunity was not elicited in mice inoculated with tumor cell lysate or baculovirus alone. In tumor-bearing mice, which had previously received the combined baculovirus and tumor lysate vaccine, the established tumors were completely eradicated by administering a booster dose of the combined vaccine. This antitumor effect was attributed to tumor-specific T cell immunity mediated primarily by CD8⁺ T cells. Baculovirus also strongly activated DCs loaded with tumor lysate. Increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12p70 production were also observed in DCs co-cultured with tumor cell lysate and baculovirus. Our study demonstrates that combined baculovirus and tumor lysate vaccine can effectively stimulate DCs to induce acquired antitumor immunity.

  11. Enhanced tumor localization and retention of chlorin e6 in cationic nanolipoplexes potentiate the tumor ablation effects of photodynamic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Gayong; Lee, Sangbin; Kim, Chan-Wha [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Bong [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yu-Kyoung, E-mail: ohyk@snu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-07

    Here we report the tumor ablation effects of the negatively charged photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) in nanocomplexes. Ce6 was complexed to cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine-based liposomes, forming cationic nanolipoplexes. The loading efficiency of Ce6 to cationic nanolipoplexes was greater than 90%. The degree of enhancement of cellular uptake of Ce6 by treatment in cationic nanolipoplexes increased with the concentration of Ce6, showing 18.3-fold higher uptake than free Ce6 at 15 {mu}M. Molecular imaging revealed the preferential distribution and retention of Ce6 in SCC7 tumor tissues after intravenous administration of Ce6 in cationic nanolipoplexes. Moreover, localized illumination of mice receiving Ce6 in cationic nanolipoplexes resulted in the formation of thick scabs over tumor regions, and complete ablation of tumors after scab detachment. In contrast, continuous growth of tumors was observed in the group treated with free Ce6. Our results suggest that the cationic nanolipoplexes of Ce6 improve the therapeutic effects of photodynamic cancer therapy as compared to free Ce6.

  12. Adverse effect after external radiotherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Takano, Shingo; Yanaka, Kiyoyuki

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the effects on normal brain tissue of radiotherapy in relation to age and irradiation dose as determined from whole-brain sections of the autopsied brains with tumors. Twenty four patients (7 glioblastomas, 2 benign gliomas, 12 brain metastases, 2 malignant lymphomas, and 1 pituitary adenoma) older than 65 years (aged), and 17 younger than 65 years (non-aged) were treated by cobalt- or linear accelerator radiotherapy. Nine patients without brain disease (4 aged and 5 non-aged) were used as a control group. The histological findings were evaluated by grading the small and capillary vessels, fibrinoid necrosis, and myelination in the white matter in whole-brain sections. Those findings were compared to the irradiation doses within all radiation fields in whole-brain sections corresponding to CT scans. Hyalinization of the small vessels was observed within the postradiation 12 months in fields exposed to total doses of less than 800 neuret. Hyalinization of the capillary vessels was greater in the irradiated group than in the control group. Demyelination was observed within the postradiation 12 months in fields irradiated by more than 800 neuret in aged patients and in fields irradiated by less than 800 neuret in non-aged patients. Fibrinoid necrosis was observed after the post-radiation 12 months in fields irradiated by less than 800 neuret in aged patients and in fields irradiated by more than 800 neuret in non-aged patients. It is worth noting that in non-aged patients with brain tumors, adverse effects of radiotherapy on vessels and parenchyma were very high even in low-dose radiation areas; and in aged patients fibrinoid necrosis, which indicates irreversible damage of vessels, was observed in low-dose radiation areas. (author)

  13. Effective genetic vaccination with a widely shared endogenous retroviral tumor antigen requires CD40 stimulation during tumor rejection phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Cingarlini, Sara; Apolloni, Elisa; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; De Santo, Carmela; Macino, Beatrice; Marin, Oriano; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-12-15

    Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) products are recognized by T lymphocytes in mice and humans. As these Ags are preferentially expressed by neoplastic tissues, they might represent an ideal target for active immunization by genetic vaccination. However, i.m. inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding mouse gp70 or p15E, two products of the env gene of an endogenous murine leukemia virus, elicited a weak Ag-specific T lymphocyte response and resulted in partial protection from challenge with mouse tumors possessing these Ags. Depletion experiments showed that CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T lymphocytes were crucial for the antitumor activity of the vaccines. Systemic administration of agonistic anti-CD40 mAb increased the therapeutic potential of genetic vaccination, but only when given during the tumor rejection phase and not at the time of immunization. This effect correlated with a dramatic increase in the number of ERV-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Adjuvant activity of CD40 agonists thus seems to be relevant to enhance the CD8(+) T cell-dependent response in tumor-bearing hosts, suggesting that sustaining tumor-specific T lymphocyte survival in subjects undergoing vaccination might be a key event in the successful vaccination with weak tumor Ags.

  14. Efficacy and biological effects of techniques used to induce hypoxia in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.; Moulder, J.E.; Martin, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    The authors tested several aspects of the assumptions using BA1112 rat rhabdomyosacromas and EMT6 mouse mammary tumors. Both techniques were effective in producing hypoxia: survival curves for tumors made hypoxic by the 2 techniques were the same, and were indistinguishable from survival curves for hypoxic tumor cells in vitro. Induction of hypoxia for the 30-60 min necessary for irradiation did not alter the yield or clonogenicity of cells suspended from the tumors. Longer clamping was cytotoxic. Clamping did not alter tumor growth unless a major blood vessel was injured. However, clamping BA1112 tumors for 30 min and removing the clamp just before irradiation altered the tumor cell survival curve and TCD/sub 50/. Anesthesia or restrain, often used during clamping, can have major effects

  15. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of transarterial pulsed perfusion with heated saline on tumor vascular permeability in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Wei; Li Jinghua; Feng Dayun; Wan Yi; Liu Yufeng; Yang Qingfeng; Cheng Jianwei; Zhao Siyuan; Zhang Hongxin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline on vascular permeability of tumor tissue, as well as its hepatic and renal toxicity, in a rabbit VX2 liver model. Materials and methods: VX2 carcinomas were grown in rabbit livers, forty male New Zealand white tumor-bearing rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, followed by transarterial perfusion with 37 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (control 1 group), transarterial pulsed perfusion with 37 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (control 2 group), transarterial continuous perfusion with 60 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (TCP group), transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (TPP group), the duration of time for tumor tissues in the range 43–45 °C of the treated groups was measured with needle thermometer during perfusion. Vascular permeability was assessed using the extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye in the tumor or normal liver tissues of the four groups separately, the tumor or normal liver tissues of the four groups were estimated by histopathologic examination, and hepatic and renal toxicity was evaluated by means of blood biochemical analysis. The vascular endothelial cells in the tumor were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: The duration of time for tumor tissues in the range 43–45 °C of TPP group showed significantly longer than that of TCP group (12.3 ± 3.3 min vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 min) (P 0.05), and there was no significant difference in the serum BUN, Cr levels among the four groups at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h after perfusion. Observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in liver tissue and tumor tissue. TEM indicating the endothelial cell gap was broadened and the endothelial cells’ microvillus was decreased after heated perfusion. Conclusions: The vascular permeability of the rabbit VX2 tumor was significantly increased after transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline without

  17. Effect of certain variables on the tumor and tissue distribution of tracers. Salicylates and vasoactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.; Stern, P.; Gordon, R.; Dabbs, J.

    1981-01-01

    Attempts were made to increase the viable tumor concentration of 54Mn and 67Ga in a rat hepatoma model by administering rat angiotensin, tolazoline, and salicylates. Salicylates increased the tumor concentrations of 54Mn and improved 65Mn viable tumor/background ratios. 67Ga was not affected by the salicylates. The salicylate effect appeared to be mediated by intracellular mechanisms rather than alterations in plasma protein binding. Rat angiotensin slightly increased the concentrations of 67Ga in the tumors but not enough to suggest that it would be useful clinically. Tolazoline did not increase tumor uptake of the tracers

  18. Effect of administration route on FES uptake into MCF-7 tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downer, Joanna B.; Jones, Lynne A.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Welch, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    We have observed that intraperitoneal administration of [ 18 F]fluoroestradiol (FES), a radiolabeled estrogen receptor ligand, results in higher abdominal organ uptake and slower blood clearance than intravenous administration in female mice. In SCID mice bearing MCF-7 human tumors SC, IP administration resulted in tumor uptake that was only about one third that obtained with IV administration. Thus, the route of administration of a radiopharmaceutical for imaging or radiotherapy of a tumor in the abdomen, an ovarian tumor, for example, could have a profound effect on the efficiency and selectivity of delivery of the agent to the tumor

  19. Effect of anemia on tumor radiosensitivity under normo and hyperbaric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.; Smith, K.A.; Soranson, J.A.; Randhawa, V.S.; Stratford, M.R.; Denekamp, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of chronic anemia on tumor radiosensitivity in a murine tumor has been investigated. Anemia was induced by bilateral kidney irradiation given several months before tumor implantation. Anemic, anemic transfused, and normal non-anemic age-matched tumor bearing animals were irradiated with X rays (2 F/24 hr) either in air, air plus misonidazole, or under hyperbaric oxygen. The most resistant response was that of tumors grown in normal mice treated in air. Anemia produced an increase in radiosensitivity which was further enhanced by red blood cell replacement. The most sensitive overall response was seen in the anemic-transfused group treated with HBO

  20. Anti-tumor effect of total body irradiation of low doses on WHT/Ht mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Miyako; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1987-01-01

    The effect of low dose (0.05 - 1.0 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) on non-tumor bearing and tumor bearing mice were investigated. Mice received TBI of 0.1 Gy during 6 - 12 hours before tumor cell inoculation demonstrated to need larger number of tumor cells (approximately 2.5 times) for 50 per cent tumor incidence, compared to recipient mice not to receive TBI. On the other hand, in tumor bearing mice given 0.1 Gy of TBI only tumor cell killing effect was not detected, however enhancement of tumor cell killing effect and prolonged growth delay were observed when tumor bearing mice were treated with 0.1 Gy of TBI in combined with local irradiation on tumors, especially cell killing effect was remarkable in dose range over 6 Gy of local exposure. The mechanism of the effect of 0.1 Gy TBI is considered to be host mediated reactions from the other our experimental results. (author)

  1. Effects of oxygen on the metabolism of murine tumors using in-vivo P-31 NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunieff, P.; Willett, C.; Suit, H.D.; McFarland, E.; Neuringer, L.; Hitzig, B.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of 100% inspired oxygen on in vivo tumor metabolism was examined using /sup 31p/. Isotransplants of murine tumors, MCaIV (mammary adenocarcinoma) and FSaII, (fibrosarcoma), were used. Tumor volumes ranged from 30 to 1800 mm/sup 3/. Both tumors have a high hypoxic cell fraction at >250mm/sup 3/. NMR spectra were obtained using a narrow bore superconducting magnet operating at 145.587 MHz for Phosphorus-31. Tumors were implanted in the hind food dorsum to assure all detected mobile phosphates were of tumor origin. PCr/Pi ratios of tumors >250mm/sup 3/ were reduced compared with tumors <250mm/sup 3/ of the same histology. Response to 100% inspired oxygen was greater for large tumors, and for tumors with lower baseline PCr/Pi ratios. Respiration of 10% oxygen increased Pi and decreased PCr and ATP. The response to 10% oxygen was observed in both large and small tumors of both histologies. The fractional increase in PCr/Pi ratio after 100% oxygen breathing appears to be a non-invasive method of detecting tumor hypoxia

  2. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  3. Effect of skin tumor properties on laser penetration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, AE

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available into the skin. Comparison between the healthy dermis and the skin tumors indicated that up to 28 % more laser light is absorbed in the healthy dermis than in the tumor tissue. This has implications on the laser dose applied to the skin for treatment....

  4. T lymphocytes derived from human cord blood provide effective antitumor immunotherapy against a human tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Tae-Sik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the graft-versus-tumor (GVT effect of donor-derived T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an effective adoptive immunotherapy, the antitumor effects of cord blood (CB transplantation have not been well studied. Methods We established the animal model by transplantation of CB mononuclear cells and/or tumor cells into NOD/SCID mice. The presence of CB derived T cells in NOD/SCID mice or tumor tissues were determined by flow cytometric and immunohistochemical analysis. The anti-tumor effects of CB derived T cells against tumor was determined by tumor size and weight, and by the cytotoxicity assay and ELISPOT assay of T cells. Results We found dramatic tumor remission following transfer of CB mononuclear cells into NOD/SCID mice with human cervical tumors with a high infiltration of CD3+ T cells in tumors. NOD/SCID mice that receive neonatal CB transplants have reconstituted T cells with significant antitumor effects against human cervical and lung tumors, with a high infiltration of CD3+ T cells showing dramatic induction of apoptotic cell death. We also confirmed that T cells showed tumor specific antigen cytotoxicity in vitro. In adoptive transfer of CD3+ T cells into mice with pre-established tumors, we observed much higher antitumor effects of HPV-specific T cells by ELISPOT assays. Conclusions Our results show that CB derived T lymphocytes will be useful for novel immunotherapeutic candidate cells for therapy of several tumors in clinic.

  5. Improving the Effect and Efficiency of FMD Control by Enlarging Protection or Surveillance Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Toft, Nils; Boklund, Anette

    2015-01-01

    An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in a FMD-free country with large exports of livestock and livestock products would result in profound economic damage. This could be reduced by rapid and efficient control of the disease spread. The objectives of this study were to estimate the economic....... The stochastic spatial simulation model DTU-DADS was used to simulate the spread of FMD in Denmark. The control strategies were the basic EU and Danish strategy, pre-emptive depopulation, suppressive or protective vaccination, enlarging protection or surveillance zones, and a combination of pre......-emptive depopulation or emergency vaccination with enlarged protection or surveillance zones. Herds are detected either based on basic detection through the appearance of clinical signs, or as a result of surveillance in the control zones. The economic analyses consisted of direct costs and export losses. Sensitivity...

  6. Effect of magnetic field on oxygen pressure, radiosensitivity and growth of some experimental tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, B.N.; Kauashev, S.K.

    The effect of variation of partial oxygen pressure in liquid media and directly in living tumors was investigated to determine the effect of a permanent magnetic field on these changes. Partial oxygen pressure increases significantly in Pliss lymphosarcoma and RS-1 tumors when exposed to a magnetic field and decreases after the magnetic field is removed. The variation of partial oxygen pressure is similar in Walker carcinosarcoma, but is different for living and killed rats. The growth rate of tumors decreases appreciably after each session of combination magnetic and radiation effects with an increase of partial oxygen pressure in magnetized tumors. Periodic one-hour magnetic exposure preceding irradiation causes a marked zigzag growth of tumors, while 5- and 30- minute exposure to a permanent magnetic field has essentially no effect on tumor growth.

  7. Although Abundant in Tumor Tissue, Mast Cells Have No Effect on Immunological Micro-milieu or Growth of HPV-Induced or Transplanted Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanawaz Mohammed Ghouse

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: High numbers of mast cells populate the stroma of many types of neoplasms, including human papilloma virus-induced benign and malignant tumors in man and mouse. Equipped with numerous pattern recognition receptors and capable of executing important pro-inflammatory responses, mast cells are considered innate sentinels that significantly impact tumor biology. Mast cells were reported to promote human papilloma virus (HPV-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and neo-angiogenesis in an HPV-driven mouse model of skin cancer. We analyzed HPV-induced epithelial hyperplasia and squamous cell carcinoma formation, as well as growth of tumors inoculated into the dermis, in mice lacking skin mast cells. Unexpectedly, the absence of mast cells had no effect on HPV-induced epithelial growth or angiogenesis, on growth kinetics of inoculated tumors, or on the immunological tumor micro-milieu. Thus, the conspicuous recruitment of mast cells into tumor tissues cannot necessarily be equated with important mast cell functions in tumor growth. : Mast cells accumulate in high numbers in many human tumors, and they are widely viewed as important promoters of tumor growth. Ghouse et al. show that growth, angiogenesis, and the immunological micro-milieu of tumors growing in mice genetically deficient for mast cells are unchanged compared to control tumors. Keywords: mast cells, HPV-induced skin cancer, tumor angiogenesis, tumor micro-milieu

  8. Epidemiological surveillance - air and health. Surveillance of effects on health linked to air pollution in urban area; Surveillance epidemiologique - air et sante. Surveillance des effets sur la sante lies a la pollution atmospherique en milieu urbain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In order to quantify the short term relationship between the air pollution and its effects on health and to monitor its evolution, the Institute of Sanitary Watch, with the help of the Department of development and environment and the Department in charge of health, has realised a study in eight towns: Bordeaux, Le Havre, Lille, Lyon, Marseille, Rouen, Strasbourg and Toulouse. These towns have been chosen for the contrasted character of their sources, of their pollution levels and their geo climatic conditions. Paris contributes to the study with the E.R.P.U.R.S results. (N.C.)

  9. In vivo tumor targeting and anti-tumor effects of 5-fluororacil loaded, folic acid targeted quantum dot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwatanglang, Ibrahim Birma; Mohammad, Faruq; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Jaafar; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Hussein, Mohd Zubir; Abu, Nadiah; Mohammed, Nurul Elyani; Nordin, Noraini; Zamberi, Nur Rizi; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we modulated the anti-cancer efficacy of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) using a carrier system with enhanced targeting efficacy towards folate receptors (FRs) expressing malignant tissues. The 5-FU drug was loaded onto Mn-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) encapsulated with chitosan (CS) biopolymer and conjugated with folic acid (FA) based on a simple wet chemical method. The formation of 5-FU drug loaded composite was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore, the in vivo biodistribution and tumor targeting specificity of the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS in the tumor-bearing mice was conducted based on the Zn(2+) tissue bioaccumulation using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy. In addition to the characterization, the in vitro release profile of 5-FU from the conjugates investigated under diffusion controlled method demonstrated a controlled release behaviour as compared against the release behaviour of free 5-FU drug. The as-synthesized 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS nanoparticle (NP) systemically induced higher level of apoptosis in breast cancer cells in vitro as compared to cells treated with free 5-FU drug following both cell cycle and annexin assays, respectively. Also, the in vivo toxicity assessment of the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS NPs as compared to the control did not cause any significant increase in the activities of the liver and kidney function biomarkers, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels. However, based on the FA-FRs chemistry, the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS NPs specifically accumulated in the tumor of the tumor-bearing mice and thus contributed to the smaller tumor size and less event of metastasis was observed in the lungs when compared to the tumor-bearing mice groups treated with the free 5-FU drug. In summary, the results demonstrated that the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS QDs exhibits selective anti-tumor effect in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells in vitro and 4TI breast

  10. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lopes Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME. In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME.

  11. Oxygen consumption can regulate the growth of tumors, a new perspective on the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijun; Cairns, Rob; Papandreou, Ioanna; Koong, Albert; Denko, Nicholas C

    2009-09-15

    The unique metabolism of tumors was described many years ago by Otto Warburg, who identified tumor cells with increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial activity. However, "aerobic glycolysis" generates fewer ATP per glucose molecule than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, so in terms of energy production, it is unclear how increasing a less efficient process provides tumors with a growth advantage. We carried out a screen for loss of genetic elements in pancreatic tumor cells that accelerated their growth as tumors, and identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein L28 (MRPL28). Knockdown of MRPL28 in these cells decreased mitochondrial activity, and increased glycolysis, but paradoxically, decreased cellular growth in vitro. Following Warburg's observations, this mutation causes decreased mitochondrial function, compensatory increase in glycolysis and accelerated growth in vivo. Likewise, knockdown of either mitochondrial ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) or cytochrome oxidase had a similar effect. Conversely, expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) increased oxygen consumption and decreased tumor growth. Finally, treatment of tumor bearing animals with dichloroacetate (DCA) increased pyruvate consumption in the mitochondria, increased total oxygen consumption, increased tumor hypoxia and slowed tumor growth. We interpret these findings to show that non-oncogenic genetic changes that alter mitochondrial metabolism can regulate tumor growth through modulation of the consumption of oxygen, which appears to be a rate limiting substrate for tumor proliferation.

  12. Oxygen consumption can regulate the growth of tumors, a new perspective on the Warburg effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chen

    Full Text Available The unique metabolism of tumors was described many years ago by Otto Warburg, who identified tumor cells with increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial activity. However, "aerobic glycolysis" generates fewer ATP per glucose molecule than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, so in terms of energy production, it is unclear how increasing a less efficient process provides tumors with a growth advantage.We carried out a screen for loss of genetic elements in pancreatic tumor cells that accelerated their growth as tumors, and identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein L28 (MRPL28. Knockdown of MRPL28 in these cells decreased mitochondrial activity, and increased glycolysis, but paradoxically, decreased cellular growth in vitro. Following Warburg's observations, this mutation causes decreased mitochondrial function, compensatory increase in glycolysis and accelerated growth in vivo. Likewise, knockdown of either mitochondrial ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12 or cytochrome oxidase had a similar effect. Conversely, expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 increased oxygen consumption and decreased tumor growth. Finally, treatment of tumor bearing animals with dichloroacetate (DCA increased pyruvate consumption in the mitochondria, increased total oxygen consumption, increased tumor hypoxia and slowed tumor growth.We interpret these findings to show that non-oncogenic genetic changes that alter mitochondrial metabolism can regulate tumor growth through modulation of the consumption of oxygen, which appears to be a rate limiting substrate for tumor proliferation.

  13. The relative effectiveness of testers during field surveillance for bovine tuberculosis in unrestricted low-risk herds in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, T A; Duignan, A; More, S J

    2015-04-01

    In Ireland, new bovine tuberculosis (bTB) cases are detected using both field and abattoir surveillance. Field surveillance is conducted on all cattle annually using the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test (SICTT). Testing is reliant on the skills and experience of the tester and a broad range of factors may adversely affect test accuracy. There is considerable emphasis on quality control (QC) within the national programme and field inspection of testers has been conducted in Ireland for many years. Since 2008, inspection has been supplemented with quantitative performance reports, enabling testers to be evaluated and ranked using a range of performance indicators. The objectives of this study were first, to quantify the relative effectiveness of testers during field surveillance and, second, to assess whether there has been any change in the performance of testers between 2008 and 2011. Mixed logistic regression was used to assess the relative effectiveness of testers. The study population included all testers who carried out at least ten eligible tests in Ireland during 2008 or 2011. The outcome measure was a herd restriction at the eligible test. Results from the mixed model indicated that the variation by tester had significantly (p=0.039) decreased from 0.589 in 2008 to 0.426 in 2011, indicating an increase in consistency of testing, after accounting for other known risk factors. This study provides objective data on the variation in tester performance over time and the relative performance of testers during field surveillance in Ireland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kast, Martin

    2004-01-01

    .... This AA induced autoimmune-like response exerts limited anti-tumor activity in a murine prostate cancer model, but could be synergistic with CTLA-4 blockade that promotes the development of autoreactive T cell...

  15. Different ways to improve the clinical effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, Jean-Francois; Davodeau, Francois; Cherel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been proven effective in the treatment of radiosensitive non-Hodgkin lymphoma but, for radioresistant solid tumors, new approaches are necessary to improve the clinical effectiveness. A real improvement has been the introduction of the pretargeting technology which appeared to be able to significantly increase tumor-to-normal organ uptake ratios.Another very promising approach consists in associating RIT with other treatment modalities. Finally the use of alpha particle-emitting radionuclides such as astatin-211 or bismuth-213 (alpha-RIT) should allow to efficiently eradicate disseminated microscopic clusters of tumor cells or isolated tumor cells which fit well with the short path length of alpha particles.

  16. Effects of Low Intensity Continuous Ultrasound (LICU on Mouse Pancreatic Tumor Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Bazou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effects of low intensity continuous ultrasound (LICU on the inflammatory response of mouse pancreatic tumor explants. While there are many reports focusing on the application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS on cell cultures and tissues, the effects of continuous oscillations on biological tissues have never been investigated. Here we present an exploratory study of the effects induced by LICU on mouse pancreatic tumor explants. We show that LICU causes significant upregulation of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α on tumor explants. No detectable effects were observed on tumor vasculature or collagen I deposition, while thermal and mechanical effects were not apparent. Tumor explants responded as a single unit to acoustic waves, with spatial pressure variations smaller than their size.

  17. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha infusion on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Whereas TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce...

  18. Are We Digital Masters Or Captives? A Critical Evaluation Of Panoptic Versus Synoptic Effect Of Surveillance In Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Öngün

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The era we are living in is the one where we are exposed to a massive attraction of social connectivity based widely on digital forms of media. The most common one of them is social media. Social media exposes us to a kind of virtual Panopticon where ‘the few’ watch ‘the many’ in architecture of surveillance. Another term related to surveillance is Synopticon, a system where ‘the many’ watch ‘the few’ in the “Viewer Society”.  In the light of the related literature of theory and practice in the area, the study aims at viewing social media tools and its users from a critical perspective in a descriptive manner. To be able to do this, the study develops a set of hypothetical questions whose answers are instrumented to find out whether there is truly such a thing as “Virtual Panopticon” or “Synopticon” and if so, to what extent and how the Panoptic versus Synoptic effect of social media are felt among its users in various applications in light of media and communication. Facebook, based on the current theoretical knowledge within the field of surveillance can be given as an example. The study concludes with an overview of both assumptions with further reflections and contemplations of the readers of the study, who implicitly or explicitly could also be the actors of social media as masters or captives.

  19. Laser tumor thermotherapy: Is there a clinically relevant effect on the immune system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranberg, Karl-G.

    2006-02-01

    Laser thermotherapy is interesting from an immunological point of view since it can reduce tumor volume without causing immunosuppression at the same time as it may induce and/or enhance tumor immunity. In a rat liver tumor model, we have demonstrated that laser thermotherapy 1) is superior to surgical resection, 2) gives a strong rejection immunity associated with an immune cellular response of tumor-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes, 3) results in pronounced suppression of the growth of a simultaneous untreated tumor (distant bystander effect), 4) produces an increased anti-tumor lymphocyte proliferative response in tumor-draining and systemic lymph nodes and spleen, and 5) results in increased HSP70 immunoreactivity in tumors and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. Thus, the evidence for a laser-induced immunologic effect in tumor-bearing rats is strong. Some observations suggest that laser thermotherapy may be used for inducing favorable immunologic effects also in patients. Thus, we have shown a laser-induced bystander effect in a patient with malignant melanoma. In patients with breast cancer we have shown that laser thermotherapy induces intratumoral infiltration of immunocompetent cells like CD68 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes. Laser thermotherapy is likely to be beneficial mainly when tumor burden is small, that is, when treatment is performed with curative intent, either with laser alone or together with surgical resection. For optimal effect, it appears likely that thermotherapy should be combined with other therapies. Most likely, a clinically meaningful effect can only be proven in prospective randomized studies comparing thermotherapy with other methods, particularly surgical resection.

  20. The Effects of Radiation and Dose-Fractionation on Cancer and Non-Tumor Disease Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle E. Woloschak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Janus series of radiation experiments, conducted from 1970 to 1992, explored the effects of gamma and neutron radiation on animal lifespan and disease development. Data from these experiments presents an opportunity to conduct a large scale analysis of both tumor and non-tumor disease development. This work was focused on a subset of animals from the Janus series of experiments, comparing acute or fractionated exposures of gamma or neutron radiation on the hazards associated with the development of tumor and non-tumor diseases of the liver, lung, kidney or vascular system. This study also examines how the co-occurrence of non-tumor diseases may affect tumor-associated hazards. While exposure to radiation increases the hazard of dying with tumor and non-tumor diseases, dose fractionation modulates these hazards, which varies across different organ systems. Finally, the effect that concurrent non-cancer diseases have on the hazard of dying with a tumor also differs by organ system. These results highlight the complexity in the effects of radiation on the liver, lung, kidney and vascular system.

  1. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. - Highlights: • Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells. • Oroxin B significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice.

  2. Brain tumor radiosurgery. Current status and strategies to enhance the effect of radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niranjan, A.; Lunsford, L.D.; Gobbel, G.T.; Kondziolka, D.; Maitz, A.; Flickinger, J.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    First, the current status of brain tumor radiosurgery is reviewed, and radiosurgery for brain tumors, including benign tumors, malignant tumors, primary glial tumors, and metastatic tumors, is described. Rapid developments in neuroimaging, stereotactic techniques, and robotic technology in the last decade have contributed to improved results and wider applications of radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has become the preferred management modality for many intracranial tumors, including schwannomas, meningiomas, and metastatic tumors. Although radiosurgery provides survival benefits in patients with diffuse malignant brain tumors, cure is still not possible. Microscopic tumor infiltration into surrounding normal tissue is the main cause of recurrence. Additional strategies are needed to specifically target tumor cells. Next, strategies to enhance the effect of radiosurgery are reviewed. Whereas the long-term clinical results of radiosurgery have established its role in the treatment of benign tumors, additional strategies are needed to improve cell killing in malignant brain tumors and to protect normal surrounding brain. The first strategy included the use of various agents to protect normal brain while delivering a high dose to the tumor cells, but finding an effective radioprotective agent has been problematic. Pentobarbital and 21-aminosteroid (21-AS) are presented as examples. The second strategy for radiation protection aimed at the repair of radiation-induced damage to the normal brain. The cause of radiation-induced breakdown of normal tissue is unclear. The white matter and the cerebral vasculature appear to be particularly susceptible to radiation. Oligodendrocytes and endothelial cells may be critical targets of radiation. The authors hypothesize that radiation-induced damage to these cell types can be repaired by neural stem cells. They also describe the use of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and neural stem cells as a means of enhancing the effect of

  3. Effect of hyperthermia on blood flow in VX2 tumor transplanted in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, Takeshi

    1994-01-01

    Effect of hyperthermia on blood flow was evaluated using VX 2 rabbit carcinoma in both legs. Microwave energy at 2450 MHz was used to heat tumors for 40 minutes. An outer canula of 18 G Erasta was implanted in the depth of 2 cm in tumor to measure the temperature and to maintain at 43.0degC-44.0degC. The blood flow in tumors was evaluated by color doppler flow imaging and dynamic MRI. Disturbance of blood flow in the depth of surface 0 cm to 2 cm in tumors was showed at 10 minutes starting 43.0degC heating and at almost all sites disappearance of blood flow was showed at 40 minutes using color doppler flow imaging. But the blood flow beyond the depth of 2 cm was not so disturbed at 40 minutes, relatively. After hyperthermia T1WI and T2WI in heated tumor were no difference comparing with those in control tumor, but heated tumor showed no enhancement using dynamic MRI with TURBO-FLASH technique and post-enhanced T1WI. Histologically, there was extensive tumor necrosis and thrombus formation in heated tumor after 3 days and 1 week. Therefore color doppler flow imaging and dynamic MRI were considered to be useful for evaluation of blood flow in tumor after and during hyperthermia. (author)

  4. Effectiveness of community participation in a surveillance system initiative to prevent drowning in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansiritaweesook, Getsara; Muangsom, Niramon; Kanato, Manop; Ratanasiri, Amornrat

    2015-03-01

    This study had a 2-group pre-post quasiexperimental design and was conducted in 2 selected areas of Ubon Ratchathani province, Thailand. The objective was to evaluate the extent to which the surveillance system that was developed helped in drowning prevention. The development process involved extensive participation from the community. System efficiency was evaluated, and the drowning rates were compared. The system demonstrated 82.8% system sensitivity and 87% positive-predictive value. There were 90.0% rescues with no injury during the study period. The relative risk of drowning injury suggests that the control area was at 5.6 times more at risk for drowning injury than the intervention area (95% CI = 1.58, 20.12). Local knowledge and participation from the community were found to be key issues in the success of the surveillance system, and such systems can be applied to other areas with similar problems. © 2013 APJPH.

  5. Aiding surveillance

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    arashid

    generator in itself.4 Yet surveillance unconstrained by legal frameworks, human rights protections, and the rule of law has the ... Analysis of the potential adverse implications of using personal information is often completely ..... acknowledge the potential of new information technologies to strengthen electoral processes,.

  6. Combining Surveillance Systems: Effective Merging of U.S. Veteran and Military Health Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-04

    was classified similarly as moderately severe by the CDC [8]; however, the burden of morbidity was unusually high among children and young adults [9...among young adults , the delays are more clearly skewed towards earlier alerting within the DoD system. Combined Veteran and Military Health Surveillance...data from October 2006 through September 2010 to demonstrate geographic and demographic coverage, timeliness of influenza epidemic awareness, and impact

  7. Multicolor microRNA FISH effectively differentiates tumor types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Masry, Paul A.; McGeary, Sean E.; Miller, Jason B.; Hafner, Markus; Li, Zhen; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Morozov, Pavel; Brown, Miguel; Gogakos, Tasos; Mobin, Mehrpouya B.; Snorrason, Einar L.; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Zhang, Xiao; Perlis, Clifford S.; Wu, Hong; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Feng, Huichen; Shuda, Masahiro; Moore, Patrick S.; Tron, Victor A.; Chang, Yuan; Tuschl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are excellent tumor biomarkers because of their cell-type specificity and abundance. However, many miRNA detection methods, such as real-time PCR, obliterate valuable visuospatial information in tissue samples. To enable miRNA visualization in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, we developed multicolor miRNA FISH. As a proof of concept, we used this method to differentiate two skin tumors, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), with overlapping histologic features but distinct cellular origins. Using sequencing-based miRNA profiling and discriminant analysis, we identified the tumor-specific miRNAs miR-205 and miR-375 in BCC and MCC, respectively. We addressed three major shortcomings in miRNA FISH, identifying optimal conditions for miRNA fixation and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) retention using model compounds and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, enhancing signal amplification and detection by increasing probe-hapten linker lengths, and improving probe specificity using shortened probes with minimal rRNA sequence complementarity. We validated our method on 4 BCC and 12 MCC tumors. Amplified miR-205 and miR-375 signals were normalized against directly detectable reference rRNA signals. Tumors were classified using predefined cutoff values, and all were correctly identified in blinded analysis. Our study establishes a reliable miRNA FISH technique for parallel visualization of differentially expressed miRNAs in FFPE tumor tissues. PMID:23728175

  8. The effectiveness of breath-holding to stabilize lung and pancreas tumors during radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Martin J.; Martin, David; Whyte, Richard; Hai, Jenny; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of breath-holding on the short-term reproducibility and long-term variability of tumor position during image-guided radiosurgery. Method: Thirteen patients have undergone single-fraction radiosurgery treatments during which the tumor was repeatedly imaged radiographically to observe its position. The imaging data were used to monitor the efficacy of breath-holding and to periodically readjust the alignment of the treatment beam with the tumor. These measurements have allowed the effects of breathing, heartbeat, patient movement, and instrumental uncertainties to be separately identified in the record of tumor position. Results: During inspiration breath-holding, the lung tumor position was reproducible to within 1 mm, on average, in the direction of maximum displacement during regular breathing, and to within 1.8 mm in three dimensions overall. The pancreas tumor position in three dimensions was reproducible to within 2.5 mm on average. Some patients showed a slow, steady drift of tumor position during the extended sequence of breath-holds, which was compensated by periodic retargeting of the treatment beam. Conclusion: Breath-holding can allow the reduction of tumor motion dosimetry margins to 2 mm or less for lung cancer treatments, provided that the treatment system can detect and adapt to long-term variations in the mean tumor position during a lengthy treatment fraction

  9. Tumor-inhibitory effect of intralesional injection of bradykinin and immunostimulants in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiba, H; Matsunaga, K

    1985-11-01

    Intralesional injection of bradykinin at the dose of 500 micrograms or 1000 micrograms in oil or gelatin was effective in inhibiting the growth of Sa 180 cells in ddY mice. Ulcer formation in tumor was observed at a high rate in these bradykinin-treated groups. Combined use of bradykinin with a streptococcal preparation (OK-432) was more effective in inhibition of tumor growth compared with that in oil. Similar bradykinin-induced inhibition was observed in a spontaneous mammary tumor of C3H (MM 46) mice. These results suggest that increase in cellular influx and activation of infiltrated cells within a tumor are important factors to induce tumor inhibition effectively.

  10. The Effect of Electroacupuncture on Osteosarcoma Tumor Growth and Metastasis: Analysis of Different Treatment Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branden A. Smeester

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor found in children and adolescents and is associated with many complications including cancer pain and metastasis. While cancer patients often seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches to treat cancer pain and fatigue or the side effects of chemotherapy and treatment, there is little known about the effect of acupuncture treatment on tumor growth and metastasis. Here we evaluate the effects of six different electroacupuncture (EA regimens on osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis in both male and female mice. The most significant positive effects were observed when EA was applied to the ST-36 acupoint twice weekly (EA-2X/3 beginning at postimplantation day 3 (PID 3. Twice weekly treatment produced robust reductions in tumor growth. Conversely, when EA was applied twice weekly (EA-2X/7, starting at PID 7, there was a significant increase in tumor growth. We further demonstrate that EA-2X/3 treatment elicits significant reductions in tumor lymphatics, vasculature, and innervation. Lastly, EA-2X/3 treatment produced a marked reduction in pulmonary metastasis, thus providing evidence for EA’s potential antimetastatic capabilities. Collectively, EA-2X/3 treatment was found to reduce both bone tumor growth and lung metastasis, which may be mediated in part through reductions in tumor-associated vasculature, lymphatics, and innervation.

  11. Programme of air surveillance and health 9 towns. Synthesis review. Surveillance of effects on the health in relation with air pollution in urban area. Phase 2; Programme de surveillance Air et Sante 9 villes. Revue de synthese. Surveillance des effets sur la sante lies a la pollution atmospherique en milieu urbain. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-15

    The InVS published its first results on the Nine-City Air and Health Surveillance Programme (PSAS-9) in March 1999. This phase I pointed out that it was possible for various specialists in the field of air pollution and health to gather around a common set of problems. They also found a link between the daily variations of all the urban air pollution indicators and the total, cardio-vascular and respiratory mortality which, based on French data, contributed to strengthen scientific knowledge in this field. Today's report presents the results of phase Il of the PSAS-9 programme which essentially aimed at assessing the short-term exposure-risk relationships between pollution indicators and hospital admission indicators. This second phase also allowed to confirm the results of phase I on the short-term effect of air pollution on mortality thanks to longer periods of study. Exploratory analysis using new indicators and sensitivity analysis on the pertinence of results were also conducted. Finally, methodological tools were developed in order to optimise data collection and statistical modelization. All these results enabled the quantification of the short-term health impact of air pollution on the PSAS-9 cities. PSAS-9 is now an ongoing epidemiological surveillance programme on the effects of urban air pollution on health, providing information tools to decision-makers and the general population. (author)

  12. Programme of air surveillance Air and Health 9 towns. Surveillance of effects on health in relation with air pollution in urban area. Phase 2; Programme de surveillance Air et Sante 9 villes. Surveillance des effets sur la sante lies a la pollution atmospherique en milieu urbain. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-15

    The InVS published its first results on the Nine-City Air and Health Surveillance Programme (PSAS-9) in March 1999. This phase I pointed out that it was possible for various specialists in the field of air pollution and health to gather around a common set of problems. They also found a link between the daily variations of all the urban air pollution indicators and the total, cardio-vascular and respiratory mortality which, based on French data, contributed to strengthen scientific knowledge in this field. Today's report presents the results of phase Il of the PSAS-9 programme which essentially aimed at assessing the short-term exposure-risk relationships between pollution indicators and hospital admission indicators. This second phase also allowed to confirm the results of phase I on the short-term effect of air pollution on mortality thanks to longer periods of study. Exploratory analysis using new indicators and sensitivity analysis on the pertinence of results were also conducted. Finally, methodological tools were developed in order to optimise data collection and statistical modelization. All these results enabled the quantification of the short-term health impact of air pollution on the PSAS-9 cities. PSAS-9 is now an ongoing epidemiological surveillance programme on the effects of urban air pollution on health, providing information tools to decision-makers and the general population. (author)

  13. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  14. Tumor treatment by sustained intratumoral release of cisplatin: effects of drug alone and combined with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapp, Donald T.T.; Lloyd, David K.; Zhu, Julian; Lehnert, Shirley M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of intratumoral delivery of cisplatin to a mouse tumor model (RIF-1) by means of a biodegradable polymer implant with and without radiation was studied. Methods and Materials: The polymer bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)propane-sebacic acid (CPP:SA; 80:20) and its degradation products have been characterized. Polymer rods (8 x 0.5 mm) containing 17% cisplatin by weight were prepared by extrusion, and the in vitro degradation rate measured. The implants were placed into mouse tumors and their effect (with and without radiation) on tumor growth delay studied. The levels of Pt in the mouse kidney, tumor, and blood plasma at selected intervals after implant were also determined. These results were compared with those obtained when cisplatin was delivered systematically. Results: When cisplatin was delivered by the polymer implants, higher levels were present in the tumor for longer time periods (cf. systemic delivery of the drug). For both nonirradiated and irradiated tumors, those treated with the polymer implants had significantly longer tumor growth delays compared to nonimplanted controls and to systematically treated tumors. Conclusions: The results show that intratumoral delivery of cisplatin is more efficient than systemic delivery. Using the biodegradable polymer implant, higher doses of cisplatin can be tolerated by the animal as the drug is localized within the tumor, and the high levels of the drug in the tumor can be maintained for an extended period of time. When radiation is given in conjunction with cisplatin, the tumor response is supraadditive for all modes of cisplatin administration but is potentiated to a greater extent when cisplatin is delivered through the polymer implant. The greatest effect is seen for treatment with cisplatin delivered by polymer implant combined with fractionated radiation

  15. Effects of high-dose microbeam irradiation on tumor microvascular function and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, Andrew N; Boss, Mary-Keara; Hadsell, Michael; Zhang, Jian; Schroeder, Thies; Berman, Katherine G; Dewhirst, Mark W; Chang, Sha; Palmer, Gregory M

    2015-02-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a form of cancer treatment in which a single large dose of radiation is spatially fractionated in-line or grid-like patterns. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that MRT is capable of eliciting high levels of tumor response while sparing normal tissue that is exposed to the same radiation field. Since a large fraction of the MRT-treated tumor is in the dose valley region that is not directly irradiated, tumor response may be driven by radiation bystander effects, which in turn elicit a microvascular response. Differential alterations in hemodynamics between the tumor and normal tissue may explain the therapeutic advantages of MRT. Direct observation of these dynamic responses presents a challenge for conventional ex vivo analysis. Furthermore, knowledge gleaned from in vitro studies of radiation bystander response has not been widely incorporated into in vivo models of tumor radiotherapy, and the biological contribution of the bystander effect within the tumor microenvironment is unknown. In this study, we employed noninvasive, serial observations of the tumor microenvironment to address the question of how tumor vasculature and HIF-1 expression are affected by microbeam radiotherapy. Tumors (approximately 4 mm in diameter) grown in a dorsal window chamber were irradiated in a single fraction using either a single, microplanar beam (300 micron wide swath) or a wide-field setup (whole-window chamber) to a total dose of 50 Gy. The tumors were optically observed daily for seven days postirradiation. Microvascular changes in the tumor and surrounding normal tissue differed greatly between the wide-field and microbeam treatments. We present evidence that these changes may be due to dissimilar spatial and temporal patterns of HIF-1 expression induced through radiation bystander effects.

