WorldWideScience

Sample records for effective thermal cross

  1. Measurement of the effective thermal cross section of {sup 134}Cs by triple neutron capture reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Katoh, Toshio [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1998-03-01

    The effective thermal cross section ({sigma}{sub eff}) of the {sup 134}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 135}Cs reaction was measured by the activation method and the {gamma}-ray spectroscopic method in order to obtain fundamental data for research on the transmutation of nuclear wastes. The effective thermal cross section of the reaction {sup 134}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 135}Cs was found to be 140.6{+-}8.5 barns. (author)

  2. Doppler broadening effect on collision cross section functions - Deconvolution of the thermal averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The surprising feature of the Doppler problem in threshold determination is the 'amplification effect' of the target's thermal energy spread. The small thermal energy spread of the target molecules results in a large dispersion in relative kinetic energy. The Doppler broadening effect in connection with thermal energy beam experiments is discussed, and a procedure is recommended for the deconvolution of molecular scattering cross-section functions whose dominant dependence upon relative velocity is approximately that of the standard low-energy form.

  3. Effects of Starvation and Thermal Stress on the Thermal Tolerance of Silkworm, Bombyx mori: Existence of Trade-offs and Cross-Tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, A H; Qamar, A

    2017-09-27

    Organisms, in nature, are often subjected to multiple stressors, both biotic and abiotic. Temperature and starvation are among the main stressors experienced by organisms in their developmental cycle and the responses to these stressors may share signaling pathways, which affects the way these responses are manifested. Temperature is a major factor governing the performance of ectothermic organisms in ecosystems worldwide and, therefore, the thermal tolerance is a central issue in the thermobiology of these organisms. Here, we investigated the effects of starvation as well as mild heat and cold shocks on the thermal tolerance of the larvae of silkworm, Bombyx mori (Linnaeus). Starvation acted as a meaningful or positive stressor as it improved cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time (CCRT), but, at the same time, it acted as a negative stressor and impaired the heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time (HKT). In the case of heat tolerance, starvation negated the positive effects of both mild cold as well as mild heat shocks and thus indicated the existence of trade-off between these stressors. Both mild heat and cold shocks improved the thermal tolerance, but the effects were more prominent when the indices were measured in response to a stressor of same type, i.e., a mild cold shock improved the cold tolerance more than the heat tolerance and vice versa. This improvement in thermal tolerance by both mild heat as well as cold shocks indicated the possibility of cross-tolerance between these stressors.

  4. Solid-state effects on thermal-neutron cross sections and on low-energy resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, J.A.; Mook, H.A.; Hill, N.W.; Shahal, O.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross sections of several single crystals (Si, Cu, sapphire), several polycrystalline samples (Cu, Fe, Be, C, Bi, Ta), and a fine-powder copper sample have been measured from 0.002 to 5 eV. The Cu powder and polycrystalline Fe, Be and C data exhibit the expected abrupt changes in cross section. The cross section of the single crystal of Si is smooth with only small broad fluctuations. The data on two single Cu crystals, the sapphire crystal, cast Bi, and rolled samples of Ta and Cu have many narrow peaks approx. 10/sup -3/ eV wide. High resolution (0.3%) transmission measurements were made on the 1.057-eV resonance in /sup 240/Pu and the 0.433-eV resonance in /sup 180/Ta, both at room and low temperatures to study the effects of crystal binding. Although the changes in Doppler broadening with temperature were apparent, no asymmetries due to a recoilless contribution were observed.

  5. Effect of U-238 and U-235 cross sections on nuclear characteristics of fast and thermal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kaneko, Kunio

    1997-03-01

    Benchmark calculation has been made for fast and thermal reactors by using ENDF/B-VI release 2(ENDF/B-VI.2) and JENDL-3.2 nuclear data. Effective multiplication factors (k{sub eff}s) calculated for fast reactors calculated with ENDF/B-VI.2 becomes about 1% larger than the results with JENDL-3.2. The difference in k{sub eff} is caused mainly from the difference in inelastic scattering cross section of U-238. In all thermal benchmark cores, ENDF/B-VI.2 gives smaller multiplication factors than JENDL-3.2. In U-235 cores, the difference is about 0.3%dk and it becomes about 0.6% in TCA U cores. The difference in U-238 data is also important in thermal reactors, while there are found 0.1-0.3% different v values of U isotopes in thermal energy between ENDF/B-VI.2 and JENDL-3.2. (author)

  6. The effect of some disiloxane chain extenders on the thermal and mechanical properties of cross-linked poly(siloxane-urethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pusztai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Poly(siloxane-urethane (PSiU networks based on a bis(hydroxyorgano disiloxane chain extender, a trifunctional polyether polyol as a cross-linker, methylene-diphenyl diisocyanate and α,β-hydroxyethoxyethyl polydimethylsiloxane were synthesized in butyl acetate solution. The effect of the chain extenders and the cross-link density was investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA, swelling, hardness and tensile strength measurements. Isotherm thermogravimetric analyses were carried out for selected polymer compositions at 120 and 170°C and also the changes in tensile strength were followed. The different chain extenders have a strong effect on the hard segment structure, thus on the thermal and mechanical behaviour. The phase separation of the soft and hard segments was indicated by the two or three well distinguished tanδ peaks, the maxima of which range within wide intervals depending on the polymer composition. The polymers of high cross-link density showed a very good thermal stability, high tensile strength (up to 68.7 MPa and hardness (80–95 Shore A even of high 13–36% dimethyl siloxane content. Changing the siloxane soft segment ratio and the cross-link density the physical properties can be adjusted.

  7. Thermal Analyse sof Cross-Linked Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Polansky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes results obtained during the structural analyses measurements (Differential Scanning Calorimetry DSC, Thermogravimetry TG, Thermomechanical analysis TMA and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy FT-IR. The samples of cross-linked polyethylene cable insulation were tested via these analyses. The DSC and TG were carried out using simultaneous thermal analyzer TA Instruments SDT Q600 with connection of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer Nicolet 380. Thermomechanical analysis was carried out by TMA Q400EM TA Instruments apparatus.

  8. Thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; Saíz-Jabardo, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a numerical computational methodology for thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers, with applications in chemical, refrigeration and automobile industries. This methodology allows obtaining effectiveness-number of transfer units (e-NTU) data and has been used for simulating several standard and complex flow arrangements configurations of cross-flow heat exchangers. Simulated results have been validated through comparisons with results from available exact and approximate analytical solutions. Very accurate results have been obtained over wide ranges

  9. Modeling the Effects of Viscosity and Thermal Conduction on Acoustic Propagation in Rigid Tubes with Various Cross-Sectional Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, René

    2011-01-01

    be established for the geometry. These parameters can be found for a tube with a triangular cross-section and an implementation of the low reduced frequency which can handle tubes with both circular, rectangular triangular cross-sections has been made in COMSOL Multiphysics. For the circular and the rectangular...... tube results found using this implementation have been compared to results from an analytical model, a so-called full Navier-Stokes implementation in COMSOL Multiphysics and the commercial package FFT ACTRAN which also uses the low reduced frequency model. The triangular tube implementation has been...

  10. Giant thermal Hall effect in multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideue, T.; Kurumaji, T.; Ishiwata, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Multiferroics, in which dielectric and magnetic orders coexist and couple with each other, attract renewed interest for their cross-correlated phenomena, offering a fundamental platform for novel functionalities. Elementary excitations in such systems are strongly affected by the lattice-spin interaction, as exemplified by the electromagnons and the magneto-thermal transport. Here we report an unprecedented coupling between magnetism and phonons in multiferroics, namely, the giant thermal Hall effect. The thermal transport of insulating polar magnets (ZnxFe1-x)2Mo3O8 is dominated by phonons, yet extremely sensitive to the magnetic structure. In particular, large thermal Hall conductivities are observed in the ferrimagnetic phase, indicating unconventional lattice-spin interactions and a new mechanism for the Hall effect in insulators. Our results show that the thermal Hall effect in multiferroic materials can be an effective probe for strong lattice-spin interactions and provide a new tool for magnetic control of thermal currents.

  11. Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Sections of the PalladiumIsotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.; Krticka, M.; McNabb, D.P.; Sleaford, B.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Zs.

    2006-07-17

    Precise gamma-ray thermal neutron capture cross sectionshave been measured at the Budapest Reactor for all elements withZ=1-83,92 except for He and Pm. These measurements and additional datafrom the literature been compiled to generate the Evaluated Gamma-rayActivation File (EGAF), which is disseminated by LBNL and the IAEA. Thesedata are nearly complete for most isotopes with Z<20 so the totalradiative thermal neutron capture cross sections can be determineddirectly from the decay scheme. For light isotopes agreement with therecommended values is generally satisfactory although large discrepanciesexist for 11B, 12,13C, 15N, 28,30Si, 34S, 37Cl, and 40,41K. Neutroncapture decay data for heavier isotopes are typically incomplete due tothe contribution of unresolved continuum transitions so only partialradiative thermal neutron capture cross sections can be determined. Thecontribution of the continuum to theneutron capture decay scheme arisesfrom a large number of unresolved levels and transitions and can becalculated by assuming that the fluctuations in level densities andtransition probabilities are statistical. We have calculated thecontinuum contribution to neutron capture decay for the palladiumisotopes with the Monte Carlo code DICEBOX. These calculations werenormalized to the experimental cross sections deexciting low excitationlevels to determine the total radiative thermal neutron capture crosssection. The resulting palladium cross sections values were determinedwith a precision comparable to the recommended values even when only onegamma-ray cross section was measured. The calculated and experimentallevel feedings could also be compared to determine spin and parityassignments for low-lying levels.

  12. Effects of water and sawdust additives on thermal effusivity, thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of water and sawdust additives on the thermal effusivity (e), thermal conductivity (λ), and durability of cement-stabilized laterites were investigated. The thermal effusivity (e) and conductivity(λ) have direct influ-ence on heat transfer and thermal insulation in buildings, and the parameters were determined by hot ...

  13. Thermal effects in supercapacitors

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Guoping; Fisher, Timothy S

    2015-01-01

    This Brief reviews contemporary research conducted in university and industry laboratories on thermal management in electrochemical energy storage systems (capacitors and batteries) that have been widely used as power sources in many practical applications, such as automobiles, hybrid transport, renewable energy installations, power backup and electronic devices. Placing a particular emphasis on supercapacitors, the authors discuss how supercapacitors, or ultra capacitors, are complementing and  replacing, batteries because of their faster power delivery, longer life cycle and higher coulombic efficiency, while providing higher energy density than conventional electrolytic capacitors. Recent advances in both macro- and micro capacitor technologies are covered. The work facilitates systematic understanding of thermal transport in such devices that can help develop better power management systems.

  14. The thermal neutron scattering cross section of {sup 86}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terburg, B.P.

    1992-05-01

    The availability of 27 1 STP krypton-86 gas, an isotope with unknown thermal neutron scattering cross section, was an excellent occasion to determine the (bound atom) scattering cross section and its coherent part by application of the neutron transmission method and neutron interferometry. The transmission method was applied in a diffractometer, a Larmor spectrometer and a TOF-spectrometer. In addition to {sup 86}Kr also natural krypton ({sup n}Kr) was used for sample in the diffractometer. The diffractometer measurements result in bound atom scattering cross sections {sigma}{sub s}=8.92(46) b for {sup 86}Kr and {sigma}{sub s}=7.08(95) b for {sup n}Kr. The Larmor transmission measurements lead to a final result {sigma}{sub s}=8.44(9) b for {sup 86}Kr. In the TOF-spectrometer the wavelength-dependent total cross section of water was determined. Coherent neutron scattering lengths were determined using the neutron interferometry method with a skew symmetric neutron interferometer. Scans with {sup 86}Kr and {sup n}Kr led to b{sub c}=8.07(26) fm for {sup 86}Kr and 7.72(33) fm for {sup n}Kr, corresponding to coherent scattering cross sections {sigma}{sub c}=8.18(53) b and 7.49(64) b respectively. Due to the large errors in the bound atom scattering cross section and coherent scattering cross section of {sup 86}Kr and {sup n}Kr, the incoherent cross section of both gases, {sigma}{sub i} = 0 within its inaccuracy, {sigma}{sub i}=0.26(54) b for {sup 86}Kr and {sigma}{sub i}=0.41(1.15) b for {sup n}Kr. (orig.).

  15. Characterization of Thermally Cross-Linkable Hollow Fiber Membranes for Natural Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Chien-Chiang

    2013-01-23

    The performance of thermally cross-linkable hollow fiber membranes for CO2/CH4 separation and the membrane stability against CO2 plasticization was investigated. The fiber membranes were thermally cross-linked at various conditions. Cross-linking temperature was found to have a significant effect, while shorter soak time and the presence of trace oxidizer (O2 or N2O) had a negligible effect. The cross-linked fibers were tested using high CO2 content feeds (50-70% CO2) at a variety of feed pressures (up to 1000 psia), temperatures, and permeate pressures (up to 100 psia) to evaluate membrane performance under various realistic operating conditions. The results demonstrated that cross-linking improves membrane selectivity and effectively eliminates swelling-induced hydrocarbon loss at high pressures. Excellent stability under aggressive feeds (with CO2 partial pressure up to 700 psia) suggests that cross-linked hollow fiber membranes have great potential for use in diverse aggressive applications, even beyond the CO2/CH4 example explored in this work. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Study on the Cross Plane Thermal Transport of Polycrystalline Molybdenum Nanofilms by Applying Picosecond Laser Transient Thermoreflectance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Miao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin metal films are widely used as interconnecting wires and coatings in electronic devices and optical components. Reliable thermophysical properties of the films are required from the viewpoint of thermal management. The cross plane thermal transport of four polycrystalline molybdenum nanofilms with different thickness deposited on glass substrates has been studied by applying the picosecond laser transient thermoreflectance technique. The measurement is performed by applying both front pump-front probe and rear pump-front probe configurations with high quality signal. The determined cross plane thermal diffusivity of the Mo films greatly decreases compared to the corresponding bulk value and tends to increase as films become thicker, exhibiting significant size effect. The main mechanism responsible for the thermal diffusivity decrease of the present polycrystalline Mo nanofilms is the grain boundary scattering on the free electrons. Comparing the cross plane thermal diffusivity and inplane electrical conductivity indicates the anisotropy of the transport properties of the Mo films.

  17. Cross-spectrum Measurement of Thermal-noise Limited Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig W.; Howe, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly-used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering noise. It extracts the desired correlated noise from two time series in the presence of uncorrelated interfering noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to AM noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-...

  18. Thermally reversible cross-linked poly(ether-urethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gaina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linked poly(ether-urethanes were prepared by Diels-Alder (DA reaction of the furan-containing poly(ether-urethane to bismaleimides and showed thermal reversibility evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance in conjunction with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. The furan-containing poly(ether-urethanes were synthesized by the polyaddition reaction of 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI or 4,4'- dibenzyl diisocyanate (DBDI to poly(tetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG having Mn = 250, 650, 1000, 1500 and 2000 and 2-[N,N-bis(2-methyl-2-hydroxyethylamino]furfuryl as chain extender by the solution prepolymer method. The molar ratio of isocyanate: PTMEG:chain extender varied from 2:1:1 to 4:1:3, which produces a molar concentration of furyl group ranging between 3.65•10–4 and 1.25•10–3 mol/g.

  19. The Effect of Core Configuration on Thermal Barrier Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Bott, Robert H.; Druesedow, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barriers and seals are integral components in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of nearly all aerospace vehicles. They are used to minimize heat transfer through interfaces and gaps and protect underlying temperature-sensitive components. The core insulation has a significant impact on both the thermal and mechanical properties of compliant thermal barriers. Proper selection of an appropriate core configuration to mitigate conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer through the thermal barrier is challenging. Additionally, optimization of the thermal barrier for thermal performance may have counteracting effects on mechanical performance. Experimental evaluations have been conducted to better understand the effect of insulation density on permeability and leakage performance, which can significantly impact the resistance to convective heat transfer. The effect of core density on mechanical performance was also previously investigated and will be reviewed. Simple thermal models were also developed to determine the impact of various core parameters on downstream temperatures. An extended understanding of these factors can improve the ability to design and implement these critical TPS components.

  20. Thermal conductivity of cross-linked polyethylene from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xue; Yang, Ming; Liu, Changlin; Li, Xiaobo; Tang, Dawei

    2017-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of cross-linked bulk polyethylene is studied using molecular dynamics simulation. The atomic structure of the cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) is generated through simulated bond formation using LAMMPS. The thermal conductivity of PEX is studied with different degrees of crosslinking, chain length, and tensile strain. Generally, the thermal conductivity increases with the increasing degree of crosslinking. When the length of the primitive chain increases, the thermal conductivity increases linearly. When the polymer is stretched along one direction, the thermal conductivity increases in the stretched direction and decreases in the direction perpendicular to it. However, the thermal conductivity varies slightly when the polymer is stretched in three directions simultaneously.

  1. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of {sup 45}Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Thi Hien, Nguyen [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangsoo [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Department of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Manwoo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ{sub 0}) and resonance integral (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (G{sub th}) and resonance (G{sub epi}) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (F{sub g}) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction, with σ{sub o,Au} = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and I{sub o,Au} = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σ{sub o,Sc} = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be I{sub o,Sc} = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  2. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of 45Sc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (Gth) and resonance (Gepi) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (Fg) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction, with σo,Au = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and Io,Au = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σo,Sc = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be Io,Sc = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  3. Thermal neutron capture cross section of gadolinium by pile-oscillation measurements in MINERVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, P.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Hentati, A. [International School in Nuclear Engineering, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01

    Natural gadolinium is used as a burnable poison in most LWR to account for the excess of reactivity of fresh fuels. For an accurate prediction of the cycle length, its nuclear data and especially its neutron capture cross section needs to be known with a high precision. Recent microscopic measurements at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) suggest a 11% smaller value for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd, compared with most of evaluated nuclear data libraries. To solve this inconsistency, we have analyzed several pile-oscillation experiments, performed in the MINERVE reactor. They consist in the measurement of the reactivity variation involved by the introduction in the reactor of small-samples, containing different mass amounts of natural gadolinium. The analysis of these experiments is done through the exact perturbation theory, using the PIMS calculation tool, in order to link the reactivity effect to the thermal capture cross section. The measurement of reactivity effects is used to deduce the 2200 m.s-1 capture cross section of {sup nat}Gd which is (49360 {+-} 790) b. This result is in good agreement with the JEFF3.1.1 value (48630 b), within 1.6% uncertainty at 1{sigma}, but is strongly inconsistent with the microscopic measurements at RPI which give (44200 {+-} 500) b. (authors)

  4. Model development for MODIS thermal band electronic cross-talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiejun; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Li, Yonghong; Brinkmann, Jake; Keller, Graziela; Xiong, Xiaoxiong (Jack)

    2016-10-01

    MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 bands. Among them, 16 thermal emissive bands covering a wavelength range from 3.8 to 14.4 μm. After 16 years on-orbit operation, the electronic crosstalk of a few Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands develop substantial issues which cause biases in the EV brightness temperature measurements and surface feature contamination. The crosstalk effects on band 27 with center wavelength at 6.7 μm and band 29 at 8.5 μm increased significantly in recent years, affecting downstream products such as water vapor and cloud mask. The crosstalk issue can be observed from nearly monthly scheduled lunar measurements, from which the crosstalk coefficients can be derived. Most of MODIS thermal bands are saturated at moon surface temperatures and the development of an alternative approach is very helpful for verification. In this work, a physical model was developed to assess the crosstalk impact on calibration as well as in Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. This model was applied to Terra MODIS band 29 empirically for correction of Earth brightness temperature measurements. In the model development, the detector nonlinear response is considered. The impacts of the electronic crosstalk are assessed in two steps. The first step consists of determining the impact on calibration using the on-board blackbody (BB). Due to the detector nonlinear response and large background signal, both linear and nonlinear coefficients are affected by the crosstalk from sending bands. The crosstalk impact on calibration coefficients was calculated. The second step is to calculate the effects on the Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. The effects include those from affected calibration coefficients and the contamination of Earth view measurements. This model links the measurement bias with crosstalk coefficients, detector nonlinearity, and the ratio of Earth measurements between the sending and receiving bands. The correction

  5. Modeling of Cross-Plane Interface Thermal Conductance Between Graphene Nano-Ribbons (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    to the intrinsic thermal conductance across bi-layer graphene in the limit of no edges, i.e. η∼ 1 or large bi-layer graphene flakes . On the other...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0192 MODELING OF CROSS-PLANE INTERFACE THERMAL CONDUCTANCE BETWEEN GRAPHENE NANO- RIBBONS (POSTPRINT) Ajit K. Roy...MODELING OF CROSS-PLANE INTERFACE THERMAL CONDUCTANCE BETWEEN GRAPHENE NANO-RIBBONS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  6. Late Lutetian Thermal Maximum—Crossing a Thermal Threshold in Earth's Climate System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.; Donner, B.; Frederichs, T.; Kordesch, W. E. C.; Bohaty, S. M.; Hodell, D. A.; Laskar, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2018-01-01

    Recognizing and deciphering transient global warming events triggered by massive release of carbon into Earth's ocean-atmosphere climate system in the past are important for understanding climate under elevated pCO2 conditions. Here we present new high-resolution geochemical records including benthic foraminiferal stable isotope data with clear evidence of a short-lived (30 kyr) warming event at 41.52 Ma. The event occurs in the late Lutetian within magnetochron C19r and is characterized by a ˜2°C warming of the deep ocean in the southern South Atlantic. The magnitudes of the carbon and oxygen isotope excursions of the Late Lutetian Thermal Maximum are comparable to the H2 event (53.6 Ma) suggesting a similar response of the climate system to carbon cycle perturbations even in an already relatively cooler climate several million years after the Early Eocene Climate Optimum. Coincidence of the event with exceptionally high insolation values in the Northern Hemisphere at 41.52 Ma might indicate that Earth's climate system has a thermal threshold. When this tipping point is crossed, rapid positive feedback mechanisms potentially trigger transient global warming. The orbital configuration in this case could have caused prolonged warm and dry season leading to a massive release of terrestrial carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system initiating environmental change.

  7. Thermal flexural analysis of cross-ply laminated plates using trigonometric shear deformation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwaraj Marotrao Ghugal

    Full Text Available Thermal stresses and displacements for orthotropic, two-layer antisymmetric, and three-layer symmetric square cross-ply laminated plates subjected to nonlinear thermal load through the thickness of laminated plates are presented by using trigonometric shear deformation theory. The in-plane displacement field uses sinusoidal function in terms of thickness co-ordinate to include the shear deformation effect. The theory satisfies the shear stress free boundary conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. The present theory obviates the need of shear correction factor. Governing equations and boundary conditions of the theory are obtained using the principle of virtual work. The validity of present theory is verified by comparing the results with those of classical plate theory and first order shear deformation theory and higher order shear deformation theory.

  8. Thermal-hydraulically corrected neutron cross-sections for PWR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, Daniela M.N.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.; Silva, Fernando C., E-mail: dsantiago@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: alvim@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Reactor core simulation codes ought to have a thermal-hydraulics feedback module. This module calculates, among other effects, the fuel temperature thermal-hydraulics feedback, that corrects neutron cross sections. In the nodal code developed at PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, the fuel temperature is obtained through an empirical model. This work presents a physical model to calculate this temperature. A finite volume technique was used to discretize the equation for temperature distribution, while the moderator coefficient of heat transfer was calculated using ASME routines, appended to the developed code. This model allows calculation of an average radial temperature per node, since the thermal-hydraulic feedback must follow the conditions imposed by the nodal code. The results obtained were compared with the ones obtained by the empirical model. The results show that, for fuel elements near core periphery, the empirical model overestimates the temperature in the fuel, as compared to our model, which may indicate that the physical model is more appropriate to calculate the thermal-hydraulic feedback temperatures. (author)

  9. Fire exposed steel columns with a thermal gradient over the cross-section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojeda, O.D.; Maljaars, J.; Abspoel, R.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal gradients often occur in fire exposed structures. This paper considers thermal gradients over the cross-section of steel columns. By means of finite element simulations, the paper demonstrates that these gradients reduce the fiexural buckling resistance of the columns. This is due to the

  10. Effective thermal conductivity of condensed polymeric nanofluids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... scattering at matrix–particle boundaries. These two mechanisms are combined to arrive at an expression for their effective thermal conductivity. Analysis of the results reveals the possibility to tune the thermal conductivity of such nanosolids over a wide range using the right types of nanoparticles and right concentration.

  11. Novel thermally cross-linked polyimide membranes for ethanol dehydration via pervaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. In this work, two novel carboxyl-containing polyimides, 2,2\\'-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride-4,4\\'-diaminodiphenylmethane/3,5-diaminobenzoic acid (6FDA-MDA/DABA, FMD) and 3,3\\',4,4\\'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride-4,4\\'-diaminodiphenylmethane/3,5-diaminobenzoic acid (BTDA-MDA/DABA, BMD), are synthesized via chemical and thermal imidization methods, respectively, and employed as pervaporation membranes for ethanol dehydration. Chemical structures of the two polyimides are examined by FTIR and TGA to confirm the successful synthesis. A post thermal treatment of the polyimide membranes with the temperature range of 250 to 400. °C is applied, and its effects on the membrane morphology and separation performance are studied and characterized by FTIR, TGA, WXRD, solubility and sorption test. It is believed that the thermal treatment of the carboxyl-containing polyimide membrane at a relative low temperature only leads to the physical annealing, while it may cause the decarboxylation-induced cross-linking at a higher temperature. In addition, the operation temperature in pervaporation is also varied and shown to be an important factor to affect the final membrane performance. Performance benchmarking shows that the developed polyimide membranes both have superior pervaporation performance to most other flat-sheet dense membranes. This work is believed to shed useful insights on polyimide membranes for pervaporation applications.

  12. Thermal Bridge Effects in Walls Separating Rowhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures.......In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures....

  13. Thermal effects on PLATO point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullieuszik, Marco; Magrin, Demetrio; Greggio, Davide; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Bergomi, Maria; Biondi, Federico; Chinellato, Simonetta; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Marafatto, Luca; Viotto, Valentina; Munari, Matteo; Pagano, Isabella; Sicilia, Daniela; Basso, Stefano; Borsa, Francesco; Ghigo, Mauro; Spiga, Daniele; Bandy, Thimoty; Benz, Willy; Brändli, Mathias; Bruno, Giordano; De Roche, Thierry; Piazza, Daniele; Rieder, Martin; Brandeker, Alexis; Klebor, Maximilian; Mogulsky, Valery; Schweitzer, Mario; Wieser, Matthias; Erikson, Anders; Rauer, Heike

    2016-07-01

    Thermal effects in PLATO are analyzed in terms of uniform temperature variations, longitudinal and lateral temperature gradients. We characterize these effects by evaluating the PSF centroid shifts and the Enclosed Energy variations across the whole FoV. These patterns can then be used to gauge the thermal behavior of each individual telescope in order to improve the local photometric calibration across the PLATO field of view.

  14. On the treatment of resonance cross sections in thermal reactor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the mathematical models and methods used for calculating resonance cross sections in the resonance region of the neutron energy spectrum. Particular attention has been paid to the treatment outlined in the WIMSD/4 version of the WIMS lattice transport code. The significance of the resonance ...

  15. Determination of the 243,246,248Cm thermal neutron induced fission cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serot, O.; Wagemans, C.; Vermote, S.; Heyse, J.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.

    2005-11-01

    The minor actinide waste produced in nuclear power plants contains various Cm-isotopes, and transmutation scenarios require improved fission cross section data. The available thermal neutron induced fission cross section data for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm are not very accurate, so new cross section measurements have been performed at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble (France) under better experimental conditions (highly enriched samples, very intense and clean neutron beam). The measurements were performed at a neutron energy of 5.38 meV, yielding fission cross section values of (1240±28)b for 243Cm, (25±47)mb for 246Cm and (685±84)mb for 248Cm. From these results, thermal fission cross section values of (572±14)b; (12±25)mb and (316±43)mb have been deduced for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm, respectively.

  16. Thermal stresses and deflections of cross-ply laminated plates using refined plate theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdeir, A. A.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    Exact analytical solutions of refined plate theories are developed to study the thermal stresses and deflections of cross-ply rectangular plates. The state-space approach in conjunction with the Levy method is used to solve exactly the governing equations of the theories under various boundary conditions. Numerical results of the higher-order theory of Reddy for thermal stresses and deflections are compared with those obtained using the classical and first-order plate theories.

  17. Neutron Capture by Cadmium: Thermal Cross Sections and Resonance Integrals of ^106,108,110,112,114,116Cd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicking, Allison M.; Krane, Kenneth S.

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the stable, even-mass Cd isotopes (A = 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, and 116) have been previously measured in sources of natural abundance or low enrichment, often making the results uncertain owing to the large absorption cross section of naturally occurring ^113Cd. Ambiguities in values of the isomeric branching ratios have also contributed to uncertainties in previous results. We have remeasured the Cd neutron capture cross sections using samples of greater than 90% isotopic enrichment irradiated in the OSU TRIGA reactor. Gamma-ray emission spectra were analyzed to determine the effective resonance integrals and thermal cross sections leading to eight radioactive ground and isomeric states in the Cd isotopes.

  18. Cross-tools and cross-media effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorveld, H.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of persuasive messages depend on the content of the message itself and on the media or tools that deliver the persuasive messages. Nowadays almost all campaigns make use of multiple media or multiple promotional tools. Therefore, it is important to study so-called cross-media (or

  19. Pickering emulsions stabilized by whey protein nanoparticles prepared by thermal cross-linking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Luhai; Wang, Ze; Yan, Xinzhong; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    A Pickering (o/w) emulsion was formed and stabilized by whey protein isolate nanoparticles (WPI NPs). Those WPI NPs were prepared by thermal cross-linking of denatured WPI proteins within w/o emulsion droplets at 80. °C for 15. min. During heating of w/o emulsions containing 10% (w/v) WPI

  20. Thermal Bridge Effects in Window Grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report thermal bridge effects in window grooves are analyzed. The analysis is performed using different thicknesses of the window groove insulation, to evaluate what the optimal solution is.All analysis in the report is performed using both 2- and 3-dimensional numerical analysis....

  1. Microlevel thermal effects in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    A method for studying the influence of thermal effects on the inelastic response of metal matrix composites is reviewed. A micromechanics approach based upon the method of cells is shown to be quite versatile for studying a variety of materials response phenomena. Yielding and inelastic response of the composite are predicted as functions of thermal stresses, yielding of the matrix, and imperfect fiber/matrix bonding. Results are presented in the form of yield surfaces and nonlinear stress-strain curves for unidirectional and laminated boron/aluminum and silicon-carbide/titanium.

  2. Measurements of effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energy of continuum beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisao [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Inst. for Atomic Energy

    1998-03-01

    Two practically useful quantities are introduced in this study to characterize a continuum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in field of quantitative neutron radiography: an effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section defined at the monochromatic energy. The effective energy was evaluated by means of energy dependence of ETM cross section. To realize the method a beam quality indicator (BQI) has been proposed recently. Several effective energies were measured for non-filtered, filtered neutron beams, and outputs of neutron guide tubes in world by the BQI. A thermal neutron beam and three beams modulated by Pb filters with different thicknesses are studied to measure ETM cross sections for various materials and summarized in a table. Validity of the effective energy determined by the BQI is discussed relating with ETM cross sections of materials. (author)

  3. Ultrasound thermal mapping based on a hybrid method combining cross-correlation and zero-crossing tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang-Wei; Lien, Der-Hsien; Chen, Ben-Ting; Shieh, Jay; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid method for estimating temperature with spatial mapping using diagnostic ultrasound, based on detection of echo shifts from tissue undergoing thermal treatment, is proposed. Cross-correlation and zero-crossing tracking are two conventional algorithms used for detecting echo shifts, but their practical applications are limited. The proposed hybrid method combines the advantages of both algorithms with improved accuracy in temperature estimation. In vitro experiments were performed on porcine muscle for preliminary validation and temperature calibration. In addition, thermal mapping of rabbit thigh muscle in vivo during high-intensity focused ultrasound heating was conducted. Results from the in vitro experiments indicated that the difference between the estimated temperature change by the proposed hybrid method and the actual temperature change measured by the thermocouple was generally less than 1 °C when the increase in temperature due to heating was less than 10 °C. For the in vivo study, the area predicted to experience the highest temperature coincided well with the focal point of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer. The computational efficiency of the hybrid algorithm was similar to that of the fast cross-correlation algorithm, but with an improved accuracy. The proposed hybrid method could provide an alternative means for non-invasive monitoring of limited temperature changes during hyperthermia therapy.

  4. Effects of radiant temperature on thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atmaca, Ibrahim; Kaynakli, Omer; Yigit, Abdulvahap [Uludag University, Bursa (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the local differences between body segments caused by high radiant temperature, and to analyze the interior surface temperatures for different wall and ceiling constructions with their effect on thermal comfort. For the segment-wise thermal interactions between human body and its surrounding, simulations have been conducted by appropriately modifying Gagge 2-node model to multi-segment case to demonstrate the local differences. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental and simulation results reported in the literature. To calculate the interior surface temperatures of the wall and ceiling, the sol-air temperature approach is used for convenience. It is shown in the paper that the body segments close the relatively hot surfaces are more affected than others and interior surface temperatures of un-insulated walls and ceilings exposed to a strong solar radiation reach high levels, all of which cause thermal discomfort for the occupants in buildings. (author)

  5. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. Corneal collagen cross-linking in the stabilization of PRK, LASIK, thermal keratoplasty, and orthokeratology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michelle K; Chuck, Roy S

    2013-07-01

    To describe the use of corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) and its efficacy in the stabilization of keratorefractive procedures, including PRK, laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK), thermal keratoplasty, and orthokeratology. Since its introduction, CXL has quickly gained interest in the treatment of ectactic disorders due to its ability to increase the biomechanical stability of the cornea. In its earliest use, it has shown to be effective in the treatment of both keratoconus and post-LASIK ectasia. More recent studies of CXL in combination with keratorefractive procedures have shown varying degrees of success. CXL with PRK has shown to be effective in slowing or halting the progression of keratoconus, pellucid marginal degeneration, and post-LASIK ectasia, in addition to potentially decreasing or delaying the need for penetrating keratoplasty. Several small case series have also demonstrated improved stability and efficacy of PRK and LASIK when combined with CXL, as well as a potentially decreased risk of postprocedure ectasia. In conjunction with thermokeratoplasty and orthokeratology, CXL has shown improved but only temporary results in the treatment of keratoconus. Future studies are needed to determine the efficacy and long-term stability of CXL in combination with keratorefractive procedures, as well as to address possible complications.

  7. Scaling thermal effects in radial flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, R. T.; Guenther, R. B.; Roley, K. L.; McDougal, W. G.

    To adequately evaluate the environmental impact of siting nuclear waste repositories in basalt aquicludes, it is essential to know the effects on parameter identification algorithms of thermal gradients that exist in these basaltic aquicludes. Temperatures of approximately 60°C and pressures of approximately 150 atm can be expected at potential repository sites located at depths of approximately 1000 m. The phenomenon of over-recovery has been observed in some pumping tests conducted at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation located in the Pasco Basin adjacent to the Columbia River in the state of Washington, USA. This over-recovery phenomenon may possibly be due to variations in the fluid density caused by thermal gradients. To assess the potential effects of these thermal gradients on indirect parameter identification algorithms, a systematic scaling of the governing field equations is required in order to obtain dimensionless equations based on the principle of similarity. The constitutive relationships for the specific weight of the fluid and for the porosity of the aquiclude are shown to be exponentially dependent on the pressure gradient. The dynamic pressure is converted to the piezometric head and the flow equation for the piezometric head is then scaled in radial coordinates. Order-of-magnitude estimates are made for all variables in unsteady flow for a typical well test in a basaltic aquiclude. Retaining all nonlinear terms, the parametric dependency of the flow equation on the classical dimensionless thermal and hydraulic parameters is demonstrated. These classical parameters include the Batchelor, Fourier, Froude, Grashof, and Reynolds Numbers associated with thermal flows. The flow equation is linearized from order-of-magnitude estimates based on these classical parameters for application in parameter identification algorithms.

  8. Effects of insular stimulation on thermal nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, D J; Marouf, R; Rainville, P; Bouthillier, A; Nguyen, D K

    2016-05-01

    Electrical stimulation used for brain mapping in the postero-superior insula can evoke pain. The effects of prolonged high frequency insular stimulation on pain thresholds are unknown. Prolonged high frequency insular stimulation, by virtue of its inhibitory properties on networks, could decrease thermal nociception. Epileptic subjects had electrodes implanted in the insular cortex for the purpose of epileptic focus resection. Thermal and pressure nociceptive thresholds were tested bilaterally on the forearm on two consecutive days. Randomly assigned double-blind high frequency (150 Hz) insular stimulation took place for 10 min before pain testing either on the first day or on the second day. Six subjects (three females; mean age of 35 years) were included. Insular stimulation increased heat pain threshold on the ipsilateral (p = 0.003; n = 6) and contralateral sides (p = 0.047; n = 6). Differences in cold pain threshold did not reach statistical significance (ipsilateral: p = 0.341, contralateral: p = 0.143; n = 6), but one subject had a profound decrease in both heat and cold pain responses. Pressure pain threshold was not modified by insular stimulation (ipsilateral: p = 0.1123; contralateral: p = 0.1192; n = 6). Two of the three subjects who had a postero-superior operculo-insulectomy developed central pain with contralateral thermal nociceptive deficit. High frequency inhibitory postero-superior insular stimulation may have the potential to decrease thermal nociception. Together with previous studies, our data support the notion that the integrity of this brain region is necessary for thermal but not pressure nociceptive processing. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  9. Thermal effects in microfluidics with thermal conductivity spatially modulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Toro, Agustín.

    2014-05-01

    A heat transfer model on a microfluidic is resolved analytically. The model describes a fluid at rest between two parallel plates where each plate is maintained at a differentially specified temperature and the thermal conductivity of the microfluidic is spatially modulated. The heat transfer model in such micro-hydrostatic configuration is analytically resolved using the technique of the Laplace transform applying the Bromwich Integral and the Residue theorem. The temperature outline in the microfluidic is presented as an infinite series of Bessel functions. It is shown that the result for the thermal conductivity spatially modulated has as a particular case the solution when the thermal conductivity is spatially constant. All computations were performed using the computer algebra software Maple. It is claimed that the analytical obtained results are important for the design of nanoscale devices with applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, it is suggested some future research lines such as the study of the heat transfer model in a microfluidic resting between coaxial cylinders with radially modulated thermal conductivity in order to achieve future developments in this area.

  10. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  11. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  12. Effective thermal conductivity of a thin composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, P.E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Niemann, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thickness. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relatively low thermal conductivity. Results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity increases with decreasing thickness, while above the threshold the thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between filler and matrix thermal conductivities.

  13. Physical effects of thermal pollution in lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Râman Vinnâ, Love; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic heat emissions into inland waters influence water temperature and affect stratification, heat and nutrient fluxes, deep water renewal, and biota. Given the increased thermal stress on these systems by growing cooling demands of riparian/coastal infrastructures in combination with climate warming, the question arises on how to best monitor and manage these systems. In this study, we investigate local and system-wide physical effects on the medium-sized perialpine Lake Biel (Switzerland), influenced by point-source cooling water emission from an upstream nuclear power plant (heat emission ˜700 MW, ˜18 W m-2 lake wide). We use one-dimensional (SIMSTRAT) and three-dimensional (Delft3D-Flow) hydrodynamic numerical simulations and provide model resolution guidelines for future studies of thermal pollution. The effects on Lake Biel by the emitted excess heat are summarized as: (i) clear seasonal trend in temperature increase, locally up to 3.4°C and system-wide volume mean ˜0.3°C, which corresponds to one decade of regional surface water climate warming; (ii) the majority of supplied thermal pollution (˜60%) leaves this short residence time (˜58 days) system via the main outlet, whereas the remaining heat exits to the atmosphere; (iii) increased length of stratified period due to the stabilizing effects of additional heat; (iv) system-wide effects such as warmer temperature, prolonged stratified period, and river-caused epilimnion flushing are resolved by both models whereas local raised temperature and river short circuiting was only identifiable with the three-dimensional model approach. This model-based method provides an ideal tool to assess man-made impacts on lakes and their downstream outflows.

  14. Experimental investigation on the thermal performance of Si micro-heat pipe with different cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidnia, Mohammad; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Congming

    2017-10-01

    Increasing component densities of the integrated circuit (IC) and packaging levels has led to thermal management problems. Si substrates with embedded micro-heat pipes (MHPs) couple good thermal characteristics and cost savings associated with IC batch processing. The thermal performance of MHP is intimately related to the cross-sectional geometry. Different cross-sections are designed in order to enhance the backflow of working fluid. In this experimental study, three different Si MHPs with same hydraulic diameter and various cross-sections are fabricated by micro-fabrication methods and tested under different conditions of fluid charge ratios. The results show that the trapezoidal MHP associated with rectangular artery which is charged with 40% of vapor chamber’s volume has the best thermal performance. This silicon-based MHP is a passive approach for thermal management, which could widen applications in the commercial electronics industry and LED lightings.

  15. Crossing the Traditional Boundaries: Salen-Based Schiff Bases for Thermal Protective Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Anil D; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Bellayer, Séverine; Bourbigot, Serge

    2015-09-30

    A broad spectrum of applications of "Salen"-based Schiff bases tagged them as versatile multifunctional materials. However, their applicability is often bounded by a temperature threshold and, thus, they have rarely been used for high temperature applications. Our investigation of a classical Schiff base, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)ethylenediamine (L2), reveals that it displays an intriguingly combative response to an elevated temperature/fire scenario. L2 resists and regulates thermal degradation by forming an ablative surface, and acts as a thermal shield. A polycondensation via covalent cross-linking, which forms a hyperbranched cross-linked resin is found to constitute the origin of the ablative surface. This is a unique example of a resin formation produced with a Schiff base, that mimicks the operational strategy of a high-heat resistant phenolic resin. Further applicability of L2, as a flame retardant, was tested in an engineering polymer, polyamide-6. It was found that it reinforces the polymer against fire risks by the formation of an intumescent coating. This paves the way for a new strategic avenue in safeguarding polymeric materials toward fire risks. Further, this material represents a promising start for thermal protective applications.

  16. Comparative investigation of thermal and mechanical properties of cross-linked epoxy polymers with different curing agents by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyranpour, F; Alahyarizadeh, Gh; Arab, B

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to predict the thermal and mechanical properties of the cross-linked epoxy system composed of DGEBA resin and the curing agent TETA. To investigate the effects of curing agents, a comprehensive and comparative study was also performed on the thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA epoxy systems such as density, glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and elastic properties of different cross-linking densities and different temperatures. The results indicated that the glass transition temperature of DGEBA/TETA system calculated through density-temperature data, ∼ 385-395 °K, for the epoxy system with the cross-linking density of 62.5% has a better agreement with the experimental value (Tg, ∼ 400 °K) in comparison to the value calculated through the variation of cell volume in terms of temperature, 430-440 °K. They also indicated that CTE related parameters and elastic properties including Young, Bulk, and shear's moduli, and Poisson's ratio have a relative agreement with the experimental results. Comparison between the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy systems of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA showed that the DGEBA/DETDA has a higher Tg in all cross linking densities than that of DGEBA/TETA, while higher mechanical properties was observed in the case of DGEBA/TETA in almost all cross linking densities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effect of Thermal Mass on Annual Heat Load and Thermal Comfort in Cold Climate Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Vanessa; Kotol, Martin; Grunau, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Thermal mass in building construction refers to a building material's ability to absorb and release heat based on changing environmental conditions. In building design, materials with high thermal mass used in climates with a diurnal temperature swing around the interior set-point temperature have...... been shown to reduce the annual heating demand. However, few studies exist regarding the effects of thermal mass in cold climates. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of high thermal mass on the annual heat demand and thermal comfort in a typical Alaskan residence using energy...... that while increased thermal mass does have advantages in all climates, such as a decrease in summer overheating, it is not an effective strategy for decreasing annual heat demand in typical residential buildings in Alaska. (C) 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers....

  18. Thermal performance of nuclear fuel rod with a Jacobian elliptic cross sectional form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Joao B. de; Tu, Carlos C.C.; Abe, Luciano [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Sistemas Mecanicos], e-mail: jbaguiar@usp.br, e-mail: carlcctu@usp.br, e-mail: Luciano.abe@poli.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    Boiling water reactors, BWR, commercially use fuel rods with a circular cross section. Set the operational conditions as well as the distribution of these rods, a specific power is established. Changing this form while conserving the cross sectional area may deliver a better performance. This fact is investigated here for a family of elliptic forms, in a thermal sense, using the finite element method. Two limiting values are considered: the melting temperature of the fuel and the critical flux rate. For 2 d models, gains of the order of twenty percent in performance are estimated. It is also perceived the advantage of this alteration in other form of reactor, and discussed means of addressing other aspects of the problem. (author)

  19. Effects of Screening on the Thermal Resistivity And Compressibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Models for computing thermal resistivity, compressibility ratio, and screening parameter of metals was developed and used to study the effects of screening on the thermal resistivity and compressibility ratio of metals. The results obtained revealed that the thermal resistivity of metals increases with an increase in the electron ...

  20. An effective thermal circuit model for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-C.; Zhang, Kun

    2011-08-01

    A physics-based thermal circuit model is developed for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog circuits. The circuit model integrates a non-isothermal device thermal circuit with interconnect thermal networks and is validated with high accuracy against finite element simulations in different layout structures. The non-isothermal circuit model is implemented in BSIMSOI to account for self-heating effect (SHE) in a Spice simulator, and applied to electro-thermal simulation of an SOI cascode current mirror constructed using different layouts. Effects of layout design on electric and thermal behaviors are investigated in detail. Influences of BOX thickness are also examined. It has been shown that the proposed non-isothermal approach is able to effectively account for influences of layout design, self-heating, high temperature gradients along the islands, interconnect temperature distributions, thermal coupling, and heat losses via BOX and interconnects, etc., in SOI current mirror structures. The model provides basic concepts and thermal circuits that can be extended to develop an effective model for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog ICs.

  1. Determination of thermally induced effects and design guidelines of optomechanical accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qianbo; Bai, Jian; Wang, Kaiwei; Jiao, Xufen; Han, Dandan; Chen, Peiwen; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Yang, Guoguang

    2017-11-01

    Thermal effects, including thermally induced deformation and warm up time, are ubiquitous problems for sensors, especially for inertial measurement units such as accelerometers. Optomechanical accelerometers, which contain light sources that can be regarded as heat sources, involve a different thermal phenomenon in terms of their specific optical readout, and the phenomenon has not been investigated systematically. This paper proposes a model to evaluate the temperature difference, rise time and thermally induced deformation of optomechanical accelerometers, and then constructs design guidelines which can diminish these thermal effects without compromising other mechanical performances, based on the analysis of the interplay of thermal and mechanical performances. In the model, the irradiation of the micromachined structure of a laser source is considered a dominant factor. The experimental data obtained using a prototype of an optomechanical accelerometer approximately confirm the validity of the model for the rise time and response tendency. Moreover, design guidelines that adopt suspensions with a flat cross-section and a short length are demonstrated with reference to the analysis. The guidelines can reduce the thermally induced deformation and rise time or achieve higher mechanical performances with similar thermal effects, which paves the way for the design of temperature-tolerant and robust, high-performance devices.

  2. Effect of thermal state and thermal comfort on cycling performance in the heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze, E.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Levels, K.; Casadio, J.R.; Plews, D.J.; Kliding, A.E.; Siegel, R.; Laursen, P.B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of thermal state and thermal comfort on cycling performance in the heat. Methods: Seven well-trained male triathletes completed 3 performance trials consisting of 60 min cycling at a fixed rating of perceived exertion (14) followed immediately by a 20-km time trial

  3. How to measure thermal effects of personal cooling systems : Human, thermal manikin and human simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Psikuta, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Rossi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects, such as cooling power and thermophysiological responses initiated upon application of a personal cooling system, can be assessed with (i) humans, (ii) a thermal manikin and (iii) a thermophysiological human simulator. In order to compare these methods, a cooling shirt (mild cooling)

  4. Thermal neutron capture cross sections resonance integrals and g-factors

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, S F

    2003-01-01

    The thermal radiative capture cross sections and resonance integrals of elements and isotopes with atomic numbers from 1 to 83 (as well as sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U) have been re-evaluated by taking into consideration all known pertinent data published since 1979. This work has been undertaken as part of an IAEA co-ordinated research project on 'Prompt capture gamma-ray activation analysis'. Westcott g-factors for radiative capture cross sections at a temperature of 300K were computed by utilizing the INTER code and ENDF-B/VI (Release 8) library files. The temperature dependence of the Westcott g-factor is illustrated for sup 1 sup 1 sup 3 Cd, sup 1 sup 2 sup 4 Xe and sup 1 sup 5 sup 7 Gd at temperatures of 150, 294 and 400K. Comparisons have also been made of the newly evaluated capture cross sections of sup 6 Li, sup 7 Li, sup 1 sup 2 C and sup 2 sup 0 sup 7 Pb with those determined by the k sub 0 method.

