WorldWideScience

Sample records for effective low-energy hamiltonians

  1. Effective low-energy Hamiltonians for interacting nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinza, Michael; Ortloff, Jutta; Honerkamp, Carsten

    2010-10-01

    We present a functional renormalization group (fRG) treatment of trigonal graphene nanodisks and composites thereof, modeled by finite-size Hubbard-like Hamiltonians with honeycomb lattice structure. At half filling, the noninteracting spectrum of these structures contains a certain number of half-filled states at the Fermi level. For the case of trigonal nanodisks, including interactions between these degenerate states was argued to lead to a large ground state spin with potential spintronics applications [M. Ezawa, Eur. Phys. J. B 67, 543 (2009)10.1140/epjb/e2009-00041-7]. Here we perform a systematic fRG flow where the excited single-particle states are integrated out with a decreasing energy cutoff, yielding a renormalized low-energy Hamiltonian for the zero-energy states that includes effects of the excited levels. The numerical implementation corroborates the results obtained with a simpler Hartree-Fock treatment of the interaction effects within the zero-energy states only. In particular, for trigonal nanodisks the degeneracy of the one-particle-states with zero energy turns out to be protected against influences of the higher levels. As an explanation, we give a general argument that within this fRG scheme the zero-energy degeneracy remains unsplit under quite general conditions and for any size of the trigonal nanodisk. We also discuss a second class of nanostructures, bow-tie-shaped systems, where the zero-energy states are not protected.

  2. Analytic solutions of QCD motivated Hamiltonians at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepez, T.; Amor, A.; Hess, P.O.; Szczepaniak, A.; Civitarese, O.

    2011-01-01

    A model Hamiltonian, motivated by QCD, is investigated in order to study only the quark sector, then only the gluon sector and finally both together. Restricting to the pure quark sector and setting the mass of the quarks to zero, we find analytic solutions, involving two to three orbitals. Allowing the mass of the quarks to be different to zero, we find semi-analytic solutions involving an arbitrary number of orbitals. Afterwards, we indicate on how to incorporate gluons. (author)

  3. Effective magnetic Hamiltonians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef; Turek, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2013), s. 1997-2000 ISSN 1557-1939 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0775 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : effective magnetic Hamiltonian * ab initio * magnetic structure Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2013

  4. TDA and RPA pseudoscalar and vector solutions for the low energy regime of a motivated QCD Hamiltonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yépez-Martínez, T.; Amor Quiroz, D. A.; Hess, P. O.; Civitarese, O.

    2017-07-01

    We present the low energy meson spectrum of a Coulomb gauge QCD motivated Hamiltonian for light and strange quarks. We have used the harmonic oscillator as a trial basis and performed a pre-diagonalization of the kinetic energy term in order to get an effective basis where quark and anti-quark degrees of freedom are defined. For the relevant interactions between quarks and anti-quarks, we have implemented a confining interaction between color sources, in order to account in an effective way for the gluonic degrees of freedom. The low energy meson spectrum is obtained from the implementation of the TDA and RPA many-body-methods. The physical states have been described as TDA and RPA collective states with a relatively good agreement. Particularly, the particle-hole correlations of the RPA ground state improve the RPA pion-like state (159.7 MeV) close to its physical value while the TDA one remains at a higher energy (269.2 MeV).

  5. Implementation of rigorous renormalization group method for ground space and low-energy states of local Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brenden; Vidick, Thomas; Motrunich, Olexei I.

    2017-12-01

    The success of polynomial-time tensor network methods for computing ground states of certain quantum local Hamiltonians has recently been given a sound theoretical basis by Arad et al. [Math. Phys. 356, 65 (2017), 10.1007/s00220-017-2973-z]. The convergence proof, however, relies on "rigorous renormalization group" (RRG) techniques which differ fundamentally from existing algorithms. We introduce a practical adaptation of the RRG procedure which, while no longer theoretically guaranteed to converge, finds matrix product state ansatz approximations to the ground spaces and low-lying excited spectra of local Hamiltonians in realistic situations. In contrast to other schemes, RRG does not utilize variational methods on tensor networks. Rather, it operates on subsets of the system Hilbert space by constructing approximations to the global ground space in a treelike manner. We evaluate the algorithm numerically, finding similar performance to density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) in the case of a gapped nondegenerate Hamiltonian. Even in challenging situations of criticality, large ground-state degeneracy, or long-range entanglement, RRG remains able to identify candidate states having large overlap with ground and low-energy eigenstates, outperforming DMRG in some cases.

  6. Perturbation theory of effective Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandow, B.H.

    1975-01-01

    This paper constitutes a review of the many papers which have used perturbation theory to derive ''effective'' or ''model'' Hamiltonians. It begins with a brief review of nondegenerate and non-many-body perturbation theory, and then considers the degenerate but non-many-body problem in some detail. It turns out that the degenerate perturbation problem is not uniquely defined, but there are some practical criteria for choosing among the various possibilities. Finally, the literature dealing with the linked-cluster aspects of open-shell many-body systems is reviewed. (U.S.)

  7. Low-energy effective action for the superstring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, C.P.; Font, A.; Quevedo, F.

    1986-01-01

    We construct the low-energy D=4, N=1 supergravity that arises in superstring theories for an arbitrary number of generations. The coupling of all massless modes that carry low-energy gauge quantum numbers are calculated by truncating the heavy Kaluza-Klein modes of the ten-dimensional effective field theory. The resulting action is compared to the most general effective action compatible with the symmetries of the underlying ten-dimensional field (and string) theories. This comparison indicates which features of the truncation correctly approximate the exact low-energy action. (orig.)

  8. Low-energy operators in effective theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felline, C.; Piekarewicz, J.; Mehta, N.P.; Shepard, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Modern effective-theory techniques are applied to the nuclear many-body problem. A novel approach is proposed for the renormalization of operators in a manner consistent with the construction of the effective potential. To test this approach, a one-dimensional, yet realistic, nucleon-nucleon potential is introduced. An effective potential is then constructed by tuning its parameters to reproduce the exact effective-range expansion and a variety of bare operators are renormalized in a fashion compatible with this construction. Predictions for the expectation values of these effective operators in the ground state reproduce the results of the exact theory with remarkable accuracy (at the 0.5% level). This represents a marked improvement over a widely practiced approach that uses effective interactions but retains bare operators. Further, it is shown that this improvement is more impressive as the operator becomes more sensitive to the short-range structure of the potential. We illustrate the main ideas of this work using the elastic form factor of the deuteron as an example

  9. Low energy effective Lagrangians in open superstring theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    The low energy effective Lagrangian describes the interactions of the massless modes of String Theory. Present work is being done to obtain all alpha' 3 terms (bosonic and fermionic) by means of the known 5-point amplitudes and SUSY

  10. Effective Hamiltonian for travelling discrete breathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Robert S.; Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre

    2002-05-01

    Hamiltonian chains of oscillators in general probably do not sustain exact travelling discrete breathers. However solutions which look like moving discrete breathers for some time are not difficult to observe in numerics. In this paper we propose an abstract framework for the description of approximate travelling discrete breathers in Hamiltonian chains of oscillators. The method is based on the construction of an effective Hamiltonian enabling one to describe the dynamics of the translation degree of freedom of moving breathers. Error estimate on the approximate dynamics is also studied. The concept of the Peierls-Nabarro barrier can be made clear in this framework. We illustrate the method with two simple examples, namely the Salerno model which interpolates between the Ablowitz-Ladik lattice and the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger system, and the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain.

  11. Effective Hamiltonian for high Tc Cu oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, H.; Matsukawa, H.

    1989-01-01

    Effective Hamiltonian has been derived for CuO 2 layers in the presence of extra holes doped mainly into O-sites by taking both on-site and intersite Coulomb interaction into account. A special case with a single hole has been examined in detail. It is found that there exist various types of bound states, singlet and triplet with different spatial symmetry, below the hole bank continuum. The spatial extent of the Zhang-Rice singlet state, which is most stabilized, and the effective transfer integral between these singlet states are seen to be very sensitive to the relative magnitude of the direct and the indirect transfer integrals between O-sites. Effective Hamiltonian for the case of electron doping has also been derived

  12. Effective Hamiltonians in quantum physics: resonances and geometric phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, A R P; Uskov, D

    2006-01-01

    Effective Hamiltonians are often used in quantum physics, both in time-dependent and time-independent contexts. Analogies are drawn between the two usages, the discussion framed particularly for the geometric phase of a time-dependent Hamiltonian and for resonances as stationary states of a time-independent Hamiltonian

  13. Effective Hamiltonians for phosphorene and silicene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voon, L. C. Lew Yan; Lopez-Bezanilla, A.; Wang, J.