  16. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juliachs, Mercè; Viñals, Francesc; Vidal, August; Muro, Xavier Garcia del; Piulats, Josep M; Condom, Enric; Casanovas, Oriol; Graupera, Mariona; Germà, Jose R; Villanueva, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies

  17. Modeling the Dichotomy of the Immune Response to Cancer: Cytotoxic Effects and Tumor-Promoting Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Kathleen P; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Although the immune response is often regarded as acting to suppress tumor growth, it is now clear that it can be both stimulatory and inhibitory. The interplay between these competing influences has complex implications for tumor development, cancer dormancy, and immunotherapies. In fact, early immunotherapy failures were partly due to a lack in understanding of the nonlinear growth dynamics these competing immune actions may cause. To study this biological phenomenon theoretically, we construct a minimally parameterized framework that incorporates all aspects of the immune response. We combine the effects of all immune cell types, general principles of self-limited logistic growth, and the physical process of inflammation into one quantitative setting. Simulations suggest that while there are pro-tumor or antitumor immunogenic responses characterized by larger or smaller final tumor volumes, respectively, each response involves an initial period where tumor growth is stimulated beyond that of growth without an immune response. The mathematical description is non-identifiable which allows an ensemble of parameter sets to capture inherent biological variability in tumor growth that can significantly alter tumor-immune dynamics and thus treatment success rates. The ability of this model to predict non-intuitive yet clinically observed patterns of immunomodulated tumor growth suggests that it may provide a means to help classify patient response dynamics to aid identification of appropriate treatments exploiting immune response to improve tumor suppression, including the potential attainment of an immune-induced dormant state.

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-tumoral Effects of the Flavonoid Apigenin in Malignant Mesothelioma

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Masuelli; Monica Benvenuto; Rosanna Mattera; Enrica Di Stefano; Erika Zago; Gloria Taffera; Ilaria Tresoldi; Maria Gabriella Giganti; Giovanni Vanni Frajese; Ginevra Berardi; Andrea Modesti; Andrea Modesti; Roberto Bei; Roberto Bei

    2017-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor arising from mesothelium. MM patients’ survival is poor. The polyphenol 4′,5,7,-trihydroxyflavone Apigenin (API) is a “multifunctional drug”. Several studies have demonstrated API anti-tumoral effects. However, little is known on the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumoral effects of API in MM. Thus, we analyzed the in vitro effects of API on cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, pro-survival signaling pathways, apoptosis, and autophagy of human and mouse...

  19. Antitumor effectiveness of different amounts of electrical charge in Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciria, HC; Quevedo, MS; Cabrales, LB; Bruzón, RP; Salas, MF; Pena, OG; González, TR; López, DS; Flores, JM

    2004-01-01

    In vivo studies were conducted to quantify the effectiveness of low-level direct electric current for different amounts of electrical charge and the survival rate in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors, also the effect of direct electric in Ehrlich tumor was evaluate through the measurements of tumor volume and the peritumoral and tumoral findings. BALB/c male mice, 7–8 week old and 20–22 g weight were used. Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 cell lines, growing in BALB/c mice. Solid and subcutaneous Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors, located dorsolaterally in animals, were initiated by the inoculation of 5 × 10 6 and 1 × 10 5 viable tumor cells, respectively. For each type of tumor four groups (one control group and three treated groups) consisting of 10 mice randomly divided were formed. When the tumors reached approximately 0.5 cm 3 , four platinum electrodes were inserted into their bases. The electric charge delivered to the tumors was varied in the range of 5.5 to 110 C/cm 3 for a constant time of 45 minutes. An additional experiment was performed in BALB/c male mice bearing Ehrlich tumor to examine from a histolological point of view the effects of direct electric current. A control group and a treated group with 77 C/cm 3 (27.0 C in 0.35 cm 3 ) and 10 mA for 45 min were formed. In this experiment when the tumor volumes reached 0.35 cm 3 , two anodes and two cathodes were inserted into the base perpendicular to the tumor long axis. Significant tumor growth delay and survival rate were achieved after electrotherapy and both were dependent on direct electric current intensity, being more marked in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor. Complete regressions for fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors were observed for electrical charges of 80 and 92 C/cm 3 , respectively. Histopathological and peritumoral findings in Ehrlich tumor revealed in the treated group marked tumor necrosis, vascular congestion, peritumoral neutrophil infiltration, an acute inflammatory

  20. Antitumor effectiveness of different amounts of electrical charge in Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González TR

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo studies were conducted to quantify the effectiveness of low-level direct electric current for different amounts of electrical charge and the survival rate in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors, also the effect of direct electric in Ehrlich tumor was evaluate through the measurements of tumor volume and the peritumoral and tumoral findings. Methods BALB/c male mice, 7–8 week old and 20–22 g weight were used. Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 cell lines, growing in BALB/c mice. Solid and subcutaneous Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors, located dorsolaterally in animals, were initiated by the inoculation of 5 × 106 and 1 × 105 viable tumor cells, respectively. For each type of tumor four groups (one control group and three treated groups consisting of 10 mice randomly divided were formed. When the tumors reached approximately 0.5 cm3, four platinum electrodes were inserted into their bases. The electric charge delivered to the tumors was varied in the range of 5.5 to 110 C/cm3 for a constant time of 45 minutes. An additional experiment was performed in BALB/c male mice bearing Ehrlich tumor to examine from a histolological point of view the effects of direct electric current. A control group and a treated group with 77 C/cm3 (27.0 C in 0.35 cm3 and 10 mA for 45 min were formed. In this experiment when the tumor volumes reached 0.35 cm3, two anodes and two cathodes were inserted into the base perpendicular to the tumor long axis. Results Significant tumor growth delay and survival rate were achieved after electrotherapy and both were dependent on direct electric current intensity, being more marked in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor. Complete regressions for fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors were observed for electrical charges of 80 and 92 C/cm3, respectively. Histopathological and peritumoral findings in Ehrlich tumor revealed in the treated group marked tumor necrosis, vascular congestion, peritumoral neutrophil

  1. Birth defects surveillance in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Juan; Wang, Yan-Ping; Wang, He; Mao, Meng

    2011-11-01

    Birth defects are a global public health problem because of their large contribution to infant mortalities and disabilities. It is estimated that 4%-6% of Chinese newborns are affected by birth defects every year. Surveillance is a basic approach to understanding the occurrence and associated factors of birth defects. The Ministry of Health of China initiated a national hospital-based birth defects monitoring system 20 years ago. Nearly every province in this country has established its own surveillance system in the past. The authors reviewed the result of the monitoring system at different administrative levels in China. Available publications on the surveillance of birth defects and data from national and provincial birth defects surveillance systems were reviewed to evaluate the effectiveness of the surveillance systems. According to the 2009 data, the national hospital-based birth defects surveillance system monitored over 1.3 million births, which accounted for more than 8% of births in China. In addition, 30 provincial hospital-based surveillance programs covered a birth population of more than 3.6 million (22% of births in China). Great achievements have been made in terms of case ascertainment, data quality control, and online reporting. But the surveillance systems in China still have some limitations. A short ascertainment period may miss some internal anomalies, inherited metabolic diseases, and malformed fetus aborted before the 28th gestational week. Discrepancies in antenatal or postnatal diagnosis of birth defects between surveillance institutes may affect the detection rate and introduce biases. Absence of baseline data and lack of integrated database systems limit the application of surveillance data to etiological studies and affect the process of decision-making. The surveillance system for birth defects is prerequisite to propose, conduct and assess any interventions for the disease. To meet the need of study and prevention of birth defects

  2. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Fei Conghe; Shen Fangzhen; Liang Jun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Kunming stain male mice were implanted with S180 sarcoma cells in the left inguen subcutaneously as an in situ experimental animal model. Seven days after implantation, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body γ-irradiation. At 24 and 48 h after irradiation, all mice were sacrificed to measure the tumor volume, and tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 and the apoptotic rate of tumor cells were observed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results: Tumor growth was significantly slowed down after LDR (P 1 phase and the expression of bcl-2 protein decreased at 24 h. Apoptotic rate of tumor cells increased significantly at 48 h after LDR. Conclusion: LDR could cause a G 1 -phase arrest and increase the apoptosis of tumor cells through the low level of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in the tumor-bearing mice. The organized immune function and anti-tumor ability are markedly increased after LDR. The study provides practical evidence of clinical application to cancer treatment

  3. Pyruvate induces transient tumor hypoxia by enhancing mitochondrial oxygen consumption and potentiates the anti-tumor effect of a hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Takakusagi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug (HAP of bromo isophosphoramide mustard that is selectively activated within hypoxic regions in solid tumors. Our recent study showed that intravenously administered bolus pyruvate can transiently induce hypoxia in tumors. We investigated the mechanism underlying the induction of transient hypoxia and the combination use of pyruvate to potentiate the anti-tumor effect of TH-302. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: The hypoxia-dependent cytotoxicity of TH-302 was evaluated by a viability assay in murine SCCVII and human HT29 cells. Modulation in cellular oxygen consumption and in vivo tumor oxygenation by the pyruvate treatment was monitored by extracellular flux analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR oxygen imaging, respectively. The enhancement of the anti-tumor effect of TH-302 by pyruvate treatment was evaluated by monitoring the growth suppression of the tumor xenografts inoculated subcutaneously in mice. TH-302 preferentially inhibited the growth of both SCCVII and HT29 cells under hypoxic conditions (0.1% O2, with minimal effect under aerobic conditions (21% O2. Basal oxygen consumption rates increased after the pyruvate treatment in SCCVII cells in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that pyruvate enhances the mitochondrial respiration to consume excess cellular oxygen. In vivo EPR oxygen imaging showed that the intravenous administration of pyruvate globally induced the transient hypoxia 30 min after the injection in SCCVII and HT29 tumors at the size of 500-1500 mm(3. Pretreatment of SCCVII tumor bearing mice with pyruvate 30 min prior to TH-302 administration, initiated with small tumors (∼ 550 mm(3, significantly delayed tumor growth. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our in vitro and in vivo studies showed that pyruvate induces transient hypoxia by enhancing mitochondrial oxygen consumption in tumor cells. TH-302 therapy can be potentiated by pyruvate pretreatment if started at the

  4. Police surveillance and driving speed.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Although speed plays a large part in the occurrence of crashes, drivers often exceed the speed limit. The police use various methods when carrying out their speed surveillance. In the Netherlands positive effects have been found of speed surveillance with radar cars (without stopping). It is to be

  5. Health surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The Code includes a number of requirements for the health surveillance of employees associated with the mining and milling of radioactive ores. This guideline is particularly directed at determining the level of fitness of employees and prospective employees, detecting any symptom which might contraindicate exposure to the environment encountered in mine/mill situations, examination of any employee who may have been exposed to radiation in excess of defined limits and the accumulation and provision of data on the health of employees

  6. Rinderpest surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Rinderpest is probably the most lethal virus disease of cattle and buffalo and can destroy whole populations; damaging economies; undermining food security and ruining the livelihood of farmers and pastoralists. The disease can be eradicated by vaccination and control of livestock movement. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme, with technical support from the Joint FAO/IAEA Division to provide advice, training and materials to thirteen states through the 'Support for Rinderpest Surveillance in West Asia' project. (IAEA)

  7. In vivo tumor targeting of gold nanoparticles: effect of particle type and dosing strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvanakrishnan P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan1, Jaesook Park1, Deyali Chatterjee2, Sunil Krishnan2, James W Tunnell11Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 2The UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs have gained significant interest as nanovectors for combined imaging and photothermal therapy of tumors. Delivered systemically, GNPs preferentially accumulate at the tumor site via the enhanced permeability and retention effect, and when irradiated with near infrared light, produce sufficient heat to treat tumor tissue. The efficacy of this process strongly depends on the targeting ability of the GNPs, which is a function of the particle’s geometric properties (eg, size and dosing strategy (eg, number and amount of injections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of GNP type and dosing strategy on in vivo tumor targeting. Specifically, we investigated the in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of pegylated gold nanoshells (GNSs and gold nanorods (GNRs for single and multiple dosing. We used Swiss nu/nu mice with a subcutaneous tumor xenograft model that received intravenous administration for a single and multiple doses of GNS and GNR. We performed neutron activation analysis to quantify the gold present in the tumor and liver. We performed histology to determine if there was acute toxicity as a result of multiple dosing. Neutron activation analysis results showed that the smaller GNRs accumulated in higher concentrations in the tumor compared to the larger GNSs. We observed a significant increase in GNS and GNR accumulation in the liver for higher doses. However, multiple doses increased targeting efficiency with minimal effect beyond three doses of GNPs. These results suggest a significant effect of particle type and multiple doses on increasing particle accumulation and on tumor targeting ability.Keywords: gold nanorods, gold nanoshells, tumor targeting

  8. Paradox between angiogenesis and oxygen effect in the treatment of tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masanobu

    2008-01-01

    The paradox in the title is described on recent findings concerning the effects of anti-angiogenetic drugs on possible radiation resistance and sensitivity of tumor tissue. Suppression of angiogenesis leads to inhibition of tumor growth, based on which anti-tumor drugs like anti- vascular endotherial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab to suppress the genesis have been developed and clinically used, but they conceivably increase the population of hypoxic tumor cells. Those drugs are essentially used in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents and/or radiation. Hypoxic tumor cells present in the tissue are generally radioresistant. There are reported findings, however, that the drugs sometimes elevate the efficacy of radiotherapy, which hypothesizes that the drugs induces a proangiogenetic state, where increased level of growth factors in the tissue is reduced to normalize the vasculature and thereby reoxygenation occurs, the oxygen effect. Because copper is a cofactor of growth factors like VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and essential for angiogenesis, authors have studied the effect of a Cu-chelator, trientine, on transplanted mouse tumors which has been shown to induce apoptosis of the target cells. Combination of the chelator with X-ray irradiation is found effective in tumor growth inhibition and in survival increase. For more effective combination therapy, the interaction occurring in combinations of regimen should be elucidated. (R.T.)

  9. Postradiation disturnabce of tumors blood sypply during polyradiomodification for enchancement of radiotherapy effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozin, S.V.; Voloshina, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    A therapeutic effect of the postradiation use of methods disturbing the blood supply of malignant neoplasms: short-term hyperglycemia (STH), mexamine (M) and a tourniquet (T) - was assessed in experiments on mice with solid Ehrlich carcinoma. It was shown that an independent use of STH, M and T without radiation exposure did not possess a significant antitumor effect whereas their use shortly after irradiation enhanced the effect of the latter on tumors without increasing skin radiation injury in the zone of tumor growth. The utmost antitumor effect was achieved in combination of irradiation with immediate STH followed either by M or T: in these cases a tumor radiation effect was enhanced in different seris of experiments 1.5-2-or over 3-fold. A conclusion has been made as to the importance of the blood supply inhibition in malignant tumors in the postradiation period

  10. The effect of endostatin gene in combination with radiotherapy on rats with implanted tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Jin Ning; Yang Haishan; Piao Chunji; Lv Zhe

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the combination therapy effect of the radiotherapy with endostatin gene therapy on the rats with implanted tumor. Methods: Immediate Walker-256 cancerous ascetic injection method was used to make a rat tumor-bearing model, then the tumor was treated with saline, endostatin gene, irradiation or endostatin gene plus irradiation. The tumor growth rate and weight were observed, Western blot and RT-PCR were adopted to check the expressions of endostatin mRNA and protein. Results: The expressions of endostatin mRNA and protein were significant in the gene therapy group and the gene plus radiotherapy group, but there was a significant difference between these two groups. As compared with the control group, the tumor growth rate and weight decreased significantly in all the therapy groups (P 0.05). Conclusion: After the pCMV-Endostatin was induced, the expressions of endostatin mRNA and protein was significant in Walker-256 tumor and the tumor growth was inhibited. However, the effect of the endostatin gene plus radiotherapy was obviously better than that of the endostatin gene therapy group or the radiotherapy group for inhibiting tumor growth. (authors)

  11. Experimental study on anti-tumor effect of pcEgr-IFNγ gene-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Congmei; Li Xiuyi; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the anti-tumor effect of IFN γ gene-radiotherapy to murine melanoma and its immunologic mechanism. Methods: pcEgr-IFNγ plasmids were injected locally into tumor, and 36 hours later, the tumors were given 20 Gy X-ray irradiation. Tumor growth at different time, IFN γ expression 3 days later and immunologic indexes 15 days later were detected. Results: At 3-15 days after pcEgr-IFNγ gene-radiotherapy, the tumor growth rate was lower than that of irradiation alone group. It was also lower than that of gene therapy alone group and control plasmid combined with X-ray irradiation group significantly. Day 3 tumor IFN γ expression was higher than that of plasmid treatment alone group. NK activity, IL-2 and IFN γ secretion activities were higher than those of gene therapy alone and irradiation alone groups significantly. Conclusion: The antitumor effect of IFN γ gene-radiotherapy is better than that of either of them applied solely. Its mechanism might be concerned with the higher expression of IFN γ induced by irradiation in tumors and activation of anti-tumor immunologic functions

  12. [Antitumor effect of intratumoral administration of a Coriolus preparation, PSK: inhibition of tumor invasion in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, T; Murata, K

    1994-09-01

    The antitumor effects of biological response modifiers (BRM) in an experimental mouse model, the "double grafted tumor system," were analysed. Intratumoral administration of PSK (polysaccharide Kureha), a Coriolus preparation into primary tumor induced a cure of not only the primary solid tumor but also the metastatic, distant tumor. The effect of PSK on in vitro invasion by murine RL male-1 leukemia cells was studied using Biocoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber (Becton Dickinson Labware). We determined the ability of tumor cells to penetrate matrigel-coated filters in the presence or absence of PSK. PSK (100 micrograms/ml) reduced to half the number of invasive tumor cells for 3 hr incubation. PSK inhibited tumor cell invasion of matrigel-coated filters in a dose-dependent manner. Matrigel includes laminin, collagen, fibronectin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It is possible, therefore, that PSK may inhibit enzymes which digest the components of basement membranes, extra cellular matrices (ECM). This phenomenon suggests that PSK also inhibits metastatic activity of tumor cells in vivo.

  13. The effect of housing temperature on the growth of CT26 tumor expressing fluorescent protein EGFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhakova, Diana V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lapkina, Irina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2016-04-01

    To date, the effect of housing temperature on tumor development in the immunocompetent mice has been studied on poorly immunogenic cancer models. Standard housing temperature 20-26°C was shown to cause chronic metabolic cold stress and promote tumor progression via suppression of the antitumor immune response, whereas a thermoneutral temperature 30-31°C was more preferable for normal metabolism of mice and inhibited tumor growth. Our work represents the first attempt to discover the potential effect of housing temperature on the development of highly immunogenic tumor. EGFP-expressing murine colon carcinoma CT26 generated in Balb/c mice was used as a tumor model. No statistically significant differences were shown in tumor incidences and growth rates at 20°C, 25°C and 30°C for non-modified CT26. Maintaining mice challenged with CT26-EGFP cells at 30°C led to complete inhibition of tumor development. In summary, we demonstrated that the housing temperature is important for the regulation of growth of highly immunogenic tumors in mice through antitumor immunity.

  14. The effect of tumor location and respiratory function on tumor movement estimated by real-time tracking radiotherapy (RTRT) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimaru, Rikiya; Shirato, Hiroki; Fujino, Masaharu; Suzuki, Keishiro; Yamazaki, Kouichi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of tumor location and pulmonary function on the motion of fiducial markers near lung tumors were evaluated to deduce simple guidelines for determining the internal margin in radiotherapy without fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Pooled data collected by a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system on 42 markers in 39 patients were analyzed. The pulmonary functions of all patients were assessed before radiotherapy. Using chest X-ray film, the position of the marker was expressed relative to the geometry of the unilateral lung. Posterior location meant the area of the posterior half of the lung in a lateral chest X-ray film, and caudal location meant the caudal half of the chest X-ray film; these categories were determined by measuring the distance between the marker and anatomic landmarks, including the apex, costophrenic angle, midline of spinal canal, lateral, anterior, and posterior boundary of the lung. Results: Before the radiotherapy, 18 patients had obstructive respiratory dysfunction (ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity [FEV 1.0 /FVC] 1.0 /FVC and %VC were 97.0% and 66.5%, respectively. Median tumor movements in the x (left-right), y (anteroposterior), and z (craniocaudal) directions were 1.1 mm, 2.3 mm, and 5.4 mm, respectively. There was no significant correlation between respiratory function and magnitude of marker movement in any direction. Median marker movement in the z direction was 2.6 mm for the cranial location and 11.8 mm for the caudal location, respectively (p < 0.001). Median movement in the z direction was 11.8 mm for posterior location and 3.4 mm for anterior location, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Simple measurement of the relative location on plain chest X-ray film was related, but respiratory function test was not related, to the craniocaudal amplitude of the motion of the fiducial marker near lung tumors

  15. Tumor suppressive effects of bromodomain-containing protein 7 (BRD7) in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Ae; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Hye-Sun; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Choi, Chel Hun; Choi, Jung-Joo; Jeon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Young Jae; Ryu, Ji Yoon; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2014-02-01

    Bromodomain-containing protein 7 (BRD7), which is a subunit of SWI/SNF complex, has been recently suggested as a novel tumor suppressor in several cancers. In this study, we investigated the tumor suppressive effect of BRD7 in epithelial ovarian cancer. We analyzed the expression of BRD7 in human ovarian tissues with real-time PCR. To investigate the functional role of BRD7, we transfected ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and SKOV3) with BRD7 plasmid and checked the cell viability, apoptosis, and invasion. The activities of BRD7 in the signaling pathways associated with carcinogenesis were also tested. In addition, we used the orthotopic mouse model for ovarian cancer to evaluate tumor growth-inhibiting effect by administration of BRD7 plasmid. The BRD7 expression was downregulated in the ovarian cancer tissues compared with normal (P p53-wild) or SKOV3 (p53-null) ovarian cancer cells showed the tumor suppressive effects assessed by cell viability, apoptosis, and invasion assay and especially significantly decreased tumor weight in orthotopic mouse model (A2780). Moreover, we found that tumor suppressive effects of BRD7 are independent to the presence of p53 activity in ovarian cancer cells. BRD7 negatively regulated β-catenin pathway, resulting in decreased its accumulation in the nucleus. These results suggested that BRD7 acts as a tumor suppressor in epithelial ovarian cancers independently of p53 activity, via negative regulation of β-catenin pathway. ©2013 AACR.

  16. Novel "Elements" of Immune Suppression within the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Devikala; Clever, David; Eil, Robert; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive evolution has prompted immune cells to use a wide variety of inhibitory signals, many of which are usurped by tumor cells to evade immune surveillance. Although tumor immunologists often focus on genes and proteins as mediators of immune function, here we highlight two elements from the periodic table-oxygen and potassium-that suppress the immune system in previously unappreciated ways. While both are key to the maintenance of T-cell function and tissue homeostasis, they are exploited by tumors to suppress immuno-surveillance and promote metastatic spread. We discuss the temporal and spatial roles of these elements within the tumor microenvironment and explore possible therapeutic interventions for effective and promising anticancer therapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(6); 426-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Osteoprotegerin mediates tumor-promoting effects of Interleukin-1beta in breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, S.T.M. (Stephanie Tsang Mui); D. Geerts (Dirk); Roseman, K. (Kim); Renaud, A. (Ashleigh); Connelly, L. (Linda)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ It is widely recognized that inflammation promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Given the complex nature of the breast tumor inflammatory microenvironment, much remains to be understood of the molecular mechanisms that govern these effects. We have

  18. Different ways to improve the clinical effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in solid tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Cherel Michel; Davodeau Francois; Barbet Jacques; Chatal Jean-Francois

    2009-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been proven effective in the treatment of radiosensitive non-Hodgkin lymphoma but, for radioresistant solid tumors, new approaches are necessary to improve the clinical effectiveness. A real improvement has been the introduction of the pretargeting technology which appeared to be able to significantly increase tumor-to-normal organ uptake ratios.Another very promising approach consists in associating RIT with other treatment modalities. Finally the use of alpha pa...

  19. Safety and effectiveness of sorafenib in Japanese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in daily medical practice: interim analysis of a prospective postmarketing all-patient surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Shuichi; Ikeda, Kenji; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Furuse, Junji; Minami, Hironobu; Okayama, Yutaka; Sunaya, Toshiyuki; Ito, Yuichiro; Inuyama, Lyo; Okita, Kiwamu

    2016-10-01

    Sorafenib was approved for treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Japan in 2009. A prospective postmarketing all-patient surveillance (PMS) study was requested by Japanese authorities to confirm safety and effectiveness of sorafenib in Japanese HCC population. Patients with unresectable HCC treated with sorafenib were followed up for 12 months. Data on patient demographic characteristics, treatment status, clinical outcome, and adverse events (AEs) were collected. This interim analysis included 1109 and 1065 patients evaluable for safety and effectiveness, respectively. Most patients (83.4 %) received the recommended initial dose of 400 mg twice daily. After a follow-up of 12-months, 89.8 % had discontinued treatment, most because of AEs (44.5 %) or progression (33.8 %). The most common drug-related adverse events (DRAE) were hand-foot skin reaction (51.4 %), liver dysfunction (26.4 %), diarrhea (25.1 %), and hypertension (21.6 %). The median overall survival (OS) was 348 days [95 % confidence interval (CI) 299-389 days], and the median duration of treatment was 87 days (95 % CI 78-98 days). Multivariate analyses identified baseline prognostic factors for longer OS, including female sex, low Child-Pugh score, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0, tumor stage I/II/III, low aspartate aminotransferase level, high hemoglobin level, hepatitis C and history of surgical resection. In general, the safety and effectiveness findings in this PMS were consistent with findings from previous clinical studies. Sorafenib was well tolerated and clinically useful for Japanese patients. NCT01411436.

  20. Immunohistochemical Study Effects of Spirulina Algae on the Induced Mammary Tumor in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BinMeferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    This work aimed at investigating the protective effects of Spirulina platensis on the induced mammary tumor in rats by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and the proliferation of the tumor cells by using immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). At 50 days of age, group 1 remained untreated, group 2 treated with 2% Spirulina platenesis in food, group 3 received 50 mg/kg DMBA i.p. groupe 4 received 50 mg/kg DMBA i.p and fed on 2% spirulina. Rats were killed when the largest mammary tumor reached 1-2 cm in diameter or after 6 months of animal>s age. All the tumors produced by DMBA were ductal carcinoma in 100% of group 3, but in group 4 two rats had mammary tumor. The groups 1 and 2 had no tumor and have the same histological and immunostaining features, but in group 4, 13/15 rats had no tumor except formation of some cysts and hyperplasia in epithelial cells. The conclusion of this work suggests that Spirulina platnesis could be considered as a chemotherapeutic agent that causes apoptosis to tumor cells by reducing the number of malignant cells and resists cancer formation. (author)

  1. A theoretical model for the effects of reduced hemoglobin-oxygen affinity on tumor oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Hsu, Richard; Lin, P.-S.; Venitz, Jurgen; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a theoretical model for oxygen delivery to tumors, and to use the model to simulate the effects of changing the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen on tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Hemoglobin affinity is expressed in terms of P 50 , the partial pressure of oxygen (Po 2 ) at half saturation. Effects of changing P 50 on arterial Po 2 are predicted using an effective vessel approach to describe diffusive oxygen transport in the lungs, assuming fixed systemic oxygen demand and fixed blood flow rate. The decline in oxygen content of blood as it flows through normal tissue before entering the tumor region is assumed fixed. The hypoxic fraction of the tumor region is predicted using a three-dimensional simulation of diffusion from a network of vessels whose geometry is derived from observations of tumor microvasculature in the rat. Results: In air-breathing rats, predicted hypoxic fraction decreases with moderate increases in P 50 , but increases with further increases of P 50 , in agreement with previous experimental results. In rats breathing hyperoxic gases, and in humans breathing either normoxic or hyperoxic gases, increased P 50 is predicted to improve tumor oxygenation. Conclusions: The results support the administration of synthetic agents to increase P 50 during radiation treatment of tumors

  2. 48 CFR 44.304 - Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Surveillance. 44.304... SUBCONTRACTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Contractors' Purchasing Systems Reviews 44.304 Surveillance. (a) The ACO shall maintain a sufficient level of surveillance to ensure that the contractor is effectively managing...

  3. Nutritional surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J B; Mitchell, J T

    1983-01-01

    The concept of nutritional surveillance is derived from disease surveillance, and means "to watch over nutrition, in order to make decisions that lead to improvements in nutrition in populations". Three distinct objectives have been defined for surveillance systems, primarily in relation to problems of malnutrition in developing countries: to aid long-term planning in health and development; to provide input for programme management and evaluation; and to give timely warning of the need for intervention to prevent critical deteriorations in food consumption. Decisions affecting nutrition are made at various administrative levels, and the uses of different types of nutritional surveillance information can be related to national policies, development programmes, public health and nutrition programmes, and timely warning and intervention programmes. The information should answer specific questions, for example concerning the nutritional status and trends of particular population groups.Defining the uses and users of the information is the first essential step in designing a system; this is illustrated with reference to agricultural and rural development planning, the health sector, and nutrition and social welfare programmes. The most usual data outputs are nutritional outcome indicators (e.g., prevalence of malnutrition among preschool children), disaggregated by descriptive or classifying variables, of which the commonest is simply administrative area. Often, additional "status" indicators, such as quality of housing or water supply, are presented at the same time. On the other hand, timely warning requires earlier indicators of the possibility of nutritional deterioration, and agricultural indicators are often the most appropriate.DATA COME FROM TWO MAIN TYPES OF SOURCE: administrative (e.g., clinics and schools) and household sample surveys. Each source has its own advantages and disadvantages: for example, administrative data often already exist, and can be

  4. Anti-tumor effects of (1→3)-β-d-glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in S180 tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Li; Chen, Yafei; Li, Wenjian; Guo, Shuai; Wang, Xuzhao; An, Hailong; Zhan, Yong

    2017-02-01

    (1→3)-β-d-Glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a typical polysaccharide with various biological effects and is considered a candidate for the prevention and treatment of cancer in vitro. Research into the function of (1→3)-β-d-glucan in tumor-bearing animals in vivo, however, is limited. Here, we investigated the effects of (1→3)-β-d-glucan from S. cerevisiae on S180 tumor-bearing mice and on the immunity of the tumor-bearing host. The molecular mechanisms underlying the observed effects were investigated. (1→3)-β-d-Glucan was shown to exert anti-tumor effects without toxicity in normal mouse cells. The volume and weight of S180 tumors decreased dramatically following treatment with (1→3)-β-d-glucan, and treatment with the polysaccharide was furthermore shown to increase the tumor inhibition rate in a dose-dependent manner. Spleen index, T lymphocyte subsets (CD 4 and CD 8 ), as well as interleukins (IL)-2, (IL-2, IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α were assayed to detect the immunoregulatory and anti-tumor effects after (1→3)-β-d-glucan intragastrical administration. (1→3)-β-d-Glucan was shown to significantly potentiate the mouse immune responses by, among other effects, decreasing the ratio of CD 4 to CD 8 . The expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α were also significantly increased by (1→3)-β-d-glucan. These results suggest that (1→3)-β-d-glucan enhances the host's immune function during the tumor inhibition process. S180 tumor cells treated with (1→3)-β-d-glucan also exhibited significant apoptotic characteristics. (1→3)-β-d-glucan increased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 at the translation level by up-regulating Bax expression and down-regulating Bcl-2 expression, resulting in the initiation of cell apoptosis in S180 tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-tumor effects exerted by (1→3)-β-d-glucan may be attributed to the polysaccharide's immunostimulating properties and apoptosis

  5. Inherent Tumor Characteristics That Limit Effective and Safe Resection of Giant Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Hiroshi; Hara, Takayuki; Nagata, Yuichi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yamada, Shozo

    2017-10-01

    Surgical treatment of giant pituitary adenomas is sometimes challenging. We present our surgical series of giant nonfunctioning adenomas to shed light on the limitations of effective and safe tumor resection. The preoperative tumor characteristics, surgical approaches, outcome, and histology of giant nonfunctioning adenoma (>40 mm) in 128 consecutive surgical patients are reviewed. The follow-up period ranged from 19 to 113 months (mean 62.2 months). A transsphenoidal approach was used in the treatment of 109 patients and a combined transsphenoidal transcranial approach in 19 patients. A total of 93 patients (72.7%) underwent total resection or subtotal resection apart from the cavernous sinus (CS). The degree of tumor resection, excluding the marked CS invasion, was lower in tumors that were larger (P = 0.0107), showed massive intracranial extension (P = 0.0352), and had an irregular configuration (P = 0.0016). Permanent surgical complications developed in 28 patients (22.0%). Long-term tumor control was achieved in all patients by single surgery, including 43 patients with adjuvant radiotherapy. Most tumors were histologically benign, with a low MIB-1 index (inherent factors that independently limit effective resection. These high-risk tumors require an individualized therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antitumor effect of Ganoderma lucidum : Cytotoxicity and Tumor Growth Delay(1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Choi, Dong Seong; Song, Chang Won

    1994-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum(G.I.) on the survival of tumor cells in vitro and on the growth of tumors in vivo. Materials and Methods: Dried G.I. was made into powder, extracted with distilled water, filtered and diluted from a maximum concentration of 100 mg/ml in sequence. The cytotoxicity of G.O. in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenicity of SCK tumor cells. For the tumor growth delay study, about 2x10 5 of SCK tumor cells were subcutaneously inoculated in the legs of A/J mice. The first experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G/I. From the first day after tumor inoculation for 10 days. The second experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G.I. either once a day for 10 days or twice a day for 5 days beginning from the 7th day after tumor inoculation. Results: 1. Cytotoxicity in vitro; survival fraction, as judged from the curve, at G.I. concentration of 0.5, 1,5,10,25,50 and 100 mg/ml were 1.0, 0.74±0.03, 0.18±0.03, 0.15±0.02, 0.006±0.002, 0.015 and 0.0015, respectively. 2. Tumor growth delay in vivo; a) the time required for the mean tumor volume to grow to 1,000mm 3 was 11 days in the control group and 14 days in the experimental group. b) the time required for tumor volume to increase 4 times was 11 days in the control group while it was 10.5 and 12 days in the groups injected with G.I. once a day and twice a day from the 7th day after tumor inoculation respectively. Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of G.I. showed a marked cytotoxicity on the SCK mammary cells in vitro. Tumor growth delay was statistically significant when G.I. injection was started soon after tumor inoculation, but it was not significant when injection was started after the tumors were firmly established

  7. Antitumor effect of Ganoderma lucidum : Cytotoxicity and Tumor Growth Delay(1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Seong [Chonju Woosuck Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Won [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    1994-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum(G.I.) on the survival of tumor cells in vitro and on the growth of tumors in vivo. Materials and Methods: Dried G.I. was made into powder, extracted with distilled water, filtered and diluted from a maximum concentration of 100 mg/ml in sequence. The cytotoxicity of G.O. in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenicity of SCK tumor cells. For the tumor growth delay study, about 2x10{sup 5} of SCK tumor cells were subcutaneously inoculated in the legs of A/J mice. The first experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G/I. From the first day after tumor inoculation for 10 days. The second experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G.I. either once a day for 10 days or twice a day for 5 days beginning from the 7th day after tumor inoculation. Results: 1. Cytotoxicity in vitro; survival fraction, as judged from the curve, at G.I. concentration of 0.5, 1,5,10,25,50 and 100 mg/ml were 1.0, 0.74{+-}0.03, 0.18{+-}0.03, 0.15{+-}0.02, 0.006{+-}0.002, 0.015 and 0.0015, respectively. 2. Tumor growth delay in vivo; a) the time required for the mean tumor volume to grow to 1,000mm{sup 3} was 11 days in the control group and 14 days in the experimental group. b) the time required for tumor volume to increase 4 times was 11 days in the control group while it was 10.5 and 12 days in the groups injected with G.I. once a day and twice a day from the 7th day after tumor inoculation respectively. Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of G.I. showed a marked cytotoxicity on the SCK mammary cells in vitro. Tumor growth delay was statistically significant when G.I. injection was started soon after tumor inoculation, but it was not significant when injection was started after the tumors were firmly established.

  8. Effect of Audio Coaching on Correlation of Abdominal Displacement With Lung Tumor Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of audio coaching on the time-dependent behavior of the correlation between abdominal motion and lung tumor motion and the corresponding lung tumor position mismatches. Methods and Materials: Six patients who had a lung tumor with a motion range >8 mm were enrolled in the present study. Breathing-synchronized fluoroscopy was performed initially without audio coaching, followed by fluoroscopy with recorded audio coaching for multiple days. Two different measurements, anteroposterior abdominal displacement using the real-time positioning management system and superoinferior (SI) lung tumor motion by X-ray fluoroscopy, were performed simultaneously. Their sequential images were recorded using one display system. The lung tumor position was automatically detected with a template matching technique. The relationship between the abdominal and lung tumor motion was analyzed with and without audio coaching. Results: The mean SI tumor displacement was 10.4 mm without audio coaching and increased to 23.0 mm with audio coaching (p < .01). The correlation coefficients ranged from 0.89 to 0.97 with free breathing. Applying audio coaching, the correlation coefficients improved significantly (range, 0.93-0.99; p < .01), and the SI lung tumor position mismatches became larger in 75% of all sessions. Conclusion: Audio coaching served to increase the degree of correlation and make it more reproducible. In addition, the phase shifts between tumor motion and abdominal displacement were improved; however, all patients breathed more deeply, and the SI lung tumor position mismatches became slightly larger with audio coaching than without audio coaching.

  9. Effect of Curcuma zedoaria crude extract against tumor progression and immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FR Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study the effect of the crude extract of Curcuma zedoaria on peripheral blood cells and tumor progression in C57Bl/6J mice injected with B16F10 murine melanoma cells. The intraperitoneal therapy showed a significant increase in total white and red blood cell counts, a decrease in peritoneal cell number and tumor volume reduction, whereas the oral administration revealed a noteworthy augmentation only in total leukocyte count. These results contribute to evaluate the importance of alternative treatments that employ phytotherapic compounds against tumor progression and its possible immunomodulation.

  10. Anti-Tumor Effects of Ketogenic Diets in Mice: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Rainer J.; Champ, Colin E.; Otto, Christoph; Kämmerer, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently ketogenic diets (KDs) are hyped as an anti-tumor intervention aimed at exploiting the metabolic abnormalities of cancer cells. However, while data in humans is sparse, translation of murine tumor models to the clinic is further hampered by small sample sizes, heterogeneous settings and mixed results concerning tumor growth retardation. The aim was therefore to synthesize the evidence for a growth inhibiting effect of KDs when used as a monotherapy in mice. Methods We conducted a Bayesian random effects meta-analysis on all studies assessing the survival (defined as the time to reach a pre-defined endpoint such as tumor volume) of mice on an unrestricted KD compared to a high carbohydrate standard diet (SD). For 12 studies meeting the inclusion criteria either a mean survival time ratio (MR) or hazard ratio (HR) between the KD and SD groups could be obtained. The posterior estimates for the MR and HR averaged over four priors on the between-study heterogeneity τ2 were MR = 0.85 (95% highest posterior density interval (HPDI) = [0.73, 0.97]) and HR = 0.55 (95% HPDI = [0.26, 0.87]), indicating a significant overall benefit of the KD in terms of prolonged mean survival times and reduced hazard rate. All studies that used a brain tumor model also chose a late starting point for the KD (at least one day after tumor initiation) which accounted for 26% of the heterogeneity. In this subgroup the KD was less effective (MR = 0.89, 95% HPDI = [0.76, 1.04]). Conclusions There was an overall tumor growth delaying effect of unrestricted KDs in mice. Future experiments should aim at differentiating the effects of KD timing versus tumor location, since external evidence is currently consistent with an influence of both of these factors. PMID:27159218

  11. Anti-Tumor Effects of Ketogenic Diets in Mice: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Rainer J; Champ, Colin E; Otto, Christoph; Kämmerer, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Currently ketogenic diets (KDs) are hyped as an anti-tumor intervention aimed at exploiting the metabolic abnormalities of cancer cells. However, while data in humans is sparse, translation of murine tumor models to the clinic is further hampered by small sample sizes, heterogeneous settings and mixed results concerning tumor growth retardation. The aim was therefore to synthesize the evidence for a growth inhibiting effect of KDs when used as a monotherapy in mice. We conducted a Bayesian random effects meta-analysis on all studies assessing the survival (defined as the time to reach a pre-defined endpoint such as tumor volume) of mice on an unrestricted KD compared to a high carbohydrate standard diet (SD). For 12 studies meeting the inclusion criteria either a mean survival time ratio (MR) or hazard ratio (HR) between the KD and SD groups could be obtained. The posterior estimates for the MR and HR averaged over four priors on the between-study heterogeneity τ2 were MR = 0.85 (95% highest posterior density interval (HPDI) = [0.73, 0.97]) and HR = 0.55 (95% HPDI = [0.26, 0.87]), indicating a significant overall benefit of the KD in terms of prolonged mean survival times and reduced hazard rate. All studies that used a brain tumor model also chose a late starting point for the KD (at least one day after tumor initiation) which accounted for 26% of the heterogeneity. In this subgroup the KD was less effective (MR = 0.89, 95% HPDI = [0.76, 1.04]). There was an overall tumor growth delaying effect of unrestricted KDs in mice. Future experiments should aim at differentiating the effects of KD timing versus tumor location, since external evidence is currently consistent with an influence of both of these factors.