  5. Transient thermal effects in Alpine permafrost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Noetzli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In high mountain areas, permafrost is important because it influences the occurrence of natural hazards, because it has to be considered in construction practices, and because it is sensitive to climate change. The assessment of its distribution and evolution is challenging because of highly variable conditions at and below the surface, steep topography and varying climatic conditions. This paper presents a systematic investigation of effects of topography and climate variability that are important for subsurface temperatures in Alpine bedrock permafrost. We studied the effects of both, past and projected future ground surface temperature variations on the basis of numerical experimentation with simplified mountain topography in order to demonstrate the principal effects. The modeling approach applied combines a distributed surface energy balance model and a three-dimensional subsurface heat conduction scheme. Results show that the past climate variations that essentially influence present-day permafrost temperatures at depth of the idealized mountains are the last glacial period and the major fluctuations in the past millennium. Transient effects from projected future warming, however, are likely larger than those from past climate conditions because larger temperature changes at the surface occur in shorter time periods. We further demonstrate the accelerating influence of multi-lateral warming in steep and complex topography for a temperature signal entering the subsurface as compared to the situation in flat areas. The effects of varying and uncertain material properties (i.e., thermal properties, porosity, and freezing characteristics on the subsurface temperature field were examined in sensitivity studies. A considerable influence of latent heat due to water in low-porosity bedrock was only shown for simulations over time periods of decades to centuries. At the end, the model was applied to the topographic setting of the Matterhorn

  6. Thermal Radiation Effects on Thermal Explosion in Polydisperse Fuel Spray-Probabilistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Navea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of thermal radiation on the dynamics of a thermal explosion of polydisperse fuel spray with a complete description of the chemistry via a single-step two-reactant model of general order. The polydisperse spray is modeled using a Probability Density Function (PDF. The thermal radiation energy exchange between the evaporation surface of the fuel droplets and the burning gas is described using the Marshak boundary conditions. An explicit expression of the critical condition for thermal explosion limit is derived analytically and represents a generalization of the critical parameter of the classical Semenov theory. Because we investigated the model in the range where the temperature is very high, the effect of the thermal radiation is significant.

  7. The coke drum thermal kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldescu, Maria M.; Romero, Sim; Larson, Mel [KBC Advanced Technologies plc, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The coke drum thermal kinetic dynamics fundamentally affect the coker unit yields as well as the coke product properties and unit reliability. In the drum the thermal cracking and polymerization or condensation reactions take place in a semi-batch environment. Understanding the fundamentals of the foaming kinetics that occur in the coke drums is key to avoiding a foam-over that could result in a unit shutdown for several months. Although the most dynamic changes with time occur during drum filling, other dynamics of the coker process will be discussed as well. KBC has contributed towards uncovering and modelling the complexities of heavy oil thermal dynamics. (author)

  8. The effect of leucite crystallization and thermal history on thermal expansion measurement of dental porcelains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajotia, Sharukh Soli

    1997-12-01

    Objectives. Measurement of thermal expansion in glassy materials is complicated by thermal history effects. The purpose of this research was to determine whether the occurrence of structural relaxation in glassy materials, such as dental porcelains, and changes in porcelain leucite content could interfere with the accurate measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion during the thermal expansion measurement itself. Methods. In a randomized design, thermal expansion specimens were fabricated using six commercial body porcelains and the leucite-containing Component No. 1 frit (Weinstein et al. patent, 1962), and subjected to one of the following heat treatments: a single heating run at 3sp°C/min in a conventional dilatometer followed by air quenching; three successive low-rate heating and cooling thermal expansion runs at 3sp°C/min in a conventional dilatometer; or three successive high-rate heating and cooling thermal expansion runs at 600sp°C/min in a laser dilatometer. The remaining specimens were left untreated and served as controls. Potential changes in porcelain leucite content were monitored via quantitative X-ray diffraction. Thermal expansion data for each run over a temperature range of 25-500sp°C and the leucite content of all specimens were subjected to repeated measures analysis of variance. Results. The thermal expansion coefficient measured on first slow heating was significantly lower than the values for succeeding low-rate heating and cooling runs in all materials (p $ 0.05). No significant effect of dilatometer thermal treatments on leucite content (p >$ 0.05) was shown for all materials studied using both dilatometers. Significance. The crystallization of additional amounts of leucite during thermal expansion runs can be ruled out as a possible interference in the determination of the thermal expansion coefficient of dental porcelain. Conventional dilatometer measurements exhibited structural relaxation during the first heating run, as

  9. Anisotropic fibrous thermal insulator of relatively thick cross section and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Carl D.; Ardary, Zane L.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an anisotropic thermal insulator formed of carbon-bonded organic or inorganic fibers and having a thickness or cross section greater than about 3 centimeters. Delaminations and deleterious internal stresses generated during binder curing and carbonizing operations employed in the fabrication of thick fibrous insulation of thicknesses greater than 3 centimeters are essentially obviated by the method of the present invention. A slurry of fibers, thermosetting resin binder and water is vacuum molded into the selected insulator configuration with the total thickness of the molded slurry being less than about 3 centimeters, the binder is thermoset to join the fibers together at their nexaes, and then the binder is carbonized to form the carbon bond. A second slurry of the fibers, binder and water is then applied over the carbonized body with the vacuum molding, binder thermosetting and carbonizing steps being repeated to form a layered insulator with the binder providing a carbon bond between the layers. The molding, thermosetting and carbonizing steps may be repeated with additional slurries until the thermal insulator is of the desired final thickness. An additional feature of the present invention is provided by incorporating opacifying materials in any of the desired layers so as to provide different insulating properties at various temperatures. Concentration and/or type of additive can be varied from layer-to-layer.

  10. Thermally activated superradiance and intersystem crossing in the water-soluble chlorophyll binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, T; Madjet, M E; Müh, F; Trostmann, I; Schmitt, F-J; Theiss, C; Paulsen, H; Eichler, H J; Knorr, A; Renger, G

    2009-07-23

    The crystal structure of the class IIb water-soluble chlorophyll binding protein (WSCP) from Lepidium virginicum is used to model linear absorption and circular dichroism spectra as well as excited state decay times of class IIa WSCP from cauliflower reconstituted with chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b. The close agreement between theory and experiment suggests that both types of WSCP share a common Chl binding motif, where the opening angle between pigment planes in class IIa WSCP should not differ by more than 10 degrees from that in class IIb. The experimentally observed (Schmitt et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 13951) decrease in excited state lifetime of Chl a homodimers with increasing temperature is fully explained by thermally activated superradiance via the upper exciton state of the dimer. Whereas a temperature-independent intersystem crossing (ISC) rate is inferred for WSCP containing Chl a homodimers, that of WSCP with Chl b homodimers is found to increase above 100 K. Our quantum chemical/electrostatic calculations suggest that a thermally activated ISC via an excited triplet state T4 is responsible for the latter temperature dependence.

  11. Revisiting the U-238 thermal capture cross section and gamma-raymission probabilities from Np-239 decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Firestone,R.B.; Pronyaev, V.G.; Nichols, A.L.; Moxon, M.C.

    2005-03-03

    The precise value of the thermal capture cross section of238U is uncertain, and evaluated cross sections from various sourcesdiffer by more than their assigned uncertainties. A number of theoriginal publications have been reviewed to assess the discrepant data,corrections were made for more recent standard cross sections andotherconstants, and one new measurement was analyzed. Due to the strongcorrelations in activation measurements, the gamma-ray emissionprobabilities from the beta decay of 239Np were also analyzed. As aresult of the analysis, a value of 2.683 +- 0.012 barns was derived forthe thermal capture cross section of 238U. A new evaluation of thegamma-ray emission probabilities from 239Np decay was alsoundertaken.

  12. Crystallite Size Effect on Thermal Conductive Properties of Nonwoven Nanocellulose Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetani, Kojiro; Okada, Takumi; Oyama, Hideko T

    2015-07-13

    The thermal conductive properties, including the thermal diffusivity and resultant thermal conductivity, of nonwoven nanocellulose sheets were investigated by separately measuring the thermal diffusivity of the sheets in the in-plane and thickness directions with a periodic heating method. The cross-sectional area (or width) of the cellulose crystallites was the main determinant of the thermal conductive properties. Thus, the results strongly indicate that there is a crystallite size effect on phonon conduction within the nanocellulose sheets. The results also indicated that there is a large interfacial thermal resistance between the nanocellulose surfaces. The phonon propagation velocity (i.e., the sound velocity) within the nanocellulose sheets was estimated to be ∼800 m/s based on the relationship between the thermal diffusivities and crystallite widths. The resulting in-plane thermal conductivity of the tunicate nanocellulose sheet was calculated to be ∼2.5 W/mK, markedly higher than other plastic films available for flexible electronic devices.

  13. A method for measuring macroscopic cross-sections for thermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Abd, A; Taha, G; Ellithi, A Y

    2017-10-01

    A method was proposed for measuring macroscopic absorption and scattering cross-sections for thermal neutrons. It is based on a Pu-Be neutron source and He-3 neutron detectors assembly. A beam of neutrons was obtained from the source imbedded in a water tank. The He-3 detectors oriented inside the sample and at 180° and 0° with respect to the incident neutron beam were used to register neutrons after interaction with the samples. Neutron count rates (detectors responses) were obtained for large (5.5l) as well as small (1.3l) volumes of standard samples. Sensitivities of the results obtained for the large and small samples were compared. A semi-empirical model was proposed to fit the results. It describes the relative detector responses in terms of a dimensionless variable which depends on the geometrical parameters and cross section of the standard samples used. The model successfully fits the results obtained. Advantages and limitations of the method were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth. PMID:27682115

  15. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likozar, Blaz, E-mail: blaz.likozar@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Major, Zoltan, E-mail: zoltan.major@jku.at [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 x 10{sup 28} m{sup -3}), density (maximally 1.16 g cm{sup -3}), and tear strength (11.2 kN m{sup -1}), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  16. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  17. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T. [Swinburne Sarawak Research Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Computing & Science, Swinburne University of Technology Sarawak Campus, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering.

  18. Effects of Strand Lay Direction and Crossing Angle on Tribological Behavior of Winding Hoist Rope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-dong Chang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction and wear behavior exists between hoisting ropes that are wound around the drums of a multi-layer winding hoist. It decreases the service life of ropes and threatens mine safety. In this research, a series of experiments were conducted using a self-made test rig to study the effects of the strand lay direction and crossing angle on the winding rope’s tribological behavior. Results show that the friction coefficient in the steady-state period shows a decreasing tendency with an increase of the crossing angle in both cross directions, but the variation range is different under different cross directions. Using thermal imaging, the high temperature regions always distribute along the strand lay direction in the gap between adjacent strands, as the cross direction is the same with the strand lay direction (right cross contact. Additionally, the temperature rise in the steady-state increases with the increase of the crossing angle in both cross directions. The differences of the wear scar morphology are obvious under different cross directions, especially for the large crossing angle tests. In the case of right cross, the variation range of wear mass loss is larger than that in left cross. The damage that forms on the wear surface is mainly ploughing, pits, plastic deformation, and fatigue fracture. The major wear mechanisms are adhesive wear, and abrasive and fatigue wear.

  19. Effect of thermal treatment on Zn nanodisks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acuña-Avila, Pedro E., E-mail: pacunaa004@alumno.uaemex.mx; López, Roberto; Vigueras-Santiago, Enrique; Hernández-López, Susana; Camacho-López, Marco [Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA). Facultad de Química de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Paseo Colón esquina Paseo Tollocan C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de México, México (Mexico); Ornelas-Gutierrez, Carlos; Antunez, Wilber [Centro de investigación en Materiales Avanzados S. C. (CIMAV). Miguel de Cervantes N° 120. C.P. 31109. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    Metallic Zn nanodisks with hexagonal morphology were obtained onto glass substrate under vacuum thermal evaporation. A thermal characterization of Zn nanodiks showed a lower oxidation temperature than source powder Zn. Different thermal treatment on Zn nanodisks played an important role on the morphology, crystal size and surface vibrational modes of ZnO. The growth of ZnO nanoneedles started at the edge of metallic zinc hexagonal structures according with SEM images, the higher temperature the longer needles were grown. XRD diffractogram confirmed the wurtzite structure of ZnO with metallic nuclei. A wide band between 530 and 580 cm{sup −1} of Raman scattering corresponded at surface vibrational modes not observed at higher temperature.

  20. Time-dependent thermal effects in GRB afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postnov, K.A.; Blinnikov, S.I.; Kosenko, D.I.; Sorokina, E.I

    2004-06-01

    Time-dependent thermal effects should accompany standard non-thermal afterglows of GRB when {gamma}-rays pass through inhomogeneous surroundings of the GRB site. Thermal relaxation of an optically thin plasma is calculated using time-dependent collisional ionization of the plasma ion species. X-ray emission lines are similar to those found in the fading X-ray afterglow of GRB 011211. Thermal relaxation of clouds or shells around the GRB site could also contribute to the varying late optical GRB afterglows, such as in GRB 021004 and GRB 030329.

  1. Pulsed pump: Thermal effects in solid state lasers under super ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 67; Issue 6. Pulsed ... Pulse pump; thermal effects; thermal lensing; phase shift; diode-pumped solid state laser; super-Gaussian pump profile. Abstract. Solid state laser (SSL) powers can be realistically scaled when pumped by a real, efficient and multimode pulse.

  2. Effect of normal processes on thermal conductivity of germanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of normal scattering processes is considered to redistribute the phonon momentum in (a) the same phonon branch – KK-S model and (b) between different phonon branches – KK-H model. Simplified thermal conductivity relations are used to estimate the thermal conductivity of germanium, silicon and diamond ...

  3. Effect of normal processes on thermal conductivity of germanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of normal scattering processes is considered to redistribute the phonon momentum in (a) the same phonon branch – KK-S model and (b) between differ- ent phonon branches – KK-H model. Simplified thermal conductivity relations are used to estimate the thermal conductivity of germanium, silicon and ...

  4. Effect of urbanization on the thermal structure in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Viskanta; R. O. Johnson; R. W., Jr. Bergstrom

    1977-01-01

    An unsteady two-dimensional transport model was used to study the short-term effects of urbanization and air pollution on the thermal structure in the urban atmosphere. A number of simulations for summer conditions representing the city of St. Louis were performed. The diurnal variation of the surface temperature and thermal structure are presented and the influences...

  5. Thermal dose requirement for tissue effect: experimental and clinical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, Mark; Viglianti, Benjamin L.; Lora-Michiels, Michael; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hanson, Margaret A.

    2003-06-01

    In this review we have summarized the basic principles that govern the relationships between thermal exposure (temperature and time of exposure) and thermal damage, with an emphasis on normal tissue effects. We have also attempted to identify specific thermal dose information (for safety and injury) for a variety of tissues in a variety of species. We address the use, accuracy and difficulty of conversion of an individual time and temperature (thermal dose) to a standardized value (eg equivalent minutes at 43degC) for comparison of thermal treatments. Although, the conversion algorithm appears to work well within a range of moderately elevated temperatures (2-15degC) above normal physiologic baseline (37-39degC) there is concern that conversion accuracy does not hold up for temperatures which are minimally or significantly above baseline. An extensive review of the literature suggests a comprehensive assessment of the "thermal dose-to-tissue effect" has not previously been assembled for most individual tissues and never been viewed in a semi-comprehensive (tissues and species) manner. Finally, we have addressed the relationship of thermal dose-to-effect vs. baseline temperature. This issues is important since much of the thermal dose-to-effect information has been accrued in animal models with baseline temperatures 1-2 deg higher than that of humans.

  6. Thermal effects in Yb-doped double-cladding Distributed Modal Filtering rod-type fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2012-01-01

    element method. A DMF fiber design, which is single-mode in the 1030 nm–1064 nm region, is considered, and the effects of thermal load on the transmission characteristics are evaluated. Results show a blue-shift of the single-mode window and the single-mode bandwidth narrowing as the absorbed pump power......The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change in Yb-doped Distributed Modal Filtering (DMF) photonic crystal fibers are investigated, where high-order mode suppression is obtained by resonant coupling with high index elements in the cladding. The temperature distribution on the fiber...... cross-section is calculated with an analytical model, for different pump power values. The consequent refractive index change, due to the thermo-optical effect, is applied to the cross-section of the DMF fiber, whose guiding properties are studied with a full-vector modal solver based on the finite...

  7. Convection with local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This book is one of the first devoted to an account of theories of thermal convection which involve local thermal non-equilibrium effects, including a concentration on microfluidic effects. The text introduces convection with local thermal non-equilibrium effects in extraordinary detail, making it easy for readers newer to the subject area to understand. This book is unique in the fact that it addresses a large number of convection theories and provides many new results which are not available elsewhere. This book will be useful to researchers from engineering, fluid mechanics, and applied mathematics, particularly those interested in microfluidics and porous media.

  8. Thermal Arrest Memory Effect in Ni-Mn-Ga Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rudajevova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilatation characteristics were measured to investigate the thermal arrest memory effect in Ni53.6Mn27.1Ga19.3 and Ni54.2Mn29.4Ga16.4 alloys. Interruption of the martensite-austenite phase transformation is connected with the reduction of the sample length after thermal cycle. If a total phase transformation took place in the complete thermal cycle following the interruption, then the sample length would return to its original length. Analysis of these results has shown that the thermal arrest memory effect is a consequence of a stress-focusing effect and shape memory effect. The stress-focusing effect occurs when the phase transformation propagates radially in a cylindrical sample from the surface, inward to the center. Evolution and release of the thermoelastic deformations in both alloys during heating and cooling are analyzed.

  9. Effects of basal-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance on the hot spot temperature in graphene electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David; Poudel, Nirakar; Cronin, Stephen B.; Shi, Li

    2017-02-01

    Electrostatic force microscopy and scanning thermal microscopy are employed to investigate the electric transport and localized heating around defects introduced during transfer of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition to an oxidized Si substrate. Numerical and analytical models are developed to explain the results based on the reported basal-plane thermal conductivity, κ, and interfacial thermal conductance, G, of graphene and to investigate their effects on the peak temperature. Irrespective of the κ values, increasing G beyond 4 × 107 W m-2 K-1 can reduce the peak temperature effectively for graphene devices made on sub-10 nm thick gate dielectric, but not for the measured device made on 300-nm-thick oxide dielectric, which yields a cross-plane thermal conductance (Gox) much smaller than the typical G of graphene. In contrast, for typical G values reported for graphene, increasing κ from 300 W m-1 K-1 toward 3000 W m-1 K-1 is effective in reducing the hot spot temperature for the 300-nm-thick oxide devices but not for the sub-10 nm gate dielectric case, because the heat spreading length (l) can be appreciably increased relative to the micron-scale localized heat generation spot size (r0) only when the oxide layer is sufficiently thick. As such, enhancement of κ increases the vertical heat transfer area above the gate dielectric only for the thick oxide case. In all cases considered, the hot spot temperature is sensitive to varying G and κ only when the G/Gox ratio and r0/l ratio are below about 5, respectively.

  10. Thermal Mass & Dynamic Effects Danish Building Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Selman, Ayser Dawod; Heiselberg, Per

    will focus on three main aspects: ♦ Assess the robustness of the monthly calculation method by varying the input parameters (Part 3) ♦ Better take into consideration the thermal mass in the actual tool by updating the utilisation factors used for the calculation of cooling and heating (Part 3) ♦ Find...... a method to evaluate night-time ventilation in the monthly calculation (Part 4)...

  11. Modeling thermal effects in braking systems of railway vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Miloš S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of thermal effects has become increasingly important in product design in different transport means, road vehicles, airplanes, railway vehicles, and so forth. The thermal analysis is a very important stage in the study of braking systems, especially of railway vehicles, where it is necessary to brake huge masses, because the thermal load of a braked railway wheel prevails compared to other types of loads. In the braking phase, kinetic energy transforms into thermal energy resulting in intense heating and high temperature states of railway wheels. Thus induced thermal loads determine thermomechanical behavior of the structure of railway wheels. In cases of thermal overloads, which mainly occur as a result of long-term braking on down-grade railroads, the generation of stresses and deformations occurs, whose consequences are the appearance of cracks on the rim of a wheel and the final total wheel defect. The importance to precisely determine the temperature distribution caused by the transfer process of the heat generated during braking due to the friction on contact surfaces of the braking system makes it a challenging research task. Therefore, the thermal analysis of a block-braked solid railway wheel of a 444 class locomotive of the national railway operator Serbian Railways is processed in detail in this paper, using analytical and numerical modeling of thermal effects during long-term braking for maintaining a constant speed on a down-grade railroad.

  12. Effective Translation, Tokenization and Combination for Cross-Lingual Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, J.; Fissaha Adafre, S.; de Rijke, M.; Peters, C.; Clough, P.D.; Jones, G.J.F.; Gonzalo, J.; Kluck, M.; Magnini, B.

    2005-01-01

    Our approach to cross-lingual document retrieval starts from the assumption that effective monolingual retrieval is at the core of any cross-language retrieval system. We devote particular attention to three crucial ingredients of our approach to cross-lingual retrieval. First, effective

  13. Effects of thermal insulation on electrical connections and outlet boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausoliel, R. W.; Clifton, J. R.; Meese, W. J.

    1981-04-01

    When residential walls are retrofitted with foamed-in urea formaldehyde or blown-in cellulose thermal insulations, the insulation may enter electrical outlet and switch boxes. The effects of these thermal insulations on the durability of electrical components were studied. These studies were carried out at 44, 75, and 96 percent relative humidities with test periods between one and twelve months. Laboratory test methods were developed and tests performed to determine the electrical and corrosive effects of urea formaldehyde and cellulose thermal insulation contained in electrical outlet and switch boxes.

  14. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Pourhassan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  15. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam, E-mail: b.pourhassan@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: f2mir@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  16. Effect of Thermal Fluctuations on a Charged Dilatonic Black Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Pourhassan, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  17. Measurement of thermal neutron cross section for {sup 241}Am(n,f) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Yamamoto, Shuji; Fujita, Yoshiaki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Miyoshi, Mitsuharu; Kimura, Itsuro; Kanno, Ikuo; Shinohara, Nobuo

    1997-03-01

    Making use of a standard neutron spectrum field with a pure Maxwellian distribution, the thermal neutron cross section for the {sup 241}Am(n,f) reaction has been measured relative to the reference value of 586.2b for the {sup 235U}(n,f) reaction. For the present measurement, electrodeposited layers of {sup 241}Am and {sup 235}U have been employed as back-to-back type double fission chambers. The present result at neutron energy of 0.0253 eV is 3.15 {+-} 0.097b. The ENDF/B-VI data is in good agreement with the present value, while the JENDL-3.2 data is lower by 4.2%. The evaluated data in JEF-2.2 and by Mughabghab are higher by 0.9% and 1.6%, respectively than the present result. The ratios of the earlier experimental data to the present value are distributed between 0.89 and 1.02. (author)

  18. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  19. EFFECTS OF SURFACE MORPHOLOGY ON THERMAL CONTACT RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiming Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal contact resistance is common in aerospace industry, nuclear reactors and electronic equipments. The work addresses a new scheme for determining the thermal contact resistance between a smooth surface of a film and a rough surface of a metal specimen. The finite element method was used as a tool to explore the surface morphology effect on the thermal contact resistance while the temperature of the contact surface was determined by a regression method. According to the results developed, the temperature on the contact surfaces linearly drops with the increasing average height of surface roughness and nonlinearly drops with the increasing ratio between non-contact area and nominal contact area. On the other hand, the thermal contact resistance increases linearly with increases in the average height of the surface roughness. What's more, the thermal contact resistance increases in a non-linear manner as the ratio of the non-contact area to the nominal contact area is increasing.

  20. Thermal effect-resilient design of large mode area double-cladding Yb-doped photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Johansen, Mette Marie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change on the guiding properties of different large mode area fibers have been numerically analyzed. A simple but accurate model has been applied to obtain the refractive index change in the fiber cross-section, and a full-vector modal solver based...... on the finite-element method has been used to calculate the guided modes of the fibers operating at high power levels. The results demonstrate that resonant structures added to the fiber cross-section can be exploited to provide efficient suppression of high-order modes with a good resilience to thermal effects....

  1. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple “shark fins” and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  2. Effect of interfacial treatment on the thermal properties of thermal conductive plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ZnO, which is processed by different surface treatment approaches, is blended together with polypropylene to produce thermal conductive polymer composites. The composites are analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM to investigate the surface modification of filler, their distribution in the matrix and the condition of two-phase interface. Optimized content of filler surface modifier is investigated as well. The results showed that using low-molecular coupling agent produces positive effect to improve the interface adhesion between filler and matrix, and the thermal conductivity of the composite as well. Macro-molecular coupling agent can strongly improve two-phase interface, but it is not beneficial at obtaining a high thermal conductivity. The blend of ZnO without modification and polypropylene has many defects in the two-phase interface, and the thermal conductivity of the composite is between those of composites produced by previous two approaches. The surface treatment of the filler also allowed producing the composites with lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE. As for the content of low-molecular coupling agent, it obtains the best effect at 1.5 wt%.

  3. Effects of partial hydrolysis and subsequent cross-linking on wheat gluten physicochemical properties and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaiqiang; Luo, Shuizhong; Cai, Jing; Sun, Qiaoqiao; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhong, Xiyang; Jiang, Shaotong; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-04-15

    The rheological behavior and thermal properties of wheat gluten following partial hydrolysis using Alcalase and subsequent microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) cross-linking were investigated. The wheat gluten storage modulus (G') and thermal denaturation temperature (Tg) were significantly increased from 2.26 kPa and 54.43°C to 7.76 kPa and 57.69°C, respectively, by the combined action of partial hydrolysis (DH 0.187%) and cross-linking. The free SH content, surface hydrophobicity, and secondary structure analysis suggested that an appropriate degree of Alcalase-based hydrolysis allowed the compact wheat gluten structure to unfold, increasing the β-sheet content and surface hydrophobicity. This improved its molecular flexibility and exposed additional glutamine sites for MTGase cross-linking. SEM images showed that a compact 3D network formed, while SDS-PAGE profiles revealed that excessive hydrolysis resulted in high-molecular-weight subunits degrading to smaller peptides, unsuitable for cross-linking. It was also demonstrated that the combination of Alcalase-based partial hydrolysis with MTGase cross-linking might be an effective method for modifying wheat gluten rheological behavior and thermal properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative

  5. Precise measurement of the thermal and stellar 54Fe(n ,γ )55Fe cross sections via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, A.; Buczak, K.; Belgya, T.; Bichler, M.; Coquard, L.; Dillmann, I.; Golser, R.; Käppeler, F.; Karakas, A.; Kutschera, W.; Lederer, C.; Mengoni, A.; Pignatari, M.; Priller, A.; Reifarth, R.; Steier, P.; Szentmiklosi, L.

    2017-08-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) represents a complementary approach for precise measurements of neutron capture cross sections, e.g., for nuclear astrophysics. This technique, completely independent of previous experimental methods, was applied for the measurement of the 54Fe(n ,γ )55Fe reaction. Following a series of irradiations with neutrons from cold and thermal to keV energies, the produced long-lived 55Fe nuclei (t1 /2=2.744 +-0.009 ) yr) were analyzed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator. A reproducibility of about 1% could be achieved for the detection of 55Fe, yielding cross-section uncertainties of less than 3%. Thus, this method produces new and precise data that can serve as anchor points for time-of-flight experiments. We report significantly improved neutron capture cross sections at thermal energy (σth=2.30 ±0.07 b) as well as for a quasi-Maxwellian spectrum of k T =25 keV (σ =30.3 ±1.2 mb) and for En=481 ±53 keV (σ =6.01 ±0.23 mb). The new experimental cross sections have been used to deduce improved Maxwellian-averaged cross sections in the temperature regime of the common s -process scenarios. The astrophysical impact is discussed by using stellar models for low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars.

  6. Analysis of Thermal Radiation Effects on Temperatures in Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are important, and in some instances a necessity, for high temperature applications such as combustor liners, and turbine vanes and rotating blades for current and advanced turbine engines. Some of the insulating materials used for coatings, such as zirconia that currently has widespread use, are partially transparent to thermal radiation. A translucent coating permits energy to be transported internally by radiation, thereby increasing the total energy transfer and acting like an increase in thermal conductivity. This degrades the insulating ability of the coating. Because of the strong dependence of radiant emission on temperature, internal radiative transfer effects are increased as temperatures are raised. Hence evaluating the significance of internal radiation is of importance as temperatures are increased to obtain higher efficiencies in advanced engines.

  7. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Insulating Material made from Recycled Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Etsuro; Takahashi, Kaneko; Sato, Mitsuo; Ishii, Yukihiro

    In this paper, the experimental results are represented on the effective thermal conductivity of cellulose insulation powder which is made from recycled newspapers. This insulating material is useful for energy and resources saving. The steady state cylindrical absolute method is employed by considering the accuracy of measurement. The experimental results are compared with the ones measured previously by other methods. The main results obtained are as follows (1) The effective thermal conductivity of this insulating material increases with increasing temperature and effective specific density, respectively. But, these increasing rate is not so large. (2) The effective thermal conductivity is about 0.04-0.06[W/mK] at the range of the effective specific density less than 100 [kg/m3]. This value is comparable with other industrial insulating materials.

  8. Effects of polymer additives in the bulk of turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi-Chao; Funfschilling, Denis; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that a minute amount of polymer additives can significantly enhance heat transport in the bulk region of turbulent thermal convection. The effects of polymer additives are found to be the \\textit{suppression} of turbulent background fluctuations that give rise to incoherent heat fluxes that make no net contribution to heat transport, and at the same time to \\textit{increase} the coherency of temperature and velocity fields. The suppression of small-scale turbulent fluctuations leads to more coherent thermal plumes that result in the heat transport enhancement. The fact that polymer additives can increase the coherency of thermal plumes is supported by the measurements of a number of local quantities, such as the extracted plume amplitude and width, the velocity autocorrelation functions and the velocity-temperature cross-correlation coefficient. The results from local measurements also suggest the existence of a threshold value for the polymer concentration, only above which c...

  9. Averaged electron collision cross sections for thermal mixtures of β-alanine conformers in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Milton M.; de Lima, Erik V. R.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    A theoretical study of elastic electron scattering by gas-phase amino acid molecule β-alanine (NH2-CH2-CH2-COOH) is presented. R-matrix calculations are performed for each of the ten lowest-lying, thermally-accessible conformers of β-alanine. Eigenphase sums, resonance features, differential and integral cross sections are computed for each conformer. The positions of the low-energy shape resonance associated with the unoccupied {π }* orbital of the -COOH group are found to vary from 2.5 to 3.3 eV and the resonance widths from 0.2 to 0.5 eV depending on the conformation. The temperature-dependent population ratios are derived, based on temperature-corrected Gibbs free energies. Averaged cross sections for thermal mixtures of the 10 conformers are presented. A comparison with previous results for the α-alanine isomer is also presented.

  10. Effects of non-thermal plasma on mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Kalghatgi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces no heat, so its effects can be selective. In order to exploit the potential for clinical applications, including wound healing, sterilization, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of non-thermal plasma with living tissues is required. Using mammalian cells in culture, it is shown here that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD has dose-dependent effects that range from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis. It is also shown that these effects are primarily due to formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. We have utilized γ-H2AX to detect DNA damage induced by non-thermal plasma and found that it is initiated by production of active neutral species that most likely induce formation of organic peroxides in cell medium. Phosphorylation of H2AX following non-thermal plasma treatment is ATR dependent and ATM independent, suggesting that plasma treatment may lead to replication arrest or formation of single-stranded DNA breaks; however, plasma does not lead to formation of bulky adducts/thymine dimers.

  11. Effects of Building Design Elements on Residential Thermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingbao Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Residential thermal environment affects the life of residents in terms of their physical and mental health. Many studies have shown that building design elements affect the urban thermal environment. In this study, Nanjing City was used as the study area. A three-dimensional microclimate model was used to simulate and analyze the effects of four main factors, namely, building height, density, layout and green ratio, on thermal environment in residential areas. Results showed that 25% building density obtained a low average air temperature (ATa and average predicted mean vote (APMV during 24 h. Thus, a higher building height indicates a lower ATa and APMV and better outdoor comfort level. In addition, peripheral layout had the lowest ATa and APMV, followed by the determinant and point group layouts. The green ratio increased from 0% to 50% with a 10% step and the ATa and APMV decreased gradually. However, when the green ratio increased from 30% to 40%, ATa and APMV decreased most. The effects of building height, density and green ratio on the thermal environment in residential areas were interactive. The effects of building density, green ratio and layout on hourly air temperature and hourly predicted mean vote in daytime varied from these indicators during night time. How the four building design elements interact with thermal environment were probed from two aspects of air temperature and thermal comfort based on the validated ENVI-met, which is the element of novelty in this study. However, thermal comfort has rarely been considered in the past studies about urban outdoor thermal environment.

  12. Solvent-resistant organic transistors and thermally stable organic photovoltaics based on cross-linkable conjugated polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyeongjun

    2012-01-10

    Conjugated polymers, in general, are unstable when exposed to air, solvent, or thermal treatment, and these challenges limit their practical applications. Therefore, it is of great importance to develop new materials or methodologies that can enable organic electronics with air stability, solvent resistance, and thermal stability. Herein, we have developed a simple but powerful approach to achieve solvent-resistant and thermally stable organic electronic devices with a remarkably improved air stability, by introducing an azide cross-linkable group into a conjugated polymer. To demonstrate this concept, we have synthesized polythiophene with azide groups attached to end of the alkyl chain (P3HT-azide). Photo-cross-linking of P3HT-azide copolymers dramatically improves the solvent resistance of the active layer without disrupting the molecular ordering and charge transport. This is the first demonstration of solvent-resistant organic transistors. Furthermore, the bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaics (BHJ OPVs) containing P3HT-azide copolymers show an average efficiency higher than 3.3% after 40 h annealing at an elevated temperature of 150 °C, which represents one of the most thermally stable OPV devices reported to date. This enhanced stability is due to an in situ compatibilizer that forms at the P3HT/PCBM interface and suppresses macrophase separation. Our approach paves a way toward organic electronics with robust and stable operations. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  14. Analysis and Experimental on Aircraft Insulation Thermal Bridge Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIA Tian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of typical aircraft insulation structures were designed for the heat bridge in the metal ribs of aircraft insulation structures. In order to study the influence of heat bridge effect on thermal insulation performance, each configuration was analyzed by the transient heat transfer FEA, check point temperature was obtained in the hot surface temperature of 100 ℃, 200 ℃, 300 ℃, 424 ℃ respectively, and the validity of FEA was proved by insulation performance experiment. The result showed that the thermal bridge has a great influence to the insulation performance of insulation structure, and the thermal bridge influence should be considered adequately when the insulation structure designed. Additionally, the blocking method for thermal bridge is also put forward.

  15. Photon-induced thermal effects in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwen; Zhou, Pinjia; Wei, Lianfu; Li, Haijie; Zhang, Beihong; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Qiang; Fang, Yurong; Cao, Chunhai

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally investigated the optical responses of a superconducting niobium resonator. It was found that, with increasing radiation power, the resonance frequency increases monotonically below around 500 mK, decreases monotonically above around 1 K, and exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior at around 700 mK. These observations show that one can operate the irradiated resonator in three temperature regimes, depending on whether two-level system (TLS) effects or kinetic inductance effects dominate. Furthermore, we found that the optical responses at ultra-low temperatures can be qualitatively regarded as a photon-induced thermalization effect of TLSs, which could be utilized to achieve thermal sensitive photon detections.

  16. Thermal neutron radiative capture on cadmium as a counting technique at the INES beam line at ISIS: A preliminary investigation of detector cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, G; Grazzi, F; Pietropaolo, A; Scherillo, A; Schooneveld, E M

    2017-12-01

    Experimental tests are presented that assess the cross-talk level among three scintillation detectors used as neutron counters exploiting the thermal neutron radiative capture on Cd. The measurements were done at the INES diffractometer operating at the ISIS spallation neutron source (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK). These tests follow a preliminary set of measurements performed on the same instrument to study the effectiveness of this thermal neutron counting strategy in neutron diffraction measurements, typically performed on INES using squashed 3He filled gas tubes. The experimental data were collected in two different geometrical configurations of the detectors and compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations, performed using the MCNP code. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Theoretical investigation of some thermal effects in turbulence modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathelin, Lionel [LIMSI-CNRS, Orsay (France); Bataille, Francoise [PROMES-CNRS, Perpignan (France); Ye, Zhou [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Fluid compressibility effects arising from thermal rather than dynamical aspects are theoretically investigated in the framework of turbulent flows. The Mach number is considered low and not to induce significant compressibility effects which here occur due to a very high thermal gradient within the flowfield. With the use of the Two-Scale Direct Interaction Approximation approach, essential turbulent correlations are derived in a one-point one-time framework. In the low velocity gradient limit, they are shown to directly depend on the temperature gradient, assumed large. The impact of thermal effects onto the transport equations of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate is also investigated, together with the transport equation for both the density and the internal energy variance.

  18. Planck 2015 results: XXIII. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect-cosmic infrared background correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    We use Planck data to detect the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the infrared emission from the galaxies that make up the the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We first perform a stacking analysis towards Planck-confirmed galaxy clusters. We detect infrare...

  19. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia (42-46°C, treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  20. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  1. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  2. FY 2017 – Thermal Aging Effects on Advanced Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Wei-Ying [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of the effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of existing laboratory-sized heats of Alloy 709 austenitic stainless steel and the completion of effort on the thermal aging effect on the tensile properties of optimized G92 ferritic-martensitic steel. The report is a Level 3 deliverable in FY17 (M3AT-17AN1602081), under the Work Package AT-17AN160208, “Advanced Alloy Testing - ANL” performed by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  3. Evidence of Space-Charge Effects in Thermal Poling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, X.; Arentoft, Jesper; Wong, D.

    1999-01-01

    The in situ thermal poling processes in germanosilicate fibers for positive and negative poling voltages are significantly different. Thermal poling of silica fibers consists of two processes: the faster linear process of charge migration and the subsequent single exponential process of charge...... ionization. Both the shielding electrical field due to charge migration and the ionization electrical field due to charge ionization are able to be frozen-in at room temperature acid lead to the residual linear electrooptic effects, The observations support that the mechanism of the induced electrooptic...... effects is based on space charge electrical fields instead of dipole/bond orientation....

  4. Nonreciprocal light transmission based on the thermal radiative effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2015-01-01

    Nonreciprocal light transmission is critical in building optical isolations and circulations in optical communication systems. Achieving high optical isolation and broad bandwidth with CMOS-compatibility are still difficult in silicon nano-photonics. Here we first experimentally demonstrate...... to the significant characteristics of the thermal radiative effect, which could cause a fiber displacement up to tens of microns. This powerful thermal radiative effect opens up a new opportunity for nonreciprocal light transmission which is promising to be used in complete on-chip nonreciprocal devices...

  5. Effect of Financing on Profitability of Sawmill Industries in Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the Effect of Financing on Profitability of Sawmill Industries in Cross River State, Nigeria. The study was conducted at enterprise level in Cross River State with a sample of 80 saw millers to ascertain the effect of finance on their profitability. The result shows that amount borrowed business experience, ...

  6. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  7. A review on ergonomics of headgear: Thermal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Aerts, J.M.; Annaheim, S.; Bröde, P.; Bruyne, G. de; Flouris, A.D.; Kuklane, K.; Sotto Mayor, T.; Rossi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal effects related to wearing headgear are complex and different studies have investigated single parts of this topic. This review aims at summarizing the different findings to give a complete overview on this topic as well as to suggest new perspectives. Headgear increases head insulation

  8. Thermal effects on parallel resonance energy of whistler mode wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this short communication, we have evaluated the effect of thermal velocity of the plasma particles on the energy of resonantly interacting energetic electrons with the propagating whistler mode waves as a function of wave frequency and L-value for the normal and disturbed magnetospheric conditions. During the ...

  9. Effective action for hard thermal loops in gravitational fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine, through a Boltzmann equation approach, the generating action of hard thermal loops in the background of gravitational fields. Using the gauge and Weyl invariance of the theory at high temperature, we derive an explicit closed-form expression for the effective action.

  10. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high.

  11. Differential effects of thermal and chemical stressors on tissue balls ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coral cell aggregates (tissue balls) from four species (Acropora muricata, Fungia repanda, Pavona cactus and Pocillopora damicornis) were used as an indicator to investigate the effects on the corals of thermal stress and of chemical extracts from three sponges (Adocia sp., Haliclona sp. and Lissodendoryx sp.) and one ...

  12. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    but rely on the concentration of hydrogen. The model ... first-order rate law. Lehmhus and Rausch (2004) have annealed TiH2 pow- der in air and argon. In argon, the powder does not develop a surface layer and as a result, a small amount of hydro- gen is lost ... rate effect on the thermal decomposition behaviour of TiH2.

  13. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 81; Issue 4. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod ... The transient analytical solutions of temperature distribution, stress, strain and optical path difference in convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod are derived.

  14. Infrared lens thermal effect: equivalent focal shift and calculating model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng-shuo; Shi, Zelin; Feng, Bin; Xu, Bao-shu

    2014-11-01

    It's well-know that the focal shift of infrared lens is the major factor in degeneration of imaging quality when temperature change. In order to figure out the connection between temperature change and focal shift, partial differential equations of thermal effect on light path are obtained by raytrace method, to begin with. The approximately solution of the PDEs show that focal shift is proportional to temperature change. And a formula to compute the proportional factor is given. In order to understand infrared lens thermal effect deeply, we use defocus by image plane shift at constant temperature to equivalently represent thermal effect on infrared lens. So equivalent focal shift (EFS) is defined and its calculating model is proposed at last. In order to verify EFS and its calculating model, Physical experimental platform including a motorized linear stage with built-in controller, blackbody, target, collimator, IR detector, computer and other devices is developed. The experimental results indicate that EFS make the image plane shift at constant temperature have the same influence on infrared lens as thermal effect and its calculating model is correct.

  15. On the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on temperature rise in biologic tissues during microwave heating. The method of asymptotic expansion is used for finding solution. An appropriate matching procedure was used in our method. Our result reveals the possibility of multiple solutions and it ...

  16. The effect of Acacia karroo supplementation and thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of Acacia karroo supplementation and thermal preparation on consumer sensory scores of meat from indigenous Xhosa lop-eared goat breed. 18 castrated four-month-old Xhosa lop-eared kids were kept at the University of Fort Hare Farm until slaughter. Sample ...

  17. Thermal-vacuum effects on polymer matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Mabson, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on the thermal-vacuum response of a variety of fiber reinforced polymers matrix composites that comprised the UTIAS experiment on the LDEF satellite. Theoretical temperature-time predictions for this experiment are in excellent agreement with test data. Results also show quite clearly the effect of outgassing in the dimensional changes of these materials and the corresponding coefficients of thermal expansion. Finally, comparison with ground-based simulation tests are presented as well. Use of these data for design purposes are also given.

  18. Concrete containment analysis including thermal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Pretest predictions were made by the staff of the Engineering Mechanics Program at ANL for the response of the 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model that was tested to failure by liner tearing and leakage at the Sandia National Laboratories. Questions have been raised in regard to possible effects of temperature in combination with internal pressure on the behavior of the model. Specifically, if the containment had been subjected to elevated temperature as well as internal pressure, what differences in pressure capacity, failure mechanism and location would have been predicted when compared to the analysis of internal pressure alone. The purpose of this paper is to address these questions. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Determination of the thermal neutron induced O-17(n,alpha) C-14 reaction cross section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemans, J; Wagemans, C; Bieber, R; Geltenbort, P

    1998-01-01

    The. O-17(n(th),alpha)C-14 reaction cross section was determined at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble relative to the known N-14(n(th),p)C-14 cross section. For the flux calibration measurements, N-14(2) from the air was used. The O-17(n,alpha) measurements were performed with several

  20. Evaluating the thermal reduction effect of plant layers on rooftops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Chih-Fang [Department of Landscape Design and Management, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, No. 35, Lane 215, Sec. 1, Jhongshan Road, Taiping City, Taichung County 411 (China)

    2008-07-01

    This study examines the thermal reduction effect of plant layers on rooftops through experiments performed in a controlled environment. The relevant parameters are coverage ratio (CR) and total leaf thickness (TLT). Both parameters are positively correlated with thermal reduction ratio (TRR). The TRR data of all experiments were plotted on a grid system with CR on the x-axis and TLT on the y-axis. A TRR map was then drawn using the curve fitting process. The applicability of the TRR map drawn for Codiaeum variegatum (1) was further confirmed by performing experiments with Cordyline terminalis (1) and Ixora duffii (1) and by results of experiments on C. variegatum (2), C. terminalis (2), Duranta repens, and I. duffii (2) in outdoor environments. The TRR map provides quantitative and straightforward guidance on thermal reduction planting arrangements for green roofs. (author)

  1. Aging effects on vertical graphene nanosheets and their thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Polaki, S. R.; Ajikumar, P. K.; Krishna, N. G.; Kamruddin, M.

    2017-10-01

    The present study investigates environmental aging effects and thermal stability of vertical graphene nanosheets (VGN). Self-organized VGN is synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and exposed to ambient conditions over 6-month period to examine its aging behavior. A systematic inspection is carried out on morphology, chemical structure, wettability and electrical property by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, water contact angle and four-probe resistivity measurements at regular intervals, respectively. Detailed microscopic and spectroscopic analysis substantiated the retention of graphitic quality and surface chemistry of VGN over the test period. An unchanged sheet resistance and hydrophobicity reveals its electrical and wetting stability over the time, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis ensures an excellent thermal stability of VGN up to 575 °C in ambient atmosphere. These findings of long-term morphological, structural, wetting, electrical and thermal stability of VGN validate their potential utilization for the next-generation device applications.

  2. Thermal properties of soils: effect of biochar application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Thermal properties (thermal conductivity, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) have a significant effect on the soil surface energy partitioning and resulting in the temperature distribution. Thermal properties of soil depend on water content, bulk density and organic matter content. An important source of organic matter is biochar. Biochar as a material is defined as: "charcoal for application as a soil conditioner". Biochar is generally associated with co-produced end products of pyrolysis. Many different materials are used as biomass feedstock for biochar, including wood, crop residues and manures. Additional predictions were done for terra preta soil (also known as "Amazonian dark earth"), high in charcoal content, due to adding a mixture of charcoal, bone, and manure for thousands of years i.e. approximately 10-1,000 times longer than residence times of most soil organic matter. The effect of biochar obtained from the wood biomass and other organic amendments (peat, compost) on soil thermal properties is presented in this paper. The results were compared with wetland soils of different organic matter content. The measurements of the thermal properties at various water contents were performed after incubation, under laboratory conditions using KD2Pro, Decagon Devices. The measured data were compared with predictions made using Usowicz statistical-physical model (Usowicz et al., 2006) for biochar, mineral soil and soil with addition of biochar at various water contents and bulk densities. The model operates statistically by probability of occurrence of contacts between particular fractional compounds. It combines physical properties, specific to particular compounds, into one apparent conductance specific to the mixture. The results revealed that addition of the biochar and other organic amendments into the soil caused considerable reduction of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The mineral soil showed the highest thermal conductivity and diffusivity

  3. Dissociating explicit and implicit effects of cross-media advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandeberg, L.; Murre, J.M.J.; Voorveld, H.A.M.; Smit, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of cross-media advertising effects is mainly based on explicit psychological measures, such as self-reports. To fully understand the mechanisms responsible for the success of cross-media advertising, it is important to also use implicit measures. We used both types of measures to assess

  4. Determination of the thermal neutron induced 17O(n,α)14C reaction cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, J.; Wagemans, C.; Bieber, R.; Geltenbort, P.

    1998-11-01

    The 17O(nth,α)14C reaction cross section was determined at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble relative to the known 14N(nth,p)14C cross section. For the flux calibration measurements, 14N2 from the air was used. The 17O(n,α) measurements were performed with several highly enriched oxygen gas samples. This resulted in a precise value of (244+/-7) mb for the 17O(nth,α)14C cross section.