    2015-01-01

    We derived the effective Hamiltonians for silicene and phosphorene with strain, electric field andmagnetic field using the method of invariants. Our paper extends the work of Geissler et al 2013 (NewJ. Phys. 15 085030) on silicene, and Li and Appelbaum 2014 (Phys. Rev. B 90, 115439) on phosphorene.......For phosphorene, it is shown that the bands near the Brillouin zone center only have terms ineven powers of the wave vector. We predict that the energies change quadratically in the presence of aperpendicular external electric field but linearly in a perpendicular magnetic field, as opposed to thosefor silicene...

  14. Effective Hamiltonians for phosphorene and silicene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L C; Lopez-Bezanilla, A; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Willatzen, M

    2015-01-01

    We derived the effective Hamiltonians for silicene and phosphorene with strain, electric field and magnetic field using the method of invariants. Our paper extends the work of Geissler et al 2013 (New J. Phys. 15 085030) on silicene, and Li and Appelbaum 2014 (Phys. Rev. B 90, 115439) on phosphorene. Our Hamiltonians are compared to an equivalent one for graphene. For silicene, the expression for band warping is obtained analytically and found to be of different order than for graphene. We prove that a uniaxial strain does not open a gap, resolving contradictory numerical results in the literature. For phosphorene, it is shown that the bands near the Brillouin zone center only have terms in even powers of the wave vector. We predict that the energies change quadratically in the presence of a perpendicular external electric field but linearly in a perpendicular magnetic field, as opposed to those for silicene which vary linearly in both cases. Preliminary ab initio calculations for the intrinsic band structures have been carried out in order to evaluate some of the k⋅p parameters. (paper)

  15. Developing effective rockfall protection barriers for low energy impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentani, Alessio; Giacomini, Anna; Buzzi, Olivier; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Fityus, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Recently, important progresses have been made towards the development of high capacity rockfall barriers (100 kJ - 8000 kJ). The interest of researchers and practitioners is now turning to the development of fences of minor capacity, whose use becomes essential in areas where rockfall events generally have low intensity and the use of high capacity barriers would be accompanied by excessive costs and high environmental impact. Low energy barriers can also provide a cost-effective solution even in areas where high energies events are expected. Results of full-scale tests are vital to any investigation on the behaviour of these structures. An experimental set-up has been developed at The University of Newcastle (AUS), to investigate the response of low energy rockfall barrier prototypes to low energy impacts. The Australian territory, and in particular New South Wales, is in fact characterised by rockfall events of low-to-medium intensity (50 kJ - 500 kJ) and the need of protection structures working within such energy range, is particularly felt [1]. The experiments involved the impact of a test block onto three spans, low energy barrier prototypes, made of steel structural posts, fully fixed at the base, side cables and a steel meshwork constituted by a double twist hexagonal wire net [2]. Test data enabled the development, calibration and assessment of FE models [3], on which non-linear and dynamic analyses have been performed addressing the effect of the block size. Results have shown that the response of the structure is strongly governed by the net. Data from tests conducted on the sole net and on the entire barrier showed in fact a similar trend, different to what typically observed for high capacity barriers, whose behaviour is also led by the presence of uphill cables and brakes. In particular, the numerical analyses have demonstrated a dependence of the net performance on the block size. In particular, a loss of capacity in the order of 50% occurred as the

  16. Analysis of parity violating nuclear effects at low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desplanques, B; Missimer, J [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1978-05-15

    The authors present an analysis of parity-violating nuclear effects at low energy which attempts to circumvent the uncertainties due to the weak and strong nucleon-nucleon interactions at short distances. Extending Danilov's parametrization of the parity-violating nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude, they introduce six parameters: one for the long-range contribution due to the pion exchange and five for the shorter-range contributions. This choice gives an accurate representation of parity-violating effects in the nucleon-nucleon system up to a lab energy of 75 MeV. For calculations in nuclei, an effective two-body potential is derived in terms of the parameters. The analysis of presently measured effects shows that they are consistent, and, in particular, that the circular polarization of photons in n + p ..-->.. d + ..gamma.. is not incompatible with the other measurements. It does not imply a dominant isotensor component.

  17. Effective hamiltonian calculations using incomplete model spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, S.; Mukherjee, D.

    1987-01-01

    It appears that the danger of encountering ''intruder states'' is substantially reduced if an effective hamiltonian formalism is developed for incomplete model spaces (IMS). In a Fock-space approach, the proof a ''connected diagram theorem'' is fairly straightforward with exponential-type of ansatze for the wave-operator W, provided the normalization chosen for W is separable. Operationally, one just needs a suitable categorization of the Fock-space operators into ''diagonal'' and ''non-diagonal'' parts that is generalization of the corresponding procedure for the complete model space. The formalism is applied to prototypical 2-electron systems. The calculations have been performed on the Cyber 205 super-computer. The authors paid special attention to an efficient vectorization for the construction and solution of the resulting coupled non-linear equations

  18. Effective hamiltonian within the microscopic unitary nuclear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.I.; Blokhin, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    Within the microscopic version of the unitary collective model with the horizontal mixing the effective Hamiltonian for 18 O and 18 Ne nuclei is constructed. The algebraic structure of the Hamiltonian is compared to the familiar phenomenological ones with the SU(3)-mixing terms which describe the coupled rotational and vibrational spectra. The Hamiltonian, including central nuclear and Coulomb interaction, is diagonalized on the basis of three SU(3) irreducible representations with two orbital symmetries. 32 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  19. Geometric low-energy effective action in a doubled spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chen-Te; Pezzella, Franco

    2018-05-01

    The ten-dimensional supergravity theory is a geometric low-energy effective theory and the equations of motion for its fields can be obtained from string theory by computing β functions. With d compact dimensions, an O (d , d ; Z) geometric structure can be added to it giving the supergravity theory with T-duality manifest. In this paper, this is constructed through the use of a suitable star product whose role is the one to implement the weak constraint on the fields and the gauge parameters in order to have a closed gauge symmetry algebra. The consistency of the action here proposed is based on the orthogonality of the momenta associated with fields in their triple star products in the cubic terms defined for d ≥ 1. This orthogonality holds also for an arbitrary number of star products of fields for d = 1. Finally, we extend our analysis to the double sigma model, non-commutative geometry and open string theory.

  20. Effective Hamiltonian within the microscopic unitary nuclear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Blokhin, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    A technique of projecting the microscopic nuclear Hamiltonian on the SU(3)-group enveloping algebra is developed. The approach proposed is based on the effective Hamiltonian restored from the matrix elements between the coherent states of the SU(3) irreducible representations. The technique is displayed for almost magic nuclei within the mixed representation basis, and for arbitrary nuclei within the single representation. 40 refs

  1. An effective Hamiltonian approach to quantum random walk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... Abstract. In this article we present an effective Hamiltonian approach for discrete time quantum random walk. A form of the Hamiltonian for one-dimensional quantum walk has been prescribed, utilizing the fact that Hamil- tonians are generators of time translations. Then an attempt has been made to ...