  12. Anti-Tumor Effects of Ketogenic Diets in Mice: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer J Klement

    Full Text Available Currently ketogenic diets (KDs are hyped as an anti-tumor intervention aimed at exploiting the metabolic abnormalities of cancer cells. However, while data in humans is sparse, translation of murine tumor models to the clinic is further hampered by small sample sizes, heterogeneous settings and mixed results concerning tumor growth retardation. The aim was therefore to synthesize the evidence for a growth inhibiting effect of KDs when used as a monotherapy in mice.We conducted a Bayesian random effects meta-analysis on all studies assessing the survival (defined as the time to reach a pre-defined endpoint such as tumor volume of mice on an unrestricted KD compared to a high carbohydrate standard diet (SD. For 12 studies meeting the inclusion criteria either a mean survival time ratio (MR or hazard ratio (HR between the KD and SD groups could be obtained. The posterior estimates for the MR and HR averaged over four priors on the between-study heterogeneity τ2 were MR = 0.85 (95% highest posterior density interval (HPDI = [0.73, 0.97] and HR = 0.55 (95% HPDI = [0.26, 0.87], indicating a significant overall benefit of the KD in terms of prolonged mean survival times and reduced hazard rate. All studies that used a brain tumor model also chose a late starting point for the KD (at least one day after tumor initiation which accounted for 26% of the heterogeneity. In this subgroup the KD was less effective (MR = 0.89, 95% HPDI = [0.76, 1.04].There was an overall tumor growth delaying effect of unrestricted KDs in mice. Future experiments should aim at differentiating the effects of KD timing versus tumor location, since external evidence is currently consistent with an influence of both of these factors.

  13. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and PARP, which resulted from suppression of MCL-1 and BCL-2 expression in the cells. APA also inactivated the Akt/mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells. Thus, APA exerts a strong anti-tumor effect on breast cancer cells, most likely through induction of apoptosis. Our study is the first to identify this novel anti-tumor compound and provides a new strategy for isolation and separation of single compounds from herbs. PMID:26943775

  14. Delay equations modeling the effects of phase-specific drugs and immunotherapy on proliferating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Maria Vittoria; Kuttler, Christina; Zinsl, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present a mathematical model for tumor growth based on the biology of the cell cycle. For an appropriate description of the effects of phase-specific drugs, it is necessary to look at the cell cycle and its phases. Our model reproduces the dynamics of three different tumor cell populations: quiescent cells, cells during the interphase and mitotic cells. Starting from a partial differential equations (PDEs) setting, a delay differential equations (DDE) model is derived for an easier and more realistic approach. Our equations also include interactions of tumor cells with immune system effectors. We investigate the model both from the analytical and the numerical point of view, give conditions for positivity of solutions and focus on the stability of the cancer-free equilibrium. Different immunotherapeutic strategies and their effects on the tumor growth are considered, as well.

  15. Different ways to improve the clinical effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatal Jean-Francois

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT has been proven effective in the treatment of radiosensitive non-Hodgkin lymphoma but, for radioresistant solid tumors, new approaches are necessary to improve the clinical effectiveness. A real improvement has been the introduction of the pretargeting technology which appeared to be able to significantly increase tumor-to-normal organ uptake ratios.Another very promising approach consists in associating RIT with other treatment modalities. Finally the use of alpha particle-emitting radionuclides such as astatin-211 or bismuth-213 (alpha-RIT should allow to efficiently eradicate disseminated microscopic clusters of tumor cells or isolated tumor cells which fit well with the short path length of alpha particles.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of lobectomy versus genetic testing (Afirma®) for indeterminate thyroid nodules: Considering the costs of surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentine, Courtney J; Vanness, David J; Schneider, David F

    2018-01-01

    We evaluated whether diagnostic thyroidectomy for indeterminate thyroid nodules would be more cost-effective than genetic testing after including the costs of long-term surveillance. We used a Markov decision model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of thyroid lobectomy versus genetic testing (Afirma®) for evaluation of indeterminate (Bethesda 3-4) thyroid nodules. The base case was a 40-year-old woman with a 1-cm indeterminate nodule. Probabilities and estimates of utilities were obtained from the literature. Cost estimates were based on Medicare reimbursements with a 3% discount rate for costs and quality-adjusted life-years. During a 5-year period after the diagnosis of indeterminate thyroid nodules, lobectomy was less costly and more effective than Afirma® (lobectomy: $6,100; 4.50 quality-adjusted life- years vs Afirma®: $9,400; 4.47 quality-adjusted life-years). Only in 253 of 10,000 simulations (2.5%) did Afirma® show a net benefit at a cost-effectiveness threshold of $100,000 per quality- adjusted life-years. There was only a 0.3% probability of Afirma® being cost saving and a 14.9% probability of improving quality-adjusted life-years. Our base case estimate suggests that diagnostic lobectomy dominates genetic testing as a strategy for ruling out malignancy of indeterminate thyroid nodules. These results, however, were highly sensitive to estimates of utilities after lobectomy and living under surveillance after Afirma®. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Safety and effectiveness of tadalafil in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: Japanese post-marketing surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroyoshi; Kobayashi, Noriko; Taketsuna, Masanori; Tajima, Koyuki; Murakami, Masahiro

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of tadalafil in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in real-world clinical practice. This prospective, multicenter, noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance included patients with PAH who were observed for up to 2 years after initiation of tadalafil. Safety was assessed by analyzing the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discontinuations due to adverse events (AEs), and serious adverse drug reactions (SADRs). Effectiveness measurements included the assessment of the change in World Health Organization (WHO) functional classification of PAH, 6-minute walk test, cardiac catheterization, and echocardiography. Among 1676 patients analyzed for safety, the overall incidence of ADRs was 31.2%. The common ADRs (≥1.0%) were headache (7.0%), diarrhea (1.9%), platelet count decreased (1.8%), anemia, epistaxis, and nausea (1.6% each), flushing (1.3%), hepatic function abnormal (1.1%), hot flush, and myalgia (1.0% each). The common SADRs (≥0.3%) were cardiac failure (0.7%), interstitial lung disease, worsening of PAH, and platelet count decreased (0.3% each). Among 1556 patients analyzed for effectiveness, the percentages of patients with improvement of WHO functional class at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the initiation of tadalafil, and last observation were 17.1%, 24.8%, 28.9%, and 22.5%, respectively. At all observation points (except pulmonary regurgitation pressure gradient at end diastole at 3 months), the mean 6-minute walk distance, cardiac catheterization, and echocardiogram measurements showed statistically significant improvement. This surveillance demonstrated that tadalafil has favorable safety and effectiveness profiles for long-term use in patients with PAH in Japan.

  18. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET Imaging for Monitoring Everolimus Effect on Tumor-Growth in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Munk Jensen, Mette; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors...... and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging. METHODS: The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline...

  19. The anti-tumor effect of ACNU and x-irradiation on mouse glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hidemitsu; Hori, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Mogami, Heitaro; Hayakawa, Toru.

    1979-01-01

    Anti-tumor activities of 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride (ACNU) and x-irradiation on methylcholanthrene induced glioma in C 57 BL mice were studied in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments using cultured glioma cells (MGB cells), the synchronization of cell cycle was done by excess addition of thymidine, and the anti-tumor cell effect were investigated by mean of determinations of DNA synthesis, mitotic index and the number of the living cells following the treatments. As the results, it appeared obvious that ACNU was most effective on MGB cells in S phase and x-irradiation in M phase. As to the combined therapy of ACNU and x-irradiation, the anti-tumor effect was most remarkable when the cells were treated by x-irradiation in the G 2 , M phase, which were hervested by addition of ACNU 44 hours before irradiation. However simultaneous treatment of ACNU and x-irradiation on the cells in G 1 phase was not so remarkable. In vivo experiments the anti-tumor effect of ACNU and x-irradiation on subcutaneously or intracranially transplanted glioma in mice was investigated. Either ACNU 10 mg/kg or local x-irradiation 1240 rads showed inhibitory effect on the tumor growth and prolonged the survival time of the tumor bearing mice. The combination therapy was more effective than ACNU or x-irradiation alone, particularly combination therapy of ACNU and repeated small doses irradiation of x-ray was remarkably effective. Evidence obtained indicated that the combination therapy of ACNU and x-irradiation have synergistic anti-tumor effect on experimental mouse glioma. (author)

  20. Non-cell-autonomous effects yield lower clonal diversity in expanding tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, Tazzio; Thomas, Frédéric; Roche, Benjamin

    2017-09-11

    Recent cancer research has investigated the possibility that non-cell-autonomous (NCA) driving tumor growth can support clonal diversity (CD). Indeed, mutations can affect the phenotypes not only of their carriers ("cell-autonomous", CA effects), but also sometimes of other cells (NCA effects). However, models that have investigated this phenomenon have only considered a restricted number of clones. Here, we designed an individual-based model of tumor evolution, where clones grow and mutate to yield new clones, among which a given frequency have NCA effects on other clones' growth. Unlike previously observed for smaller assemblages, most of our simulations yield lower CD with high frequency of mutations with NCA effects. Owing to NCA effects increasing competition in the tumor, clones being already dominant are more likely to stay dominant, and emergent clones not to thrive. These results may help personalized medicine to predict intratumor heterogeneity across different cancer types for which frequency of NCA effects could be quantified.

  1. Investigating the expression, effect and tumorigenic pathway of PADI2 in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Yabing; Xu, Bing; Ma, Fang; Li, Chang; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yao; Chang, Xiaotian

    2017-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) catalyzes the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues, termed citrullination. Recent studies have suggested that PAD isoform 2 (PADI2) plays an important role in tumors, although its tumorigenic effect and mechanism are largely unknown. Immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to investigate the expression level of PADI2 in various tumor tissues and patient blood samples, respectively. MNK-45 and Bel-7402 tumor cell lines originating from gastric and liver tumors, respectively, were treated with anti-PADI2 siRNA, and the subsequent cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration were observed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays, including Cancer PathwayFinder, Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes, p53 Signaling Pathway, Signal Transduction Pathway and Tumor Metastasis PCR arrays, were used to investigate the tumorigenic pathway of PADI2 in the siRNA-treated tumor cells. This analysis was verified by real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry detected significantly increased expression of PADI2 in invasive breast ductal carcinoma, cervical squamous cell carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, liver hepatocellular carcinoma, lung cancer, ovarian serous papillary adenocarcinoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma samples. ELISA detected a twofold increase in PADI2 expression in the blood of 48.3% of patients with liver cancer, 38% of patients with cervical carcinoma and 32% of patients with gastric carcinoma. Increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and migration were observed in the anti-PADI2 siRNA-treated MNK-45 cells, and increased cell proliferation and migration and decreased apoptosis were observed in the treated Bel-7402 cells with suppressed PADI2 expression. PCR arrays and real-time PCR detected significantly decreased CXCR2 and EPO expression in the MNK-45 cells and Bel-7402 cells, respectively, with the anti-PADI2 siRNA treatments. PADI2 expression is increased in many types of

  2. Tumor histology and location predict deep nuclei toxicity: Implications for late effects from focal brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaga, Alexis; Shields, Lisa B.E.; Sun, David A.; Vitaz, Todd W.; Spalding, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity resulting from both disease and treatment is an adverse side effect in the management of patients with central nervous system malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that despite these improvements, certain tumors place patients at risk for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory late effects. Defining patient groups at risk for these effects could allow for development of preventive strategies. Fifty patients with primary brain tumors underwent radiation planning with magnetic resonance imaging scan and computed tomography datasets. Organs at risk (OAR) responsible for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory function were defined. Inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy was optimized with priority given to target coverage while penalties were assigned to exceeding normal tissue tolerances. Tumor laterality, location, and histology were compared with OAR doses, and analysis of variance was performed to determine the significance of any observed correlation. The ipsilateral hippocampus exceeded dose limits in frontal (74%), temporal (94%), and parietal (100%) lobe tumor locations. The contralateral hippocampus was at risk in the following tumor locations: frontal (53%), temporal (83%), or parietal (50%) lobe. Patients with high-grade glioma were at risk for ipsilateral (88%) and contralateral (73%) hippocampal damage (P <0.05 compared with other histologies). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus exceeded dose tolerances in patients with pituitary tumors (both 100%) and high-grade gliomas (50% and 75%, P <0.05 compared with other histologies), respectively. Despite application of modern radiation therapy, certain tumor locations and histologies continue to place patients at risk for morbidity. Patients with high-grade gliomas or tumors located in the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes are at risk for neurocognitive decline, likely because of larger target volumes and higher radiation doses. Data from this study

  3. Tumor histology and location predict deep nuclei toxicity: Implications for late effects from focal brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, Alexis; Shields, Lisa B.E. [Norton Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, KY (United States); Sun, David A.; Vitaz, Todd W. [Norton Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, KY (United States); Brain Tumor Center, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY (United States); Spalding, Aaron C., E-mail: acspalding1@gmail.com [Brain Tumor Center, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY (United States); Norton Cancer Institute, Radiation Center, Kosair Children' s Hospital, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Normal tissue toxicity resulting from both disease and treatment is an adverse side effect in the management of patients with central nervous system malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that despite these improvements, certain tumors place patients at risk for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory late effects. Defining patient groups at risk for these effects could allow for development of preventive strategies. Fifty patients with primary brain tumors underwent radiation planning with magnetic resonance imaging scan and computed tomography datasets. Organs at risk (OAR) responsible for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory function were defined. Inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy was optimized with priority given to target coverage while penalties were assigned to exceeding normal tissue tolerances. Tumor laterality, location, and histology were compared with OAR doses, and analysis of variance was performed to determine the significance of any observed correlation. The ipsilateral hippocampus exceeded dose limits in frontal (74%), temporal (94%), and parietal (100%) lobe tumor locations. The contralateral hippocampus was at risk in the following tumor locations: frontal (53%), temporal (83%), or parietal (50%) lobe. Patients with high-grade glioma were at risk for ipsilateral (88%) and contralateral (73%) hippocampal damage (P <0.05 compared with other histologies). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus exceeded dose tolerances in patients with pituitary tumors (both 100%) and high-grade gliomas (50% and 75%, P <0.05 compared with other histologies), respectively. Despite application of modern radiation therapy, certain tumor locations and histologies continue to place patients at risk for morbidity. Patients with high-grade gliomas or tumors located in the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes are at risk for neurocognitive decline, likely because of larger target volumes and higher radiation doses. Data from this study

  4. The effect of cytokines on Ga-67 uptake in normal and tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, M. H.; Park, S. A.; Lee, S. Y.; Han, Y. M.; Jeong, K. H.; Kim, J. S.; Choi, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The gallium-avidity expressed by some tumors may depend, in part, upon host factors. These factors could include the action of immune-mediated elements or cytokines on the tumor. Many cytokines are frequently evolved by the host in response to the presence of a tumors. Examples include tumor necrosis factor, interferons, interleukins, and factors could to determine the degree of Ga-avidity expressed by the tumors. To determine the effect of it, we compared uptake of Ga-67 in normal and tumor cells with or without cytokines that are frequently evolved by the host on the tumor and in normal Balb/C and Balb/nude mice bearing gallium-avid tumor. Ga-avid tumor cell, MMSV/3T3 and normal cell, Balb/3T3 were incubated with cytokines, interleukine-I, interferon-a, tumor necrosis factor for 24hrs at 37 .deg. C and 8% CO 2 . After then they were incubated with DMEM+10% serum containing Ga-67 for 15 min. The cells were solubilized in 1% SDS for gamma counting and protein determinations. MMSV/3T3, approximately 1 x 10 9 cells per mouse were injected subcutaneously into the left rear flank of normal Balb/C and Balb/nude mice. When the tumors reached about 1cm in diameter, the mice were injected with Ga-67 (2uCi/g B. W.). The mice were sacrificed 72 hrs later. Organs and tissues were removed, weighed, and activity per mg determined by gamma counter. MMSV/3T3 cells were more gallium-avid than Balb/3T3 cells. But no significant difference between control cells without cytokines and cells treated with cytokines was observed. A specific cytokine was not found to induce uptake of Ga-67 in cultured cells. The pattern of Ga-67 uptake in normal and tumor tissues was similar for normal Balb/C and Balb/nude mice. We concluded that immune system or host factors medicated by tumor specific factors, cytokines were not important in mediating the uptake of Ga-67

  5. Relative effectiveness of irish factories in the surveillance of slaughtered cattle for visible lesions of tuberculosis, 2005-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olea-Popelka Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ireland, every animal is examined at slaughter for its fitness for human consumption. The aim of this study was to determine the relative effectiveness of factories in submitting and subsequently in having suspect lesions confirmed as bovine tuberculosis (TB lesions during the years 2005-2007. This work provides an update from previously published data for years 2003-2004. During 2005-2007 data were available on 4,401,813 cattle from attested herds (i.e. herds classified free of bovine TB, from which data for potential confounding factors were available for 3,344,057 slaughtered animals at one of the 37 export-licensed factories. Findings From these animals, 8,178 suspect lesions were submitted for laboratory confirmation. Lesions from 5,456 (66.7% animals tested as positive, and 269 (3.2% were inconclusive for bovine TB. Logistic regression was used to determine adjusted submission and confirmation risks for each factory while controlling for confounding factors. Factory rankings based on adjusted and crude risks were similar. The average crude submission risk for all the factories was 25 lesions per 10,000 animals slaughtered, ranging from 0 to 52. The crude confirmation risk varied between 30.3% and 91.3%. Conclusions Substantial variation in the effectiveness of lesion submission and subsequent confirmation as bovine TB was found among the 37 factories. Compared to previous years (2003-2004, there was an increased bovine TB lesion submission and confirmation risk. Continued monitoring of the effectiveness of slaughter surveillance in Ireland is recommended; emphasis should be placed on efforts to improve bovine TB surveillance in factories with lower rankings.

  6. Exhaustion of T lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment: Significance and effective mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodzadeh Gholami, Mohammad; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Saeedi, Yousef; Heydari, Sahel; Garssen, Johan; Falak, Reza

    2017-12-01

    T lymphocytes play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses to tumors. However, due to different tolerance mechanisms and inhibitory effects of the tumor microenvironment (TME) on T cells, responses to tumors are insufficient. In fact, cellular and molecular suppressive mechanisms repress T cell responses in the TME, resulting in senescent, anergic and exhausted lymphocytes. Exhaustion is a poor responsive status of T cells, with up-regulated expression of inhibitory receptors, decreased production of effective cytokines, and reduced cytotoxic activity. Low immunogenicity of tumor antigens and inadequate presentation of tumor-specific antigens results in inappropriate activation of naive T lymphocytes against tumor antigens. Moreover, when effector cytotoxic T cells enter TME, they encounter a complicated network of cells and cytokines that suppress their effectiveness and turn them into exhausted T cells. Thus, the mechanism of T cell exhaustion in cancer is different from that in chronic infections. In this review we will discuss the main components such as inhibitory receptors, inflammatory cells, stromal cells, cytokine milieu as well as environmental and metabolic conditions in TME which play role in development of exhaustion. Furthermore, recent therapeutic methods available to overcome exhaustion will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Attaching Hollywood to a Surveillant Assemblage: Normalizing Discourses of Video Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy K Lippert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines video surveillance images in Hollywood film. It moves beyond previous accounts of video surveillance in relation to film by theoretically situating the use of these surveillance images in a broader “surveillant assemblage”. To this end, scenes from a sample of thirty-five (35 films of several genres are examined to discern dominant discourses and how they lend themselves to normalization of video surveillance. Four discourses are discovered and elaborated by providing examples from Hollywood films. While the films provide video surveillance with a positive associative association it is not without nuance and limitations. Thus, it is found that some forms of resistance to video surveillance are shown while its deterrent effect is not. It is ultimately argued that Hollywood film is becoming attached to a video surveillant assemblage discursively through these normalizing discourses as well as structurally to the extent actual video surveillance technology to produce the images is used.

  8. Effect of pH on tumor cell uptake of radiogallium in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallabhajosula, S.R.; Hartwig, J.F.; Wolf, W.

    1982-10-01

    When injected at tracer levels into the blood, radiogallium as /sup 67/Ga-citrate binds to, and is transported to, the site of the tumor by transferrin. The process by which transferrin-bound Ga is converted to tumor-bound Ga is not fully unterstood, but may involve the differential physicology of neoplasmas compared with normal tissues. Based on the slight acidity known to be exhibited by the extracellular fluid of many animal and human tumors, we have studied the effect of pH on stability and dissociation of the Ga-transferrin complex and on the uptake of Ga by tumor cells in vitro and animal tumors in vivo. When plasma from rabbits injected with /sup 67/Ga-citrate was dialyzed at pH 6.5-7.5, disociation of Ga from transferrin showed an inverse pH-dependence. A similar inverse dependence on pH was observed for the uptake of Ga by L1210 leukemia cells and Ehrlich ascites cells incubated with Ga-transferrin complex. Tumor uptake of Ga in rats bearing Walker-256 carcinosarcoma or Murphystum lymphosarcoma whose tumor pH had been further lowered by administration of glucose showed a statistically significant increase over control rats receiving no glucose. These results demonstrate that the stability of the Ga-transferrin complex is pH-dependent and suggest that dissociation of this complex due to decreased pH at the tumor site may be one factor involved in tumor localization and binding of Ga.

  9. Clinical observation on the effect of resection of eyelid tumor and stage Ⅰ recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hai Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate clinical effects of local resection of eyelid tumors and pathological examination or frozen section examination as well as the stage I recovery.METHODS: For all 92 cases 92 eyes of eyelid tumor patients who underwent local resection, reconstruction in stage Ⅰ and routine pathological examination(37 cases of suspected malignant tumors using frozen section examination. If it was malignant, excision by Moths surgery. Using free palate mucosa autograft in stage I or reconstruction by Hughes surgery combined with eye flaps repaired eyelid defects.RESULTS: The postoperative pathological diagnosis: 52 cases were benign tumors, and 40 cases malignant tumors. All cases of eye flaps and hard palate mucosa grafts were survived. Followed up for more than 6mo, no tumor were recurred. The appearance and function of eyelid were satisfactory.CONCLUSION: In this group of cases, nearly half of eyelid tumors are malignant tumors. It should be treated and operated as early as possible. For suspected malignant tumors, we use frozen section examination to confirm its properties in order to excision cleanly in stage Ⅰ, reducing the recurrence and metastasis. According to the eyelid defect after resection, we could do repair operation in stage Ⅰ. The inner larger defect is repaired by using hard palate mucosa transplantation or Hughes surgery. The outer layer of the eyelid defect is repaired by using eye flap glide, the free flap, the kite flap, the simple suture, etc. It should be careful when using the hard palate mucosa transplantation in the upper eyelid defect.

  10. Surveillance and Critical Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this comment, the author reflects on surveillance from a critical theory approach, his involvement in surveillance research and projects, and the status of the study of surveillance. The comment ascertains a lack of critical thinking about surveillance, questions the existence of something called “surveillance studies” as opposed to a critical theory of society, and reflects on issues such as Edward Snowden’s revelations, and Foucault and Marx in the context of surveillance.

  11. Synergistic anti-tumor effect of ultrasound and hematoporphyrin on sarcoma180 cells with special reference to the changes of morphology and cytochrome oxidase activity of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan-hong, L; Shi-hui, S; Ya-ping, X; Hao, Q; Jin-xuan, Z; Yao-hui, R; Meng, L; Pan, W

    2004-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the inhibitory effects of the association of hematoporphyrin and ultrasound at variable intensities with a fixed frequency of 1.1MHz in tumor nodules. Specifically, the effects were studied both in solid and ascitic S180 tumors transplanted in mice by clinical, cytochemical and ultrastructural evaluation. The results indicated that the use of hematoporphyrin alone had no significant effect on destroying tumor cells. The ultrasound alone had little effect. Interestingly, the inhibition was much more effective when hematoporphyrin was combined with ultrasound. The inhibition was 3 times better than ultrasound alone and 8 times better than hematoporphyrin used alone. Our results also indicated that the changes on cell structure and cytochrome oxidation activity are important factors that could inhibit tumor cell growth and induce cell death. Apoptosis of tumor cells could be induced by hematoporphyrin. Our study investigated the killing mechanism on S180 tumor cells by using hematoporphyrin and low frequency ultrasound at cell, tissue and individual level.

  12. [Effect of resection margin and tumor number on survival of patients with small liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Weiqi; Yu, Weibo; Wu, Fan; Wu, Jianxiong; Wang, Liming; Tian, Fei; An, Songlin; Feng, Li; Liu, Faqiang

    2015-12-01

    To explore the significance of resection margin and tumor number on survival of patients with small liver cancer after hepatectomy. We collected 219 cases with small liver cancer undergoing hepatectomy in Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between December 2003 to July 2013. The survival rates were compared by log-rank test between two resection margin groups (≥ 1 cm vs. number groups (single tumor vs. multiple tumors). We also performed a multifactor analysis by Cox model. The 1-, 3-, 5- and 10- year overall survival rates were 95.9%, 85.3%, 67.8% and 53.3%, respectively, in all patients. The median survival time was 28 months in the group of number on the patients' survival. For small liver cancer, the resection margin of 1 cm might be advised. Increasing resection margin in further could probably not improve therapeutic effect. Standardized operation and combined treatment will decrease the negative influence of multiple tumors on overall survival.

  13. Effects of low dose radiation on antioxidant enzymes after radiotherapy of tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin; Gao Gang; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Liu Xiaoqiu; Wang Zhiquan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To search for effects of low dose radiation on the activities of antioxidant enzymes after radiotherapy of tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) were all determined by chemical colorimetry. Results: Low dose radiation increase the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) in serum of tumor-bearing mice more markedly than those in the unirradiated controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, GST, CAT in serum of tumor-bearing mice (d 5 , d 3 ) irradiated with 5cGy 6h before 2.0 Gy radiation are obviously higher than those of the group (c 3 , c 5 ) given with radiotherapy only. Conclusion: The increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in serum of tumor-bearing mice triggered by low dose radiation could partly contribute to the protective mechanism. (authors)

  14. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Polarization within the Tumor Microenvironment Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosette M. Rivera-Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs represent a promising tool for cell therapy, particularly for their antitumor effects. This cell population can be isolated from multiple tissue sources and also display an innate ability to home to areas of inflammation, such as tumors. Upon entry into the tumor microenvironment niche, MSCs promote or inhibit tumor progression by various mechanisms, largely through the release of soluble factors. These factors can be immunomodulatory by activating or inhibiting both the adaptive and innate immune responses. The mechanisms by which MSCs modulate the immune response are not well understood. Because of this, the relationship between MSCs and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment niche continues to be an active area of research in order to help explain the apparent contradictory findings currently available in the literature. The ongoing research aims to enhance the potential of MSCs in future therapeutic applications.

  15. Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Immunosuppressive Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiujun Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is an important complementary strategy for treating cancer in China. The mechanism is related to regulating the internal environment and remodeling the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment (TIM. Herein we illustrate how TIM is reformed and its protumor activity on promoting tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, tumor invasion, and the oncogenicity of cancer stem cells. Furthermore we summarize the effects and mechanism of TCM on regulating TIM via enhancing antitumor immune responses (e.g., regulating the expression of MHC molecules and Fas/FasL, attenuating cancerigenic ability of cancer stem cells and remolding immunosuppressive cells (e.g., reversing immune phenotypes of T lymphocytes and tumor associated macrophages, promoting dendritic cells mature, restraining myeloid derived suppressor cells function, and regulating Th1/Th2 factors. We also reveal the bidirectional and multitargeting functions of TCM on regulating TIM. Hopefully, it provides new theoretical basis for TCM clinical practice in cancer treatment and prevention.

  16. An evaluation of anti-tumor effect and toxicity of PEGylated ursolic acid liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qianqian; Zhao, Tingting; Liu, Yanping; Xing, Shanshan; Li, Lei; Gao, Dawei, E-mail: dwgao@ysu.edu.cn [Yanshan University, Applying Chemistry Key Lab of Hebei Province, Department of Bioengineer (China)

    2016-02-15

    Therapy of solid tumors mediated by nano-drug delivery has attracted considerable interest. In our previous study, ursolic acid (UA) was successfully encapsulated into PEGylated liposomes. The study aimed to evaluate the tumor inhibition effect and cytotoxicity of the PEGylated UA liposomes by U14 cervical carcinoma-bearing mice. The liposomes were spherical particles with mean particle diameters of 127.2 nm. The tumor inhibition rate of PEGylated UA liposomes was 53.60 % on U14 cervical carcinoma-bearing mice, which was greater than those of the UA solution (18.25 %) and traditional UA liposome groups (40.75 %). The tumor cells apoptosis rate of PEGylated UA liposomes was 25.81 %, which was significantly higher than that of the traditional UA liposomes (13.37 %). Moreover, the kidney and liver did not emerge the pathological changes in UA therapeutic mice by histopathological analysis, while there were significant differences on tumor tissues among three UA formulation groups. The PEGylated UA liposomes exhibited higher anti-tumor activity and lower cytotoxicity, and the main reason was that the coating PEG layer improved UA liposome properties, such as enhancing the stability of liposomes, promoting the effect of slow release, and prolonging the time of blood circulation. This may shed light on the development of PEGylated nano-vehicles.

  17. Differential effects of antofine N-oxide on solid tumor and leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Tania; Yang, Xianwen; Li, Weihong; Bernardin, Francois; Kaoma, Tony; Muller, Arnaud; Vallar, Laurent; Steinmetz, André

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the anti-cancer activities of antofine N-oxide isolated and purified from the medicinal plant Cynanchum vincetoxicum. Antofine N-oxide displayed a strong inhibitory effect on several solid tumor cell lines (glioblastoma, breast carcinoma and lung carcinoma) and on a T-cell leukemia cell line. Remarkably, its cytotoxic effect was considerably weaker in non-cancer cells. Antofine N-oxide was found to inhibit proliferation of the solid tumor cells whereas it caused apoptotic cell death in the leukemia cells. A microarray analysis after a short treatment revealed that the number of differentially expressed genes was considerably higher in solid tumor than in leukemia cells. Up-regulated genes in the three solid tumor cell lines include genes related to TNFα signaling, of which TNFα was among the most significantly induced. A functional analysis revealed that TNFR1 signaling was most likely activated in the solid tumor cells. The increased mRNA levels of several genes of this pathway (namely TNFα, TNFAIP3 and BIRC3) were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR after different treatment durations. Finally a slight inhibition of NFκB-mediated transcription was observed in the same cells. Together our results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation in solid tumor cells essentially occurs through TNFα signaling whereas this pathway is not activated in leukemia cells. Apoptotic cell death in the latter is induced by a distinct yet unknown pathway.

  18. Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Q.-S.; Goh, Vicky; Milner, Jessica; Padhani, Anwar R.; Saunders, Michele I.; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the in vivo acute vascular effects of fractionated radiotherapy for human non-small-cell lung cancer using volumetric perfusion computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, undergoing palliative radiotherapy delivering 27 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 weeks, were scanned before treatment, and after the second (9 Gy), fourth (18 Gy), and sixth (27 Gy) radiation fraction. Using 16-detector CT, multiple sequential volumetric acquisitions were acquired after intravenous contrast agent injection. Measurements of vascular blood volume and permeability for the whole tumor volume were obtained. Vascular changes at the tumor periphery and center were also measured. Results: At baseline, lung tumor vascularity was spatially heterogeneous with the tumor rim showing a higher vascular blood volume and permeability than the center. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vascular blood volume increased by 31.6% (paired t test, p = 0.10), 49.3% (p = 0.034), and 44.6% (p = 0.0012) respectively at the tumor rim, and 16.4% (p = 0.29), 19.9% (p = 0.029), and 4.0% (p = 0.0050) respectively at the center of the tumor. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vessel permeability increased by 18.4% (p = 0.022), 44.8% (p = 0.0048), and 20.5% (p = 0.25) at the tumor rim. The increase in permeability at the tumor center was not significant after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Fractionated radiotherapy increases tumor vascular blood volume and permeability in human non-small-cell lung cancer. We have established the spatial distribution of vascular changes after radiotherapy; greater vascular changes were demonstrated at the tumor rim compared with the center

  19. Effective surveillance strategies following a potential classical Swine Fever incursion in a remote wild pig population in North-Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, E; Cowled, B; Graeme Garner, M; Toribio, J-A L M L; Ward, M P

    2014-10-01

    Early disease detection and efficient methods of proving disease freedom can substantially improve the response to incursions of important transboundary animal diseases in previously free regions. We used a spatially explicit, stochastic disease spread model to simulate the spread of classical swine fever in wild pigs in a remote region of northern Australia and to assess the performance of disease surveillance strategies to detect infection at different time points and to delineate the size of the resulting outbreak. Although disease would likely be detected, simple random sampling was suboptimal. Radial and leapfrog sampling improved the effectiveness of surveillance at various stages of the simulated disease incursion. This work indicates that at earlier stages, radial sampling can reduce epidemic length and achieve faster outbreak delineation and control, but at later stages leapfrog sampling will outperform radial sampling in relation to supporting faster disease control with a less-extensive outbreak area. Due to the complexity of wildlife population dynamics and group behaviour, a targeted approach to surveillance needs to be implemented for the efficient use of resources and time. Using a more situation-based surveillance approach and accounting for disease distribution and the time period over which an epidemic has occurred is the best way to approach the selection of an appropriate surveillance strategy. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Effects of alkylating carcinogens on human tumor cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goth-Goldstein, R.; Hughes, M.

    1987-01-01

    In Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine and 3-methylguanine have been identified as lethal lesions, since two types of alkylating agent-sensitive mutants were deficient in repair of either of these lesions. Similar alkylation-sensitive human cell lines exist. These are the tumor cell lines of the complex Mer - phenotype. All Mer - cells examined were hypersensitive to killing by MNNG and other alkylating agents, and failed to repair O 6 -methylguanine. The widely studied HeLa S3 cell line has the Mer + phenotype, but a Mer - variant (HeLa MR) has arisen. This offers the possibility to study Mer - and Mer + cells of otherwise similar genetic background. We are using these two variants to analyze the Mer - phenotype further. When HeLa S3 and HeLa MR were treated with a highly dose of MNNG, and the surviving population exposed to a second dose of MNNG 2-3 weeks later, HeLa S3 (Mer + ) cells were equally or even slightly more sensitive to a second exposure of MNNG, whereas the surviving HeLa MR (Mer - ) population was much more resistant to MNNG. 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Preventing the preventable through effective surveillance: the case of diphtheria in a rural district of Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalkey, Revati K; Bhosale, Rajesh V; Joshi, Abhijeet P; Wakchoure, Sushil S; Tambe, Muralidhar P; Awate, Pradip; Marx, Michael

    2013-04-08

    age despite consistently poor immunization coverage (below 50%) remains unclear. Concomitant efforts should now focus on improving and monitoring primary immunization and booster coverages across all age groups. Gradually introducing adult immunization at ten year intervals may become necessary to prevent future vulnerabilities. Laboratory networks for genotyping and toxigenicity testing are urgently mandated at district level given the endemicity of the disease in the surrounding region and its recent introduction in remote Dhule. Contingency funds with pre- agreements to obtain ADS and DT/Td vaccines at short notice and developing standard case management protocols at district level are necessary. Monitoring the disease, emerging strains and mutations, alongside drug resistance through robust and effective surveillance is a pragmatic way forward.

  2. Tumor vaccines:

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Mojca; Ihan, Alojz

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regirrcents. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tccmor aaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which imrrtune tol...

  3. Effects of perfluorochemical emulsion on the timing of administration and irradiation in tumor bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa-Itoh, Youko; Ayakawa, Yoshio; Miyata, Nobuki

    1988-01-01

    Perfluorochemical content was examined periodically, in blood, tumor and some organs using gas chromatography, after Fluosol-DA saline 20 % (FDAS) was injected into LLC bearing mice. The blood half-life of FDAS in LLC bearing mice was 3.76 hrs (5 ml/kg injection) or 6.15 hrs (20 ml/kg injection) respectively, and FDAS almost disapeared from the blood after about 2 days (5 ml/kg) and 3 days (20 ml/kg) of FDAS-injection. Most of FDAS was accumulated into spleen and the liver. FDAS accumulation into the tumor tissue was 1 ∼ 6 % of injected-FDAS dose and the peak of FDAS accumulation was 1 ∼ 3 days after injection. The timing of FDAS-injection and irradiation in tumor bearing mice determined according to the results above (half-life and accumulation of FDAS in tumor). FDAS (5, 10, 20 ml/kg) was injected to LLC-bearing mice on 3, 2, 1 and 0 day before irradiation and they were irradiated 15 Gray under oxygen-breathing, respectively. FDAS-injected groups before irradiation (3, 2, 1 day before, respectively) showed a tendency of tumor growth delay, but didn't show significant difference as compared with oxygen-breathing group without FDAS, because they had not enough effective FDAS content in the blood. Although the FDAS-injected groups just before irradiation significantly showed the delay of tumor growth. These results demonstrate that oxygen and FDAS existing in the blood injected just before irradiation effectively delay tumor growth in which the lowest effective dose is 5 ml/kg. In the case of clinical application of FDAS, FDAS may be most effective, when administrated just before irradiation in every fractionated irradiation. (author)

  4. Acute effects of vascular modifying agents in solid tumors assessed by noninvasive laser Doppler flowmetry and near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Michael; Quistorff, Bjørn; Horsman, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    The potential of noninvasive laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to detect acute effects of different vascular-modifying agents on perfusion and blood volume in tumors was evaluated. C3H mouse mammary carcinomas (approximately 200 mm(3)) in the rear foot of CDF1 mice...... that the mechanism of action of CA4DP was vascular shut down with the blood pool trapped in the tumor. NTA caused no change in either tumor perfusion or tumor blood volume. We conclude that noninvasive LDF and NIRS can determine acute effects of vascular modifying agents on tumor perfusion and blood volume....

  5. Active Surveillance for Low Risk Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Confirmatory and Resource Consumption Study from the BIAS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurle, Rodolfo; Lazzeri, Massimo; Vanni, Elena; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Buffi, NicolòMaria; Casale, Paolo; Saita, Alberto; Morenghi, Emanuela; Forni, Giovanni; Cardone, Pasquale; Lista, Giuliana; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Peschechera, Roberto; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia; Benetti, Alessio; Maffei, Davide; Vavassori, Ivano; Guazzoni, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    We investigated predictive factors of failure and performed a resource consumption analysis in patients who underwent active surveillance for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. This prospective observational study monitored patients with a history of pathologically confirmed stage pTa (grade 1-2) or pT1a (grade 2) nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, and recurrent small size and number of tumors without hematuria and positive urine cytology. The primary end point was the failure rate of active surveillance. Assessment of failure predictive variables and per year direct hospital resource consumption analysis were secondary outcomes. Descriptive statistical analysis and Cox regression with univariable and multivariable analysis were done. Of 625 patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer 122 with a total of 146 active surveillance events were included in the protocol. Of the events 59 (40.4%) were deemed to require treatment after entering active surveillance. Median time on active surveillance was 11 months (IQR 5-26). Currently 76 patients (62.3%) remain under observation. On univariable analysis only time from the first transurethral resection to the start of active surveillance seemed to be inversely associated with recurrence-free survival (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.98-1.00, p = 0.027). Multivariable analysis also revealed an association with age at active surveillance start (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.94-1.00, p = 0.031) and the size of the lesion at the first transurethral resection (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.06-2.27, p = 0.025). The average specific annual resource consumption savings for each avoided transurethral bladder tumor resection was €1,378 for each intervention avoided. Active surveillance might be a reasonable clinical and cost-effective strategy in patients who present with small, low grade pTa/pT1a recurrent papillary bladder tumors. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Saponin-based adjuvants create a highly effective anti-tumor vaccine when combined with in situ tumor destruction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Nierkens, S.; Wagenaars, J.A.L.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Schrier, C.C.; Rijke, E.O.; Adema, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Today's most commonly used microbial vaccines are essentially composed of antigenic elements and a non-microbial adjuvant, and induce solid amounts of antibodies. Cancer vaccines mostly aim to induce anti-tumor CTL-responses, which require cross-presentation of tumor-derived antigens by dendritic

  7. Effects of the tumor vasculature targeting agent NGR-TNF on the tumor microenvironment in murine lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Gambarota, G.; Heerschap, A.; Lok, J.; Verhagen, I.; Corti, A.; Toma, S.; Gallo Stampino, C.; van der Kogel, A.; Punt, C. J. A.

    2006-01-01

    TNF-alpha may improve drug delivery to tumors by alteration of vascular permeability. However, toxicity precludes its systemic administration in patients. NGR-TNF comprises TNF coupled to the peptide CNGRC, which is a ligand for CD13. CD13 is expressed on tumor vasculature. Therefore, to assess the

  8. Effect of cytochalasins on F-actin and morphology of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, J W; Falsig Pedersen, S; Walmod, P S

    2000-01-01

    that, in intact cells, different cytochalasins can have varying effects on cell morphology and F-actin content and organization. To examine this problem in more detail, we analyzed the effects of cytochalasins on the cell morphology of and F-actin content and organization in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT...

  9. Anti-thrombotic and anti-tumor effect of water extract of caulis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    significantly (p < 0.05) up-regulated, whereas Bcl-2 was significantly (p < 0.05) down-regulated in the tumor tissues. ... effect, and therefore, has the potentials to be developed into effective drugs for clinical treatment of cancer and thrombosis diseases. .... changes in light transmission were recorded for 5 min. MTT assay.