  5. In situ thermally cross-linked polyacrylonitrile as binder for high-performance silicon as lithium ion battery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lanyao; Shen, Lian; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Liquan

    2014-07-01

    Electrode integrity and electric contact between particles and between particle and current collector are critical for electrochemical performance, especially for that of electrode materials with large volume change during cycling and with poor electric conductivity. We report on the in situ thermally cross-linked polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a binder for silicon-based anodes of lithium-ion batteries. The electrode delivers excellent cycle life and rate capability with a reversible capacity of about 1450 mA h g(-1) even after 100 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance of such silicon electrodes is attributed to heat-treatment-induced cross-linking and the formation of conjugated PAN. These findings open new avenues to explore other polymers for both anode and cathode electrodes of rechargeable batteries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Prediction of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Powder Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lingxue; Park, Jiho; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    The powder insulation method is widely used in structural and cryogenic systems such as transportation and storage tanks of cryogenic fluids. The powder insulation layer is constructed by small particle powder with light weight and some residual gas with high porosity. So far, many experiments have been carried out to test the thermal performance of various kinds of powder, including expanded perlite, glass microspheres, expanded polystyrene (EPS). However, it is still difficult to predict the thermal performance of powder insulation by calculation due to the complicated geometries, including various particle shapes, wide powder diameter distribution, and various pore sizes. In this paper, the effective thermal conductivity of powder insulation has been predicted based on an effective thermal conductivity calculationmodel of porous packed beds. The calculation methodology was applied to the insulation system with expanded perlite, glass microspheres and EPS beads at cryogenic temperature and various vacuum pressures. The calculation results were compared with previous experimental data. Moreover, additional tests were carried out at cryogenic temperature in this research. The fitting equations of the deformation factor of the area-contact model are presented for various powders. The calculation results show agood agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Effective Thermal Expansion Property of Consolidated Granular Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçük, Gülşad; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2017-11-09

    Thermally-assisted compaction of granular materials is of keen interest in many engineering applications. A proper estimation of the material behavior of compacted granular materials is contingent upon the knowledge of microstructure formation, which is highly dependent on the bulk material properties and processing conditions, during the deformation stage. Originating from the pair interactions between particles, the macroscopic properties are obtained using various homogenization techniques and postulating continuum constitutive laws. While pioneers in this field have laid fundamental groundwork regarding effective medium descriptions, there exists a discrepancy between discrete and continuum level solutions. In our previous work, we elaborated a Particle Mechanics Approach (PMA) that integrates thermal contact and Hertzian deformation models to understand the thermo-mechanically-coupled consolidation problem. We also considered the analogous problem from the perspective of the conventional Continuum Mechanics Approach (CMA). In this study, following the multi-scale modeling framework, we propose an effective thermal expansion coefficient for the thermally-assisted compaction of granular materials.

  8. The effect of allometric scaling in coral thermal microenvironments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Ong

    Full Text Available A long-standing interest in marine science is in the degree to which environmental conditions of flow and irradiance, combined with optical, thermal and morphological characteristics of individual coral colonies, affects their sensitivity of thermal microenvironments and susceptibility to stress-induced bleaching within and/or among colonies. The physiological processes in Scleractinian corals tend to scale allometrically as a result of physical and geometric constraints on body size and shape. There is a direct relationship between scaling to thermal stress, thus, the relationship between allometric scaling and rates of heating and cooling in coral microenvironments is a subject of great interest. The primary aim of this study was to develop an approximation that predicts coral thermal microenvironments as a function of colony morphology (shape and size, light or irradiance, and flow velocity or regime. To do so, we provided intuitive interpretation of their energy budgets for both massive and branching colonies, and then quantified the heat-size exponent (b* and allometric constant (m using logarithmic linear regression. The data demonstrated a positive relationship between thermal rates and changes in irradiance, A/V ratio, and flow, with an interaction where turbulent regime had less influence on overall stress which may serve to ameliorate the effects of temperature rise compared to the laminar regime. These findings indicated that smaller corals have disproportionately higher stress, however they can reach thermal equilibrium quicker. Moreover, excellent agreements between the predicted and simulated microscale temperature values with no significant bias were observed for both the massive and branching colonies, indicating that the numerical approximation should be within the accuracy with which they could be measured. This study may assist in estimating the coral microscale temperature under known conditions of water flow and irradiance

  9. Long-term durability of HT-PEM fuel cells based on thermally cross-linked polybenzimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Tonny; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Becker, Hans; Aili, David; Steenberg, Thomas; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Seerup, Larisa; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2017-02-01

    Long-term durability of high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells based on thermally cross-linked polybenzimidazole membranes was studied and compared with reference membranes based on linear polybenzimidazole. The test was conducted at 160 °C under constant load currents of 200 mA cm-2 for periods of 1000, 4400, and 13,000 h. Extensive beginning-of-life (BoL) and end-of-test (EoT) characterisation was carried out, and disturbance of the steady state operated cells was minimised by limiting in-line diagnostics to the low-invasive technique of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Up until the operating time of 9200 h, the cell equipped with the cross-linked membrane showed an average degradation rate of 0.5 μV h-1, compared to 2.6 μV h-1 for the reference membrane, though parallel tests for a shorter period of time showed deviations, likely due to malfunctioning contact between layers or cell components. For the full test period of 13,000 h, the average voltage decay rate was about 1.4 and 4.6 μV h-1 for cells equipped with cross-linked and linear polybenzimidazole membranes, respectively. EIS and post-test analysis revealed that the cross-linked membrane showed better stability in terms of area specific resistance due to improved acid retention characteristics.

  10. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Sánchez, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10(-4)) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10(-4)). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects.

  11. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua, Jesus M., E-mail: paniagua@unex.es [Department of Applied Physics, Polytechnic School, University of Extremadura. Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain); Rufo, Montana; Jimenez, Antonio; Antolin, Alicia; Sanchez, Miguel [Department of Applied Physics, Polytechnic School, University of Extremadura. Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain)

    2009-08-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10{sup -4}) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10{sup -4}). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects.

  12. Testing mediation effects in cross-classified multilevel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen

    2017-04-01

    In this article, we propose an approach to test mediation effects in cross-classified multilevel data in which the initial cause is associated with one crossed factor, the mediator is associated with the other crossed factor, and the outcome is associated with Level-1 units (i.e., the 2((A))➔2((B))➔1 design). Multiple-membership models and cross-classified random effects models are used to estimate the indirect effects. The method is illustrated using real data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (1998). The results from the simulation study show that the proposed method can produce a consistent estimate of the indirect effect and reliable statistical inferences, given an adequate sample size.

  13. Planck 2015 results. XXIII. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect-cosmic infrared background correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We use Planck data to detect the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the infrared emission from the galaxies that make up the the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We first perform a stacking analysis towards Planck-confirmed galaxy clusters. We detect infrared emission produced by dusty galaxies inside these clusters and demonstrate that the infrared emission is about 50% more extended than the tSZ effect. Modelling the emission with a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we find that the radial profile concentration parameter is c500 = 1.00+0.18-0.15 . This indicates that infrared galaxies in the outskirts of clusters have higher infrared flux than cluster-core galaxies. We also study the cross-correlation between tSZ and CIB anisotropies, following three alternative approaches based on power spectrum analyses: (I) using a catalogue of confirmed clusters detected in Planck data; (II) using an all-sky tSZ map built from Planck frequency maps; and (III) using cross-spectra between Planck frequency maps. With the three different methods, we detect the tSZ-CIB cross-power spectrum at significance levels of (I) 6σ; (II) 3σ; and (III) 4σ. We model the tSZ-CIB cross-correlation signature and compare predictions with the measurements. The amplitude of the cross-correlation relative to the fiducial model is AtSZ-CIB = 1.2 ± 0.3. This result is consistent with predictions for the tSZ-CIB cross-correlation assuming the best-fit cosmological model from Planck 2015 results along with the tSZ and CIB scaling relations.

  14. Determination of the thermal neutron induced 36Cl(n,p)36S and 36Cl(n,α)33P reaction cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, C.; Bieber, R.; Geltenbort, P.

    1996-07-01

    The cross sections of the 36Cl(nth,p) 36S and the 36Cl(nth,α)33P reactions were measured with thermal neutrons at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble. For the 36Cl(nth,p)36S reaction cross section a precise value of (47+/-2) mb was obtained and for the 36Cl(nth,α)33P reaction a cross section value of (0.59+/-0.07) mb was determined.

  15. Effects of thermal environment on sleep and circadian rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto-Mizuno Kazue

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The thermal environment is one of the most important factors that can affect human sleep. The stereotypical effects of heat or cold exposure are increased wakefulness and decreased rapid eye movement sleep and slow wave sleep. These effects of the thermal environment on sleep stages are strongly linked to thermoregulation, which affects the mechanism regulating sleep. The effects on sleep stages also differ depending on the use of bedding and/or clothing. In semi-nude subjects, sleep stages are more affected by cold exposure than heat exposure. In real-life situations where bedding and clothing are used, heat exposure increases wakefulness and decreases slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Humid heat exposure further increases thermal load during sleep and affects sleep stages and thermoregulation. On the other hand, cold exposure does not affect sleep stages, though the use of beddings and clothing during sleep is critical in supporting thermoregulation and sleep in cold exposure. However, cold exposure affects cardiac autonomic response during sleep without affecting sleep stages and subjective sensations. These results indicate that the impact of cold exposure may be greater than that of heat exposure in real-life situations; thus, further studies are warranted that consider the effect of cold exposure on sleep and other physiological parameters.

  16. Thermal conductivity of vitreous silica from molecular dynamics simulations: The effects of force field, heat flux and system size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Du, Jincheng; Han, Wei; Zu, Xiaotao; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2017-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of vitreous silica is computed using the direct method in molecular dynamics simulations with three sets of empirical force fields, including the BKS, Teter, and ReaxFF, to investigate their performance in thermal characterization. Various heat flux and system sizes are used in the simulations to evaluate the statistical uncertainty and the finite-size effect. While all these potentials can reproduce realistic silica structures, the ReaxFF provides better agreement with experiments at 300 K than the BKS and Teter, which is due to its improved description of low-frequency vibrations. Increasing the heat flux and cross-sectional area tends to reduce the calculated standard deviation induced by thermal fluctuations, thus contributing to more accurate thermal conductivity predictions.

  17. Effects of Thermal Tension Transients on the Muscle Crossbridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Peter R.

    2016-09-01

    The transverse thermal fluctuations of the myosin molecule are significant. This paper explores the contribution of lateral myosin bending to the developed crossbridge force and power stroke. The equipartition theorem is used to calculate the mode amplitudes for myosin bending. Crossbridge axial force Fx and power stroke Δx are developed by transverse in-plane fluctuations along the y- and z-axes. Practical applications include the effects of temperature on the flexibility of the myosin molecule stiffness and tension, relevant to man-made fabrication of synthetic muscle using micromachines and nanowires. Scaling laws for the S2 bending amplitude depend on filament length, mode number, and stiffness, as n-2,L2, and (EI)-1. This paper quantifies the effects of thermal motion on the mechanics of miniature molecular motors, including the muscle crossbridge.

  18. Pressure Effects on the Thermal De-NOx Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Karsten; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the thermal de-NOx process has been investigated in flow reactor experiments. The experiments were performed at pressures from 1 to 10 bar and temperatures ranging from 925 to 1375 K. The inlet O-2 level was varied from 1000 ppm to 10%, while NH3 and NO were maintained...... effect of the pressure but also cause a slight decrease in the NO reduction potential. The results are consistent with recent atmospheric pressure experiments of thermal de-NOx covering a wide range of reactant partial pressures. Comparisons of the experimental data with the recent chemical kinetic model...... at 1000 and 500 ppm, respectively At the highest pressure, CO was added to shift the regime for NO reduction to lower temperatures. The results show that the pressure affects the location and the width of the temperature window for NO reduction. As the pressure is increased, both the lower and the higher...

  19. Ordered Pinning Arrays with Tunable Geometry via Thermal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastoy, Juan; Bernard, Rozenn; Briatico, Javier; Villegas, Javier E.; Malnou, Maxime; Bergeal, Nicolas; Lesueur, Jerome; Ulysse, Christian; Faini, Giancarlo

    2015-03-01

    We have used geometrically frustrated pinning arrays to create artificial vortex-ice. The pinning arrays are fabricated via ion irradiation of high-Tc superconducting films. These arrays present a very unique characteristic: the frustration can be reversibly switched on/off using temperature as a control knob, which allows stabilizing either a vortex-ice or a square vortex lattice. We have further investigated the thermal switching mechanism by studying the matching of the flux lattice to arrays that are incrementally deformed upon fabrication by introducing minute variations of the distance between pins. The array deformation exacerbates the thermal effects, leading to dramatic variations of the vortex distribution as a function of temperature. These results illustrate the strength of the temperature-induced reconfiguration effects, which may constitute a novel knob in fluxtronic devices based on vortex manipulation. Work supported by the French ANR MASTHER, the COST Action NanoSC, the Ville de Paris and the Galician Fundacion Barrie.

  20. Influence of thermal effects on stability of nanoscale films and filaments on thermally conductive substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seric, Ivana; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2018-01-01

    We consider fluid films and filaments of nanoscale thickness on thermally conductive substrates exposed to external heating and discuss the influence of the variation of material parameters with temperature on film stability. Particular focus is on metal films exposed to laser irradiation. Due to the short length scales involved, the absorption of heat in the metal is directly coupled to the film evolution, since the absorption length and the film thickness are comparable. Such a setup requires self-consistent consideration of fluid mechanical and thermal effects. We approach the problem via volume-of-fluid-based simulations that include destabilizing liquid metal-solid substrate interaction potentials. These simulations couple fluid dynamics directly with the spatio-temporal evolution of the temperature field both in the fluid and in the substrate. We focus on the influence of the temperature variation of material parameters, in particular of surface tension and viscosity. Regarding variation of surface tension with temperature, the main finding is that while the Marangoni effect may not play a significant role in the considered setting, the temporal variation of surface tension (modifying normal stress balance) is significant and could lead to complex evolution including oscillatory evolution of the liquid metal-air interface. Temperature variation of film viscosity is also found to be relevant. Therefore, the variations of surface tensions and viscosity could both influence the emerging wavelengths in experiments. By contrast, the filament geometry is found to be much less sensitive to a variation of material parameters with temperature.

  1. A review on ergonomics of headgear: Thermal effects

    OpenAIRE

    Bogerd, C.P.; Aerts, J.M.; Annaheim, S.; Bröde, P.; Bruyne, G. de; Flouris, A.D.; Kuklane, K.; Sotto Mayor, T.; Rossi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal effects related to wearing headgear are complex and different studies have investigated single parts of this topic. This review aims at summarizing the different findings to give a complete overview on this topic as well as to suggest new perspectives. Headgear increases head insulation and therefore is mainly problematic under warm conditions, which is the focus of this review. Helmets do not affect physiological parameters other than the local skin temperature and sweat rate. Ho...

  2. Tuning the thermal conductance of molecular junctions with interference effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöckner, J. C.; Cuevas, J. C.; Pauly, F.

    2017-12-01

    We present an ab initio study of the role of interference effects in the thermal conductance of single-molecule junctions. To be precise, using a first-principles transport method based on density functional theory, we analyze the coherent phonon transport in single-molecule junctions made of several benzene and oligo(phenylene ethynylene) derivatives. We show that the thermal conductance of these junctions can be tuned via the inclusion of substituents, which induces destructive interference effects and results in a decrease of the thermal conductance with respect to the unmodified molecules. In particular, we demonstrate that these interference effects manifest as antiresonances in the phonon transmission, whose energy positions can be tuned by varying the mass of the substituents. Our work provides clear strategies for the heat management in molecular junctions and, more generally, in nanostructured metal-organic hybrid systems, which are important to determine how these systems can function as efficient energy-conversion devices such as thermoelectric generators and refrigerators.

  3. Topological thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    In frustrated magnets the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction (DMI) arising from spin-orbit coupling can induce a magnetic long-range order. Here, we report a theoretical prediction of the thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome magnets such as KCr3(OH) 6(SO4) 2 and KFe3(OH) 6(SO4)2 . The thermal Hall effects in these materials are induced by scalar spin chirality as opposed to DMI in previous studies. The scalar spin chirality originates from the magnetic-field-induced chiral spin configuration due to noncoplanar spin textures, but in general it can be spontaneously developed as a macroscopic order parameter in chiral quantum spin liquids. Therefore, we infer that there is a possibility of the thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome magnets such as herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH) 6Cl2 and the chromium compound Ca10Cr7O28 , although they also show evidence of magnetic long-range order in the presence of applied magnetic field or pressure.

  4. Imaging laser-induced thermal fields and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.

    1995-05-01

    Laser light interaction with biological tissues is a combination of optical, thermal and mechanical effects depending on the energy applied per unit of volume per unit of time. Visualization of the phenomena with a high temporal and spatial resolution, contributes to a better understanding of the mechanism of action, especially when pulsed lasers are involved. For this goal, setups were developed based on Schlieren techniques to image the interaction of pulsed (CO2, Holmium and Excimer) and CW (CO2, Nd:YAG, Cu-vapor) lasers with physiological media and biological tissues. In a 'fast' Schlieren setup, images of shock waves and fast expanding and imploding vapor bubbles were captured using very short light flashes (10 ns-10 microseconds). These recordings suggest that these explosive vapor bubbles seem to be the main dynamism for tissue ablation. In a 'color' Schlieren setup, very small changes in optical density of the media induced by temperature gradients, were color coded. Calibration of the color images to absolute temperatures were performed by using calculated temperature distributions and by thermocouple measurements. Cameras with high speed shutters (0.1-50 ms) enabled the recording of dynamic images of the thermal relaxation and heat diffusion in tissues during variation of pulse length and repetition rate. Despite pulse lengths Schlieren techniques were applied to study the thermal characteristics of laser probes, e.g. for the treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH). In combination with thermal modeling an optimal therapy might be predicted. Schlieren techniques, generating high-speed and 'thermal' images, can provide a good understanding of the ablation mechanism and the thermo-dynamics during laser-tissue interaction with continuous wave and pulse lasers.

  5. Collisions at thermal energy between metastable hydrogen atoms and hydrogen molecules: Total and differential cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilev, G.; Perales, F.; Miniatura, C.; Robert, J.; Reinhardt, J.; Vecchiocattivi, F.; Baudon, J. (Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Villetaneuse (France). Lab. de Physique des Lasers)

    1990-10-01

    A metastable hydrogen (deuterium) atom source in which groundstate atoms produced by a RF discharge dissociator are bombarded by electrons, provides a relatively large amount of slow metastable atoms (velocity 3-5 km/s). Total integral cross sections for H{sup *}(D{sup *})(2s)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, {nu}=0) collisions have been measured in a wide range of relative velocity (2,5-30 km/s), by using the attenuation method. A significant improvement of accuracy is obtained, with respect to previous measurements, at low relative velocities. Total cross sections for H{sup *} and D{sup *}, as functions of the relative velocity, are different, especially in the low velocity range. H{sup *}+H{sub 2} total differential cross sections have also been measured, with an angular spread of 3.6deg, for two different collision energy distributions, centered respectively at 100 meV and 390 meV. A first attempt of theoretical analysis of the cross sections, by means of an optical potential, is presented. (orig.).

  6. The negative effect of starvation and the positive effect of mild thermal stress on thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Inon; Wexler, Yonatan; MacMillan, Heath Andrew; Presman, Shira; Simson, Eddie; Rosenstein, Shai

    2016-04-01

    The thermal tolerance of a terrestrial insect species can vary as a result of differences in population origin, developmental stage, age, and sex, as well as via phenotypic plasticity induced in response to changes in the abiotic environment. Here, we studied the effects of both starvation and mild cold and heat shocks on the thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Starvation led to impaired cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time, and this effect, which was stronger in males than females, persisted for longer than 2 days but less than 7 days. Heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time, was not affected by starvation. Our results highlight the difficulty faced by insects when encountering multiple stressors simultaneously and indicate physiological trade-offs. Both mild cold and heat shocks led to improved heat tolerance in both sexes. It could be that both mild shocks lead to the expression of heat shock proteins, enhancing heat tolerance in the short run. Cold tolerance was not affected by previous mild cold shock, suggesting that such a cold shock, as a single event, causes little stress and hence elicits only weak physiological reaction. However, previous mild heat stress led to improved cold tolerance but only in males. Our results point to both hardening and cross-tolerance between cold and heat shocks.

  7. The negative effect of starvation and the positive effect of mild thermal stress on thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Inon; Wexler, Yonatan; MacMillan, Heath Andrew; Presman, Shira; Simson, Eddie; Rosenstein, Shai

    2016-04-01

    The thermal tolerance of a terrestrial insect species can vary as a result of differences in population origin, developmental stage, age, and sex, as well as via phenotypic plasticity induced in response to changes in the abiotic environment. Here, we studied the effects of both starvation and mild cold and heat shocks on the thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Starvation led to impaired cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time, and this effect, which was stronger in males than females, persisted for longer than 2 days but less than 7 days. Heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time, was not affected by starvation. Our results highlight the difficulty faced by insects when encountering multiple stressors simultaneously and indicate physiological trade-offs. Both mild cold and heat shocks led to improved heat tolerance in both sexes. It could be that both mild shocks lead to the expression of heat shock proteins, enhancing heat tolerance in the short run. Cold tolerance was not affected by previous mild cold shock, suggesting that such a cold shock, as a single event, causes little stress and hence elicits only weak physiological reaction. However, previous mild heat stress led to improved cold tolerance but only in males. Our results point to both hardening and cross-tolerance between cold and heat shocks.

  8. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  9. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, Ivana; Cigasova, Julia; Stevulova, Nadezda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution) and physically (by ultrasonic procedure) treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  10. Thermal effects in high average power optical parametric amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, Jan; Demmler, Stefan; Hädrich, Steffen; Peschel, Thomas; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) have the reputation of being average power scalable due to the instantaneous nature of the parametric process (zero quantum defect). This Letter reveals serious challenges originating from thermal load in the nonlinear crystal caused by absorption. We investigate these thermal effects in high average power OPAs based on beta barium borate. Absorption of both pump and idler waves is identified to contribute significantly to heating of the nonlinear crystal. A temperature increase of up to 148 K with respect to the environment is observed and mechanical tensile stress up to 40 MPa is found, indicating a high risk of crystal fracture under such conditions. By restricting the idler to a wavelength range far from absorption bands and removing the crystal coating we reduce the peak temperature and the resulting temperature gradient significantly. Guidelines for further power scaling of OPAs and other nonlinear devices are given.

  11. Effect of thermal power plant emissions on Catharanthus roseus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A.M.; Pandey, V.; Shukla, J.; Singh, N.; Yunus, M.; Singh, S.N.; Ahmad, K.J. (National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow (India))

    1990-06-01

    Most of the industrialized nations depend largely on the combustion of fossil fuels for their energy requirements. During the past few years in India quite a few thermal power plants have been commissioned to cater to the increasing energy requirements. As most of the power plants are coal-fired, a complex mixture of several pollutants is released in the atmosphere on the combustion of coal. Leaves by virtue of their unique position on plants and their functions, experience the maximum brunt of exposure and undergo certain changes in form, structure and function with the changes in surrounding environs, and such modifications are likely to serve as markers of environmental pollution. The present paper deals with the long term exposure effects of thermal power plant emissions on Catharanthus roseus L. - a common perennial shrub, with glossy leaves and white, mauve or pink colored flowers and of great medicinal value is grown as an ornamental plant all over the country.

  12. Effective permittivity of saline ice under thermal variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Gow, A. J.; Arcone, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    A model for calculating the effective permittivity of saline ice under thermal variation is presented. The model includes multiphase inhomogeneities with multiple species characterized by orientation, size and shape distributions. The model is used to derive the effective permittivity as a function of temperature under the strong fluctuation theory which is extended to account for the complexity. The results calculated from the model are compared with experimental data at 4.8 GHz for saline ice grown at the US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL). The comparison between measured and calculated complex permittivities is good for the imaginary part, and the difference is within 10 percent for the real part.

  13. CROSSBREEDING EFFECTS IN FRIESIAN, JERSEY AND SAHIWAL CROSSES IN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ah mad, J.H.J. van der Werf1 and K.Javed

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on 4023 lactation records on purebred Sahiwal cows and 2391 lactation records of Holstein Friesian X Sahiwal (FS and Jersey X Sahiwal (JS crossbreds from Livestock Production Research Institute (LPRI Bahadurnagar, District Okara and Qadirabad District Sahiwal for the period 1973-1995, in Punjab, Pakistan were analysed. Crossbreeding effects were studied for production and reproduction traits: lactation milk yield (LMY, calving interval (CI, milk yield per day of calving interval (MCI, days open and days dry. Heterosis effects were significant (P<0.01 and in a favourable direction for all production and fertility traits in all groups. Compared with the mid-parent mean, the F I would increase LMY by 31 % in FS and by 41 % in JS crosses. The MCI would be increased in these crosses, by 49 % and 51 %, respectively. For reproduction traits there was a decrease in days open: 35 and 60 %; days dry: 41 and 72 % and CI: 15 and 20 % for FS and JS crosses, respectively. Heterosis effects were larger than breed additive effects. Additive breed effects for FS crosses were larger than for JS crosses, and FS crossbreds were superior to JS crossbreds in LMY and MCI. The recombination effects were found significant (P <0.01 for most of the traits in this study.

  14. Effects of β-sheet crystals and a glycine-rich matrix on the thermal conductivity of spider dragline silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinju; Kim, Duckjong; Lee, Seung-Mo; Choi, Ji-Ung; You, Myungil; So, Hye-Mi; Han, Junkyu; Nah, Junghyo; Seol, Jae Hun

    2017-03-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of Araneus ventricosus' spider dragline silk using a suspended microdevice. The thermal conductivity of the silk fiber was approximately 0.4Wm-1K-1 at room temperature and gradually increased with an increasing temperature in a manner similar to that of other disordered crystals or proteins. In order to elucidate the effect of β-sheet crystals in the silk, thermal denaturation was used to reduce the quantity of the β-sheet crystals. A calculation with an effective medium approximation supported this measurement result showing that the thermal conductivity of β-sheet crystals had an insignificant effect on the thermal conductivity of SDS. Additionally, the enhancement of bonding strength in a glycine-rich matrix by atomic layer deposition did not increase the thermal conductivity. Thus, this study suggests that the disordered part of the glycine-rich matrix prevented the peptide chains from being coaxially extended via the cross-linking covalent bonds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermal neutron capture cross section for Fe-56(n,gamma)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Firestone, R. B.; Belgya, T.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Tomandl, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 014328. ISSN 2469-9985 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07117S; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron cross section * gamma gamma-coincidence data Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  16. Enhanced Olefin Cross Metathesis Reactions: The Copper Iodide Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtritter, Karl; Ghorai, Subir

    2011-01-01

    Copper iodide has been shown to be an effective co-catalyst for the olefin cross metathesis reaction. In particular, it has both a catalyst stabilizing effect due to iodide ion, as well as copper(I)-based phosphine-scavenging properties that apply to use of the Grubbs-2 catalyst. A variety of Michael acceptors and olefinic partners can be cross-coupled under mild conditions in refluxing diethyl ether that avoid chlorinated solvents. This effect has also been applied to chemistry in water at room temperature using the new surfactant TPGS-750-M. PMID:21528868

  17. All-PP composites (PURE® with unidirectional and cross-ply lay-ups: dynamic mechanical thermal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available All polypropylene (all-PP composite laminates with unidirectional (UD and cross-ply (CP lay-ups were produced by hot consolidation from oriented coextruded PP tapes (PURE®. The consolidation of the tapes, wound on a steel plate, occurred in autoclave vacuum bag molding. The set processing conditions resulted in all-PP laminates of high rigidity as the PP copolymer surface layers of the tapes were molten and thus forming the matrix, while their PP homopolymer core remained unaffected and thus fulfilled its role as reinforcement. Specimens cut off from the laminates were subjected to dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA in a broad temperature range (T = –50…120°C at various frequencies (f = 10–2…101. For the DMTA results the time-temperature superposition principle was adopted and master curves in the form of storage modulus vs. frequency (f = 10–9…1020 and loss factor vs. frequency were created.

  18. High-resolution cross-borehole thermal tracer testing in granite: preliminary field results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixel, Bernard; Klepikova, Maria; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Understanding how heat is transported, stored and exchanged across fractured media is becoming increasingly relevant in our society, as manifested from the growing popularity of modern technologies relying on the subsurface to either source or store heat. One good example is the utilization of heat from deep hydrothermal or petrothermal systems to generate electricity for base load power generation, a technology also known as deep geothermal energy (DGE). While very attractive in principle, the number of geothermal fields producing economical levels of electricity to this day is still very limited - largely due to the difficulty of either locating deep reservoirs that are both sufficiently hot and permeable or, in the absence of the latter, creating them. In this context, the Swiss Competence Center for Energy Research - Supply of Electricity (SCCER - SoE) is carrying out an in situ stimulation and circulation (ISC) experiment at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), an underground rock lab located in the Aar massif, in the Swiss Alps. The circulation experiment planned for the post-stimulation phase represents one of the key components of this experimental research program, and the outcome of this test is expected to ultimately provide key insights in the factors controlling the performance of enhanced geothermal reservoirs. Therefore, to support the design of this experiment, short-term thermal tracer tests (TTT) were conducted with the objective to (i) assess the feasibility of conducting TTTs in a relatively intact granite (where fluid flow is controlled by a limited number of discrete fractures); (ii) determine optimal experimental setups; and to ultimately (iii) monitor thermal breakthroughs at high spatial and temporal resolution, providing insights on heat transport and complementing the characterization of hydrogeological conditions carried out through conventional means (e.g. hydraulic and/or solute tracer tests). Presented herein are the results of a 10-day

  19. Thermally Cross-Linked Anion Exchange Membranes from Solvent Processable Isoprene Containing Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-15

    using Friedel−Crafts alkylation chemistry .15 Recently, Wang and Hickner reported low-temperature cross-linking of styrene-based copolymers with pendent...Diffusion at Infinite Dilution. In CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 81st ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2001. (34) Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Chen, Q. Nat...5390− 5397. (37) Beers , K. M.; Balsara, N. P. ACS Macro Lett. 2012, 1, 1155− 1160. (38) Marino, M. G.; Melchior, J. P.; Wohlfarth, A.; Kreuer, K. D

  20. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  1. Finite-temperature effective boundary theory of the quantized thermal Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Ryota; Ryu, Shinsei; Nomura, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    A finite-temperature effective free energy of the boundary of a quantized thermal Hall system is derived microscopically from the bulk two-dimensional Dirac fermion coupled with a gravitational field. In two spatial dimensions, the thermal Hall conductivity of fully gapped insulators and superconductors is quantized and given by the bulk Chern number, in analogy to the quantized electric Hall conductivity in quantum Hall systems. From the perspective of effective action functionals, two disti...

  2. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Eduardo Alcides; Endler, Antônio; Rizzato, Felipe Barbedo

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12 3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compre...

  3. Thermal enhancement of interference effects in quantum point contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbout, Adel; Lemarié, Gabriel; Pichard, Jean-Louis

    2011-04-15

    We study an electron interferometer formed with a quantum point contact and a scanning probe tip in a two-dimensional electron gas. The images giving the conductance as a function of the tip position exhibit fringes spaced by half the Fermi wavelength. For a contact opened at the edges of a quantized conductance plateau, the fringes are enhanced as the temperature T increases and can persist beyond the thermal length l(T). This unusual effect is explained by assuming a simplified model: The fringes are mainly given by a contribution which vanishes when T→0 and has a decay characterized by a T-independent scale.

  4. Thermal Enhancement of Interference Effects in Quantum Point Contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Abbout, Adel; Lemarié, Gabriel; Pichard, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    We study an electron interferometer formed with a quantum point contact and a scanning probe tip in a two-dimensional electron gas. The images giving the conductance as a function of the tip position exhibit fringes spaced by half the Fermi wavelength. For a contact opened at the edges of a quantized conductance plateau, the fringes are enhanced as the temperature T increases and can persist beyond the thermal length l_T. This unusual effect is explained assuming a simplified model: The fring...

  5. Measuremental analysis of thermal performance of direct gain houses in Kanto district. Effects of thermal mass and caves; Kanto chiho ni tatsu direct gain jutaku no netsuseino jissoku. Netsuyoryo to hisashi no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K.; Sunaga, N.; Muro, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    The thermal performance of direct gain passive solar houses was measured. Mr. M`s two-storied RC residence with double glazing windows and thermal storage floors, walls and ceilings of brick or concrete was provided for measurement. Its double eaves of the south window and both SE and SW overhanging exterior walls play a role in sunshade. Mr. I`s two-storied wooden residence with thermal storage RC floors and brick walls, and no eaves of the south window and no overhanging exterior walls was also provided. The summer and winter measurement results were in complete contrast between the residences. In summer, large thermal mass and eaves of Mr. M`s residence were effective, while in winter, small thermal mass and no eaves of Mr. I`s residence were effective. The following ideas are important in design from the viewpoint of indoor thermal environment: a movable sunshade for taking in solar radiation as much as possible in winter, well-balanced arrangement of thermal storage parts with suitable thermal mass corresponding to movement of the sun, a large screen door for cross ventilation in summer, and a night insulation shutter for reducing heat loss in winter. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Electro-optical characteristics of indium tin oxide (ITO) films: effect of thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D.V.; Salehi, A.; Aliyu, Y.H.; Bunce, R.W. [University of Wales College of Cardiff (United Kingdom). School of Electrical, Electronics and System Engineering

    1996-02-01

    The effect of thermal annealing on the electrical and optical characteristics of ITO films prepared by reactive sputtering and thermal evaporation have been studied. The effect of the thermal annealing is to improve the conductivity and the optical transmission in the shorter wavelength region. The conductivity of the films increases with annealing temperature, this behaviour is associated with grain growth in the film. (author)

  7. Evaluation of different measurements for effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective thermal conductivity is generally recognized as the intrinsic factor to reveal the thermal responses of fibrous materials. Here, two typical measurements, the step-wise transient method and the guarded hot plate method, were utilized to identify their feasibility for the effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials (non-woven fabric and twill fabric with different stacking layers.

  8. Effect of composition on thermal conductivity of silica insulation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung; Kwon, Young-Pil; Kwon, Hyuk-Chon; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jae Chun

    2008-10-01

    Nano-sized fumed silica-based insulation media were prepared by adding TiO2 powders and ceramic fibers as opacifiers and structural integrity improvers, respectively. The high temperature thermal conductivities of the fumed silica-based insulation media were investigated using different types of TiO2 opacifier and by varying its content. The opacifying effects of nanostructured TiO2 powders produced by homogeneous precipitation process at low temperatures (HPPLT) were compared with those of commercial TiO2 powder. The nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder with a mean particle size of 1.8 microm was more effective to reduce radiative heat transfer than the commercial one with a similar mean particle size. The insulation samples with the HPPLT TiO2 powder showed about 46% lower thermal conductivity at temperatures of about 820 degrees C than those with the commercial one. This interesting result might be due to the more effective radiation scattering efficiency of the nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder which has better gap filling and coating capability in nano-sized composite compacts.

  9. Ion thermal and dispersion effects in Farley-Buneman instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, S. K., E-mail: sandeep.litt@usask.ca; Smolyakov, A. I., E-mail: andrei.smolyakov@usask.ca [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Hassan, E., E-mail: ehab@utexas.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Horton, W., E-mail: wendell.horton@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Applied Research Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Farley-Buneman modes are an example of the collisional instability, which is thought to be the dominant mechanism for the irregularities in low ionosphere region. Despite high collisionality due to electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions, the kinetic effects associated with finite temperature are important for determination of the mode frequencies and growth rate. This is especially important for ion component that is largely unmagnetized due to low ion cyclotron frequency. The ion thermal effects are strongly pronounced for shorter wavelengths and are crucial for the growth rate cut-off at high wavenumbers. We develop an extended fluid model for ion dynamics to incorporate the effects of ion thermal motion. The model is based on the extended MHD model that includes the evolution equations for higher order moments such as ion viscosity and ion heat flux. We also develop the generalized Chapman-Enskog closure model that provides exact linear closures based on the linearized kinetic equation. The results of these models are compared and tested against the linear kinetic model. The dispersion of Farley-Buneman modes and growth rate behavior are investigated in the short wavelength region.

  10. Total cross section of solid mesitylene, toluene and a mixture of them at thermal neutron energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Palomino, L.A. [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro (CNEA/UnCuyo), Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Cantargi, F. [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro (CNEA/UnCuyo), Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)], E-mail: cantargi@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Blostein, J.J. [Instituto Balseiro (CNEA/UnCuyo), Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Dawidowski, J.; Granada, J.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro (CNEA/UnCuyo), Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2009-01-15

    The total neutron cross sections of mesitylene, toluene and a solution 3:2 by volume of mesitylene and toluene were measured at the electron LINAC based pulsed neutron source of Centro Atomico Bariloche. Measurements were performed at 180 K, 120 K and 31.6 K for mesitylene and at 120 K and 31.6 K for toluene and a solution 3:2 by volume of mesitylene and toluene. The systems are potential moderator materials to be considered in the design of a cold neutron source due to their high resistance to radiation and the richness in low-energy excitations of their frequency spectra, that lead to produce an enhanced cold neutron flux.

  11. Reliability and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite insulating coatings on cooled hydrogen-oxygen rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. G., Jr.; Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structural integrity and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite coatings was conducted. These coatings were plasma sprayed onto the combustion side of water-cooled, 12.7-centimeter throat diameter, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chambers operating at 2.07 to 4.14 meganewtons per square meter chamber pressure. The metallic-ceramic composites functioned for six to 17 cycles and for as long as 213 seconds of rocket operations and could have probably provided their insulating properties for many additional cycles. The effective thermal conductivity of all the coatings was in the range of 0.7472 to 4.483 w/(m)(K), which makes the coatings a very effective thermal barrier. Photomicrographic studies of cross-sectioned coolant tubes seem to indicate that the effective thermal conductivity of the coatings is controlled by contact resistance between the particles, as a result of the spraying process, and not the thermal conductivity of the bulk materials.

  12. Thermal gradients in Southwestern United States and the effect on bridge bearing loads : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Thermal gradients became a component of bridge design after soffit cracking in prestressed concrete bridges was attributed to nonlinear temperature distribution through the depth of the bridge. While the effect of thermal gradient on stress distribut...

  13. Effective thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance of gas diffusion layers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Part 2: Hysteresis effect under cyclic compressive load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, E. [Dept. Mechanical Eng., and Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC (Canada); Mechatronic Systems Engineering, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada); Djilali, N. [Dept. Mechanical Eng., and Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC (Canada); Bahrami, M. [Mechatronic Systems Engineering, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Heat transfer through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) is a key process in the design and operation of a PEM fuel cell. The analysis of this process requires the determination of the effective thermal conductivity as well as the thermal contact resistance between the GDL and adjacent surfaces/layers. The Part 1 companion paper describes an experimental procedure and a test bed devised to allow separation of the effective thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance, and presents measurements under a range of static compressive loads. In practice, during operation of a fuel cell stack, the compressive load on the GDL changes. In the present study, experiments are performed on Toray carbon papers with 78% porosity and 5% PTFE under a cyclic compressive load. Results show a significant hysteresis in the loading and unloading cycle data for total thermal resistance, thermal contact resistance (TCR), effective thermal conductivity, thickness, and porosity. It is found that after 5 loading-unloading cycles, the geometrical, mechanical, and thermal parameters reach a ''steady-state'' condition and remain unchanged. A key finding of this study is that the TCR is the dominant component of the GDL total thermal resistance with a significant hysteresis resulting in up to a 34% difference between the loading and unloading cycle data. This work aims to clarify the impact of unsteady/cyclic compression on the thermal and structural properties of GDLs and provides new insights on the importance of TCR which is a critical interfacial transport phenomenon. (author)

  14. Investigating effect of different reflective surfaces on solar thermal collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yaw Long; Chin, Kiat Keong; Tay, Tee Tiong

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on the experiments conducted to investigate the efficiency of different type of reflecting surfaces used on solar thermal collector. Three types of commonly available reflective surfaces coated with silver colour acrylic paint, reflective aluminium foil and blank compact disc are investigated. In this paper, the effect of different reflective surfaces on the water container and parabolic concentrator dish are investigated. In the first experiment, two types of surfaces, coated with silver colour acrylic paint and black colour acrylic paint on an aluminium container are compared. The other factors that might influence the experiment outcome like the material, focal point, and weather condition are kept constant. The experiment results proved that black colour surface is better in absorbing heat reflected by the parabolic dish. The second experiment focused on investigating the effect of different reflective surfaces on the parabolic concentrator dish itself. These surfaces are tested on a parabolic disc of a static solar thermal collector that reflects heat from the sun to a body of water stored in a black colour aluminium container. The temperature of the water is measured at a predetermined interval to measure the efficiency of the reflective surfaces used. It is found that the aluminium reflective surface performed the best compared to the other surfaces.

  15. Effects of thermal treatments on donkey milk nutritional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, Paolo; Vincenzetti, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    Human breast milk is the best nutritional support to ensure right development and influence immune status of the newborn infant. However, when it is not possible to breast feed it may be necessary to use commercial infant formulas that mimic, where possible, the levels and types of nutrients present in human milk. Despite this, some formula-fed infants develop allergy and/or atopic disease compared to breast-fed infants. Most infants with cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) develop symptoms before 1 month of age, often within 1 week after introduction of cow's milk-based formula. Donkey milk may be considered a good substitute for cow's milk in feeding children with CMPA since its composition is very similar to human milk. An in-depth analysis of the donkey milk protein profile has been performed in this study. The interest was focused on the milk proteins considered safe for the prevention and treatment of various disorders in human. Since donkey milk supply is related to its seasonal availability during the year, in this study were evaluated the effects of different thermal treatments on the protein fractions of donkey milk. The results obtained in fresh, frozen, powdered and lyophilized donkey milk showed different values in total proteins, caseins, whey proteins and lysozyme content. This study demonstrated the possibility of using lyophilization in order to maintain the nutritional characteristics of donkey milk. The article presents some promising patents on the effects of thermal treatments on donkey milk nutritional characteristics.

  16. MMOD Protection and Degradation Effects for Thermal Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) environment overview Hypervelocity impact effects & MMOD shielding MMOD risk assessment process Requirements & protection techniques - ISS - Shuttle - Orion/Commercial Crew Vehicles MMOD effects on spacecraft systems & improving MMOD protection - Radiators Coatings - Thermal protection system (TPS) for atmospheric entry vehicles Coatings - Windows - Solar arrays - Solar array masts - EVA Handrails - Thermal Blankets Orbital Debris provided by JSC & is the predominate threat in low Earth orbit - ORDEM 3.0 is latest model (released December 2013) - http://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/ - Man-made objects in orbit about Earth impacting up to 16 km/s average 9-10 km/s for ISS orbit - High-density debris (steel) is major issue Meteoroid model provided by MSFC - MEM-R2 is latest release - http://www.nasa.gov/offices/meo/home/index.html - Natural particles in orbit about sun Mg-silicates, Ni-Fe, others - Meteoroid environment (MEM): 11-72 km/s Average 22-23 km/s.

  17. The effect of crossing legs on blood pressure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adiyaman, A.; Tosun, N.; Elving, L.D.; Deinum, J.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Thien, Th.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether crossing of the legs at the knee or at the ankles during blood pressure measurement in sitting position has an effect on blood pressure. METHODS: One hundred and eleven patients, 60 women, mean age 52+/-17 years (19-80): 49 chronically treated hypertensives, 28

  18. Trickle effects of cross-sector social partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kolk (Ans); W.M. van Dolen (Willemijn); M. Vock (Marlene)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCross-sector social partnerships are often studied from a macro and meso perspective, also in an attempt to assess effectiveness and societal impact. This paper pays specific attention to the micro perspective, i.e. individual interactions between and within organizations related to

  19. Cross-contamination in the kitchen: effect of hygiene measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Verhoeff-Bakkenes, L.; Nauta, M.J.; Jonge, de R.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To determine the effect of hygiene measures on cross-contamination of Campylobacter jejuni at home and to select a safe tracer organism for C. jejuni. Methods and Results: Comparative tests were conducted with nonpathogenic Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus casei and L. casei was chosen as

  20. Effective thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance of gas diffusion layers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Part 1: Effect of compressive load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, E. [Dept. Mechanical Eng., and Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC (Canada); Mechatronic Systems Engineering, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada); Djilali, N. [Dept. Mechanical Eng., and Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC (Canada); Bahrami, M. [Mechatronic Systems Engineering, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2011-01-01

    Heat transfer through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) is a key process in the design and operation of a PEM fuel cell. The analysis of this process requires determination of the effective thermal conductivity as well as the thermal contact resistance associated with the interface between the GDL and adjacent surfaces/layers. In the present study, a custom-made test bed that allows the separation of effective thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance in GDLs under vacuum and ambient conditions is described. Measurements under varying compressive loads are performed using Toray carbon paper samples with a porosity of 78% for a range of thicknesses. The measurements are complemented by compact analytical models that achieve good agreement with experimental data. A key finding is that thermal contact resistance is the dominant component of the total thermal resistance; neglecting this phenomenon may result in significant errors in evaluating heat transfer rates and temperature distributions. (author)

  1. Thermally and Electrically Conductive Nanopapers from Reduced Graphene Oxide: Effect of Nanoflakes Thermal Annealing on the Film Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mar Bernal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report a novel strategy to prepare graphene nanopapers from direct vacuum filtration. Instead of the conventional method, i.e., thermal annealing nanopapers at extremely high temperatures prepared from graphene oxide (GO or partially reduced GO, we fabricate our graphene nanopapers directly from suspensions of fully reduced graphene oxide (RGO, obtained after RGO and thermal annealing at 1700 °C in vacuum. By using this approach, we studied the effect of thermal annealing on the physical properties of the macroscopic graphene-based papers. Indeed, we demonstrated that the enhancement of the thermal and electrical properties of graphene nanopapers prepared from annealed RGO is strongly influenced by the absence of oxygen functionalities and the morphology of the nanoflakes. Hence, our methodology can be considered as a valid alternative to the classical approach.

  2. Bactericidal effects of reactive thermal plasma synthesized titanium dioxide photocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijay, M [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ananthapadmanabhan, P V; Sreekumar, K P [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Stengl, Vaclav [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, AS CR, v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Bondioli, Federica [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905 - 41100 Modena (Italy); Selvarajan, V, E-mail: vselvrjn47@rediffmail.co

    2010-02-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium oxide powder has been synthesized by reactive plasma processing. The precursor powder of TiH{sub 2} was oxidized 'in-flight' in a thermal plasma reactor to effect complete conversion of TiH{sub 2} to nano-sized TiO{sub 2} powder. Characterization of the powder by various analytical tools indicated that the powder consisted of nano-sized titanium dioxide particles consisting predominantly of the anatase phase. Bactericidal action of illuminated TiO{sub 2} on pure culture of Escherichia coli was studied. The plasma synthesized TiO{sub 2}nano powder catalyst was found to be highly effective for the killing of Escherichia coli. The efficiency of photocatalytic disinfection, used to inactivate Escherischia coli as function of time is discussed.

  3. Thermal, Squeezing and Compressibility Effects in Lubrication of Asymmetric Rollers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Prasad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamically heavily loaded rigid cylindrical rollers, lubricated by a thin compressible fluid film, are investigated for normal squeezing motion and cavitations. The lubricant is assumed to follow the non-Newtonian power-law fluid model where consistency and density of the lubricant vary with one dimensional pressure and temperature. The modified Reynolds pressure equation and thermal energy equation are derived and solved simultaneously by R-K Fehlberg method. Secant method is also applied in order to enforce the boundary condition at the outlet. It is observed that temperature has significant effects on consistency and density both. It is also to be noted that compressibility effect is even more significant when squeezing is taken into account.

  4. Effect of the environmental stimuli upon the human body in winter outdoor thermal environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Kondo, Emi; Ishii, Jin

    2013-01-01

    the psychological thermal responses of the human body and winter outdoor thermal environment variables. Subjective experiments were conducted in the winter outdoor environment. Environmental factors and human psychological responses were measured. The relationship between the psychological thermal responses...... of the human body and the outdoor thermal environment index ETFe (enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature) in winter was shown. The variables which influence the thermal sensation vote of the human body are air temperature, long-wave thermal radiation and short-wave solar radiation....... The variables that influence the thermal comfort vote of the human body are air temperature, humidity, short-wave solar radiation, long-wave thermal radiation, and heat conduction. Short-wave solar radiation, and heat conduction are among the winter outdoor thermal environment variables that affect...