  2. Probing quark mass effects in low-energy hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditsche, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Since quarks are confined inside hadrons, their properties as well as their contributions to hadronic observables can be assessed by indirect methods only. As the strength of the strong interaction increases with the spatial distance, the treatment of quantum chromodynamics at low energies in general requires non-perturbative methods like dispersion relations or lattice gauge theory. Based on the fact that the light quark masses are very small with respect to the typical hadronic mass scales for mesons and baryons, furthermore effective field theories can be constructed to describe low-energy properties and dynamics of hadrons perturbatively. The present work is concerned with two particularly interesting hadronic processes that are closely related to the light quark masses. Although distinct theoretical frameworks utilizing different calculational techniques are applied, in both cases the investigations at hand are prerequisites for high-precision analyses of the respective quark-mass effects. In the first part of this thesis, we investigate higher-order isospin-breaking effects in η→3π decays, namely η→π 0 π + π - and η→3π 0 , in chiral perturbation theory. By evaluating the second-order mixed strong and electromagnetic isospin-breaking corrections, we confirm the picture that the electromagnetic contributions are small. Therefore, η→3π is perfectly suited to extract isospin-breaking ratios of light quark masses via comparing theoretical predictions with experimental results. Since for an accurate determination a detailed description of the Dalitz plot distributions is necessary, we study the different effects of higher-order isospin breaking in η→3π on a more general basis. In particular, we investigate corrections to isospin relations between both decay channels at the level of Dalitz plot parameters, showing that the branching ratio of the two partial decay widths entails sizeable uncertainties. In the second part, we develop a dispersive

  3. Channeling effect for low energy ion implantation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, K.; Allen, W.R.; Finstad, T.G.; Chu, W.K.; Liu, J.; Wortman, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Ion implantation is one of the most important processes in semiconductor device fabrication. Due to the crystalline nature of Si, channeling of implanted ions occurs during this process. Modern devices become smaller and shallower and therefore require ion implantation at lower energies. The effect of channeling on ion implantation becomes a significant problem for low energy ion implantation. The critical angle for axial and planar channeling increases with decreasing energy. This corresponds to an increased probability for channeling with lowering of ion energy. The industry approach to avoid the channeling problem is to employ a tilt angle of 7 0 between the ion implantation direction and the surface normal. We approach the problem by mapping major crystalline axes and planes near the [100] surface normal. Our analysis indicates that a 7 0 tilt is not an optimum selection in channeling reduction. Tilt angles in the range 5 0 to 6 0 combined with 7 0 +- 0.5 0 rotation from the (100) plane are better selections for the reduction of the channeling effect. The range of suitable angles is a function of the implantation energy. Implantations of boron along well specified crystallographic directions have been carried out by careful alignment and the resulting boron profiles measured by SIMS. (orig.)

  4. Coulomb effects in low-energy nuclear fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Francis F.; John, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    Early versions of the Langley nuclear fragmentation code NUCFRAG (and a publicly released version called HZEFRG1) assumed straight-line trajectories throughout the interaction. As a consequence, NUCFRAG and HZEFRG1 give unrealistic cross sections for large mass removal from the projectile and target at low energies. A correction for the distortion of the trajectory by the nuclear Coulomb fields is used to derive fragmentation cross sections. A simple energy-loss term is applied to estimate the energy downshifts that greatly alter the Coulomb trajectory at low energy. The results, which are far more realistic than prior versions of the code, should provide the data base for future transport calculations. The systematic behavior of charge-removal cross sections compares favorably with results from low-energy experiments.

  5. The Effective Hamiltonian in the Scalar Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dineykhan, M D; Zhaugasheva, S A; Sakhyev, S K

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of an investigation of the asymptotic behaviour of the polarization loop for the scalar particles in the external electromagnetic field the relativistic corrections to the Hamiltonian are determined. The constituent mass of the particles in the bound state is analytically derived. It is shown that the constituent mass of the particles differs from the mass of the particles in the free state. The corrections connected with the Thomas precession have been calculated.

  6. Low energy He+ irradiation effect on graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, E.; Nakamura, K.G.; Kitajima, M.; Kawabe, T.

    1992-01-01

    Study on the lattice disordering and the secondary electron emission under low energy (1-5keV) He + irradiation is reported. Real-time Raman measurements show that difference in the observed Raman spectra for different ion energies is due to the difference of the damage depth. The relation between the observed Raman spectrum and the depth profile of lattice damage is discussed. Energy dependence of the secondary electron emission coefficient are also described. (author)

  7. Does the effective Lagrangian for low-energy QCD scale?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birse, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is not an approximately scale-invariant theory. Hence a dilaton field is not expected to provide a good description of the low-energy dynamics associated with the gluon condensate. Even if such a field is introduced, it remains almost unchanged in hadronic matter at normal densities. This is because the large glueball mass together with the size of the phenomenological gluon condensate ensure that changes to that condensate are very small at such densities. Any changes in hadronic masses and decay constants in matter generated by that condensate will be much smaller than those produced directly by changes in the quark condensate. Hence, masses and decay constants are not expected to display a universal scaling. (author)

  8. Effective Hamiltonian for protected edge states in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Deshpande, H.

    2017-01-01

    Edge states in topological insulators (TIs) disperse symmetrically about one of the time-reversal invariant momenta Λ in the Brillouin zone (BZ) with protected degeneracies at Λ. Commonly TIs are distinguished from trivial insulators by the values of one or multiple topological invariants that require an analysis of the bulk band structure across the BZ. We propose an effective two-band Hamiltonian for the electronic states in graphene based on a Taylor expansion of the tight-binding Hamiltonian about the time-reversal invariant M point at the edge of the BZ. This Hamiltonian provides a faithful description of the protected edge states for both zigzag and armchair ribbons, though the concept of a BZ is not part of such an effective model. In conclusion, we show that the edge states are determined by a band inversion in both reciprocal and real space, which allows one to select Λ for the edge states without affecting the bulk spectrum.

  9. Effect of projectile on incomplete fusion reactions at low energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vijay R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Present work deals with the experimental studies of incomplete fusion reaction dynamics at energies as low as ≈ 4 - 7 MeV/A. Excitation functions populated via complete fusion and/or incomplete fusion processes in 12C+175Lu, and 13C+169Tm systems have been measured within the framework of PACE4 code. Data of excitation function measurements on comparison with different projectile-target combinations suggest the existence of ICF even at slightly above barrier energies where complete fusion (CF is supposed to be the sole contributor, and further demonstrates strong projectile structure dependence of ICF. The incomplete fusion strength functions for 12C+175Lu, and 13C+169Tm systems are analyzed as a function of various physical parameters at a constant vrel ≈ 0.053c. It has been found that one neutron (1n excess projectile 13C (as compared to 12C results in less incomplete fusion contribution due to its relatively large negative α-Q-value, hence, α Q-value seems to be a reliable parameter to understand the ICF dynamics at low energies. In order to explore the reaction modes on the basis of their entry state spin population, the spin distribution of residues populated via CF and/or ICF in 16O+159Tb system has been done using particle-γ coincidence technique. CF-α and ICF-α channels have been identified from backward (B and forward (F α-gated γspectra, respectively. Reaction dependent decay patterns have been observed in different α emitting channels. The CF channels are found to be fed over a broad spin range, however, ICF-α channels was observed only for high-spin states. Further, the existence of incomplete fusion at low bombarding energies indicates the possibility to populate high spin states

  10. Effect of projectile on incomplete fusion reactions at low energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Kumar, R.; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Prasad, R.

    2017-11-01

    Present work deals with the experimental studies of incomplete fusion reaction dynamics at energies as low as ≈ 4 - 7 MeV/A. Excitation functions populated via complete fusion and/or incomplete fusion processes in 12C+175Lu, and 13C+169Tm systems have been measured within the framework of PACE4 code. Data of excitation function measurements on comparison with different projectile-target combinations suggest the existence of ICF even at slightly above barrier energies where complete fusion (CF) is supposed to be the sole contributor, and further demonstrates strong projectile structure dependence of ICF. The incomplete fusion strength functions for 12C+175Lu, and 13C+169Tm systems are analyzed as a function of various physical parameters at a constant vrel ≈ 0.053c. It has been found that one neutron (1n) excess projectile 13C (as compared to 12C) results in less incomplete fusion contribution due to its relatively large negative α-Q-value, hence, α Q-value seems to be a reliable parameter to understand the ICF dynamics at low energies. In order to explore the reaction modes on the basis of their entry state spin population, the spin distribution of residues populated via CF and/or ICF in 16O+159Tb system has been done using particle-γ coincidence technique. CF-α and ICF-α channels have been identified from backward (B) and forward (F) α-gated γspectra, respectively. Reaction dependent decay patterns have been observed in different α emitting channels. The CF channels are found to be fed over a broad spin range, however, ICF-α channels was observed only for high-spin states. Further, the existence of incomplete fusion at low bombarding energies indicates the possibility to populate high spin states

  11. Error Estimates for the Approximation of the Effective Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilli, Fabio; Capuzzo Dolcetta, Italo; Gomes, Diogo A.