  10. Laser immunotherapy for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with optimal thermal effects to enhance tumor immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Min; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Fuhe; Zhou, Feifan; Zhang, Linglin; Wang, Bo; Wang, Peiru; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Haiyan; Yang, Degang; Zhang, Guolong; Chen, Wei R; Wang, Xiuli

    2018-02-26

    Laser immunotherapy is a new anti-cancer therapy combining photothermal therapy and immunostimulation. It can eliminate the tumors by damaging tumor cells directly and promoting the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) to enhance tumor immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the thermal effects of laser immunotherapy and to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of laser immunotherapy for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). The cell viability and the DAMPs productions of heat-treated cSCC A431 cells in different temperatures were investigated. Laser immunotherapy with the optimal thermal effect for DAMPs production was performed on SKH-1 mice bearing ultraviolet-induced cSCC and a patient suffering from a large refractory cSCC. The temperature in the range of 45 °C - 50 °C killing half of A431 cells had an optimal thermal effect for the productions of DAMPs. The thermal effect could be further enhanced by local application of imiquimod, an immunoadjuvant. Laser immunotherapy eliminated most tumors and improved the survival rate of the ultraviolet-induced cSCC-bearing SKH-1 mice (P effect was observed in the mice experiment or in the clinical application. Our results strongly indicate that laser immunotherapy with optimal thermal effects is an effective and safe treatment modality for cSCC.

  11. Effects of chronic exposure to acidic environment on the response of tumor cells to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Ra; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    The influence of short-term exposure to an acidic environment on the radiosensitivity of tumor cells has been extensively explored, but the implication of chronic exposure to an acidic environment for the response of tumor cells to radiation has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic pre- and post-irradiation exposure of tumor cells to an acidic environment on the radiation-induced clonogenic death. Rat gliosarcoma cells were used throughout the in vitro study. Cells were exposed to pH 6.6 medium for varying durations of up to 4 days before and after X-irradiation. Cell viability, apoptosis, clonogenic cell death and cell cycle distribution were observed. Incubation of tumor cells in pH 6.6 medium for 2 or 4 days extended cell cycle, decreased cell viability, and induced apoptotic and clonogenic cell death. The radiation-induced clonogenic death was increased by 2- or 4-day pre-irradiation exposure of tumor cells to pH 6.6 medium, whereas it was reduced by 4-day post-irradiation exposure to an acidic medium. Prolonged exposure to an acidic environment enhanced the sensitivity of tumor cells to subsequent X-irradiation. However, the radiosensitization by pre-irradiation exposure was almost completely nullified by prolonged post-irradiation exposure to an acidic environment.

  12. Long-term psychological effects in children treated for intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannoun, L.; Bloom, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of the psychological assessment of 62 children who presented with primary intracranial tumors and who received radiotherapy at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1963 and 1973. Evaluations were carried out 3-20 years after treatment. All patients were free from progressive tumor at testing. The average IQ of the total series was within the normal range (Full-Scale IQ 92) but 23% of the patients were functioning at an educationally subnormal level of intelligence (IQ less than 80). Sex, tumor type, tumor location and the radiotherapy volume and site of maximum dose were not found to have a significant effect on intellectual outcome. A significant correlation was found between intelligence and age at the time of treatment. Children who received treatment under the age of 5 years were more adversely affected (average IQ 72) than those who were aged 6-10 (average IQ 93) and those aged 11-15 years (average IQ 107). The incidence of neurological abnormalities and physical disability was significantly greater among patients with supratentorial tumors (72% of cases), compared with patients with infratentorial lesions (44% of cases). The results were discussed in terms of the management of young patients with intracranial tumors

  13. Late effects of treatment on the intelligence of children with posterior fossa tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffner, P.K.; Cohen, M.E.; Thomas, P.

    1983-01-01

    This retrospective pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the late effects of treatment on intelligence in a population of children with posterior fossa tumors. Ten children with posterior fossa tumors treated with radiation and chemotherapy received intellectual evaluations at least one year following diagnosis. Six children had medulloblastomas, one child had a fourth ventricular ependymoma, two children had brainstem gliomas, and one child had a recurrent cerebellar astrocytoma. Children with supratentorial tumors were specifically excluded from the study in order to eliminate the possible influence of the tumor on intellectual functioning. Four children had had intelligence testing in school prior to treatment of their tumor. In each case results following treatment revealed a deterioration of full scale IQ of at least 25 points. Six children did not have prior testing; of these, two had IQ's less than 20. Overall, 50% of the patients had IQ's of less than 80 and 20% had IQ's of greater than 100. Furthermore, four children with normal intelligence (IQ greater than 80) have learning problems requiring special classes. Thus, of the ten children evaluated, all have either dementia, learning disabilities, or evidence of intellectual retardation. This study suggests that aggressive treatment of children with brain tumors may improve survivals but may be associated with significant long-term disabilities

  14. Early Effects of Combretastatin-A4 Disodium Phosphate on Tumor Perfusion and Interstitial Fluid Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten D. Ley

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Combretastatin-A4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP is a vascular-disruptive agent that causes an abrupt decrease in tumor blood flow. The direct actions of CA4DP include increases in vascular permeability and destabilization of the endothelial cytoskeleton, which are thought to contribute to occlusion of the tumor vasculature. It has been proposed that increased permeability causes a transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure (IFP, which in turn could collapse intratumoral blood vessels. We examined the immediate effects of CA4DP on tumor IFP in C3H mammary carcinoma. Mice were treated with 100 mg/kg CA4DP by intraperitoneal injection. Tumor perfusion was recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry at separate time points, and IFP was recorded continuously by the wickin-needle method. In this study, we found that CA4DP treatment resulted in a rapid reduction in tumor perfusion, followed by a decrease in IFP; no increases in IFP were observed. This suggests that CA4DP-induced reductions in tumor perfusion are not dependent on increases in IFP.

  15. Optimal surveillance and eradication of invasive species in heterogeneous landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca S. Epanchin-Niell; Robert G. Haight; Ludek Berec; John M. Kean; Andrew M. Liebhold

    2012-01-01

    Cost-effective surveillance strategies are needed for efficient responses to biological invasions and must account for the trade-offs between surveillance effort and management costs. Less surveillance may allow greater population growth and spread prior to detection, thereby increasing the costs of damages and control. In addition, surveillance strategies are usually...

  16. Effect of gold nanoparticles on radiation doses in tumor treatment: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musywel, H A; Laref, A

    2017-12-01

    Radiotherapy is an extensively used treatment for most tumor types. However, ionizing radiation does not discriminate between cancerous and normal cells surrounding the tumor, which can be considered as a dose-limiting factor. This can lead to the reduction of the effectiveness of tumor cell eradication with this treatment. A potential solution to this problem is loading the tumor with high-Z materials prior to radiotherapy as this can induce higher toxicity in tumor cells compared to normal ones. New advances in nanotechnology have introduced the promising use of heavy metal nanoparticles to enhance tumor treatment. The primary studies showed that gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique characteristics as biocompatible radiosensitizers for tumor cells. This study aimed to quantify the dose enhancement effect and its radial dose distribution by Monte Carlo simulations utilizing the EGSnrc code for the water-gold phantom loaded with seven different concentrations of Au: 0, 7, 18, 30, 50, 75, and 100 mg-Au/g-water. The phantom was irradiated with two different radionuclide sources, Ir-192 and Cs-137, which are commonly used in brachytherapy, for all concentrations. The results exhibited that gold nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy (GNRT) increases the efficacy of radiotherapy with low-energy photon sources accompanied with high Au concentration loads of up to 30 mg-Au/g-water. Our finding conducts also to the detection of dose enhancement effects in a short average range of 650 μm outside the region loaded with Au. This can indicate that the location determination is highly important in this treatment method.

  17. Synthesis of oil soluble radio-opaque agent entering a cell and causing anti-tumor effect with X-ray endovascular therapy for malignant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovetskaya, K. N.; Klyubin, V. V.; Tarazov, P. G.; Pavlovsky, A. V.; Statsenko, A. A.; Granov, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Analytic review of domestic and foreign literature dedicated to X-ray endovascular studies in the therapy for malignant tumors aiming to diagnose and treat tumors showed a great interest to the agent named Lipiodol Ultra Fluid, developed by Guerbet (France) that is oil soluble radio-opaque agent meant mainly for lymphography and sialography. The interest of researchers is caused by the ability of Lipiodol to penetrate into tumor cells and stay there for a long time expressing diagnostic efficacy and in a number of cases expressing anti-tumor effect. The authors note that the mechanism of anti-tumor effect of Lipiodol is still unclear. High viscosity of Lipiodol can be considered as its shortages that at giving intravascular therapy with Lipiodol it can result in embolism of organs of vital importance. The present study was aimed to develop effective oil soluble radio-opaque agent that would not cause vessels embolism but could infiltrate neoplastic tissue while administrating it into vessels of the tumors of parenchymastous organs.

  18. Effect of hepatic artery embolization on liver hypertrophy response in a rabbit liver VX2 tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lienden, Krijn P; Hoekstra, Lisette T; van Trigt, Jessica D; Roelofs, Joris J; van Delden, Otto M; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-12-01

    Portal vein embolization not only induces hypertrophy of the non-embolized liver, but also enhances tumor growth. The latter could be prevented by embolizing the hepatic arteries supplying the tumor-bearing liver segments. This study aimed to determine the effects of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on tumor volume and liver regeneration in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Twenty-three rabbits underwent subcapsular tumor implantation with a VX2 tumor. Two weeks after implantation, 18 rabbits were used for TAE experiments, 5 were for sham controls. Tumor response and liver regeneration response of the embolized cranial and non-embolized caudal liver lobes were assessed by CT volumetry, liver to body weight index, and the amount of proliferating hepatocytes. All super-selective arterial tumor embolization procedures were performed successfully. Despite embolization, the tumor volume increased after an initial steady state. The tumor volume after embolization was smaller than that of the sham group, but this difference was not significant. Massive necrosis of the tumor, however, was seen after embolization, without damage of the surrounding liver parenchyma. There was a significant atrophy response of the tumor bearing cranial lobe after super-selective arterial embolization of the tumor with a concomitant hypertrophy response of the non-embolized, caudal lobe. This regeneration response was confirmed histologically by a significantly higher number of proliferating hepatocytes on the Ki-67 stained slides. Super-selective, bland arterial coil embolization causes massive necrosis of the tumor, despite increase of volume on CT scan. Atrophy of the tumor bearing liver lobe is seen after arterial embolization of the tumor with a concomitant hypertrophy response of the non-embolized lobe, despite absence of histological damage of the tumor-surrounding liver parenchyma.

  19. Anti-tumor effects of gene therapy with GALV membrane fusion glycoprotein in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Yang, Jian-ru; Fu, Xin-ping; Jiang, Yue-quan

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the efficacy of gene therapy of lung adenocarcinoma using specifically controlled type I herpes simplex virus recombinant vector expressing Gibbon ape leukemia virus membrane fusion glycoprotein gene (GALV.fus). Recombinant HSV-I plasmid carrying target transgene was constructed, and recombinant viral vector was generated in Vero cells using Lipofectamine transfection. Viral vector was introduced into lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells or human fetal fibroblast HFL-I GNHu 5 cells, or inoculated into human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in nude mice. The anti-tumor and cytotoxic effects of GALV-FMG, the transgene, were examined in these cell and animal models. Expression of GALV-FMG in xenographs achieved 100 % tumorigenicity. Recombinant HSV-I viral vector also exhibited significant tumor cell killing effect in vitro. Relative survival rates of tumor cells treated with GALV-FMG or control vectors were, respectively, 20 and 70 %. GALV.fus has a potent anti-tumor effect against lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. This anti-tumor potential provides foundation for further studies with this vector.

  20. Health surveillance - myth and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles, health benefit and cost-effectiveness of health surveillance in the occupational setting, which apply to exposure to ionising radiations in the same manner as to other hazards in the workplace. It highlights the techniques for undertaking health surveillance, discusses their relative advantages and disadvantages and illustrates these in relation to specific hazards. The responsibilities of the medical staff and of the worker are also discussed. (author)

  1. Occupational Surveillance for Spaceflight Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of longterm occupational health surveillance of astronauts after exposure to the possible hazards of spaceflight. Because there is not much information about long term effects of spaceflight on human health, it is important to identify some of the possible results of exposure to the many possible factors that can influence longterm health impacts. This surveillance also allows for NASA to meet the obligation to care for the astronauts for their lifetime.

  2. Antioxidants Impair Anti-Tumoral Effects of Vorinostat, but Not Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Vorinostat and Caspase-8 Downregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat...

  3. Visualizing the antivascular effect of bortezomib on the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaorong; Ackerstaff, Ellen; He, Fuqiu; Xing, Ligang; Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Koutcher, Jason A; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2015-10-27

    Bortezomib, a novel proteasome inhibitor, has been approved for treating multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma and studied pre-clinically and clinically for solid tumors. Preferential cytotoxicity of bortezomib was found toward hypoxic tumor cells and endothelial cells in vitro. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of a pretreatment hypoxic tumor microenvironment on the effects of bortezomib in vitro and ex vivo, and explore the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to noninvasively evaluate the biological effects of bortezomib. It was shown in vitro by Western blot, flow cytometry, and ELISA that bortezomib accumulated HIF-1α in non-functional forms and blocks its hypoxia response in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Ex vivo experiments were performed with fluorescent immunohistochemical staining techniques using multiple endogenous and exogenous markers to identify hypoxia (pimonidazole, HRE-TKeGFP), blood flow/permeability (Hoechst 33342), micro-vessels (CD31 and SMA), apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3) and hypoxia response (CA9). After bortezomib administration, overall apoptosis index was significantly increased and blood perfusion was dramatically decreased in tumor xenografts. More importantly, apoptosis signals were found preferentially located in moderate and severe pretreatment hypoxic regions in both tumor and endothelial cells. Meanwhile, DCE MRI examinations showed that the tumor blood flow and permeability decreased significantly after bortezomib administration. The present study revealed that bortezomib reduces tumor hypoxia response and blood perfusion, thus, presenting antivascular properties. It will be important to determine the hypoxic/perfusion status pre- and during treatment at further translational studies.

  4. Who is Surveilling Whom?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This article concerns the particular form of counter-surveillance termed “sousveillance”, which aims to turn surveillance at the institutions responsible for surveillance. Drawing on the theoretical perspectives “mediatization” and “aerial surveillance,” the article studies WikiLeaks’ publication...

  5. Effect of surgical resection combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization on postoperative serum tumor marker levels and stem cell characteristics during tumor recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of surgical resection combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE on postoperative serum tumor marker levels and stem cell characteristics during tumor recurrence. Methods: A total of 98 patients with liver cancer who received radical resection in our hospital between May 2013 and July 2015 were reviewed and divided into TACE group and control group according to whether they received TACE within two months after surgical resection. Serum levels of tumor markers were detected 4 weeks after operation; the tumor recurrence was followed up within 3 years after operation, and the expression of stem cell marker molecules and cell proliferation molecules in recurrent lesions were detected. Results: 4 weeks after radical hepatectomy, serum AFP, AFP-L3, GP73 and GPC3 levels in TACE group were significantly lower than those in control group; Nanog, CD133, EpCAM, PICK1, CyclinD1, C-myc and Survivin expression in surgically removed lesions of TACE group were not different from those of control group while Nanog, CD133, EpCAM, PICK1, CyclinD1, C-myc and Survivin expression in recurrent lesions were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Surgical resection combined with TACE can more effectively remove liver cancer lesions, reduce the tumor marker levels and inhibit the tumor stem cell characteristics and cell proliferation activity in recurrent lesions.

  6. Risk based surveillance for vector borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Rene

    of samples and hence early detection of outbreaks. Models for vector borne diseases in Denmark have demonstrated dramatic variation in outbreak risk during the season and between years. The Danish VetMap project aims to make these risk based surveillance estimates available on the veterinarians smart phones...... in Northern Europe. This model approach may be used as a basis for risk based surveillance. In risk based surveillance limited resources for surveillance are targeted at geographical areas most at risk and only when the risk is high. This makes risk based surveillance a cost effective alternative...... sample to a diagnostic laboratory. Risk based surveillance models may reduce this delay. An important feature of risk based surveillance models is their ability to continuously communicate the level of risk to veterinarians and hence increase awareness when risk is high. This is essential for submission...

  7. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs as Potential Inducers of Antineoplastic Effects in CNS Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Tatenhorst

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-inducible transcription factors which belong to the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors. In recent years it turned out that natural as well as synthetic PPAR agonists exhibit profound antineoplastic as well as redifferentiation effects in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS. The molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still emerging, with partially controverse findings reported by a number of studies dealing with the influence of PPARs on treatment of tumor cells in vitro. Remarkably, studies examining the effects of these drugs in vivo are just beginning to emerge. However, the agonists of PPARs, in particular the thiazolidinediones, seem to be promising candidates for new approaches in human CNS tumor therapy.

  8. The effect of environmental chemicals on the tumor microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Vaccari, Monica; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Brown, Dustin G.; Chapellier, Marion; Christopher, Joseph; Curran, Colleen S.; Forte, Stefano; Hamid, Roslida A.; Heneberg, Petr; Koch, Daniel C.; Krishnakumar, P. K.; Laconi, Ezio; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Marongiu, Fabio; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Ryeom, Sandra; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Soucek, Laura; Vermeulen, Louis; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Colacci, Annamaria; Bisson, William H.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    Potentially carcinogenic compounds may cause cancer through direct DNA damage or through indirect cellular or physiological effects. To study possible carcinogens, the fields of endocrinology, genetics, epigenetics, medicine, environmental health, toxicology, pharmacology and oncology must be

  9. EphA2-derived peptide vaccine with amphiphilic poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanoparticles elicits an anti-tumor effect against mouse liver tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo; Sasakawa, Akira; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kohga, Keisuke; Miyagi, Takuya; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hiramastu, Naoki; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Norio

    2010-05-01

    The prognosis of liver cancer remains poor, but recent advances in nanotechnology offer promising possibilities for cancer treatment. Novel adjuvant, amphiphilic nanoparticles (NPs) composed of L: -phenylalanine (Phe)-conjugated poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA-Phe NPs) having excellent capacity for carrying peptides, were found to have the potential for use as a peptide vaccine against tumor models overexpressing artificial antigens, such as ovalbumin (OVA). However, the anti-tumor potential of gamma-PGA-Phe NPs vaccines using much less immunogenic tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-derived peptide needs to be clarified. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of immunization with EphA2, recently identified TAA, derived peptide-immobilized gamma-PGA-Phe NPs (Eph-NPs) against mouse liver tumor of MC38 cells (EphA2-positive colon cancer cells). Immunization of normal mice with Eph-NPs resulted in generation of EphA2-specific type-1 CD8+ T cells. Immunization with Eph-NPs tended to provide a degree of anti-MC38 liver tumor protection more than that observed for immunization with the mixture of EphA2-derived peptide and complete Freund's adjuvant (Eph + CFA). Neither Eph-NPs nor Eph + CFA vaccines inhibited tumor growth of BL6, EphA2-negative melanoma cells. Splenocytes isolated from MC38-bearing mice treated with Eph-NPs showed strong and specific cytotoxic activity against MC38 cells. Immunization with Eph + CFA induced liver damage as evidenced by elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase, while Eph-NPs vaccination did not exhibit any toxic damage to the liver. These results demonstrated that immunization with Eph-NPs displayed anti-tumor effects against liver tumor by generating acquired immunity equivalent to the toxic adjuvant CFA, suggesting that safe gamma-PGA-Phe NPs could be applied clinically for the vaccine treatment of liver cancer.

  10. Commercial Online Social Network Data and Statin Side-Effect Surveillance: A Pilot Observational Study of Aggregate Mentions on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesch, Marco D

    2017-12-01

    Surveillance of the safety of prescribed drugs after marketing approval has been secured remains fraught with complications. Formal ascertainment by providers and reporting to adverse-event registries, formal surveys by manufacturers, and mining of electronic medical records are all well-known approaches with varying degrees of difficulty, cost, and success. Novel approaches may be a useful adjunct, especially approaches that mine or sample internet-based methods such as online social networks. A novel commercial software-as-a-service data-mining product supplied by Sysomos from Datasift/Facebook was used to mine all mentions on Facebook of statins and stain-related side effects in the US in the 1-month period 9 January 2017 through 8 February 2017. A total of 4.3% of all 25,700 mentions of statins also mentioned typical stain-related side effects. Multiple methodological weaknesses stymie interpretation of this percentage, which is however not inconsistent with estimates that 5-20% of patients taking statins will experience typical side effects at some time. Future work on pharmacovigilance may be informed by this novel commercial tool, but the inability to mine the full text of a posting poses serious challenges to content categorization.

  11. Stimulatory effect of low dose radiation on the immune function in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Li Xiujuan; Li Xiuyi; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The author aims at investigating the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with low dose radiation on immune function in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: C57BL/6J mine implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells in the right thighs were used as an experimental animal model. WBI with 75 mGy X-rays was given at the 10 th day after implantation and immunological parameters were detected 18 hours after irradiation. The immunological parameters included the spontaneous incorporation of 3 H-TdR into thymocytes, the number of splenocytes, the reaction of splenocytes to ConA and LPS, the splenic production of IL-2, the cytotoxic activities of natural killer (NK) and lymphokine activated killer cells (LAK) as well as specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Results: The immunological parameters of irradiated tumor-bearing mice were significantly increased compared with those of sham-irradiated tumor-bearing mice (P<0.05∼0.01). Conclusion: Low dose radiation could significantly increase the immune function of tumor-bearing mice, and this stimulatory effect may be of some potential significance in tumor therapy

  12. Combination therapy targeting the tumor microenvironment is effective in a model of human ocular melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafer Peter H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular melanoma is the leading intraocular malignancy. There is no effective treatment for metastatic ocular melanoma. We sought a treatment targeting the tumor microenvironment as well as the tumor cells. Methods Migration of HUVEC cells, the ability of HUVEC cells to form tubes, and proliferative capacity of a human ocular melanoma cell line were tested in the presence of lenalidomide and sorafenib alone and in combination. The compounds were also tested in a rat aortic ring assay and were tested in a highly aggressive human ocular melanoma xenograft model. Results Lenalidomide and Sorafenib inhibit HUVEC ability to migrate and form tubes and when used in combination the inhibition is increased. The agents alone and in combination inhibit outgrowth in the rat aortic ring model. The combination of the agents improved the inhibition over either single agent. In a xenograft model, combination therapy inhibited tumor growth over inhibition by single agent alone in a significant fashion (p Conclusion Lenalidomide and sorafenib are effective at targeting endothelial cells, inhibiting growth of ocular melanoma cells and can inhibit growth of tumors in a xenograft model as well as inhibit development of metastases. Combining these agents works in an additive to synergistic way to inhibit the growth of tumors and development of metastases.

  13. Effect of certain variables on the tumor and tissue distribution of tracers. III. Salicylates and vasoactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.; Stern, P.; Gordon, R.; Dabbs, J.

    1981-01-01

    Attempts were made to increase the viable tumor concentration of 54 Mn and 67 Ga in a rat hepatoma model by administering rat angiotensin, tolazoline, and salicylates. Salicylates increased the tumor concentrations of 54 Mn and improved 65 Mn viable tumor/background ratios. 67 Ga was not affected by the salicylates. The salicylate effect appeared to be mediated by intracellular mechanisms rather than alterations in plasma protein binding. Rat angiotensin slightly increased the concentrations of 67 Ga in the tumors but not enough to suggest that it would be useful clinically. Tolazoline did not increase tumor uptake of the tracers

  14. Safety and effectiveness of rapid-acting intramuscular olanzapine for agitation associated with schizophrenia – Japan postmarketing surveillance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katagiri H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hideaki Katagiri,1 Masanori Taketsuna,2 Shinpei Kondo,3 Kenta Kajimoto,4 Etsuko Aoi,5 Yuka Tanji1 1Bio Medicine, 2Statistical Sciences, 3Post Marketing Study Management, 4Scientific Communications, Medicines Development Unit Japan, 5Global Patient Safety Japan, Quality and Patient Safety, Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, Japan Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapid-acting intramuscular (IM olanzapine in the treatment of acute agitation associated with schizophrenia in real-world clinical settings in Japan.Methods: In this multicenter, postmarketing surveillance (PMS study, patients with acute agitation associated with schizophrenia were treated with IM olanzapine daily in a daily clinical setting. The observational period ranged from 1 to 7 days, including the day of initial administration. Safety was assessed by reporting treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs and adverse drug reactions (ADRs. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale – Excited Component (PANSS-EC score was used to evaluate effectiveness at baseline and at 2 hours (after each administration, 2 days, and 3 days (end of the observational period from the last administration of the IM olanzapine injection.Results: The safety analysis set included 999 patients, and the initial dose of 10 mg was administered to 955 patients. TEAEs were reported in 28 patients (36 events, the most common of which were dyslalia (5 patients, akathisia and somno­lence (4 patients each, hepatic function abnormal (3 patients, and constipation and dehydration (2 patients each. One serious adverse event of akathisia occurred during the observation period. The PANSS-EC score (mean ± standard deviation was 23.3±6.4 (n=625 at baseline, 16.9±7.0 (n=522 at 2 hours after initial injection, and 14.9±6.5 (n=650 at the last observation carried forward.Conclusion: The results of this Japanese PMS study demonstrated that IM olanzapine is safe and has a

  15. Dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion in phase gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Bo; Yang Yong; Li Tianfang; Li Xiang; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A major concern for lung intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery is the deviation of actually delivered dose distribution from the planned one due to simultaneous movements of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves and tumor. For gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment (SBRT), the situation becomes even more complicated because of SBRT's characteristics such as fewer fractions, smaller target volume, higher dose rate, and extended fractional treatment time. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion during gated lung SBRT delivery by reconstructing the delivered dose distribution with real-time tumor motion considered. Methods: The tumor motion data were retrieved from six lung patients. Each of them received three fractions of stereotactic radiotherapy treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Phase gating through an external surrogate was simulated with a gating window of 5 mm. The resulting residual tumor motion curves during gating (beam-on) were retrieved. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as physician-contoured clinical target volume (CTV) surrounded by an isotropic 5 mm margin. Each patient was prescribed with 60 Gy/3 fractions. The authors developed an algorithm to reconstruct the delivered dose with tumor motion. The DMLC segments, mainly leaf position and segment weighting factor, were recalculated according to the probability density function of tumor motion curve. The new DMLC sequence file was imported back to treatment planning system to reconstruct the dose distribution. Results: Half of the patients in the study group experienced PTV D95% deviation up to 26% for fractional dose and 14% for total dose. CTV mean dose dropped by 1% with tumor motion. Although CTV is almost covered by prescribed dose with 5 mm margin, qualitative comparison on the dose distributions reveals that CTV is on the verge of underdose. The discrepancy happens due to tumor

  16. Involvement of the Warburg effect in non-tumor diseases processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Meiqing; Li, Lanfang; Chen, Linxi

    2018-04-01

    Warburg effect, as an energy shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, is extensively found in various cancers. Interestingly, increasing researchers show that Warburg effect plays a crucial role in non-tumor diseases. For instance, inhibition of Warburg effect can alleviate pulmonary vascular remodeling in the process of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Interference of Warburg effect improves mitochondrial function and cardiac function in the process of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Additionally, the Warburg effect induces vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and contributes to atherosclerosis. Warburg effect may also involve in axonal damage and neuronal death, which are related with multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, Warburg effect significantly promotes cell proliferation and cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Besides, Warburg effect relieves amyloid β-mediated cell death in Alzheimer's disease. And Warburg effect also improves the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Finally, we also introduce some glycolytic agonists. This review focuses on the newest researches about the role of Warburg effect in non-tumor diseases, including PH, tuberculosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), failing heart, cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases, multiple sclerosis, and PKD. Obviously, Warburg effect may be a potential therapeutic target for those non-tumor diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventrucci, Gislaine; Mello, Maria Alice Roston de; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2002-01-01

    It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein): pregnant (N), tumor-bearing (WN), pair-fed rats (Np). Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine): leucine (L), tumor-bearing (WL) and pair-fed with leucine (Lp). Non pregnant rats (C), which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones

  18. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mello Maria

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. Methods To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein: pregnant (N, tumor-bearing (WN, pair-fed rats (Np. Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine: leucine (L, tumor-bearing (WL and pair-fed with leucine (Lp. Non pregnant rats (C, which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Results Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Conclusions Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones.

  19. Effects of Ligustilide on Tumor Growth and Immune Function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: LIG significantly increased thymus and spleen index, macrophage phagocytosis, serum hemolysin concentration, spleen lymphocyte proliferation and CTL and NK cell activities in normal ICR mice, but inhibited the growth of transplantable H22 hepatoma. The effect was dose-related but not in a linear fashion.

  20. Effect of Arrabidaea chica extracts on the Ehrlich solid tumor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia C. Ribeiro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Arrabidaea chica (Humb. & Bonpl. B. Verl., Bignoniaceae, extracts on Ehrlich solid tumor development in Swiss mice. Leaves of A. chica were extracted with two distinct solvents, ethanol and water. The phytochemical analysis of the extracts indicated different classes of secondary metabolites like as anthocyanidins, flavonoids, tannins and saponins. Ethanol (EE and aqueous (AE extracts at 30 mg/kg reduced the development of Ehrlich solid tumor after ten days of oral treatment. The EE group presented increase in neutrophil count, α1 and β globulin values, and decrease of α2 globulin values. Furthermore, EE reduced the percentage of CD4+ T cells in blood but did not alter the percentage of inflammatory mononuclear cells associated with tumor suggesting a direct action of EE on tumor cells. Reduced tumor development observed in AE group was accompanied by a lower percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes in blood. At the tumor microenvironment, this treatment decreased the percentage of CD3+ T cells, especially due to a reduction of CD8+ T subpopulation and NK cells. The antitumor activity presented by the AE is possibly related to an anti-inflammatory activity. None of the extracts produced toxic effects in animals. In conclusion, the ethanol and aqueous extracts of A. chica have immunomodulatory and antitumor activities attributed to the presence of flavonoids, such as kaempferol. These effects appear to be related to different mechanisms of action for each extract. This study demonstrates the potential of A. chica as an antitumor agent confirming its use in traditional popular medicine.

  1. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (2). Combination effect on MM102 syngeneic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Ohishi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Niitsu, Iwayasu; Hayashibara, Hiromi; Yoshihama, Takashi; Moriyuki, Hirobumi

    1988-03-01

    C3H/He mice transplanted syngeneic MM102 tumor subcutaneously in the footpad were used to study the timing of administration of lentinan when combined with local irradiation of X-ray. In combination with 1,000 rads irradiation, the administration of lentinan after X-ray was not effective. When lentinan was administered in combination with 2,000 to 3,000 rads irradiation, the growth of tumor was decreased significantly in comparison with the groups which received radiotherapy alone and those that received lentinan alone. The administration of lentinan before irradiation was effective at the same degree in the group that received lentinan after irradiation. Life prolongation effect was also observed in the group that received lentinan before and after irradiation, and 4 mice among 8 tested mice were survived at 70th day after tumor transplantation.

  2. The Anti-Tumor Effects of Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transduced with HSV-Tk Gene on U-87-Driven Brain Tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Maymone de Melo

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is an infiltrative tumor that is difficult to eradicate. Treating GBM with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that have been modified with the HSV-Tk suicide gene has brought significant advances mainly because MSCs are chemoattracted to GBM and kill tumor cells via a bystander effect. To use this strategy, abundantly present adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs were evaluated for the treatment of GBM in mice. AT-MSCs were prepared using a mechanical protocol to avoid contamination with animal protein and transduced with HSV-Tk via a lentiviral vector. The U-87 glioblastoma cells cultured with AT-MSC-HSV-Tk died in the presence of 25 or 50 μM ganciclovir (GCV. U-87 glioblastoma cells injected into the brains of nude mice generated tumors larger than 3.5 mm2 after 4 weeks, but the injection of AT-MSC-HSV-Tk cells one week after the U-87 injection, combined with GCV treatment, drastically reduced tumors to smaller than 0.5 mm2. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tumors showed the presence of AT-MSC-HSV-Tk cells only within the tumor and its vicinity, but not in other areas of the brain, showing chemoattraction between them. The abundance of AT-MSCs and the easier to obtain them mechanically are strong advantages when compared to using MSCs from other tissues.

  3. Effect of Routine Surveillance Imaging on the Outcomes of Patients With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma After Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapke, Jonathan T; Epperla, Narendranath; Shah, Namrata; Richardson, Kristin; Carrum, George; Hari, Parameswaran N; Pingali, Sai R; Hamadani, Mehdi; Karmali, Reem; Fenske, Timothy S

    2017-07-01

    Patients with relapsed and refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) are often treated with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). After auto-HCT, most transplant centers implement routine surveillance imaging to monitor for disease relapse; however, there is limited evidence to support this practice. In this multicenter, retrospective study, we identified cHL patients (n = 128) who received auto-HCT, achieved complete remission (CR) after transplantation, and then were followed with routine surveillance imaging. Of these, 29 (23%) relapsed after day 100 after auto-HCT. Relapse was detected clinically in 14 patients and with routine surveillance imaging in 15 patients. When clinically detected relapse was compared with to radiographically detected relapse respectively, the median overall survival (2084 days [range, 225-4161] vs. 2737 days [range, 172-2750]; P = .51), the median time to relapse (247 days [range, 141-3974] vs. 814 days [range, 96-1682]; P = .30) and the median postrelapse survival (674 days [range, 13-1883] vs. 1146 days [range, 4-2548]; P = .52) were not statistically different. In patients who never relapsed after auto-HCT, a median of 4 (range, 1-25) surveillance imaging studies were performed over a median follow-up period of 3.5 years. A minority of patients with cHL who achieve CR after auto-HCT will ultimately relapse. Surveillance imaging detected approximately half of relapses; however, outcomes were similar for those whose relapse was detected using routine surveillance imaging versus detected clinically in between surveillance imaging studies. There appears to be limited utility for routine surveillance imaging in cHL patients who achieve CR after auto-HCT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quali...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Photosensitizers and Their Effect in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    used increasingly to monitor metabolism and disease states in humans. Both magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy have evolved into sophisticated... disease states in humans. Both magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy have evolved into sophisticated diagnostic techniques. In addition to the...Antispermatogenic effect and chemical R.S.Gupta Pharmaceutical Biol. 2002 investigation of Opuntia dillenii A.Sharma 40,411-415 M.P. Dobhal 42 A

  6. Anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody impairs the therapeutic effect of ceftriaxone in murine pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijneveld, Anita W.; Florquin, Sandrine; Hartung, Thomas; Speelman, Peter; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Treatments aimed at inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in patients with sepsis have been unsuccessful. Up to 50% of such patients suffer from pneumonia. To determine the effect that treatment with anti-TNF has on pneumococcal pneumonia, mice were intranasally inoculated with Streptococcus

  7. Primary tumor location and bevacizumab effectiveness in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, M K; Johansen, J S; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is an unmet need for predictive markers for the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We aimed to assess whether the location of the primary tumor is associated with bevacizumab effectiveness when combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPEOX...

  8. Anti-thrombotic and anti-tumor effect of water extract of caulis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-thrombosis and anti-tumor effect of the water extract of the caulis of Sargentodoxa cuneata (Oliv.) Rehd. et Wils. (WCSW) in rat and mouse models. Methods: WCSW extract was prepared and the main constituents were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The acute ...

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using fast neutrons: Effects in two human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Ziegler, W.; Szypniewski, H.; Streffer, C.

    1990-01-01

    The results demonstrate that the effect of fast neutrons on cell survival in cell culture can be enhanced by boron neutron capture reaction. Even with lower enhancement ratios, the concept of NCT assisted fast neutron therapy may successfully be applied for tumor treatment with the Essen cyclotron. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of Anti-tumor and Chemoresistance-lowering Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Anti-tumor and Chemoresistance-lowering Effects of Pectolinarigenin from Cirsium japonicum Fisch ex DC in Breast Cancer. Mingqian Lu, Xinhua Xu, Hongda Lu, Zhongxin Lu, Bingqing Xu, Chao Tan, Kezhi Shi, Rong Guo, Qingzhi Kong ...

  11. Effect of low dose irradiation on renal enlargement in children following nephrectomy for Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassady, J.R.; Lebowitz, R.L.; Jaffe, N.; Hoffman, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of low dose irradiation on subsequent compensatory renal enlargement in a group of children operated upon with unilateral nephrectomy for Wilms' tumor is reported. Comparison groups were children whose remaining kidney received either no direct irradiation or irradiation to only the upper portion of the kidney. The rate of growth of the kidney in the irradiated group was slightly less but this was not statistically significant. Thus radiation therapy in children with Wilm's tumor, so crucial to optimum survival, does not seem to cause significant renal toxicity. (Auth.)

  12. Effects of daily treatment with a radioprotector WR-2721 on Ehrlich's ascites tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebuchi, Makoto; Shinohara, Shigeo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Kunio; Shima, Akihiro

    1981-01-01

    Mice were injected daily with a radioprotector WR-2721 (S-2-[3-aminopropyl-amino]ethylphosphorothioic acid) after inoculation with Ehrlich's ascites tumor cells. Increases in weight of mice, volume of ascitic fluid and number of ascitic cells per mouse were reduced by the daily administration of 5 mg/mouse of the drug, indicating a suppressive effect of WR-2721 on growth of ascitic cells. But daily treatment with 5 mg/mouse of WR-2721 caused earlier death of tumor-bearing mice. (author)

  13. Initial findings from the implementation of a community-based sentinel surveillance system to assess the health effects of climate change in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, David L; Sunbury, Tenaya; Johnston, Janet; Renes, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study to determine whether a community-based sentinel surveillance system can be developed and implemented to assess the health effects of climate change, and to contribute to local discussions to mitigate these health effects. The purpose of this report is to describe the process and outcomes of this innovative approach to identifying priority areas for adaptation investment. This report can be used to assist local, state and federal governments in determining how to develop actions and policies to promote adaptation to climate change. To evaluate the health effects of climate change in rural Alaska. We conducted an iterative and participatory process to develop metrics, an instrument and a protocol to collect sentinel surveillance data on the health effects of climate change in 3 ecologically distinct regions of the state. We collected surveillance data from 91 study participants over the course of 12 months. These data were analyzed and categorized by frequency and association between specific health outcomes or health-related factors (such as food security) and reported exposure to environmental effects of climate change. We found significant associations between several health outcomes and health outcome mediators and reported exposures. We presented these data to study participants in community settings and moderated discussions of likely causal factors for these measured associations, and helped community residents to identify specific adaption measures to mitigate those health effects. We conclude that community-based sentinel surveillance is an effective method for assessing health outcomes from exposure to environmental effects of climate change, and informing climate change health adaptation planning in Alaskan communities. We contend that it would be effective in other regions of the nation as well.

  14. Effect of combination laser hyperthermia and radiation therapy for malignant tumor of the eyelid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Tomoko [Chukyo Hospital, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Ando, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Michiko

    1997-10-01

    Malignant tumors of the eyelid have been treated successfully by excision of a margin of normal tissue, but cosmesis may be a problem postoperatively. To avoid the problems of surgery, we used a combination therapy of laser hyperthermia followed by radiation in 4 eyes of 4 patients (2 eyes with sebaceous gland carcinoma, 1 with squamous cell carcinoma, and 1 with basal cell carcinoma). An interstitial contact laser probe of artificial sapphire connected to a continuous wave neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to effect hyperthermia in the tumor for 15 to 20 minutes at each treatment. The laser energy was applied directly to the surface of the conjunctiva, which was anesthetized before each treatment by topical application of anesthetic drops and injection of lidocaine. The temperature around the tumor was maintained between 42 and 43 degrees C by intermittent low-power irradiation of 2 watts. Radiotherapy was administered 3 to 5 times a week using a linear accelerator set at 4 to 6 MeV to deliver 2.5 to 3.5 Gy at each session for a total of 50 to 65 Gy. None of the 4 patients experienced recurrence of eyelid tumor, and the only complications observed were madarosis (2 eyes) and cataract (1 eye). This protocol seems to be a promising method to treat malignant tumor of the eyelid. (author)

  15. Effects of Yttrium-90 selective internal radiation therapy on non-conventional liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuei, Andrew; Saab, Sammy; Cho, Sung-Ki; Kee, Stephen T; Lee, Edward Wolfgang

    2015-07-21

    The liver is a common site of metastasis, with essentially all metastatic malignancies having been known to spread to the liver. Nearly half of all patients with extrahepatic primary cancer have hepatic metastases. The severe prognostic implications of hepatic metastases have made surgical resection an important first line treatment in management. However, limitations such as the presence of extrahepatic spread or poor functional hepatic reserve exclude the majority of patients as surgical candidates, leaving chemotherapy and locoregional therapies as next best options. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a form of catheter-based locoregional cancer treatment modality for unresectable tumors, involving trans-arterial injection of microspheres embedded with a radio-isotope Yttrium-90. The therapeutic radiation dose is selectively delivered as the microspheres permanently embed themselves within the tumor vascular bed. Use of SIRT has been conventionally aimed at treating primary hepatic tumors (hepatocellular carcinoma) or colorectal and neuroendocrine metastases. Numerous reviews are available for these tumor types. However, little is known or reviewed on non-colorectal or non-neuroendocrine primaries. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to systematically review the current literature to evaluate the effects of Yttrium-90 radioembolization on non-conventional liver tumors including those secondary to breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ocular and percutaneous melanoma, pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and lung cancer.