  5. Thermal resistances of air in cavity walls and their effect upon the thermal insulation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkouche, S.M.A.; Cherier, M.K.; Hamdani, M.; Benamrane, N. [Application of Renewable Energies in Arid and Semi Arid Environments /Applied Research Unit on Renewable Energies/ EPST Development Center of Renewable Energies, URAER and B.P. 88, ZI, Gart Taam Ghardaia (Algeria); Benouaz, T. [University of Tlemcen, BP. 119, Tlemcen R.p. 13000 (Algeria); Yaiche, M.R. [Development Center of Renewable Energies, CDER and B.P 62, 16340, Route de l' Observatoire, Bouzareah, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-07-01

    The optimum thickness in cavity walls in buildings is determined under steady conditions; the heat transfer has been calculated according to ISO 15099:2003. Two forms of masonry units are investigated to conclude the advantage of high thermal emissivity. The paper presents also some results from a study of the thermal insulation performance of air cavities bounded by thin reflective material layer 'eta = 0.05'. The results show that the most economical cavity configuration depends on the thermal emissivity and the insulation material used.

  6. Electric field effects in combustion with non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Tiernan Albert

    Chemically reacting zones such as flames act as sources of charged species and can thus be considered as weakly-ionized plasmas. As such, the action of an externally applied electric field has the potential to affect the dynamics of reaction zones by enhancing transport, altering the local chemical composition, activating reaction pathways, and by providing additional thermal energy through the interaction of electrons with neutral molecules. To investigate these effects, one-dimensional simulations of reacting flows are performed including the treatment of charged species transport and non-thermal electron chemistry using a modified reacting fluid solver. A particular area of interest is that of plasma assisted ignition, which is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields by applied voltages across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the electron sub-fluid formed during the discharge. Strong electric fields cause charged species to be rapidly transported from the ignition zone across the domain in opposite directions as charge fronts, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect. This phenomenon results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time, accelerating electron impact dissociation processes. A semi-analytic model to represent this dynamic electrode effect is constructed to highlight the relative simplicity of the electrodynamic problem admitted by the far more detailed chemistry and transport. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame's preheat zone. The effect of nanosecond pulses are to

  7. Effect of microstructure of graphite on the nonreductive thermal ion emission in thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H Z; Jiang, S Y; Xiao, Y K

    2010-02-25

    The emission behavior of polyatomic ions in the ionization source of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) was investigated. The results suggest that the presence of a graphite promoter plays a key role for the formation and stable emission of polyatomic ions, such as M(2)X(+), M(2)BO(2)(+), Cs(2)NO(2)(+), and Cs(2)CNO(+). Our data further implied that the intensity of M(2)X(+) and M(2)BO(2)(+) increases and the emission temperature decreases with increasing cationic and anionic radius. During the boron isotopic measurement using the Cs(2)BO(2)(+)-graphite-PTIMS method, the isobaric interference ion Cs(2)CNO(+) cannot be transformed from nitrate or organic compounds containing an amide group but can be induced by the existence of trace amounts of boron because of its special electron-deficiency property (B(3+)). Characterization on the planar crystalline structure of various graphite samples with SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the relationship of the emission capacity of polyatomic ions and the crystal microstructure of graphite and provides direct evidence that graphite with a perfect parallel and equidistant layer orientation shows a beneficial effect on the emission of polyatomic ions in TIMS. The mechanism study on the formation of polyatomic ions opens the possibility to establish high precision methods for isotopic composition analysis of more nonmetal elements with the TIMS technique.

  8. Measurement of the thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral of the {sup 109}Ag(n,{gamma}){sup 110m}Ag reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, S.; Wada, H.; Furutaka, K.; Harada, H.; Katoh, T. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross section ({sigma}{sub 0}) and the resonance integral (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 109}Ag(n,{gamma}) reaction were measured by the activation and {gamma}-ray spectroscopic methods to develop a neutron flux monitor for the long irradiation. (author)

  9. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzova Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution and physically (by ultrasonic procedure treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  10. Thermal stability of the krypton Hall effect thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Krypton Large IMpulse Thruster (KLIMT ESA/PECS project, which has been implemented in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM and now is approaching its final phase, was aimed at incremental development of a ~500 W class Hall effect thruster (HET. Xenon, predominantly used as a propellant in the state-of-the-art HETs, is extremely expensive. Krypton has been considered as a cheaper alternative since more than fifteen years; however, to the best knowledge of the authors, there has not been a HET model especially designed for this noble gas. To address this issue, KLIMT has been geared towards operation primarily with krypton. During the project, three subsequent prototype versions of the thruster were designed, manufactured and tested, aimed at gradual improvement of each next exemplar. In the current paper, the heat loads in new engine have been discussed. It has been shown that thermal equilibrium of the thruster is gained within the safety limits of the materials used. Extensive testing with both gases was performed to compare KLIMT’s thermal behaviour when supplied with krypton and xenon propellants.

  11. Investigation of thermal effects in through-silicon vias using scanning thermal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgoszewski, Grzegorz; Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Babij, Michał; Baraniecki, Tomasz; Geer, Robert; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-11-01

    Results of quantitative investigations of copper through-silicon vias (TSVs) are presented. The experiments were performed using scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), enabling highly localized imaging of thermal contrast between the copper TSVs and the surrounding material. Both dc and ac active-mode SThM was used and differences between these variants are shown. SThM investigations of TSVs may provide information on copper quality in TSV, as well as may lead to quantitative investigation of thermal boundaries in micro- and nanoelectronic structures. A proposal for heat flow analysis in a TSV, which includes the influence of the boundary region between the TSV and the silicon substrate, is presented; estimation of contact resistance and boundary thermal conductance is also given. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental and modeling study of forest fire effect on soil thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen M. Smits; Elizabeth Kirby; William J. Massman; Scott Baggett

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of soil thermal conductivity after a wildfire or controlled burn is important to land management and post-fire recovery efforts. Although soil thermal conductivity has been well studied for non-fire heated soils, comprehensive data that evaluate the long-term effect of extreme heating from a fire on the soil thermal conductivity are limited....

  13. The effects of actinide based fuels on incremental cross sections in a Candu reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morreale, A.C.; Ball, M.R.; Novog, D.R.; Luxat, J.C., E-mail: morreaac@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ballmr@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: novog@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel such as the extraction of actinide materials for use in mixed oxide fuels is a key component of reducing the end waste from nuclear power plant operations. Using recycled spent fuels in current reactors is becoming a popular option to help close the fuel cycle. In order to ensure safe and consistent operations in existing facilities, the properties of these fuels must be compatible with current reactor designs. This paper examines the features of actinide mixed oxide fuel, TRUMOX, in a CANDU reactor. Specifically, the effect of this fuel design on the incremental cross sections related to the use of adjuster rods is investigated. The actinide concentrations studied in this work were based on extraction from thirty year cooled spent fuel and mixed with natural uranium to yield a MOX fuel of 4.75% actinide by weight. The incremental cross sections were calculated using the DRAGON neutron transport code. The results for the actinide fuel were compared to those for standard natural uranium fuel and for a slightly enriched (1% U-235) fuel designed to reduce void reactivity. Adjuster reactivity effect calculations and void reactivity simulations were also performed. The impact of the adjuster on reactivity decreased by as much as 56% with TRUMOX fuel while the CVR was reduced by 71% due to the addition of central burnable poison. The incremental cross sections were largely affected by the use of the TRUMOX fuel primarily due to its increased level of fissile material (five times that of NU). The largest effects are in the thermal neutron group where the Σ{sub T} value is increased by 46.7%, the Σ{sub ny)} values increased by 13.0% and 9.9%. The value associated with thermal fission, υΣ{sub f}, increased by 496.6% over regular natural uranium which is expected due to the much higher reactivity of the fuel. (author)

  14. Effect of orbital and ionic dynamics coupling in barrier crossing rates for Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanam, L. N.; Ong, S. W.; Tok, E. S.; Kang, H. C.

    2015-02-01

    Even though the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) method provides excellent sampling for thermal equilibrium, coupling between ionic motion and the fictitious orbital dynamics leads to an underestimation of ionic vibration frequencies In this letter we examine how this coupling affects calculated rates of energy-barrier crossing. Simulating double-well potentials in 'toy' models based on H3O2- and H5O2+ complexes, we demonstrate that barrier crossing rates can be dramatically affected depending upon how orbitals evolve at the top of the reaction barrier. Thus, it is important that calculated dynamical quantities such as chemical reaction rates be assessed for this coupling effect.

  15. NOUR. Daylighting and thermal effects of windows in desert houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouahrani, Djamel

    1999-07-01

    This study is on a combined effect of window, the daylighting and the thermal effects, in desert houses. It is comprised of two complementary studies. In the introduction a historical review on the development of using daylight has been carried out in order to place the case study in a historical perspective. The first study is comprehensive and contains two main parts. In the first part a study was carried out on the people and history of the town of Ghardaia in Southern Algeria. This was done in order to understand the architectural form of that region. The second part is experimental and consists of two field studies carried out in Ghardaia. Their aim was to investigate the influence of daylight and temperature on the use of residential houses. This investigation included both traditional and 'modern' houses, the modern having relatively large windows similar to those of the northern part of Algeria, the traditional ones having small or no windows. The second study is also experimental consisting of computer parametric studies on window design from two standpoints, namely daylighting level and thermal effects of windows in desert houses. A typical traditional house is described as it was observed. Then the recorded light values are presented and commented upon. In the second part, three types of modern houses observed in the field studies are presented and compared to the traditional archetype. The comparison especially dwells on the relative effectiveness of the two systems of daylighting. In the third part, focusing on various issues of lighting, the results of interviews with the inhabitants are presented. The historical studies indicate that the process of housing development, in several respects, has reached a certain quality (social, technology, and adaptation to climate) appropriate to the local original context, but that development has slowed down. The results of the lighting study indicate that the use of more windows in modern houses

  16. Deposition stress effects on thermal barrier coating burner rig life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  17. Thermal and viscous effects on sound waves: revised classical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony M J; Brenner, Howard

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the recently developed, bi-velocity model of fluid mechanics based on the principles of linear irreversible thermodynamics (LIT) is applied to sound propagation in gases taking account of first-order thermal and viscous dissipation effects. The results are compared and contrasted with the classical Navier-Stokes-Fourier results of Pierce for this same situation cited in his textbook. Comparisons are also made with the recent analyses of Dadzie and Reese, whose molecularly based sound propagation calculations furnish results virtually identical with the purely macroscopic LIT-based bi-velocity results below, as well as being well-supported by experimental data. Illustrative dissipative sound propagation examples involving application of the bi-velocity model to several elementary situations are also provided, showing the disjoint entropy mode and the additional, evanescent viscous mode.

  18. Radiation and thermal effects on cobalt retention by Mexican aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Rangel, J.I. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D. F. (Mexico); Unidad Academica Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Frac. La Penuela, Zacatecas, Zacatecas 98068 (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100 Col. Centro C. P. 50000, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Solache-Rios, M. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D. F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: msr@nuclear.inin.mx; Nunez-Monreal, J.E. [Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimicas, Programa de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Km. 0.5 Carr. a Cd. Cuauhtemoc., Guadalupe, Zacatecas 98600 (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cobalt from two cobalt exchanged zeolites and one clay were determined. The cobalt exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 deg. C), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 and 5 M) and HNO{sub 3} (0.001 and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behavior of cobalt from the materials. Cobalt showed greater stability when the materials were heated at the highest temperature. The unheated samples and those heated at 1100 deg. C were gamma irradiated, and it was found that cobalt leaching from gamma irradiated aluminosilicates was higher than that for non-irradiated materials.

  19. Isotope Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengji Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity (TC of isolated graphene with different concentrations of isotope (C13 is studied with equilibrium molecular dynamics method at 300 K. In the limit of pure C12 or C13 graphene, TC of graphene in zigzag and armchair directions are ~630 W/mK and ~1000W/mK, respectively. We find that the TC of graphene can be maximally reduced by ~80%, in both armchair and zigzag directions, when a random distribution of C12 and C13 is assumed at different doping concentrations. Therefore, our simulation results suggest an effective way to tune the TC of graphene without changing its atomic and electronic structure, thus yielding a promising application for nanoelectronics and thermoelectricity of graphene-based nano device.

  20. Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Silicate Matrix for Applications in Effective Media Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Lukáš; Jerman, Miloš; Reiterman, Pavel; Černý, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Silicate materials have an irreplaceable role in the construction industry. They are mainly represented by cement-based- or lime-based materials, such as concrete, cement mortar, or lime plaster, and consist of three phases: the solid matrix and air and water present in the pores. Therefore, their effective thermal conductivity depends on thermal conductivities of the involved phases. Due to the time-consuming experimental determination of the effective thermal conductivity, its calculation by means of homogenization techniques presents a reasonable alternative. In the homogenization theory, both volumetric content and particular property of each phase need to be identified. For porous materials the most problematic part is to accurately identify thermal conductivity of the solid matrix. Due to the complex composition of silicate materials, the thermal conductivity of the matrix can be determined only approximately, based on the knowledge of thermal conductivities of its major compounds. In this paper, the thermal conductivity of silicate matrix is determined using the measurement of a sufficiently large set of experimental data. Cement pastes with different open porosities are prepared, dried, and their effective thermal conductivity is determined using a transient heat-pulse method. The thermal conductivity of the matrix is calculated by means of extrapolation of the effective thermal conductivity versus porosity functions to zero porosity. Its practical applicability is demonstrated by calculating the effective thermal conductivity of a three-phase silicate material and comparing it with experimental data.

  1. Effect of wind, thermal convection, and variation in flight strategies on the daily rhythm and flight paths of migrating raptors at Georgia's Black Sea coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vansteelant, W.M.G.; Verhelst, B.; Shamoun-Baranes, J.; Bouten, W.; van Loon, E.E.; Bildstein, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    Every autumn, large numbers of raptors migrate through geographical convergence zones to avoid crossing large bodies of water. At coastal convergence zones, raptors may aggregate along coastlines because of convective or wind conditions. However, the effect of wind and thermal convection on

  2. Evidence of Non-local Chemical, Thermal and Gravitational Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu H.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum entanglement is ubiquitous in the microscopic world and manifests itself macroscopically under some circumstances. But common belief is that it alone cannot be used to transmit information nor could it be used to produce macroscopic non- local effects. Yet we have recently found evidence of non-local effects of chemical substances on the brain produced through it. While our reported results are under independent verifications by other groups, we report here our experimental findings of non-local chemical, thermal and gravitational effects in simple physical systems such as reservoirs of water quantum-entangled with water being manipulated in a remote reservoir. With the aids of high-precision instruments, we have found that the pH value, temperature and gravity of water in the detecting reservoirs can be non-locally affected through manipulating water in the remote reservoir. In particular, the pH value changes in the same direction as that being manipulated; the temperature can change against that of local environment; and the gravity apparently can also change against local gravity. These non-local effects are all reproducible and can be used for non-local signalling and many other purposes. We suggest that they are mediated by quantum entanglement between nuclear and/or electron spins in treated water and discuss the implications of these results.

  3. Integrin-targeting thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for combined cancer imaging and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Kyung; Park, Jinho; Jon, Sangyong [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Chemdangwagi-ro, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong Yeon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Jeonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, 160 Ilsim-ri, Hwasun-eup, Jeonnam 519-809 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: syjon@gist.ac.kr [Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    We report multifunctional nanoparticles that are capable of cancer targeting and simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy. The nanoparticles are composed of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide ligand bioconjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) that enable loading of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox). The cyclic RGD-conjugated TCL-SPION (cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION) had a mean hydrodynamic size of 34 {+-} 8 nm with approximately 0.39 wt% of cyclic RGD attached to the surface of the nanoparticles. The cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION exhibited preferential binding towards target cancer cells (U87MG, integrin {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} +) when analyzed by T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. When Dox was loaded onto the polymeric coating layers of cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION via ionic interaction, the resulting Dox-loaded cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION (Dox-cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION) showed much higher cytotoxicity in U87MG cells than Dox-TCL-SPION lacking cRGD (IC{sub 50} value of 0.02 {mu}M versus 0.12 {mu}M). These results suggest that Dox-cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION has potential for use as an integrin-targeted, combined imaging and therapeutic agent.

  4. Thermal Transport in Supported Graphene: Substrate Effects on Collective Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    France-Lanord, Arthur; Soukiassian, Patrick; Glattli, Christian; Wimmer, Erich

    2017-03-01

    A detailed computational analysis of thermal transport in supported graphene reveals the possibility of tuning its thermal conductivity by targeted chemical modifications of the substrate's surface. Based on classical molecular dynamics with an accurate charge-optimized bond-order force field and a time-domain normal-mode analysis, our approach allows us to distinguish collective from single-phonon excitations. The computations reveal a disproportional reduction of the thermal conductivity, due to the two different excitations, when graphene interacts with a substrate. Deposition of graphene on a bare silica surface leads to a dramatic reduction of the thermal conductivity and a change in the heat transport mechanism. Remarkably, partial hydroxylation of the silica surface almost doubles the thermal conductivity of the collective excitations. Thus, specific surface terminations allow for control of the thermal conductivity of graphene.

  5. The effect of the thermal inertia on the thermal transfer in building wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahcene, Lahcene; Cheknane, Ali; Bekkouche, SMA.; Sahel, Djemal

    2017-11-01

    In a hot and dry climate, the design and construction of buildings involve the adoption of combination between shape of building envelope and construction materials. The objective of this work is to study the thermal behavior of a multilayer wall submitted to varying climatic conditions. We have proposed four configurations of an element of an outer wall. A numerical simulation was used to understand the phenomenon of thermal inertia, especially its influence on the resulting temperatures. The study is based on the modeling of heat transfer in a 2D unsteady-state using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The comparison of numerical results was affected with an available experimental data and shows a satisfactory agreement. In addition, this work highlights the importance of the study of the thermal inertia of the wall in order to ensure a comfortable indoor climate of building located in hot and dry climate.

  6. Preliminary investigation of the thermal antinociceptive effects of codeine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Monteiro, Beatriz P; Lavoie, Anne-Marie; Troncy, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential thermal antinociceptive effects of oral administration of a single dose of codeine in cats compared with positive (buprenorphine) and negative (saline 0.9%) controls. Six adult healthy cats weighing 5.14 ± 0.6 kg were used. Skin temperature and thermal thresholds (TTs) were evaluated using a wireless device (Topcat Metrology) at baseline, 0.5, 1, 3, 6 and 10 h after treatment. In period 1, TTs were evaluated after subcutaneous administration of saline 0.9%. In period 2, cats were administered either oral codeine (10 mg total, 2.0 ± 0.2 mg/kg) or buccal buprenorphine (0.04 mg/kg) in a cross-over, blinded study design. Half of the volume of buprenorphine was administered into each cheek pouch. Δ TT (difference between TTs after and before treatment) was used for data comparison. Mean ± SD data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's or Tukey's test when appropriate (P codeine. Buprenorphine increased Δ TT at 3 h (2.7 ± 3.3°C) when compared with baseline or saline (P 47.6°C at any time point in four cats. The mean highest temperature recorded in the two other cats in that group was 54.5 and 52.8°C at 3 h. At the dose administered, codeine did not produce thermal antinociception. Mild increases in TT after buccal buprenorphine might be related to the first-pass effect after drug swallowing, drug spillage during administration and/or individual variability. These factors should be taken in to consideration when administering buprenorphine by this route in the clinical setting. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  7. Evolving artificial neural networks for cross-adaptive audio effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jordal, Iver

    2017-01-01

    Cross-adaptive audio effects have many applications within music technology, including for automatic mixing and live music. Commonly used methods of signal analysis capture the acoustical and mathematical features of the signal well, but struggle to capture the musical meaning. Together with the vast number of possible signal interactions, this makes manual exploration of signal interactions difficult and tedious. This project investigates Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods for finding usef...

  8. Piezoelectric effect on the thermal conductivity of monolayer gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations, in this work, we find that the heat transport property of the monolayer gallium nitride (GaN) can be efficiently tailored by external electric field due to its unique piezoelectric characteristic. As the monolayer GaN possesses different piezoelectric properties in armchair and zigzag directions, different effects of the external electric field on thermal conductivity are observed when it is applied in the armchair and zigzag directions. Our further study reveals that due to the elastoelectric effect in the monolayer GaN, the external electric field changes the Young's modulus and therefore changes the phonon group velocity. Also, due to the inverse piezoelectric effect, the applied electric field induces in-plane stress in the monolayer GaN subject to a length constraint, which results in the change in the lattice anharmonicity and therefore affects the phonon mean free path. Furthermore, for relatively long GaN monolayers, the in-plane stress may trigger the buckling instability, which can significantly reduce the phonon mean free path.

  9. Size-dependent effects in exchange-biased planar Hall effect sensor crosses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2011-01-01

    Exchange-biased planar Hall effect magnetic field sensor crosses with arm width w have been studied as function of w. For large values of w, the magnetic behavior is hysteresis-free and follows the single domain Stoner-Wohlfarth model. When w is decreased, hysteresis is observed in the sensor...... by an increasing magnetic shape anisotropy of the arms of the cross. We propose a simple analytical model that captures the essential physics of the observations and parameterizes the effects of the cross-shape on the central part of the cross. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3561364]...

  10. Thermal-neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of {sup 138}Ba and {sup 141}Pr using Am-Be neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Karnataka (India)

    2016-09-15

    The thermal-neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of {sup 138}Ba(n, γ){sup 139}Ba and {sup 141}Pr(n, γ){sup 142}Pr were measured by activation method using an isotopic Am-Be neutron source. The estimations were with respect to that of {sup 55}Mn(n, γ){sup 56}Mn and {sup 197}Au(n, γ){sup 198}Au reference monitors. The measured thermal-capture cross section of {sup 138}Ba with respect to {sup 55}Mn is 0.410±0.023 b and with respect to {sup 197}Au is 0.386±0.019 b. The measured thermal-capture cross section of {sup 141}Pr with respect to {sup 55}Mn is 11.36±1.29 b and with respect to {sup 197}Au is 10.43±1.14 b. The resonance integrals for {sup 138}Ba are 0.380±0.033 b ({sup 55}Mn) and 0.364±0.027 b ({sup 197}Au) and for {sup 141}Pr are 21.05±2.88 b ({sup 55}Mn) and 15.27±1.87 b ({sup 197}Au). The comparison between the present measurements and various reported values are discussed. The cross sections corresponding to the selected isotopes are measured using an Am-Be source facility for the first time. (orig.)

  11. THERMAL INSULATION EFFECTS ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF BUILDING STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cvetkovska; Knezevic, M.; Rogac, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the use of Finite Element Method for heat transfer analysis. Connections wall-beam-floor structures with different positions of the thermal insulation have been analyzed and conclusions about energy efficiency and energy loss are made. Keywords: heat transfer, numerical analysis, finite elements, thermal insulation, energy efficiency.

  12. Effect of organic modification on the thermal transformations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis techniques were used to study the thermal transforma- tions of raw (Maghnia bentonite) and modified bentonite (algae extract (ulvans) within clay). XRD data showed that the basal spacing (d001) was gradually decreased from ∼12.80 Å (6.90◦ (2θ)) at room temperature ...

  13. Effect of thermal processing methods on the proximate composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutritive value of raw and thermal processed castor oil seed (Ricinus communis) was investigated using the following parameters; proximate composition, gross energy, mineral constituents and ricin content. Three thermal processing methods; toasting, boiling and soaking-and-boiling were used in the processing of the ...

  14. Mechanical properties and shape memory effect of thermal-responsive polymer based on PVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liulan; Zhang, Lingfeng; Guo, Yanwei

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the effect of content of glutaraldehyde (GA) on the shape memory behavior of a shape memory polymer based on polyvinyl alcohol chemically cross-linked with GA was investigated. Thermal-responsive shape memory composites with three different GA levels, GA-PVA (3 wt%, 5 wt%, 7 wt%), were prepared by particle melting, mold forming and freeze–drying technique. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and shape memory behavior were measured by differential scanning calorimeter, physical bending test and cyclic thermo-mechanical test. The addition of GA to PVA led to a steady shape memory transition temperature and an improved mechanical compressive strength. The composite with 5 wt% of GA exhibited the best shape recoverability. Further increase in the crosslinking agent content of GA would reduce the recovery force and prolong the recovery time due to restriction in the movement of the soft PVA chain segments. These results provide important information for the study on materials in 4D printing.

  15. Nonlinear dynamical effects on reaction rates in thermally fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2010-07-21

    A framework to calculate the rate constants of condensed phase chemical reactions of manybody systems is presented without relying on the concept of transition state. The theory is based on a framework we developed recently adopting a multidimensional underdamped Langevin equation in the region of a rank-one saddle. The theory provides a reaction coordinate expressed as an analytical nonlinear functional of the position coordinates and velocities of the system (solute), the friction constants, and the random force of the environment (solvent). Up to moderately high temperature, the sign of the reaction coordinate can determine the final destination of the reaction in a thermally fluctuating media, irrespective of what values the other (nonreactive) coordinates may take. In this paper, it is shown that the reaction probability is analytically derived as the probability of the reaction coordinate being positive, and that the integration with the Boltzmann distribution of the initial conditions leads to the exact reaction rate constant when the local equilibrium holds and the quantum effect is negligible. Because of analytical nature of the theory taking into account all nonlinear effects and their combination with fluctuation and dissipation, the theory naturally provides us with the firm mathematical foundation of the origin of the reactivity of the reaction in a fluctuating media.

  16. Effect of the Environmental Stimuli upon the Human Body in Winter Outdoor Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Kondo, Emi; Ishii, Jin; Sakoi, Tomonori; Fukagawa, Kenta; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Tsuchikawa, Tadahiro; Matsubara, Naoki; Horikoshi, Tetsumi

    2013-01-01

    In order to manage the outdoor thermal environment with regard to human health and the environmental impact of waste heat, quantitative evaluations are indispensable. It is necessary to use a thermal environment evaluation index. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and winter outdoor thermal environment variables. Subjective experiments were conducted in the winter outdoor environment. Environmental factors and human psychological responses were measured. The relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and the outdoor thermal environment index ETFe (enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature) in winter was shown. The variables which influence the thermal sensation vote of the human body are air temperature, long-wave thermal radiation and short-wave solar radiation. The variables that influence the thermal comfort vote of the human body are air temperature, humidity, short-wave solar radiation, long-wave thermal radiation, and heat conduction. Short-wave solar radiation, and heat conduction are among the winter outdoor thermal environment variables that affect psychological responses to heat. The use of thermal environment evaluation indices that comprise short-wave solar radiation and heat conduction in winter outdoor spaces is a valid approach. PMID:23861691

  17. Effect of the Environmental Stimuli upon the Human Body in Winter Outdoor Thermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito Kurazumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to manage the outdoor thermal environment with regard to human health and the environmental impact of waste heat, quantitative evaluations are indispensable. It is necessary to use a thermal environment evaluation index. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and winter outdoor thermal environment variables. Subjective experiments were conducted in the winter outdoor environment. Environmental factors and human psychological responses were measured. The relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and the outdoor thermal environment index ETFe (enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature in winter was shown. The variables which influence the thermal sensation vote of the human body are air temperature, long-wave thermal radiation and short-wave solar radiation. The variables that influence the thermal comfort vote of the human body are air temperature, humidity, short-wave solar radiation, long-wave thermal radiation, and heat conduction. Short-wave solar radiation, and heat conduction are among the winter outdoor thermal environment variables that affect psychological responses to heat. The use of thermal environment evaluation indices that comprise short-wave solar radiation and heat conduction in winter outdoor spaces is a valid approach.

  18. Competition between the Thermal Gradient and the Bimorph Effect in Locally Heated MEMS Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of thermal gradient effects in inhomogeneously heated MEMS/NEMS. The actuation perturbations caused by thermal gradients have been studied through static optothermal actuation experiments of a bi-material polymer based cantilever and supported by finite element...... modeling. As a result, bidirectional bending has been experimentally observed and interpreted as the competition between bimorph and thermal gradient effects. The competition has illustrated the importance of including the thermal gradient effect in the behavior analysis of bimorph driven MEMS/NEMS devices....

  19. Effective Thermal Conductivity of an Aluminum Foam + Water Two Phase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskito, John

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effect of volume fraction and pore size on the effective thermal conductivity of an aluminum foam and water system. Nine specimens of aluminum foam representing a matrix of three volume fractions (4-8% by vol.) and three pore sizes (2-4 mm) were tested with water to determine relationships to the effective thermal conductivity. It was determined that increases in volume fraction of the aluminum phase were correlated to increases in the effective thermal conductivity. It was not statistically possible to prove that changes in pore size of the aluminum foam correlated to changes in the effective thermal conductivity. However, interaction effects between the volume fraction and pore size of the foam were statistically significant. Ten theoretical models were selected from the published literature to compare against the experimental data. Models by Asaad, Hadley, and de Vries provided effective thermal conductivity predictions within a 95% confidence interval.

  20. Effect of surrogate aggregates on the thermal conductivity of concrete at ambient and elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Tae Sup; Jeong, Yeon Jong; Youm, Kwang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100 °C during heating to ~800 °C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m(-1) K(-1). The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating.

  1. Effect of Surrogate Aggregates on the Thermal Conductivity of Concrete at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sup Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100°C during heating to ~800°C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m−1 K−1. The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating.

  2. effect of pre effect of pre-ageing thermal conditions on the corrosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: Al-Si-Mg alloy, thermal ageing, polarization, eutectics, interdendritic spacing. 1. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. Corrosion of aluminium alloys lead to impairment of its operation and progressive weakening of that structure. The consequences of corrosion are many, and its effects on safety, ...

  3. Effect of Ionizing Beta Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of Poly(ethylene under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarik Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found in this study, that ionizing beta radiation has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of poly(ethylene. In recent years, there have been increasing requirements for quality and cost effectiveness of manufactured products in all areas of industrial production. These requirements are best met with the polymeric materials, which have many advantages in comparison to traditional materials. The main advantages of polymer materials are especially in their ease of processability, availability, and price of the raw materials. Radiation crosslinking is one of the ways to give the conventional plastics mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of expensive and highly resistant construction polymers. Several types of ionizing radiation are used for crosslinking of polymers. Each of them has special characteristics. Electron beta and photon gamma radiation are used the most frequently. The great advantage is that the crosslinking occurs after the manufacturing process at normal temperature and pressure. The main purpose of this paper has been to determine the effect of ionizing beta radiation on the tensile modulus, strength and elongation of low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 99 kGy were compared and on the test temperature. Radiation cross-linking of LDPE and HDPE results in increased tensile strength and modulus, and decreased of elongation. The measured results indicate that ionizing beta radiation treatment is effective tool for improvement of mechanical properties of LDPE and HDPE under thermal stress.

  4. Aging Effects and Estimating Degradation Mechanisms of Thermally Upgraded Paper in Mineral Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Katsunori; Oe, Etsuo; Yamagata, Naoki

    The life of a transformer is limited to the deterioration of its solid insulation. Winding conductors and other solid insulation materials in oil-immersed transformers have been insulated using cellulose products. For many years, manufacturers have met the needs of special applications by designing transformers using thermally upgraded materials to achieve lighter weight, higher power density and increased life. Recently, the effect of thermally upgraded insulation on diagnostic techniques such as gas-in oil analysis, and their indication of insulation degradation have been reviewed. This paper describes evaluations of the thermal degradation characteristics and decomposition reactions in mineral transformer oil of amine-impregnated thermally upgraded paper insulation. The thermal resistance of the thermally upgraded paper is evaluated by comparison with Kraft paper insulation. Further, aging degradation mechanisms of decompositional degradation of the thermally upgraded paper due to aging in mineral transformer oil are proposed.

  5. The InSight Mars Lander and Its Effect on the Subsurface Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Matthew A.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Grott, Matthias; Piqueux, Sylvain; Mueller, Nils; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Spohn, Tilman

    2017-10-01

    The 2018 InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Mission has the mission goal of providing insitu data for the first measurement of the geothermal heat flow of Mars. The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) will take thermal conductivity and thermal gradient measurements to approximately 5 m depth. By necessity, this measurement will be made within a few meters of the lander. This means that thermal perturbations from the lander will modify local surface and subsurface temperature measurements. For HP3's sensitive thermal gradient measurements, this spacecraft influence will be important to model and parameterize. Here we present a basic 3D model of thermal effects of the lander on its surroundings. Though lander perturbations significantly alter subsurface temperatures, a successful thermal gradient measurement will be possible in all thermal conditions by proper (>3 m depth) placement of the heat flow probe.

  6. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  7. Cosmological phases of the string thermal effective potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourliot, F., E-mail: Francois.Bourliot@cpht.polytechnique.f [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau cedex (France); Estes, J., E-mail: John.Estes@cpth.polytechnique.f [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau cedex (France); Kounnas, C., E-mail: Costas.Kounnas@lpt.ens.f [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Partouche, H., E-mail: Herve.Partouche@cpht.polytechnique.f [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2010-05-01

    In a superstring framework, the free energy density F can be determined unambiguously at the full string level once supersymmetry is spontaneously broken via geometrical fluxes. We show explicitly that only the moduli associated to the supersymmetry breaking may give relevant contributions. All other spectator moduli mu{sub I} give exponentially suppressed contributions for relatively small (as compared to the string scale) temperature T and supersymmetry breaking scale M. More concisely, for mu{sub I}>T and M, F takes the form F(T,M;mu{sub I})=F(T,M)+O[exp(-(mu{sub I})/T ),exp(-(mu{sub I})/M )]. We study the cosmological regime where T and M are below the Hagedorn temperature scale T{sub H}. In this regime, F remains finite for any values of the spectator moduli mu{sub I}. We investigate extensively the case of one spectator modulus mu{sub d} corresponding to R{sub d}, the radius-modulus field of an internal compactified dimension. We show that its thermal effective potential V(T,M;mu)=F(T,M;mu) admits five phases, each of which can be described by a distinct but different effective field theory. For late cosmological times, the Universe is attracted to a 'Radiation-like evolution' with M(t)propor toT(t)propor to1/a(t)propor tot{sup -2/d}. The spectator modulus mu(t) is stabilized either to the stringy enhanced symmetry point where R{sub d}=1, or fixed at an arbitrary constant mu{sub 0}>T,M. For arbitrary boundary conditions at some initial time, t{sub E}, mu(t) may pass through more than one effective field theory phase before its final attraction.

  8. The effects of deep water cycling on planetary thermal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Constantin; Lenardic, Adrian; McGovern, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    We use a parameterized convection model to investigate the effects of deep water cycling on the thermal evolution of an Earth-like planet. The model incorporates two water reservoirs, a surface and an interior mantle reservoir. Exchange between the two is calculated using a mantle convection parameterization that allows for temperature- and water-dependent mantle viscosity together with internally self-consistent degassing and regassing parameterizations. The balance between degassing and regassing depends on the average spreading rate of tectonic plates, the amount of water partitioned into melt, the thickness of a mantle melt zone, and of a hydrated layer at the top of subducting plates. Degassing scales with melt zone thickness such that an early period of extensive melting would create a drier and more viscous mantle, shifting the solidus line in a direction that would reduce the melt zone thickness and the rate of mantle heat loss. Coupling a hydrated zone thickness-dependent regassing factor to the model, to mimic water delivery to the mantle via a serpentinized layer, allows for the potential of a reversing point where the overall water flow direction switches from degassing to regassing as the mantle cools. The water effect on viscosity creates a negative feedback that tends to regulate the final amount of water in the mantle so it is not strongly dependent on the initial amount of planetary water. The final amount of water in the surface reservoir is then determined by this feedback effect together with the initial water budget of the entire planet. This implies that if the initial water budget of a planet can be estimated, from planetary formation models, then the volume of surface water can be used to estimate the volume of water in the mantle of an Earth-like planet. Applying this methodology to the Earth leads to predictions for water concentration in the Earth's mantle that are in line with geochemical and petrological constraints.

  9. Microscopic description of production cross sections including deexcitation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Background: At the forefront of the nuclear science, production of new neutron-rich isotopes is continuously pursued at accelerator laboratories all over the world. To explore the currently unknown territories in the nuclear chart far away from the stability, reliable theoretical predictions are inevitable. Purpose: To provide a reliable prediction of production cross sections taking into account secondary deexcitation processes, both particle evaporation and fission, a new method called TDHF+GEMINI is proposed, which combines the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a sophisticated statistical compound-nucleus deexcitation model, GEMINI++. Methods: Low-energy heavy ion reactions are described based on three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations. Using the particle-number projection method, production probabilities, total angular momenta, and excitation energies of primary reaction products are extracted from the TDHF wave function after collision. Production cross sections for secondary reaction products are evaluated employing GEMINI++. Results are compared with available experimental data and widely used grazing calculations. Results: The method is applied to describe cross sections for multinucleon transfer processes in 40Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃128.54 MeV ), 48Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃125.44 MeV ), 40Ca+208Pb (Ec .m .≃208.84 MeV ), 58Ni+208Pb (Ec .m .≃256.79 MeV ), 64Ni+238U (Ec .m .≃307.35 MeV ), and 136Xe+198Pt (Ec .m .≃644.98 MeV ) reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. It is shown that the inclusion of secondary deexcitation processes, which are dominated by neutron evaporation in the present systems, substantially improves agreement with the experimental data. The magnitude of the evaporation effects is very similar to the one observed in grazing calculations. TDHF+GEMINI provides better description of the absolute value of the cross sections for channels involving transfer of more than one proton, compared to the grazing

  10. Parental Effect of Long Acclimatization on Thermal Tolerance of Juvenile Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Lin Wang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the thermal resistance of marine invertebrates to elevated temperatures under scenarios of future climate change, it is crucial to understand parental effect of long acclimatization on thermal tolerance of offspring. To test whether there is parental effect of long acclimatization, adult sea cucumbers (Apostichopus japonicus from the same broodstock were transplanted southward and acclimatized at high temperature in field mesocosms. Four groups of juvenile sea cucumbers whose parents experienced different durations of high temperature acclimatization were established. Upper thermal limits, oxygen consumption and levels of heat shock protein mRNA of juveniles was determined to compare thermal tolerance of individuals from different groups. Juvenile sea cucumbers whose parents experienced high temperature could acquire high thermal resistance. With the increase of parental exposure duration to high temperature, offspring became less sensitive to high temperature, as indicated by higher upper thermal limits (LT50, less seasonal variations of oxygen consumption, and stable oxygen consumption rates between chronic and acute thermal stress. The relatively high levels of constitutive expression of heat-shock proteins should contribute to the high thermal tolerance. Together, these results indicated that the existence of a parental effect of long acclimatization would increase thermal tolerance of juveniles and change the thermal sensitivity of sea cucumber to future climate change.

  11. A Study of the Effects of Altitude on Thermal Ice Protection System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Gene; Oleskiw, Myron; Broeren, Andy P.; Orchard, David

    2013-01-01

    Thermal ice protection systems use heat energy to prevent a dangerous buildup of ice on an aircraft. As aircraft become more efficient, less heat energy is available to operate a thermal ice protections system. This requires that thermal ice protection systems be designed to more exacting standards so as to more efficiently prevent a dangerous ice buildup without adversely affecting aircraft safety. While the effects of altitude have always beeing taked into account in the design of thermal ice protection systems, a better understanding of these effects is needed so as to enable more exact design, testing, and evaluation of these systems.

  12. Thermal evaluation of different DC multi-conductor cable cross-sections and installation patterns for the CLIC drive-beam quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Maglio, D

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to determine the thermal behaviour of different dc multi-conductor cable cross-sections and installations patterns for the CLIC drive beam quadrupoles loaded with increasing values of current intensity. A simplified two dimensional model of the heat transfer problem was prepared with a commercial CFD software, STAR-CD 4.2. The heat flux generated by Joule effect in conductors was estimated taking into account the current value per conductor and the temperature dependence of the copper electrical resistance. In parallel, a geometrical simplification of the problem has been done in order to be able to apply theoretical formulas which have been implemented by Microsoft Excel. Obtained results have been compared with those got by the dedicated software, showing between them a good correspondence for two-conductor cables and confirming, for this case, the rules given in the in the French norm NF C15-100. In case of multiconductor cables, attention is to be paid to the temperature lev...

  13. Investigation of the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Containment Wall of OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun [Pohang University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwi; Kang, Hie Chan [Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Many computational codes used for analyzing pressure of containment was developed such as CAP (Containment Analysis Package). These computational codes consider concrete conductivity instead of thermal conductivity of containment wall which have special geometry as heat sink. For precise analysis, effective thermal conductivity of containment wall has to be measured in individual NPPs. Thermal properties of concrete such as thermal conductivity have been investigated as function of chemical composition and temperature. Generally, containment of OPR1000 is constructed by Prestressed (PS) concrete-a composite material. Containment wall of OPR1000 is made up of steel liner, tendon, rebar and concrete as shown in Figure 1. Role of steel liner protects release of radioactive materials so called leak tightness. The effective thermal conductivity of containment wall in OPR1000 is analyzed by numerical tool (CFD) and compared with thermal conductivity models in composite solids. The effective thermal conductivity of containment wall of OPR1000 is investigated by numerical analysis (CFD). The thermal conductivity of reinforced concrete is 18.6% higher than that of concrete only. Several models were compared with CFD results. Rayleigh-Parallel liner model agrees well with CFD results. Experiment results will be compared with CFD result and models. CFD result was calculated in low steel volume fraction (0.0809) than that of OPR1000 (0.1043). The effective thermal conductivity in OPR1000 has slightly higher than CFD result because of different volume fraction.

  14. Effect of Material Composition and Environmental Condition on Thermal Characteristics of Conductive Asphalt Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Pan; Wu, Shaopeng; Hu, Xiaodi; Liu, Gang; Li, Bo

    2017-02-23

    Conductive asphalt concrete with high thermal conductivity has been proposed to improve the solar energy collection and snow melting efficiencies of asphalt solar collector (ASC). This paper aims to provide some insight into choosing the basic materials for preparation of conductive asphalt concrete, as well as determining the evolution of thermal characteristics affected by environmental factors. The thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete were studied by the Thermal Constants Analyzer. Experimental results showed that aggregate and conductive filler have a significant effect on the thermal properties of asphalt concrete, while the effect of asphalt binder was not evident due to its low proportion. Utilization of mineral aggregate and conductive filler with higher thermal conductivity is an efficient method to prepare conductive asphalt concrete. Moreover, change in thermal properties of asphalt concrete under different temperature and moisture conditions should be taken into account to determine the actual thermal properties of asphalt concrete. There was no noticeable difference in thermal properties of asphalt concrete before and after aging. Furthermore, freezing-thawing cycles strongly affect the thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete, due to volume expansion and bonding degradation.

  15. Effect of Material Composition and Environmental Condition on Thermal Characteristics of Conductive Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Pan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive asphalt concrete with high thermal conductivity has been proposed to improve the solar energy collection and snow melting efficiencies of asphalt solar collector (ASC. This paper aims to provide some insight into choosing the basic materials for preparation of conductive asphalt concrete, as well as determining the evolution of thermal characteristics affected by environmental factors. The thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete were studied by the Thermal Constants Analyzer. Experimental results showed that aggregate and conductive filler have a significant effect on the thermal properties of asphalt concrete, while the effect of asphalt binder was not evident due to its low proportion. Utilization of mineral aggregate and conductive filler with higher thermal conductivity is an efficient method to prepare conductive asphalt concrete. Moreover, change in thermal properties of asphalt concrete under different temperature and moisture conditions should be taken into account to determine the actual thermal properties of asphalt concrete. There was no noticeable difference in thermal properties of asphalt concrete before and after aging. Furthermore, freezing–thawing cycles strongly affect the thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete, due to volume expansion and bonding degradation.

  16. Radiation cross-linked collagen/dextran dermal scaffolds: effects of dextran on cross-linking and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Xiangmei; Xu, Ling; Wei, Shicheng; Zhai, Maolin

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation effectively cross-links collagen into network with enhanced anti-degradability and biocompatibility, while radiation-cross-linked collagen scaffold lacks flexibility, satisfactory surface appearance, and performs poor in cell penetration and ingrowth. To make the radiation-cross-linked collagen scaffold to serve as an ideal artificial dermis, dextran was incorporated into collagen. Scaffolds with the collagen/dextran (Col/Dex) ratios of 10/0, 7/3, and 5/5 were fabricated via (60)Co γ-irradiation cross-linking, followed by lyophilization. The morphology, microstructure, physicochemical, and biological properties were investigated. Compared with pure collagen, scaffolds with dextran demonstrated more porous appearance, enhanced hydrophilicity while the cross-linking density was lower with the consequence of larger pore size, higher water uptake, as well as reduced stiffness. Accelerated degradation was observed when dextran was incorporated in both the in vitro and in vivo assays, which led to earlier integration with cell and host tissue. The effect of dextran on degradation was ascribed to the decreased cross-linking density, looser microstructure, more porous and hydrophilic surface. Considering the better appearance, softness, moderate degradation rate due to controllable cross-linking degree and good biocompatibility as well, radiation-cross-linked collagen/dextran scaffolds are expected to serve as promising artificial dermal substitutes.

  17. Kerr-effect analysis in a three-level negative index material under magneto cross-coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutabba, N.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss the feasibility of the Kerr effect in negative refractive index materials under magneto cross-coupling and reservoir interaction. The considered medium is a typical three-level atomic system where we derive both the refractive and the gain spectrum. The profiles are analyzed for a weak probe field, and for varying strengths of the strong control field. The considered scheme shows an enhancement of the Kerr nonlinearity which we attribute to the contribution of the electromagnetic components of the fields. For more realistic experimental conditions, we discuss the dependence of the Kerr effect on different thermal bath coupling constants.

  18. Effect of particle size on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids containing metallic nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warrier, Pramod; Teja, Amyn

    2011-01-01

    .... Although literature data could be correlated well using the model, the effect of the size of the particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluid could not be elucidated from these data...

  19. Effect of highly reflective roofing sheet on building thermal loads for a school in Osaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jihui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, urban heat island (UHI phenomenon and building energy consumptions are becoming serious. Strategies to mitigate UHI and reduce building energy consumptions are implemented worldwide. In Japan, as an effective means of mitigating UHI and saving energy of buildings, highly reflective (HR and green roofs are increasingly used. In order to evaluate the effect of roofs with high reflection and thermal insulation on the energy conservation of buildings, we investigated the roof solar reflectivity of the subject school in Osaka, in which the HR roofing sheet was installed on the roof from 2010. Thermal loads, including cooling and heating loads of the top floor of school, were calculated using the thermal load calculation software, New HASP/ACLD-β. Comparing the thermal loads after HR roofing sheet installation to previous, the annual thermal load decreased about 25 MJ/m2-year and the cooling load decreased about 112 MJ/m2-year. However, the heating load increased about 87 MJ/m2-year in winter. To minimize the annual thermal load, thermal insulation of the roof was also considered be used together with HR roofing sheet in this study. The results showed that the combination of HR roofing sheet and high thermal insulation is more effective to reduce the annual thermal load.

  20. Comparison of the effects of thermal stress and CO₂-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in coral Acropora digitifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    Global warming (GW) and ocean acidification (OA) have been recognized as severe threats for reef-building corals that support coral reef ecosystems, but these effects on the early life history stage of corals are relatively unknown compared with the effects on calcification of adult corals. In this study, we evaluated the effects of thermal stress and CO2-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in a reef-building coral, Acropora digitifera. The fertilization rates of A. digitifera decreased in response to thermal stress compared with those under normal seawater conditions. In contrast, the changes of fertilization rates were not evident in the acidified seawater. Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) predicted that sperm/egg crosses and temperature were explanatory variables in the best-fitted model for the fertilization data. In the best model, interactions between thermal stress and acidified seawater on the fertilization rates were not selected. Our results suggested that coral fertilization is more sensitive to future GW than OA. Taking into consideration the previous finding that sperm motility of A. digitifera was decreased by acidified seawater, the decrease in coral cover followed by that of sperm concentration might cause the interacting effects of GW and OA on coral fertilization.