    2008-01-01

    We study approximation schemes for the cell problem arising in homogenization of Hamilton-Jacobi equations. We prove several error estimates concerning the rate of convergence of the approximation scheme to the effective Hamiltonian, both in the optimal control setting and as well as in the calculus of variations setting

  12. Low-energy irradiation effects of gas cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houzumi, Shingo; Takeshima, Keigo; Mochiji, Kozo; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2007-01-01

    A cluster-ion irradiation system with cluster-size selection has been developed to study the effects of the cluster size for surface processes using cluster ions. A permanent magnet with a magnetic field of 1.2 T is installed for size separation of large cluster ions. Trace formations at HOPG surface by the irradiation with size-selected Ar-cluster ions under acceleration energy of 30 keV were investigated by a scanning tunneling microscopy. Generation behavior of the crater-like traces is strongly affected by the number of constituent atoms (cluster size) of the irradiating cluster ion. When the incident cluster ion is composed of 100-3000 atoms, crater-like traces are observed on the irradiated surfaces. In contrast, such traces are not observed at all with the irradiation of the cluster-ions composed of over 5000 atoms. Such the behavior is discussed on the basis of the kinetic energy per constituent atom of the cluster ion. To study GCIB irradiation effects against macromolecule, GCIB was irradiated on DNA molecules absorbed on graphite surface. By the GCIB irradiation, much more DNA molecules was sputtered away as compared with the monomer-ion irradiation. (author)

  13. The effects of low-energy scattering on positron implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritley, K.A. (Dept. of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)); Lynn, K.G.; Ghosh, V.; Welch, D.O. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Existing Monte Carlo models are capable of simulating the behavior of positrons incident at keV energies, then following the energy loss process to arbitrary final kinetic energies of from 20 eV to 100 eV. This work describes a Monte Carlo simulation of the final stages of positron thermalization in Al, from 25 eV to thermal energies, via the mechanisms of conduction-electron and longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering. The latter stages of thermalization can have important effects on the stopping profiles and mean depth. A novel way to obtain information about positron energy loss by considering the time-evolution of a point-concentration (delta-function distribution) of positrons is described. The effects of a positive positron work function are examined for the first time in the context of a positron Monte Carlo calculation. Finally, some issues relating to the agreement of Monte Carlo calculations with experimental data are discussed. 6 figs., 16 refs.

  14. The effects of low-energy scattering on positron implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritley, K.A. [Dept. of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Lynn, K.G.; Ghosh, V.; Welch, D.O. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Existing Monte Carlo models are capable of simulating the behavior of positrons incident at keV energies, then following the energy loss process to arbitrary final kinetic energies of from 20 eV to 100 eV. This work describes a Monte Carlo simulation of the final stages of positron thermalization in Al, from 25 eV to thermal energies, via the mechanisms of conduction-electron and longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering. The latter stages of thermalization can have important effects on the stopping profiles and mean depth. A novel way to obtain information about positron energy loss by considering the time-evolution of a point-concentration (delta-function distribution) of positrons is described. The effects of a positive positron work function are examined for the first time in the context of a positron Monte Carlo calculation. Finally, some issues relating to the agreement of Monte Carlo calculations with experimental data are discussed. 6 figs., 16 refs.

  15. Vacuum polarization effects in low-energy muonic atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, V.S.

    1995-01-01

    We estimate the vacuum polarization (VP) correction to the Coulomb interaction in collisions of muonic atoms. It is shown that the VP effect, amplified by the low-lying virtual state var-epsilon var-theta ∼10 eV, is of the order of ∼1--2 % in the S-wave cross sections for pμ+p collisions as var-epsilon ≤ var-epsilon var-theta . The VP amplitude becomes comparable to the anomalously small pure Coulomb amplitude for the singlet tμ+t scattering as var-epsilon →0 and near the Ramsauer-Townsend minima in the dμ+p and tμ+p scattering

  16. arXiv Lightcone Effective Hamiltonians and RG Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Katz, Emanuel; Vitale, Lorenzo G.; Walters, Matthew T.

    We present a prescription for an effective lightcone (LC) Hamiltonian that includes the effects of zero modes, focusing on the case of Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) deformed by relevant operators. We show how the prescription resolves a number of issues with LC quantization, including i) the apparent non-renormalization of the vacuum, ii) discrepancies in critical values of bare parameters in equal-time vs LC quantization, and iii) an inconsistency at large N in CFTs with simple AdS duals. We describe how LC quantization can drastically simplify Hamiltonian truncation methods applied to some large N CFTs, and discuss how the prescription identifies theories where these simplifications occur. We demonstrate and check our prescription in a number of examples.

  17. Entangled trajectories Hamiltonian dynamics for treating quantum nuclear effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brendan; Akimov, Alexey V.

    2018-04-01

    A simple and robust methodology, dubbed Entangled Trajectories Hamiltonian Dynamics (ETHD), is developed to capture quantum nuclear effects such as tunneling and zero-point energy through the coupling of multiple classical trajectories. The approach reformulates the classically mapped second-order Quantized Hamiltonian Dynamics (QHD-2) in terms of coupled classical trajectories. The method partially enforces the uncertainty principle and facilitates tunneling. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by studying the dynamics in symmetric double well and cubic metastable state potentials. The methodology is validated using exact quantum simulations and is compared to QHD-2. We illustrate its relationship to the rigorous Bohmian quantum potential approach, from which ETHD can be derived. Our simulations show a remarkable agreement of the ETHD calculation with the quantum results, suggesting that ETHD may be a simple and inexpensive way of including quantum nuclear effects in molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Effectively semi-relativistic Hamiltonians of nonrelativistic form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Schoeberl, F.F.; Moser, M.

    1993-12-01

    We construct effective Hamiltonians which despite their apparently nonrelativistic form incorporate relativistic effects by involving parameters which depend on the relevant momentum. For some potentials the corresponding energy eigenvalues may be determined analytically. Applied to two-particle bound states, it turns out that in this way a nonrelativistic treatment may indeed be able to simulate relativistic effects. Within the framework of hadron spectroscopy, this lucky circumstance may be an explanation for the sometimes extremely good predictions of nonrelativistic potential models even in relativistic regions. (authors)

  19. The effect of low energy protons on silicon solar cells with simulated coverglass cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasner, S.; Anspaugh, B.; Francis, R.; Marvin, D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a series of low-energy proton (LEP) tests are presented. The purpose of the tests was to investigate the effect of low-energy protons on the electrical performance of solar cells with simulated cracked covers. The results of the tests were then related to the space environment. A matrix of LEP tests was set up using solar cells with simulated cracks to determine the effect on electrical performance as a function of fluence, energy, crack width, coverglass adhesive shielding, crack location, and solar cell size. The results of the test were, for the most part, logical, and consistent.

  20. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Decelerated ultra-low energy ion beam bombarded naked DNA. • DNA form change induced by ion bombardment was investigated. • N-ion bombardment at 32 eV induced DNA single and double strand breaks. • Ar-ion bombardment at a-few-hundreds eV induced DNA single strand break. - Abstract: Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  1. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Decelerated ultra-low energy ion beam bombarded naked DNA. • DNA form change induced by ion bombardment was investigated. • N-ion bombardment at 32 eV induced DNA single and double strand breaks. • Ar-ion bombardment at a-few-hundreds eV induced DNA single strand break. - Abstract: Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms

  2. Effect of the space-charge force on tracking at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present tracking results for the SSC's Low Energy Booster at injection energy, including the effect of the space-charge force. The bunches are assumed to be gaussian with elliptical cross-section. Magnet errors and sextupoles are not included, but an RF cavity is. The authors compare the phase space with and without synchrotron oscillations, with and without space-charge. The effective emittance is not significantly altered. They also present results on tune shifts with amplitude

  3. Low-energy effective action in two-dimensional SQED: a two-loop analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, I. B.

    2017-07-01

    We study two-loop quantum corrections to the low-energy effective actions in N=(2,2) and N=(4,4) SQED on the Coulomb branch. In the latter model, the low-energy effective action is described by a generalized Kähler potential which depends on both chiral and twisted chiral superfields. We demonstrate that this generalized Kähler potential is one-loop exact and corresponds to the N=(4,4) sigma-model with torsion presented by Roček, Schoutens and Sevrin [1]. In the N=(2,2) SQED, the effective Kähler potential is not protected against higher-loop quantum corrections. The two-loop quantum corrections to this potential and the corresponding sigma-model metric are explicitly found.