  16. The anti-tumor effect of bee honey in Ehrlich ascite tumor model of mice is coincided with stimulation of the immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, W Y; Gabry, M S; El-Shaikh, K A; Othman, G A

    2008-01-01

    Honey is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of therapeutic properties including antibacterial, antifungal, cytostatic and anti-inflammatory activity and has been used for the treatment of gastric ulcers, burns, and for storage of skin grafts. The present study investigated the antitumor effect of bee honey against Ehrlich ascites tumor in mice and the possible mode of antitumor action. Peroral administration of mice with honey (10, 100 or 1000 mg/ 100 g BW) every other day for 4 weeks before intraperitoneal inoculation with Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT, 1 x 10(6) cells) increased the number bone marrow cells as well as peritoneal macrophages, but not peripheral blood leukocytes nor splenocytes. The phagocytic function of macrophages as well as the T- and B-cell functions were also increased. Honey pre-treatment also recovered the total lipids, total proteins, as well as liver and kidney enzyme activities in EAT-bearing mice. In vitro studies on EAT cells demonstrated inhibitory effect of honey on tumor cell proliferation, viability % of tumor cells as well as the size of solid tumor. The present results indicate that the preventive treatment with honey is considerably effective against EAT in mice both in vivo and in vitro. The antitumor activity of honey may occur through the activation of macrophages, T-cells and B-cells.

  17. Stabilization of neurotensin analogues: effect on peptide catabolism, biodistribution and tumor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruehlmeier, Matthias E-mail: peter.blaeuenstein@psi.ch; Garayoa, Elisa Garcia; Blanc, Alain; Holzer, Barbara; Gergely, Suzanne; Tourwe, Dirk; Schubiger, Pius August; Blaeuenstein, Peter

    2002-04-01

    Neurotensin (NT) receptors in pancreatic and other neuroendocrine tumors are promising targets for imaging and therapeutic purposes. Here, we report on the effect of distinct changes in the peptide chain on catabolism in vitro for five radiolabeled [{sup 99m}Tc] neurotensin analogues having high affinity for neurotensin receptors. Substitution of NT(1-7) by (N{alpha}His)Ac--the Tc-binding moiety--combined with a reduced bond 8-9 (CH{sub 2}NH), N-methylation of peptide bonds or replacement of Ile(12) by tertiary leucin (Tle) led to peptide stabilization of various degrees. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing HT29 xenografts showed higher tumor uptake with more stable peptides, yielding high tumor to blood ratios of up to 70.

  18. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

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    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  19. Combined IL-21 and Low-Dose IL-2 therapy induces anti-tumor immunity and long-term curative effects in a murine melanoma tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo studies have recently demonstrated that interleukin 21 (IL-21 enhances the anti-tumor function of T-cells and NK cells in murine tumor models, and the combined use of IL-21 and IL-15 has resulted in prolonged tumor regression and survival in mice with previously established tumors. However, the combined anti-tumor effects of IL-21 and low dose IL-2 have not been studied even though IL-2 has been approved for human use, and, at low dose administration, stimulates the proliferation of memory T cells, and does not significantly increase antigen-induced apoptosis or regulatory T cell (Treg expansion. This study examined whether recombinant IL-21 alone or in combination with low-dose IL-2 could improve the in vivo anti-tumor function of naïve, tumor-antigen specific CD8+ T cells in a gp10025–33 T cell receptor transgenic pmel murine melanoma model. Methods Congenic C57BL/6 (Ly5.2 mice bearing subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were sublethally irradiated to induce lymphopenia. After irradiation naive pmel splenocytes were adoptively transferred, and mice were immunized with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with human gp10025–33 (hgp10025–33. Seven days after vaccination groups of mice received 5 consecutive days of intraperitoneal administration of IL-2 alone (20 × 103 IU, IL-21 alone (20 μg or IL-21 and IL-2. Control animals received no cytokine therapy. Results IL-21 alone and IL-2 alone both delayed tumor progression, but only IL-21 significantly augmented long-term survival (20% compared to the control group. However, combination therapy with IL-21 and IL-2 resulted in the highest long-term (>150 days tumor-free survival frequency of 46%. Animals that were tumor-free for > 150 days demonstrated tumor-specific protection after rechallenge with B16F10 melanoma cells. At peak expansion (21 days post vaccination, the combination of IL-21 plus IL-2 resulted in a 2- to 3-fold higher absolute number of

  20. The effect of TACE with endostatin on hemodynamics in hepatic implantation tumor using Doppler ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Guangli; Wu Yuanyuan; Wang Bin; Liu Yan; Zheng Chuanli; Sang Li; Liu Feng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hemodynamic changes in the rabbit liver and VX2 hepatic implantation tumor after treatment by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE)/endostatin using Doppler ultrasonography. Methods: Twenty rabbits with VX2 hepatic tumor were randomly distributed into the control group (n=10) and the anti- angiogenesis group (n=10). The rabbits were administered with endostatin and adriamycin-lipiodol in the anti-angiogenesis group and with 37℃ saline in the control group via hepatic artery. The hemodynamic changes of the tumors, hepatic artery, and portal vein were recorded with Doppler ultrasonography 1 week after the treatment. The results before and after the treatment were compared. Results: In the control group, the maximal hepatic artery blood flow velocity was significantly higher than that before the treatment (P<0.05). However, the resistance index and the portal vein blood flow velocities had no significantly change compared with those before the treatment (P>0.05). In the anti-angiogenesis group, the hepatic artery blood flow velocity was significantly lower than that before the treatment (P<0.05), and the resistance index was increased (P<0.05). However, the portal vein blood flow velocity had no significantly change (P>0.05). The blood flow signal in all tumors was rich before embolization. After TACE, the blood flow signal was significantly decreased, even partly disappeared in the anti-angiogenesis group. Conclusion: TACE with endostatin can effectively block the blood supplement of VX2 hepatic implantation tumor. Doppler ultrasonography can detected the blood flow changes and can be used in evaluating the therapeutic effect in hepatic implantation tumor. (authors)

  1. Assessment of immune surveillance among inhabitants of high natural background radiation areas in Ramsar-Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sileh, Sajad Borzouei; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Mostafazade, Amrollah; Abedian, Said

    2010-01-01

    In this study by Multi-parameter flow cytometry, immunologic analyze is performed on peripheral blood, NK cells, most effective cells in innate immune and the proportion of TCD8/TCD4 cells that is effective in cellular immune system will be determined. Lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1 or CD107a) is used as a functional marker for the identification of natural killer cell activity. Immune surveillance and immune system role in tumoral defense in Ramsar inhabitants will be determined. Radiation dose rate in Talesh mahalle is very high and was many times greater than Chaparsar (another region in Ramsar). Immune surveillance and immune system role in tumoral defense in Talesh mahalle inhabitants will be compared to Chaparsar inhabitants. If this doesn't have significant difference, we should think about some other aspects such as free radical scavengers that will study later

  2. Microsimulation model of CT versus MRI surveillance of Bosniak IIF renal cystic lesions: should effects of radiation exposure affect selection of imaging strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Stella K; Turan, Ekin A; Eisenberg, Jonathan D; Lee, Pablo A; Kong, Chung Yin; Pandharipande, Pari V

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of radiation-induced cancer risks in patients with Bosniak category IIF lesions undergoing CT versus MRI surveillance. We developed a Markov-Monte Carlo model to determine life expectancy losses attributable to radiation-induced cancers in hypothetical patients undergoing CT versus MRI surveillance of Bosniak IIF lesions. Our model tracked hypothetical patients as they underwent imaging surveillance for up to 5 years, accounting for potential lesion progression and treatment. Estimates of radiation-induced cancer mortality were generated using a published organ-specific radiation-risk model based on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII methods. The model also incorporated surgical mortality and renal cancer-specific mortality. Our primary outcome was life expectancy loss attributable to radiation-induced cancers. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the stability of the results with variability in key parameters. The mean number of examinations per patient was 6.3. In the base case, assuming 13 mSv per multiphase CT examination, 64-year-old men experienced an average life expectancy decrease of 5.5 days attributable to radiation-induced cancers from CT; 64-year-old women experienced a corresponding life expectancy loss of 6.9 days. The results were most sensitive to patient age: Life expectancy loss attributable to radiation-induced cancers increased to 21.6 days in 20-year-old women and 20.0 days in 20-year-old men. Varied assumptions of each modality's (CT vs MRI) depiction of lesion complexity also impacted life expectancy losses. Microsimulation modeling shows that radiation-induced cancer risks from CT surveillance for Bosniak IIF lesions minimally affect life expectancy. However, as progressively younger patients are considered, increasing radiation risks merit stronger consideration of MRI surveillance.

  3. Incidence of neoplasias and effectiveness of postoperative surveillance endoscopy for patients with ulcerative colitis: comparison of ileorectal anastomosis and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hiroaki; Hata, Keisuke; Kishikawa, Junko; Anzai, Hiroyuki; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-03-09

    The incidence of neoplasia after surgery has not been sufficiently evaluated in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), particularly in the Japanese population, and it is not clear whether surveillance endoscopy is effective in detecting dysplasia/cancer in the remnant rectum or pouch. The aims of this study were to assess and compare postoperative development of dysplasia/cancer in patients with UC who underwent ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) and to evaluate the effectiveness of postoperative surveillance endoscopy. One hundred twenty patients who received postoperative surveillance endoscopy were retrospectively reviewed for development of dysplasia/cancer in the remnant rectal mucosa or pouch. Three hundred seventy-nine endoscopy sessions were conducted for 30 patients after IRA, while 548 pouch endoscopy sessions were conducted for 90 patients after IPAA. In the IRA group, 5 patients developed dysplasia/cancer during postoperative surveillance and in all cases, neoplasia was detected at an early stage. In the IRA group, no patient developed neoplasia within 10 years of diagnosis; the cumulative incidence of neoplasia after disease onset was 7.2, 12.0, and 23.9% at 15, 20, and 25 years, respectively. In one case after stapled IPAA, dysplasia was found at the ileal pouch; a subsequent 9 endoscopy sessions in 8 years did not detect any dysplasia. Neoplasia was found more frequently during postoperative surveillance in the IRA group than in the IPAA group (p = .0028). The cumulative incidence of neoplasia after IRA was 3.8, 8.7, and 21.7% at 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively, and that after IPAA was 1.6% at 20 years. The cumulative incidence of neoplasia after IPAA was minimal. Those who underwent IRA had a greater risk of developing neoplasia than those who underwent IPAA, although postoperative surveillance endoscopy was able to detect dysplasia/cancer at an early stage. IRA can be the surgical procedure of choice only in

  4. Supercritical-Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract from Chrysanthemum indicum Enhances Anti-Tumor Effect and Reduces Toxicity of Bleomycin in Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin (BLM, a family of anti-tumor drugs, was reported to exhibit severe side effects limiting its usage in clinical treatment. Therefore, finding adjuvants that enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the detrimental effect of BLM is a prerequisite. Chrysanthemum indicum, an edible flower, possesses abundant bioactivities; the supercritical-carbon dioxide fluid extract from flowers and buds of C. indicum (CISCFE have strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and lung protective effects. However, the role of CISCFE combined with BLM treatment on tumor-bearing mice remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the potential synergistic effect and the underlying mechanism of CISCFE combined with BLM in the treatment of hepatoma 22 (H22 tumor-bearing mice. The results suggested that the oral administration of CISCFE combined with BLM could markedly prolong the life span, attenuate the BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis, suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, activities of myeloperoxidase, and malondiadehyde. Moreover, CISCFE combined with BLM promoted the ascites cell apoptosis, the activities of caspases 3 and 8, and up-regulated the protein expression of p53 and down-regulated the transforming growth factor-β1 by activating the gene expression of miR-29b. Taken together, these results indicated that CISCFE could enhance the anti-cancer activity of BLM and reduce the BLM-induced pulmonary injury in H22 tumor-bearing mice, rendering it as a potential adjuvant drug with chemotherapy after further investigation in the future.

  5. A cost-effectiveness analysis of three components of a syndromic surveillance system for the early warning of epidemics in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Sauerborn, Rainer; Xu, Biao; Shaofa, Nie; Yan, Weirong; Diwan, Vinod K; Dong, Hengjin

    2015-11-14

    Syndromic surveillance systems (SSSs) collect non-specific syndromes in early stages of disease outbreaks. This makes an SSS a promising tool for the early detection of epidemics. An Integrated Surveillance System in rural China (ISSC project), which added an SSS to the existing Chinese surveillance system for the early warning of epidemics, was implemented from April 2012 to March 2014 in Jiangxi and Hubei Provinces. This study aims to measure the costs and effectiveness of the three components of the SSS in the ISSC project. The central measures of the cost-effectiveness analysis of the three components of the syndromic surveillance system were: 1) the costs per reported event, respectively, at the health facilities, the primary schools and the pharmacies; and 2) the operating costs per surveillance unit per year, respectively, at the health facilities, the primary schools and the pharmacies. Effectiveness was expressed by reporting outputs which were numbers of reported events, numbers of raw signals, and numbers of verified signals. The reported events were tracked through an internal data base. Signal verification forms and epidemiological investigation reports were collected from local country centers for disease control and prevention. We adopted project managers' perspective for the cost analysis. Total costs included set-up costs (system development and training) and operating costs (data collection, quality control and signal verification). We used self-designed questionnaires to collect cost data and received, respectively, 369 and 477 facility and staff questionnaires through a cross-sectional survey with a purposive sampling following the ISSC project. All data were entered into Epidata 3.02 and exported to Stata for descriptive analysis. The number of daily reported events per unit was the highest at pharmacies, followed by health facilities and finally primary schools. Variances existed within the three groups and also between Jiangxi and Hubei

  6. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wen-guo; Zhen, Yong-su; Lu, Xin-an; Shang, Bo-yang; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Sheng-hua; Zhou, Daifu; Li, Liang; Li, Yi; Luo, Yongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells by endostatin

  7. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-09-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quality and genome-wide expression signature. RNA integrity number (RIN) values were compared between total RNA samples extracted from consecutive LRP (n=11) and ORP (n=24) prostate specimens. Expression profiling was performed using the Agilent human whole-genome expression microarrays. Expression differences by surgical type were analyzed by Volcano plot analysis and gene ontology analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used for expression validation in an independent set of LRP (n=8) and ORP (n=8) samples. The LRP procedure did not compromise RNA integrity. Differential gene expression by surgery types was limited to a small subset of genes, the number of which was smaller than that expected by chance. Unexpectedly, this small subset of differentially expressed genes was enriched for those encoding transcription factors, oxygen transporters and other previously reported surgery-induced stress-response genes, and demonstrated unidirectional reduction in LRP specimens in comparison to ORP specimens. The effect of the LRP procedure on RNA quality and genome-wide transcript levels is negligible, supporting the suitability of LRP surgical specimens for routine molecular analysis. Blunted in vivo stress response in LRP specimens, likely mediated by CO(2) insufflation but not by longer ischemia time, is manifested in the reduced expression of stress-response genes in these specimens.

  8. Neurocognitive effects of therapeutic irradiation for base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, Christina A.; Geara, Fady; Wong Peifong; Morrison, William H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy delivered to the paranasal sinuses causes any long-term impairment in neurocognitive function as a result of incidental brain irradiation. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients who received paranasal sinus irradiation at least 20 months and up to 20 years before assessment were given a battery of neuropsychologic tests of cognitive function. Radiation was delivered by a three-field (one anteroposterior and two lateral) technique. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range 50-68 Gy) in fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The volume of irradiated brain was calculated from planning computed tomography slices or simulation films. The results of the neuropsychologic tests were compared to normative control values. Results: Memory impairment was found in 80% of the patients, and one-third manifested difficulty with visual-motor speed, frontal lobe executive functions, and fine motor coordination. Two of the patients had frank brain necrosis with resultant dementia and blindness, and three had evidence of brain atrophy. Three of the fourteen patients without documented cerebral atrophy or necrosis were disabled from their normal activities. Three patients also developed pituitary dysfunction. Neurocognitive symptoms were related to the total dose of radiation delivered but not to the volume of brain irradiated, side of radiation boost, or chemotherapy treatment. The pattern of test findings was consistent with radiation injury to subcortical white matter. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for paranasal sinus cancer may cause delayed neurocognitive side effects. Currently, however, the development of severe adverse effects appears to be decreasing because of improvements in the techniques used to deliver radiation. Lowering the total dose and improving dose distributions should further decrease the incidence of delayed brain injury due to radiation

  9. Effect of maternal death on child survival in rural West Africa: 25 years of prospective surveillance data in The Gambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Scott

    Full Text Available The death of a mother is a tragedy in itself but it can also have devastating effects for the survival of her children. We aim to explore the impact of a mother's death on child survival in rural Gambia, West Africa.We used 25 years of prospective surveillance data from the Farafenni Health and Demographic surveillance system (FHDSS. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years up to ten years of age were estimated and Kaplan-Meier survival curves plotted by maternal vital status. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine factors associated with child survival.Between 1st April 1989 and 31st December 2014, a total of 2, 221 (7.8% deaths occurred during 152,906 child-years of follow up. Overall mortality rate was 14.53 per 1,000 child-years (95% CI: 13.93-15.14. Amongst those whose mother died, the rate was 25.89 (95% CI: 17.99-37.25 compared to 14.44 (95% CI: 13.84-15.06 per 1,000 child-years for those whose mother did not die. Children were 4.66 (95% CI: 3.15-6.89 times more likely to die if their mother died compared to those with a surviving mother. Infants whose mothers died during delivery or shortly after were up to 7 times more likely to die within the first month of life compared to those whose mothers survived. Maternal vital status was significantly associated with the risk of dying within the first 2 years of life (p-value <0.05, while this was no longer observed for children over 2 years of age (P = 0.872. Other factors associated with an increased risk of dying were living in more rural areas, and birth spacing and year of birth.Mother's survival is strongly associated with child survival. Our findings highlight the importance of the continuum of care for both the mother and child not only throughout pregnancy, and childbirth but beyond 6 weeks post-partum.

  10. Investigating the expression, effect and tumorigenic pathway of PADI2 in tumors

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    Guo W

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wei Guo,1,2,* Yabing Zheng,2,* Bing Xu,1 Fang Ma,1 Chang Li,3 Xiaoqian Zhang,4 Yao Wang,1 Xiaotian Chang1 1Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, 2Obstetrical Department, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 3Pathology Department, Tengzhou Central People’s Hospital, Tengzhou, 4Clinical Laboratory, PKU Care Luzhong Hospital, Zibo, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD catalyzes the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues, termed citrullination. Recent studies have suggested that PAD isoform 2 (PADI2 plays an important role in tumors, although its tumorigenic effect and mechanism are largely unknown. Materials and methods: Immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were used to investigate the expression level of PADI2 in various tumor tissues and patient blood samples, respectively. MNK-45 and Bel-7402 tumor cell lines originating from gastric and liver tumors, respectively, were treated with anti-PADI2 siRNA, and the subsequent cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration were observed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays, including Cancer PathwayFinder, Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes, p53 Signaling Pathway, Signal Transduction Pathway and Tumor Metastasis PCR arrays, were used to investigate the tumorigenic pathway of PADI2 in the siRNA-treated tumor cells. This analysis was verified by real-time PCR. Results: Immunohistochemistry detected significantly increased expression of PADI2 in invasive breast ductal carcinoma, cervical squamous cell carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, liver hepatocellular carcinoma, lung cancer, ovarian serous papillary adenocarcinoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma samples. ELISA detected a twofold increase in PADI2 expression in the blood of 48.3% of patients with liver cancer, 38% of patients with cervical

  11. Amino Acid PET - An Imaging Option to Identify Treatment Response, Posttherapeutic Effects, and Tumor Recurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galldiks, Norbert; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring in patients with primary and secondary brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced standard MRI. However, the capacity of standard MRI to differentiate neoplastic tissue from non-specific posttreatment effects may be limited particularly after therapeutic interventions such as radio- and/or chemotherapy or newer treatment options, e.g., immune therapy. Metabolic imaging using PET may provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows a more accurate diagnosis especially in clinically equivocal situations, particularly when radiolabeled amino acids are used. Amino acid PET allows a sensitive monitoring of a response to various treatment options, the early detection of tumor recurrence, and an improved differentiation of tumor recurrence from posttherapeutic effects. In the past, this method had only limited availability due to the use of PET tracers with a short half-life, e.g., C-11. In recent years, however, novel amino acid PET tracers labeled with positron emitters with a longer half-life (F-18) have been developed and clinically validated, which allow a more efficient and cost-effective application. These developments and the well-documented diagnostic performance of PET using radiolabeled amino acids suggest that its application continues to spread and that this technique may be available as a routine diagnostic tool for several indications in the field of neuro-oncology.

  12. Studies of radiosensitizing effects of oxygen and/or perfluorochemical emulsion on 10 species of transplanted tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa-Itoh, Youko

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that perfluorochemical emulsion in combination with breathing carbogen (95% O 2 +5% CO 2 ) showed to enhance the response of several solid rodent tumors to single dose and fractionated radiation treatment. In the present experiment, radiation-effect, oxygen-effect and radiosensitizing-effect of FDAS (one of the preparations of perfluorochemical emulsion, Fluosol-DA saline) were examined and compared in 10 kinds of murine experimental tumor (EMT6, FM3A, LLC, Meth-A, MH134, MM46, RIF1, S-180, SCCVII and Y-83). All of the tumors were found to be radiosensitive and the growth of them were delayed by radiation itself. The growth of tumors derived from RIF1, Y-83, LLC, S-180 were significantly delayed by radiation under breathing carbogen. The administration of FDAS to tumor-bearing mice and exposure of the mice to an atmosphere of carbogen significantly enhanced the radiation-induced suppression of the growth of EMT6, Y-83, MM46, MH134, FM3A, LLC, SCCVII and S-180 tumor. Radiosensitizing-effects of FDAS were more sensitive in carcinomas than in fibrosarcomas. It is suggested that FDAS may play effectively as a radiosensitizer in many tumors. The reason why various tumors showed different responses may be ascribed to the difference in type and proportion of hypoxic cells in each tumor. (author)

  13. Safety and Effectiveness of Natalizumab: First Report of Interim Results of Post-Marketing Surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saida, Takahiko; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Sato, Ryusuke; Makioka, Haruki; Iizuka, Yukihiko; Hase, Masakazu; Ling, Yan; Torii, Shinichi

    2017-12-01

    Natalizumab, a humanized anti-α4 integrin monoclonal antibody, received marketing approval in Japan in 2014 for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because the previous large-scale clinical trials of natalizumab were mainly conducted in Europe and North American countries, and data in patients with MS from Japan were limited, we conducted an all-case post-marketing surveillance of natalizumab-treated MS patients from Japan to investigate the safety and effectiveness of natalizumab in a real-world clinical setting in Japan. Here, we report the results of an interim analysis. During the observation period of 2 years, all patients who were treated with natalizumab subsequent to its approval in Japan were followed. The effectiveness of natalizumab was assessed by examining the changes in expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score and annualized relapse rate (ARR) from baseline. Safety was assessed by analyzing the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The safety analysis included 106 patients (mean age 39.3 years; women 62.3%) whose data were collected until the data lock point (February 7, 2016). The effectiveness analysis included 75 patients. The majority of patients had relapsing-remitting MS (93/106 patients; 87.7%). The mean length of treatment exposure in the present study was 6.6 months. During the 2-year observation period, no significant change in the EDSS was observed, while the ARR decreased significantly from baseline (72.9% reduction, p = 0.001). ADRs and serious ADRs were observed in 11.3% and 3.8% of patients, respectively; however, no new safety concerns were detected. No patient had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) during the present study period. The safety and effectiveness of natalizumab were confirmed in Japanese patients with MS in clinical practice. Nevertheless, potential risks including PML require continuous, careful observation. Biogen Japan Ltd (Tokyo, Japan).

  14. Effectiveness and tolerability of parenteral testosterone undecanoate: a post-marketing surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jan; Keipert, Dieter; Motazedi, Heiko; Ernst, Michael; Nettleship, Joanne; Gooren, Louis

    2017-12-01

    This observational post-marketing study of parenteral testosterone undecanoate (TU) in a non-selected population aimed to: examine the effectiveness of TU as treatment of hypogonadism; record adverse drug reactions (ADR) quantitatively particularly regarding polycythemia, prostate safety and cardiovascular-related metabolic risk factors; and verify whether recommended injection intervals apply to routine clinical practice. Eight hundred and seventy subjects from 259 outpatient units scheduled to visit the clinic six times were included. Effectiveness and tolerability of TU administration were assessed on a 4-point scale. Body weight, waist girth, blood pressure, hemoglobin levels, hematocrit, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and digital rectal prostate examination were assessed. Over 90% of subjects completed the observational duration of 52.8 ± 9.7 weeks (mean ± SD) and 56% judged effectiveness as very good, 30.8% as good. 63.1% judged tolerability as very good, and 24.4% as good. No adverse effects on indicators of cardiovascular risk were observed. Polycythemia occurred in one subject and a supranormal hematocrit in one subject. Four subjects developed supranormal PSA levels. Prostate carcinoma was found in one subject, one subject had recurrence of a previously surgically treated prostate carcinoma, and the other two showed no indication of malignancy. Parenteral TU is safe, effective, and well-tolerated in clinical practice proving a good therapeutic option for hypogonadism.

  15. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  16. How to: Surveillance of Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutova, M; Kinross, P; Barbut, F; Hajdu, A; Wilcox, M H; Kuijper, E J

    2017-12-20

    The increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in healthcare settings in Europe since 2003 has affected both patients and healthcare systems. The implementation of effective CDI surveillance is key to enable monitoring of the occurrence and spread of C. difficile in healthcare and the timely detection of outbreaks. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of key components of effective CDI surveillance and to provide some practical recommendations. We also summarize the recent and current national CDI surveillance activities, to illustrate strengths and weaknesses of CDI surveillance in Europe. For the definition of key components of CDI surveillance, we consulted the current European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) CDI-related guidance documents and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) protocol for CDI surveillance in acute care hospitals. To summarize the recent and current national CDI surveillance activities, we discussed international multicentre CDI surveillance studies performed in 2005-13. In 2017, we also performed a new survey of existing CDI surveillance systems in 33 European countries. Key components for CDI surveillance are appropriate case definitions of CDI, standardized CDI diagnostics, agreement on CDI case origin definition, and the presentation of CDI rates with well-defined numerators and denominators. Incorporation of microbiological data is required to provide information on prevailing PCR ribotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility to first-line CDI treatment drugs. In 2017, 20 European countries had a national CDI surveillance system and 21 countries participated in ECDC-coordinated CDI surveillance. Since 2014, the number of centres with capacity for C. difficile typing has increased to 35 reference or central laboratories in 26 European countries. Incidence rates of CDI, obtained from a standardized CDI surveillance system, can be used as an important

  17. Highly Specific and Effective Targeting of EGFRvIII-Positive Tumors with TandAb Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwanger, Kristina; Reusch, Uwe; Fucek, Ivica; Knackmuss, Stefan; Weichel, Michael; Gantke, Thorsten; Molkenthin, Vera; Zhukovsky, Eugene A; Tesar, Michael; Treder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    To harness the cytotoxic capacity of immune cells for the treatment of solid tumors, we developed tetravalent, bispecific tandem diabody (TandAb) antibodies that recognize EGFRvIII, the deletion variant III of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and CD3 on T-cells, thereby directing immune cells to eliminate EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Using phage display, we identified scFv antibodies selectively binding to EGFRvIII. These highly EGFRvIII-specific, fully human scFv were substantially improved by affinity maturation, achieving K D s in the picomolar range, and were used to construct a set of bispecific EGFRvIII-targeting TandAbs with a broad range of binding and cytotoxic properties. These antibodies exhibited an exquisite specificity for a distinguished epitope in the N-terminal portion of EGFRvIII, as shown on recombinant antigen in Western Blot, SPR, and ELISA, as well as on antigen-expressing cells in FACS assays, and did not bind to the wild-type EGFR. High-affinity EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs were most potent in killing assays, displaying cytotoxicity toward EGFRvIII-expressing CHO, F98 glioma, or human DK-MG cells with EC 50 values in the range of 1-10 pM in vitro . They also demonstrated dose-dependent growth control in vivo in an EGFRvIII-positive subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. Together with the tumor-exclusive expression of EGFRvIII, the EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs' high specificity and strictly target-dependent activation with no off-target activity provide an opportunity to target tumor cells and spare normal tissues, thereby reducing the side effects associated with other anti-EGFR therapies. In summary, EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs are highly attractive therapeutic antibody candidates for selective immunotherapy of EGFRvIII-positive tumors.

  18. Highly Specific and Effective Targeting of EGFRvIII-Positive Tumors with TandAb Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ellwanger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To harness the cytotoxic capacity of immune cells for the treatment of solid tumors, we developed tetravalent, bispecific tandem diabody (TandAb antibodies that recognize EGFRvIII, the deletion variant III of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and CD3 on T-cells, thereby directing immune cells to eliminate EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Using phage display, we identified scFv antibodies selectively binding to EGFRvIII. These highly EGFRvIII-specific, fully human scFv were substantially improved by affinity maturation, achieving KDs in the picomolar range, and were used to construct a set of bispecific EGFRvIII-targeting TandAbs with a broad range of binding and cytotoxic properties. These antibodies exhibited an exquisite specificity for a distinguished epitope in the N-terminal portion of EGFRvIII, as shown on recombinant antigen in Western Blot, SPR, and ELISA, as well as on antigen-expressing cells in FACS assays, and did not bind to the wild-type EGFR. High-affinity EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs were most potent in killing assays, displaying cytotoxicity toward EGFRvIII-expressing CHO, F98 glioma, or human DK-MG cells with EC50 values in the range of 1–10 pM in vitro. They also demonstrated dose-dependent growth control in vivo in an EGFRvIII-positive subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. Together with the tumor-exclusive expression of EGFRvIII, the EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs’ high specificity and strictly target-dependent activation with no off-target activity provide an opportunity to target tumor cells and spare normal tissues, thereby reducing the side effects associated with other anti-EGFR therapies. In summary, EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs are highly attractive therapeutic antibody candidates for selective immunotherapy of EGFRvIII-positive tumors.

  19. A review of endocrine late effects in children after brain tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, M.; Langer, T.; Beck, J.D.; Doerr, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Advances in the therapy of malignant brain tumors in children have led to a significant improvement in survival rates over the last few decades. As a result, the recognition and treatment of late effects have become more important. In addition to secondary tumors and deficiencies in cognitive and intellectual skills, the resulting endocrine disturbances play an important role. Method: Own data and literature review. Results: Deviations from the normal growth hormone secretion are usually recognized first and are most common, and have already been observed after conventional whole brain irradiation with 18 G. With some delay, other hypothalamopituitary deficiencies may occur, including panhypopituitarism. Puberty may come too early or too late or may not appear at all. Girls in particular, frequently experience an early and rapid pubertal development after brain tumor therapy, which may lead to further reduction in height due to an accelerated bone maturation. Functional disturbances of the thyroid and adrenal glands due to hypothalamic or pituitary deficiency are less common, and usually seen only after a radiation dose of over 40 Gy. Conclusion: Survivors of childhood brain tumors must be considered as long-term survivors, in whom the first therapy-induced long-term side effects appear almost immediately after the end of therapy. Maximum quality of life for the individual patient can only be achieved by long-term care and close cooperation of specialists in the different medical disciplines involved. (orig.) [de

  20. Theranostic Liposomes with Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug to Effectively Destruct Hypoxic Tumors Post-Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Cheng, Liang; Dong, Ziliang; Tao, Danlei; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Meiwan; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-01-24

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a noninvasive cancer therapeutic method triggered by light, would lead to severe tumor hypoxia after treatment. Utilizing a hypoxia-activated prodrug, AQ4N, which only shows toxicity to cancer cells under hypoxic environment, herein, a multipurpose liposome is prepared by encapsulating hydrophilic AQ4N and hydrophobic hexadecylamine conjugated chlorin e6 (hCe6), a photosensitizer, into its aqueous cavity and hydrophobic bilayer, respectively. After chelating a 64 Cu isotope with Ce6, the obtained AQ4N- 64 Cu-hCe6-liposome is demonstrated to be an effective imaging probe for in vivo positron emission tomography, which together with in vivo fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging uncovers efficient passive homing of those liposomes after intravenous injection. After being irradiated with the 660 nm light-emitting diode light, the tumor bearing mice with injection of AQ4N-hCe6-liposome show severe tumor hypoxia, which in turn would trigger activation of AQ4N, and finally contributes to remarkably improved cancer treatment outcomes via sequential PDT and hypoxia-activated chemotherapy. This work highlights a liposome-based theranostic nanomedicine that could utilize tumor hypoxia, a side effect of PDT, to trigger chemotherapy, resulting in greatly improved efficacy compared to conventional cancer PDT.

  1. Combined effect of radiation and YM-881 (SMANCS) on murine tumors and bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Wandl, E.; Sasai, K.; Tsutsui, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.; Vienna Univ.

    1990-01-01

    The combined effect of radiation and YM-881 (SMANCS) was studied in vitro and in vivo. When 0.25 μg/ml of YM-881 was simultaneously combined with radiation, during and after irradiation for 30 min in total, D q decreased from 3.3 Gy to 1.4 Gy without changing D 0 in the dose-survival curve of exponentially growing SCC VII tumor cells. Five or ten times administrations of 0.1 mg/kg YM-881 at an interval of 24 h did not inhibit tumor growth. However, administration of 0.1 mg/kg YM-881 just before every irradiation which was repeated five times at an interval of 24 h yielded dose modifying factors (DMFs) of 1.8-1.2 when the tumor response to treatment was evaluated by the time for the tumors to regrow to three times the original volume. Administration of YM-881 ten times just before every irradiation yielded DMFs of 1.3-1.2. Adverse effects of the combination on bone marrow were examined by spleen colony assay. After five injections of 0.1 mg/kg YM-881, the mean number of CFU-S per femur decreased to 77% of the pretreatment level, but this was not significant statistically (0.1>p>0.05). The slope of radiation response curve for CFU-S per femur was not affected by the combination. (orig.)

  2. Tumor-promoting phorbol esters effect alkalinization of canine renal proximal tubular cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellas, J.; Hammerman, M.R.

    1986-03-01

    We have demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for tumor-promoting phorbol esters in the plasma membrane of the canine renal proximal tubular cell. These compounds affect proximal tubular metabolism in vitro. For example, we have shown that they inhibit gluconeogenesis in canine renal proximal tubular segments. Tumor-promoting phorbol esters have been shown to effect alkalinization of non-renal cells, by enhancing Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange across the plasma membrane. To determine whether the actions of tumor-promoting phorbol esters in proximal tubular segments might be mediated by a similar process, we incubated suspensions of segments from dog kidney with these compounds and measured changes in intracellular pH using (/sup 14/C)-5,5-dimethoxazoladine-2-4-dione (DMO) and flow dialysis. Incubation of segments with phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate, but not inactive phorbol ester, 4 ..gamma.. phorbol, effected alkalinization of cells within the segments in a concentration-dependent manner. Alkalinization was dependent upon the presence of extracellular (Na/sup +/) > intracellular (Na/sup +/), was prevented by amiloride and was demonstrable in the presence of SITS. Our findings suggest that tumor-promoting esters stimulate the Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchanger known to be present in the brush border membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell. It is possible that the stimulation reflects a mechanism by which phorbol esters affect metabolic processes in these cells.

  3. Selective effects of whey protein concentrate on glutathione levels and apoptosis in rats with mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Hsuan; Tseng, Yang-Ming; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Tsai, Shih-Meng; Tsai, Li-Yu

    2017-09-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in antioxidant defense and regulation of apoptosis. GSH deficiency is related to many diseases, including cancer, and increased GSH levels in cancer cells are associated with chemotherapy resistance because of resistance to apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of whey protein concentrate (WPC), a precursor of GSH, in rats with mammary tumors induced by treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). DMBA treatment results in cellular changes that mimic the initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis of breast tissue. We aimed to examine the possible preventive effects of diets containing whey protein on DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats. The results indicate that WPC (0.334 g/kg) supplementation significantly increased the liver GSH levels by 92%, and were accompanied by low Bax/Bcl-2 ratio (from 5 to 3) and cleaved caspase-3/procaspase-3 ratio (from 2.4 to 1.2) in DMBA-treated rats. Furthermore, tumor GSH levels were decreased by 47% in WPC-supplemented rats, which resulted in increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio (from 0.9 to 2) and cleaved caspase-3/procaspase-3 ratio (from 1.1 to 2.7). In conclusion, supplementation with WPC could selectively deplete tumor GSH levels and, therefore, WPC supplementation might be a promising strategy to overcome treatment resistance in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Curcumin and Turmeric Modulate the Tumor-Promoting Effects of Iron In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Donald J; Robinson, Todd; Kowdley, Kris V

    2017-04-01

    Free or loosely chelated iron has tumor-promoting properties in vitro. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the food spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), is a potent antioxidant that binds iron. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether curcuminoids prevent tumor-promoting effects of iron in T51B cells, a non-neoplastic rat liver epithelial cell line. Purified curcuminoids (curcumin) or a standardized turmeric extract similarly reduced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity associated with iron overload (IC 50 values near 10 μM, P turmeric for 16 wk in culture; subsequently assayed by soft agar colony formation) was nearly complete at 20 μM of total curcuminoids (P turmeric extract were taken up better by cells, had a longer half-life, and appeared more effective in blocking tumor promotion (P < 0.01), suggesting enhanced curcuminoid delivery to cells in culture. The primary finding that curcuminoids can inhibit tumor promotion caused by iron in T51B cells is tempered by evidence for an underlying increase in neoplastic transformation at lower concentrations.

  5. En bloc resections for primary spinal tumors in 20 years of experience: effectiveness and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Luca; Cappuccio, Michele; De Iure, Federico; Bandiera, Stefano; Gasbarrini, Alessandro; Boriani, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that en bloc surgical resection of primary spinal tumors with adequate margins results in improved local disease control and survival compared with intralesional excision. Nevertheless, the use of this procedure is under debate because most of the current evidence is provided by small and heterogeneous series of cases. To validate the application of en bloc resection for the treatment of aggressive benign and primary malignant spinal tumors. This is a prospective cohort study. From August 1990 to March 2010, 103 consecutive patients affected by primary spinal tumors were enrolled in the study. All patients were submitted to the same clinical and imaging workup. Analysis of local recurrence (LR) and tumor-related mortality, reliability of preoperative surgical planning, and morbidity and mortality. In addition, the effects of possible predictors of these events were studied. The parameters for the effectiveness and safety of en bloc resections performed on primary spinal tumors were considered as primary end points of this study, and two research questions were formulated. The analysis of the procedure effectiveness considered the identification of possible predictors of LR and tumor-related mortality. Information about safety is collected so as to clarify the possibility to respect the preoperative planning and to identify possible predictors of morbidity and mortality. Data from clinical and imaging examination were collected in a database and were used to answer the proposed research questions. All patients were followed for a minimum of 24 months or until death. At the final assessment, 69 patients resulted with no evidence of disease with a mean follow-up of 100 months. Among the 103 patients, tumor recurred in 22 cases with a mean follow-up period of 39 months after surgery. A Cox regression multivariate analysis shows that marginal and intralesional resections are independent predictors of LR (hazard ratio [HR] 9.45, 95

  6. Effect of Recombination in the Evolutionary Dynamics of HIV under the Surveillance of Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weiqun; Yang, Wenjing; Wang, Guanyu

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which has become one of the most destructive pandemics in history. The fact that HIV virus evolves very fast plays a central role in AIDS immunopathogenesis and the difficulty we face in finding a cure or a vaccine for AIDS. A distinguishing feature of HIV is its high frequency of recombination. The effect of recombination in the HIV evolution is not clear. We establish a mathematical model of the evolutionary dynamics. This model incorporates both point mutation and recombination for genetic diversity, and employs a fitness function developed by Wang and Deem (PRL 97, 188106, 2006) that accounts for the effect of immune system. Using this model, we explore the role of recombination in the battle between the virus population and the immune system, with a special focus on the condition under which recombination helps the virus population to escape from the immune system.

  7. The effects of Valette on skin and hair: a post-marketing surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, T; Wisser, K H; Dietrich, H

    2000-03-01

    The effects of Valette--an oral contraceptive containing ethinyloestradiol 0.03 mg and the antiandrogenic progestogen dienogest 2.0 mg--on the skin and hair were surveyed over 63,474 cycles in 10,718 women in routine gynaecological practice. Improvements were greatest in women with severe or moderate androgen-related symptoms. After six cycles, < 1% of women had severely greasy hair and 6% had moderate greasiness, compared with 11% and 27% at baseline; fewer hair washes were needed per week. The incidence of severe and moderately greasy skin disorders fell from 16% to < 1%, and from 39% to 7.5%, respectively. Self-assessments indicated less greasy hair and improved greasy skin disorders in 70% and 81% of women, respectively. The overall effect of Valette on the skin and hair was rated very good or good by 87.5% of women. These results confirm previous observations of a beneficial effect of Valette on androgen-related skin and hair conditions.

  8. Biometeorological forecasts for health surveillance and prevention of meteor-tropic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecha Estela, Luis B.

    2017-09-01

    An early method of biometeorological forecasts was developed for Cuba during the late 90s. It was based on the relationship between the daily occurrence of massive health crisis and the magnitude of the 24-h differences of partial density of oxygen in the air (PODA index). Ten years later, applying new technological facilities, a new model was developed in order to offer operational biometeorological forecast to Cuban health institutions. After a satisfactory validation process, the official bioforecast service to health institutions in Villa Clara province began on February of 2012. The effectiveness had different success levels: for the bronchial asthma crisis (94%), in the hypertensive crisis (88%), with the cerebrovascular illnesses (85%), as well as migraines (82%) and in case of cardiovascular diseases (75%) were acceptable. Since 2008, the application of the model was extended to other regions of the world, including some national applications. Furthermore, it allowed the beginning of regional monitoring of meteor-tropic effects, following the occurrence and movement of areas with higher weather contrasts, defined according to the normalized scale of PODA index. The paper describes the main regional results already available, with emphasis in the observed meteor-tropic effects increasing in all regions during recent years. It coincides with the general increase of energy imbalance in the whole climate system. Finally, the paper describes the current development of new global biometeorological forecast services.