  1. Nuclear characteristics of Pu fueled LWR and cross section sensitivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Toshikazu [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-03-01

    The present status of Pu utilization to thermal reactors in Japan, nuclear characteristics and topics and cross section sensitivities for analysis of Pu fueled thermal reactors are described. As topics we will discuss the spatial self-shielding effect on the Doppler reactivity effect and the cross section sensitivities with the JENDL-3.1 and 3.2 libraries. (author)

  2. Numerical study of chemically reacting unsteady Casson fluid flow past a stretching surface with cross diffusion and thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpalatha K.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of an unsteady MHD Casson fluid flow towards a stretching surface with cross diffusion effects is considered. The governing partial differential equations are converted into a set of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations with the help of suitable similarity transformations. Further, these equations have been solved numerically by using Runge-Kutta fourth order method along with shooting technique. Finally, we studied the influence of various non-dimensional governing parameters on the flow field through graphs and tables. Results indicate that Dufour and Soret numbers have tendency to enhance the fluid velocity. It is also found that Soret number enhances the heat transfer rate where as an opposite result is observed with Casson parameter. A comparison of the present results with the previous literature is also tabulated to show the accuracy of the results.

  3. Numerical study of chemically reacting unsteady Casson fluid flow past a stretching surface with cross diffusion and thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpalatha, K.; Ramana Reddy, J. V.; Sugunamma, V.; Sandeep, N.

    2017-04-01

    The problem of an unsteady MHD Casson fluid flow towards a stretching surface with cross diffusion effects is considered. The governing partial differential equations are converted into a set of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations with the help of suitable similarity transformations. Further, these equations have been solved numerically by using Runge-Kutta fourth order method along with shooting technique. Finally, we studied the influence of various non-dimensional governing parameters on the flow field through graphs and tables. Results indicate that Dufour and Soret numbers have tendency to enhance the fluid velocity. It is also found that Soret number enhances the heat transfer rate where as an opposite result is observed with Casson parameter. A comparison of the present results with the previous literature is also tabulated to show the accuracy of the results.

  4. Phase noise measurements with a cryogenic power-splitter to minimize the cross-spectral collapse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig W.; Pappas, David P.; Howe, David A.

    2017-11-01

    The cross-spectrum noise measurement technique enables enhanced resolution of spectral measurements. However, it has disadvantages, namely, increased complexity, inability of making real-time measurements, and bias due to the "cross-spectral collapse" (CSC) effect. The CSC can occur when the spectral density of a random process under investigation approaches the thermal noise of the power splitter. This effect can severely bias results due to a differential measurement between the investigated noise and the anti-correlated (phase-inverted) noise of the power splitter. In this paper, we report an accurate measurement of the phase noise of a thermally limited electronic oscillator operating at room temperature (300 K) without significant CSC bias. We mitigated the problem by cooling the power splitter to liquid helium temperature (4 K). We quantify errors of greater than 1 dB that occur when the thermal noise of the oscillator at room temperature is measured with the power splitter at temperatures above 77 K.

  5. The Performance of a Thermally Cross-Linked Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIM-1) for Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alghunaimi, Fahd

    2013-05-01

    Gas transport properties of PIM-1 (the first ladder polymer with intrinsic microporosity) and TC-PIM-1 (thermally cross-linked PIM-1) at 35°C and different pressures were thoroughly studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of the TC-PIM-1 membranes with PIM-1 for natural gas separation. The TC-PIM-1 polymer was prepared by post-modification of PIM-1 at 300°C for a period of two days. Sorption isotherms of seven gases, including N2, O2, CH4, CO2, C2H6, C3H8 and n-C4H10, were determined for PIM-1 and TC-PIM-1 using the dual-volume barometric sorption technique at 35°C at different pressures. The sorption isotherms followed the dual-mode sorption model, which is typical for glassy polymers. Moreover, permeability (P) of eight gases, including He, H2, N2, O2, CH4, CO2, C3H8 and n-C4H10, were determined for PIM-1 and TC-PIM-1 at 35°C and 2.0 atm. Furthermore, average diffusion coefficients (D ̅) were calculated from the permeability and solubility data for all tested gases for both polymers. The sorption (S), permeability (P) and average diffusion coefficients (D ̅) for the TC-PIM-1 membrane exhibited lower values than the PIM-1 membrane. However, the TC-PIM-1 membrane showed exceptional gas separation performance. The TC-PIM-1 membrane had a helium (He) permeability of 1218 barrer with He/CH4 and He/N2 ideal selectivities of 27.1 and 23.9 respectively, and carbon dioxide (CO2) permeability of 1088 barrer with CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 ideal selectivities of 24.2 and 21.3 respectively. Additionally, the TC-PIM-1 membrane showed a hydrogen (H2) permeability of 2452 barrer with an ideal H2/CH4 selectivity of 54.5.

  6. Effects of high thermal neutron fluences on Type 6061 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Farrell, K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The control rod drive follower tubes of the High Flux Beam Reactor are contructed from precipitation-hardened 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and they operate in the high thermal neutron flux regions of the core. It is shown that large thermal neutron fluences up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} at 333K cause large increases in tensile strength and relatively modest decreases in tensile elongation while significantly reducing the notch impact toughness at room temperature. These changes are attributed to the development of a fine distribution of precipitates of amorphous silicon of which about 8% is produced radiogenically. A proposed role of thermal-to-fast flux ratio is discussed.

  7. Effects of high thermal neutron fluences on Type 6061 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Farrell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The control rod drive follower tubes of the High Flux Beam Reactor are contructed from precipitation-hardened 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and they operate in the high thermal neutron flux regions of the core. It is shown that large thermal neutron fluences up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} at 333K cause large increases in tensile strength and relatively modest decreases in tensile elongation while significantly reducing the notch impact toughness at room temperature. These changes are attributed to the development of a fine distribution of precipitates of amorphous silicon of which about 8% is produced radiogenically. A proposed role of thermal-to-fast flux ratio is discussed.

  8. Effects of carbon content on high-temperature mechanical and thermal fatigue properties of high-boron austenitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature mechanical properties of high-boron austenitic steels (HBASs were studied at 850 °C using a dynamic thermal-mechanical simulation testing machine. In addition, the thermal fatigue properties of the alloys were investigated using the self-restraint Uddeholm thermal fatigue test, during which the alloy specimens were cycled between room temperature and 800°C. Stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the surface cracks and cross-sectional microstructure of the alloy specimens after the thermal fatigue tests. The effects of carbon content on the mechanical properties at room temperature and high-temperature as well as thermal fatigue properties of the HBASs were also studied. The experimental results show that increasing carbon content induces changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HBASs. The boride phase within the HBAS matrix exhibits a round and smooth morphology, and they are distributed in a discrete manner. The hardness of the alloys increases from 239 (0.19wt.% C to 302 (0.29wt.% C and 312 HV (0.37wt.% C; the tensile yield strength at 850 °C increases from 165.1 to 190.3 and 197.1 MPa; and the compressive yield strength increases from 166.1 to 167.9 and 184.4 MPa. The results of the thermal fatigue tests (performed for 300 cycles from room temperature to 800 °C indicate that the degree of thermal fatigue of the HBAS with 0.29wt.% C (rating of 2–3 is superior to those of the alloys with 0.19wt.% (rating of 4–5 and 0.37wt.% (rating of 3–4 carbon. The main cause of this difference is the ready precipitation of M23(C,B6-type borocarbides in the alloys with high carbon content during thermal fatigue testing. The precipitation and aggregation of borocarbide particles at the grain boundaries result in the deterioration of the thermal fatigue properties of the alloys.

  9. The effect of Y2O3 addition on thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pošarac Milica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of yttria additive on the thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel has been investigated. As a starting material we used spinel (MgAl2O4 obtained by the modified glycine nitrate procedure (MGNP. Sintered products were characterized in terms of phase analysis, densities, thermal shock, monitoring the damaged surface area in the refractory specimen during thermal shock and ultrasonic determination of the Dynamic Young modulus of elasticity. It was found that a new phase between yttria and alumina is formed, which improved thermal shock properties of the spinel refractories. Also densification of samples is enhanced by yttria addition.

  10. Spectral phonon scattering effects on the thermal conductivity of nano-grained barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Brian F.; Foley, Brian M.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2014-08-01

    We study the effect of grain size on thermal conductivity of thin film barium titanate over temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 K. We show that the thermal conductivity of Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) decreases with decreasing grain size as a result of increased phonon scattering from grain boundaries. We analyze our results with a model for thermal conductivity that incorporates a spectrum of mean free paths in BaTiO3. In contrast to the common gray mean free path assumption, our findings suggest that the thermal conductivity of complex oxide perovskites is driven by a spectrum of phonons with varying mean free paths.

  11. Effects of thermal drying on phosphorus availability from iron-precipitated sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Camilla; Scheutz, Charlotte; Bruun, Sander

    2017-01-01

    Thermal drying of sewage sludge implies sanitation and improves practical handling options of the sludge prior to land application. However, it may also affect its value as a fertilizer. The objective of this study was to assess whether thermal drying of sewage sludge, as well as drying temperature...... experiments, thermal drying reduced P availability, as shown by 37 and 23% lower DGT and WEP values, respectively, and a 16% lower P uptake by barley in the pot experiment. The specific drying temperature did not appear to have much effect. Overall, our results suggest that thermal drying of iron...

  12. Thermal Hall Effect in a Phonon-Glass Ba3 CuSb2 O9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugii, K.; Shimozawa, M.; Watanabe, D.; Suzuki, Y.; Halim, M.; Kimata, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Nakatsuji, S.; Yamashita, M.

    2017-04-01

    A distinct thermal Hall signal is observed in a quantum spin liquid candidate Ba3 CuSb2 O9 . The transverse thermal conductivity shows a power-law temperature dependence below 50 K, where a spin gap opens. We suggest that because of the very low longitudinal thermal conductivity and the thermal Hall signals, a phonon Hall effect is induced by strong phonon scattering of orphan Cu2 + spins formed in the random domains of the Cu2 + -Sb5 + dumbbells in Ba3 CuSb2 O9 .

  13. Effects of ageing and moisture content on thermal properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean thermal conductivity ranged from 0.4770 to 0.5654, 0.4804 to 0.5530 and 0.4302 to 0.6102 W/mK at these ages respectively. The thermal diffusivity also ranged from 1.588 to 2.426, 1.614 to 0.1972 and 1.610 to 2.020m2/s while the specific heat capacity ranged from 2.3626 to 3.1495, 2.4900 to 3.7538 and 3.4222 ...

  14. Effect of tuber skin on the thermal properties of whole tubers of potato and sweet potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwo, A. A.; Khan, R. M.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature-dependent thermal coefficients of mathematical models of the postharvest storage process play an important role in determining the models accuracy. Thermal properties of tubers under storage available in literature are generally of those in semi processed form (skinless) such as those having undergone peeling, dicing and cutting actions. This study investigates the effect of tuber skin on the thermal properties of whole tubers of potato and sweet potato. A direct approach was used to measure the tubers' density and thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity by the transient heat transfer method. Indirect approach was used to measure the tubers' specific heat. Experimental data were used to develop empirical models of the thermal coefficients as a function of temperature. Results of the study should find great use in the modeling of potato and sweet potato storage process.

  15. Effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene materials to surface coating of LED lighting module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Jeong, J Y; Han, S H; Kim, J H; Kwon, K T; Hwang, M K; Kim, I T; Cho, G S

    2013-05-01

    The effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene nano-platelets to two different commercially available thermal dissipation coatings (ceramic coating and powder coating) was studied. Steady state temperatures of each points of LED modules was monitored in a closed system, with an integral photo detection sphere where there is no external air flow. Having eliminated the contributions of thermal conduction and air flow convection, the module with a conventional heat dissipation coatings showed 8-16% enhancement of thermal dissipation compared to that of non-coated LED module. The addition of graphene is shown to have about 3% additional enhancement. By analyzing thermal resistance of each component of the LED module, the improved thermal conductivity of the graphene added coatings contributes to the enhancement of slight improvement with heat dissipation.

  16. Effect of hydrophobic nano-silica on the thermal insulation of fibrous silica compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng-Wen Lian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The particle’s surface property plays an important role on controlling the thermal insulation performance of fibrous silica compacts. In the present study, the effect of addition of hydrophobic silica on the thermal conductivity of the fibrous silica compacts is investigated. The measurement was conducted using laser flash method and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC method. The thermal conductivity of fibrous silica compacts is only 0.042 W/m K. The addition of 5% hydrophobic silica further reduces the thermal conductivity of fibrous silica compacts to 0.033 W/m K. The thermal conductivity reaches a constant value with higher hydrophobic silica content. The flexural strength decreases with the increase of hydrophobic silica content. A compromise between the thermal insulation and strength is needed. The performance of fibrous silica compacts shows strong dependence on the surface structure of glass fibers.

  17. Absence of the Thermal Hall Effect in Anomalous Nernst and Spin Seebeck Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Jia; Huang, Ssu-Yen

    2016-12-09

    The anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) and the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in spin caloritronics are two of the most important mechanisms to manipulate the spin-polarized current and pure spin current by thermal excitation. While the ANE in ferromagnetic metals and the SSE in magnetic insulators have been extensively studied, a recent theoretical work suggests that the signals from the thermal Hall effect (THE) have field dependences indistinguishable from, and may even overwhelm, those of the ANE and SSE. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the contribution of the THE in the ANE and SSE. In this work, we systematically study the THE in a ferromagnetic metal, Permalloy (Py), and magnetic insulator, an yttrium iron garnet (YIG), by using different Seebeck coefficients between electrodes and contact wires. Our results demonstrate that the contribution of the THE by the thermal couple effect in the Py and YIG is negligibly small if one includes the thickness dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, the spin-polarized current in the ANE and the pure spin current in the SSE remain indispensable for exploring spin caloritronics phenomena.

  18. Assessment of effective thermal conductivity in U–Mo metallic fuels with distributed gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Casella, Andrew M.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2015-07-15

    This work presents a numerical method to assess the relative impact of various microstructural features including grain sizes, nanometer scale intragranular gas bubbles, and larger intergranular gas bubbles in irradiated U–Mo metallic fuels on the effective thermal conductivity. A phase-field model was employed to construct a three-dimensional polycrystalline U–Mo fuel alloy with a given crystal morphology and gas bubble microstructures. An effective thermal conductivity “concept” was taken to capture the effect of polycrystalline structures and gas bubble microstructures with significant size differences on the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of inhomogeneous materials was calculated by solving the heat transport equation. The obtained results are in reasonably good agreement with experimental measurements made on irradiated U–Mo fuel samples containing similar microstructural features. The developed method can be used to predict the thermal conductivity degradation in operating nuclear fuels if the evolution of microstructures is known during operation of the fuel.

  19. Thermal Impedance Model of High Power IGBT Modules Considering Heat Coupling Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Thermal loading of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) modules is important for the reliability performance of power electronic systems, thus the thermal information of critical points inside module like junction temperature must be accurately modeled and predicted. Usually in the existing...... thermal models, only the self-heating effects of the chips are taken into account, while the thermal coupling effects among chips are less considered. This could result in inaccurate temperature estimation, especially in the high power IGBT modules where the chips are allocated closely to each other...... with large amount of heat generated. In this paper, both the self-heating and heat-coupling effects in the of IGBT module are investigated based on Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation, a new thermal impedance model is thereby proposed to better describe the temperature distribution inside IGBT modules...

  20. The effect of different transitional spaces on thermal comfort and energy consumption of residential buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taleghani, M.; Tenpierik, M.J.; Van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose- This paper focuses on the effect of courtyards, atria and sunspaces on indoor thermal comfort and energy consumption for heating and cooling. One of the most important purposes is to understand if certain transitional spaces can reduce the energy consumption of and improve thermal comfort

  1. Effect of urea additive on the thermal decomposition kinetics of flame retardant greige cotton nonwoven fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunghyun Nam; Brian D. Condon; Robert H. White; Qi Zhao; Fei Yao; Michael Santiago Cintrón

    2012-01-01

    Urea is well known to have a synergistic action with phosphorus-based flame retardants (FRs) in enhancing the FR performance of cellulosic materials, but the effect of urea on the thermal decomposition kinetics has not been thoroughly studied. In this study, the activation energy (Ea) for the thermal decomposition of greige...

  2. Electrochemical study of the thermal treatment effects on Cusub(x)S thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duo, R.; Fatas, E.; Arjona, F.; Camarero, E.G.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of thermal treatments on the stoichiometry and photovoltaic properties of Cusub(x)S thin films have been studied. It has been observed that the evaporation of a thin copper films on Cusub(x)S, followed by thermal treatment in vacuum, improves the Cusub(x)S/CdS heterojunctions due to a rire in the stoichiometry and fill factor.

  3. Genetic effects on seed quality in diallel crosses of popcorn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Diego Silva Cabral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The failure to obtain the ideal stand is one of the causes of decreased crop yields, in this sense it is important to investigate the genetic effects related to seed quality. The aim of this study was to measure the general combining ability (GCA, the specific combining ability (SCA and the reciprocal effects (RE for popcorn seed quality in addition to evaluate the association between germination and vigor tests with field emergencein order to identify hybrids with better germination and vigour. Ten inbred lines were evaluated using a complete diallel cross with reciprocals. Seed quality was measured by germination tests (GT and by modified cold vigour tests (MCV. In the GT, the numbers of strong normal seedlings (SNS, weak normal (WNS, abnormal (AS and ungerminated seeds (UGS were counted. In the MCV, the numbers of normal seedlings (NPC, abnormal (ASC and ungerminated seeds (UGSC were counted, and the plants' dry matter (DM was measured. Analysis of variance for GCA, SCA and RE were significant for all variables. The quadratic components for SCA were higher than those for GCA for the SNS, AS, UGS, ASC and UGSC traits, which indicates higher significance for the non-additive effects. The most favourable GCA estimates, were found in lines P3 and L70. The best hybrids were P1xL70, P3xP6 and P8xL70. The RE results showed that L70 and P3 should be used as the female parent in the P1xL70 and P3xP6 hybrid crosses, respectively. The MCV was the test that was most strongly correlated with field emergence, with a magnitude of 0.667.

  4. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  5. Metallic nanowire networks: effects of thermal annealing on electrical resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, D. P.; Lagrange, M.; Giusti, G.; Jiménez, C.; Bréchet, Y.; Nguyen, N. D.; Bellet, D.

    2014-10-01

    Metallic nanowire networks have huge potential in devices requiring transparent electrodes. This article describes how the electrical resistance of metal nanowire networks evolve under thermal annealing. Understanding the behavior of such films is crucial for the optimization of transparent electrodes which find many applications. An in-depth investigation of silver nanowire networks under different annealing conditions provides a case study demonstrating that several mechanisms, namely local sintering and desorption of organic residues, are responsible for the reduction of the systems electrical resistance. Optimization of the annealing led to specimens with transmittance of 90% (at 550 nm) and sheet resistance of 9.5 Ω sq-1. Quantized steps in resistance were observed and a model is proposed which provides good agreement with the experimental results. In terms of thermal behavior, we demonstrate that there is a maximum thermal budget that these electrodes can tolerate due to spheroidization of the nanowires. This budget is determined by two main factors: the thermal loading and the wire diameter. This result enables the fabrication and optimization of transparent metal nanowire electrodes for solar cells, organic electronics and flexible displays.

  6. Effects of nanoscale size dependent parameters on lattice thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Throughout the method of trial and error, using the MATHCAD. 12 program, the values of P,Nimp and γ were adjusted such that the best fit for calculated lattice thermal conductivity to the experimental curves were obtained as shown in figure 3. The diameter dependence of the fitting parameters Nimp,P and γ (L, T ) and γ ...

  7. Effects of reduction time on the structural, electrical and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    catalyst support in direct methanol fuel cell. Therefore, in this paper, the RGO nanosheets were prepared via highly efficient chemical reduction reaction of exfoliated GO nanosheets using sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) as the reduc- ing agent. Extensive characterizations have been conducted in terms of structural, thermal ...

  8. Effect of urban albedo surfaces on thermal comfort | Mansouri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They have addressed this issue in order to identify the main causes that generate the warming of urban areas and therefore contribute to the degradation of the exterior and interior thermal comfort of the inhabitants. It turns out that the reflectivity of materials known as the albedo, plays a leading role in this degradation.

  9. Thermal effects on cognition: a new quantitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, José Ignacio; Hancock, P A

    2017-07-05

    There is little doubt that increases in thermal load beyond the thermo-neutral state prove progressively stressful to all living organisms. Increasing temperatures across the globe represent in some locales, and especially for outdoors workers, a significant source of such chronic load increase. However, increases in thermal load affect cognition as well as physical work activities. Such human cognition has perennially been viewed as the primary conduit through which to solve many of the iatrogenic challenges we now face. Yet, thermal stress degrades the power to think. Here, we advance and refine the isothermal description of such cognitive decrements, founded upon a synthesis of extant empirical evidence. We report a series of mathematical functions which describe task-specific patterns of performance deterioration, linking such degrees of decrement to the time/temperature conditions in which they occur. Further, we provide a simple, free software tool to support such calculations so that adverse thermal loads can be monitored, assessed and (where possible) mitigated to preserve healthy cognitive functioning.

  10. Effective thermal conductivity of real two-phase systems using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An effort is made to correlate it in terms of the ratio of thermal conductivities of the constituents and the physical porosity. Theoretical expression so obtained has been tested on a large number of samples cited in the literature and found that the values predicted are quite close to the experimental results. Comparison of our ...

  11. Effective thermal conductivity of real two-phase systems using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    non-uniform shape of the particles and non-linear flow of heat flux lines in real systems, incorporating an empirical correction factor in place of physical porosity modifies an expression for ETC. An effort is made to correlate it in terms of the ratio of thermal conductivities of the constituents and the physical porosity. Theo-.

  12. Thermal Expansion and Aging Effects in Neuromorphic Signal Processor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zjajo, A.; van Leuken, T.G.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient methodology based on a real-time estimator and predictor-corrector scheme for accurate thermal expansion profile and aging evaluation of a neuromorphic signal processor circuit components. As the experimental results indicate, for comparable mesh size, the

  13. Thermal boundary effects on a GT liner structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvatore, M.; Laget, H.; Vanderhaegen, E.; Altunlu, A.C.; Tufano, S.; Daumantas, Ciplys

    2012-01-01

    GT combustor liners are subjected to mechanical and thermal loads that damage the structure and reduce their operational life. Among those, the thermo-acoustic instabilities develop, generating pressure oscillations because of the interaction between heat release, acoustic waves and structure

  14. The effect of Acacia Karroo supplementation and thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bathesh

    2012-08-14

    Aug 14, 2012 ... thermal preparation on consumer sensory scores of meat from indigenous Xhosa lop-eared goat breed. 18 castrated four-month-old ... (Muchenje et al., 2008b; 2009a, b), age (Simela, 2005), ageing, fatness and ..... fresh Sulla (Hedysarum coronarium L.) with or without polyethylene glycol or concentrate.

  15. The Effect of Thermal Processing on Apple Puree's Structuring Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.E. Polischuk

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of temperature and duration of heat processing on the structural ability of apple puree was studied. It was proved, that apple puree reveals the thixotropic and rheopexic character when its structure is restored, depending on the conditions of thermal processing.

  16. Analysis of simultaneous thermal/gamma radiation aging of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation—interim status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Correa, Miguel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-06-16

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) is the most common cable insulation found in nuclear containment, and is therefore a priority material for investigation of long term aging effect from elevated temperature combined with gamma radiation exposure. Prior work has identified the possibility of anomalous aging behavior in XLPE such as the inverse temperature effect in which radiation exposure is more damaging at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. We explored simultaneous aging of XLPE insulation from modern Firewall® III nuclear cables at 60, 90, and 115 °C, at gamma dose rates from 116 to 540 Gy/h, for exposure periods up to 25 d. XLPE samples exposed in this way were characterized using the percent gel and uptake factor method. For the conditions and material examine, degradation behavior was seen to track proportionally with increasing temperature, rather than to exhibit greater degradation at lower temperatures. Ongoing work including similar aging at 25 °C and characterization of the XLPE samples using other methods will further elucidate these initial results

  17. Exogenous collagen cross-linking reduces scleral permeability: modeling the effects of age-related cross-link accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jay M; Schultz, David S; Lee, On-Tat; Trinidad, Monique L

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between scleral permeability and nonenzymatic cross-link density. Scleral discs 18 mm in diameter were dissected from the medial and lateral equatorial regions of 60 cadaveric porcine eyes. Samples were incubated for 24 hours with control solution or methylglyoxal at concentrations of 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.10%, and 1.00%. Nonenzymatic cross-link density in treated and control groups was quantified with the use of papain digest and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Treated scleral discs were mounted in a customized Ussing-type chamber connected to vertical tubing, and specific hydraulic conductivity was determined according to the descent of a column of degassed saline at room temperature. Permeability to diffusion of fluorescein in a static chamber was determined for another set of treated scleral samples. Methylglyoxal treatment effectively increased nonenzymatic cross-link content, as indicated by the average fluorescence for each group. Specific hydraulic conductivity (m(2)) was reduced with increasing cross-link density. Similarly, the permeability coefficient for the fluorescein solute consistently decreased with increasing methylglyoxal concentration, indicating diffusion impedance from the treatment. Nonenzymatic cross-link density can be significantly increased by treatment with methylglyoxal. Porcine sclera showed a nonlinear reduction in solute permeability and specific hydraulic conductivity with increasing cross-link density. This model indicates that age-related nonenzymatic cross-link accumulation can have a substantial impact on scleral permeability.

  18. Thermal evolution of Lower Paleozoic sedimentary successions from organic and inorganic studies: the case history of the Holy Cross Mountains (central Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolese, Matteo; Stefano Celano, Antonio; Corrado, Sveva; Caricchi, Chiara; Schito, Andrea; Aldega, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The rapid increase in shale gas production in the USA has triggered a growing interest in unconventional resources in Eastern and Northern Europe. In this framework, the potential shale gas reserves in Poland are the most promising in Europe, extending from the Baltic Sea to the Ukraine border. In this area, the Baltic, Podlasie and Lublin basins have already become objective of shale gas exploration and the Holy Cross Mountains (HCM, Central Poland) represents the outcropping analog of the buried targeted Lower Paleozoic successions, providing a unique opportunity to study and assess source rock potential. In this work, we provide new thermal maturity data of Paleozoic rocks exposed in the HCM. A multi-method approach, coupling organic matter/graptolites (i.e., marine organoclasts) optical analysis and X-ray diffraction of clay-sized fraction of sediments, was applied to constrain the burial - thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. The investigated area of the HCM includes two different tectonic blocks: the Łysogóry region to the North and the Kielce region to the South, separated by the Holy Cross Fault (HCF). lllite content in mixed layer illite-smectite determinations and vitrinite/graptolites reflectance measurements (Roeq%), performed on samples (Cambrian - Devonian) collected from both the regions, show a substantial difference between the two blocks in terms of thermal maturity and burial history. Roeq% values in the southern block range from 0.5% to 1.0%, with few exceptions, indicating early to mid-mature stage of hydrocarbon generation. Samples collected in the northern block show much higher values, mainly from 1.2% up to 1.7%, representative of the gas generation window. The I-S ordering type also shows relevant differences in the two blocks. In the southern block, mixed-layered clay minerals varies from R1 (short-range) to R3 (long-range), whereas R3 structures are recorded in the northern block. Vitrinite reflectance and mixed-layer I

  19. Determination of the thermal neutron induced 41Ca(n,p)41K and 41Ca(n,α)38Ar reaction cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, C.; Bieber, R.; Weigmann, H.; Geltenbort, P.

    1998-04-01

    The 41Ca(n,p)41K and 41Ca(n,α)38Ar reaction cross sections were determined with thermal neutrons at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble. For the 41Ca(nth,p)41K reaction cross section, a value of (7+/-2) mb was obtained. In the case of the 41Ca(nth,α)38Ar reaction, the transition to the ground state in 38Ar has a cross section σ(nth,α0) = (42+/-6) mb, the most prominent decay going to the first excited state in 38Ar with a cross section σ(nth,α1) = (130+/-25) mb. This can be explained by the presence of a nearby bound level with Jπ=4-. Also 41Ca(nth,γα)38Ar transitions have been observed with a cross section of (10+/-2) mb. The primary γ transitions are shown to have a M1 multipolarity.

  20. The effects of mobile phone use on pedestrian crossing behaviour at signalized and unsignalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Julie; Murphy, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Research amongst drivers suggests that pedestrians using mobile telephones may behave riskily while crossing the road, and casual observation suggests concerning levels of pedestrian mobile-use. An observational field survey of 270 females and 276 males was conducted to compare the safety of crossing behaviours for pedestrians using, versus not using, a mobile phone. Amongst females, pedestrians who crossed while talking on a mobile phone crossed more slowly, and were less likely to look at traffic before starting to cross, to wait for traffic to stop, or to look at traffic while crossing, compared to matched controls. For males, pedestrians who crossed while talking on a mobile phone crossed more slowly at unsignalized crossings. These effects suggest that talking on a mobile phone is associated with cognitive distraction that may undermine pedestrian safety. Messages explicitly suggesting techniques for avoiding mobile-use while road crossing may benefit pedestrian safety.

  1. The Hanle effect and level-crossing spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Strumia, Franco

    1991-01-01

    I am most pleased and, in a way, I feel honored to write the Foreword for the book The Hanle Effect and Level-Crossing Spectroscopy, which covers such a very wide range of applications not only in the initial areas of atomic and molecular physics, but also in solid state physics, solar physics, laser physics, and gravitational metrology. To link these fields together in a coherent way has been the merit of the editors of the book, who attracted most distinguished authors for writing the chapters. In retrospect to Hanle's discovery of quantum mechanical coherence between two quantum states about 65 years ago, this book demonstrates the enormous impact and central importance the effect has had, and most vividly still has, on modern physics. On the other hand, the concept of quantum mechanical coherence, which is an outgrowth of the linear super­ position principle of quantum states, has been evident through a consider­ able number of experimental methods beyond the original Hanle effect; some of these methods...

  2. Effective strategies for development of thermal heavy oil field facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ken; Lehnert-Thiel, Gunter [IMV Projects (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In thermal heavy oil, a significant part of the capital has to be invested in field facilities and therefore strategies have to be implemented to optimize these costs. Field facilities consist of pipelines, earthworks and production pads whose purpose is to connect an oilsands reservoir to a central processing facility. This paper, presented by IMV Projects, a leading company in the thermal heavy oil field, highlights strategies to manage field facility lifecycle cost. Upfront planning should be done and the development of field facilities should be thought of as a long term infrastructure program rather than a stand-alone project. In addition, templates should be developed to save money and repeatability should be implemented to obtain a better prediction of the program's costs. The strategies presented herein allow major savings over the program's life by implementing an improved schedule and allowing refinements all along the program's course.

  3. Thermal Effect of Ceramic Nanofiller Aluminium Nitride on Polyethylene Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Bin Sohail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene polymerization was done to form polyethylene nano-composite with nanoaluminum nitride using zirconocene catalysts. Results show that the catalytic activity is maximum at a filler loading of 15 mg nanoaluminum nitride. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD results show that percentage crystallinity was also marginally higher at this amount of filler. Thermal behavior of polyethylene nanocomposites (0, 15, 30, and 45 mg was studied by DSC and thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA. Morphology of the component with 15 mg aluminium nitride is more fibrous as compared to 0 mg aluminium nitride and higher filler loading as shown by SEM images. In order to understand combustibility behavior, tests were performed on microcalorimeter. Its results showed decrease in combustibility in polyethylene nanocomposites as the filler loading increases.

  4. Effects of ascorbic acid and sugars on solubility, thermal, and mechanical properties of egg white protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Tabatabaei, Ramin H; Pashania, Bita; Rajabi, Hadiseh Z; Karim, A A

    2013-11-01

    The effects of reducing sugars (fructose, glucose, ribose, and arabinose), sucrose, and ascorbic acid were studied on thermo-mechanical properties and crosslinking of egg white proteins (EWP) through Maillard reaction. Sugars (0%, 1%, 5%, and 10%) and ascorbic acid (0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 2.5%) were added to EWP solutions. Thermal denaturation and crosslinking of EWP were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Mechanical properties (failure strength, failure strain and Young's modulus) of modified and unmodified EWP gels were evaluated by texture analyzer. Ascorbic acid decreased thermal denaturation temperature of EWP, but the reducing sugars increased the denaturation temperature. DSC thermograms of EWP showed that ascorbic acid exhibited an exothermic transition (≈110 °C) which was attributed to Maillard crosslinking of the protein. The reduction in pH (from 7.21 to ≈6) and protein solubility of egg white protein gel (from ≈70% to ≈10%) provides further evidence of the formation of Maillard cross-linking. Reactive sugars (ribose and arabinose) increased the mechanical properties of EWP gels, whereas ascorbic acid decreased the mechanical properties. Generally, the effect of ascorbic acid was more pronounced than that of various reducing sugars on the thermal and mechanical properties of egg white proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy Consumption of Insulated Material Using Thermal Effect Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fadzil M. A.; Norliyati M. A.; Hilmi M. A.; Ridzuan A. R.; Wan Ibrahim M. H.; Assrul R. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Wall is one of the structures elements that resist direct heat from the atmosphere. Modification on several structures is relevance to reduce filtrate thermal movement on wall. Insulation material seems to be suitable to be implemented since its purpose meets the heat resistance requirement. Insulation material applied as to generate positive impact in energy saving through reduction in total building energy consumption. Fiberglass is one of the insulation materials that can be used to insula...

  6. Effect of Some Thermal Processing Methods on the Caffeine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fresh kola nuts (Cola nitida) were thermally processed (blanched, boiled and roasted) for different periods of time (5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes respectively) at different temperatures (65, 75, 85 and 95oC). Boiling was done at 80oC while roasting was at 108.5oC, and steam blanching duration was 5, 7.5, 15 and 20 seconds ...

  7. Effects of Porosity and Thermal Treatment on Hydration of Mushrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Paudel, Ekaraj; Boom, R.M.; Sman, van der, R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, hydration of mushroom as a porous food material has been studied considering their biphasic character. It consists of a solid phase that consists of intertwined hyphae and having cell walls with a swellable polymeric matrix and a pore phase made up by the space in between the hyphae. We have investigated the hydration of mushrooms as a function of initial porosity and thermal treatment. Variation in porosity is induced by the natural variation in the growth of mushroom. Porosit...

  8. Thermal effect of climate change on groundwater-fed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick; Zhu, Yonghui; Zhan, Hongbin; Manga, Michael; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Dunham, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater temperature changes will lag surface temperature changes from a changing climate. Steady state solutions of the heat-transport equations are used to identify key processes that control the long-term thermal response of springs and other groundwater discharge to climate change, in particular changes in (1) groundwater recharge rate and temperature and (2) land-surface temperature transmitted through the vadose zone. Transient solutions are developed to estimate the time required for new thermal signals to arrive at ecosystems. The solution is applied to the volcanic Medicine Lake highlands, California, USA, and associated springs complexes that host groundwater-dependent ecosystems. In this system, upper basin groundwater temperatures are strongly affected only by recharge conditions. However, as the vadose zone thins away from the highlands, changes in the average annual land-surface temperature also influence groundwater temperatures. Transient response to temperature change depends on both the conductive time scale and the rate at which recharge delivers heat. Most of the thermal response of groundwater at high elevations will occur within 20 years of a shift in recharge temperatures, but the large lower elevation springs will respond more slowly, with about half of the conductive response occurring within the first 20 years and about half of the advective response to higher recharge temperatures occurring in approximately 60 years.

  9. Thermal effect of climate change on groundwater-fed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick R.; Zhu, Yonghui; Zhan, Hongbin; Manga, Michael; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater temperature changes will lag surface temperature changes from a changing climate. Steady state solutions of the heat-transport equations are used to identify key processes that control the long-term thermal response of springs and other groundwater discharge to climate change, in particular changes in (1) groundwater recharge rate and temperature and (2) land-surface temperature transmitted through the vadose zone. Transient solutions are developed to estimate the time required for new thermal signals to arrive at ecosystems. The solution is applied to the volcanic Medicine Lake highlands, California, USA, and associated springs complexes that host groundwater-dependent ecosystems. In this system, upper basin groundwater temperatures are strongly affected only by recharge conditions. However, as the vadose zone thins away from the highlands, changes in the average annual land-surface temperature also influence groundwater temperatures. Transient response to temperature change depends on both the conductive time scale and the rate at which recharge delivers heat. Most of the thermal response of groundwater at high elevations will occur within 20 years of a shift in recharge temperatures, but the large lower elevation springs will respond more slowly, with about half of the conductive response occurring within the first 20 years and about half of the advective response to higher recharge temperatures occurring in approximately 60 years.

  10. Experimental study of thermal effects on the mechanical behaviour of a clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekerevac, Cane; Laloui, Lyesse

    2004-03-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of thermal effects on the mechanical behaviour of a saturated clay. The study was performed on CM clay (Kaolin) using a temperature-controlled triaxial apparatus. Applied temperatures were between 22 and 90°C. A comprehensive experimental program was carried out, including: (i) triaxial shear tests at ambient and high temperatures for different initial overconsolidation ratios; (ii) consolidation tests at ambient and high temperatures; and (iii) drained thermal heating for different initial overconsolidation ratios. The obtained results provide observations concerning a wide scope of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of clays. Test results obtained at 90°C were compared with tests performed at ambient temperature. Based on these comparisons, thermal effects on a variety of features of behaviour are presented and discussed. Focus is made on: (i) induced thermal volume change during drained heating; (ii) experimental evidence of temperature influence on preconsolidation pressure and on compressibility index; (iii) thermal effects on shear strength and critical state; and (iv) thermal effects on elastic modulus. Thermal yielding is discussed and yield limit evolution with temperature is presented. The directions of the induced plastic strains are also discussed. Several remarks on the difference in the mechanical behaviour at ambient and high temperatures conclude the paper. Copyright

  11. Cellulose nanowhiskers from coconut husk fibers: effect of preparation conditions on their thermal and morphological behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared by sulfuric acid hydrolysis from coconut husk fibers which had previously been submitted to a delignification process. The effects of preparation conditions on the thermal and morphological behavior of the nanocrystals were investigated. Cellulose nanowhisker sus...

  12. Dynamical thermal effects in InGaAsP microtubes at telecom wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhaobing; Bianucci, Pablo; Roche, Philip J R; Dastjerdi, M Hadi Tavakoli; Mi, Zetian; Poole, Philip J; Kirk, Andrew G; Plant, David V

    2012-07-01

    We report on the observation of a dynamical thermal effect in InGaAsP microtubes at telecom wavelengths. The microtubes are fabricated by releasing a strained semiconductor bilayer and are picked up by abruptly tapered optical fibers for subsequent coupling with adiabatically tapered optical fibers. As a result of absorption by InAs quantum dots embedded in the tube structure, these microtubes show dynamical thermal effects at wavelengths around 1525 nm and 1578 nm, while they are passive at longer wavelengths near 1634 nm. The photon absorption induced thermal effect is visualized by generating a pair of microbottles. The dynamical thermal effect can be avoided or exploited for passive or active applications by utilizing appropriate resonance wavelengths.

  13. Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahney, Robert

    1997-12-19

    This paper summarizes the development of a reliable methodology for the prediction of peak spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature within the waste disposal package. The effective thermal conductivity method replaces other older methodologies.

  14. Sterilization effect of atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma on dental instruments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sung, Su-Jin; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Chang, Brian Myung W; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan

    2013-01-01

    .... To develop a dental sterilizer which can sterilize most materials, such as metals, rubbers, and plastics, the sterilization effect of an atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was evaluated...

  15. Thermal effects on aquatic organisms. Annotated bibliography of the 1975 literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutant, C.C.; Talmage, S.S.; Carrier, R.F.; Collier, B.N.; Dailey, N.S. (comps.)

    1976-10-01

    Abstracts are presented of 716 papers published during 1975 concerning thermal effects on aquatic organisms. Indexes are included for author, subject category, geographic location, toxon, title, and keywords. (CH)

  16. Effects of heating with radiofrequency power on myocardial impulse conduction: is radiofrequency ablation exclusively thermally mediated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmers, T. A.; de Bakker, J. M.; Wittkampf, F. H.; Hauer, R. N.

    1996-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that radiofrequency (RF) ablation causes exclusively thermally mediated effects, it has never been proved. In a previous report, temperatures required to induce conduction block in superfused canine epicardial ventricular myocardium were identified by exposure to

  17. Corneal collagen cross-linking effects on pseudophakic bullous keratopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirzaei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of riboflavin administration and ultraviolet A(UVAcross-linking on advanced symptomatic bullous keratopathy. METHODS: Fifteen patients with symptomatic pseudophakic bullous keratopathy(PBKwere included. Slit-lamp examination, visual acuity, foreign body sensation(FBSquestionnaire, corneal clarity grading, ocular pain intensity scale and corneal thickness measures with Pentacam and ultrasound pachymetry(UP, were performed before corneal cross-linking and 1 and 6mo thereafter. After using sodium chloride solution, for one week, the central 8mm(diameterof the corneal epithelium was removed, and cross-linking, with riboflavin instillation every 3min for 30min, and UVA irradiation for 30min was performed. RESULTS: Five males and 10 females with mean age of 66±13y were included. Mean follow up time was 6.2mo. Corneal transparency in all eyes was statistically significantly better 1 month after treatment than preoperatively(PP= 0.218. Foreign body sensation subsided in 70% of patients. The average CCT decreased within 1mo after the procedure(PP=0.006. The improvement in mean CDVA from preoperatively to 1mo postoperatively was statistically significant(P=0.010. At 6mo, no significant differences were observed(P=0.130. The pain scores at 1mo were statistically significantly better than preoperatively(P=0.007. At 6mo, however the mean pain score was higher than at 1mo and not statistically significantly different from the preoperative score(P=0.070. CONCLUSION: Corneal CXL significantly improved corneal transparency, corneal thickness, and ocular pain 1 month postoperatively. However, it did not seem to have a long-lasting effect in decreasing pain and maintaining corneal transparency in patients with PBK. This procedure extends the time interval for corneal transplantation and increases visualization at DSAEK procedure.

  18. Registry Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Few-Layer Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2014-01-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the registry effect on the thermal conductivity of few-layer graphene. The interlayer interaction is described by either the Lennard-Jones potential or the registry-dependent potential. Our calculations show that the thermal conductivity in few-layer graphene from both potentials are close to each other, i.e the registry effect is essentially not important. It is because the thermal transport in few-layer graphene is mainly limited by the int...

  19. Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Thermal Distribution in Arch Dams considering Solar Radiation Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzabozorg, H.; Hariri-Ardebili, M. A.; Shirkhan, M.; Seyed-Kolbadi, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams. PMID:24695817

  20. Analysis of thermal effects in endoscopic nanocarriers-based photodynamic therapy applied to esophageal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Wilfert, O.; Hudcova, L.; Poliak, J.; Barcik, P.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we propose a predictive model that allows the study of thermal effects produced when the optical radiation interacts with an esophageal or stomach disease with gold nanoparticles embedded. The model takes into account light distribution in the tumor tissue by means of a Monte Carlo method. Mie theory is used to obtain the gold nanoparticles optical properties and the thermal model employed is based on the bio-heat equation. The complete model was applied to two types of tumoral tissue (squamous cell carcinoma located in the esophagus and adenocarcinoma in the stomach) in order to study the thermal effects induced by the inclusion of gold nanoparticles.

  1. Effects of torsion on the thermal conductivity of multi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Chao; Lu, Gui; Cao, Bing-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Fan, Zhen; Feng, Zhi-Hai

    2017-05-01

    This work employs the equilibrium molecular dynamics method to study the effects of torsion on the thermal conductivity of multi-layer graphene. Thermal conductivities of twisted 10-layer 433.91 × 99.68 Å2 graphene with torsion angles of 0°, 11.25°, 22.5°, 33.75°, 45°, 67.5°, 90°, 112.5°, and 135° are calculated. The corresponding radial distribution functions and nearest atomic distances are calculated to reveal the effects of torsion on lattice structures. The spectral energy density (SED) method is utilized to analyze the phonon transport properties. It is very interesting that the thermal conductivity of multi-layer graphene decreases slightly at first and then increases with the increasing torsion angle, and the valley is located at θG = 22.5° with the lowest thermal conductivity of 4692.40 W m-1 K-1. The torsion effect can be considered as a combination of the compression effect and the dislocation effect. Further SED analysis confirms that the effect of dislocation on thermal conductivities can be negligible, while the compression effect decreases the phonon lifetimes of flexural out-of-plane acoustic (ZA) branches and increases the ZA group velocities and the phonon specific heat. The decrease becomes dominated when the torsion angle is small, whereas the increase becomes more and more dominated when the torsion angle becomes larger, which are responsible for the reported variation of thermal conductivities.

  2. Non-adiabatic effects within a single thermally averaged potential energy surface: thermal expansion and reaction rates of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J L; Castro, A; Clemente-Gallardo, J; Echenique, P; Mazo, J J; Polo, V; Rubio, A; Zueco, D

    2012-12-14

    At non-zero temperature and when a system has low-lying excited electronic states, the ground-state Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down and the low-lying electronic states are involved in any chemical process. In this work, we use a temperature-dependent effective potential for the nuclei which can accommodate the influence of an arbitrary number of electronic states in a simple way, while at the same time producing the correct Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for the electronic part. With the help of this effective potential, we show that thermally activated low-lying electronic states can have a significant effect in molecular properties for which electronic excitations are oftentimes ignored. We study the thermal expansion of the Manganese dimer, Mn(2), where we find that the average bond length experiences a change larger than the present experimental accuracy upon the inclusion of the excited states into the picture. We also show that, when these states are taken into account, reaction-rate constants are modified. In particular, we study the opening of the ozone molecule, O(3), and show that in this case the rate is modified as much as a 20% with respect to the ground-state Born-Oppenheimer prediction.

  3. Thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction induced by pulsed neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Kye, Yong-Uk; Cho, Moo-Hyun

    2017-10-01

    We measured the thermal neutron cross-section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction. Sm and Au foils with and without a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the electron linac. The induced activities of the reaction products were determined via high energy resolution HPGe detector. The present results: σ0,Sm =212±8 b and I0,Sm =3.02±0.19 kb are consistent with most of the existing reference data.

  4. Experimental determination of the 14N(n,p)14C reaction cross section for thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, J.; Wagemans, C.; Goeminne, G.; Geltenbort, P.

    2000-06-01

    The 14N(nth,p)14C reaction cross section was determined at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble using various polyimide and adenine samples. We obtained a precise value of (1.93+/-0.05) b for the cross section. A comparison is made with the currently available results in the literature and the astrophysical context is briefly discussed. Also the previously determined 17O(nth,α)14C cross section is renormalized taking into account this new result.

  5. Effect of Moisture Content on Thermal Properties of Porous Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Vejmelková, Eva; Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Keppert, Martin; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of characteristic types of porous building materials are determined in the whole range of moisture content from dry to fully water-saturated state. A transient pulse technique is used in the experiments, in order to avoid the influence of moisture transport on measured data. The investigated specimens include cement composites, ceramics, plasters, and thermal insulation boards. The effect of moisture-induced changes in thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity on the energy performance of selected building envelopes containing the studied materials is then analyzed using computational modeling of coupled heat and moisture transport. The results show an increased moisture content as a substantial negative factor affecting both thermal properties of materials and energy balance of envelopes, which underlines the necessity to use moisture-dependent thermal parameters of building materials in energy-related calculations.

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon/Phenolic Composite Thermal Protection Materials: Atomistic to Effective Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Lawson, John W.; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation ablative thermal protection systems are expected to consist of 3D woven composite architectures. It is well known that composites can be tailored to achieve desired mechanical and thermal properties in various directions and thus can be made fit-for-purpose if the proper combination of constituent materials and microstructures can be realized. In the present work, the first, multiscale, atomistically-informed, computational analysis of mechanical and thermal properties of a present day - Carbon/Phenolic composite Thermal Protection System (TPS) material is conducted. Model results are compared to measured in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical and thermal properties to validate the computational approach. Results indicate that given sufficient microstructural fidelity, along with lowerscale, constituent properties derived from molecular dynamics simulations, accurate composite level (effective) thermo-elastic properties can be obtained. This suggests that next generation TPS properties can be accurately estimated via atomistically informed multiscale analysis.

  7. Mechanistic evaluation of the effect of thermal-treating on Eudragit RS matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmi, Shirzad; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Löbenberg, Raimar; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Thermal treatment of acrylic matrices was recently introduced as a tool for prolonging the release of drug. Thermal treatment at temperatures above the T(g) of the polymer can decrease drug release rate. In this research we studied the mechanism of the effect of thermal treatment on Eudragit RS matrices. Indomethacin was used as model drug. The results showed that polymer chain movement and redistribution of the polymer in the tablet matrix structure after thermal-treating is the possible mechanism of drug release prolongation. The melting and resolidification of the polymer, due to the thermal treatment has apparently resulted in a redistribution of the polymer throughout the matrix and a change in the porosity of the tablet. FTIR results did not show any drug-polymer interaction due to heat-treatment. DSC and PXD studies ruled out the occurrence of solid solution and polymorphic change of the drug.