  4. Classical effective Hamiltonians, Wigner functions, and the sign problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    In the functional-integral technique an auxiliary field, coupled to appropriate operators such as spins, linearizes the interaction term in a quantum many-body system. The partition function is then averaged over this time-dependent stochastic field. Quantum Monte Carlo methods evaluate this integral numerically, but suffer from the sign (or phase) problem: the integrand may not be positive definite (or not real). It is shown that, in certain cases that include the many-band Hubbard model and the Heisenberg model, the sign problem is inevitable on fundamental grounds. Here, Monte Carlo simulations generate a distribution of incompatible operators---a Wigner function---from which expectation values and correlation functions are to be calculated; in general no positive-definite distribution of this form exists. The distribution of time-averaged auxiliary fields is the convolution of this operator distribution with a Gaussian of variance proportional to temperature, and is interpreted as a Boltzmann distribution exp(-βV eff ) in classical configuration space. At high temperatures and large degeneracies this classical effective Hamiltonian V eff tends to the static approximation as a classical limit. In the low-temperature limit the field distribution becomes a Wigner function, the sign problem occurs, and V eff is complex. Interpretations of the distributions, and a criterion for their positivity, are discussed. The theory is illustrated by an exact evaluation of the Wigner function for spin s and the effective classical Hamiltonian for the spin-1/2 van der Waals model. The field distribution can be negative here, more noticeably if the number of spins is odd

  5. The orbifolder: A tool to study the low energy effective theory of heterotic orbifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilles, H.P.; Wingerter, A.

    2011-10-01

    The orbifolder is a program developed in C ++ that computes and analyzes the low-energy effective theory of heterotic orbifold compactifications. The program includes routines to compute the massless spectrum, to identify the allowed couplings in the superpotential, to automatically generate large sets of orbifold models, to identify phenomenologically interesting models (e.g. MSSM-like models) and to analyze their vacuum-configurations. (orig.)

  6. The orbifolder. A tool to study the low energy effective theory of heterotic orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilles, H P [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, S [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Vaudrevange, P K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics, Muenchen (Germany); Wingerter, A [CNRS/IN2P3, INPG, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2011-10-15

    The orbifolder is a program developed in C{sup ++} that computes and analyzes the low-energy effective theory of heterotic orbifold compactifications. The program includes routines to compute the massless spectrum, to identify the allowed couplings in the superpotential, to automatically generate large sets of orbifold models, to identify phenomenologically interesting models (e.g. MSSM-like models) and to analyze their vacuum-configurations. (orig.)

  7. Functional integral and effective Hamiltonian t-J-V model of strongly correlated electron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinicher, V.I.; Chertkov, M.V.

    1990-09-01

    The functional integral representation for the generating functional of t-J-V model is obtained. In the case close to half filling this functional integral representation reduces the conventional Hamiltonian of t-J-V model to the Hamiltonian of the system containing holes and spins 1/2 at each lattice size. This effective Hamiltonian coincides with that one obtained one of the authors by different method. This Hamiltonian and its dynamical variables can be used for description of different magnetic phases of t-J-V model. (author). 16 refs

  8. The effective QCD theory at low energy; La theorie effective de QCD a basse energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1995-12-31

    Quantum chromodynamics is studied here in the range of low energies. The Chiral perturbation theory is presented, this theory is based on a thorough study of QCD symmetry, of general field theory principles and of S-matrices. Ward identities are defined within the scope of current algebras and by using functional method. Their consequences on Chiral structure of QCD emptiness and on strong interaction at low energies are studied. The pion-pion diffusion at low energies is treated as an example. (A.C.) 70 refs.

  9. On low-energy effective action in three-dimensional = 2 and = 4 supersymmetric electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Merzlikin, B. S.; Samsonov, I. B.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss general structure of low-energy effective actions in = 2 and = 4 three-dimensional supersymmetric electrodynamics (SQED) in gauge superfield sector. There are specific terms in the effective action having no four-dimensional analogs. Some of these terms are responsible for the moduli space metric in the Coulomb branch of the theory. We find two-loop quantum corrections to the moduli space metric in the = 2 SQED and show that in the = 4 SQED the moduli space does not receive two-loop quantum corrections.

  10. Lens effect of unipolar electrostatic steerers on low-energy ion beams and its effective reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asozu, Takuhiro; Matsuda, Makoto; Kutsukake, Kenichi

    2010-08-01

    The JAEA-Tokai tandem accelerator has two ion injectors, one is the negative ion injector placed on the ground and the other is the positive ion injector in the high voltage terminal. The electrostatic steerers in the high voltage terminal are used for ion beams from the both injectors. Because the beams from the negative ion injector gain high energy at the 20MV terminal, the electrodes of the electrostatic steerers are designed to be supplied several ten kV. The high voltages are supplied by two unipolar DC power supplies and they are controlled as the sum of the voltages keeps constant. The high electric potential between the electrodes affects the beam trajectory as an electrostatic lens. The potential must be too high for the low energy ion beams from the positive ion injector on the 100kV deck. We simulated the beam trajectory by calculation and evaluated the strength of the lens effects. The results showed that the focal distances were too short to control the beam form positive ion injector using optical devices in the downstream. If we reduce the voltages to one tenth in simulation, then the focusing effects were much less significant. We installed a multiplying factor circuit to make the voltages variable and much lower. The results of beam-handling tests using the circuit actually showed significant increase of the ion beam current. (author)

  11. The low-energy effective theory of QCD at small quark masses in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, Christoph

    2010-01-15

    At low energies the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can be described effectively in terms of the lightest particles of the theory, the pions. This approximation is valid for temperatures well below the mass difference of the pions to the next heavier particles. We study the low-energy effective theory at very small quark masses in a finite volume V. The corresponding perturbative expansion in 1/{radical}(V) is called {epsilon} expansion. At each order of this expansion a finite number of low-energy constants completely determine the effective theory. These low-energy constants are of great phenomenological importance. In the leading order of the {epsilon} expansion, called {epsilon} regime, the theory becomes zero-dimensional and is therefore described by random matrix theory (RMT). The dimensionless quantities of RMT are mapped to dimensionful quantities of the low-energy effective theory using the leading-order lowenergy constants {sigma} and F. In this way {sigma} and F can be obtained from lattice QCD simulations in the '' regime by a fit to RMT predictions. For typical volumes of state-of-the-art lattice QCD simulations, finite-volume corrections to the RMT prediction cannot be neglected. These corrections can be calculated in higher orders of the {epsilon} expansion. We calculate the finite-volume corrections to {sigma} and F at next-to-next-to-leading order in the {epsilon} expansion. We also discuss non-universal modifications of the theory due to the finite volume. These results are then applied to lattice QCD simulations, and we extract {sigma} and F from eigenvalue correlation functions of the Dirac operator. As a side result, we provide a proof of equivalence between the parametrization of the partially quenched low-energy effective theory without singlet particle and that of the super-Riemannian manifold used earlier in the literature. Furthermore, we calculate a special version of the massless sunset diagram at finite volume without

  12. Effect of Low-Energy Linear Shockwave Therapy on Erectile Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojecki, Grzegorz L; Thiessen, Stefan; Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown that focal low-energy extracorporeal shockwave therapy (Li-ESWT) can have a positive effect in men with erectile dysfunction (ED). Linear Li-ESWT (LLi-ESWT) for ED has not been previously assessed in a randomized trial. AIM: To evaluate the treatment...... MEASURES: The primary outcome measurement was an increase of at least five points on the IIEF-EF score. The secondary outcome measurement was an increased EHS score to at least 3 in men with a score no higher than 2 at baseline. Data were analyzed by linear and logistic regression. RESULTS: Mean IIEF...

  13. Effect of passive cooling strategies on overheating in low energy residential buildings for Danish climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Avantaggiato, Marta; de Carli, Michele

    2014-01-01

    creating not negligible thermal discomfort. In the present work the effect of passive strategies, such as solar shading and natural night-time ventilation, are evaluated through computer simulations. The analyses are performed for 1½-storey single-family house in Copenhagen’s climate. The main result......Climate changes have progressively produced an increase of outdoors temperature resulting in tangible warmer summers even in cold climate regions. An increased interest for passive cooling strategies is rising in order to overcome the newly low energy buildings’ overheating issue. The growing level...

  14. Moment methods with effective nuclear Hamiltonians; calculations of radial moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belehrad, R.H.