  9. Biometeorological forecasts for health surveillance and prevention of meteor-tropic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecha Estela, Luis B

    2017-09-13

    An early method of biometeorological forecasts was developed for Cuba during the late 90s. It was based on the relationship between the daily occurrence of massive health crisis and the magnitude of the 24-h differences of partial density of oxygen in the air (PODA index). Ten years later, applying new technological facilities, a new model was developed in order to offer operational biometeorological forecast to Cuban health institutions. After a satisfactory validation process, the official bioforecast service to health institutions in Villa Clara province began on February of 2012. The effectiveness had different success levels: for the bronchial asthma crisis (94%), in the hypertensive crisis (88%), with the cerebrovascular illnesses (85%), as well as migraines (82%) and in case of cardiovascular diseases (75%) were acceptable. Since 2008, the application of the model was extended to other regions of the world, including some national applications. Furthermore, it allowed the beginning of regional monitoring of meteor-tropic effects, following the occurrence and movement of areas with higher weather contrasts, defined according to the normalized scale of PODA index. The paper describes the main regional results already available, with emphasis in the observed meteor-tropic effects increasing in all regions during recent years. It coincides with the general increase of energy imbalance in the whole climate system. Finally, the paper describes the current development of new global biometeorological forecast services.

  10. Haploidentical hematopoietic SCT increases graft-versus-tumor effect against renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak-Alpdogan, T; Sauter, C T; Bailey, C P; Biswas, C S; Panis, M M; Civriz, S; Flomenberg, N; Alpdogan, O

    2013-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) has been shown to be an effective treatment option for advanced renal cell cancer (RCC). However, tumor resistance/relapse remains as the main post transplant issue. Therefore, enhancing graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity without increasing GVHD is critical for improving the outcome of HSCT. We explored the GVT effect of haploidentical-SCT (haplo-SCT) against RCC in murine models. Lethally irradiated CB6F1 (H2K(b/d)) recipients were transplanted with T-cell-depleted BM cells from B6CBAF1 (H2K(b/k)) mice. Haplo-SCT combined with a low-dose haploidentical (HI) T-cell infusion (1 × 10(5)) successfully provided GVT activity without incurring GVHD. This effect elicited murine RCC growth control and consequently displayed a comparative survival advantage of haplo-SCT recipients when compared with MHC-matched (B6D2F1CB6F1) and parent-F1 (B6CB6F1) transplant recipients. Recipients of haplo-SCT had an increase in donor-derived splenic T-cell numbers, T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ-secreting donor-derived T-cells, a critical aspect for anti-tumor activity. The splenocytes from B6CBAF1 mice had a higher cytotoxicity against RENCA cells than the splenocytes from B6 and B6D2F1 donors after tumor challenge. These findings suggest that haplo-SCT might be an innovative immunotherapeutic platform for solid tumors, particularly for renal cell carcinoma.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-tumoral Effects of the Flavonoid Apigenin in Malignant Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Masuelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma (MM is a tumor arising from mesothelium. MM patients’ survival is poor. The polyphenol 4′,5,7,-trihydroxyflavone Apigenin (API is a “multifunctional drug”. Several studies have demonstrated API anti-tumoral effects. However, little is known on the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumoral effects of API in MM. Thus, we analyzed the in vitro effects of API on cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, pro-survival signaling pathways, apoptosis, and autophagy of human and mouse MM cells. We evaluated the in vivo anti-tumor activities of API in mice transplanted with MM #40a cells forming ascites. API inhibited in vitro MM cells survival, increased reactive oxygen species intracellular production and induced DNA damage. API activated apoptosis but not autophagy. API-induced apoptosis was sustained by the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, increase of p53 expression, activation of both caspase 9 and caspase 8, cleavage of PARP-1, and increase of the percentage of cells in subG1 phase. API treatment affected the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPKs in a cell-type specific manner, inhibited AKT phosphorylation, decreased c-Jun expression and phosphorylation, and inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation. Intraperitoneal administration of API increased the median survival of C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally transplanted with #40a cells and reduced the risk of tumor growth. Our findings may have important implications for the design of MM treatment using API.

  12. Increased Serotonin Signaling Contributes to the Warburg Effect in Pancreatic Tumor Cells Under Metabolic Stress and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Heng; Li, Jun; Dong, Fang-Yuan; Yang, Jian-Yu; Liu, De-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Pang, Xiu-Feng; Huo, Yan-Miao; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Qin, Wen-Xin; Gu, Jian-Ren; Sun, Yong-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    Desmoplasia and poor vascularity cause severe metabolic stress in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator with neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine functions that contributes to tumorigenesis. We investigated the role of 5-HT signaling in the growth of pancreatic tumors. We measured the levels of proteins that regulate 5-HT synthesis, packaging, and degradation in pancreata from Kras G12D/+ /Trp53 R172H/+ /Pdx1-Cre (KPC) mice, which develop pancreatic tumors, as well as in PDAC cell lines and a tissue microarray containing 81 human PDAC samples. We also analyzed expression levels of proteins involved in 5-HT synthesis and degradation by immunohistochemical analysis of a tissue microarray containing 311 PDAC specimens, and associated expression levels with patient survival times. 5-HT level in 14 matched PDAC tumor and non-tumor tissues were analyzed by ELISA. PDAC cell lines were incubated with 5-HT and cell survival and apoptosis were measured. We analyzed expression of the 5-HT receptor HTR2B in PDAC cells and effects of receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as HTR2B knockdown with small hairpin RNAs. We determined the effects of 5-HT stimulation on gene expression profiles of BxPC-3 cells. Regulation of glycolysis by 5-HT signaling via HTR2B was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analyses, as well as by determination of the extracellular acid ratio, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Primary PDACs, with or without exposure to SB204741 (a selective antagonist of HTR2B), were grown as xenograft tumors in mice, and SB204741 was administered to tumor-bearing KPC mice; tumor growth and metabolism were measured by imaging analyses. In immunohistochemical analysis of a tissue microarray of PDAC specimens, increased levels of TPH1 and decreased level of MAOA, which regulate 5-HT synthesis and degradation, correlated with stage and size of PDACs and shorter patient survival time. We found levels

  13. The effectiveness of interventions to treat obesity in survivors of childhood brain tumors: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kuan-Wen; Valencia, Marlie; Banfield, Laura; Chau, Ruth; Fleming, Adam; Singh, Sheila K.; Burrow, Sarah; de Souza, Russell J.; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, M. Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumors in children. Advances in understanding the hallmarks of cancer biology and novel therapies have led to an increasing number of survivors of childhood brain tumors (SCBT). However, these survivors are at an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic disorders that affect their quality of life and lifespan. It is important to define effective strategies to treat and prevent obesity in this population. This systematic review a...

  14. Suppressive versus augmenting effect of the same pretreatment regimen in two murine tumor systems with distinct effector mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Hamaoka, Toshiyuki; Kitagawa, Masayasu

    1978-01-01

    The effect of presensitization with x-irradiated tumor cells on the development of host's immune resistance against the tumor-associated transplantation antigens (TATA) was investigated in two syngeneic tumor systems with distinct effector mechanisms. When X5563 plasmacytoma, to which immune resistance was mediated exclusively by killer T lymphocytes, was intravenously inoculated into syngeneic C3H/He mice with lower number after 7000 R x-irradiation, the mice failed to exhibit any protective immunity against the subsequent challenge with viable tumor cells. Moreover, these mice lost their capability to develop any immune resistance even after an appropriate immunization procedure. The immunodepression induced by such a pretreatment regimen was specific for X5563 tumor. While no suppressor cell activity was detected in the above pretreated mice, serum factor(s) from these mice was virtually responsible for this suppression. When the serum factor mediating this tumor-specific suppression was fractionated on the Sephadex G-200 column, the suppressive activity was found in albumin-corresponding fraction, free of any immunoglobulin component. In contrast, in MM102 mammary tumor system, in which immune resistance is solely mediated by tumor-specific antibody, the pretreatment with x-irradiated MM102 cells augmented the induction of anti-tumor immunity. These results indicate that while tumor antigens given in the form of x-irradiated tumor cells suppress the induction of killer T cell-mediated immunity in one system, the same presensitization regimen of tumor antigens augments the antibody-mediated immunity in another system, thus giving a divergent effect on the distinct effector mechanisms of syngeneic tumor immunity. (author)

  15. Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on Radiofrequency Ablation of VX2 Liver Tumor: Intraarterial versus Intravenous Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Nak Jong; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be used as a possible pharmaceutical alternative that augments radiofrequency (RF) ablation by reducing tumor blood flow. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of intraarterial and intravenous administration of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on RF-induced ablation in an experimentally induced liver tumor. VX2 carcinoma was grown in the livers of 30 rabbits. As{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1 mg/kg) was administered through the hepatic artery (n = 10, group A) or ear vein (n = 10, group B), 30 minutes before RF ablation (125 mA {+-} 35; 90 {+-} 5 degrees Celsius). As a control group, 10 rabbits were treated with RF ablation alone (group C). RF was intentionally applied to the peripheral margin of the tumor so that ablation can cover the tumor and adjacent hepatic parenchyma. Ablation areas of the tumor and adjacent parenchymal changes among three groups were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. The overall ablation areas were 156 {+-} 28.9 mm{sup 2} (group A), 119 {+-} 31.7 (group B), and 92 {+-} 17.4 (group C, p < 0.04). The ablation area of the tumor was significantly larger in group A (73 {+-} 19.7 mm{sup 2}) than both group B (50 {+-} 19.4, p = 0.02) and group C (28 {+-} 2.2, p < 0.01). The ratios of the tumoral ablation area to the overall ablation area were larger in group A (47 {+-} 10.5%) than that of the other groups (42 {+-} 7.3% in group B and 32 {+-} 5.6% in group C) (p < 0.03). Radiofrequency-induced ablation area can be increased with intraarterial or intravenous administration of As{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The intraarterial administration of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} seems to be helpful for the selective ablation of the tumor.

  16. SNSA surveillance over the ageing effects and ability for long term operation at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savli, S.; Ferjancic, M.; Pavlin, D.; Lovincic, D.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) tools used for verification the adequacy of management of ageing effects and assuring suitability for long term operation at the Krsko NPP. In addition to tools commonly used as PSR (Periodic Safety Review), assessment of plant modifications, regular inspections, the SNSA applies some special methods like monitoring the condition of important plant structures, systems and components (SSC) through special designed software, review and assessment of important plant programmes and its own set of performance indicators

  17. Correcting for day of the week and public holiday effects: improving a national daily syndromic surveillance service for detecting public health threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Buckingham-Jeffery

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As service provision and patient behaviour varies by day, healthcare data used for public health surveillance can exhibit large day of the week effects. These regular effects are further complicated by the impact of public holidays. Real-time syndromic surveillance requires the daily analysis of a range of healthcare data sources, including family doctor consultations (called general practitioners, or GPs, in the UK. Failure to adjust for such reporting biases during analysis of syndromic GP surveillance data could lead to misinterpretations including false alarms or delays in the detection of outbreaks. The simplest smoothing method to remove a day of the week effect from daily time series data is a 7-day moving average. Public Health England developed the working day moving average in an attempt also to remove public holiday effects from daily GP data. However, neither of these methods adequately account for the combination of day of the week and public holiday effects. Methods The extended working day moving average was developed. This is a further data-driven method for adding a smooth trend curve to a time series graph of daily healthcare data, that aims to take both public holiday and day of the week effects into account. It is based on the assumption that the number of people seeking healthcare services is a combination of illness levels/severity and the ability or desire of patients to seek healthcare each day. The extended working day moving average was compared to the seven-day and working day moving averages through application to data from two syndromic indicators from the GP in-hours syndromic surveillance system managed by Public Health England. Results The extended working day moving average successfully smoothed the syndromic healthcare data by taking into account the combined day of the week and public holiday effects. In comparison, the seven-day and working day moving averages were unable to account for all

  18. Correcting for day of the week and public holiday effects: improving a national daily syndromic surveillance service for detecting public health threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham-Jeffery, Elizabeth; Morbey, Roger; House, Thomas; Elliot, Alex J; Harcourt, Sally; Smith, Gillian E

    2017-05-19

    As service provision and patient behaviour varies by day, healthcare data used for public health surveillance can exhibit large day of the week effects. These regular effects are further complicated by the impact of public holidays. Real-time syndromic surveillance requires the daily analysis of a range of healthcare data sources, including family doctor consultations (called general practitioners, or GPs, in the UK). Failure to adjust for such reporting biases during analysis of syndromic GP surveillance data could lead to misinterpretations including false alarms or delays in the detection of outbreaks. The simplest smoothing method to remove a day of the week effect from daily time series data is a 7-day moving average. Public Health England developed the working day moving average in an attempt also to remove public holiday effects from daily GP data. However, neither of these methods adequately account for the combination of day of the week and public holiday effects. The extended working day moving average was developed. This is a further data-driven method for adding a smooth trend curve to a time series graph of daily healthcare data, that aims to take both public holiday and day of the week effects into account. It is based on the assumption that the number of people seeking healthcare services is a combination of illness levels/severity and the ability or desire of patients to seek healthcare each day. The extended working day moving average was compared to the seven-day and working day moving averages through application to data from two syndromic indicators from the GP in-hours syndromic surveillance system managed by Public Health England. The extended working day moving average successfully smoothed the syndromic healthcare data by taking into account the combined day of the week and public holiday effects. In comparison, the seven-day and working day moving averages were unable to account for all these effects, which led to misleading smoothing

  19. Role of immunological surveillance in radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sado, Toshihiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The immune system is known to be highly susceptible to various physical, chemical, and biological insults. The studies on the immediate and long-term effects of radiation on immune system of mice indicated very clearly that there was a dose-dependent reduction in the number of T and B cells, depression of antibody and cytotoxic T cell responses as well as proliferative responses of spleen cells to T and B cell mitogens shortly after irradiation, but they all recovered to the control level within a few months. Immunosuppression observed shortly after irradiation had little influence on the development of radiogenic tumors. The effects of radiation on the incidence of Friend leukemia virus (FLV)-induced leukemias are examined by using young adult B6C3F{sub 1} male mice which are normally resistant to FLV-induced leukemogenesis. There was a clear threshold dose of 2 Gy below which the development of FLV induced leukemias was not observed but after exposure to >3 Gy high incidence of leukemias was observed. Fractionated, weekly exposure of young C57BL strain mice to 1.6 Gy of X-rays for four successive weeks causes most of the exposed mice to develop thymic lymphomas between 3 and 10 months. However, when the exposed mice are grafted with bone marrow cells from normal donors, the development of thymic lymphomas on the exposed mice is greatly inhibited. There was a clear dose response relationship between the number of bone marrow cells injected and the inhibition of the development of thymic lymphomas. It now appears clear that T cell-mediated immunological surveillance against newly arising neoplasms conceived by Thomas and Burnet does not hold true anymore in the original form, although virus-infected host cells and other host cells expressing altered-self' markers on their cell surfaces are constantly monitored by the immunological surveillance mechanism. A surveillance function against newly arising neoplasms may be a property of surrounding normal tissue

  20. Effects of whole-body irradiation on neonatally thymectomized mice. Incidence of benign and malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Howarth, J.L.; Troup, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    The individual and combined effects of neonatal thymectomy and whole-body irradiation on the prevalence of benign and malignant tumors in germ-free female mice of the Charles Rivers line were studied to determine if a portion of the tumorigenic effects of irradiation can be attributed to injury of the thymic-dependent component of the immune response. Neonatal thymectomy increased (a) the incidence of benign and malignant tumors and (b) the prevalence of multiple primary neoplasms in an individual mouse. Whole-body exposure to 700 rad at 6 weeks of age further increased the incidence of tumors, but the relative magnitude of this increase was less pronounced than in sham-operated controls. Thus, the cumulative effects of thymectomy plus irradiation are less pronounced than the sum of the individual effects. One of several possible explanations for this observation is that a portion of the carcinogenic effects of whole-body irradiation is mediated by suppression of the thymic-dependent component of the immune response

  1. Effectiveness and Cost-benefit Evaluation of a Comprehensive Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Sustainable Employability of Meat Processing Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Holland, Berry J; Reneman, Michiel F; Soer, Remko; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R

    2018-03-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive workers' health surveillance (WHS) program on aspects of sustainable employability and cost-benefit. Methods A cluster randomized stepped wedge trial was performed in a Dutch meat processing company from february 2012 until march 2015. In total 305 workers participated in the trial. Outcomes were retrieved during a WHS program, by multiple questionnaires, and from company registries. Primary outcomes were sickness absence, work ability, and productivity. Secondary outcomes were health, vitality, and psychosocial workload. Data were analyzed with linear and logistic multilevel models. Cost-benefit analyses from the employer's perspective were performed as well. Results Primary outcomes sickness absence (OR = 1.40), work ability (B = -0.63) and productivity (OR = 0.71) were better in the control condition. Secondary outcomes did not or minimally differ between conditions. Of the 12 secondary outcomes, the only outcome that scored better in the experimental condition was meaning of work (B = 0.18). Controlling for confounders did not or minimally change the results. However, our stepped wedge design did not enable adjustment for confounding in the last two periods of the trial. The WHS program resulted in higher costs for the employer on the short and middle term. Conclusions Primary outcomes did not improve after program implementation and secondary outcomes remained equal after implementation. The program was not cost-beneficial after 1-3 year follow-up. Main limitation that may have contributed to absence of positive effects may be program failure, because interventions were not deployed as intended.

  2. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  3. Binimetinib inhibits MEK and is effective against neuroblastoma tumor cells with low NF1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Sarah E; Zhang, Linna; Scorsone, Kathleen A; Liu, Yin; Zage, Peter E

    2016-03-01

    Novel therapies are needed for children with high-risk and relapsed neuroblastoma. We hypothesized that MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibition with the novel MEK1/2 inhibitor binimetinib would be effective in neuroblastoma preclinical models. Levels of total and phosphorylated MEK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were examined in primary neuroblastoma tumor samples and in neuroblastoma cell lines by Western blot. A panel of established neuroblastoma tumor cell lines was treated with increasing concentrations of binimetinib, and their viability was determined using MTT assays. Western blot analyses were performed to examine changes in total and phosphorylated MEK and ERK and to measure apoptosis in neuroblastoma tumor cells after binimetinib treatment. NF1 protein levels in neuroblastoma cell lines were determined using Western blot assays. Gene expression of NF1 and MEK1 was examined in relationship to neuroblastoma patient outcomes. Both primary neuroblastoma tumor samples and cell lines showed detectable levels of total and phosphorylated MEK and ERK. IC50 values for cells sensitive to binimetinib ranged from 8 nM to 1.16 μM, while resistant cells did not demonstrate any significant reduction in cell viability with doses exceeding 15 μM. Sensitive cells showed higher endogenous expression of phosphorylated MEK and ERK. Gene expression of NF1, but not MEK1, correlated with patient outcomes in neuroblastoma, and NF1 protein expression also correlated with responses to binimetinib. Neuroblastoma tumor cells show a range of sensitivities to the novel MEK inhibitor binimetinib. In response to binimetinib, sensitive cells demonstrated complete loss of phosphorylated ERK, while resistant cells demonstrated either incomplete loss of ERK phosphorylation or minimal effects on MEK phosphorylation, suggesting alternative mechanisms of resistance. NF1 protein expression correlated with responses to binimetinib, supporting the use of NF1 as a biomarker to identify

  4. Late radiation effects on hearing, vestibular function, and taste in brain tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesen, Tom B.; Rasmussen, Kjell; Winther, Finn Oe.; Halvorsen, Ulf; Lote, Knut

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate late radiation effects on hearing, vestibular function, and taste after conventional radiotherapy in brain tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Hearing, vestibular function, and taste were assessed in 33 brain tumor patients irradiated unilaterally to the tumor-bearing hemisphere and the temporal bone. Median observation time after completion of radiotherapy was 13 years; the fraction dose was 1.8 Gy, and mean radiation dose was 53.1 Gy. Results: Deep ulceration in the external ear canal and osteoradionecrosis on the irradiated side was seen in three patients. Reduced hearing was found for air and bone conduction of the irradiated side compared to the opposite side (0.25-2 kHz: 6.1 dB, 4 kHz: 10.3 dB, 6 kHz: 15.6 dB, and 8 kHz: 16.5 dB). For bone conduction, the corresponding figures were 0.25-2 kHz: 5.5 dB and 4 kHz: 8.2 dB. Three patients had a canal paresis of the irradiated side, and three patients had affection of the chorda tympani. Conclusion: Irradiation of the temporal bone with doses usually given in the treatment of patients with brain tumors may cause osteoradionecrosis, sensorineural hearing loss, dysfunction of the vestibular inner ear, and loss of taste. Head-and-neck examination should be included in the follow-up of long-term survivors

  5. Symptom resolution, tumor control, and side effects following postoperative radiotherapy for pituitary macroadenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, Stephen; Cooper, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This study reports the outcome of 70 patients who were treated by a consistent treatment plan of surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary macroadenomas in the modern era [computed tomographic scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dopamine agonist therapy (DA) added as indicated, and immunohistochemical staining]. Sixty-two patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery (vs. transcranial surgery) and 61 received 45-Gy/25 fractions postoperatively (vs. other dose fractionation schemes). Twenty-four patients received DA for prolactin-secreting tumors. With a median follow-up of 8 years (range 2-15), 68 patients have experienced continuous control of their tumors. Most symptoms related to mass effect abated, while physiologic symptoms such as amenorrhea from markedly elevated prolactin levels tended to persist. Treatment-induced hypopituitarism occurred in 42% of the patients at risk. No patients in this series have died as a result of their pituitary tumor. No gross neuropsychologic dysfunction after treatment has been noted. While it is possible at this time with serial MRI to withhold postoperative RT and observe some patients who have had a 'gross total' resection of a macroadenoma, the therapeutic ratio for surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with nonfunctional tumors as well as select patients with secretory macroadenomas is favorable

  6. Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anna; Grøntved, Anders; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann

    2015-01-01

    prevalence levels. Prevalence based on HbA1c was lower than prevalence based on FPG in 42·8% of age-sex-survey groups and higher in another 41·6%; in the other 15·6%, the two definitions provided similar prevalence estimates. The variation across studies in the relation between glucose-based and HbA1c......BACKGROUND: Diabetes has been defined on the basis of different biomarkers, including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT), and HbA1c. We assessed the effect of different diagnostic definitions on both the population prevalence of diabetes...... of the biomarkers used for defining diabetes. Diabetes was defined using HbA1c (HbA1c ≥6·5% or history of diabetes diagnosis or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs) compared with either FPG only or FPG-or-2hOGTT definitions (FPG ≥7·0 mmol/L or 2hOGTT ≥11·1 mmol/L or history of diabetes or using insulin...

  7. How is the effectiveness of immune surveillance impacted by the spatial distribution of spreading infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadolsky, Ulrich D.; Yates, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    What effect does the spatial distribution of infected cells have on the efficiency of their removal by immune cells, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL)? If infected cells spread in clusters, CTL may initially be slow to locate them but subsequently kill more rapidly than in diffuse infections. We address this question using stochastic, spatially explicit models of CTL interacting with different patterns of infection. Rather than the effector : target ratio, we show that the relevant quantity is the ratio of a CTL's expected time to locate its next target (search time) to the average time it spends conjugated with a target that it is killing (handling time). For inefficient (slow) CTL, when the search time is always limiting, the critical density of CTL (that required to control 50% of infections, C*) is independent of the spatial distribution and derives from simple mass-action kinetics. For more efficient CTL such that handling time becomes limiting, mass-action underestimates C*, and the more clustered an infection the greater is C*. If CTL migrate chemotactically towards targets the converse holds—C* falls, and clustered infections are controlled most efficiently. Real infections are likely to spread patchily; this combined with even weak chemotaxis means that sterilizing immunity may be achieved with substantially lower numbers of CTL than standard models predict. PMID:26150655

  8. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET imaging for monitoring everolimus effect on tumor-growth in neuroendocrine tumors: studies in human tumor xenografts in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Bardram Johnbeck

    Full Text Available The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging.The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10.Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative to baseline were significantly lower in the everolimus group compared to the control group at day 3 (126±6% vs. 152±6%; p = 0.016, day 7 (164±7% vs. 226±13%; p<0.001 and at day 10 (194±10% vs. 281±18%; p<0.001. Uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT showed little differences between control and treatment groups, but individual mean uptake of 18F-FDG at day 3 correlated with tumor growth day 10 (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.034, 18F-FLT mean uptake at day 1 correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.63; P = 0.019 and at day 3 18F-FLT correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.87; P<0.001 and day 10 (r2 = 0.58; P = 0.027.Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders and non-responders.

  9. Protective Effect of Metformin Against Walker 256 Tumor Growth is Not Dependent on Metabolism Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinéia Conationi da Silva Franco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The objective of the current work was to test the effect of metformin on the tumor growth in rats with metabolic syndrome. Methods: We obtained pre-diabetic hyperinsulinemic rats by neonatal treatment with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG, which were chronically treated every day, from weaning to 100 day old, with dose of metformin (250 mg/kg body weight. After the end of metformin treatment, the control and MSG rats, treated or untreated with metformin, were grafted with Walker 256 carcinoma cells. Tumor weight was evaluated 14 days after cancer cell inoculation. The blood insulin, glucose levels and glucose-induced insulin secretion were evaluated. Results: Chronic metformin treatment improved the glycemic homeostasis in pre-diabetic MSG-rats, glucose intolerance, tissue insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and decreased the fat tissue accretion. Meanwhile, the metformin treatment did not interfere with the glucose insulinotropic effect on isolated pancreatic islets. Chronic treatment with metformin was able to decrease the Walker 256 tumor weight by 37% in control and MSG rats. The data demonstrated that the anticancer effect of metformin is not related to its role in correcting metabolism imbalances, such as hyperinsulinemia. However, in morphological assay to apoptosis, metformin treatment increased programmed cell death. Conclusion: Metformin may have a direct effect on cancer growth, and it may programs the rat organism to attenuate the growth of Walker 256 carcinoma.

  10. Surveillance for World Trade Center disaster health effects among survivors of collapsed and damaged buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackbill, Robert M; Thorpe, Lorna E; DiGrande, Laura; Perrin, Megan; Sapp, James H; Wu, David; Campolucci, Sharon; Walker, Deborah J; Cone, Jim; Pulliam, Paul; Thalji, Lisa; Farfel, Mark R; Thomas, Pauline

    2006-04-07

    associations between dust cloud exposure and physical health outcomes. Building type and time of evacuation were associated with injuries on September 11, 2001 and reported symptoms; building type (collapsed versus damaged) also was associated with mental distress. Two to three years after September 11, survivors of buildings that collapsed or that were damaged as a result of the WTC attack reported substantial physical and mental health problems. The long-term ramifications of these effects are unknown. Many survivors were caught directly in the dust and debris of collapsing towers, a dense cloud of particulate matter that might have produced or exacerbated these health effects. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTION RECOMMENDED: Long-term follow-up of building survivors and all other persons enrolled in WTCHR should be maintained, with particular attention to those persons exposed to the dust cloud. Some of these findings might lead to building designs that can minimize injury hazards.

  11. Antioxidants Impair Anti-Tumoral Effects of Vorinostat, but Not Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Vorinostat and Caspase-8 Downregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat induces formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. To investigate the role of oxidative stress as anti-neoplastic mechanism, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (Bha, Nac and Tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cell line Ishikawa treated with Vorinostat. We show that Bha, Nac and Tiron markedly inhibited the cytotoxic effects of Vorinostat, increasing cell viability in vitro. We found that all three antioxidants did not inhibited accumulation of acetyl Histone H4, so that antioxidants did not inhibit Vorinostat activity. Finally, we have evaluated the effects of antioxidants on anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat as monotherapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, antioxidants blocked the reduction of tumour growth caused by Vorinostat, but they were unable to inhibit anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat plus caspase-8 inhibition. PMID:24651472

  12. Antioxidants impair anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat, but not anti-neoplastic effects of Vorinostat and caspase-8 downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat induces formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. To investigate the role of oxidative stress as anti-neoplastic mechanism, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (Bha, Nac and Tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cell line Ishikawa treated with Vorinostat. We show that Bha, Nac and Tiron markedly inhibited the cytotoxic effects of Vorinostat, increasing cell viability in vitro. We found that all three antioxidants did not inhibited accumulation of acetyl Histone H4, so that antioxidants did not inhibit Vorinostat activity. Finally, we have evaluated the effects of antioxidants on anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat as monotherapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, antioxidants blocked the reduction of tumour growth caused by Vorinostat, but they were unable to inhibit anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat plus caspase-8 inhibition.

  13. A moderate elevation of blood glucose level increases the effectiveness of thermoradiotherapy in a rat tumor model I. relative contributions of glucose and heating to tumor acidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Ad P. van den; Berg-Blok, Anneke E. van den; Kal, Henk B.; Reinhold, Huib S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To establish dose-effect relationships for tumor acidification induced by heat and glucose as a basis for testing the value of adding glucose administration to combined heat and x-ray treatment at clinically achievable glucose and temperature levels. Methods and Materials: Rhabdomyosarcoma BA1112 was grown s.c. in the upper leg of 16-20-week-old Wag/Rij rats. Animals were given 2 consecutive 100-min periods of saline (S) or glucose (G) infusion, while keeping tumor temperature at 37 deg., 42 deg., or 43 deg. C for 1 or 2 periods, in various combinations, each involving 6 animals. Glucose was infused i.v. as a 20% solution at 2.4-3 g/kg/h. Tumors were heated using 2,450-MHz electromagnetic radiation, and tumor pH was measured using a 0.7 mm fiberoptic probe. Results: Mean overall baseline pH was 7.00 (SD 0.10). The change induced by G37G43 (i.e., glucose infusion for a full 200 min, first 100 min at 37 deg. C, final 100 min at 43 deg. C) was -0.48±0.03 (SEM) pH units, and -0.17 ± 0.03 for S37S43. The effect of G37G42 was -0.37±0.03 pH units, compared with -0.08±0.02 for S37S42 and -0.28±0.04 for glucose alone (G37G37). Glucose was less effective when given after or fully parallel to heating: -0.21±0.02 pH units for S43G37 and -0.37±0.02 for G43G43. Conclusion: The glucose-induced tumor pH drop is much more pronounced than that induced by heat, both of which are dose dependent. The effects of glucose and heat seem additive if heating is started when glucose-induced acidification has reached its plateau level, but the overall effect is diminished if administration is fully simultaneous or in reversed order. Schedule G37G43 is optimal with respect to tumor acidification. Its predicted superiority in thermoradiotherapy as compared with S37S42, S37S43, and G37G42 treatment regimens was confirmed in a subsequent experimental tumor control study

  14. Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Shivnani, Anand T.; Chen, Ke; Lee, Christopher M.; Tward, Jonathan D.; MacDonald, O. Kenneth; Crane, Christopher H.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Munoz, Louis L.; Small, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

  15. Effect of annatto-tocotrienols supplementation on the development of mammary tumors in HER-2/neu transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpaoli, Elisa; Viola, Valentina; Barucca, Alessandra; Orlando, Fiorenza; Galli, Francesco; Provinciali, Mauro

    2013-06-01

    Tocotrienols (T3), the lesser known isomers of vitamin E, have been reported to possess anticancer activity both in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of rodents transplanted with parental tumors or treated with carcinogens. We investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with annatto-T3 (90% δ-T3 and 10% γ-T3) on the spontaneous development of mammary tumors in HER-2/neu transgenic mice. Underlying mechanisms of the antitumor effect were evaluated by studying apoptosis, senescent-like growth arrest, immune modulation, oxidative effect and the expression of HER-2/neu in tumoral mammary glands of transgenic mice and in vitro in human and mice tumor cell lines. Annatto-T3 supplementation delayed the development of mammary tumors, reducing the number and size of mammary tumor masses and those of lung metastases. In annatto-T3-supplemented mice, both apoptosis and senescent-like growth arrest of tumor cells were increased in mammary glands while no immune modulation was observed. In vitro, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, increased apoptosis and senescent-like growth arrest and a time-dependent accumulation of reactive oxygen species were observed in tumor cells treated with annatto-T3 or purified δ-T3. Annatto-T3 reduced both HER-2/neu mRNA and p185(HER-2/neu) protein in tumors and in tumor cell lines. The results show that the antitumor effect of annatto-T3 supplementation in HER-2/neu transgenic mice is mainly related to the direct induction of oxidative stress, senescent-like growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells rather than to an immune modulation.

  16. Hypoxia increases tumor cell shedding of MHC class I chain-related molecule: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, D Robert; Hu, Nianping; Sheikhi, Abdol Karim; Chung, Eugene; Frederiksen, Lisa J; Pross, Hugh; Graham, Charles H

    2008-06-15

    The MHC class I chain-related (MIC) molecules play important roles in tumor immune surveillance through their interaction with the NKG2D receptor on natural killer and cytotoxic T cells. Thus, shedding of the MIC molecules from the tumor cell membrane represents a potential mechanism of escape from NKG2D-mediated immune surveillance. Tumor hypoxia is associated with a poor clinical outcome for cancer patients. We show that hypoxia contributes to tumor cell shedding of MIC through a mechanism involving impaired nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Whereas hypoxia increased MIC shedding in human prostate cancer cells, activation of NO signaling inhibited hypoxia-mediated MIC shedding. Similar to incubation in hypoxia, pharmacologic inhibition of endogenous NO signaling increased MIC shedding. Parallel studies showed hypoxia-mediated tumor cell resistance to lysis by interleukin 2-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and NO-mediated attenuation of this resistance to lysis. Inhibition of NO production also led to resistance to PBL-mediated lysis. Interference of MIC-NKG2D interaction with a blocking anti-MIC antibody abrogated the effect of hypoxia and NO signaling on tumor cell sensitivity to PBL-mediated lysis. Finally, continuous transdermal delivery of the NO mimetic glyceryl trinitrate (7.3 mug/h) attenuated the growth of xenografted MIC-expressing human prostate tumors. These findings suggest that the hypoxic tumor microenvironment contributes to resistance to immune surveillance and that activation of NO signaling is of potential use in cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Protective effects of dendrosomal curcumin on an animal metastatic breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Dehghan, Mohammad Javad; Khori, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Alemeh; Khaniki, Mahmood; Sadeghiezadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-07-05

    Curcumin has been shown to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer angiogenesis via interacting with key regulatory molecules like NF-κB. Rapidly metabolized and conjugated in the liver, curcumin has the limited systemic bioavailability. Previous results have shown a new light of potential biocompatibility, biodegradability, as well as anti-cancer effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) in biological systems. The present study aims to deliberate the protective effects of DNC on metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After the dosing procedure, twenty-seven female mice were divided into 40 and 80mg/kg groups of DNC, along with a control group to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNC on mammary tumor-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that the different concentrations of DNC reduced the migration and the adhesion of 4T1 cells after 24h (PDNC was safe at 80mg/kg and lower doses. The treated DNC animals had a higher survival rate and lower metastatic signs (14%) compared to control (100%) (PDNC had smaller tumor volume in comparison with control group (PDNC groups, respectively (PDNC led to down-regulation of VEGF, COX-2, and MMP-9 expressions in the breast tumor, the lung, the brain, the spleen and the liver tissues (P<0.05). These outcomes indicate that dendrosomal curcumin has a chemoprotective effect on the breast cancer metastasis through suppression of NF-κB and its regulated gene products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Warburg effect(s)?a biographical sketch of Otto Warburg and his impacts on tumor metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually everyone working in cancer research is familiar with the ?Warburg effect?, i.e., anaerobic glycolysis in the presence of oxygen in tumor cells. However, few people nowadays are aware of what lead Otto Warburg to the discovery of this observation and how his other scientific contributions are seminal to our present knowledge of metabolic and energetic processes in cells. Since science is a human endeavor, and a scientist is imbedded in a network of social and academic contacts, it is...

  19. Effect of hepatic artery embolization on liver hypertrophy response in a rabbit liver VX2 tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lienden, Krijn P.; Hoekstra, Lisette T.; van Trigt, Jessica D.; Roelofs, Joris J.; van Delden, Otto M.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein embolization not only induces hypertrophy of the non-embolized liver, but also enhances tumor growth. The latter could be prevented by embolizing the hepatic arteries supplying the tumor-bearing liver segments. This study aimed to determine the effects of transcatheter arterial

  20. Influenza epidemiology and influenza vaccine effectiveness during the 2014–2015 season: annual report from the Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Puig-Barberà

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network (GIHSN has established a prospective, active surveillance, hospital-based epidemiological study to collect epidemiological and virological data for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres over several consecutive seasons. It focuses exclusively on severe cases of influenza requiring hospitalization. A standard protocol is shared between sites allowing comparison and pooling of results. During the 2014–2015 influenza season, the GIHSN included seven coordinating sites from six countries (St. Petersburg and Moscow, Russian Federation; Prague, Czech Republic; Istanbul, Turkey; Beijing, China; Valencia, Spain; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Here, we present the detailed epidemiological and influenza vaccine effectiveness findings for the Northern Hemisphere 2014–2015 influenza season.

  1. Clinical Evaluation and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Serum Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of serum tumor markers is valuable for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers are frequently used for the management of cancer patients. However, single markers are less efficient but marker combinations increase the cost, which is troublesome for clinics. To find an optimal serum marker combination panel that benefits the patients and the medical management system as well, four routine lung cancer serum markers (SCCA, NSE, CEA, and CYFRA21-1 were evaluated individually and in combination. Meanwhile, the costs and effects of these markers in clinical practice in China were assessed by cost-effectiveness analysis. As expected, combinations of these tumor markers improved their sensitivity for lung cancer and different combination panels had their own usefulness. NSE + CEA + CYFRA21-1 was the optimal combination panel with highest Youden’s index (0.64, higher sensitivity (75.76%, and specificity (88.57%, which can aid the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer. Nevertheless, the most cost-effective combination was SCCA + CEA, which can be used to screen the high-risk group.

  2. Invasive meningococcal disease in the Veneto region of Italy: a capture-recapture analysis for assessing the effectiveness of an integrated surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldovin, Tatjana; Lazzari, Roberta; Cocchio, Silvia; Furlan, Patrizia; Bertoncello, Chiara; Saia, Mario; Russo, Francesca; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2017-05-02

    Epidemiology of Neisseria meningitidis has been changing since the introduction of universal vaccination programmes against meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) and meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) has now become dominant. This study aimed to analyse the cases reported in institutional data recording systems to estimate the burden of invasive meningococcal diseases (IMDs) and assess the effectiveness of surveillance in Veneto region (Italy). Analysis was performed from 2007 to 2014 on data recorded in different systems: Mandatory Notification System, National Surveillance of Invasive Bacterial Diseases System and Laboratories Surveillance System (LSS), which were pooled into a combined surveillance system (CSS) and hospital discharge records (HDRs). A capture-recapture method was used and completeness of each source estimated. Number of cases with IMD by source of information and year, incidence of IMD by age group, case fatality rate (CFR) and distribution of meningococcal serogroups by year were also analysed. Combining the four data systems enabled the identification of 179 confirmed cases with IMD, achieving an overall sensitivity of 94.7% (95% CI: 90.8% to 98.8%), while it was 76.7% (95% CI: 73.6% to 80.1%) for CSS and 77.2% (95% CI: 74.1% to 80.6%) for HDRs. Typing of isolates was done in 80% of cases, and 95.2% of the typed cases were provided by LSS. Serogroup B was confirmed in 50.3% of cases. The estimated IMD notification rate (cases with IMD diagnosed and reported to the surveillance systems) was 0.48/100 000 population, and incidence peaked at 6.2/100 000 in children aged surveillance systems relies on case ascertainment based on serological characterisation of the circulating strains by microbiology laboratories. All available sources should be routinely combined to improve the epidemiology of IMD and the information used by public health departments to conduct timely preventive measures. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  3. Comparing the level of bystander effect in a couple of tumor and normal cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni, Mohammad T. Toossi

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to radiation responses which occur in non-irradiated cells. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of bystander effect in a couple of tumor and normal cell lines (QU-DB and MRC5). To induce bystander effect, cells were irradiated with 0.5, 2, and 4 Gy of 60Co gamma rays and their media were transferred to non-irradiated (bystander) cells of the same type. Cells containing micronuclei were counted in bystander subgroups, non-irradiated, and...

  4. Effect of lymphotoxin-like substance (OH-1) on metastatic tumor proliferation.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita,Yutaka; Orita,Kunzo; Kurimoto,Masashi

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a lymphotoxin-like substance, OH-1, released by human acute lymphatic leukemia BALL-1 cells, on metastatic tumor proliferation was investigated in BDF1 mice with transplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Mitomycin-C, cyclophosphamide and adriamycin were used as control agents. The effect of OH-1 on metastases, as determined by comparison of the numbers of pulmonary nodules and by 3H-thymidine labeling indices, was significant. Also, investigation of the effect of OH-1 on host imm...