  8. In situ polymerized wood polymer composite: effect of additives and nanoclay on the thermal, mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, Rashmi R; Maji, Tarun K., E-mail: tkm@tezu.ernet.in [Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Assam, (India)

    2013-11-01

    This study concerns the preparation and characterization of wood polymer nanocomposites based on impregnation of styrene acrylonitrile co-polymer-nanoclay intercalating system in presence of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), a cross linking agent, and vinyl trichloro silane (VTCS) as additives into Simul (Bombex ceiba, L.), a soft wood. The effect of nanoclay and VTCS on the properties of the resultant wood polymer nanocomposites (WPNC) has been evaluated. FTIR spectroscopy shows the interaction among wood, polymers, GMA, nanoclay and VTCS. The penetration of polymer and nanoclay into the wood cell wall is supported by SEM study. The distribution of nanoclay in the SAN polymer matrix present within the wood cell wall has been evidenced by TEM study. TGA results show an improvement in the thermostability of the resultant composites. The inclusion of VTCS enhances the self extinguishing behaviour of the WPNC as revealed by limiting oxygen index (LOI) test. Due to treatment, the resultant WPNC exhibits an improvement in all the properties like water repellency, dimensional stability, hardness, flexural, tensile and thermal stability compared to untreated wood. (author)

  9. In situ polymerized wood polymer composite: effect of additives and nanoclay on the thermal, mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi R Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the preparation and characterization of wood polymer nanocomposites based on impregnation of styrene acrylonitrile co-polymer-nanoclay intercalating system in presence of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, a cross linking agent, and vinyl trichloro silane (VTCS as additives into Simul (Bombex ceiba, L., a soft wood. The effect of nanoclay and VTCS on the properties of the resultant wood polymer nanocomposites (WPNC has been evaluated. FTIR spectroscopy shows the interaction among wood, polymers, GMA, nanoclay and VTCS. The penetration of polymer and nanoclay into the wood cell wall is supported by SEM study. The distribution of nanoclay in the SAN polymer matrix present within the wood cell wall has been evidenced by TEM study. TGA results show an improvement in the thermostability of the resultant composites. The inclusion of VTCS enhances the self extinguishing behaviour of the WPNC as revealed by limiting oxygen index (LOI test. Due to treatment, the resultant WPNC exhibits an improvement in all the properties like water repellancy, dimensional stability, hardness, flexural, tensile and thermal stability compared to untreated wood.

  10. The effects of cross-generational and cross-dialectal variation on vowel identification and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert Allen

    2012-02-01

    Cross-generational and cross-dialectal variation in vowels among speakers of American English was examined in terms of vowel identification by listeners and vowel classification using pattern recognition. Listeners from Western North Carolina and Southeastern Wisconsin identified 12 vowel categories produced by 120 speakers stratified by age (old adults, young adults, and children), gender, and dialect. The vowels /ɝ, o, ʊ, u/ were well identified by both groups of listeners. The majority of confusions were for the front /i, ɪ, e, ɛ, æ/, the low back /ɑ, ɔ/ and the monophthongal North Carolina /aɪ/. For selected vowels, generational differences in acoustic vowel characteristics were perceptually salient, suggesting listeners' responsiveness to sound change. Female exemplars and native-dialect variants produced higher identification rates. Linear discriminant analyses which examined dialect and generational classification accuracy showed that sampling the formant pattern at vowel midpoint only is insufficient to separate the vowels. Two sample points near onset and offset provided enough information for successful classification. The models trained on one dialect classified the vowels from the other dialect with much lower accuracy. The results strongly support the importance of dynamic information in accurate classification of cross-generational and cross-dialectal variations. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  11. Identifying possible non-thermal effects of radio frequency energy on inactivating food microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xiaoxi; Li, Rui; Hou, Lixia; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Shaojin

    2018-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) heating has been successfully used for inactivating microorganisms in agricultural and food products. Athermal (non-thermal) effects of RF energy on microorganisms have been frequently proposed in the literature, resulting in difficulties for developing effective thermal treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to identify if the athermal inactivation of microorganisms existed during RF treatments. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in apple juice and mashed potato were exposed to both RF and conventional thermal energies to compare their inactivation populations. A thermal death time (TDT) heating block system was used as conventional thermal energy source to simulate the same heating treatment conditions, involving heating temperature, heating rate and uniformity, of a RF treatment at a frequency of 27.12 MHz. Results showed that a similar and uniform temperature distribution in tested samples was achieved in both heating systems, so that the central sample temperature could be used as representative one for evaluating thermal inactivation of microorganisms. The survival patterns of two target microorganisms in two food samples were similar both for RF and heating block treatments since their absolute difference of survival populations was  0.05) in inactivating bacteria between the RF and the heating block treatments at each set of temperatures. The solid temperature and microbial inactivation data demonstrated that only thermal effect of RF energy at 27.12 MHz was observed on inactivating microorganisms in foods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of functionalized silver nanoparticles over the thermal conductivity of base fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Seyhan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivities of nanofluids are expected to be higher than common heat transfer fluids. The use of metal nanoparticles has not been intensely investigated for heat transfer applications due to lack of stability. Here we present an experimental study on the effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs which are stabilized with surfactants, on the thermal conductivity of water, ethylene glycol and hexane. Hydrophilic Ag NPs were synthesized in aqueous medium with using gum arabic as surfactant and oleic acid/oleylamine were used to stabilize Ag NPs in the organic phase. The enhancement up to 10 per cent in effective thermal conductivity of hexane and ethylene glycol was achieved with addition of Ag NPs at considerably low concentrations (i.e. 2 and 1 per cent, by weight, for hexane and ethylene glycol respectively. However, almost 10 per cent of deterioration was recorded at effective thermal conductivity of water when Ag NPs were added at 1 per cent (by wt. Considerable amount of Gum Arabic in the medium is shown to be the major contributor to this fall, causing lowering of thermal conductivity of water. Same particles performed much better in ethylene glycol where the stabilizer does not lower the thermal conductivity of the base fluid. Also thermal conductivity of nanofluids was found to be temperature independent except water based Ag nanofluids above a threshold concentration. This temperature dependency is suggested to be due to inhibition of hydrogen bonding among water molecules in the presence of high amounts of gum arabic.

  13. The effect of functionalized silver nanoparticles over the thermal conductivity of base fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Merve; Altan, Cem Levent; Gurten, Berna; Bucak, Seyda

    2017-04-01

    Thermal conductivities of nanofluids are expected to be higher than common heat transfer fluids. The use of metal nanoparticles has not been intensely investigated for heat transfer applications due to lack of stability. Here we present an experimental study on the effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) which are stabilized with surfactants, on the thermal conductivity of water, ethylene glycol and hexane. Hydrophilic Ag NPs were synthesized in aqueous medium with using gum arabic as surfactant and oleic acid/oleylamine were used to stabilize Ag NPs in the organic phase. The enhancement up to 10 per cent in effective thermal conductivity of hexane and ethylene glycol was achieved with addition of Ag NPs at considerably low concentrations (i.e. 2 and 1 per cent, by weight, for hexane and ethylene glycol respectively). However, almost 10 per cent of deterioration was recorded at effective thermal conductivity of water when Ag NPs were added at 1 per cent (by wt). Considerable amount of Gum Arabic in the medium is shown to be the major contributor to this fall, causing lowering of thermal conductivity of water. Same particles performed much better in ethylene glycol where the stabilizer does not lower the thermal conductivity of the base fluid. Also thermal conductivity of nanofluids was found to be temperature independent except water based Ag nanofluids above a threshold concentration. This temperature dependency is suggested to be due to inhibition of hydrogen bonding among water molecules in the presence of high amounts of gum arabic.

  14. Effect of amantadine on oxymorphone-induced thermal antinociception in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, K T; Pypendop, B H; Escobar, A; Stanley, S D; Ilkiw, J E

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the effect of amantadine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, on the thermal antinociceptive effect of oxymorphone in cats. Six adult healthy cats were used. After baseline thermal threshold determinations, oxymorphone was administered intravenously to maintain plasma oxymorphone concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 400 ng/mL. In addition, amantadine, or an equivalent volume of saline, was administered intravenously to maintain a plasma amantadine concentration of 1100 ng/mL. Thermal threshold and plasma oxymorphone and amantadine concentrations were determined at each target plasma oxymorphone concentration. Effect maximum models were fitted to the oxymorphone concentration-thermal threshold data, after transformation in % maximum response. Oxymorphone increased skin temperature, thermal threshold, and thermal excursion (i.e., the difference between thermal threshold and skin temperature) in a concentration-dependent manner. No significant difference was found between the amantadine and saline treatments. Mean ± SE oxymorphone EC(50) were 14.2 ± 1.2 and 24.2 ± 7.4 ng/mL in the amantadine and saline groups, respectively. These values were not significantly different. Large differences in oxymorphone EC(50) in the saline and amantadine treatment groups were observed in two cats. These results suggest that amantadine may decrease the antinociceptive dose of oxymorphone in some, but not all, cats. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings: Evidence of Assimilation Effects Using Cross-Classified Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Andersson, Björn; Guo, Boliang; Xin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Writing assessments are an indispensable part of most language competency tests. In our research, we used cross-classified models to study rater effects in the real essay rating process of a large-scale, high-stakes educational examination administered in China in 2011. Generally, four cross-classified models are suggested for investigation of rater effects: (1) the existence of sequential effects, (2) the direction of the sequential effects, and (3) differences in raters by their individual characteristics. We applied these models to the data to account for possible cluster effects caused by the application of multiple rating strategies. The results of our research showed that raters demonstrated sequential effects during the rating process. In contrast to many other studies on rater effects, our study found that raters exhibited assimilation effects. The more experienced, lenient, and qualified raters were less susceptible to assimilation effects. In addition, our research demonstrated the feasibility and appropriateness of using cross-classified models in assessing rater effects for such data structures. This paper also discusses the implications for educators and practitioners who are interested in reducing sequential effects in the rating process, and suggests directions for future research.

  16. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings: Evidence of Assimilation Effects Using Cross-Classified Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Writing assessments are an indispensable part of most language competency tests. In our research, we used cross-classified models to study rater effects in the real essay rating process of a large-scale, high-stakes educational examination administered in China in 2011. Generally, four cross-classified models are suggested for investigation of rater effects: (1 the existence of sequential effects, (2 the direction of the sequential effects, and (3 differences in raters by their individual characteristics. We applied these models to the data to account for possible cluster effects caused by the application of multiple rating strategies. The results of our research showed that raters demonstrated sequential effects during the rating process. In contrast to many other studies on rater effects, our study found that raters exhibited assimilation effects. The more experienced, lenient, and qualified raters were less susceptible to assimilation effects. In addition, our research demonstrated the feasibility and appropriateness of using cross-classified models in assessing rater effects for such data structures. This paper also discusses the implications for educators and practitioners who are interested in reducing sequential effects in the rating process, and suggests directions for future research.

  17. Auto-correcting for atmospherical effects in thermal hyperspectral measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago-Acevedo, Maria; Verhoef, Wout

    2017-04-01

    Correct estimation of soil and vegetation thermal emissivity's has been of huge importance in remote sensing studies. Field measurements of the leaf/soil and canopy emissivity can lead to estimations of water content. Consequently several studies have been performed with the objective of identifying the spectral behavior of the emissivity. However such measurements provide additional challenges before any retrieval can successfully be performed. While in laboratory the influence of the atmospheric conditions can be controlled in field experiments this cannot be done. In most cases such atmospheric correction however requires detailed knowledge of the atmospheric constituents at the time of the measurements. The objective of this research was to create an auto-atmospherically correct thermal hyperspectral emissivity measurements for retrieving canopy water content. For this hyperspectral thermal measurements were obtained during ESAs REFLEX campaign in 2012 using a MIDAC FTIR radiometer. MODTRAN simulations were used to construct a simple quadratic radiative transfer model that couples atmospheric transmissivities to the different gas constituents. This model was afterwards used to estimate the concentrations of H20 (g) and CO2 (g). The radiative measurements were afterwards corrected for these gas absorptions. Finally a temperature emissivity separation was applied to estimate the emissivities of the different land surface components. Gas concentrations were validated against measurements of a LICOR 7500 taken in parallel to the MIDAC measurements. It is observed that in general the relative errors are around 25% of the LICOR measurements, which are in the same range as the instrumental errors of the eddy-covariance system (15-30%). The correction of the absorption features proved however more difficult and resulted in overestimations of the correction-terms; 1) because spectral collocation of the simulations with the observations proved troublesome, and 2 because

  18. Effects of rim structure formation on the thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2} pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, Masaki; Hirai, Mutsumi [Global Nuclear Fuel - Japan Co., Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kaino, Masaru; Hattori, Toshiitsu [Tokyo Electric Power Company, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Thermal diffusivities of UO{sub 2} pellets irradiated in a test reactor were measured by using a laser flash method. The maximum burnups of the samples were about 85 GWd/t and some of the samples contained rim structures. Thermal diffusivities of irradiated decreased compared with those of unirradiated and simulated soluble fission products-doped UO{sub 2} pellets. Hysteresis phenomena in the thermal diffusivity of irradiated fuel, which had been reported before, were not clearly observed in UO{sub 2} pellets in which the rim structures had formed. The thermal conductivities for irradiated UO{sub 2} pellets were evaluated from measured thermal diffusivities, specific heat capacities of unirradiated UO{sub 2} pellets and measured sample densities. The thermal conductivities of irradiated UO{sub 2} were compared to those of unirradiated UO{sub 2} pellets. The relative thermal conductivities were normalized to those of 96.5% TD (Theoretical Density). These normalized thermal conductivities of irradiated UO{sub 2} pellets in which significant rim structures had formed tended to be slightly higher than those of irradiated UO{sub 2} pellets in which no rim structure had formed. This may be caused by an effect of recrystallization in rim structures. (author)

  19. Effects of thermal cycling on aluminum metallization of power diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Mads; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; Kristensen, Peter Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of aluminum metallization on top of power electronic chips is a well-known wear out phenomenon under power cycling conditions. However, the origins of reconstruction are still under discussion. In the current study, a method for carrying out passive thermal cycling of power diodes...... is controlled and the device is not subjected to a current load the observed degradation of metallization and corresponding increase of resistance is purely induced by thermo-mechanical stress. A correlation between number of cycles, micro-structural evolution, and sheet resistance is found and conclusions...

  20. Thermal effects of dams in the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Stewart A.

    2010-01-01

    where the annual maximum temperature typically occurred in September or October. Without-dam temperatures also tended to have more daily variation than with-dam temperatures. Examination of the without-dam temperature estimates indicated that dam sites could be grouped according to the amount of streamflow derived from high-elevation, spring-fed, and snowmelt-driven areas high in the Cascade Mountains (Cougar, Big Cliff/Detroit, River Mill, and Hills Creek Dams: Group A), as opposed to flow primarily derived from lower-elevation rainfall-driven drainages (Group B). Annual maximum temperatures for Group A ranged from 15 to 20 degree(s)C, expressed as the 7-day average of the daily maximum (7dADM), whereas annual maximum 7dADM temperatures for Group B ranged from 21 to 25 degrees C. Because summertime stream temperature is at least somewhat dependent on the upstream water source, it was important when estimating without-dam temperatures to use correlations to sites with similar upstream characteristics. For that reason, it also is important to maintain long-term, year-round temperature measurement stations at representative sites in each of the Willamette River basin's physiographic regions. Streamflow and temperature estimates downstream of the major dam sites and throughout the Willamette River were generated using existing CE-QUAL-W2 flow and temperature models. These models, originally developed for the Willamette River water-temperature Total Maximum Daily Load process, required only a few modifications to allow them to run under the greatly reduced without-dam flow conditions. Model scenarios both with and without upstream dams were run. Results showed that Willamette River streamflow without upstream dams was reduced to levels much closer to historical pre-dam conditions, with annual minimum streamflows approximately one-half or less of dam-augmented levels. Thermal effects of the dams varied according to the time of year, from cooling in mid-summer to warm

  1. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  2. Modelling of segmented high-performance thermoelectric generators with effects of thermal radiation, electrical and thermal contact resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Zhongliang; Li, Dawen

    2016-04-07

    In this study, segmented thermoelectric generators (TEGs) have been simulated with various state-of-the-art TE materials spanning a wide temperature range, from 300 K up to 1000 K. The results reveal that by combining the current best p-type TE materials, BiSbTe, MgAgSb, K-doped PbTeS and SnSe with the strongest n-type TE materials, Cu-Doped BiTeSe, AgPbSbTe and SiGe to build segmented legs, TE modules could achieve efficiencies of up to 17.0% and 20.9% at ΔT = 500 K and ΔT = 700 K, respectively, and a high output power densities of over 2.1 Watt cm(-2) at the temperature difference of 700 K. Moreover, we demonstrate that successful segmentation requires a smooth change of compatibility factor s from one end of the TEG leg to the other, even if s values of two ends differ by more than a factor of 2. The influence of the thermal radiation, electrical and thermal contact effects have also been studied. Although considered potentially detrimental to the TEG performance, these effects, if well-regulated, do not prevent segmentation of the current best TE materials from being a prospective way to construct high performance TEGs with greatly enhanced efficiency and output power density.

  3. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weijing [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Pupeschi, Simone [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Hanaor, Dorian [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science and Technologies, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Gan, Yixiang, E-mail: yixiang.gan@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  4. Analysis on the effect of hypersonic vehicle's optical window on infrared thermal imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liquan; Han, Ying; Kong, Lingqin; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin; Zhang, Li; Li, Yanhong; Tian, Yi; Sa, Renna

    2015-08-01

    According to the aero-thermal effects and aero-thermal radiation effects of the optical window, the thermo-optic effect, the elasto-optical effect and the thermal deformation of the optical window are analyzed using finite element analysis method. Also, the peak value and its location of the point spread function, which is caused by the thermo-optic effect and the dome thermal deformation, are calculated with the variance of time. Furthermore, the temperature gradient influence to the transmission of optical window, the variation trend of transmission as well as optical window radiation with time are studied based on temperature distribution analysis. The simulations results show that: When the incident light is perpendicular to the optical window, image shift is mainly caused by its thermal deformation, and the value of image shift is very small. Image shift is determined only by the angle of the incident light. With a certain incident angle, image shift is not affected by the gradient refractive index change. The optical window transmission is mainly affected by temperature gradient and thus not neglectable to image quality. Therefore, the selection of window cooling methods, needs not only consider the window temperature but try to eliminate the temperature gradient. When calculating the thermal radiation, the optical window should be regarded as volume radiation source instead of surface radiator. The results provide the basis for the optical window design, material selection and the later image processing.

  5. Thermal effects and beam parameter variations in electron guns

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Stepin, D L

    2001-01-01

    The paper described results of research on influence of electrode temperatures and manufacturing tolerance of an electron gun on parameters of an output beam. The Pierce's gun that provides an electron beam with a current of 1.2 A and energy of 25 keV for the S-band technological linac is considered as an example. Numerically calculated parameters of the beam and the temperature distribution in electrodes are presented.It is shown that the acceptable error in a position of electrodes is +- 0.1 mm. This value does not fall outside the limit of thermal deformations and technical abilities for manufacturing guns in a laboratory. The scaling to the area of injectors for compact X-band linacs leads to the tolerance of +-0.01 mm that requires introducing fixing and adjustment elements reducing a thermal insulation of the cathode. However, the calculation and experiment showed that such reducing is negligible even for the modern low temperature thermionic cathodes due to a dominant role of the radiation in the heat ...

  6. Suitability of cross-bred cows for organic farms based on cross-breeding effects on production and functional traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de Y.; Smolders, E.A.A.; Hoorneman, J.N.; Nauta, W.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Data from 113 Dutch organic farms were analysed to determine the effect of cross-breeding on production and functional traits. In total, data on 33 788 lactations between January 2003 and February 2009 from 15 015 cows were available. Holstein–Friesian pure-bred cows produced most kg of milk in 305

  7. Effect of pore size and shape on the thermal conductivity of metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Hasan; McGaughey, Alan J H; Wilmer, Christopher E

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pore size and shape on the thermal conductivity of a series of idealized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) containing adsorbed gas using molecular simulations. With no gas present, the thermal conductivity decreases with increasing pore size. In the presence of adsorbed gas, MOFs with smaller pores experience reduced thermal conductivity due to phonon scattering introduced by gas-crystal interactions. In contrast, for larger pores (>1.7 nm), the adsorbed gas does not significantly affect thermal conductivity. This difference is due to the decreased probability of gas-crystal collisions in larger pore structures. In contrast to MOFs with simple cubic pores, the thermal conductivity in structures with triangular and hexagonal pore channels exhibits significant anisotropy. For different pore geometries at the same atomic density, hexagonal channel MOFs have both the highest and lowest thermal conductivities, along and across the channel direction, respectively. In the triangular and hexagonal channeled structures, the presence of gas molecules has different effects on thermal conductivity along different crystallographic directions.

  8. The Effect of Thermal Annealing Processes on Structural and Photoluminescence of Zinc Oxide Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Shan Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used radio frequency sputtering at room temperature to prepare a zinc oxide (ZnO thin film. After deposition, the thin film was placed in a high-temperature furnace to undergo thermal annealing at different temperatures (300, 400, 500, and 600°C and for different dwelling times (15, 30, 45, and 60 min. The objective was to explore the effects that the described process had on the thin film’s internal structure and luminescence properties. A scanning electron microscope topographic image showed that the size of the ZnO crystals grew with increases in either the thermal annealing temperature or the dwelling time. However, significant differences in the levels of influence caused by increasing the thermal annealing temperature or dwelling time existed; the thermal annealing temperature had a greater effect on crystal growth when compared to the dwelling time. Furthermore, the crystallization directions of ZnO (002, (101, (102, and (103 can be clearly observed through an X-ray diffraction analysis, and crystallization strength increased with an increase in the thermal annealing temperature. The photoluminescence measurement spectra showed that ultraviolet (UV emission intensity increased with increases in thermal annealing temperature and dwelling time. However, when the thermal annealing temperature reached 600°C or when the dwelling time reached 60 min, even exhibited a weak green light emission peak.

  9. Crossed ratchet effects on magnetic domain walls: geometry and transverse field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alija, A; Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Perez-Junquera, A; Alameda, J M; Martin, J I; Velez, M, E-mail: mvelez@uniovi.es [Dept. Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-08-17

    Domain wall propagation across a 2D array of asymmetric holes is strongly dependent on the domain wall configuration: i.e. on whether the wall is flat or kinked. This results in interesting crossed ratchet and asymmetric accommodation effects that have been studied as a function of geometry and transverse field. Micromagnetic simulations have shown that the observation of crossed ratchet effects is easier for arrow than for triangular holes due to a larger field range in which kink propagation is the preferred mode for domain wall motion. Also, it has been found that dc transverse fields can produce a significant enhancement of the easy axis asymmetric accommodation and, also, that ac transverse fields can be rectified by the crossed ratchet potential.

  10. Effect of the Kapitza temperature jump on thermal processes in nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novopashin Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two analytical solutions describing thermal processes in a nanofluid based on spherical nanoparticles taking into account the Kapitza temperature jump on a particle-fluid boundary were found. In the first solution the thermal conductivity of nanofluids was found with the help of Maxwell approach. The second solution describes stationary heat exchange between a spherical particle and fluid in two different conditions. A dimensionless criterion characterizing the effect of the Kapitza temperature jump on thermal processes in nanofluids has been obtained in both solutions.

  11. Isotopic effect on thermal physical properties of isotopically modified boron single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Quanli [Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama (Japan); Noda, Tetsuji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Araki, Hiroshi; Numazawa, Takenori; Hirano, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nogi, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Satoru [University of Tokyo, Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity at low temperature for isotopically modified boron single crystals was performed between 0.5 and 100K using relaxation method and steady heat flow method, respectively. The results indicate that the specific heat has obvious divergences at T<5K. At 40K, the thermal conductivity of {sup 10}B-enriched crystal is about 570 W/m{center_dot}K, which is 40% larger than that of natural boron crystal. The influence of lattice vibration modes and the isotopic effect on specific heat and thermal conductivity for isotopically modified boron are discussed. (author)

  12. Effect of Filler Concentration on Thermal Stability of Vinyl Copolymer Elastomer (VCE) Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Devlin, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henderson, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pacheco, Robin Montoya [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-06

    To study the thermal stability of vinyl copolymer elastomer (VCE) in its composite form, systematic TGA characterizations were conducted in both nonisothermal and isothermal modes. The effects of filler concentration on the aging behaviors of the VCE/filler composites were investigated under nitroplasticizer (NP) environment. FTIR characterization was used to probe the structural changes in the VCE polymer before and after the thermal treatments. This study suggests that the filler concentration significantly deteriorates the thermal stability of NP at a moderate temperature (< 70 °C). The degradation of NP, in turn, accelerates the aging process of the VCE polymer in its composite form.

  13. Moisture dependent thermal properties of hydrophilic mineral wool: application of the effective media theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iñigo Antepara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of mineral wool based materials appear to be of particular importance for their practical applications because the majority of them is used in the form of thermal insulation boards. Every catalogue list of any material producer of mineral wool contains thermal conductivity, sometimes also specific heat capacity, but they give only single characteristic values for dry state of material mostly. Exposure to outside climate or any other environment containing moisture can negatively affect the thermal insulation properties of mineral wool. Nevertheless, the mineral wool materials due to their climatic loading and their environmental exposure contain moisture that can negatively affect their thermal insulation properties. Because the presence of water in mineral wool material is undesirable for the majority of applications, many products are provided with hydrophobic substances. Hydrophilic additives are seldom used in mineral wool products. However, this kind of materials has a good potential for application for instance in interior thermal insulation systems, masonry desalination, green roofs, etc. For these materials, certain moisture content must be estimated and thus their thermal properties will be different than for the dry state. On this account, moisture dependent thermal properties of hydrophilic mineral wool (HMW are studied in a wide range of moisture content using a pulse technique. The experimentally determined thermal conductivity data is analysed using several homogenization formulas based on the effective media theory. In terms of homogenization, a porous material is considered as a mixture of two or three phases. In case of dry state, material consists from solid and gaseous phase. When moistened, liquid phase is also present. Mineral wool consists of the solid phase represented by basalt fibers, the liquid phase by water and the gaseous phase by air. At first, the homogenization techniques are applied for the

  14. Effect of metallic nanoparticle fillers on the thermal conductivity of diatomaceous earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, Mouhamad S. [Department of Liberal Arts, Des Moines Area Community College, Des Moines, IA 50314 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Srinivasan, Srilok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chang, Boyce [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ghosh, Suvojit [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S4L8 (Canada); Balasubramanian, Ganesh, E-mail: bganesh@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2016-10-23

    Thermal conductivity of solid nanoparticles (aluminum) in a nanoporous solid matrix (diatomaceous earth) is examined to understand the effect of conductive fillers on the thermal properties of a porous material. We find that thermal conductivity is strongly dependent on load applied to prepare the mixture compacts, while porosity is influenced by the composition of the mixture. The addition of nanoparticles contributes to limited increases in thermal conductivity of the mixture by (1) increasing contact area between the mixture constituents and (2) reduction of porosity that leads to enhanced solid–gas coupling contribution. Thermal conductivity increases exponentially with external gas pressures due to the coupling effect between the solid particles and the entrapped air. - Highlights: • Thermal conductivity k of DE/AlNP mixture is more dependent on compaction than on Al concentration. • Nanoparticles affect k of DE by increase in solid contact area rather than by its effect on porosity. • When air content in mixture rises, k increases with gas pressures due to solid–gas coupling effect.

  15. Thermal Bridge Effect of Aerated Concrete Block Wall in Cold Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baochang; Guo, Lirong; Li, Yubao; Zhang, Tiantian; Tan, Yufei

    2018-01-01

    As a self-insulating building material which can meet the 65 percent energy-efficiency requirements in cold region of China, aerated concrete blocks often go moldy, frost heaving, or cause plaster layer hollowing at thermal bridge parts in the extremely cold regions due to the restrictions of environmental climate and construction technique. L-shaped part and T-shaped part of aerated concrete walls are the most easily influenced parts by thermal bridge effect. In this paper, a field test is performed to investigate the scope of the thermal bridge effect. Moreover, a heat transfer calculation model for L-shaped wall and T-shaped wall is developed. According to the simulation results, the temperature fields of the thermal bridge affected regions are simulated and analyzed. The research outputs can provide theoretical basis for the application of aerated concrete wall in extremely cold regions.

  16. The effect of interphase on residual thermal stresses. 2. Unidirectional fiber composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnevsky, V.; Bledzki, A. K.

    1997-03-01

    In real composite materials an additional phase may exist between the fiber and the matrix. This phase, commonly known as the interphase, is a local region that results from the matrix bonds with the fiber surface or the fiber sizing. The differing thermal expansions or contractions of the fiber and matrix cause thermally induced stresses in composite materials. In the present study, a four-cylinder model is proposed for the determination of residual thermal stresses in unidirectional composite materials. The elastic modulus of the interphase is a function of the interphase radius and thickness. The governing equations in terms of displacements are solved in the form of expansion into a series [1]. The effective elastic characteristics are obtained using the finite element approach. The effect of the interphase thickness and different distributions of the interphase Young's modulus on the thermal residual stress field in unidirectional composite materials is investigated.

  17. Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Tensile Behavior of CF/AL Fiber Metal Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farhan Noor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work was to estimate the effect of thermal cycling on the tensile behavior of CARALL composites. Fiber metal laminates (FMLs, based on 2D woven carbon fabric and 2024-T3 Alclad aluminum alloy sheet, was manufactured by pressure molding technique followed by hand layup method. Before fabrication, aluminum sheets were anodized with phosphoric acid to produce micro porous alumina layer on surface. This micro-porous layer is beneficial to produce strong bonding between metal and fiber surfaces in FMLs. The effect of thermal cycling (-65 to +70ºC on the tensile behavior of Cf/Al based FML was studied. Tensile strength was increased after 10 thermal cycles, but it was slightly decreased to some extent after 30, and 50 thermal cycles. Tensile modulus also shown the similar behavior as that of tensile strength.

  18. AC Losses and Their Thermal Effect in High-Temperature Superconducting Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Zou, Shengnan

    2016-01-01

    In transient operations or fault conditions, hightemperature superconducting (HTS) machines suffer ac losses, which have an influence on the thermal stability of superconducting windings. In this paper, a method to calculate ac losses and their thermal effect in HTS machines is presented....... The method consists of three submodels that are coupled only in one direction. The magnetic field distribution is first solved in a machine model, assuming a uniform current distribution in HTS windings. The magnetic fields on the boundaries are then used as inputs for an ac loss model that has a homogeneous...... approximation and solves the H formulation. Afterward, the computed ac losses are considered as the heat source in a thermal model to study the temperature profile in HTS windings. The method proposed is able to evaluate ac losses and their thermal effect, thus providing a reference to design an HTS machine...

  19. Thermal Load Effect on Print Quality of Ink Jet Printined Textile Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Grujić

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Printed textile materials are often exposed to certain external impacts. One of the most common impact, these materials are subjected to, is thermal load. This effect causes certain changes in textile fibers as well as changes of ink colour reproduction printed on these materials. In this paper is presented an investigation of the series of thermal loads effects on print quality parameters of digitally produced impressions on textile substrates. The research includes basic print quality attributes: colour reproduction, macro non-uniformity and quality of line reproduction. Investigation results indicate that by increasing number of thermal loads, bigger changes in colour reproduction occur. Also, the influence of the series of thermal loads on mottle and line reproduction variations is confirmed, as well as the influence of printing substrate characteristics on print quality.

  20. A Network Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Jochen; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A procedure is described for computing the effective thermal conductivity of a rigid fibrous refractory insulation. The insulation is modeled as a 3-dimensional Cartesian network of thermal conductance. The values and volume distributions of the conductance are assigned to reflect the physical properties of the insulation, its constituent fibers, and any permeating gas. The effective thermal conductivity is computed by considering the simultaneous energy transport by solid conduction, gas conduction and radiation through a cubic volume of model insulation; thus the coupling between heat transfer modes is retained (within the simplifications inherent to the model), rather than suppressed by treating these heat transfer modes as independent. The model takes into account insulation composition, density and fiber anisotropy, as well as the geometric and material properties of the constituent fibers. A relatively good agreement, between calculated and experimentally derived thermal conductivity values, is obtained for a variety of rigid fibrous insulations.

  1. Thermal effect on the morphology and performance of organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Eisuke; Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2016-09-29

    The morphology of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is a significant factor in improving performance, and establishing a method for controlling morphology is necessary. In this study, we propose a device-size simulation model, combining reptation and the dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) algorithm, to investigate the relationship between the manufacturing process, morphology, and OPV performance. The reptation reproduces morphologies under thermal annealing, and DMC showed morphology-dependence of performance: not only short-circuit current density but also open-circuit voltage had optimal interfacial areas due to competition between exciton dissociation and charge collection. Besides, we performed transient absorption spectroscopy of various BHJ morphologies under realistic conditions, which revealed prompt and delayed dynamics of charge generation-the majority of the charges were from excitons that were generated on interfaces and dissociated within a few picoseconds, and the others from excitons that migrated to interfaces and dissociated on the order of sub-nanoseconds.

  2. Study of thermal effects of silicate-containing hydroxyapatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Zaits, A. V.; Berdinskaya, N. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of modifications of hydroxyapatite silicate ions, from the extracellular fluid prototype solution under near-physiological conditions has been studied. Formation of silicon-structured hydroxyapatite with different extent of substitution of phosphate groups in the silicate group has been established through chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained are in agreement and suggest the possibility of substitution of phosphate groups for silicate groups in the hydroxyapatite structure when introducing different sources of silica, tetraethoxysilane and sodium silicate, in the reaction mixture. Growth in the amount of silicon in Si-HA results in the increase in the thermal stability of the samples. The greatest mass loss occurs at temperatures in the range of 25-400 0C that is caused by the removal of the crystallization and adsorption water and volatile impurities. It is shown that the modified apatites are of imperfect structure and crystallize in a nanocrystalline state.

  3. Thermal effects of carbonated hydroxyapatite modified by glycine and albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerk, S. A.; Golovanova, O. A.; Kuimova, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    In this work calcium phosphate powders were obtained by precipitation method from simulated solutions of synovial fluid containing glycine and albumin. X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy determined that all samples are single-phase and are presented by carbonate containing hydroxyapatite (CHA). The thermograms of solid phases of CHA were obtained and analyzed; five stages of transformation in the temperature range of 25-1000°C were marked. It is shown that in this temperature range dehydration, decarboxylation and thermal degradation of amino acid and protein connected to the surface of solid phase occur. The tendency of temperature lowering of the decomposition of powders synthesized from a medium containing organic substances was determined. Results demonstrate a direct dependence between the concentration of the amino acid in a model solution and its content in the solid phase.

  4. Effects of additives on thermal stability of Li ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Daniel H.; Roth, E. Peter; Crafts, Chris C.; Nagasubramanian, G.; Henriksen, Gary; Amine, Khalil

    Li ion cells are being developed for high-power applications in hybrid electric vehicles, because these cells offer superior combination of power and energy density over current cell chemistries. Cells using this chemistry are proposed for battery systems in both internal combustion engine and fuel cell-powered hybrid electric vehicles. However, the safety of these cells needs to be understood and improved for eventual widespread commercial applications. The thermal-abuse response of Li ion cells has been improved by the incorporation of more stable anode carbons and electrolyte additives. Electrolyte solutions containing vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), tris(trifluoroethyl)phosphate (TFP) as well as some proprietary flame-retardant additives were evaluated. Test cells in the 18,650 configuration were built at Sandia National Laboratories using new stable electrode materials and electrolyte additives. A special test fixture was designed to allow determination of self-generated cell heating during a thermal ramp profile. The flammability of vented gas and expelled electrolyte was studied using a novel arrangement of a spark generator placed near the cell to ignite vent gas if a flammable gas mixture was present. Flammability of vent gas was somewhat reduced by the presence of certain additives. Accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) was also used to characterize 18,650-size test cell heat and gas generation. Gas composition was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and was found to consist of CO 2, H 2, CO, methane, ethane, ethylene and small amounts of C1-C4 organic molecules.

  5. Thermal Ablative Therapies and Immune Checkpoint Modulation: Can Locoregional Approaches Effect a Systemic Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous image-guided ablation is an increasingly common treatment for a multitude of solid organ malignancies. While historically these techniques have been restricted to the management of small, unresectable tumors, there is an expanding appreciation for the systemic effects these locoregional interventions can cause. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of action for the most common thermal ablation modalities and highlight the key advances in knowledge regarding the interactions between thermal ablation and the immune system.

  6. Effect of plastic deformation on the low-temperature minimum of the thermal emf of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlov, V. N.

    2012-02-01

    The effect of plastic deformation on the thermal emf and electrical resistance of polycrystalline copper is studied at low temperatures. Primary attention is devoted to the minimum in the thermal emf near 15 K and the changes in it during plastic deformation on the order of and less than 100%. These studies offer the prospect of deeper understanding of the mechanisms of electron scattering in metals with defects.

  7. Investigation of Thermal Acoustic Effects on SRF Cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Martinez, Alex [Fermilab; Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Two TESLA-style 8-cavity cryomodules have been operated at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST), formerly the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. Operational instabilities were revealed during Radio Frequency (RF) power studies. These observations were complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  8. Thermal effects on aquatic organisms: an annotated bibliography of the 1976 literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, S.S. (comp.)

    1978-05-01

    This bibliography, containing 784 annotated references on the effects of temperature on aquatic organisms, is part of an assessment of the literature on the effects of thermal power plants on the environment. The effects of thermal discharges at power plant sites are emphasized. Laboratory and field studies on temperature tolerance and the effects of temperature changes on reproduction, development, growth, distribution, physiology, and sensitivity to other stresses are included. Indexes are provided for author, keywords, subject category, geographic location of the study, taxon, and title (alphabetical listing of keywords-in-context of nontrivial words in the title).

  9. Thermal behavior of latent thermal energy storage unit using two phase change materials: Effects of HTF inlet temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzi Benmoussa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical study of the thermal behavior of shell-and-tube latent thermal energy storage (LTES unit using two phase change materials (PCMs. The heat transfer fluid (HTF flow through the inner tube and transfer the heat to PCMs. First, a mathematical model is developed based on the enthalpy formulation and solved through the governing equations. Second, the effects of HTF inlet temperature on the unsteady temperature evolution of PCMs, the total energy stored evolution as well as the total melting time is studied. Numerical results show that for all HTF inlet temperature, melting rate of PCM1 is the fastest and that of PCM2 is the slowest; increasing the HTF inlet temperature considerably increases the temperature evolution of PCMs. The maximum energy stored is observed in PCM2 with high melting temperature and high specific heat; heat storage capacity is large for high HTF inlet temperature. When the HTF inlet temperature increases from 338 K to 353 K, decreasing degree of melting time of PCM2 is the biggest from 1870 s to 490 s, which reduces about 73.8%; decreasing degree of melting time of PCM1 is the smallest from 530 s to 270 s, which reduces about 49.1%.

  10. Laser-enhanced thermal effect of moderate intensity focused ultrasound on bio-tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, JinYu; Zhang, ShuYi; Shui, XiuJi; Fan, Li

    2017-09-01

    For avoiding extra-damage to healthy tissues surrounding the focal point during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment in medical therapy, to reduce the ultrasonic intensity outside the focal point is expected. Thus, the heating processes induced by moderate intensity focused ultrasound (MIFU) and enhanced by combined irradiation of laser pulses for bio-tissues are studied in details. For fresh bio-tissues, the enhanced thermal effects by pulsed laser combined with MIFU irradiation are observed experimentally. To explore the mechanisms of these effects, several tissue-mimicking materials composed of agar mixed with graphite powders are prepared and studied for comparison, but the laser-enhanced thermal effects in these mimicking materials are much less than that in the fresh bio-tissues. Therefore, it is suggested that the laser-enhanced thermal effects may be mainly attributed to bio-activities and related photo-bio-chemical effects of fresh tissues.

  11. Adiabatic Interactions of Manakov Solitons -- Effects of Cross-modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerdjikov, V. S.; Todorov, M. D.; Kyuldjiev, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the asymptotic behavior of the Manakov soliton trains perturbed by cross-modulation in the adiabatic approximation. The multisoliton interactions in the adiabatic approximation are modeled by a generalized Complex Toda chain (GCTC). The cross-modulation requires special treating for the evolution of the polarization vectors of the solitons. The numerical predictions of the Manakov system are compared with the perturbed GCTC. For certain set of initial parameters GCTC describes ...

  12. The Effect of Particle Size on Thermal Conduction in Granular Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghwoon; Yun, Tae Sup; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Shredded rubber tire is a geomaterial that is potentially useful in environmental and engineering projects. Here, we study the effect of particle size ratio on the thermal conductivity of granular mixtures containing rubber tire particles. Glass beads were mixed at various volume fractions with rubber particles of varying size. The 3D network model analysis using synthetic packed assemblies was used to determine the dominant factors influencing the thermal conduction of the mixtures. Results present that mixtures with varying size ratios exhibit different nonlinear evolutions of thermal conductivity values with mixture fractions. In particular, mixtures with large insulating materials (e.g., rubber particles) have higher thermal conduction that those with small ones. This is because the larger insulating particles allow better interconnectivity among the conductive particles, thereby avoiding the interruption of the thermal conduction of the conductive particles. Similar tests conducted with natural sand corroborate the significant effect of the relative size of the insulating particles. The 3D network model identifies the heterogeneity of local and effective thermal conductivity and the influence of connectivity among conductive particles. A supplementary examination of electrical conductivity highlights the significance of local and long-range connectivity on conduction paths in granular mixtures. PMID:28793419

  13. Longitudinal Heat Conduction Effects on a Conjugate Thermal Creep Flow in a Microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Ian; Lizardi, José J.; Méndez, Federico

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we use asymptotic and numerical techniques to analyze the conjugate heat transfer between a rarified gas flow and the lower wall of a thin horizontal microchannel exposed to a uniform heat flux, when the laminar motion of the gas is only caused by the thermal creep or transpiration effect on the lower wall of the microchannel. Usually, it is enough to impose a linear temperature profile as a boundary condition to produce the thermal creep effect. However, we prefer to avoid this arbitrary simplification taking into account that for real cases, the temperature profile at the lower wall can be unknown. We can assume then that the lower face of this heat sink with finite thermal conductivity and thickness is exposed to a uniform heat flux, while the upper wall of the microchannel is subject to a well-known prescribed thermal boundary condition. The resulting governing equations are written in dimensionless form, assuming that the Reynolds number associated with the characteristic velocity of the thermal creep and the aspect ratio of the microchannel, are both very small. Thermal creep effect depends strongly on a dimensionless conjugate parameter that represents the competition between the heat driven by the gas and the heat that longitudinally conducts the lower wall.

  14. Effects of hypoxia and ocean acidification on the upper thermal niche boundaries of coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Rasmus; Johansen, Jacob L; Rummer, Jodie L; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Rising ocean temperatures are predicted to cause a poleward shift in the distribution of marine fishes occupying the extent of latitudes tolerable within their thermal range boundaries. A prevailing theory suggests that the upper thermal limits of fishes are constrained by hypoxia and ocean acidification. However, some eurythermal fish species do not conform to this theory, and maintain their upper thermal limits in hypoxia. Here we determine if the same is true for stenothermal species. In three coral reef fish species we tested the effect of hypoxia on upper thermal limits, measured as critical thermal maximum (CT max ). In one of these species we also quantified the effect of hypoxia on oxygen supply capacity, measured as aerobic scope (AS). In this species we also tested the effect of elevated CO 2 (simulated ocean acidification) on the hypoxia sensitivity of CT max We found that CT max was unaffected by progressive hypoxia down to approximately 35 mmHg, despite a substantial hypoxia-induced reduction in AS. Below approximately 35 mmHg, CT max declined sharply with water oxygen tension ( P w O 2 ). Furthermore, the hypoxia sensitivity of CT max was unaffected by elevated CO 2 Our findings show that moderate hypoxia and ocean acidification do not constrain the upper thermal limits of these tropical, stenothermal fishes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. The Effect of Particle Size on Thermal Conduction in Granular Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghwoon Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Shredded rubber tire is a geomaterial that is potentially useful in environmental and engineering projects. Here, we study the effect of particle size ratio on the thermal conductivity of granular mixtures containing rubber tire particles. Glass beads were mixed at various volume fractions with rubber particles of varying size. The 3D network model analysis using synthetic packed assemblies was used to determine the dominant factors influencing the thermal conduction of the mixtures. Results present that mixtures with varying size ratios exhibit different nonlinear evolutions of thermal conductivity values with mixture fractions. In particular, mixtures with large insulating materials (e.g., rubber particles have higher thermal conduction that those with small ones. This is because the larger insulating particles allow better interconnectivity among the conductive particles, thereby avoiding the interruption of the thermal conduction of the conductive particles. Similar tests conducted with natural sand corroborate the significant effect of the relative size of the insulating particles. The 3D network model identifies the heterogeneity of local and effective thermal conductivity and the influence of connectivity among conductive particles. A supplementary examination of electrical conductivity highlights the significance of local and long-range connectivity on conduction paths in granular mixtures.

  16. Effect of oral dietary supplement for chicks subjected to thermal oscillation on performance and intestinal morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanir Inês Müller Fernandes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a nutritional formulation based on amino acids and vitamins supplemented in the drinking water for chicks in the first week of life subjected to thermal oscillation on performance, organ development and intestinal morphometry from 1 to 21 days. 640-male broiler chicks were distributed in a 2x2 factorial completely randomized design (with or without dietary supplementation and at comfort temperature or thermal oscillation. Chicks subjected to thermal oscillation presented worse performance (p < 0.05 than those under thermal comfort of 1 to 7, 1 to 14 and 1 to 21 days. Nutritional supplementation did not alter the performance (p < 0.05 of the birds, but resulted in a higher body weight (p < 0.05 regardless of the environmental thermal condition. At 7 days, chicks under thermal comfort had better intestinal morphometric parameters (p < 0.05, in relation to birds under thermal oscillation. In conclusion, the temperature oscillations caused negative consequences to the productive performance and the intestinal morphology of chicks for which dietary supplementation was not enough to mitigate the effects of the environmental challenge during the first week of life of the birds.

  17. Modelling and Characterization of Effective Thermal Conductivity of Single Hollow Glass Microsphere and Its Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Wang, Hui; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2018-01-14

    Tiny hollow glass microsphere (HGM) can be applied for designing new light-weighted and thermal-insulated composites as high strength core, owing to its hollow structure. However, little work has been found for studying its own overall thermal conductivity independent of any matrix, which generally cannot be measured or evaluated directly. In this study, the overall thermal conductivity of HGM is investigated experimentally and numerically. The experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of HGM powder is performed by the transient plane source (TPS) technique to provide a reference to numerical results, which are obtained by a developed three-dimensional two-step hierarchical computational method. In the present method, three heterogeneous HGM stacking elements representing different distributions of HGMs in the powder are assumed. Each stacking element and its equivalent homogeneous solid counterpart are, respectively, embedded into a fictitious matrix material as fillers to form two equivalent composite systems at different levels, and then the overall thermal conductivity of each stacking element can be numerically determined through the equivalence of the two systems. The comparison of experimental and computational results indicates the present computational modeling can be used for effectively predicting the overall thermal conductivity of single HGM and its powder in a flexible way. Besides, it is necessary to note that the influence of thermal interfacial resistance cannot be removed from the experimental results in the TPS measurement.