    1981-02-01

    A truncated orthogonal polynomial expansion is used to evaluate the expectation value of the radial moments of the one-body density of nuclei. The expansion contains the configuration moments, , , and 2 >, where R/sup (k)/ is the operator for the k-th power of the radial coordinate r, and H is the effective nuclear Hamiltonian which is the sum of the relative kinetic energy operator and the Bruckner G matrix. Configuration moments are calculated using trace reduction formulae where the proton and neutron orbitals are treated separately in order to find expectation values of good total isospin. The operator averages are taken over many-body shell model states in the harmonic oscillator basis where all particles are active and single-particle orbitals through six major shells are included. The radial moment expectation values are calculated for the nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca, and 58 Ni and find that is usually the largest term in the expansion giving a large model space dependence to the results. For each of the 3 nuclei, a model space is found which gives the desired rms radius and then we find that the other 5 lowest moments compare favorably with other theoretical predictions. Finally, we use a method of Gordon (5) to employ the lowest 6 radial moment expectation values in the calculation of elastic electron scattering from these nuclei. For low to moderate momentum transfer, the results compare favorably with the experimental data

  15. The mass effect model of the survival rate's dose effect of organism irradiated with low energy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Gui Qifu; Yu Zengliang

    1995-01-01

    The main characteristic of the low energy ions mutation is its mass deposition effect. Basing on the theory of 'double strand breaking' and the 'mass deposition effect', the authors suggests that the mass deposition products can repair or further damage the double strand breaking of DNA. According to this consideration the dose effect model of the survival rate of organism irradiated by low energy of N + ion beam is deduced as: S exp{-p[αφ + βφ 2 -Rφ 2 exp(-kφ)-Lφ 3 exp(-kφ)]}, which can be called 'mass effect model'. In the low energy ion beam mutation, the dose effects of many survival rates that can not be imitated by previous models are successfully imitated by this model. The suitable application fields of the model are also discussed

  16. Effective Hamiltonian theory: recent formal results and non-nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandow, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    Effective Hamiltonian theory is discussed from the points of view of the unitary transformation method and degenerate perturbation theory. It is shown that the two approaches are identical term by term. The main features of a formulation of the coupled-cluster method for open-shell systems are outlined. Finally, recent applications of the many-body linked-cluster form of degenerate perturbation theory are described: the derivation of effective spin Hamiltonians in magnetic insulator systems, the derivation and calculation ab initio of effective π-electron Hamiltonians for planar conjugated hydrocarbon molecules, and understanding the so-called valence fluctuation phenomenon exhibited by certain rare earth compounds

  17. The orbifolder: A tool to study the low-energy effective theory of heterotic orbifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilles, H. P.; Ramos-Sánchez, S.; Vaudrevange, P. K. S.; Wingerter, A.

    2012-06-01

    The orbifolder is a program developed in C++ that computes and analyzes the low-energy effective theory of heterotic orbifold compactifications. The program includes routines to compute the massless spectrum, to identify the allowed couplings in the superpotential, to automatically generate large sets of orbifold models, to identify phenomenologically interesting models (e.g. MSSM-like models) and to analyze their vacuum configurations. Program summaryProgram title: orbifolder Catalogue identifier: AELR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 145 572 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 930 517 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language:C++ Computer: Personal computer Operating system: Tested on Linux (Fedora 15, Ubuntu 11, SuSE 11) Word size: 32 bits or 64 bits Classification: 11.1 External routines: Boost (http://www.boost.org/), GSL (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/) Nature of problem: Calculating the low-energy spectrum of heterotic orbifold compactifications. Solution method: Quadratic equations on a lattice; representation theory; polynomial algebra. Running time: Less than a second per model.

  18. Effects of low energy radiations on the stability of red palm oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzulkefly, K.; Zarida, Z.; Hamdan, S.

    1999-01-01

    Red palm oil (R-PO) is a new generation of cooking oil in which the carotenes are retained in the refined oil. In this study, the oxidative effects of low energy radiations (sunlight and ultra-violet radiation) on RPO were investigated. The red palm oil was exposed to sunlight and ultra-violet (UV) radiation for various time intervals. The concentrations of carotene, peroxide value (PV), conjugated diene value (CD) and free fatty acid (FFA) content were measured. The irradiation was also performed in the presence of antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Results showed that carotene contents were significantly reduced as the irradiation doses increase. The destruction of carotenes were 23.9 % and 24.1 % respectively under sunlight and UV radiation after 5 hours exposure. Measurements of PV, CD and FFA have indicated that both UV and sunlight radiations caused deterioration of red palm oil. In the presence of antioxidant, the extent of deterioration of RPO and the destruction of carotene were suppressed. This study has shown that the natural antioxidant (carotenes and tocopherols) did not give complete protection to RPO against oxidative deterioration induced by low energy radiations. Additional antioxidant (BHT) was needed to suppress the oxidative deterioration of RPO. (Author)

  19. The temperature effect of low-energy ion beam implantation on seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Shenghe; Su Mingjie; Qin Guangyong; Wu Yuping; Zhao Haizhen

    2005-01-01

    The temperature effects of low-energy ion beam implantation on the seed germination were studied. Maize dry seeds were covered with copy paper, aluminum foil and without cover, respectively. Results showed that the germination rate of the seeds covered with paper which was the bad heat transmitter was the highest among three treatments, while that covered with aluminum foil which can transmit heat energy well was the least. The germination rate of the seeds covered with nothing was the second. Temperature affected seeds germination markedly. Generally the temperature of the target room inhibited the seeds' germination. After minus the effects of the temperature in the target room, the germination rates of the seeds were modified in this paper. The modified germination rate curve was also provided. (authors)

  20. Damaging Effect of Low Energy N+ Implantation on Aspergillus niger Spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lisheng; Cai Kezhou; Cheng Maoji; Chen Lijuan; Liu Xuelan; Zhang Shuqing; Yu Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    The mutant effects of a keV range nitrogen ion (N + ) beam on enzyme-producing probiotics were studied, particularly with regard to the induction in the genome. The electron spin resonance (ESR) results showed that the signal of ESR spectrum existed in both implanted and non-implanted spores, and the yields of free radicals increased in a dose-dependent manner. The ionic etching and dilapidation of cell wall could be observed distinctly through the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mutagenic effect on genome indicated that N + implantation could make base mutation. This study provided an insight into the roles low-energy ions might play in inducing mutagenesis of micro-organisms

  1. Damaging Effect of Low Energy N{sup +} Implantation on Aspergillus niger Spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisheng, Wang [Department of Animal Science and Technology, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Kezhou, Cai [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China); Maoji, Cheng [Department of Animal Science and Technology, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Lijuan, Chen [Department of Animal Science and Technology, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Xuelan, Liu [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China); Shuqing, Zhang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China); Zengliang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2007-06-15

    The mutant effects of a keV range nitrogen ion (N{sup +}) beam on enzyme-producing probiotics were studied, particularly with regard to the induction in the genome. The electron spin resonance (ESR) results showed that the signal of ESR spectrum existed in both implanted and non-implanted spores, and the yields of free radicals increased in a dose-dependent manner. The ionic etching and dilapidation of cell wall could be observed distinctly through the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mutagenic effect on genome indicated that N{sup +} implantation could make base mutation. This study provided an insight into the roles low-energy ions might play in inducing mutagenesis of micro-organisms.

  2. Possible roles of Peccei-Quinn symmetry in an effective low energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Daijiro

    2017-12-01

    The strong C P problem is known to be solved by imposing Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry. However, the domain wall problem caused by the spontaneous breaking of its remnant discrete subgroup could make models invalid in many cases. We propose a model in which the PQ charge is assigned quarks so as to escape this problem without introducing any extra colored fermions. In the low energy effective model resulting after the PQ symmetry breaking, both the quark mass hierarchy and the CKM mixing could be explained through Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. If the model is combined with the lepton sector supplemented by an inert doublet scalar and right-handed neutrinos, the effective model reduces to the scotogenic neutrino mass model in which both the origin of neutrino masses and dark matter are closely related. The strong C P problem could be related to the quark mass hierarchy, neutrino masses, and dark matter through the PQ symmetry.

  3. Symmetry-adaptation and selection rules for effective crystal field Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszynski, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to systematically derive an effective Hamiltonian in the presence of crystal fields in such a way as to incorporate relativistic effects and higher order perturbation corrections including configuration mixing. This Hamiltonian will then be conveniently represented as a symmetry-adapted series of one- and two-body double tensor operators whose matrix elements will be analyzed for selection rules. 16 references, 4 tables

  4. Studies on biological effects of low energy N+ on ion beam implantation rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Songli; Huang Qunce; Wang Tiegu; Qin Guangyong

    2006-01-01

    Dry seeds of five varieties of rice were implanted by 25 KeV low energy N + with doses of 2.0 x 10 17 , 2.5 x 10 17 and 3.0 x 10 17 N + /cm 2 , respectively. Mutant plants were selected from their progenies and the biological effects of the mutant plants were studied. The results showed that chlorophyll content of mutant plants was higher than that of the control, and one of those is as high as 148.67% of chlorophyll content compared with the control. Isoenzyme activities (POD, CAT and SOD) of mutant plants were different from the control plants. And AFLP analysis showed that the similarity between variant plants and feminine control plants was higher than that between variant plants and masculine control plants. (authors)

  5. Temporal characteristics and saturation effects of organic scintillators to low-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, J.G.; Chase, L.F.