  5. DAMP-TLR-cytokine axis dictates the fate of tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Ashok; Selvaraj, Sathishkumar; Sarode, Aditya; Chauhan, Prashant; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Saha, Bhaskar

    2017-10-09

    Random mutations leading to loss of cell cycle control is not a rare occurrence in an organism but the mutated cells are recognized and eliminated preventing the development of a tumor. These potentially tumorigenic cells release damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by toll-like receptors (TLRs) on macrophages and dendritic cells. The initial TLR-DAMP interactions lead to different responses such as altered antigen presentation and cytokine release that directly affect T cell activation and removal of the tumorigenic cells. The indirect effects of TLR-DAMP interaction include chemokine-directed altered T cell trafficking, angiogenesis for both T cell infiltration and tumor cell metastasis, and alteration of intra-tumoral milieu contributing to the development of tumor cells heterogeneity. Thus, the initial TLR-DAMP interaction has a set of local effects that modulate tumor cell growth and heterogeneity and a disseminating set of central effects that dynamically affect T cell trafficking and functions. Herein, we argue that the DAMP-TLR-cytokine axis in the tumor microenvironment serves as the mainstay that orchestrates and regulates the pro- and anti-tumor elements which dynamically interact between themselves eventuating in tumor regression or growth. The knowledge of this TLR-based immuno-surveillance framework is a key to developing a novel immunotherapy against cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Cytotoxicity and anti-tumor effects of new ruthenium complexes on triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília P Popolin

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive breast cancer subtype. The high rate of metastasis associated to the fact that these cells frequently display multidrug resistance, make the treatment of metastatic disease difficult. Development of antitumor metal-based drugs was started with the discovery of cisplatin, however, the severe side effects represent a limitation for its clinical use. Ruthenium (Ru complexes with different ligands have been successfully studied as prospective antitumor drugs. In this work, we demonstrated the activity of a series of biphosphine bipyridine Ru complexes (1 [Ru(SO4(dppb(bipy], (2 [Ru(CO3(dppb(bipy], (3 [Ru(C2O4(dppb(bipy] and (4 [Ru(CH3CO2(dppb(bipy]PF6 [where dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphinobutane and bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine], on proliferation of TNBC (MDA-MB-231, estrogen-dependent breast tumor cells (MCF-7 and a non-tumor breast cell line (MCF-10A. Complex (4 was most effective among the complexes and was selected to be further investigated on effects on tumor cell adhesion, migration, invasion and in apoptosis. Moreover, DNA and HSA binding properties of this complex were also investigated. Results show that complex (4 was more efficient inhibiting proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells over non-tumor cells. In addition, complex (4 was able to inhibit MDA-MB231 cells adhesion, migration and invasion and to induce apoptosis and inhibit MMP-9 secretion in TNBC cells. Complex (4 should be further investigated in vivo in order to stablish its potential to improve breast cancer treatment.

  7. Cytotoxicity and anti-tumor effects of new ruthenium complexes on triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolin, Cecília P; Reis, João P B; Becceneri, Amanda B; Graminha, Angélica E; Almeida, Márcio A P; Corrêa, Rodrigo S; Colina-Vegas, Legna A; Ellena, Javier; Batista, Alzir A; Cominetti, Márcia R

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive breast cancer subtype. The high rate of metastasis associated to the fact that these cells frequently display multidrug resistance, make the treatment of metastatic disease difficult. Development of antitumor metal-based drugs was started with the discovery of cisplatin, however, the severe side effects represent a limitation for its clinical use. Ruthenium (Ru) complexes with different ligands have been successfully studied as prospective antitumor drugs. In this work, we demonstrated the activity of a series of biphosphine bipyridine Ru complexes (1) [Ru(SO4)(dppb)(bipy)], (2) [Ru(CO3)(dppb)(bipy)], (3) [Ru(C2O4)(dppb)(bipy)] and (4) [Ru(CH3CO2)(dppb)(bipy)]PF6 [where dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane and bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine], on proliferation of TNBC (MDA-MB-231), estrogen-dependent breast tumor cells (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (MCF-10A). Complex (4) was most effective among the complexes and was selected to be further investigated on effects on tumor cell adhesion, migration, invasion and in apoptosis. Moreover, DNA and HSA binding properties of this complex were also investigated. Results show that complex (4) was more efficient inhibiting proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells over non-tumor cells. In addition, complex (4) was able to inhibit MDA-MB231 cells adhesion, migration and invasion and to induce apoptosis and inhibit MMP-9 secretion in TNBC cells. Complex (4) should be further investigated in vivo in order to stablish its potential to improve breast cancer treatment.

  8. Between visibility and surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie

    As activists move from alternative media platforms to commercial social media platforms they face increasing challenges in protecting their online security and privacy. While government surveillance of activists is well-documented in both scholarly research and the media, corporate surveillance...... of activists remains under-researched. This presentation explores visibility as a prerequisite and an obstacle to political participation. The dual capacity of visibility in social media enables both surveillance and counter-surveillance by making not only the surveilled actor, but also the surveilling actor...... visible. It thus enables activists to monitor and expose corporate misconduct, but simultaneously renders them vulnerable to surveillance from corporations. In this presentation, I examine these practices and discuss their implications for political participation by drawing on examples of companies...

  9. Surveillance and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge, Ask Risom; Albrechtslund, Anders; Lauritsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    eyes of cameras are but one of many important aspects of the surveillance society. In particular, surveillance has become intrinsic to our digitally mediated communication. Many are constantly engaged in forms of social surveillance as they observe what friends, family, celebrities, love interests......, and acquaintances are up to on social media. In turn, they also leave trails of digital footprints that may be collected and analyzed by governments, businesses, or hackers. The imperceptible nature of this new surveillance raises some pressing concerns about our digital lives as our data doubles increasingly...... are particularly relevant to this topic and audience. The fourth section outlines a variety of themes in which surveillance of communication is being studied. Organized under the headings Tracking; Mass Surveillance; Media; and Art, Fiction, and Popular Culture, this section provides a survey in surveillance...

  10. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  11. Luteolin and its inhibitory effect on tumor growth in systemic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, Shailendra

    2013-01-01

    Lamy et al have provided interesting data in their recent article in your esteemed journal. Luteolin augments apoptosis in a number of systemic malignancies. Luteolin reduces tumor growth in breast carcinomas. Luteolin mediates this effect by up-regulating the expression of Bax and down-regulating the expression of Bcl-xL. EGFR-induced MAPK activation is also attenuated. As a result there is increased G2/ M phase arrest. These effects have been seen both in vivo as well as in vitro. It also reduces ERα expression and causes inhibition of IGF-1 mediated PI3K–Akt pathway. Luteolin also activates p38 resulting in nuclear translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor. Simultaneously it also activates ERK. As a result there is increased intra-tumoral apoptosis which is caspase dependent as well as caspase independent. - Highlights: ► Luteolin and tumor growth in breast carcinomas. ► Luteolin and pulmonary cancer. ► Luteolin and colon cancer

  12. β-elemene inhibits tumor-promoting effect of M2 macrophages in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaomu; Xu, Maoyi; Li, Na; Li, Zongjuan; Li, Hongye; Shao, Shujuan; Zou, Kun; Zou, Lijuan

    2017-08-19

    Macrophages in tumor are mostly M2-polarized and have been reported to promote tumorigenesis, which are also defined as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). β-elemene has therapeutic effects against several cancers, however, it remains unknown whether β-elemene could inhibit cancer by targeting TAMs. Herein, we examined the effect of β-elemene on macrophages to elucidate a novel mechanism of β-elemene in tumor therapy. We showed that the conditioned medium of M2 macrophages promoted lung cancer cells to migration, invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition, which could be inhibited by β-elemene. Moreover, β-elemene regulated the polarization of macrophages from M2 to M1. β-elemene also inhibited the proliferation, migration, invasion of lung cancer cells and enhanced its radiosensitivity. These results indicate β-elemene suppresses lung cancer by regulating both macrophages and lung cancer cells, it is a promising drug for combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Berahovich, Robert; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Shirley; Harto, Hizkia; Li, Le; Chao, Cheng-Chi; Mao, Mike Ming; Wu, Lijun

    2017-10-21

    CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor)-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment) from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  14. The inhibitory effect of anti- tumor polysaccharide from Punica granatum on metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Sheeja; Joseph, Manu M; S R, Aravind; B S, Unnikrishnan; Sreelekha, T T

    2017-10-01

    Galactomannan (PSP001) isolated from the fruit rind of Punica granatum was demonstrated as an excellent antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anticancer agent both in vitro and in vivo models. Since the most lethal and debilitating attribute of cancer cells is their ability to evolve to a state of malignancy, with key features like increased angiogenesis, invasion, migration, colony formation, and metastasis, the present study focused on evaluating the effects of the galactomannan on tumor and malignancy. PSP001 effectively reduced the neovascularization in chick embryos highlighting its potential as an angiogenic inhibitor. Furthermore, the invasion, migration and clonogenic capacity of human and murine cancer cells were dramatically inhibited by PSP001. Evaluation of the molecular mechanism of its unique potential revealed the down regulation of key players including VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 with marked elevation of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. The anti-metastatic potential of PSP001 tested in pulmonary metastasis C57BL/6 mice model deciphered the combinatorial administration with vincristine deliberated better survival rates and decreased metastatic index. The angiogenic inhibition potential of PSP001 was further proved with peritoneal angiogenesis assay in BALB/c mice ascitic tumor model. The outcomes of the current investigation highlight the mode of action of antitumor galactomannan in the reduction of tumor malignancy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Surveillance-guided selective digestive decontamination of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the intensive care unit: A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Joyce H S; Li, Hong-Kiu; Ip, Margaret

    2018-03-01

    Clinical findings have shown effectiveness and safety of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) for eradication of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in high-risk carriers. We aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of SDD guided by CRE surveillance in the intensive care unit (ICU). Outcomes of surveillance-guided SDD (test-guided SDD) and no screening (control) in the ICU were compared by Markov model simulations. Model outcomes were CRE infection and mortality rates, direct costs, and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) loss. Model inputs were estimated from clinical literature. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the robustness of base case results. Test-guided SDD reduced infection (4.8% vs 5.0%) and mortality (1.8% vs 2.1%) rates at a higher cost ($1,102 vs $1,074) than the control group in base case analysis, respectively. Incremental cost per QALY saved (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER]) by the test-guided SDD group was $557 per QALY. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that test-guided SDD was effective in saving QALYs in 100% of 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations, and cost-saving 59.1% of time. The remaining 40.9% of simulations found SDD to be effective at an additional cost, with ICERs accepted as cost-effective per the willingness-to-pay threshold. Surveillance-guided SDD appears to be cost-effective in reducing CRE infection and mortality with QALYs saved. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute Effects of Vascular Modifying Agents in Solid Tumors Assessed by Noninvasive Laser Doppler Flowmetry and Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kragh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of noninvasive laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS to detect acute effects of different vascular-modifying agents on perfusion and blood volume in tumors was evaluated. C3H mouse mammary carcinomas (∼200 mm3 in the rear foot of CDF1 mice were treated with flavone acetic acid (FAA, 150 mg/kg, 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4acetic acid (DMXAA, 20 mg/kg, combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CAMP, 250 mg/kg, hydralazine (HDZ, 5 mg/kg, or nicotinamide (NTA, 500 mg/kg. Tumor perfusion before and after treatment was evaluated by noninvasive LDF, using a 41°C heated custombuilt LDF probe with four integrated laser/receiver units, and tumor blood volume was estimated by MRS, using light guide coupled reflectance measurements at 800±10 nm. FAA, DMXAA, CAMP, and HDZ significantly decreased tumor perfusion by 50%, 47%, 73%, and 78%, respectively. In addition, FAA, DMXAA, and HDZ significantly reduced the blood volume within the tumor, indicating that these compounds to some degree shunted blood from the tumor to adjacent tissue, HDZ being most potent. CAMP caused no change in the tumor blood volume, indicating that the mechanism of action of CAMP was vascular shut down with the blood pool trapped in the tumor. NTA caused no change in either tumor perfusion or tumor blood volume. We conclude that noninvasive LDF and MRS can determine acute effects of vascular modifying agents on tumor perfusion and blood volume.

  17. Informatics enables public health surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. N McNabb

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the world has radically changed. New advances in information and communication technologies (ICT connect the world in ways never imagined. Public health informatics (PHI leveraged for public health surveillance (PHS, can enable, enhance, and empower essential PHS functions (i.e., detection, reporting, confirmation, analyses, feedback, response. However, the tail doesn't wag the dog; as such, ICT cannot (should not drive public health surveillance strengthening. Rather, ICT can serve PHS to more effectively empower core functions. In this review, we explore promising ICT trends for prevention, detection, and response, laboratory reporting, push notification, analytics, predictive surveillance, and using new data sources, while recognizing that it is the people, politics, and policies that most challenge progress for implementation of solutions.

  18. The effects of natural language processing on cross-institutional portability of influenza case detection for disease surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Jeffrey P; Ye, Ye; Gesteland, Per H; Haug, Peter J; Tsui, Fuchiang Rich; Cooper, Gregory F; Van Bree, Rudy; Ginter, Thomas; Nowalk, Andrew J; Wagner, Michael

    2017-05-31

    This study evaluates the accuracy and portability of a natural language processing (NLP) tool for extracting clinical findings of influenza from clinical notes across two large healthcare systems. Effectiveness is evaluated on how well NLP supports downstream influenza case-detection for disease surveillance. We independently developed two NLP parsers, one at Intermountain Healthcare (IH) in Utah and the other at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) using local clinical notes from emergency department (ED) encounters of influenza. We measured NLP parser performance for the presence and absence of 70 clinical findings indicative of influenza. We then developed Bayesian network models from NLP processed reports and tested their ability to discriminate among cases of (1) influenza, (2) non-influenza influenza-like illness (NI-ILI), and (3) 'other' diagnosis. On Intermountain Healthcare reports, recall and precision of the IH NLP parser were 0.71 and 0.75, respectively, and UPMC NLP parser, 0.67 and 0.79. On University of Pittsburgh Medical Center reports, recall and precision of the UPMC NLP parser were 0.73 and 0.80, respectively, and IH NLP parser, 0.53 and 0.80. Bayesian case-detection performance measured by AUROC for influenza versus non-influenza on Intermountain Healthcare cases was 0.93 (using IH NLP parser) and 0.93 (using UPMC NLP parser). Case-detection on University of Pittsburgh Medical Center cases was 0.95 (using UPMC NLP parser) and 0.83 (using IH NLP parser). For influenza versus NI-ILI on Intermountain Healthcare cases performance was 0.70 (using IH NLP parser) and 0.76 (using UPMC NLP parser). On University of Pisstburgh Medical Center cases, 0.76 (using UPMC NLP parser) and 0.65 (using IH NLP parser). In all but one instance (influenza versus NI-ILI using IH cases), local parsers were more effective at supporting case-detection although performances of non-local parsers were reasonable.

  19. MUC1 and survivin combination tumor gene vaccine generates specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects in a murine melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Liu, Chenlu; Zhang, Fangfang; Geng, Fei; Xia, Qiu; Lu, Zhenzhen; Xu, Ping; Xie, Yu; Wu, Hui; Yu, Bin; Wu, Jiaxin; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2016-05-23

    MUC1 and survivin are ideal tumor antigens. Although many cancer vaccines targeting survivin or MUC1 have entered clinical trials, no vaccine combining MUC1 and survivin have been reported. Due to tumor heterogeneity, vaccines containing a combination of antigens may have improved efficacy and coverage of a broader spectrum of cancer targets. Here, cellular responses and anti-tumor activities induced by a combination of DNA vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin (MS) were evaluated. Results showed that CTL activity and inhibition of tumor growth were obviously enhanced in mice immunized with the combined vaccine in a protection assay. However, in order to enhance the therapeutic effect in the treatment assay, a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vaccine expressing MUC1 and survivin (Ad-MS) was used as a booster following the DNA vaccine prime. Meanwhile, IL-2 promoting T cell proliferation was used as an immunoadjuvant for the DNA vaccine. Results showed that the CTL activity response to the DNA vaccine was enhanced nearly 200% when boosted by the rAd vaccine and was further enhanced by nearly 60% when combined with the IL-2 adjuvant. Therefore, DNA prime combined with rAd boost and IL-2 (MS/IL2/Ad-MS) adjuvant was considered as the best strategy and further evaluated. Multiple cytokines promoting cellular immune responses were shown to be greatly enhanced in mice immunized with MS/IL2/Ad-MS. Moreover, in the treatment assay, the tumor inhibition rate of MS/IL2/Ad-MS reached up to 50.1%, which may be attributed to the enhancement of immune responses and reduction of immunosuppressive factors in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that immunization with the combination vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin using a DNA prime-rAd boost strategy along with IL-2 adjuvant may be an effective method for breaking through immune tolerance to tumors expressing these antigens with potential therapeutic benefits in melanoma cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Identification of anti-tumoral effect of a polypeptide isolated from Scorpionfish Scorpaena plumieri venom and assessment of its potential use for tumor diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soprani, Juliana

    2008-01-01

    Cancer has killed millions of people worldwide. Despite the increasing knowledge about the molecular basis of tumor development, few advances have been reached in clinical therapy and diagnoses, which shows the importance of new drugs development for therapeutic and diagnosis purpose. Venomous creatures have been studied as potential sources of pharmacological agents and physiological tools. A lot of work has been done about biological activity of terrestrial animals, but comparatively less research has been undertaken on venomous marine creature, particularly fish, which means that marine toxins represent a vast and unexplored source of novel molecules with therapeutical potential. In this work, the scorpion fish Scorpaena plumieri crude venom (SPB) and a gelatinolytic protease purified from this venom (SPGP) were evaluated for their applicability for in vivo tumor detection. In vitro results showed that both. SPB and SPGP, possess a powerful antitumor effects on p53-wild-type glioblastoma cells (LD 50 = 3,9 ± 0,98μg/mL and 8,00 x 10 -12 ± 2,94 x 10 -12 M, respectively) and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells (LD 50 =14,05 ± 2,95 μg/mL and 1,22 x 10 -11 ± 6,56 x 10 -12 M, respectively). P53 mutant glioblastoma cells were more resistant to both, SPB and SPGP treatment (LD 50 > 125 μg/mL and LD 50 > 1,39 x 10 -9 M, respectively). The morphological changes observed in the cell lines treated with SPB and SPGP, and the data of DAPI staining, indicate that the antitumor effect of these substances occurs via apoptosis. Radioactive probes of SPB ([ 99m Tc] SPB) and SPGP ([ 125 I] SPGP) with high specific activity and high radiochemical purity were synthesized. Data of biodistribution studies, performed by intravenous injections in Swiss mice bearing Ehrlich carcinoma cells, showed that SPB has poor uptake in tumor region. On the other hand, SPGP had a substantial uptake in tumor at ali analyzed times. Intratumoral administration of [ 125 I]SPGP increased its uptake by

  1. Combined anti-tumor therapeutic effect of targeted gene, hyperthermia, radionuclide brachytherapy in breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daozhen; Tang Qiusha; Xiang Jingying; Xu Fei; Zhang Li; Wang Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antitumor therapeutic effect of combined therapy of magnetic induction heating by nano-magnetic particles, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk suicide gene) and internal radiation in mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma. Methods: The transfection reagents, plasmids heat shock protein-HSV-tk (pHSP-HSV-tk), ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow and 188 Re-ganciclovir-bovine serum albumin-nanopaticles (GCV-BSA-NP) were prepared. The heating experiments in vivo were carried out using ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow. Sixty mice tumor models bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma were established and randomly divided into six groups. Group A was the control group, B was gene transfection therapy group, C was hyperthermia group, D was gene transfection therapy combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group, E was gene therapy combined with hyperthermia group, and F was gene therapy, hyperthermia combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group. The tumor growth, tumor mass and histopathological changes were evaluated. The expression of HSV-tk in the groups of B, D, E and F was detected by RT-PCR. Poisson distribution and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis by SPSS 10.0 software. Results: In the animal heating experiments, the temperature of tumor increased up to 39.6 degree C, 43.2 degree C, and 48.1 degree C quickly with different injected doses (2, 4 and 6 mg respectively) of nano-magnetic particles and maintained for 40 min. The temperature of tumor tissue reduced to 36.8 degree C, 37.5 degree C and 37.8 degree C in 10 min when alternating magnetic field (AMF) stopped. The tumor mass in Groups C ((452.50±30.29) mg), D ((240.98±35.32)mg), E((231.87±27.41) mg) and F ((141.55±23.78) mg) were much lower than that in Group A ((719.12±22.65) mg) (F=800.07, P<0.01), with the most significant treatment effect in Group F.The tumor mass in Group B((684.05±24.02) mg) was higher than

  2. Cotreatment with dichloroacetate and omeprazole exhibits a synergistic antiproliferative effect on malignant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISHIGURO, TATSUAKI; ISHIGURO, MIYU; ISHIGURO, RYUMEI; IWAI, SAYURI

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that treating cancer cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an approved treatment for congenital lactic acidosis, reverses the Warburg effect and inhibits tumor growth). Furthermore, omeprazole (OMP) is a well-known agent that enhances the effects of anticancer drugs. The aim of this study was to find clinically-used drugs that enhance the effects of DCA. The combination of DCA and OMP exhibited a more potent antitumor activity than DCA alone in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and RKO colon cancer cells, while the drugs did not affect the proliferation of WI-38 human fibroblasts. The inhibitory effect of DCA combined with OMP was reversed with vitamin E and Z-VAD-FMK; therefore conventional caspase-dependent cell growth inhibition through superoxide production was suggested as the mechanism for inhibition. The combination of these drugs also had an effect on HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells inoculated into mice. Since OMP and DCA may be administered orally and have been used clinically for several years without major side effects, we believe that this combination therapy could be readily translated to treat malignant tumors. PMID:22740984

  3. Immunotherapy of Malignancy by in vivo Gene Transfer into Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Gregory E.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bei-Yue; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Leaf; Nabel, Gary J.

    1993-05-01

    The immune system confers protection against a variety of pathogens and contributes to the surveillance and destruction of neoplastic cells. Several cell types participate in the recognition and lysis of tumors, and appropriate immune stimulation provides therapeutic effects in malignancy. Foreign major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins also serve as a potent stimulus to the immune system. In this report, a foreign MHC gene was introduced directly into malignant tumors in vivo in an effort to stimulate tumor rejection. In contrast to previous attempts to induce tumor immunity by cell-mediated gene transfer, the recombinant gene was introduced directly into tumors in vivo. Expression of the murine class I H-2K^s gene within the CT26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma (H-2K^d) or the MCA 106 fibrosarcoma (H-2K^b) induced a cytotoxic T-cell response to H-2K^s and, more importantly, to other antigens present on unmodified tumor cells. This immune response attenuated tumor growth and caused complete tumor regression in many cases. Direct gene transfer in vivo can therefore induce cell-mediated immunity against specific gene products, which provides an immunotherapeutic effect for malignancy, and potentially can be applied to the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases in man.

  4. Sonoma Persistent Surveillance System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, D M

    2006-03-24

    Sonoma offers the first cost-effective, broad-area, high-resolution, real-time motion imagery system for surveillance applications. Sonoma is unique in its ability to provide continuous, real-time video imagery of an area the size of a small city with resolutions sufficient to track 8,000 moving objects in the field of view. At higher resolutions and over smaller areas, Sonoma can even track the movement of individual people. The visual impact of the data available from Sonoma is already causing a paradigm shift in the architecture and operation of other surveillance systems. Sonoma is expected to cost just one-tenth the price of comparably sized sensor systems. Cameras mounted on an airborne platform constantly monitor an area, feeding data to the ground for real-time analysis. Sonoma was designed to provide real-time data for actionable intelligence in situations such as monitoring traffic, special events, border security, and harbors. If a Sonoma system had been available in the aftermath of the Katrina and Rita hurricanes, emergency responders would have had real-time information on roads, water levels, and traffic conditions, perhaps saving many lives.

  5. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (3). Combination effect on the metastatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Ohishi, Kazuo; Niitsu, Iwayasu; Hayashibara, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Yoshihama, Takashi; Moriyuki, Hirobumi

    1988-03-01

    Combination effect of lentinan with X-ray irradiation on the metastatic mouse tumors, L1210, KLN205 and Lewis lung carcinoma were studied. Combination use of lentinan with X-ray therapy prolonged the life of BDF/sub 1/ mice bearing L1210 leukemia in the suitable combination conditions. Combination effects of lentinan with X-ray therapy were also observed on the suppression of the growth of KLN205 squamus cell carcinoma and on the suppression of the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma. Especially, in the case that lentinan was administered before or after X-ray local irradiation in the pulmorary metastasis system of Lewis lung carcinoma, a marked suppressin of pulmonary metastasis was observed and 2 to 4 mice among 8 tested mice were tumor free.

  6. Killing tumor cells: the effect of photodynamic therapy using mono-l-aspartyl chlorine and NS-398

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Elizabeth H.; Webber, John; Kessel, David; Fromm, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a useful treatment for malignant tumors. PDT involves the administration of a photosensitive drug that is selected by neoplastic tissues and their vasculature. One such photosensitizer is mono-l-aspartyl chlorine e6 (NPe6). Recent evidence suggests that the presence of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor NS-398 may potentiate the effect of photosensitizing agents. This study was designed to determine if the addition of NS-398 to NPe6-induced PDT in single or fractionated dosing would result in greater tumor kill. Methods Colon-38 tumor was subcutaneously implanted into both flanks of mice and allowed to grow to 0.5 to 1.0 cm. Mice were randomly allocated to 5 groups: (1) single dose of NPe6; (2) fractionated dose of NPe6; (3) NS-398 only; (4) single dose of NPe6 + NS-398; and (5) fractionated dose of NPe6 + NS-398. The left flank was shielded from exposure to irradiation. Tumor size was measured before initiation of PDT and at the time of sacrifice. Results The initial tumor weights of both flanks were not significantly different between all groups. Tumor weights at the time of death after PDT using NPe6 were significantly less than their paired tumors in the untreated flanks (P photosensitizer in the absence of NS-398. NS-398 did not significantly further decrease tumor weight in the group that received the fractionated dose of NPe6. Conclusions Fractionated dosing of NPe6 demonstrated the best tumor kill. However, NS-398 did not potentiate the effect of PDT using fractionated dosing of NPe6. While PDT using the single NPe6 dose significantly decreased tumor weight, the addition of NS-398 potentiated the killing effect. PMID:15792755

  7. Novel synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin with bortezomib on hepatocellular carcinoma cells and orthotopic tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cun; Jin, Guangzhi; Sun, Haiyan; Wu, Weizhong; Liu, Yinkun; Gao, Dongmei; Guo, Kun; Kang, Xiaonan; Jiang, Kai; Sun, Chun; Li, Yan; Sun, Lu; Shu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the chemotherapy efficacy against HCC is still unsatisfactory. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been emerged as an important cancer therapeutic target. However, HCC cells often resistant to rapamycin because of the paradoxical activation of Akt by rapamycin. In this study, we investigated whether bortezomib could enhance the antitumor effects of rapamycin. The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness in vitro were assessed by CCK-8 analysis, flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342 staining and transwell assays, respectively. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Akt were detected by Western blotting. The effects of rapamycin and/or bortezomib on the mRNA expression levels of p53, p27, p21 and Bcl-2 family in HCCLM3 cells were evaluated by RT-PCR. The roles of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC growth and metastasis in xenograft models were evaluated by tumor volumes and fluorescent signals. The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vivo were test by PCNA and TUNEL staining. Bortezomib synergized with rapamycin to reduce cell growth, induce apoptosis, and inhibit cell mobility in vitro. Further mechanistic studies showed that bortezomib inhibited rapamycin-induced phosphorylated Akt, which in turn enhanced apoptosis of HCC cell lines. The alteration of the mRNA expression of cell cycle inhibitors p53, p27, p21 and apoptosis associated genes Bcl-2, Bax were also involved in the synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin and bortezomib. P53 inhibitor PFT-α significantly attenuate the effect of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell apoptosis, which indicated that the pro-apoptotic effect of rapamycin and bortezomib may be p53-dependent. Treatment of HCCLM3-R bearing nude mice with rapamycin and bortezomib significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition (72.4%), comparing with either rapamycin- (54.7%) or

  8. Novel synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin with bortezomib on hepatocellular carcinoma cells and orthotopic tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the chemotherapy efficacy against HCC is still unsatisfactory. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been emerged as an important cancer therapeutic target. However, HCC cells often resistant to rapamycin because of the paradoxical activation of Akt by rapamycin. In this study, we investigated whether bortezomib could enhance the antitumor effects of rapamycin. Methods The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness in vitro were assessed by CCK-8 analysis, flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342 staining and transwell assays, respectively. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Akt were detected by Western blotting. The effects of rapamycin and/or bortezomib on the mRNA expression levels of p53, p27, p21 and Bcl-2 family in HCCLM3 cells were evaluated by RT-PCR. The roles of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC growth and metastasis in xenograft models were evaluated by tumor volumes and fluorescent signals. The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vivo were test by PCNA and TUNEL staining. Results Bortezomib synergized with rapamycin to reduce cell growth, induce apoptosis, and inhibit cell mobility in vitro. Further mechanistic studies showed that bortezomib inhibited rapamycin-induced phosphorylated Akt, which in turn enhanced apoptosis of HCC cell lines. The alteration of the mRNA expression of cell cycle inhibitors p53, p27, p21 and apoptosis associated genes Bcl-2, Bax were also involved in the synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin and bortezomib. P53 inhibitor PFT-α significantly attenuate the effect of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell apoptosis, which indicated that the pro-apoptotic effect of rapamycin and bortezomib may be p53-dependent. Treatment of HCCLM3-R bearing nude mice with rapamycin and bortezomib significantly enhanced tumor growth

  9. HORMONAL CONTROL OF OVARIAN FUNCTION FOLLOWING CHLOROTRIAZINE EXPOSURE: EFFECT ON REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION AND MAMMARY GLAND TUMOR DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormonal Control of Ovarian Function Following Chlorotriazine Exposure: Effect on Reproductive Function and Mammary Gland Tumor Development. Ralph L. Cooper, Susan C. Laws, Michael G. Narotsky, Jerome M. Goldman, and Tammy E. StokerAbstractThe studies review...

  10. Dll4 blockade potentiates the anti-tumor effects of VEGF inhibition in renal cell carcinoma patient-derived xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiersten Marie Miles

    Full Text Available The Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (Dll4 is highly expressed in vascular endothelium and has been shown to play a pivotal role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. Blockade of the Dll4-Notch pathway in preclinical cancer models has been associated with non-productive angiogenesis and reduced tumor growth. Given the cross-talk between the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Delta-Notch pathways in tumor angiogenesis, we examined the activity of a function-blocking Dll4 antibody, REGN1035, alone and in combination with anti-VEGF therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC.Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice bearing patient-derived clear cell RCC xenografts were treated with REGN1035 and in combination with the multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib or the VEGF blocker ziv-aflibercept. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent analyses were carried out, as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations pre and 24 hours and 2 weeks post treatment. Single agent treatment with REGN1035 resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition (36-62% that was equivalent to or exceeded the single agent anti-tumor activity of the VEGF pathway inhibitors sunitinib (38-54% and ziv-aflibercept (46%. Importantly, combination treatments with REGN1035 plus VEGF inhibitors resulted in enhanced anti-tumor effects (72-80% growth inhibition, including some tumor regression. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a marked decrease in tumor perfusion in all treatment groups. Interestingly, anti-tumor efficacy of the combination of REGN1035 and ziv-aflibercept was also observed in a sunitinib resistant ccRCC model.Overall, these findings demonstrate the potent anti-tumor activity of Dll4 blockade in RCC patient-derived tumors and a combination benefit for the simultaneous targeting of the Dll4 and VEGF signaling pathways, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this treatment modality in RCC.

  11. Effect of antiangiogenic therapy on luciferase activity in a cytomegalovirus- or HSP70-promoter-transfected M21 tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundt, Walter; Schink, Christian; Steinbach, Silke; O'Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E.; Kiessling, Andreas; Librizzi, Damiano; Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Guccione, Samira

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy on heat shock protein 70 expression (Hsp70) and protein production (HSP70) in a melanoma tumor model (M21; M21-L). M21 and M21-L cells transfected with a plasmid containing the Hsp70 (Hspa1b) or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the luciferase reporter gene were injected into mice; the resulting tumors grew to a size of 650 mm3. Mice (five per group) were intravenously treated with an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide-nanoparticle/Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein complex [RGD-NP/RAF(-)] or with a nanoparticle control. Bioluminescence imaging (IVIS®, Xenogen, USA) was performed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after the treatment cycle. Western blot analysis of HSP70 protein was performed to monitor protein expression. The size of the treated M21 tumors remained fairly constant (647.8+/-103.4 mm2 at the beginning versus 704.8+/-94.4 mm3 at the end of the experiment). The size of the M21-L tumors increased, similar to the untreated control tumors. Bioluminescent imaging demonstrated that when transcription was controlled by the CMV promoter, luciferase activity decreased to 17.9%+/-4.3% of baseline values in the treated M21 tumors. When transcription was controlled by the Hsp70 promoter, the highest luciferase activity (4.5+/-0.7-fold increase over base-line values) was seen 24 h after injection in the M21 tumors; however, no luciferase activity was seen in the M21-L tumors. In accordance with bioluminescent imaging, western blot analysis showed a peak in HSP70 production at 24 h after the injection of the RGD-NP/RAF(-) complex in the M21 tumors; however, no HSP70 protein induction was seen in the M21-L tumors. Thus, targeted antiangiogenic therapy can induce Hsp70 expression and HSP70 protein in melanoma tumors.

  12. [Effects of RAGE on Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Zhao-da; Hu, Wei-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effect of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) on cell proliferation and tumor growth in nude mice with pancreatic cancer. PANC-1 cells were transfected with shRNA RAGE -1, -2, -3 to down-regulate the expression of RAGE. Cholecystokinin octopeptide-8 (CCK-8), real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to test the impact of shRNA RAGE on the expressions of mRNAs and proteins of RAGE, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Tumor growth and microvessel density in the nude mice implanted with shRNA RAGE transfected PANC-1 cells were observed using immunohistochemistry. The shRNA RAGE -1, -2, -3 transfected cells had lower absorbance values than the controls 24 h after transfection, and the absorbance value reached the lowest at 48 h. The specific shRNA sequences significantly inhibited the expressions of mRNA and protein of RAGE. The mice implanted with shRNA RAGE -2 had lower tumor volume and microvessel density than shRNA RAGE -1, -3. The expressions of mRNAs and proteins of RAGE, MMP-2, NF-κB, MMP-9 and VEGF were lower in the cells transfected with shRNA RAGE -2 compared with shRNA RAGE -1, -3. RAGE is involved in the progression of pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo . The RAGE expression could influence the process of tumor angiogenesis.

  13. Dietary administration of scallion extract effectively inhibits colorectal tumor growth: cellular and molecular mechanisms in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanisamy Arulselvan

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Diet is known to play an important role in the etiology of colon cancer and dietary chemoprevention is receiving increasing attention for prevention and/or alternative treatment of colon cancers. Allium fistulosum L., commonly known as scallion, is popularly used as a spice or vegetable worldwide, and as a traditional medicine in Asian cultures for treating a variety of diseases. In this study we evaluated the possible beneficial effects of dietary scallion on chemoprevention of colon cancer using a mouse model of colon carcinoma (CT-26 cells subcutaneously inoculated into BALB/c mice. Tumor lysates were subjected to western blotting for analysis of key inflammatory markers, ELISA for analysis of cytokines, and immunohistochemistry for analysis of inflammatory markers. Metabolite profiles of scallion extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Scallion extracts, particularly hot-water extract, orally fed to mice at 50 mg (dry weight/kg body weight resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth and enhanced the survival rate of test mice. At the molecular level, scallion extracts inhibited the key inflammatory markers COX-2 and iNOS, and suppressed the expression of various cellular markers known to be involved in tumor apoptosis (apoptosis index, proliferation (cyclin D1 and c-Myc, angiogenesis (VEGF and HIF-1α, and tumor invasion (MMP-9 and ICAM-1 when compared with vehicle control-treated mice. Our findings may warrant further investigation of the use of common scallion as a chemopreventive dietary agent to lower the risk of colon cancer.

  14. The effect of carbohydrate restriction on prostate cancer tumor growth in a castrate mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Jorge; Masko, Elizabeth M; Ii, Jean A Thomas; Poulton, Susan H; Dewhirst, Mark; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Freedland, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    No- and low-carbohydrate diets delay tumor growth compared to western diet (WD) in prostate cancer (PCa) xenograft studies. The effect of these diets in concert with androgen deprivation is unknown. A total of 160 male SCID mice were injected with 1× 10(5) LAPC-4 human PCa cells. Of these, 150 mice were castrated and randomized to an ad libitum WD or fed via a paired-feeding protocol with a no-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (NCKD), 10% carbohydrate diet, or 20% carbohydrate diet. The remaining 10 mice were not castrated and were fed an ad libitum WD. The mice were sacrificed once volumes reached 1,000 mm3 and survival tested using the log-rank test. Serum from the median surviving 8 mice/group was assayed for insulin, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3. Body weights were roughly equal among groups. The 10 non-castrated mice experienced accelerated tumor growth. Among castrated mice, WD had the most rapid tumor growth; 20% carbohydrate diet the slowest (P = 0.046). Survival was not significantly different among the various carbohydrate restricted groups (P = 0.51). When pooled, there was a non-significant trend (P = 0.11) in improved survival among the carbohydrate restricted diets versus WD. No significant difference in serum insulin, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 levels was noted among all groups at pre-randomization or at sacrifice. A 20% carbohydrate diet slowed tumor growth versus a WD. Though the benefit of carbohydrate restriction was somewhat less than in prior studies in non-castrate mice, these data still suggest diets achievable in humans may play a role in PCa management. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Reassembling Surveillance Creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge, Ask Risom; Lauritsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We live in societies in which surveillance technologies are constantly introduced, are transformed, and spread to new practices for new purposes. How and why does this happen? In other words, why does surveillance “creep”? This question has received little attention either in theoretical...... development or in empirical analyses. Accordingly, this article contributes to this special issue on the usefulness of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) by suggesting that ANT can advance our understanding of ‘surveillance creep’. Based on ANT’s model of translation and a historical study of the Danish DNA database......, we argue that surveillance creep involves reassembling the relations in surveillance networks between heterogeneous actors such as the watchers, the watched, laws, and technologies. Second, surveillance creeps only when these heterogeneous actors are adequately interested and aligned. However...

  16. Meeting the challenge of homogenous boron targeting of heterogeneous tumors for effective boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heber, Elisa M.; Trivillin, Veronica A.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Rebagliati, J. Raul; Batistoni, Daniel; Kreimann, Erica L.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Nigg, David W.; Gonzalez, Beatriz N.

    2006-01-01

    BNCT is a tumor cell targeted radiation therapy. Inadequately boron targeted tumor populations jeopardize tumor control. Meeting the to date unresolved challenge of homogeneous targeting of heterogeneous tumors with effective boron carriers would contribute to therapeutic efficacy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the degree of variation in boron content delivered by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-10 (Na 2 10 B 10 H 10 ) and the combined administration of (BPA+GB-10) in different portions of tumor, precancerous tissue around tumor and normal pouch tissue in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Boron content was evaluated by ICP-AES. The degree of homogeneity in boron targeting was assessed in terms of the coefficient of variation ([S.D./Mean]x100) of boron values. Statistical analysis of the results was performed by one-way ANOVA and the least significant difference test. GB-10 and GB-10 plus BPA achieved respectively a statistically significant 1.8-fold and 3.3-fold increase in targeting homogeneity over BPA. The combined boron compound administration protocol contributes to homogeneous targeting of heterogeneous tumors and would increase therapeutic efficacy of BNCT by exposing all tumor populations to neutron capture reactions in boron. (author)

  17. Novel approaches to effects-based monitoring: 21st century tools for bio-effects prediction and surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects-based monitoring (EBM) has been employed as a complement to chemical monitoring to help address knowledge gaps between chemical occurrence and biological effects. We have piloted several pathway-based approaches to EBM, that utilize modern bioinformatic and high throughpu...

  18. Effectiveness and Cost Efficiency of Different Surveillance Components for Proving Freedom and Early Detection of Disease: Bluetongue Serotype 8 in Cattle as Case Study for Belgium, France and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welby, S; van Schaik, G; Veldhuis, A; Brouwer-Middelesch, H; Peroz, C; Santman-Berends, I M; Fourichon, C; Wever, P; Van der Stede, Y

    2017-12-01

    Quick detection and recovery of country's freedom status remain a constant challenge in animal health surveillance. The efficacy and cost efficiency of different surveillance components in proving the absence of infection or (early) detection of bluetongue serotype 8 in cattle populations within different countries (the Netherlands, France, Belgium) using surveillance data from years 2006 and 2007 were investigated using an adapted scenario tree model approach. First, surveillance components (sentinel, yearly cross-sectional and passive clinical reporting) within each country were evaluated in terms of efficacy for substantiating freedom of infection. Yearly cross-sectional survey and passive clinical reporting performed well within each country with sensitivity of detection values ranging around 0.99. The sentinel component had a sensitivity of detection around 0.7. Secondly, how effective the components were for (early) detection of bluetongue serotype 8 and whether syndromic surveillance on reproductive performance, milk production and mortality data available from the Netherlands and Belgium could be of added value were evaluated. Epidemic curves were used to estimate the timeliness of detection. Sensitivity analysis revealed that expected within-herd prevalence and number of herds processed were the most influential parameters for proving freedom and early detection. Looking at the assumed direct costs, although total costs were low for sentinel and passive clinical surveillance components, passive clinical surveillance together with syndromic surveillance (based on reproductive performance data) turned out most cost-efficient for the detection of bluetongue serotype 8. To conclude, for emerging or re-emerging vectorborne disease that behaves such as bluetongue serotype 8, it is recommended to use passive clinical and syndromic surveillance as early detection systems for maximum cost efficiency and sensitivity. Once an infection is detected and eradicated

  19. 14 CFR 91.1431 - CAMP: Continuing analysis and surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CAMP: Continuing analysis and surveillance... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1431 CAMP: Continuing analysis and surveillance. (a) Each... continuing analysis and surveillance of the performance and effectiveness of its inspection program and the...

  20. 14 CFR 121.373 - Continuing analysis and surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuing analysis and surveillance. 121... Alterations § 121.373 Continuing analysis and surveillance. (a) Each certificate holder shall establish and maintain a system for the continuing analysis and surveillance of the performance and effectiveness of its...