  18. Stabilization of biopolymer microgels formed by electrostatic complexation: Influence of enzyme (laccase) cross-linking on pH, thermal, and mechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarikia, Fatemeh; Wu, Bi-Cheng; Abbasi, Soleiman; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Biopolymer microgels formed by electrostatic complexation are often susceptible to disintegration when environmental conditions are changed, and so methods are required to improve their stability. In this study, microgels were formed by electrostatic complexation of a protein (type-B gelatin) and a polysaccharide (beet pectin). The impact of enzyme (laccase) crosslinking of the ferulic acid groups on the beet pectin was then studied as a method to improve microgel stability to environmental stresses. Gelatin-beet pectin (1:0.25w/w) microgels were formed at 35°C and pH4.4, and then the pH dependence of the ζ-potential, size, turbidity, and microstructure of the microgels was measured in the absence and presence of laccase cross-linking. Our results suggested that crosslinking occurred within the microgels (rather than between them) since no particle aggregation was observed after enzyme treatment. Enzyme crosslinking did not affect the ζ-potential of the microgels, but it did decrease their size. Both cross-linked and non-cross-linked microgels were stable to aggregation at low (2-3) and high (4.4-7) pH values, but not at intermediate values (3-4.4), which was attributed to their low surface charge. Cross-linking improved the resistance of the microgels to shearing-induced disruption (300rpm for 24h) and to thermal-induced disruption (50°C for 2min). These cross-linked biopolymer microgels may have applications for texture modification, encapsulation, or controlled release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simplified Transient Hot-Wire Method for Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurement in Geo Materials: Microstructure and Saturation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Merckx

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity measurement by a simplified transient hot-wire technique is applied to geomaterials in order to show the relationships which can exist between effective thermal conductivity, texture, and moisture of the materials. After a validation of the used “one hot-wire” technique in water, toluene, and glass-bead assemblages, the investigations were performed (1 in glass-bead assemblages of different diameters in dried, water, and acetone-saturated states in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation on the effective thermal conductivity, (2 in a compacted earth brick at different moisture states, and (3 in a lime-hemp concrete during 110 days following its manufacture. The lime-hemp concrete allows the measurements during the setting, desiccation and carbonation steps. The recorded Δ/ln( diagrams allow the calculation of one effective thermal conductivity in the continuous and homogeneous fluids and two effective thermal conductivities in the heterogeneous solids. The first one measured in the short time acquisitions (<1 s mainly depends on the contact between the wire and grains and thus microtexture and hydrated state of the material. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean effective thermal conductivity of the material.

  20. Analysis of effective radiant temperatures in a Pacific Northwest forest using Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data collected over H. J. Andrews experimental forest in western Oregon indicated that aspect and slope gradient had a greater effect on the thermal emission of younger reforested clearcuts than of older stands. Older forest stands (older than 25 years) with greater amounts of green biomass and closed canopies, had lower effective radiant temperatures than younger, less dense stands. Aspect and slope had little effect on the effective radiant temperature of these older stands. Canopy temperature recorded at approximately 1:30 pm local time July 29, 1983 were nearly equal to maximum daily air temperature recorded at eight reference stands. The investigation provided some insights into the utility of the thermal sensor for detecting surface temperature differences related to forest composition and green biomass amounts in mountain terrain.

  1. Thermal Effects on the Single-Mode Regime of Distributed Modal Filtering Rod Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2012-01-01

    Power scaling of fiber laser systems requires the development of innovative active fibers, capable of providing high pump absorption, ultralarge effective area, high-order mode suppression, and resilience to thermal effects. Thermally induced refractive index change has been recently appointed...... as one major limitation to the achievable power, causing degradation of the modal properties and preventing to obtain stable diffraction-limited output beam. In this paper, the effects of thermally induced refractive index change on the guiding properties of a double-cladding distributed modal filtering...... rod-type photonic crystal fiber, which exploits resonant coupling with high-index elements to suppress high-order modes, are thoroughly investigated. A computationally efficient model has been developed to calculate the refractive index change due to the thermo-optical effect, and it has been...

  2. Evaluation of thermal antinociceptive effects after intramuscular administration of buprenorphine hydrochloride to American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceulemans, Susanne M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Olsen, Glenn H; Beaufrère, Hugues; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the thermal antinociceptive effects and duration of action of buprenorphine hydrochloride after IM administration to American kestrels (Falco sparverius). 12 healthy 3-year-old American kestrels. Buprenorphine hydrochloride (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mg/kg) and a control treatment (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) were administered IM in a randomized crossover experimental design. Foot withdrawal response to a thermal stimulus was determined 1 hour before (baseline) and 1.5, 3, and 6 hours after treatment administration. Agitation-sedation scores were determined 3 to 5 minutes before each thermal stimulus. Adverse effects were monitored for 6 hours after treatment administration. Buprenorphine hydrochloride at 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mg/kg, IM, increased thermal threshold for 6 hours, compared with the response for the control treatment. There were no significant differences among buprenorphine treatments. A mild sedative effect was detected at a dose of 0.6 mg of buprenorphine/kg. At the doses tested, buprenorphine hydrochloride resulted in thermal antinociception in American kestrels for at least 6 hours, which suggested that buprenorphine has analgesic effects in this species. Further studies with longer evaluation periods and additional forms of noxious stimuli, formulations, dosages, and routes of administration are needed to fully evaluate the analgesic effects of buprenorphine in American kestrels.

  3. Effect of thermal processing on the flavonols rutin and quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Nadja; Krumbein, Angelika; Rohn, Sascha; Kroh, Lothar W

    2006-01-01

    The current research involves the study of the thermal treatment of quercetin and rutin in an aqueous model system (cooking). These substances were heated and their degradation was followed by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode-array detection (HPLC/DAD). The influence of pH and the involvement of oxygen in the degradation were studied. HPLC/electrospray ionization multi-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was used for the structural characterization of the compounds produced. The influence of the degradation of the phenolic compounds on their antioxidant properties was elucidated by a electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry study of the reaction samples mixed with the stabilized radical, Fremy's salt. Strong degradation of the model substances took place under weak basic and oxidative conditions. Quercetin showed the most intense degradation. Protocatechuic acid could be identified as a cleavage reaction product by analyzing its retention time and molar mass during the degradation of quercetin. The structure of a second cleavage product could be identified on the basis of ESI-MS(n) fragmentation data. Also, several structures for reaction products of oxidized quercetin are suggested. The ESR analysis showed a decrease in the antioxidant activity of the reaction samples after heat treatment in aqueous solution. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Energy Consumption of Insulated Material Using Thermal Effect Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadzil M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall is one of the structures elements that resist direct heat from the atmosphere. Modification on several structures is relevance to reduce filtrate thermal movement on wall. Insulation material seems to be suitable to be implemented since its purpose meets the heat resistance requirement. Insulation material applied as to generate positive impact in energy saving through reduction in total building energy consumption. Fiberglass is one of the insulation materials that can be used to insulate a space from heat and sound. Fiberglass is flammable insulation material with R Value rated of R-2.9 to R-3.8 which meets the requirement in minimizing heat transfer. Finite element software, ABAQUS v6.13 employed for analyze non insulated wall and other insulated wall with different wall thicknesses. The several calculations related to overall heat movement, total energy consumption per unit area of wall, life cycle cost analysis and determination of optimal insulation thickness is calculated due to show the potential of the implementation in minimize heat transfer and generate potential energy saving in building operation. It is hoped that the study can contribute to better understanding on the potential building wall retrofitting works in increasing building serviceability and creating potential benefits for building owner.

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a thermal hygienization reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Borski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For reasons of limiting the spread of serious transmissible diseases, with regard to the requirement for reducing landfill of biodegradable waste (which may or contains animal by-products and thus presents a potential risk to human and animal health and with a focus on supporting its separate collection, there has been created a legal framework for processing and hygienization of materials containing animal by-products. For the above reasons new technologies are being developed and implemented. These technologies are able to ensure the processing of biological waste containing animal by-products. As a practical result of the effort to ensure the hygienization of biowaste, a hygienization unit of own design, which uses the thermal way of hygienization, is presented in this work. The general part of the work defines a legislative framework for the assignment and gives technical parameters and minimum requirements for conversion that hygienization unit should be able to perform, including the limits for digestion residues and compost.In the experimental section there are described operational tests which document the technological process of hygienization depending on the aeration of the contents of the reactor. Experiment III outlines the validation process which uses contamination by indicator organisms, including subsequent checking of their occurrence as well as processing of the results of experiments and evaluation of the process of hygienization.

  6. Halo Pressure Profile through the Skew Cross-power Spectrum of the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect and CMB Lensing in Planck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmons, Nicholas; Cooray, Asantha; Feng, Chang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Keating, Brian [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    We measure the cosmic microwave background (CMB) skewness power spectrum in Planck , using frequency maps of the HFI instrument and the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ) component map. The two-to-one skewness power spectrum measures the cross-correlation between CMB lensing and the thermal SZ effect. We also directly measure the same cross-correlation using the Planck CMB lensing map and the SZ map and compare it to the cross-correlation derived from the skewness power spectrum. We model fit the SZ power spectrum and CMB lensing–SZ cross-power spectrum via the skewness power spectrum to constrain the gas pressure profile of dark matter halos. The gas pressure profile is compared to existing measurements in the literature including a direct estimate based on the stacking of SZ clusters in Planck .

  7. Effect of Residence Time of Graphitisation on Thermal Conductivity of Molded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedy Artsanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of residence time of graphitisation on thermal conductivity of molded graphite has been examined. The examination has been conducted by varying residence time of graphitisation of molded carbon with petroleum coke as raw material and coal tar pitch. Graphitisation has been conducted by heating molded graphite at 2500 °C in argon atmosphere with residention time of 10, 30 and 90 minutes. Graphitisation degree, density, shrinking mass and porosity of molded graphite were examined and so was its thermal conductivity. The result showed that the decrease of porosity and the increase of graphitisation degree due to the increasing of residention time of graphitisation will increase the thermal conductivity of graphite. Molded graphite graphitisized with residence time for 90 minutes residention time gave thermal conductivity of 2.134 Watt/mK and graphitization degree 0.718.

  8. Effect of thermal modification on the physical properties of juvenile and mature woods of Eucalyptus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Willians Calonego

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on the physical properties of juvenile and mature woods of Eucalyptus grandis. Boards were taken from 30-year-old E. grandis trees. The boards were thermally modified at 180 °C in the Laboratory of Wood Drying and Preservation at UNESP, Botucatu, Sao Paulo state, Brazil. The results showed that thermal modification caused: (1 decrease of 6.8% in the density at 0% equilibrium moisture content of mature wood; (2 significant decreases of 14.7% and 35.6% in the maximum volumetric swellings of juvenile and mature woods, respectively; (3 significant decreases of 13.7% and 21.3% in the equilibrium moisture content of juvenile and mature woods, respectively. The influence of thermal modification in juvenile wood was lower than in mature wood and caused greater uniformity in the physical variations between these types of wood in E. grandis.

  9. Numerical modelling of effective thermal conductivity for modified geomaterial using lattice element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Zarghaam Haider; Shrestha, Dinesh; Sattari, Amir S.; Wuttke, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Macroscopic parameters such as effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is an important parameter which is affected by micro and meso level behaviour of particulate materials, and has been extensively examined in the past decades. In this paper, a new lattice based numerical model is developed to predict the ETC of sand and modified high thermal backfill material for energy transportation used for underground power cables. 2D and 3D simulations are performed to analyse and detect differences resulting from model simplification. The thermal conductivity of the granular mixture is determined numerically considering the volume and the shape of the each constituting portion. The new numerical method is validated with transient needle measurements and the existing theoretical and semi empirical models for thermal conductivity prediction sand and the modified backfill material for dry condition. The numerical prediction and the measured values are in agreement to a large extent.

  10. A review of the combined effects of thermal and noise conditions on human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, Richard A.; Wang, Lily M.; Musser, Amy

    2004-05-01

    Human perception and annoyance due to background noise has been the subject of much research. A great deal of work has also been done to identify conditions that produce an acceptable thermal environment for building occupants. The experience of occupants in indoor environments, however, is much more complex than can be represented by thermal comfort or the acoustic environment in isolation. Occupants normally experience a mix of thermal, auditory, visual, and olfactory stimuli that combines to form an impression of the environment. This paper is specifically interested in how building occupants trade off between acoustic and thermal comfort. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems in buildings are often adjusted by building users to arrive at a more comfortable temperature, but this change may also produce more noise. Previous studies on the interaction effects between temperature and noise on human performance are reviewed in this presentation, followed by a discussion of the authors' current work in this area.

  11. Feasibility of fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov effect for detecting thermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-06-17

    In this research, we propose a novel method for detecting thermal neutrons with a fiber-optic radiation sensor using the Cerenkov effect. We fabricate a fiber-optic radiation sensor that detects thermal neutrons with a Gd-foil, a rutile crystal, and a plastic optical fiber. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation in the sensor probe of the fiber-optic radiation sensor and thermal neutron fluxes is determined using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code simulations. To evaluate the fiber-optic radiation sensor, the Cerenkov radiation generated in the fiber-optic radiation sensor by irradiation of pure thermal neutron beams is measured according to the depths of polyethylene.

  12. Peculiarities of determining the effective thermal conductivity of multilayer nanostructures under unsteady heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvesyuk, V. I.; Chirkov, A. Yu

    2017-11-01

    Some features of pulse heating method are considered to study the main regularities of changes in the temperature of thin films in application to flash method. Heat exchange with the surrounding space is taken into account. The characteristic parameters of laser heating system are specified. The mathematical model of the heating process is based on the heat equation with effective heat conductivity. Such an analysis allows to estimate effective thermal diffusivity and thermal conductance including Kapitza conductance. For multi-layer nano-films Kapitza conductance can be estimated as its contribution to effective conductance is significant.

  13. Modification of electromagnetic fields and plasma resistance by thermal effects in helicon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of the thermal motion of charged particles on physical characteristics of collisional helicon plasmas are investigated. First, the dielectric permittivity tensor of a helicon plasma is obtained by considering the thermal and collisional effects in the kinetic theory. Then, the electromagnetic wave and plasma resistance equations are presented and solved in a helicon plasma source with a Nagoya type III antenna. It is shown that by increasing the temperature of plasma electrons, the effective collision frequency is increased, and consequently, the peaks of resistance profiles are lowered and broadened.

  14. Effecat of Porou Diameter on Effective Thermal Conductivity and Permeability of Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Toshiyoshi; Ichimiya, Koichi

    Effective thermal conductivity and permeability of a porous medium were examined as a function of porous diameter at constant porosity. If the porous diameter increases at constant porosity, the number of pore should reduce and as the result the contact area to solid material also decreases. Effect of solid material becomes large and effective thermal conductivity increases. This tendency was experimentally confirmed by using three kinds of ceramic material (porous diameter df=1.3mm, 2.0mm and 4.2 mm, porosity &epsilon = 87%). In addition, permeability was determined experimentally for various porous diameters by using Ergun's equation including viscous term and kinetic term.

  15. Effects of Absorber Emissivity on Thermal Performance of a Solar Cavity Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabin Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar cavity receiver is a key component to realize the light-heat conversion in tower-type solar power system. It usually has an aperture for concentrated sunlight coming in, and the heat loss is unavoidable because of this aperture. Generally, in order to improve the thermal efficiency, a layer of coating having high absorptivity for sunlight would be covered on the surface of the absorber tubes inside the cavity receiver. As a result, it is necessary to investigate the effects of the emissivity of absorber tubes on the thermal performance of the receiver. In the present work, the thermal performances of the receiver with different absorber emissivity were numerically simulated. The results showed that the thermal efficiency increases and the total heat loss decreases with increasing emissivity of absorber tubes. However, the thermal efficiency increases by only 1.6% when the emissivity of tubes varies from 0.2 to 0.8. Therefore, the change of absorber emissivity has slight effect on the thermal performance of the receiver. The reason for variation tendency of performance curves was also carefully analyzed. It was found that the temperature reduction of the cavity walls causes the decrease of the radiative heat loss and the convective heat loss.

  16. Effects of osmolytes on Pelodiscus sinensis creatine kinase: a study on thermal denaturation and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Jinhyuk; Jin, Qin-Xin; Fang, Nai-Yun; Si, Yue-Xiu; Yin, Shang-Jun; Qian, Guo-Ying; Park, Yong-Doo

    2013-09-01

    The protective effect of osmolytes on the thermal denaturation and aggregation of Pelodiscus sinensis muscle creatine kinase (PSCK) was investigated by a combination of spectroscopic methods and thermodynamic analysis. Our results demonstrated that the addition of osmolytes, such as glycine and proline, could prevent thermal denaturation and aggregation of PSCK in a concentration-dependent manner. When the concentration of glycine and proline increased in the denatured system, the relative activation was significantly enhanced; meanwhile, the aggregation of PSCK during thermal denaturation was decreased. Spectrofluorometer results showed that glycine and proline significantly decreased the tertiary structural changes of PSCK and that thermal denaturation directly induced PSCK aggregation. In addition, we also built the 3D structure of PSCK and osmolytes by homology models. The results of computational docking simulations showed that the docking energy was relatively low and that the clustering groups were spread to the surface of PSCK, indicating that osmolytes directly protect the surface of the protein. P. sinensis are poikilothermic and quite sensitive to the change of ambient temperature; however, there were few studies on the thermal denaturation of reptile CK. Our study provides important insight into the protective effects of osmolytes on thermal denaturation and aggregation of PSCK. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Using thermal analysis to evaluate the fire effects on organic matter content of Andisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Neris

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic compounds play a relevant role in aggregate stability and thus, in the susceptibility of soils to erosion. Thermal analysis (N2 and air and chemical oxidation techniques (dichromate and permanganate oxidation were used to evaluate the effects of a forest fire on the organic matter of Andisols. Both thermal analysis and chemical methods showed a decrease in the organic matter content and an increase in the recalcitrance of the remaining organic compounds in the burned zones. Thermal analysis indicated an increase in the thermal stability of the organic compounds of fire-affected soils and a lower content of both labile and recalcitrant pools as a consequence of the fire. However, this decrease was relatively higher in the labile pool and lower in the recalcitrant one, indicative of an increase in the recalcitrance of the remaining organic compounds. Apparently, black carbon did not burn under our experimental conditions. Under N2, the results showed a lower labile and a higher recalcitrant and refractory contents in burned and some unburned soils, possibly due to the lower decomposition rate under N2 flux. Thermal analysis using O2 and the chemical techniques showed a positive relation, but noticeable differences in the total amount of the labile pool. Thermal analysis methods provide direct quantitative information useful to characterize the soil organic matter quality and to evaluate the effects of fire on soils.

  18. Hydrological response and thermal effect of karst springs linked to aquifer geometry and recharge processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingming; Chen, Zhihua; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Liang; Han, Zhaofeng

    2017-09-01

    To be better understand the hydrological and thermal behavior of karst systems in South China, seasonal variations in flow, hydrochemistry and stable isotope ratios of five karst springs were used to delineate flow paths and recharge processes, and to interpret their thermal response. Isotopic data suggest that mean recharge elevations are 200-820 m above spring outlets. Springs that originate from high elevations have lower NO3 - concentrations than those originating from lower areas that have more agricultural activity. Measured Sr2+ concentrations reflect the strontium contents of the host carbonate aquifer and help delineate the spring catchment's saturated zone. Seasonal variations of NO3 - and Sr2+ concentrations are inversely correlated, because the former correlates with event water and the latter with baseflow. The mean annual water temperatures of springs were only slightly lower than the local mean annual surface temperature at the outlet elevations. These mean spring temperatures suggest a vertical gradient of 6 °C/vertical km, which resembles the adiabatic lapse rate of the Earth's stable atmosphere. Seasonal temperature variations in the springs are in phase with surface air temperatures, except for Heilongquan (HLQ) spring. Event-scale variations of thermal response are dramatically controlled by the circulation depth of karst systems, which determines the effectiveness of heat exchange. HLQ spring undergoes the deepest circulation depth of 820 m, and its thermal responses are determined by the thermally effective regulation processes at higher elevations and the mixing processes associated with thermally ineffective responses at lower elevations.

  19. Changes in Effective Thermal Conductivity During the Carbothermic Reduction of Magnetite Using Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Ahmed, Hesham; Viswanathan, Nurni; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the effective thermal diffusivity changes of systems undergoing reactions where heat transfer plays an important role in the reaction kinetics is essential for process understanding and control. Carbothermic reduction process of magnetite containing composites is a typical example of such systems. The reduction process in this case is highly endothermic and hence, the overall rate of the reaction is greatly influenced by the heat transfer through composite compact. Using Laser-Flash method, the change of effective thermal diffusivity of magnetite-graphite composite pellet was monitored in the dynamic mode over a pre-defined thermal cycle (heating at the rate of 7 K/min to 1423 K (1150 °C), holding the sample for 270 minutes at this temperature and then cooling it down to the room temperature at the same rate as heating). These measurements were supplemented by Thermogravimetric Analysis under comparable experimental conditions as well as quenching tests of the samples in order to combine the impact of various factors such as sample dilatations and changes in apparent density on the progress of the reaction. The present results show that monitoring thermal diffusivity changes during the course of reduction would be a very useful tool in a total understanding of the underlying physicochemical phenomena. At the end, effort is made to estimate the apparent thermal conductivity values based on the measured thermal diffusivity and dilatations.

  20. Thermal-infrared field radiometer for vicarious cross-calibration: characterization and comparisons with other field instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michael; Spyak, Paul R.; Brogniez, Gerard; Legrand, Michel; Abuhassan, Nader K.; Pietras, Christophe; Buis, Jean P.

    1999-02-01

    A four-band (8.2 to 9.2, 10.5 to 11.5, 11.5 to 12.5, and 8 to 14 micrometers ), prototype, thermal-IR radiometer, model CE 312 [CE 312 is the company model number. In previous papers, the CE 312 was called the CLIMAT (conveyable low-noise IR radiometer for measurements of atmosphere and ground-surface targets)], with a built-in radiance reference is been fabricated by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France) for use as a field instrument. The instrument is briefly described, laboratory characterization is detailed, and its field measurements are compared with those from three other radiometers. The CE 312's main characteristics are linearity of better than 0.8%, field of view of 9.5 deg; noise- equivalent temperature difference of 0.06 to 0.2 K (depending on the band) for brightness temperatures of 0 to 75 degree(s)C; SNR greater than 1100 for the broadband and greater than 400 for the other bands for brightness temperatures between 10 and 80 degree(s)C; and repeatability of the measured radiance smaller than 0.35% after four field campaigns, corresponding to 0.2 K in terms of brightness temperature. Field measurements were conducted over different periods during 1996 at Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, Lunar Lake and Railroad Valley, Nevada, and Lake Tahoe, California. The CE 312 compares quite favorably with the other instruments; the brightness temperature at two different sites compared to within 0.3 K with two instruments. These measurements show that the CE 312 thermal-IR radiometer is very stable for ambient temperatures varying between 15 and 60 degree(s)C and that the availability of several filters in the thermal-IR region can help tremendously to improve the accuracy of the radiance determination.

  1. Analysis of the thermal effect in diode end-pumped Er:YAG lasers by using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujia; Wang, Qing; Na, QuanXin; Zhang, Yixuan; Gao, Mingwei; Zhang, Meng

    2018-01-01

    A new method for combining Finite Element Method (FEM) thermal analysis and thermo-mechanical coupling method for calculating the thermal lensing values in diode end-pumped Er:YAG lasers is proposed. A finite-element model is used to simulate the thermal effects in different Er:YAG crystals with pumping scenarios. The influences of pump powers, crystal absorption coefficients and crystal sizes on the Er:YAG thermal effects are discussed, and the relationship between the thermal effects and thermal lensing effects is analysed. A thermo-mechanical coupling model is also constituted for finite-element analysis based on the above results, and the focal length of the Er:YAG crystal with different pump powers are obtained by using this thermo-mechanical coupling model. The predicted thermal lensing values are compared with experimental results, which agree well with the simulated results.

  2. Thermal insulation of steep roofs. Heat insulating effects of different systems; Daemmung in Steildaechern. Die waermeschutztechnischen Wirkung unterschiedlicher Systeme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Gerd [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl Bauphysik; Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Bauphysik, Stuttgart, Holzkirchen, Kassel (Germany); Schade, Almuth; Sinnesbichler, Herbert [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Bauphysik, Holzkirchen (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Fassadenkonzepte

    2009-06-29

    For thermal insulation of steep roofs, so-called infrared reflecting thermal insulation materials are now available in France and also in Germany in addition to traditional thermal insulation systems. The insulating effect of these systems results primarily from the IR-reflecting surface of foils spaced at short intervals. For a comparison of the two thermal insulation systems, the Fraunhofer Institute of Constructional Physics of Holzkirchen carried out field tests and analyzed them. (orig.)

  3. Effect of racial crossing on the scrotum-testicular biometry in sheep submitted to scrotal insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio F.S. Lisboa-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the racial crossing on scrotum-testicular biometric characteristics of four sheep Santa Ines and four crossbred (Santa Ines x Dorper submitted to scrotal insulation, following the return of these characteristics to values previously reported. For this, two measurements were made regarding the scrotal circumference (SC, length (L and testicular width (W before treatments. The testicular volume (V was calculated by the formula V=2 [(r2 x π x H]. The pouches were made with double-layer plastic, internally lined with cotton, and fixed around the spermatic funiculus and scrotum with adhesive tape and bandage remaining in this position for seven days. Measurements were made every seven days, totaling 15 measurements throughout the experiment. The data were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA to a randomized block design with two blocks, 15 treatments and four replications. The variables analyzed were subjected to Dunnett test at 5% probability, to compare the values obtained before and after insulation. For comparison between the breeds, the variables were submitted to Tukey test at 5% probability. All animals studied suffered significant influence (P<0.05 after scrotal insulation, but Santa Ines returned to the values previously observed in a shorter period than the crossbred. In summary, sheep Santa Ines have a higher resistance than crossbred animals when subjected to thermal stress induced by scrotal insulation.

  4. Study of the solution thermal conductivity effect on nonlinear refraction of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhosh, L.; Mansour, N.

    2015-06-01

    In nanoparticle colloidal systems, the thermal nonlinearity is affected by the thermal parameters of the surrounding solution. Having a low temperature gradient rate solution may be a key factor in producing high thermal nonlinear properties in colloids. In this manuscript, the effect of the thermal conductivity of the surrounding liquid environment on the thermal nonlinear refraction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) synthesized by laser ablation of a gold target in different solutions is investigated. Gold nanoparticles colloids have been fabricated by the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a pure gold plate in different liquid environments with a thermal conductivity range of 0.14-0.60 W mK-1 including cyclohexanone, castor oil, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, glycerin and water. The AuNPs colloids exhibit a UV-Vis absorption spectrum with a surface plasmon absorption peak at about 540  ±  20 nm. The thermal nonlinear optical responses of the gold colloids are measured using the Z-scan technique under low power CW laser irradiation at 532 nm near the surface plasmon peak of the nanoparticles. Our results show that the nonlinear refractive index of the nanoparticle colloids is considerably affected by the thermal conductivity of liquid medium. The largest nonlinear refractive index of -3.1  ×  10-7 cm2 W-1 is obtained for AuNP in cyclohexanone with the lowest thermal conductivity of 0.14 W mK-1 whereas the lowest one of -0.1  ×  10-7 cm2 W-1 is obtained for AuNP in water with the highest thermal conductivity of 0.60 W mK-1. This study shows that the nonlinear refractive index value of colloids can be controlled by the thermal conductivity of the used liquid’s environment. This allows us to design low threshold optical limiters by choosing a solution with low thermal conductivity for colloidal nanoparticles.

  5. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  6. Nociceptive thermal threshold testing in horses – effect of neuroleptic sedation and neuroleptanalgesia at different stimulation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Aim of the study was to compare the effect of neuroleptic sedation with acepromazine and neuroleptanalgesia with acepromazine and buprenorphine on thermal thresholds (TT) obtained at the nostrils and at the withers. The study was carried out as a randomized, blinded, controlled trial with cross-over design. Thermal thresholds were determined by incremental contact heat applied to the skin above the nostril (N) or the withers (W). Eleven horses were treated with saline (S), acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg) (ACE) or acepromazine and buprenorphine (0.0075 mg/kg) (AB) intravenously (IV). Single stimulations were performed 15 minutes prior and 15, 45, 75, 105, 165, 225, 285, 405 and 525 minutes after treatment. Sedation score, gastrointestinal auscultation score and occurrence of skin lesions were recorded. Data were analysed with analysis of variance for repeated measurements. Results There were no significant differences in TT between N and W with all treatments. The TT remained constant after S and there was no difference in TT between S and ACE. After AB there was a significant increase above baseline in TT until 405 minutes after treatment. Restlessness occurred 30–90 minutes after AB in 7 horses. All horses had reduced to absent borborygmi after AB administration for 165 to 495 minutes. Conclusion Thermal stimulation at both described body areas gives comparable results in the assessment of cutaneous anti-nociception in horses. There is no differential influence of neuroleptic sedation or neuroleptanalgesia on TTs obtained at N or W. Buprenorphine combined with acepromazine has a long lasting anti-nociceptive effect associated with the typical opioid induced side effects in horses. PMID:23837730

  7. Effects of Molecular Weight upon Irradiation-Cross-Linked Poly(vinyl alcohol)/Clay Aerogel Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Zhao, Yan; Shen, Peng; Wang, Jun-Sheng; Huang, Wei; Schiraldi, David A

    2015-09-16

    Facile fabrication of mechanically strong poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH)/clay aerogel composites through a combination of increasing polymer molecular weights and gamma irradiation-cross-linking is reported herein. The aerogels produced from high polymer molecular weights exhibit significantly increased compressive moduli, similar to the effect of irradiation-induced cross-linking. The required irradiation dose for fabricating strong PVOH composite aerogels with dense microstructure decreased with increasing polymer molecular weight. Neither thermal stability nor flammability was significantly changed by altering the polymer molecular weight or by modest gamma irradiation, but they were highly dependent upon the polymer/clay ratio in the aerogel. Optimization of the mechanical, thermal, and flammability properties of these composite aerogels could therefore be obtained by using relatively low levels of polymer, with very high polymer molecular weight, or lower molecular weight coupled with moderate gamma irradiation. The facile preparation of strong, low flammability aerogels is an alternative to traditional polymer foams in applications where fire safety is important.

  8. The Third Way of Thermal-Electric Conversion beyond Seebeck and Pyroelectric Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-14

    Thermal-electric conversion is crucial for smart energy control and harvesting, such as thermal sensing and waste heat recovering. So far, people are aware of only two ways of direct thermal-electric conversion, Seebeck and pyroelectric effects, each with distinct working conditions and limitations. Here, we report the third way of thermal-electric conversion beyond Seebeck and pyroelectric effects. In contrast to Seebeck effect that requires spatial temperature difference, the-third-way converts the time-dependent ambient temperature fluctuation into electricity, similar to the behavior of pyroelectricity. However, the-third-way is also distinct from pyroelectric effect in the sense that it does not require polar materials but applies to general conducting systems. We demonstrate that the-third-way results from the temperature-fluctuation-induced dynamical charge redistribution. It is a consequence of the fundamental nonequilibrium thermodynamics and has a deep connection to the topological phase in quantum mechanics. Our findings expand our knowledge and provide new means of thermal-electric energy harvesting.

  9. Thermal effect induced wafer deformation in high-energy e-beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. S.; Wang, W. C.; Lin, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The incident surface power density in Massive Electron-beam Direct Write (MEBDW) during exposure is ~105 W/cm2, much higher than ~8 W/cm2 ArF scanners and 2.4 W/cm2 EUV. In addition, the wafer's exposure in vacuum environment makes energy dissipation even harder. This thermal effect can cause mechanical distortion of the wafer during exposure and have has a direct influence on pattern placement error and image blur. In this paper, the thermo mechanical distortions caused by wafer heating for MEB system of different electron acceleration voltages have been simulated with finite element method (FEM). The global thermal effect affected by the friction force between the wafer and the wafer chuck as well as different thermal conductivities of the chuck material are simulated. Furthermore, the thermal effects of different lithography systems such as EUV scanners and conventional optical scanners are compared. The thermal effects of MEBDW systems are shown to be acceptable.

  10. Measurement of effective thermal conductivity of compacted granular media by the transient plane source technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weijing; Gan, Yixiang

    2017-06-01

    To successfully realise industrial applications handling granular media, especially those involving heating and cooling processes, the temperature fields must be properly evaluated according to the accurate thermal properties of the media. The knowledge the effective thermal conductivity is regarded as one of the fundamental aspects. However, due to the complicated relations between the effective thermal conductivity and the heterogeneity and complexity in the structures and composition of the granular media, the quantitative prediction of the conductivity is challenging. Therefore, experimental investigation of the effective thermal conductivity becomes desired and this can provide first-hand data for industrial reference and serve as the benchmark for the theoretical analysis. In this study, the transient plane source technique is employed to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of compacted granular beds by the application of the commercially available Hot Disk system. The granular beds of different particle size ranges are characterised under different mechanical loading conditions by different sensors. Experimental results are discussed and suggestion to achieve reliable experimental designs is provided.

  11. Effects of thermal energy harvesting on the human – clothing – environment microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, A. C.; Jur, J. S.

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this work is to perform an in depth investigation of garment-based thermal energy harvesting. The effect of human and environmental factors on the working efficiency of a thermal energy harvesting devices, or a thermoelectric generator (TEG), placed on the body is explored.. Variables that strongly effect the response of the TEG are as follows: skin temperature, human motion or speed, body location, environmental conditions, and the textile properties surrounding the TEG. In this study, the use of textiles for managing thermal comfort of wearable technology and energy harvesting are defined. By varying the stitch length and/or knit structure, one can manipulate the thermal conductivity of the garment in a specific location. Another method of improving TEG efficiency is through the use of a heat spreader, which increases the effective collection area of heat on the TEG hot side. Here we show the effect of a TEG on the thermal properties of a garment with regard to two knit stitches, jersey and 1 × 1 rib.

  12. Effective thermal penetration depth in photo-irradiated ex vivo human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolik, Suren; Delgado, José Alberto; Anasagasti, Lorenzo; Pérez, Arllene Mariana

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a model of bioheat distribution is discussed for ex vivo human tissue samples, and the thermal penetration depth measurements performed on several tissues are presented. Optical radiation is widely applied in the treatment and diagnosis of different pathologies. A power density of incident light at 100 mW/cm(2) is sufficiently high enough to induce a temperature increase of >5°C in irradiated human tissue. In this case, knowledge of the thermal properties of the tissue is needed to achieve a better understanding of the therapeutic effects. The application of the diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation for the distribution of optical radiation, the experimental setup, and the results thereof are presented and discussed. The effective thermal penetration depth in the studied tissues has been determined to be in the range of 4.3-7.0 mm. The effective thermal penetration depth has been defined, and this could be useful for developing models to describe the thermal effects with a separate analysis of the tissue itself and the blood that irrigates it.

  13. The Effects of Thermal and Cold Therapies on the Flexibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative effects of the application of heating and cooling modalities on the muscles prior to the performance of flexibility exercises have not been extensively studied. This study was therefore designed to determine and compare the effects of thermal (heat) and cold (ice) therapies on the flexibility of the hamstring muscle ...

  14. The Effects of Cell Phone and Text Message Conversations on Simulated Street Crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banducci, Sarah E; Ward, Nathan; Gaspar, John G; Schab, Kurt R; Crowell, James A; Kaczmarski, Henry; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-02-01

    A fully immersive, high-fidelity street-crossing simulator was used to examine the effects of texting on pedestrian street-crossing performance. Research suggests that street-crossing performance is impaired when pedestrians engage in cell phone conversations. Less is known about the impact of texting on street-crossing performance. Thirty-two young adults completed three distraction conditions in a simulated street-crossing task: no distraction, phone conversation, and texting. A hands-free headset and a mounted tablet were used to conduct the phone and texting conversations, respectively. Participants moved through the virtual environment via a manual treadmill, allowing them to select crossing gaps and change their gait. During the phone conversation and texting conditions, participants had fewer successful crossings and took longer to initiate crossing. Furthermore, in the texting condition, smaller percentage of time with head orientation toward the tablet, fewer number of head orientations toward the tablet, and greater percentage of total characters typed before initiating crossing predicted greater crossing success. Our results suggest that (a) texting is as unsafe as phone conversations for street-crossing performance and (b) when subjects completed most of the texting task before initiating crossing, they were more likely to make it safely across the street. Sending and receiving text messages negatively impact a range of real-world behaviors. These results may inform personal and policy decisions. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  15. Fractal analysis of the effect of particle aggregation distribution on thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wei, E-mail: weiw2015@gmail.com [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cai, Jianchao, E-mail: caijc@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hu, Xiangyun, E-mail: xyhu@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Han, Qi, E-mail: hanqi426@gmail.com [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Shuang, E-mail: lius@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Yingfang, E-mail: yingfang.zhou@abdn.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, FN 264, King' s College, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-26

    A theoretical effective thermal conductivity model for nanofluids is derived based on fractal distribution characteristics of nanoparticle aggregation. Considering two different mechanisms of heat conduction including particle aggregation and convention, the model is expressed as a function of the fractal dimension and concentration. In the model, the change of fractal dimension is related to the variation of aggregation shape. The theoretical computations of the developed model provide a good agreement with the experimental results, which may serve as an effective approach for quantitatively estimating the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. - Highlights: • A thermal conductivity model is derived based on fractal aggregation distribution. • The relationship between aggregation shape and fractal dimension is analyzed. • Predictions of the proposed model show good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Study on Unit Cell Models and the Effective Thermal Conductivities of Silica Aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Li, Zeng-Yao; Zhao, Xin-Peng; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two modified unit cell models, truncated octahedron and cubic array of intersecting square rods with 45-degree rotation, are developed in consideration of the tortuous path of heat conduction in solid skeleton of silica aerogel. The heat conduction is analyzed for each model and the expressions of effective thermal conductivity of the modified unit cell models are derived. Considering the random microstructure of silica aerogel, the probability model is presented. We also discuss the effect of the thermal conductivity of aerogel backbone. The effective thermal conductivities calculated by the proposed probability model are in good agreement with available experimental data when the density of the aerogel is 110 kg/m3.

  17. Autosolvent effect of bitumen in thermal cracking; Netsubunkai hanno ni okeru bitumen no jiko yobai koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuni, M.; Sato, M.; Hattori, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology; Nagaishi, H.; Sasaki, M.; Yoshida, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Tar sand bitumen is petroleum-based ultra-heavy oil, and has a great amount of reserve like coal. However, there are still a lot of problems for its highly effective utilization. This paper discusses whether the light components in bitumen show independent behavior during the thermal cracking of heavy components, or not. Solvent effect and reaction mechanism during the thermal cracking are also derived from the change of their chemical structures. Athabasca tar sand bitumen was separated into light and heavy fractions by vacuum distillation based on D-1660 of ASTM. Mixtures of the both fractions at various ratios were used as samples. Negative effect of the light fraction on cracking of the heavy fraction was observed with dealkylation and paraffin formation Polymerization of the dealkylated light fraction to the heavy fraction was suggested due to lack of hydrogen in the thermal cracking under nitrogen atmosphere, which resulted in the formation of polymer. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Moderating Factors of Immediate, Dynamic, and Long-run Cross-Price Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Horváth (Csilla); D. Fok (Dennis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn this article the authors describe their comprehensive analysis of moderating factors of cross-brand effects of price changes and contribute to the literature in five major ways. (1) They consider an extensive set of potential variables influencing cross-brand effects of price changes.

  19. Examining Cultural Intelligence and Cross-Cultural Negotiation Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Kevin S.; Feyerherm, Ann; Gu, Minhua

    2015-01-01

    International negotiation failures are often linked to deficiencies in negotiator cross-cultural capabilities, including limited understanding of the cultures engaged in the transaction, an inability to communicate with persons from different cultural backgrounds, and limited behavioral flexibility to adapt to culturally unfamiliar contexts.…

  20. Theoretical Framework for Evaluation of Cross-cultural Training Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandis, Harry C.

    1977-01-01

    Considers six types of cross-cultural training including general, specific, affective, cognitive, behavioral and self-insight, and examines the quantity and timing of the training and the attributes of the trainers and the trainees. Available from: Transaction Periodicals Consortium, Rutgers--The State University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903,…

  1. The Effect of Road Crossing on River Morphology and Riverine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to explain the local level impact of a road crossing on channel morphology and aquatic lives of the Kunur River, based on geomorphic survey and stream classification. This study shows a comparison between upstream and downstream reaches of Kunur River where the State Highway-14 ...

  2. Cross-sectional study of health effects of cryolite production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Clausen, J; Gyntelberg, F

    1989-01-01

    A cross-sectional health study of 101 cryolite workers was performed, using spirometry and a questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between the index of smoking and a decrease in FEV1 (per cent). There was no significant correlation between work-related exp...

  3. Effects of Heterosis and Direction of Crossing on Production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the mode of gene action of determinants of performance (i.e. positive or negative heterosis) in F chickens produced by mating Fulani Ecotype (FE) and Dominant Black strain (DB) chickens, and whether the direction of crossing (DBxFE or FExDB) influenced the mode of gene ...

  4. Effects of density on cross-shore sediment transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosboom, J.; de Meijer, R.J.; Kraus, N.C.; McDougal, W.G.

    1999-01-01

    After the discovery of high concentrations of heavy minerals on the beach of the Dutch barrier-island Ameland, the radiometric fingerprinting technique was developed to assess offshore heavy-mineral concentrations. These measurements revealed cross-shore variations in the heavy-mineral

  5. Non-thermal effects of mobile phone radiation on brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Babalyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article gives a review of major experimental studies devoted to the effect of mobile phone electromagnetic emission on brain. The most relevant and fundamental studies were reviewed. Both positive and negative results were analyzed to give a straight answer, if mobile phone emission effects brain electrophysiology, cognitive function, subjective symptoms and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  6. Temperature-dependent absorption cross-sections in the thermal infrared bands of SF{sub 5}CF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinsland, C.P. E-mail: c.p.rinsland@larc.nasa.gov; Sharpe, S.W.; Sams, R.L

    2003-12-15

    Absorption cross-sections have been measured at five temperatures between 213 and 323 K in the infrared bands of SF{sub 5}CF{sub 3}. The spectra were recorded at a resolution of 0.112 cm{sup -1} using a commercial Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a 20 cm temperature-controlled sample cell. Samples of SF{sub 5}CF{sub 3} were pressurized with high-purity nitrogen to a total pressure of 1013.3 hPa (760 Torr). Six or more spectra with varying SF{sub 5}CF{sub 3} column amounts were analyzed at each temperature. The full spectral range of the measurements was 520-6500 cm{sup -1}, with only weak bands observed beyond 1400 cm{sup -1}. Absorption of thermal radiation in the 8-12 {mu}m atmospheric window region being important for climate change, we report here the integrated cross-sections of the significant absorption bands in that spectral region. Our results closely match room temperature values reported previously. Only small variation of the integrated absorption cross-sections with temperature was found. Our results confirm the accuracy of the previous measurements, which find SF{sub 5}CF{sub 3} important for global climate change on a per molecule basis. Absorption cross-sections derived from a single, near Doppler-limited spectrum recorded at room temperature do not show any rotational fine structure in the 700-950 cm{sup -1} region.

  7. Effect of pulse repetition rate on the perception of thermal sensation with pulsed shortwave diathermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C C; Kitchen, S

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed shortwave diathermy (PSWD) is a form of therapy commonly used to enhance tissue repair and reduce pain. It is normally considered to be an athermal form of treatment; however, there is some evidence to suggest that thermal effects can arise with adequate dosage. The purpose of this study was to determine the pulse repetition rate (PRR) required to generate a 'possible' and 'definite' thermal sensation when PSWD was applied to the thigh. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to placebo or treatment groups. The treatment group was exposed to PSWD at a constant setting of pulse duration (400 microseconds) and pulse power (190 W) while the PRR was increased from 26 Hz to 400 Hz in 10 increments. Each dose was applied for a period of two minutes. At the end of each application, subjects were asked if they felt a (1) 'possible' or (2) 'definite' thermal sensation. Skin temperature was measured immediately after each application. Placebo subjects were exposed to PSWD at its lowest settings throughout the experiment (pulse power = 5 W; pulse duration = 65 microseconds and PRR = 26 Hz). The results showed a significant correlation (p < 0.048) between PRR at 'definite' thermal sensation and skin temperature post-treatment and PRR at 'possible' thermal sensation (p < 0.001). Mean skin temperature increased significantly as PRR was increased, from 28.69 (+/- 0.75) degrees C pre-treatment to 31.14 (+/- 1.04) degrees C post-treatment, a mean difference of 2.34 degrees C. These results suggest that PSWD at adequate dosages can generate thermal effects, and that there is a relationship between these thermal effects and the PRR used. These results may have significant implications for the safe use of PSWD in the clinical arena.

  8. Geometrical effects on the concentrated behavior of heat flux in metamaterials thermal harvesting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Haochun; Xie, Ming; Jin, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Thermal harvesting devices based on transformation optics, which can manipulate the heat flux concentration significantly through rational arrangements of the conductivities, have attracted considerable interest owing to several great potential applications of the technique for high-efficiency thermal conversion and collection. However, quantitative studies on the geometrical effects, particularly wedge angles, on the harvesting behaviors are rare. In this paper, we adopt wedge structure-based thermal harvesting schemes, and focus on the effects of the geometrical parameters including the radii ratios and wedge angles on the harvesting performance. The temperature deformations at the boundaries of the compressional region and temperature gradients for the different schemes with varying design parameters are investigated. Moreover, a concept for temperature stabilization was derived to evaluate the fluctuation in the energy distributions. In addition, the effects of interface thermal resistances have been investigated. Considering the changes in the radii ratios and wedge angles, we proposed a modification of the harvesting efficiency to quantitatively assess the concentration performance, which was verified through random tests and previously fabricated devices. In general, this study indicates that a smaller radii ratio contributes to a better harvesting behavior, but causes larger perturbations in the thermal profiles owing to a larger heat loss. We also find that a smaller wedge angle is beneficial to ensuring a higher concentration efficiency with less energy perturbations. These findings can be used to guide the improvement of a thermal concentrator with a high efficiency in reference to its potential applications as novel heat storage, thermal sensors, solar cells, and thermoelectric devices.

  9. Effect of graphene nanoplatelets on coefficient of thermal expansion of polyetherimide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huang, E-mail: huang.wu.84@gmail.com [Composite Materials and Structures Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Drzal, Lawrence T. [Composite Materials and Structures Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Thermal expansion is one of the major concerns for polymer composites. In this research, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were added to polyetherimide (PEId) thermoplastic polymer in order to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the injection molded composite. First, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (LTE) was measured in three directions in the anisotropic coupon: 0°, 90° and the out of plane Z direction. It is found that the GNP particles are very effective in terms of reducing the LTE in 0° direction due to high degree of alignment. After annealing above glass transition temperature, significant increase of 0° LTE and decrease of Z° LTE were observed. The bulk CTE was calculated by adding up the LTEs in all three directions and is found to be independent of annealing. Second, several models were applied to predict both CTE and LTE. It is found that Schapery's lower limit model fits the experimental CTE very well. Chow's model was applied for LTEs in three directions. The behavior of GNP-5/PEId composites is explained by the combination of Chow's model and morphology obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). - Highlights: • Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of polymer composite is characterized. • Reduction of linear thermal expansion depends on filler orientation. • Filler orientation is characterized based on the location of the specimen. • Filler orientation is changed by annealing, causing subsequent change in CTE. • CTE and linear thermal expansion coefficient are modeled.

  10. Revisiting the effects of organic solvents on the thermal reduction of graphite oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso-Bujans, Fabienne, E-mail: fbarroso@ehu.es [Centro de Fisica de Materiales-Material Physics Center (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Fierro, Jose Luis G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC. Marie Curie, 2, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Alegria, Angel [Centro de Fisica de Materiales-Material Physics Center (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU) Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Colmenero, Juan [Centro de Fisica de Materiales-Material Physics Center (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU) Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-11-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retention of organic solvent on graphite oxide interlayer space. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreasing exfoliation temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Close link between structure and thermal behavior of solvent treated graphite oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Restacking inhibition of thermally reduced graphite oxide sheets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in kinetic mechanisms of thermal reduction. - Abstract: Treatment of graphite oxide (GO) with organic solvents via sorption from either liquid or gas phase, and subsequent desorption, induces profound changes in the layered GO structure: loss of stacking order, retention of trace amounts of solvents and decreasing decomposition temperature. This study presents new evidences of the effect of organic solvents on the thermal reduction of GO by means of thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results reveal a relative higher decrease of the oxygen amounts in solvent-treated GO as compared to untreated GO and the restacking inhibition of the thermally reduced GO sheets upon slow heating. The kinetic experiments evidence changes occurring in the reduction mechanisms of the solvent-treated GO, which support the close link between GO structure and thermal properties.