    1979-01-01

    Rise time, short and long term decay characteristics and possible saturation effects of the fluorescence of NE102, NE111, and doped NE111 organic scintillators were investigated using low-energy X-rays from a laser produced plasma. The laser system consisted of a pulsed Nd:glass facility operating at a pulse width of 0.2 ns at levels up to 10 J. The NE111 samples consisted of a matrix of scintillators with benzophenone, acetophenone, and piperidine each at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 percent. The rise time of NE102 was measured at (640+-50) ps while that of both the doped and undoped NE111 was 2 ns) of irradiance used in this investigation. (Auth.)

  6. The effect of interatomic potential in molecular dynamics simulation of low energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.Y.; Nordlund, K.; Peltola, J.; Gossmann, H.-J.L.; Ma, N.L.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Benistant, F.; Chan, Lap

    2005-01-01

    Being able to accurately predict dopant profiles at sub-keV implant energies is critical for the microelectronic industry. Molecular Dynamics (MD), with its capability to account for multiple interactions as energy lowers, is an increasingly popular simulation method. We report our work on sub-keV implantation using MD and investigate the effect of different interatomic potentials on the range profiles. As an approximation, only pair potentials are considered in this work. Density Functional Theory (DFT) is used to calculate the pair potentials for a wide range of dopants (B, C, N, F, Si, P, Ga, Ge, As, In and Sb) in single crystalline silicon. A commonly used repulsive potential is also included in the study. Importance of the repulsive and attractive regions of the potential has been investigated with different elements and we show that a potential depicting the right attractive forces is especially important for heavy elements at low energies

  7. Can low energy experiments supply the effective information to determine the inner structure of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo

    1980-01-01

    It is explained that the low energy experiments with high precision are important sources of information to determine the inner structure of hadrons. For such purpose, the magnetic monopole model of hadron due to Schwinger is reviewed. Appearance of the strong van der Waals force between hadrons is one of the most important consequences of such a model. A technique, which enables us to separate the effect of such a long range force from that of the short range force arising from the exchanges of pions, is introduced. Present status of the related experiments are summarized, and the experiments necessary to confirm the existence of the strong van der Waals force in a clear-cut way are explained. Possible impacts to the hadron physics, when the existence of such a long range force is confirmed, are discussed. (author)

  8. Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    大矢, 健一

    2013-01-01

    Hamiltonian Algorithm (HA) is an algorithm for searching solutions is optimization problems. This paper introduces a sound synthesis technique using Hamiltonian Algorithm and shows a simple example. "Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis" uses phase transition effect in HA. Because of this transition effect, totally new waveforms are produced.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of the angiogenic effects of low-energy shock wave therapy: roles of mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Kazuaki; Ito, Kenta; Shindo, Tomohiko; Kagaya, Yuta; Ogata, Tsuyoshi; Eguchi, Kumiko; Kurosawa, Ryo; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-energy extracorporeal cardiac shock wave (SW) therapy improves myocardial ischemia through enhanced myocardial angiogenesis in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia and in patients with refractory angina pectoris. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms for the SW-induced angiogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we thus examined the effects of SW irradiation on intracellular signaling pathways in vitro. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with 800 shots of low-energy SW (1 Hz at an energy level of 0.03 mJ/mm(2)). The SW therapy significantly upregulated mRNA expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The SW therapy also enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) and Akt. Furthermore, the SW therapy enhanced phosphorylation of caveolin-1 and the expression of HUTS-4 that represents β1-integrin activity. These results suggest that caveolin-1 and β1-integrin are involved in the SW-induced activation of angiogenic signaling pathways. To further examine the signaling pathways involved in the SW-induced angiogenesis, HUVECs were transfected with siRNA of either β1-integrin or caveolin-1. Knockdown of either caveolin-1 or β1-integrin suppressed the SW-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt and upregulation of VEGF and eNOS. Knockdown of either caveolin-1 or β1-integrin also suppressed SW-induced enhancement of HUVEC migration in scratch assay. These results suggest that activation of mechanosensors on cell membranes, such as caveolin-1 and β1-integrin, and subsequent phosphorylation of Erk and Akt may play pivotal roles in the SW-induced angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Effective Hamiltonians, two level systems, and generalized Maxwell-Bloch equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sczaniecki, L.

    1981-02-01

    A new method is proposed involving a canonical transformation leading to the non-secular part of time-independent perturbation calculus. The method is used to derive expressions for effective Shen-Walls Hamiltonians which, taken in the two-level approximation and on the inclusion of non-Hamiltonian terms into the dynamics of the system, lead to generalized Maxwell-Bloch equations. The rotating wave approximation is written anew within the framework of our formalism. (author)

  11. Path-integral isomorphic Hamiltonian for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xuecheng; Shushkov, Philip; Miller, Thomas F.

    2018-03-01

    We describe a path-integral approach for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic chemical dynamics simulations. For a general physical system with multiple electronic energy levels, a corresponding isomorphic Hamiltonian is introduced such that Boltzmann sampling of the isomorphic Hamiltonian with classical nuclear degrees of freedom yields the exact quantum Boltzmann distribution for the original physical system. In the limit of a single electronic energy level, the isomorphic Hamiltonian reduces to the familiar cases of either ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) or centroid molecular dynamics Hamiltonians, depending on the implementation. An advantage of the isomorphic Hamiltonian is that it can easily be combined with existing mixed quantum-classical dynamics methods, such as surface hopping or Ehrenfest dynamics, to enable the simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes with nuclear quantum effects. We present numerical applications of the isomorphic Hamiltonian to model two- and three-level systems, with encouraging results that include improvement upon a previously reported combination of RPMD with surface hopping in the deep-tunneling regime.

  12. Effect of low energy electron irradiation on DNA damage by Cu{sup 2+} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Ah; Cho, Hyuck [Dept. of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeun Soo [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The combined effect of the low energy electron (LEE) irradiation and Cu{sup 2+} ion on DNA damage was investigated. Lyophilized pBR322 plasmid DNA films with various concentrations (1–15 mM) of Cu{sup 2+} ion were independently irradiated by monochromatic LEEs with 5 eV. The types of DNA damage, single strand break (SSB) and double strand break (DSB), were separated and quantified by gel electrophoresis. Without electron irradiation, DNA damage was slightly increased with increasing Cu ion concentration via Fenton reaction. LEE-induced DNA damage, with no Cu ion, was only 6.6% via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process. However, DNA damage was significantly increased through the combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion, except around 9 mM Cu ion. The possible pathways of DNA damage for each of these different cases were suggested. The combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion is likely to cause increasing dissociation after elevated transient negative ion state, resulting in the enhanced DNA damage. For the decrease of DNA damage at around 9-mM Cu ion, it is assumed to be related to the structural stabilization due to DNA inter- and intra-crosslinks via Cu ion.

  13. Chemical effects of low-energy electron impact on hydrocarbons in the gas phase. II. Propene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derai, R.; Danon, J.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical effects of low-energy (3.5 to 15.0 eV) electron impact on propene were investigated. The setup used for the irradiations has previously been described. Appearance curves for stable products were determined, from which correlations between products and precursors were deduced. In the excitation range, the main precursors are the triplet state at 4.4 eV and various singlet states around 7.0 and 9.0 eV. Above the ionization potential, contribution from superexcited molecules and ions was noted. Superexcited molecules are formed with a much higher cross section than excited molecules. A reaction scheme was proposed to account for the chemical effects associated with excited states and the yields of excited molecules in dissociating states were derived from experimental data. Results concerning the fragmentation of propene excited in singlet states conform to photolysis data. The following new results were obtained: the decomposition of propene excited in the triplet state at 4.4 eV involves mainly C--C bond rupture; the decomposition processes of superexcited and excited molecules are similar. A higher degree of fragmentation is observed in the case of superexcited molecules

  14. Effect of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a low-energy (0.4 keV), short-time (2-min), heavy-dose (10 to the 18th/sq cm) hydrogen ion implant on dendritic web silicon solar cells and material was investigated. Such an implant was observed to improve the cell open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current appreciably for a number of cells. In spite of the low implant energy, measurements of internal quantum efficiency indicate that it is the base of the cell, rather than the emitter, which benefits from the hydrogen implant. This is supported by the observation that the measured minority-carrier diffusion length in the base did not change when the emitter was removed. In some cases, a threefold increase of the base diffusion length was observed after implantation. The effects of the hydrogen implantation were not changed by a thermal stress test at 250 C for 111 h in nitrogen. It is speculated that hydrogen enters the bulk by traveling along dislocations, as proposed recently for edge-defined film-fed growth silicon ribbon.