  1. ASSESSMENT OF CYTOTOXIC EFFECT OF LOW-DIMENSIONAL ALUMINUM OXIDE STRUCTURES ON TUMOR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Korovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-dimensional materials have recently attracted much attention of researchers with respect of their potential role in medicine. Physical mechanisms of interaction of nanostructures with tumor cells will help to develop new approaches to treatment of cancer. Recent studies have shown that the physicochemical properties of nanostructures, such as shape and size, are the important factors of their biological activity and toxicity. the purpose of the study was to determine the role of the shape of aluminum oxide nanostructures in their toxic effects on tumor cells. material and methods. Based on aluminum oxide phases, positively charged lowdimensional structures having different shapes (agglomerates of nanosheets, nameplates, and cone-shaped nanoaggregates were synthesized with the help of aluminum nanoparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Xray diffraction. The toxicity effect of low-dimensional aluminum oxide structures was assessed by MTT assay using A549, HeLa, MDA and PyMT cell lines. results. Agglomerates of nanosheets were shown to have the most pronounced toxic effect on the examined cell lines, while nanoplates and cone-shaped nanoaggregates were non-toxic. Conclusion. The toxic effect of agglomerates of 

  2. A moderate elevation of blood glucose level increases the effectiveness of thermoradiotherapy in a rat tumor model II. improved tumor control at clinically achievable temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Ad P. van den; Berg-Blok, Anneke E. van den; Kal, Henk B.; Reinhold, Huib S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the therapeutic gain (at the TCD 50 level) that can be obtained by boosting thermoradiotherapy with intravenous glucose infusion at different temperatures. This completes our series of studies to determine the optimal conditions and the effectiveness of glucose administration at clinically achievable glucose levels and treatment temperatures. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous rat rhabdomyosarcoma BA1112 was irradiated with graded single doses of 300-kV X-rays (dose range 0-60 Gy). Fifteen minutes after irradiation, a 100-min intravenous infusion was started, consisting of either glucose (20% solution, 2.4-3 g/kg/h) or saline as a control. Then heat was applied to the tumors at 42 deg. C or 43 deg. C (water bath) during a subsequent 100-min period of infusion. Tumor control was scored as the absence of palpable growth at 100 days after treatment. Results: Glucose infusion enhanced tumor control independent of temperature in the range 42-43 deg. C. At 42 deg. C, the TCD 50 for X-irradiation decreased by 5.9 Gy (SEM 1.8 Gy), from 41.6 (1.6) to 35.7 (1.5) Gy, and at 43 deg. C from 33.3 (1.6) to 27.3 (1.5) Gy, representing a glucose enhancement ratio of approximately 1.2. At doses corresponding to the TCD 50 at either 42 or 43 deg. C, the addition of glucose increased tumor control from 50% to 70%. An enhancement ratio of 2.1 was found for the combination of irradiation, glucose infusion, and heating at 43 deg. C, with respect to irradiation alone (TCD 50 56.3 Gy, reanalyzed earlier data). The contribution of combined heat and glucose to tumor control represented an additive effect, probably on the hypoxic cell population. Conclusion: Moderate glucose administration (blood concentration 300 mg/100 mL) sizably improves experimental tumor control after combined X-irradiation and hyperthermia under clinically feasible conditions. Clinical treatment should benefit from this additional modality, in particular if unsatisfactory local control rates are due

  3. Handbook of surveillance technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, JK

    2012-01-01

    From officially sanctioned, high-tech operations to budget spy cameras and cell phone video, this updated and expanded edition of a bestselling handbook reflects the rapid and significant growth of the surveillance industry. The Handbook of Surveillance Technologies, Third Edition is the only comprehensive work to chronicle the background and current applications of the full-range of surveillance technologies--offering the latest in surveillance and privacy issues.Cutting-Edge--updates its bestselling predecessor with discussions on social media, GPS circuits in cell phones and PDAs, new GIS s

  4. Redefining syndromic surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Katz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With growing concerns about international spread of disease and expanding use of early disease detection surveillance methods, the field of syndromic surveillance has received increased attention over the last decade. The purpose of this article is to clarify the various meanings that have been assigned to the term syndromic surveillance and to propose a refined categorization of the characteristics of these systems. Existing literature and conference proceedings were examined on syndromic surveillance from 1998 to 2010, focusing on low- and middle-income settings. Based on the 36 unique definitions of syndromic surveillance found in the literature, five commonly accepted principles of syndromic surveillance systems were identified, as well as two fundamental categories: specific and non-specific disease detection. Ultimately, the proposed categorization of syndromic surveillance distinguishes between systems that focus on detecting defined syndromes or outcomes of interest and those that aim to uncover non-specific trends that suggest an outbreak may be occurring. By providing an accurate and comprehensive picture of this field’s capabilities, and differentiating among system types, a unified understanding of the syndromic surveillance field can be developed, encouraging the adoption, investment in, and implementation of these systems in settings that need bolstered surveillance capacity, particularly low- and middle-income countries.

  5. Mediastinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymoma - mediastinal; Lymphoma - mediastinal ... mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum. They are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas, germ cell tumors, or thymomas. These tumors are ...

  6. Multi-centric clinical study of the effect of intervention time on efficacy of gastroparesis external application prescription treatment of gastrointestinal tumor postsurgical gastroparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Gastroparesis external application prescription can effectively treat gastrointestinal tumor postsurgical gastroparesis and may be more efficacious in progressive disease compared placebo. Patients with gastrointestinal tumor postsurgical gastroparesis should therefore undergo intervention at an earlier stage.

  7. Osteoprotegerin mediates tumor-promoting effects of Interleukin-1beta in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Stephanie Tsang Mui; Geerts, Dirk; Roseman, Kim; Renaud, Ashleigh; Connelly, Linda

    2017-02-01

    It is widely recognized that inflammation promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Given the complex nature of the breast tumor inflammatory microenvironment, much remains to be understood of the molecular mechanisms that govern these effects. We have previously shown that osteoprotegerin knockdown in breast cancer cells resulted in reduced invasion and metastasis. Here we present novel insight into the role of osteoprotegerin in inflammation-driven tumor progression in breast cancer by investigating the link between osteoprotegerin, macrophages and the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-1beta. We used human breast cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of Interleukin-1beta treatment on osteoprotegerin secretion as measured by ELISA. We analyzed public datasets containing human breast cancer genome-wide mRNA expression data to reveal a significant and positive correlation between osteoprotegerin mRNA expression and the mRNA expression of Interleukin-1beta and of monocyte chemoattractant protein CC-chemokine ligand 2. Osteoprotegerin, Interleukin-1beta and CC-chemokine ligand 2 mRNA levels were also examined by qPCR on cDNA from normal and cancerous human breast tissue. We determined the effect of Interleukin-1beta-producing macrophages on osteoprotegerin expression by co-culturing breast cancer cells and differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human breast tumor tissue microarrays to assess macrophage infiltration and osteoprotegerin expression. To demonstrate that osteoprotegerin mediated functional effects of Interleukin-1beta we performed cell invasion studies with control and OPG siRNA knockdown on Interleukin-1beta-treated breast cancer cells. We report that Interleukin-1beta induces osteoprotegerin secretion, independent of breast cancer subtype and basal osteoprotegerin levels. Co-culture of breast cancer cells with Interleukin-1beta-secreting macrophages resulted in a similar increase in osteoprotegerin

  8. Enhanced anti-tumor effects with microencapsulated c-myc antisense oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putney, S D; Brown, J; Cucco, C; Lee, R; Skorski, T; Leonetti, C; Geiser, T; Calabretta, B; Zupi, G; Zon, G

    1999-10-01

    A phosphorothioate c-myc antisense oligonucleotide was complexed with zinc and encapsulated into injectable biodegradable microspheres. The efficacy of this novel formulation was compared with intravenous administration of the unencapsulated drug in human melanoma and leukemia xenografts in immunocompromised mice. The microencapsulated formulation was more effective as shown by reduced tumor growth, a decreased number of metastases, reduced c-myc expression, and increased survival in the melanoma model, and decreased metastatic potential and increased survival in the leukemia model. These results show that, as has been demonstrated previously with protein and peptide drugs, greater therapeutic efficacy can be obtained when antisense oligonucleotides are delivered from sustained-release formulations.

  9. The effect of phosphoethanolamine intake on mortality and macrophage activity in mice with solid ehrlich tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sueli Parreira de Arruda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a diet rich in synthetic PEtn on the metabolism macrophages of tumor-bearing mice. The results demonstrated that PEtn increased the animals' survival time. In addition, the treated animals released smaller amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO than the non-treated animals, particularly after day 14. From the results it could be concluded that H2O2 and NO were important in the modulation of neoplastic growth, and pointed to a promising role of PEtn in the control of human neoplasms.

  10. Effects of tea polyphenol components on reversion of tumor multidrug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Tiecheng; Wang Yi; Liu Xinqi; Chu Taiwei; Wei Xionghui; Wang Xiangyun; Guo Zhenquan; Wei Bing

    2003-01-01

    The effects of tea polyphenol (TP) and its main components, (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) with caffeine on reversion of tumor multidrug resistance (MDR) are investigated by using MCF-7/Adr cell line and 99 Tc m -MIBI as a substrate of P-glucoprotein (P-gp). MCF-7/Adr cells are incubated with 99 Tc m -MIBI in the presence or absence of TP or its main components (separate or mixed). The cell uptake of 99 Tc m -MIBI is measured and compared with a contrast to estimate the MDR reversion effect. The experimental results indicate that the native tea polyphenol exhibits a moderate MDR reversion effect. The MDR reversion efficacies of the four main components of TP are found in the sequence ECG>EGC>EC>EGCG. Caffeine as well as the mixture of EGCG-ECG-EGC-EC in the mass ratio 10:3:2:1 shows practically no MDR reversion effect

  11. Identification of tumor promoters by their inhibitory effect on intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budunova, I V; Mittelman, L A; Belitsky, G A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the tumor promoters 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), mezerein, teleocidin, anthralin, the Ca2+-ionophore A23187, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and phenobarbital (PB) on lucifer yellow transfer in cultures of SV-40-transformed Djungarian hamster fibroblasts was studied. TPA, mezerein, teleocidin, A23187, DDT and BHT exerted a strong inhibitory effect on cell-to-cell dye transfer. Anthralin uncoupled cells in 3 experiments out of 6. PB appeared to enhance lucifer yellow transfer. Sodium nitrite, a substance with unknown promoting activity, effectively uncoupled cells. All the promoters investigated had a reversible effect on the dye transfer. The value of the dye transfer method for promoter screening is discussed.

  12. Optimizing provider recruitment for influenza surveillance networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel V Scarpino

    Full Text Available The increasingly complex and rapid transmission dynamics of many infectious diseases necessitates the use of new, more advanced methods for surveillance, early detection, and decision-making. Here, we demonstrate that a new method for optimizing surveillance networks can improve the quality of epidemiological information produced by typical provider-based networks. Using past surveillance and Internet search data, it determines the precise locations where providers should be enrolled. When applied to redesigning the provider-based, influenza-like-illness surveillance network (ILINet for the state of Texas, the method identifies networks that are expected to significantly outperform the existing network with far fewer providers. This optimized network avoids informational redundancies and is thereby more effective than networks designed by conventional methods and a recently published algorithm based on maximizing population coverage. We show further that Google Flu Trends data, when incorporated into a network as a virtual provider, can enhance but not replace traditional surveillance methods.

  13. Microprocessor-based integrated LMFBR core surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmeiner, L.

    1984-06-01

    This report results from a joint study of KfK and INTERATOM. The aim of this study is to explore the advantages of microprocessors and microelectronics for a more sophisticated core surveillance, which is based on the integration of separate surveillance techniques. Due to new developments in microelectronics and related software an approach to LMFBR core surveillance can be conceived that combines a number of measurements into a more intelligent decision-making data processing system. The following techniques are considered to contribute essentially to an integrated core surveillance system: - subassembly state and thermal hydraulics performance monitoring, - temperature noise analysis, - acoustic core surveillance, - failure characterization and failure prediction based on DND- and cover gas signals, and - flux tilting techniques. Starting from a description of these techniques it is shown that by combination and correlation of these individual techniques a higher degree of cost-effectiveness, reliability and accuracy can be achieved. (orig./GL) [de

  14. Smart sensing surveillance video system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2016-05-01

    An intelligent video surveillance system is able to detect and identify abnormal and alarming situations by analyzing object movement. The Smart Sensing Surveillance Video (S3V) System is proposed to minimize video processing and transmission, thus allowing a fixed number of cameras to be connected on the system, and making it suitable for its applications in remote battlefield, tactical, and civilian applications including border surveillance, special force operations, airfield protection, perimeter and building protection, and etc. The S3V System would be more effective if equipped with visual understanding capabilities to detect, analyze, and recognize objects, track motions, and predict intentions. In addition, alarm detection is performed on the basis of parameters of the moving objects and their trajectories, and is performed using semantic reasoning and ontologies. The S3V System capabilities and technologies have great potential for both military and civilian applications, enabling highly effective security support tools for improving surveillance activities in densely crowded environments. It would be directly applicable to solutions for emergency response personnel, law enforcement, and other homeland security missions, as well as in applications requiring the interoperation of sensor networks with handheld or body-worn interface devices.

  15. Polymeric micelles of zinc protoporphyrin for tumor targeted delivery based on EPR effect and singlet oxygen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; Greish, Khaled; Seki, Takahiro; Okazaki, Shoko; Fang, Jun; Takeshita, Keizo; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric micelles of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) with water soluble biocompatible and amphiphilic polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) demonstrated unique characteristics to target tumor tissues selectively based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The micellar macromolecular drug of ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP) previously showed notable anticancer activity as a consequence of selective tumor targeting ability and its potent HO-1 inhibitory potential, resulting in suppressed biliverdin/bilirubin production in tumors thereby leading to oxystress induced tumor cell killing. Furthermore, recent findings also showed that ZnPP efficiently generated reactive singlet oxygen under illumination of visible light, laser, or xenon light source, which could augment its oxystress induced cell killing abilities. In the present paper, we report the synergistic effects of light induced photosensitizing capabilities and HO-1 inhibitory potentials of these unique micelles when tested in vitro and in vivo on tumor models under localized, mild illumination conditions using a tungsten-xenon light source. The results indicate that these water soluble polymeric micelles of ZnPP portend to be promising candidates for targeted chemotherapy as well as photodynamic therapy against superficial tumors as well as solid tumors located at light penetrable depths.

  16. Clinical effects of vinorelbine administration in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs: 58 cases (1997–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouda, Raelene M.; Miller, Mairin E.; Chon, Esther; Stein, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of vinorelbine in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs. Design Retrospective case series. Animals 58 dogs with malignant tumors, including pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31), histiocytic sarcoma (9), mast cell tumor (5), lymphoma (4), melanoma (2), and 7 other tumor types (1 each). Procedures Medical records of dogs treated with vinorelbine from December 1997 to December 2012 were reviewed for data regarding signalment, clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic test results, diagnostic imaging results, vinorelbine doses and dose frequency, surgery and radiotherapy details when applicable, other chemotherapeutics administered, and outcomes. Descriptive, comparative, and survival statistics were computed for all dogs and for dogs by histologic subgroup of tumors. Results Vinorelbine was administered palliatively to 44 (76%) dogs. One (2%) dog had a complete response for 162 days, 5 (11%) dogs had a partial response for a median duration of 91 days, 19 (43%) dogs had stable disease for a median duration of 68 days, and 19 (43%) dogs developed progressive disease after a median duration of 21 days. Clinical benefit was more difficult to assess in the remaining 14 (24%) dogs that received vinorelbine as an adjuvant treatment. Overall median time to tumor progression was 103 days (range, 5 to 1,533 days). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Vinorelbine appeared to be effective in the treatment of several tumor types in dogs. Follow-up prospective studies of the clinical benefit of the drug in specific clinical scenarios will be necessary to support this conclusion. PMID:25970220

  17. Clinical effects of vinorelbine administration in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs: 58 cases (1997-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouda, Raelene M; Miller, Mairin E; Chon, Esther; Stein, Timothy J

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of vinorelbine in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs. Retrospective case series. 58 dogs with malignant tumors, including pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31), histiocytic sarcoma (9), mast cell tumor (5), lymphoma (4), melanoma (2), and 7 other tumor types (1 each). Medical records of dogs treated with vinorelbine from December 1997 to December 2012 were reviewed for data regarding signalment, clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic test results, diagnostic imaging results, vinorelbine doses and dose frequency, surgery and radiotherapy details when applicable, other chemotherapeutics administered, and outcomes. Descriptive, comparative, and survival statistics were computed for all dogs and for dogs by histologic subgroup of tumors. Vinorelbine was administered palliatively to 44 (76%) dogs. One (2%) dog had a complete response for 162 days, 5 (11%) dogs had a partial response for a median duration of 91 days, 19 (43%) dogs had stable disease for a median duration of 68 days, and 19 (43%) dogs developed progressive disease after a median duration of 21 days. Clinical benefit was more difficult to assess in the remaining 14 (24%) dogs that received vinorelbine as an adjuvant treatment. Overall median time to tumor progression was 103 days (range, 5 to 1,533 days). Vinorelbine appeared to be effective in the treatment of several tumor types in dogs. Follow-up prospective studies of the clinical benefit of the drug in specific clinical scenarios will be necessary to support this conclusion.

  18. Effect of a perfluorochemical emulsion on the radiosensitivity of solid tumors and bone marrow stem cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.; Mate, T.P.; Fischer, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The perfluorochemical emulsion Fluosol-DA is receiving extensive testing for use after hemorrhage, during surgery, or to minimize ischemic damage after stroke or myocardial infarction. Solid tumors include regions of severe hypoxia, containing cells resistant to radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and multi-agent therapy. These experiments examined the effect of pre-irradiation treatment of mice with oxygenated Fluosol, to determine whether this agent could be used to deliver oxygen to the hopoxic tumor regions and therefore increase the response of the tumors to therapy. Pretreatment of mice bearing EMT6 mouse mammary tumors with Fluosol and with inspired 95% 0/sub 2//5% CO/sub 2/ before and during irradiation decreased the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and increased the response of the tumors to radiation. Neither Fluosol alone nor 0/sub 2//CO/sub 2/ alone produced the same effect. The viability and radiosensitivity of pluripotential mouse bone marrow stem cells (CFU-S) and partially committed progenitors (CFU-GM) were not altered by pretreatment with perfluorochemicals and/or 0/sub 2//CO/sub 2/. These studies suggest that Fluosol may prove valuable as an adjunct to radiotherapy for solid tumors

  19. [Evaluation on Hepatitis B surveillance models at surveillance pilot points in China, 2013-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, N; Wang, F Z; Zhang, L J; Zheng, H; Sun, X J; Wang, F; Zhang, G M

    2017-12-10

    Objective: To evaluate the effects on Hepatitis B surveillance models at the surveillance pilot points in China. Methods: Hepatitis B related records kept at the surveillance pilot points were downloaded from NNDRS. Data concerning proportion of unclassified Hepatitis B cases, consistency of additional records and the accuracy of reported acute Hepatitis B cases were evaluated. Results: The proportion of unclassified Hepatitis B cases was decreasing year by year ( P surveillance could be applied elsewhere in the nation to improve the quality of report system on Hepatitis B.

  20. Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shanshan; Hotani, Kaori; Hideshima, Sho; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Takuya; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Mori, Yasuro; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP) using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab), immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL) for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum. PMID:28788579

  1. Potential anti-tumor effects of Mugil cephalus processed roe extracts on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Antonella; Scano, Paola; Atzeri, Angela; Deiana, Monica; Falchi, Angela Maria

    2013-10-01

    The salted-semidried mullet ovary product, bottarga, is a Mediterranean food rich in n-3 PUFA EPA and DHA. We studied and compared the effects on cell viability, sensitivity to the anti-tumor drug 5-fluorouracil, and lipid composition, in colon cancer Caco-2 cells after 24 h incubation with oils and hydrophilic extracts obtained from two bottarga samples stored at different conditions. The cellular absorption of bottarga lipids was assessed in cancer cells by the evaluation of lipid accumulation in cytoplasmic lipid droplets by fluorescence microscopy. Bottarga oil showed a significant in vitro inhibitory effect on the growth of cancer Caco-2 cells and the ability to potentiate, at non-toxic concentration, the growth inhibitory effect of 5-fluorouracil. Moreover, bottarga oil induced in cancer Caco-2 cells marked changes in fatty acid composition, with a significant accumulation of the n-3 PUFA EPA and DHA, and cytoplasmic lipid droplet formation. Also bottarga hydrophilic extract, characterized by means of ¹H NMR spectroscopy, exhibited a reduction in cancer cell viability, without affecting cell lipid profile. Cell cholesterol levels were unmodified by all treatments. The results showed interesting anti-tumor properties of bottarga lipids, and qualify this fish product as a food with nutraceutical properties and potential benefits in colon cancer prevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of tumor motion effect in canine model for diagnostic and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sangkeun; Nam, Taewon; Kim, Kyeongmin [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seungwoo; Han, Suchul; Ji, Younghoon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Nohwon; Eom, Kidong [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The internal organs move up to 35mm maximum and it provides information and uncertainty that has been distorted in the diagnosis and treatment. Previous most studies for the effect of respiration have been performed with external monitoring systems but it cannot represent internal organ motion such as liver, pancreas, and lung. Positron emission tomography (PET) is more influenced by motion than computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since measurement time for image acquisition is longer than CT and MRI. Thus, count of tumor is to be underestimated and region of tumor is to be overestimated. The first aim of this study was developing the artificial pulmonary nodule which can be performed non-invasive transplant into thorax of dogs and second is to assess the effect of respiratory motion on PET image with evaluating the applicability of the artificial model using dogs for diagnosis and treatment. The developed artificial pulmonary nodule showed reproducibility and motion effect as respiratory cycle and it was verified in PET images. Radiation dose estimated was not changed and was reduced slightly of 10 rpm and 15 rpm, respectively, in both of glass dosimeter and ion chamber. The developed artificial pulmonary nodule will be useful tool for evaluating respiratory motion and better research performance for diagnosis and treatment will be expected with performing simulated experiment using the nodule conducted in this study.

  3. Cytotoxic and toxicological effects of phthalimide derivatives on tumor and normal murine cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO MICHEL PINHEIRO FERREIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Eleven phthalimide derivatives were evaluated with regards to their antiproliferative activity on tumor and normal cells and possible toxic effects. Cytotoxic analyses were performed against murine tumors (Sarcoma 180 and B-16/F-10 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using MTT and Alamar Blue assays. Following, the investigation of cytotoxicity was executed by flow cytometry analysis and antitumoral and toxicological potential by in vivo techniques. The molecules 3b, 3c, 4 and 5 revealed in vitro cytotoxicity against Sarcoma 180, B-16/F-10 and PBMC. Since compound 4 was the most effective derivative, it was chosen to detail the mechanism of action after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure (22.5 and 45 µM. Sarcoma 180 cells treated with compound 4 showed membrane disruption, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in a time- and dose-dependent way. Compounds 3c, 4 and 5 (50 mg/kg/day did not inhibit in vivotumor growth. Compound 4-treated animals exhibited an increase in total leukocytes, lymphocytes and spleen relative weight, a decreasing in neutrophils and hyperplasia of spleen white pulp. Treated animals presented reversible histological changes. Molecule 4 had in vitro antiproliferative action possibly triggered by apoptosis, reversible toxic effects on kidneys, spleen and livers and exhibited immunostimulant properties that can be explored to attack neoplasic cells.

  4. Clinical pharmacokinetics and effects of vincristine sulfate in dogs with transmissible venereal tumor (TVT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantrakul, Supannika; Klangkaew, Narumol; Kunakornsawat, Sunee; Tansatit, Tawewan; Poapolathep, Ammart; Kumagai, Susumu; Poapolathep, Saranya

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of vincristine and their correlation with its clinical effects in dogs with transmissible venereal tumor (TVT). Dogs with TVT were intravenously administered vincristine sulfate at a dose of 0.7 mg/m(2) of body surface area. Blood samples were collected starting from 5 min to 48 hr after drug administration. The plasma concentration of vincristine was determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters of vincristine were characterized using a two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model. The volume of distribution, distribution half-life, elimination half-life and plasma clearance were 0.660 ± 0.210 l/kg, 21.5 ± 6.90 min, 47.6 ± 14.2 min and 0.010 ± 0.001 l/min/kg, respectively. Tumor regression was determined at weekly interval by a physical examination and histopathological analysis. In our study, three to eight administrations of vincristine at a dose of 0.7 mg/m(2) were able to induce a complete tumor regression without any evidence of gross lesion of disease. Therefore, this investigation provides the pharmacokinetic characteristics of vincristine in dogs with TVT, which may be used as an integration tool to gain a better understanding of the disposition properties of the drug and the correlation of these properties with the drug's clinical effects. In addition, we validated the LC-MS/MS method and found that it is suitable for the pharmacokinetic study of vincristine in dog plasma.

  5. Hearing Loss After Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors: Effect of Cochlear Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Chiaho; Bass, Johnnie K.; Khan, Raja; Kun, Larry E.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of cochlear dose on sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor treated by using conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: We studied 78 pediatric patients (155 ears) with localized brain tumors treated in 1997-2001 who had not received platinum-based chemotherapy and were followed up for at least 48 months. They were evaluated prospectively by means of serial pure-tone audiograms (250 Hz-8 kHz) and/or auditory brainstem response before and every 6 months after CRT. Results: Hearing loss occurred in 14% (11 of 78) of patients and 11% (17 of 155) of cochleae, with onset most often at 3-5 years after CRT. The incidence of hearing loss was low for a cochlear mean dose of 30 Gy or less and increased at greater than 40-45 Gy. Risk was greater at high frequencies (6-8 kHz). In children who tested abnormal for hearing, average hearing thresholds increased from a less than 25 decibel (dB) hearing level (HL) at baseline to a mean of 46 ± 13 (SD) dB HL for high frequencies, 41 ± 7 dB HL for low frequencies, and 38 ± 6 dB HL for intermediate frequencies. Conclusions: Sensorineural hearing loss is a late effect of CRT. In the absence of other factors, including ototoxic chemotherapy, increase in cochlear dose correlates positively with hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor. To minimize the risk of hearing loss for children treated with radiation therapy, a cumulative cochlear dose less than 35 Gy is recommended for patients planned to receive 54-59.4 Gy in 30-33 treatment fractions

  6. Cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects of nano-C{sub 60} on tumor cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni Jin [Second Military Medical University, Department of Radiation Medicine (China); Wu Qiuye [Second Military Medical University, Organic Chemistry Department, School of Pharmacy (China); Li Yuguo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lab of Nanoscale Biomedicine Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (China); Guo Zhixin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry (China); Tang Gusheng; Sun Ding; Gao Fu; Cai Jianming [Second Military Medical University, Department of Radiation Medicine (China)], E-mail: caijm@smmu.edu.cn

    2008-04-15

    There is growing evidence in recent years that the pristine fullerene may be endowed with strong pro-oxidant capacity to biological samples. In this investigation we tested the hypothesis that water-soluble fullerene-C{sub 60} (nano-C{sub 60}) may interact with ionizing radiation enhancing its antiproliferative effects. The two tumor cell lines with different radiosensitivity B16 and SMMU-7721 were treated by a combination of pristine fullerene and {sup 60}Co {gamma} irradiation. We measured cell survival rates, apoptotic characteristics, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and alteration of cell diameter with or without {gamma}-irradiation. There was reduced survival with B16 and SMMU-7721 cells exposed to nano-C{sub 60}, with the inhibitory concentrations reducing the viability by 50% to 65 part per billion (ppb) and 150 ppb respectively. For cells exposed to nano-C{sub 60} prior to {gamma}-irradiation, damage to cell membranes and increased numbers of apoptotic cells were detected by morphologic Hoechst-staining analysis and Annexin V/propidium iodide double-staining. In cells exposed to nano-C{sub 60}, there were increased levels of ROS, as measured by fluorescence detection under laser confocal microscopy. Preincubation with non-toxic pristine C{sub 60} before {gamma}-ray caused enlargement of cells with increased diameter. The results show that nano-C{sub 60} inhibits the growth of tumor cells at certain concentrations and increases the effects of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiation, possibly through the elevated production of cellular ROS and the membrane disruption. Data in this study indicates a possible consideration of using C{sub 60} as a candidate of sensitization modifier in tumor radiation biology.

  7. Conceptual evaluation of population health surveillance programs: method and example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Allaki, Farouk; Bigras-Poulin, Michel; Ravel, André

    2013-03-01

    Veterinary and public health surveillance programs can be evaluated to assess and improve the planning, implementation and effectiveness of these programs. Guidelines, protocols and methods have been developed for such evaluation. In general, they focus on a limited set of attributes (e.g., sensitivity and simplicity), that are assessed quantitatively whenever possible, otherwise qualitatively. Despite efforts at standardization, replication by different evaluators is difficult, making evaluation outcomes open to interpretation. This ultimately limits the usefulness of surveillance evaluations. At the same time, the growing demand to prove freedom from disease or pathogen, and the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement and the International Health Regulations require stronger surveillance programs. We developed a method for evaluating veterinary and public health surveillance programs that is detailed, structured, transparent and based on surveillance concepts that are part of all types of surveillance programs. The proposed conceptual evaluation method comprises four steps: (1) text analysis, (2) extraction of the surveillance conceptual model, (3) comparison of the extracted surveillance conceptual model to a theoretical standard, and (4) validation interview with a surveillance program designer. This conceptual evaluation method was applied in 2005 to C-EnterNet, a new Canadian zoonotic disease surveillance program that encompasses laboratory based surveillance of enteric diseases in humans and active surveillance of the pathogens in food, water, and livestock. The theoretical standard used for evaluating C-EnterNet was a relevant existing structure called the "Population Health Surveillance Theory". Five out of 152 surveillance concepts were absent in the design of C-EnterNet. However, all of the surveillance concept relationships found in C-EnterNet were valid. The proposed method can be used to improve the design and documentation of surveillance programs. It

  8. A boundary element model for investigating the effects of eye tumor on the temperature distribution inside the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, E H; Ang, W T; Ng, E Y K

    2009-08-01

    A three-dimensional boundary element model of the human eye is developed to investigate the thermal effects of eye tumor on the ocular temperature distribution. The human eye is modeled as comprising several regions which have different thermal properties. The tumor is one of these regions. The thermal effects of the tumor are simulated by taking it to have a very high metabolic heat generation and blood perfusion rate. Inside the tumor, the steady state temperature is governed by the Pennes bioheat equation. Elsewhere, in normal tissues of the eye, the temperature satisfies the Laplace's equation. To compute the temperature on the corneal surface, the surface boundary of each region is divided into triangular elements.

  9. Mechanisms Underlying the Anti-Aging and Anti-Tumor Effects of Lithocholic Bile Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Arlia-Ciommo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids are cholesterol-derived bioactive lipids that play essential roles in the maintenance of a heathy lifespan. These amphipathic molecules with detergent-like properties display numerous beneficial effects on various longevity- and healthspan-promoting processes in evolutionarily distant organisms. Recent studies revealed that lithocholic bile acid not only causes a considerable lifespan extension in yeast, but also exhibits a substantial cytotoxic effect in cultured cancer cells derived from different tissues and organisms. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the robust anti-aging and anti-tumor effects of lithocholic acid have emerged. This review summarizes the current knowledge of these mechanisms, outlines the most important unanswered questions and suggests directions for future research.

  10. Surveillance Avoidance Technique Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-02

    path and, using the evaluation module for feedback , alter the path until acceptable surveil- lance avoidance performance is achieved. The current ISAS...Nmber Diselav Stage Containing - Date: I I Time ( GIlT ): Figure 3-46: Textual Display for GRAPHICAL Module 3-64 Surveillance Avoidance Final Report System

  11. Tumor Oxygen Dynamics as a Prognostic Indicator of Effective Antiangiogenic Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Dawen

    2002-01-01

    ...) MR, our results showed that significantly better oxygenation was found in the well differentiated and slower growing H and HI tumors, compared with anaplastic or metastatic, faster growing ATl and MAT-Lu tumors...

  12. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  13. Anti-angiogenic therapy in pediatric brain tumors : An effective strategy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Mariska; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Brain tumors are still the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality among children, despite different therapeutic options including neurosurgery, chemotherapy and radiation. As angiogenesis is highly crucial in brain tumor growth and progression, numerous clinical trials evaluating diverse

  14. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  15. Anti-tumor effect of cactus polysaccharides on lung squamous carcinoma cells (SK-MES-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Wu, D; Wei, B; Wang, S; Sun, Hx; Li, Xl; Zhang, F; Zhang, Cl; Xin, Y

    2014-01-01

    Cactus polysaccharides are the active components of Opuntia dillenii which have been used extensively in folk medicine. In this study, we investigate the anti-tumor effect of cactus polysaccharides on lung squamous carcinoma cells SK-MES-1. The inhibitory effect of Cactus polysaccharides on lung squamous carcinoma cells were detected by MTT assay. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was determined by AnnexinV assay. Western-blotting was applied to detect P53 and PTEN protein expression in the cells treated with cactus polysaccharides. Results showed that different concentrations of wild cactus polysaccharides prevent SK-MES-1 cells growth and induces S phase arrest. The data also revealed that cactus polysaccharides cause apoptosis in SK-MES-1 cells determined by Annexin-V assay. Furthermore, cactus polysaccharides induced growth arrest and apoptosis may be due to the increase of P53 and phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) protein. Cactus polysaccharides have anti-tumor activity on lung squamous carcinoma cells.

  16. Warburg effect(s)-a biographical sketch of Otto Warburg and his impacts on tumor metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Virtually everyone working in cancer research is familiar with the "Warburg effect", i.e., anaerobic glycolysis in the presence of oxygen in tumor cells. However, few people nowadays are aware of what lead Otto Warburg to the discovery of this observation and how his other scientific contributions are seminal to our present knowledge of metabolic and energetic processes in cells. Since science is a human endeavor, and a scientist is imbedded in a network of social and academic contacts, it is worth taking a glimpse into the biography of Otto Warburg to illustrate some of these influences and the historical landmarks in his life. His creative and innovative thinking and his experimental virtuosity set the framework for his scientific achievements, which were pioneering not only for cancer research. Here, I shall allude to the prestigious family background in imperial Germany; his relationships to Einstein, Meyerhof, Krebs, and other Nobel and notable scientists; his innovative technical developments and their applications in the advancement of biomedical sciences, including the manometer, tissue slicing, and cell cultivation. The latter were experimental prerequisites for the first metabolic measurements with tumor cells in the 1920s. In the 1930s-1940s, he improved spectrophotometry for chemical analysis and developed the optical tests for measuring activities of glycolytic enzymes. Warburg's reputation brought him invitations to the USA and contacts with the Rockefeller Foundation; he received the Nobel Prize in 1931. World politics and world wars heavily affected Warburg's scientific survival in Berlin. But, after his second postwar recovery, Warburg's drive for unraveling the energetic processes of life, both in plants and in tumor cells, continued until his death in 1970. The legacy of Otto Warburg is not only the Warburg effect, but also the identification of the "respiratory ferment" and hydrogen-transferring cofactors and the isolation of glycolytic enzymes

  17. Approaches to canine health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Dan G; Church, David B; McGreevy, Paul D; Thomson, Peter C; Brodbelt, Dave C

    2014-01-01

    Effective canine health surveillance systems can be used to monitor disease in the general population, prioritise disorders for strategic control and focus clinical research, and to evaluate the success of these measures. The key attributes for optimal data collection systems that support canine disease surveillance are representativeness of the general population, validity of disorder data and sustainability. Limitations in these areas present as selection bias, misclassification bias and discontinuation of the system respectively. Canine health data sources are reviewed to identify their strengths and weaknesses for supporting effective canine health surveillance. Insurance data benefit from large and well-defined denominator populations but are limited by selection bias relating to the clinical events claimed and animals covered. Veterinary referral clinical data offer good reliability for diagnoses but are limited by referral bias for the disorders and animals included. Primary-care practice data have the advantage of excellent representation of the general dog population and recording at the point of care by veterinary professionals but may encounter misclassification problems and technical difficulties related to management and analysis of large datasets. Questionnaire surveys offer speed and low cost but may suffer from low response rates, poor data validation, recall bias and ill-defined denominator population information. Canine health scheme data benefit from well-characterised disorder and animal data but reflect selection bias during the voluntary submissions process. Formal UK passive surveillance systems are limited by chronic under-reporting and selection bias. It is concluded that active collection systems using secondary health data provide the optimal resource for canine health surveillance.

  18. Surveillance, privacy and the ethics of librarianship

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Lauren

    2018-01-01

    A presentation by Lauren Smith (Knowledge Manager, Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services). Presented at Cambridge Libraries Conference 2018. The presentation discusses forms of surveillance in higher education, how this effects freedom of expression and possible professional responses.

  19. Effect of fluid friction on interstitial fluid flow coupled with blood flow through solid tumor microvascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidgar, Mostafa; Soltani, M; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Bazmara, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    A solid tumor is investigated as porous media for fluid flow simulation. Most of the studies use Darcy model for porous media. In Darcy model, the fluid friction is neglected and a few simplified assumptions are implemented. In this study, the effect of these assumptions is studied by considering Brinkman model. A multiscale mathematical method which calculates fluid flow to a solid tumor is used in this study to investigate how neglecting fluid friction affects the solid tumor simulation. The mathematical method involves processes such as blood flow through vessels and solute and fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. The sprouting angiogenesis model is used for generating capillary network and then fluid flow governing equations are implemented to calculate blood flow through the tumor-induced capillary network. Finally, the two models of porous media are used for modeling fluid flow in normal and tumor tissues in three different shapes of tumors. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a solid tumor demonstrate that the simplifications used in Darcy model affect the interstitial velocity and Brinkman model predicts a lower value for interstitial velocity than the values that Darcy model predicts.

  20. [Anti-tumor effect of the whole worm extract of Ascaris lumbricoides on Lewis lung carcinoma in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Jun-Ping; Huang, Yan-Qin; Liang, Hua; Yuan, Keng

    2013-12-01

    Forty-five C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups (A-E). Group B and D served as the control group of A and C. Each mouse of group A was intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml whole worm extract of Ascaris lumbricoides every other day, and 10 days later injected with 0.1 ml Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells at right axillary subcutaneously region. Mice of group B were injected with normal saline and then developed tumor model. Each mouse of group C was injected with 0.1 ml LLC cells, and two days later, injected with 0.1 ml whole worm extract of A. lumbricoides every other day for 5 times. After the tumor model developed, mice in group D were injected with normal saline. Group E was the negative control group. Time intervals between implantation and active growth and tumor weight were recorded. Tumor inhibition rate was calculated. The average time interval between tumor implantation and measurable tumor growth for groups A, B, C and D was (7.0 +/-1.1), (6.0 +/- 0.7), (9.0 +/- 1.2) and (7.0 +/- 0.9) days. Tumor weight of [(338.9 +/- 282.2) mg] (P lumbricoides which may have an inhibitory effect on tumour growth.

  1. Effects on tumor development and metastatic dissemination by the NKG2D lymphocyte receptor expressed on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gazzar, A; Cai, X; Reeves, R S; Dai, Z; Caballero-Benitez, A; McDonald, D L; Vazquez, J; Gooley, T A; Sale, G E; Spies, T; Groh, V

    2014-10-09

    The stimulatory NKG2D lymphocyte receptor together with its tumor-associated ligands enable the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, with dynamic changes unfolding, cancers exploit NKG2D and its ligands for immune evasion and suppression. Recent findings have added yet another functional dimension, wherein cancer cells themselves co-opt NKG2D for their own benefit to complement the presence of its ligands for self-stimulation of parameters of tumorigenesis. Those findings are here extended to in vivo tumorigenicity testing by employing orthotopic xenotransplant breast cancer models in mice. Using human cancer lines with ectopic NKG2D expression and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated protein depletion among other controls, we show that NKG2D self-stimulation has tumor-promoting capacity. NKG2D signals had no notable effects on cancer cell proliferation and survival but acted at the level of angiogenesis, thus promoting tumor growth, tumor cell intravasation and dissemination. NKG2D-mediated effects on tumor initiation may represent another factor in the observed overall enhancement of tumor development. Altogether, these results may have an impact on immunotherapy approaches, which currently do not account for such NKG2D effects in cancer patients and thus could be misdirected as underlying assumptions are incomplete.

  2. Surveillance of the armed forces as a sentinel system for detecting adverse effects of dietary supplements in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Austin, Krista G; Farina, Emily K

    2018-04-01

    Half the US population takes dietary supplements, but surveillance systems available to regulatory and public health authorities to determine whether specific dietary supplements present a risk are inadequate and numerous severe injuries and deaths have occurred from their consumption. Uniformed military personnel regularly use dietary supplements and are more likely to use potentially dangerous supplements than civilians. Recently, the supplement 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA) was marketed for physical performance-enhancement and weight loss. However, after over 100 reports of illness attributed to DMAA, including six deaths, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning to cease its sale. When DMAA was legal (2010-2011), we conducted, using convenience samples, supplement surveys of service members and determined prevalence of use and self-reported symptoms of DMAA use. We surveyed 4374 armed forces personnel using a standardized dietary supplement survey administered by local health-care professionals. Overall, 11 % of survey respondents used dietary supplements labelled as containing DMAA at least once/week. Regular users were over two times more likely to report tachycardia (Psupplements using electronic surveys and medical records. Since armed forces personnel are much more likely than civilians to use potentially dangerous dietary supplements like DMAA, near real-time surveillance of them using electronic surveys and medical records would provide early warning to regulatory agencies and the medical and public health communities when high-risk dietary supplements are introduced.

  3. Antihistaminic and cardiorespiratory effects of diphenhydramine hydrochloride in anesthetized dogs undergoing excision of mast cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Andrea; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Mosley, Cornelia; Singh, Ameet; Mutsaers, Anthony J; Hanna, Brad; Johnson, Ron; Gu, Yu; Beaudoin-Kimble, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of IV diphenhydramine hydrochloride administration on cardiorespiratory variables in anesthetized dogs undergoing mast cell tumor (MCT) excision. DESIGN Randomized, blinded clinical trial. ANIMALS 16 client-owned dogs with MCTs. PROCEDURES In a standardized isoflurane anesthesia session that included mechanical ventilation, dogs received diphenhydramine hydrochloride (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], IV; n = 8) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (IV; control treatment; 8) 10 minutes after induction. Cardiorespiratory variables were recorded throughout anesthesia and MCT excision, and blood samples for determination of plasma diphenhydramine and histamine concentrations were collected prior to premedication (baseline), throughout anesthesia, and 2