  11. Storage effects on anthocyanins, phenolics and antioxidant activity of thermally processed conventional and organic blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Andrews, Preston K; Davies, Neal M; Walters, Thomas; Sablani, Shyam S

    2012-03-15

    Consumer demand for products rich in phytochemicals is increasing as a result of greater awareness of their potential health benefits. However, processed products are stored for long-term and the phytochemicals are susceptible to degradation during storage. The objective of this study was to assess the storage effects on phytochemicals in thermally processed blueberries. Thermally processed canned berries and juice/puree were analysed for phytochemicals during their long-term storage. The phytochemical retention of thermally processed blueberries during storage was not influenced by production system (conventional versus organic). During 13 months of storage, total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity in canned blueberry solids decreased by up to 86, 69 and 52% respectively. In canned blueberry syrup, total anthocyanins and total antioxidant activity decreased by up to 68 and 15% respectively, while total phenolic content increased by up to 117%. Similar trends in phytochemical content were observed in juice/puree stored for 4 months. The extent of changes in phytochemicals of thermally processed blueberries during storage was significantly influenced by blanching. Long-term storage of thermally processed blueberries had varying degrees of influence on degradation of total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity. Blanching before thermal processing helped to preserve the phytochemicals during storage of blueberries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Effects of Melatonin on Adrenal Cortical Functions of Indian Goats under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerasamy Sejian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted with the primary objective to establish the influence of melatonin on adrenocortical functions to ameliorate thermal stress in goats. Endocrine secretions and several other blood biochemical parameters reflecting the animals adrenocortical stress response were determined over a one-week period after goats had been exposed to 40C∘ and 60%RH for 10 days. The study was conducted for a period of 17 days in psychrometric chamber. The animals served as self-controls prior to start of the experiment. Blood samples were drawn on day 10 to establish effect of thermal stress. Chemical adrenalectomy was achieved using metyrapone followed by exogenous melatonin treatment. 40C∘ of thermal stress which is quite normal in tropical zone significantly (P≤.05 influenced all parameters except plasma insulin. Metyrapone treatment significantly (P≤.05 affected plasma levels of glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, cortisol, and aldosterone. Metyrapone aggravated thermal stress by decreasing cortisol level in goats. Melatonin treatment at 11:00 AM significantly (P≤.05 influenced plasma levels of glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, cortisol, aldosterone and insulin. Metyrapone treatment aggravated thermal stress although administration of melatonin could ameliorate the condition. This establishes the role of melatonin in relieving thermal stress in goats.

  13. Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Copper Nanofluids: The Effect of Filler Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanushali, Sushrut; Jason, Naveen Noah; Ghosh, Prakash; Ganesh, Anuradda; Simon, George P; Cheng, Wenlong

    2017-06-07

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions that exhibit enhanced thermal conductivity at low filler loadings and thus have been proposed for heat transfer applications. Here, we systematically investigate how particle shape determines the thermal conductivity of low-cost copper nanofluids using a range of distinct filler particle shapes: nanospheres, nanocubes, short nanowires, and long nanowires. To exclude the potential effects of surface capping ligands, all the filler particles are kept with uniform surface chemistry. We find that copper nanowires enhanced the thermal conductivity up to 40% at 0.25 vol % loadings; while the thermal conductivity was only 9.3% and 4.2% for the nanosphere- and nanocube-based nanofluids, respectively, at the same filler loading. This is consistent with a percolation mechanism in which a higher aspect ratio is beneficial for thermal conductivity enhancement. To overcome the surface oxidation of the copper nanomaterials and maintain the dispersion stability, we employed polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a dispersant and ascorbic acid as an antioxidant in the nanofluid formulations. The thermal performance of the optimized fluid formulations could be sustained for multiple heating-cooling cycles while retaining stability over 1000 h.

  14. Effect of cooking time on the physical, chemical and thermal properties of acha seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akeem O. Raji

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acha is a less utilized cereal grain in Africa. Scaling up of the processing technology of acha seeds is desirable if accurate information on effect of processing on its properties is available. This study investigated the effect of cooking duration on the chemical and physical properties of acha seeds. Cooking times (2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 minutes at 100oC were used. The volume, length, breadth, thickness, porosity, density, sphericity, aspect ratio, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, moisture, protein, fat, ash, crude fibre and carbohydrate were determined using standard methods. Data were analysed using ANOVA at p = 0.05. The results obtained revealed that varietal difference had a significant effect on volume, length, breadth, thickness, true density, bulk density, porosity, sphericity and aspect ratio. The moisture content, ash, protein, crude fibre, fat, carbohydrate, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity varied from 8.80 - 56.17 %, 0.32 - 1.87%, 1.92 - 11.50%, 0.29 - 1.58%, 0.32 - 2.81%, 40.94 - 76.26%, 1.66 -2.97 kJkg-1K-1, 0.26 -0.43 Wm-1K-1 and 0.85 x 10-7 - 1.17 x 10-7 ms-2 respectively, as significantly influenced by cooking time. Cooking for 7.5 minutes was appropriate using the moisture uptakes and thermal properties as criteria. 

  15. Effects of Particle Surface Charge, Species, Concentration, and Dispersion Method on the Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Gowda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experimental study is to evaluate the effects of particle species, surface charge, concentration, preparation technique, and base fluid on thermal transport capability of nanoparticle suspensions (nanofluids. The surface charge was varied by changing the pH value of the fluids. The alumina (Al2O3 and copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles were dispersed in deionized (DI water and ethylene glycol (EG, respectively. The nanofluids were prepared using both bath-type and probe sonicator under different power inputs. The experimental results were compared with the available experimental data as well as the predicted values obtained from Maxwell effective medium theory. It was found that ethylene glycol is more suitable for nanofluids applications than DI water in terms of thermal conductivity improvement and stability of nanofluids. Surface charge can effectively improve the dispersion of nanoparticles by reducing the (aggregated particle size in base fluids. A nanofluid with high surface charge (low pH has a higher thermal conductivity for a similar particle concentration. The sonication also has a significant impact on thermal conductivity enhancement. All these results suggest that the key to the improvement of thermal conductivity of nanofluids is a uniform and stable dispersion of nanoscale particles in a fluid.

  16. Effects of simultaneous climate change and geomorphic evolution on thermal characteristics of a shallow Alaskan lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jennifer R.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Ruggerone, Gregory T.

    2011-01-01

    We used a hydrodynamics model to assess the consequences of climate warming and contemporary geomorphic evolution for thermal conditions in a large, shallow Alaskan lake. We evaluated the effects of both known climate and landscape change, including rapid outlet erosion and migration of the principal inlet stream, over the past 50 yr as well as future scenarios of geomorphic restoration. Compared to effects of air temperature during the past 50 yr, lake thermal properties showed little sensitivity to substantial (~60%) loss of lake volume, as the lake maximum depth declined from 6 m to 4 m driven by outlet erosion. The direction and magnitude of future lake thermal responses will be driven largely by the extent of inlet stream migration when it occurs simultaneously with outlet erosion. Maintaining connectivity with inlet streams had substantial effects on buffering lake thermal responses to warming climate. Failing to account for changing rates and types of geomorphic processes under continuing climate change may misidentify the primary drivers of lake thermal responses and reduce our ability to understand the consequences for aquatic organisms.

  17. Thermal effects investigation on electrical properties of silicon solar cells treated by laser irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Pourakbar Saffar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we were investigated electrical properties of monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon solar cells due to laser irradiation with 650 nm wavelength in two states, proximate irradiation and via optics setup. Thermal effect on the cell surface due to laser irradiation was investigated on electrical properties too. Electrical parameters investigation of solar cells illustrates cell excitement via laser irradiation and efficiency decreases due to cell surface temperature increase. Monocrystalline parameters change with uniform shape due to thermal effect and laser irradiation toward polycrystalline cells.

  18. Experimental investigation of the effect of graphene nanofluids on heat pipe thermal performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadeghinezhad, Emad; Mehrali, Mohammad; Rosen, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to examine the thermal, performance of a sintered wick heat pipe using aqueous graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) nanofluids. The study focuses on changes in the effects of GNP concentration, heat pipe inclination angle and input heating power. The max......An experimental investigation has been carried out to examine the thermal, performance of a sintered wick heat pipe using aqueous graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) nanofluids. The study focuses on changes in the effects of GNP concentration, heat pipe inclination angle and input heating power...

  19. Effects of coherent ferroelastic domain walls on the thermal conductivity and Kapitza conductance in bismuth ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Adamo, Carolina; Ye, Linghan; Huey, Bryan D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.

    2013-03-01

    Ferroelectric and ferroelastic domain structure has a profound effect on the piezoelectric, ferroelectric, and dielectric responses of ferroelectric materials. However, domain walls and strain field effects on thermal properties are unknown. We measured the thermal conductance from 100-400 K of epitaxially grown BiFeO3 thin films with different domain variants, each separated primarily by 71° domain walls. We determined the Kapitza conductance across the domain walls, which is driven by the strain field induced by the domain variants. This domain wall Kapitza conductance is lower than the Kapitza conductance associated with grain boundaries in all previously measured materials.

  20. Effects of thermal conduction and convection on temperature profile in a water calorimeter for proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargioni, E.; Manfredotti, C. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Laitano, R.F.; Guerra, A.S. [Ist. Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA, Roma (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    In water calorimetry, in addition to the temperature increase due to beam energy deposition in water, unwanted thermal effects occur during and after calorimeter irradiation. This should be accounted for by applying proper corrections to the experimental results. In order to determine such corrections heat flow calculations were performed using the `finite element` method. This method applies even to complex 3D geometries with not necessarily symmetric conditions. Some preliminary results of these calculations are presented together with a description of the analytical method for the evaluation of the correction factors that should be applied to the experimental results to account for the above thermal effects. (orig.)

  1. Doing Research on Effective Cross-Cultural Teaching: The Teacher Tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfeld, Judith; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Problems of researching what constitutes an effective teacher of rural Eskimo and Indian children are discussed. Behaviors of effective cross-cultural teachers were evaluated by peers, school administration, and local community to aid in research. (DF)

  2. Thermal-Hydraulic Effect of Pattern of Wire-wrap Spacer in 19-pin Rod Bundle for SFR Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) has been considered the most promising reactor type for future and prototype gen-IV SFR has been developed actively in Korea, thermal-hydraulic aspects of the SFR fuel assembly have the important role for the reactor safety analysis. In PGSFR fuel assembly, 271 pins of fuel rods are tightly packed in triangular array inside hexagonal duct, and wire is wound helically per each fuel rod with regular pattern to assure the gap between rods and prevent the collision, which is called wire-wrapped spacer. Due to helical shape of the wire-wrapped spacer, flow inside duct can have stronger turbulent characteristics and thermal mixing effect. However, many studies showed the possible wake from swirl flow inside subchannel, which cause local hot spot. To prevent the wake flow and improve thermal mixing, new pattern of wire wrap spacer was suggested. To evaluate the effect of wire wrap spacer pattern, CFD analysis was performed for 19-pin rod bundle with comparison of conventional and U-pattern wire wrap spacer. To prevent the wake due to same direction of swirl flow, 7-rod unit pattern of wire spacer, which are arranged to have different rotational direction of wire with adjacent rods and center rod without wire wrap was proposed. From simulation results, swirl flow across gap conflicts its rotation direction causing wake flow from the regular pattern of the conventional one, which generates local hot spot near cladding. With U-pattern of wire wrap spacer, heat transfer in subchannel can be enhanced with evenly distributed cross flow without compensating pressure loss. From the results, the pattern of wire wrap spacer can influence the both heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop, with flow structures generated by wire wrap spacer.

  3. MHD non-Newtonian fluid flow over a slendering stretching sheet in the presence of cross-diffusion effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jayachandra Babu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we inquired the cross-diffusion effects on the magnetohydrodynamic Williamson fluid flow across a variable thickness stretching sheet by viewing velocity slip. With the aid of Runge-Kutta based shooting process, we resolved the transformed differential equations numerically. The effects of different dimensionless parameters on three usual profiles (velocity, temperature, concentration along with skin friction coefficient, heat transfer rate and mass transfer rate are examined with the support of plots and tables. Dual solutions are exhibited for two cases i.e., Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid. Results reveal that the Soret and Dufour numbers have drift to control the thermal and concentration boundary layers. We also found a good agreement of the present results by comparing with the published results.

  4. RF tumour ablation: computer simulation and mathematical modelling of the effects of electrical and thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, S M; Liu, Z-J; Yu, N C; Humphries, S; Ahmed, M; Cosman, E R; Lenkinski, R E; Goldberg, W; Goldberg, S N

    2005-05-01

    This study determined the effects of thermal conductivity on RF ablation tissue heating using mathematical modelling and computer simulations of RF heating coupled to thermal transport. Computer simulation of the Bio-Heat equation coupled with temperature-dependent solutions for RF electric fields (ETherm) was used to generate temperature profiles 2 cm away from a 3 cm internally-cooled electrode. Multiple conditions of clinically relevant electrical conductivities (0.07-12 S m-1) and 'tumour' radius (5-30 mm) at a given background electrical conductivity (0.12 S m-1) were studied. Temperature response surfaces were plotted for six thermal conductivities, ranging from 0.3-2 W m-1 degrees C (the range of anticipated clinical and experimental systems). A temperature response surface was obtained for each thermal conductivity at 25 electrical conductivities and 17 radii (n=425 temperature data points). The simulated temperature response was fit to a mathematical model derived from prior phantom data. This mathematical model is of the form (T=a+bRc exp(dR) s(f) exp(g)(s)) for RF generator-energy dependent situations and (T=h+k exp(mR)+n?exp(p)(s)) for RF generator-current limited situations, where T is the temperature (degrees C) 2 cm from the electrode and a, b, c, d, f, g, h, k, m, n and p are fitting parameters. For each of the thermal conductivity temperature profiles generated, the mathematical model fit the response surface to an r2 of 0.97-0.99. Parameters a, b, c, d, f, k and m were highly correlated to thermal conductivity (r2=0.96-0.99). The monotonic progression of fitting parameters permitted their mathematical expression using simple functions. Additionally, the effect of thermal conductivity simplified the above equation to the extent that g, h, n and p were found to be invariant. Thus, representation of the temperature response surface could be accurately expressed as a function of electrical conductivity, radius and thermal conductivity. As a result

  5. Scattering of thermal He beams by crossed atomic and molecular beams. II. The He--Ar van der Waals potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keilb), M.; Slankas, J.T.; Kuppermann, A.

    1979-01-01

    Differential cross sections for He--Ar scattering at room temperature have been measured. The experimental consistency of these measurements with others performed in different laboratories is demonstrated. Despite this consistency, the present van der Waals well depth of 1.78 meV, accurate to 10%, is smaller by 20% to 50% than the experimental values obtained previously. These discrepancies are caused by differences between the assumed mathematical forms or between the assumed dispersion coefficients of the potentials used in the present paper and those of previous studies. Independent investigations have shown that the previous assumptions are inappropriate for providing accurate potentials from fits to experimental differential cross section data for He--Ar. We use two forms free of this inadequacy in the present analysis: a modified version of the Simons--Parr--Finlan--Dunham (SPFD) potential, and a double Morse--van der Waals (M/sup 2/SV) type of parameterization. The resulting He--Ar potentials are shown to be equal to with experimental error, throughout the range of interatomic distances to which the scattering data are sensitive. The SPFD or M/sup 2/SV potentials are combined with a repulsive potential previously determined exclusively from fits to gas phase bulk properties. The resulting potentials, valid over the extended range of interatomic distances r> or approx. =2.4 A, are able to reproduce all these bulk properties quite well, without adversely affecting the quality of the fits to the DCS.

  6. Effect of thermal-treatment sequence on sound absorbing and mechanical properties of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent rapid commercial and industrial development, mechanical equipment is supplemented massively in the factory and thus mechanical operation causes noise which distresses living at home. In livelihood, neighborhood, transportation equipment, jobsite construction noises impact on quality of life not only factory noise. This study aims to preparation technique and property evaluation of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites. Hollow three-dimensional crimp PET fibers blended with low-melting PET fibers were fabricated into hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwoven after opening, blending, carding, lapping and needle-bonding process. Then, hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwovens were laminated into sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites by changing sequence of needle-bonding and thermal-treatment. The optimal thermal-treated sequence was found by tensile strength, tearing strength, sound-absorbing coefficient and thermal conductivity coefficient tests of porous composites.

  7. Effect of Periodic Surface Air Temperature Variations on Subsurface Thermal Structure with Vertical Fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, R. V.; Ravi, M.; Srivastava, K.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of climate change on near subsurface temperatures is an important research topic for global change impact assessment at the regional scale. The varying temperature of the air over the surface in long term will disturb subsurface thermal structure. Groundwater flow is another important process which perturbs the thermal distribution into the subsurface. To investigate the effect of periodic air temperature on nonisothermal subsurface, one dimensional transient heat conduction-advection equation is solved numerically using finite element method. Thermal response of subsurface for periodic variations in surface air temperature (SAT) with robin type boundary condition on the surface with vertical ground water flow are calculated and the amplitude attenuation of propagation of surface temperature information in the subsurface for different scenarios of advection and convective coefficient are discussed briefly. The results show the coupled response of trigonometric variation in air temperature with surface temperatures along with ground water velocity has significant implications for the effects of climate change.

  8. The effect of thermal pre-treatment on the hydrometallurgical purification of large silicon particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joon-Soo; Lee, Jin-Seok; Jang, Bo-Yun; Ahn, Young-Soo [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The most desirable approach to the hydrometallurgical process consists in using larger silicon particles by exposing the metallic impurities contained in the silicon to its surface via a thermally activated elution prior to chemical treatment. The present study reports experimental findings concerning the effect of a thermal pre-treatment using a mixture of 5-wt% nitric acid and 2.5-wt% hydrofluoric acid for the purification of metallurgical-grade silicon particles of different sizes on the hydrometallurgical process. The extraction rates of metallic impurities from inside the silicon were in inverse proportion to the size of the silicon particle. However, the effect of the thermal pre-treatment on the extraction rate became greater with increasing particle size.

  9. Unique effects of thermal and pressure histories on glass hardness: Structural and topological origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal

    2015-10-01

    The properties of glass are determined not only by temperature, pressure, and composition, but also by their complete thermal and pressure histories. Here, we show that glasses of identical composition produced through thermal annealing and through quenching from elevated pressure can result in samples with identical density and mean interatomic distances, yet different bond angle distributions, medium-range structures, and, thus, macroscopic properties. We demonstrate that hardness is higher when the density increase is obtained through thermal annealing rather than through pressure-quenching. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this arises because pressure-quenching has a larger effect on medium-range order, while annealing has a larger effect on short-range structures (sharper bond angle distribution), which ultimately determine hardness according to bond constraint theory. Our work could open a new avenue towards industrially useful glasses that are identical in terms of composition and density, but with differences in thermodynamic, mechanical, and rheological properties due to unique structural characteristics.

  10. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  11. Concentric or eccentric training: effects and cross-education

    OpenAIRE

    Maquet, Didier; Delvaux, François; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare pure concentric and eccentric isokinetic training with respect to their possible specificity in the progression of strength of the knee flexor and extensor muscles. Subjects were divided into 2 groups (eccentric or concentric training) and performed a specific training of dominant leg. Before and after the training session, isokinetic performances of trained leg and non-trained leg (cross-education) were evaluated. We observed a greater increase of ...

  12. Effect of fibre shape on transverse thermal conductivity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultimately, it is the combined resistance to the heat flow that determines the conductivity of any material. Since this combined resistance do change in a wide range with different shapes of fibres and hence are the large variations in the effective conductivity. In the case of an elliptic fibre (figure 9), there exists a possibility of ...

  13. Effect of thermal and physicochemical treatment on abattoir waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evacuation of abattoir waste waters into water bodies results in excessive proliferation of decomposers, thus causing oxygen depletion and eutrophication. This study is designed to find means of effectively treating the abattoir waste water before they are reused or discharged into water bodies. The waste water was taken ...

  14. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The transient analytical solutions of temperature distribution, stress, strain and optical path difference in convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod are derived. The results are compared with other works and good agreements are found. The effects of increasing the edge cooling and face cooling are studied.

  15. Effects of thermal treatments and germination on physico-chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certain physico-chemical properties including viscoelasticity, crystallinity and maltose content of corn depends on the gelatinization of starch under different treatments. Three different treatments were performed; boiling in water, steam heating, and germination. The effects of gelatinization on viscoelastic property of corn ...

  16. Effects of thermal aging on mechanical performance of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.T. Hotle; J.M. Considine; M.J. Wald; R.E. Rowlands; K.T. Turner

    2008-01-01

    A missing element of paper aging research is a description of mechanical performance with aging. Tensile strength cannot be predicted directly from DP measurements, and existing models do not represent the effects of aging on strength and stiffness. The primary aim of the present work is to characterize changes of mechanical properties, such as tensile response and...

  17. Thermal effects of water intrusion in hydrophobic nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowiak, Thomas; Paulin, Christian; Ballandras, Anthony; Weber, Guy; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2009-07-29

    Liquid water intrusion in hydrophobic nanoporous silicalite-1, a pure siliceous zeolite, in isothermal conditions under high pressure produces an endothermic effect. After intrusion, confined water in zeolite pores is in a different state from that of the liquid bulk water. Such forced intrusion also chemically modifies the material and tends to render it slightly more hydrophilic.

  18. Effects of thermal treatments and germination on physico-chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... Accepted 17 July, 2006. Certain physico-chemical properties including viscoelasticity, crystallinity and maltose content of corn ... performed; boiling in water, steam heating, and germination. The effects of gelatinization on ... changes in physical, chemical and nutritional properties of starch as well as water ...

  19. Effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal transport in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, L.; Kuang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Intrinsic thermal resistivity critically depends on features of phonon dispersions dictated by harmonic interatomic forces and masses. Here we present the effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal conductivity (κ ) of functionalized graphene from first-principles calculations. We use graphane, a buckled graphene backbone with covalently bonded hydrogen atoms on both sides, as the base material and vary the mass of the hydrogen atoms to simulate the effect of mass variance from other functional groups. We find nonmonotonic behavior of κ with increasing mass of the functional group and an unusual crossover from acoustic-dominated to optic-dominated thermal transport behavior. We connect this crossover to changes in the phonon dispersion with varying mass which suppress acoustic phonon velocities, but also give unusually high velocity optic modes. Further, we show that out-of-plane acoustic vibrations contribute significantly more to thermal transport than in-plane acoustic modes despite breaking of a reflection-symmetry-based scattering selection rule responsible for their large contributions in graphene. This work demonstrates the potential for manipulation and engineering of thermal transport properties in two-dimensional materials toward targeted applications.

  20. Study of the thermal effect on silicon surface induced by ion beam from plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Z., E-mail: pscientific5@aec.org.sy [Scientific Service Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Ahmad, M. [IBA Laboratory, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hawat, Sh.; Akel, M. [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2017-04-01

    Structural modifications in form of ripples and cracks are induced by nitrogen ions from plasma focus on silicon surface. The investigation of such structures reveals correlation between ripples and cracks formation in peripheral region of the melt spot. The reason of such correlation and structure formation is explained as result of thermal effect. Melting and resolidification of the center of irradiated area occur within one micro second of time. This is supported by a numerical simulation used to investigate the thermal effect induced by the plasma focus ion beams on the silicon surface. This simulation provides information about the temperature profile as well as the dynamic of the thermal propagation in depth and lateral directions. In accordance with the experimental observations, that ripples are formed in latter stage after the arrival of last ion, the simulation shows that the thermal relaxation takes place in few microseconds after the end of the ion beam arrival. Additionally, the dependency of thermal propagation and relaxation on the distance of the silicon surface from the anode is presented.

  1. Thermal effects on clay rocks for deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal effects on the Callovo-Oxfordian and Opalinus clay rocks for hosting high-level radioactive waste were comprehensively investigated with laboratory and in situ experiments under repository relevant conditions: (1 stresses covering the range from the initial lithostatic state to redistributed levels after excavation, (2 hydraulic drained and undrained boundaries, and (3 heating from ambient temperature up to 90 °C–120 °C and a subsequent cooling phase. The laboratory experiments were performed on normal-sized and large hollow cylindrical samples in various respects of thermal expansion and contraction, thermally-induced pore water pressure, temperature influences on deformation and strength, thermal impacts on swelling, fracture sealing and permeability. The laboratory results obtained from the samples are consistent with the in situ observations during heating experiments in the underground research laboratories at Bure and Mont-Terri. Even though the claystones showed significant responses to thermal loading, no negative effects on their favorable barrier properties were observed.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Size Effects on the Thermal Conductivity of Silicon-Germanium Alloy Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaito, Ramez; Duda, John C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hattar, Khalid; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Campion, Michael J.; Piekos, Edward S.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2012-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the role of size effects and boundary scattering on the thermal conductivity of silicon-germanium alloys. The thermal conductivities of a series of epitaxially grown Si1-xGex thin films with varying thicknesses and compositions were measured with time-domain thermoreflectance. The resulting conductivities are found to be 3 to 5 times less than bulk values and vary strongly with film thickness. By examining these measured thermal conductivities in the context of a previously established model, it is shown that long wavelength phonons, known to be the dominant heat carriers in alloy films, are strongly scattered by the film boundaries, thereby inducing the observed reductions in heat transport. These results are then generalized to silicon-germanium systems of various thicknesses and compositions; we find that the thermal conductivities of Si1-xGex superlattices are ultimately limited by finite size effects and sample size rather than periodicity or alloying. This demonstrates the strong influence of sample size in alloyed nanosystems. Therefore, if a comparison is to be made between the thermal conductivities of superlattices and alloys, the total sample thicknesses of each must be considered.

  3. Gas Phase Pressure Effects on the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas phase pressure effects on the apparent thermal conductivity of a JSC-1A/air mixture have been experimentally investigated under steady state thermal conditions from 10 kPa to 100 kPa. The result showed that apparent thermal conductivity of the JSC-1A/air mixture decreased when pressure was lowered to 80 kPa. At 10 kPa, the conductivity decreased to 0.145 W/m/degree C, which is significantly lower than 0.196 W/m/degree C at 100 kPa. This finding is consistent with the results of previous researchers. The reduction of the apparent thermal conductivity at low pressures is ascribed to the Knudsen effect. Since the characteristic length of the void space in bulk JSC-1A varies over a wide range, both the Knudsen regime and continuum regime can coexist in the pore space. The volume ratio of the two regimes varies with pressure. Thus, as gas pressure decreases, the gas volume controlled by Knudsen regime increases. Under Knudsen regime the resistance to the heat flow is higher than that in the continuum regime, resulting in the observed pressure dependency of the apparent thermal conductivity.

  4. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Open Cell Polyurethane Foam Based on the Fractal Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Ankang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fractal theory, the geometric structure inside an open cell polyurethane foam, which is widely used as adiabatic material, is illustrated. A simplified cell fractal model is created. In the model, the method of calculating the equivalent thermal conductivity of the porous foam is described and the fractal dimension is calculated. The mathematical formulas for the fractal equivalent thermal conductivity combined with gas and solid phase, for heat radiation equivalent thermal conductivity and for the total thermal conductivity, are deduced. However, the total effective heat flux is the summation of the heat conduction by the solid phase and the gas in pores, the radiation, and the convection between gas and solid phase. Fractal mathematical equation of effective thermal conductivity is derived with fractal dimension and vacancy porosity in the cell body. The calculated results have good agreement with the experimental data, and the difference is less than 5%. The main influencing factors are summarized. The research work is useful for the enhancement of adiabatic performance of foam materials and development of new materials.

  5. Thermal effect analysis of silicon microring optical switch for on-chip interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiongfeng; Yang, Lin

    2017-10-01

    The silicon microring resonator plays an important role in large-scale, high-integrability modern switching matrixes and optical networks, as silicon photonics enables ring resonators of an unprecedented compact size. But as the nature of resonators is their sensitivity to temperature, their performances are vulnerable to being affected by thermal effect. In this paper, we analyze the dominant thermal effects to the application of silicon microring optical switch. On the one hand we theoretically analyze and experimentally measure the thermal crosstalk among adjacent microring optical switches with different distances, and give possible solutions to minimize the affect of thermal crosstalk. On the other hand we analyze and measure the thermooptic dynamic response of microring switch; the experiment shows for the thermal-tuning that the rising edge is around 2 μs, and the falling edge is around 35 μs. We give the explanation of the asymmetric rise-time and fall-time. Project supported by the Natural National Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61235001, 61575187, 61535002).

  6. The effects of peer influence on adolescent pedestrian road-crossing decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeffer, Karen; Hunter, E

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Adolescence is a high-risk period for pedestrian injury. It is also a time of heightened susceptibility to peer influence. The aim of this research was to examine the effects of peer influence on the pedestrian road-crossing decisions of adolescents. Methods: Using 10 videos of road-crossing sites, 80 16- to 18-year-olds were asked to make pedestrian road-crossing decisions. Participants were assigned to one of 4 experimental conditions: negative peer (influencing unsafe decisi...

  7. Short-range and long-range cross-linking effects of polygenipin on gelatin-based composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liming; Xu, Yongbin; Liang, Weijie; Li, Xinying; Li, Defu; Mu, Changdao

    2016-11-01

    Genipin is an ideal cross-linking agent in biomedical applications, which can undergo ring-opening polymerization in alkaline condition. The polygenipin can create short-range and long-range intermolecular cross-linking between protein chains. In this article, the polygenipin with different degree of polymerization was successfully prepared and used to fix gelatin composite materials. The short-range and long-range cross-linking effects of polygenipin were systematically studied. The results show that the composite materials present porous structure with tunable pore sizes in the gel state, which can be easily controlled by adjusting the degree of polymerization of polygenipin. Long-range cross-linking can increase the pore size of the gel. However, during the drying process, the composite films cross-linked by polygenipin with higher degree of polymerization shrank to smaller size to create more compact structure, resulting in the improvement of water resistance properties, thermal stability, tensile strength, and darker color for the composite films. It is interesting that the composite films can partly swell to the original gel structure when in contact with water and saturated water vapor. All the composite films have excellent barrier properties against UV light. However, the compatibility of gelatin and polygenipin is reduced when the degree of polymerization of polygenipin increases to a certain extent, which will result in the formation of phase separation structure. The obtained composite films are ideal candidates for food and pharmaceutical packaging materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2712-2722, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Magneto-Seebeck effect in spin-valve with in-plane thermal gradient

    OpenAIRE

    S. Jain; D. D. Lam; A. Bose; H. Sharma; V. R. Palkar; C. V. Tomy; Y. Suzuki; A. A. Tulapurkar

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of magneto-Seebeck effect on a spin valve with in-plane thermal gradient. We measured open circuit voltage and short circuit current by applying a temperature gradient across a spin valve stack, where one of the ferromagnetic layers is pinned. We found a clear hysteresis in these two quantities as a function of magnetic field. From these measurements, the magneto-Seebeck effect was found to be same as magneto-resistance effect.

  9. Magneto-Seebeck effect in spin-valve with in-plane thermal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of magneto-Seebeck effect on a spin valve with in-plane thermal gradient. We measured open circuit voltage and short circuit current by applying a temperature gradient across a spin valve stack, where one of the ferromagnetic layers is pinned. We found a clear hysteresis in these two quantities as a function of magnetic field. From these measurements, the magneto-Seebeck effect was found to be same as magneto-resistance effect.

  10. Effect of Nanoparticles on the Morphology, Thermal, and Electrical Properties of Low-Density Polyethylene after Thermal Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youyuan Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the morphology, thermal, and electrical properties of LDPE (low-density polyethylene-based nanocomposites after thermal aging. The FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra results show that thermo-oxidative reactions occur in neat LDPE and LDPE/SiO2 nanocomposites when the aging time is 35 days and in LDPE/MgO nanocomposites when the aging time is 77 days. Specifically, LDPE/MgO nanocomposites delay the appearance of thermo-oxidative reactions, showing anti-thermal aging ability. Furthermore, nanocomposites present lower onset degradation temperature than neat LDPE, showing better thermal stabilization. With regard to the electrical properties, nanocomposites maintain the ability to suppress space charge accumulation after thermal aging. Additionally, in comparison with SiO2 nanocomposites and neat LDPE, the permittivity of LDPE/MgO nanocomposites changes slightly after thermal aging. It is concluded that LDPE/MgO nanocomposites have better insulation properties than neat LDPE after thermal aging, which may be caused by the interface introduced by the nanoparticles.

  11. Effect of Nanoparticles on the Morphology, Thermal, and Electrical Properties of Low-Density Polyethylene after Thermal Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youyuan; Wang, Can; Zhang, Zhanxi; Xiao, Kun

    2017-10-12

    This paper investigates the morphology, thermal, and electrical properties of LDPE (low-density polyethylene)-based nanocomposites after thermal aging. The FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) spectra results show that thermo-oxidative reactions occur in neat LDPE and LDPE/SiO₂ nanocomposites when the aging time is 35 days and in LDPE/MgO nanocomposites when the aging time is 77 days. Specifically, LDPE/MgO nanocomposites delay the appearance of thermo-oxidative reactions, showing anti-thermal aging ability. Furthermore, nanocomposites present lower onset degradation temperature than neat LDPE, showing better thermal stabilization. With regard to the electrical properties, nanocomposites maintain the ability to suppress space charge accumulation after thermal aging. Additionally, in comparison with SiO₂ nanocomposites and neat LDPE, the permittivity of LDPE/MgO nanocomposites changes slightly after thermal aging. It is concluded that LDPE/MgO nanocomposites have better insulation properties than neat LDPE after thermal aging, which may be caused by the interface introduced by the nanoparticles.

  12. Studying the Physical Basis of Global Warming: Thermal Effects of the Interaction between Radiation and Matter and Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    We present a teaching module dealing with the thermal effects of interaction between radiation and matter, the infrared emission of bodies and the greenhouse effect devoted to university level and teacher education. The module stresses the dependence of the optical properties of materials (transparency, absorptivity and emissivity) on radiation…

  13. The Effect of Thermal Cycling Treatments on the Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of a Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal cycling treatments on the thermal stability and mechanical properties of a Ti48Zr20Nb12Cu5Be15 bulk metallic glass composite (BMGC has been investigated. Results show that moderate thermal cycles in a temperature range of −196 °C (cryogenic temperature, CT to 25 °C (room temperature, RT or annealing time at CT has not induced obvious changes of thermal stability and then it decreases slightly over critical thermal parameters. In addition, the dendritic second phases with a bcc structure are homogeneously embedded in the amorphous matrix; no visible changes are detected, which shows structural stability. Excellent mechanical properties as high as 1599 MPa yield strength and 34% plastic strain are obtained, and the yield strength and elastic modulus also increase gradually. The effect on the stability is analyzed quantitatively by crystallization kinetics and plastic-flow models, and indicates that the reduction of structural relaxation enthalpy, which is related to the degradation of spatial heterogeneity, reduces thermal stability but does not imperatively deteriorate the plasticity.

  14. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  15. Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Dasgupta, A.; Velikovich, A. L.; Chong, Y. K.; Mehlhorn, T. A. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kroupp, E.; Osin, D.; Maron, Y.; Starobinets, A.; Fisher, V.; Zarnitsky, Yu.; Bernshtam, V. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Apruzese, J. P. [Consultant to NRL through Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Fisher, A. [Falculty of Physics, Technion-Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Deeney, C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89144 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The difference between the ion thermal and effective temperatures is investigated through simulations of the Ne gas puff z-pinch reported by Kroupp et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 105001 (2011)]. Calculations are performed using a 2D, radiation-magnetohydrodynamic code with Tabular Collisional-Radiative Equilibrium, namely Mach2-TCRE [Thornhill et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 3480 (2001)]. The extensive data set of imaging and K-shell spectroscopy from the experiments provides a challenging validation test for z-pinch simulations. Synthetic visible images of the implosion phase match the observed large scale structure if the breakdown occurs at the density corresponding to the Paschen minimum. At the beginning of stagnation (−4 ns), computed plasma conditions change rapidly showing a rising electron density and a peak in the ion thermal temperature of ∼1.8 keV. This is larger than the ion thermal temperature (<400 eV) inferred from the experiment. By the time of peak K-shell power (0 ns), the calculated electron density is similar to the data and the electron and ion thermal temperatures are equilibrated, as is observed. Effective ion temperatures are obtained from calculated emission line widths accounting for thermal broadening and Doppler velocity shifts. The observed, large effective ion temperatures (∼4 keV) early in the stagnation of this Ne pinch can be explained solely as a combination of compressional ion heating and steep radial velocity gradients near the axis. Approximations in the modeling are discussed in regard to the higher ion thermal temperature and lower electron density early in the stagnation compared to the experimental results.

  16. Comparison of KTP, Thulium, and CO2 laser in stapedotomy using specialized visualization techniques: thermal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalski, Digna M A; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Vincent, Robert; Trabelzini, Franco; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-06-01

    High-speed thermal imaging enables visualization of heating of the vestibule during laser-assisted stapedotomy, comparing KTP, CO2, and Thulium laser light. Perforation of the stapes footplate with laser bears the risk of heating of the inner ear fluids. The amount of heating depends on absorption of the laser light and subsequent tissue ablation. The ablation of the footplate is driven by strong water absorption for the CO2 and Thulium laser. For the KTP laser wavelength, ablation is driven by carbonization of the footplate and it might penetrate deep into the inner ear without absorption in water. The thermal effects were visualized in an inner ear model, using two new techniques: (1) high-speed Schlieren imaging shows relative dynamic changes of temperatures up to 2 ms resolution in the perilymph. (2) Thermo imaging provides absolute temperature measurements around the footplate up to 40 ms resolution. The high-speed Schlieren imaging showed minimal heating using the KTP laser. Both CO2 and Thulium laser showed heating below the footplate. Thulium laser wavelength generated heating up to 0.6 mm depth. This was confirmed with thermal imaging, showing a rise of temperature of 4.7 (±3.5) °C for KTP and 9.4 (±6.9) for Thulium in the area of 2 mm below the footplate. For stapedotomy, the Thulium and CO2 laser show more extended thermal effects compared to KTP. High-speed Schlieren imaging and thermal imaging are complimentary techniques to study lasers thermal effects in tissue.

  17. Accuracy of the thermal neutron absorption cross section measurements (based on examples of selected pulsed beam methods); Dokladnosc pomiarow przekroju czynnego absorpcji neutronow termicznych (na przykladzie wybranych metod impulsowych)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krynicka, E. [The H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The problem of accuracy of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross section determination is discussed on examples of selected measurement methods which use non-stationary neutron fields. The computer simulation method elaborated by the author is presented as a procedure for estimating the standard deviation of the measured absorption cross section. The computer simulation method presented can be easily utilized to estimate the accuracy of measurement of various physical magnitudes. (author) 46 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  18. Thermal inertia of near-Earth asteroids and implications for the magnitude of the Yarkovsky effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo', Marco; dell'Oro, Aldo; Harris, Alan W.; Mottola, Stefano; Mueller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Thermal inertia determines the temperature distribution over the surface of an asteroid and therefore governs the magnitude the Yarkovsky effect. The latter causes gradual drifting of the orbits of km-sized asteroids and plays an important role in the delivery of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) from the

  19. Thermal inertia of near-Earth asteroids and magnitude of the Yarkovsky effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo, M.; Dell'Oro, A.; Harris, A. W.; Mottola, S.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal inertia of near-Earth asteroids and magnitude of the Yarkovsky effect M. Delbo* (1,2), A. Dell'Oro (2), A. W. Harris (3), S. Mottola (3), M. Mueller (3) (1) Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur B.P. 4229, 06034 Nice Cedex 4, France. (2) INAF-Osservatorio Astr. di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, 10025

  20. Thermal Inertia of near-Earth Asteroids and Strength of the Yarkovsky Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo, Marco; Dell'Oro, A.; Harris, A. W.; Mottola, S.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal inertia is the physical parameter that controls the temperature distribution over the surface of an asteroid. It affects the strength of the Yarkovsky effect, which causes orbital drift of km-sized asteroids and is invoked to explain the delivery of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) from the main

  1. Effects of flow and colony morphology on the thermal boundary layer of corals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez, Isabel M; Kühl, Michael; Larkum, Anthony W D

    2011-01-01

    . The effect of water flow on the thermal microenvironment was investigated in hemispherical and branching corals (Porites lobata and Stylophora pistillata, respectively) in a flow chamber experiment. For both coral types, the thickness of the TBL decreased exponentially from 2.5 mm at quasi-stagnant flow (0...

  2. Planck 2015 results: XXII. A map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed all-sky Compton parameters maps, y-maps, of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 30 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck satellite. These reconstructed y-maps are delivered as part of t...

  3. Tuning the effective coupling of an AFM lever to a thermal bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jourdan, G [Institut Neel CNRS Grenoble BP 166 38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Torricelli, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chevrier, J [Institut Neel CNRS Grenoble BP 166 38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Comin, F [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2007-11-28

    Fabrication of high quality nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) is nowadays extremely efficient. These NEMS will be used as sensors and actuators in integrated systems. Their use, however, raises questions about their interface (actuation, detection, read out) with external detection and control systems. Their operation implies many fundamental questions related to single particle effects such as Coulomb blockade, light matter interactions such as radiation pressure, thermal effects, Casimir forces and the coupling of nanosystems to the external world (thermal fluctuations, back action effect). Here we specifically present how the damping of an oscillating cantilever can be tuned in two radically different ways: (i) through an electromechanical coupling in the presence of a strong Johnson noise, (ii) through an external feedback control of thermal fluctuations which is the cold damping closely related to Maxwell's demon. This shows how the interplay between external control of micro-EMS (MEMS) or NEMS and their coupling to a thermal bath can lead to a wealth of effects that are nowadays extensively studied in different areas.

  4. The effects of permafrost thaw on soil hydrologic, thermal, and carbon dynamics in an Alaskan peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan A. O' Donnell; M.Torre Jorgenson; Jennifer W. Harden; A.David McGuire; Mikhail Z. Kanevskiy; Kimberly P. Wickland

    2012-01-01

    Recent warming at high-latitudes has accelerated permafrost thaw in northern peatlands, and thaw can have profound effects on local hydrology and ecosystem carbon balance. To assess the impact of permafrost thaw on soil organic carbon (OC) dynamics, we measured soil hydrologic and thermal dynamics and soil OC stocks across a collapse-scar bog chronosequence in interior...

  5. Upgrading Fast Pyrolysis Oil via Hydrodeoxygenation and Thermal Treatment: Effects of Catalytic Glycerol Pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyhanitash, Ehsan; Tymchyshyn, M.; Yuan, Zhongshun; Albion, K.; van Rossum, G.; Xu, C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of stabilizing fast pyrolysis oil (PO) with glycerol via catalytic glycerol pretreatment on upgrading via hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) or thermal treatment (TT) were studied. Nonstabilized (original) fast pyrolysis oil was also upgraded via HDO or TT to obtain benchmarks. Generally, HDO

  6. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  7. The Effect of Ethylene Glycol, Glycine Betaine, and Urea on Lysozyme Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Nordstrom, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    The four-week student project described in this article is an extension of protein thermal denaturation experiments to include effects of added cosolutes ethylene glycol, glycine betaine, and urea on the unfolding of lysozyme. The transition temperatures and van't Hoff enthalpies for unfolding are evaluated for six concentrations of each cosolute,…

  8. Humidity Effects on Soluble Core Mechanical and Thermal Properties (Polyvinyl Alcohol/Microballoon Composite)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report for the study of humidity effects and loading rate on soluble core (PVA/MB composite material) mechanical and thermal properties. This report describes test results, procedures employed, and any unusual occurrences or specific observations associated with this test program.

  9. Effective and efficient agricultural drainage pipe mapping with UAS thermal infrared imagery: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective and efficient methods are needed to map agricultural subsurface drainage systems. Visible (VIS), near infrared (NIR), and/or thermal infrared (TIR) imagery obtained by unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) may provide a means for determining drainage pipe locations. Preliminary UAS surveys wit...

  10. Effects of microwave heating on the thermal states of biological tissues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of microwave heating on the thermal states of biological tissues. Nabil TM El-dabe, Mona AA Mohamed, Asma F El-Sayed. Abstract. A mathematical analysis of microwave heating equations in one-dimensional multi-layer model has been discussed. Maxwell's equations and transient bioheat transfer equation were ...

  11. Mechanical and thermal cycling effects on the flexural strength of glass ceramics fused to titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez, Vanessa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Nishioka, Renato; Souza, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Alfredo; Pavanelli, Carlos

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on the flexural strength (ISO 9693) of three brands of ceramics fused to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Metallic frameworks of 25 x 3 x 0.5 mm dimensions (N = 84) were cast in cpTi, followed by 150-mu m aluminum oxide airborne

  12. The effect of thermal contact resistance on the thermosetting pultrusion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    experimentally in the literature. In order to study the effects of the thermal contact resistance (TCR), which can also be expressed by the heat transfer coefficient (HTC), on the pultrusion process, a cylindrical die block and heaters are added to the original problem domain. The significance of using the TCR...

  13. Effect of pre-heating on the thermal decomposition kinetics of cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of pre-heating at low temperatures (160-280°C) on the thermal decomposition kinetics of scoured cotton fabrics was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis under nonisothermal conditions. Isoconversional methods were used to calculate the activation energies for the pyrolysis after one-...

  14. Effect of pMDI isocyanate additive on mechanical and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI) on mechanical and thermal properties of Kenaf fibre (KF) reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites was studied. Various percentages viz. 2%, 4% and 6%, were studied. The composites were characterized by using tensile testing, ...

  15. Effect of particle size on thermal decomposition of alkali metal picrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Tonglai, E-mail: ztlbit@bit.edu.cn; Yang, Li; Zhou, Zunning

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission than do its larger counterpart. The small size effect reduces the thermal decomposition activation energy, accelerates the reaction rate, and promotes the reaction activity. - Highlights: • Picrates were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis. • Thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics were studied by DPTA and DSC. • Smaller-sized picrate has higher activity and faster reaction rate. • Particle size effect on thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics was revealed. - Abstract: Three alkali metal picrates, KPA, RbPA and CsPA, were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis, and their thermal decomposition behaviors were investigated by DPTA at different temperatures and by DSC at different heating rates. The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission and smaller kinetic and thermodynamic parameters than do its larger counterpart. It can be attributed to the decreasing particle size which leads to the high surface energy, the fast mass and heat transfer, and the increasing active sites on the reaction interface. The small size effect and surface effect cause the autocatalysis which reduces the activation energy and promotes the reaction activity. The particle size does not affect the reaction mechanism. However, the picrates with different central alkali metals exhibit different reaction mechanisms even though they are of the same size. This is because the central metal determines the bond energy and consequently affects the stability of picrate.

  16. Effective thermal/mechanical properties of honeycomb core panels for hot structure applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatemi, J.; Lemmen, M.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The present work addresses the computation of the effective thermal and mechanical properties of a honeycombcore sandwich panel. The panel considered has a hexagon-cell honeycomb core. An alternative method, based on the Gebhart factors within a hexagonal cell, is presented in addition to the

  17. Effect of Hydration State of Martian Perchlorate Salts on Their Decomposition Temperatures During Thermal Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Samuel H.; Montgomery, Wren; Kounaves, Samuel P.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2017-12-01

    Three Mars missions have analyzed the composition of surface samples using thermal extraction techniques. The temperatures of decomposition have been used as diagnostic information for the materials present. One compound of great current interest is perchlorate, a relatively recently discovered component of Mars' surface geochemistry that leads to deleterious effects on organic matter during thermal extraction. Knowledge of the thermal decomposition behavior of perchlorate salts is essential for mineral identification and possible avoidance of confounding interactions with organic matter. We have performed a series of experiments which reveal that the hydration state of magnesium perchlorate has a significant effect on decomposition temperature, with differing temperature releases of oxygen corresponding to different perchlorate hydration states (peak of O2 release shifts from 500 to 600°C as the proportion of the tetrahydrate form in the sample increases). Changes in crystallinity/crystal size may also have a secondary effect on the temperature of decomposition, and although these surface effects appear to be minor for our samples, further investigation may be warranted. A less than full appreciation of the hydration state of perchlorate salts during thermal extraction analyses could lead to misidentification of the number and the nature of perchlorate phases present.

  18. Effect of thermal ammoniation and heat treatment on the faecal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyphenol content was reduced from 1,24 to 0,55%. This study was therefore conducted to determine the effect of thermal ammoniation and heat treatment of ... high-tannin grain in the diet on the performance of growing pigs. Experimental Procedures. Digestion trial. Grain sorghum with a polyphenol content of 1,24%.

  19. effect of thermal stress of short duration on the red blood cell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ivanc

    2013-05-01

    May 1, 2013 ... surrounding environment dictates the body temperature and fish become vulnerable to unseasonal thermal changes that may occur. Acute temperature increases have been found to initiate primary as well as secondary stress response, both of which produce osmoregulatory and metabolic effects in many ...

  20. Two-dimensional finite element heat transfer model of softwood. Part I, Effective thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Hunt; Hongmei Gu

    2006-01-01

    The anisotropy of wood complicates solution of heat and mass transfer problems that require analyses be based on fundamental material properties of the wood structure. Most heat transfer models use average thermal properties across either the radial or tangential direction and do not differentiate the effects of cellular alignment, earlywood/latewood differences, or...