  15. Traversable Lorentzian wormholes in the vacuum low energy effective string theory in Einstein and Jordan frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, K.K.; Zhang Yuanzhong

    2004-01-01

    Three new classes (II-IV) of solutions of the vacuum low energy effective string theory in four dimensions are derived. Wormhole solutions are investigated in those solutions including the class I case both in the Einstein and in the Jordan (string) frame. It turns out that, of the eight classes of solutions investigated (four in the Einstein frame and four in the corresponding string frame), massive Lorentzian traversable wormholes exist in five classes. Nontrivial massless limit exists only in class I Einstein frame solution while none at all exists in the string frame. An investigation of test scalar charge motion in the class I solution in the two frames is carried out by using the Plebanski-Sawicki theorem. A curious consequence is that the motion around the extremal zero (Keplerian) mass configuration leads, as a result of scalar-scalar interaction, to a new hypothetical 'mass' that confines test scalar charges in bound orbits, but does not interact with neutral test particles

  16. Effects of boosting the supply temperature on pipe dimensions of low-energy district heating networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tol, Hakan; Svendsen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the dimensioning of the low-energy District Heating (DH) piping networks operating with a control philosophy of supplying heat in low-temperature such as 55 °C in supply and 25°C in return regularly while the supply temperature levels are being boosted in cold...... winter periods. The performance of the existing radiators that were formerly sized with over-dimensions was analyzed, its results being used as input data for the performance evaluation of the piping network of the low-energy DH system operating with the control philosophy in question. The optimization...

  17. A comparison of the microbicidal effectiveness of gamma rays and high and low energy electron radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallentire, Alan; Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The radiation response of spores of Bacillus pumilus were examined for irradiation with cobalt 60 photons, 10 MeV electrons and low energy electrons at 100 and 80 keV. The responses were found to be the same for all types of radiation within the measurement uncertainties and were also in agreement with a previously published value.

  18. A comparison of the microbicidal effectiveness of gamma rays and high and low energy electron radiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tallentire, A.; Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The radiation response of spores of Bacillus pumilus were examined for irradiation with cobalt 60 photons, 10 MeV electrons and low energy electrons at 100 and 80 keV. The responses were found to be the same for all types of radiation within the measurement uncertainties and were also in agreement...... with a previously published value....

  19. Track structure analysis illustrating the prominent role of low-energy electrons in radiobiological effects of low-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Monte Carlo track structure methods have been used to illustrate the importance of low-energy electrons produced by low-LET radiations. It is shown that these low-energy secondary electrons contribute substantially to the dose in all low-LET irradiations and are particularly efficient at producing highly localized clusters of atomic damage which may be responsible for a major part of the biological effectiveness of low-LET radiations. The data generated by Monte Carlo track structure techniques and by earlier semi-analytical methods based on the LET concept have been compared in terms of cumulative and differential fractions of total dose absorbed as a function of electron energy. The data show that low-energy secondary electrons account for up to nearly 50% of the total dose imparted to a medium when irradiated with electrons or photons. (author)

  20. Low-energy QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.

    1995-11-01

    After a brief introduction to chiral perturbation theory, the effective field theory of the standard model at low energies, two recent applications are reviewed: elastic pion-pion scattering to two-loop accuracy and the complete renormalized pion-nucleon Lagrangian to O(P 3 ) in the chiral expansion. (author)

  1. Projectile Coulomb center effects on low-energy electron emission from H[sup +][yields]Ne collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, S. (Centro Atomico Bariloche e Inst. Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)); Garibotti, C. (Centro Atomico Bariloche e Inst. Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina) Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)); Bernardi, G. (Centro Atomico Bariloche e Inst. Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina) Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)); Focke, P. (Centro Atomico Bariloche e Inst. Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)); Meckbach, W. (Centro Atomico Bariloche e Inst. Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina) Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina))

    1994-03-01

    We present doubly differential energy distributions of low-energy electrons emitted in collisions of 106 keV H[sup +] on Ne atoms. We find a relevant dependence of the measured distribution of low-energy electrons on the physical extension of the gas target and discuss a correction procedure. Our measurements enable a quantitative analysis of the shape of the soft electron peak, which is clearly evidenced by measured contour lines. Present results indicate that ''two center effects'' must be considered in order to account for the strong asymmetry of the soft electron peak observed experimentaly. (orig.)

  2. Effective Hamiltonian for ΔS=1 weak nonleptonic decays in the six-quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.; Wise, M.B.

    1979-01-01

    Strong-interaction corrections to the nonleptonic weak-interaction Hamiltonian are calculated in the leading-logarithmic approximation using quantum chromodynamics. Starting with a six-quark theory, the W boson, t quark, b quark, and c quark are successively considered as ''heavy'' and the effective Hamiltonian is calculated. The resulting effective Hamiltonian for strangeness-changing nonleptonic decays involves u, d, and s quarks and has possible CP-violating pieces both in the usual (V-A) x (V-A) terms and in induced, ''penguin''-type terms. Numerically, the CP-violating compared to CP-conserving parts of the latter terms are close to results calculated on the basis of the lowest-order ''penguin'' diagram

  3. Effects of virtual isobar admixtures on the low-energy spectrum of a complex nucleus - model calculations for 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecksch, E.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of a detailed analysis of the excitation spectrum of a complex nucleus in the framework of the conventional shell model theory, the paper extends this concept by adding nucleonic degrees of freedom (isobars) and by model investigations and a realistic assessment of their effects on the excited states of the low-energy spectrum. (AH) [de

  4. Immediate Dose-Response Effect of High-Energy Versus Low-Energy Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Cutaneous Microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Robert; Sorg, Heiko; Forstmeier, Vinzent; Knobloch, Karsten; Liodaki, Eirini; Stang, Felix Hagen; Mailaender, Peter; Kisch, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Elucidation of the precise mechanisms and therapeutic options of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is only at the beginning. Although immediate real-time effects of ESWT on cutaneous hemodynamics have recently been described, the dose response to different ESWT energies in cutaneous microcirculation has never been examined. Thirty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups that received either focused high-energy shock waves (group A: total of 1000 impulses, 10 J) to the lower leg of the hind limb, focused low-energy shock waves (group B: total of 300 impulses, 1 J) or placebo shock wave treatment (group C: 0 impulses, 0 J) using a multimodality shock wave delivery system (Duolith SD-1 T-Top, Storz Medical, Tägerwilen, Switzerland). Immediate microcirculatory effects were assessed with the O2C (oxygen to see) system (LEA Medizintechnik, Giessen, Germany) before and for 20 min after application of ESWT. Cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation increased significantly higher after high-energy ESWT than after low-energy and placebo ESWT (A: 29.4% vs. B: 17.3% vs. C: 3.3%; p = 0.003). Capillary blood velocity was significantly higher after high-energy ESWT and lower after low-energy ESWT versus placebo ESWT (group A: 17.8% vs. group B: -22.1% vs. group C: -5.0%, p = 0.045). Post-capillary venous filling pressure was significantly enhanced in the high-energy ESWT group in contrast to the low-energy ESWT and placebo groups (group A: 25% vs. group B: 2% vs. group C: -4%, p = 0.001). Both high-energy and low-energy ESWT affect cutaneous hemodynamics in a standard rat model. High-energy ESWT significantly increases parameters of cutaneous microcirculation immediately after application, resulting in higher tissue oxygen saturation, venous filling pressure and blood velocity, which suggests higher tissue perfusion with enhanced oxygen saturation, in contrast to low-energy as well as placebo ESWT. Low-energy ESWT also increased tissue oxygen

  5. Controlling effect of geometrically defined local structural changes on chaotic Hamiltonian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zion, Yossi; Horwitz, Lawrence

    2010-04-01

    An effective characterization of chaotic conservative Hamiltonian systems in terms of the curvature associated with a Riemannian metric tensor derived from the structure of the Hamiltonian has been extended to a wide class of potential models of standard form through definition of a conformal metric. The geodesic equations reproduce the Hamilton equations of the original potential model through an inverse map in the tangent space. The second covariant derivative of the geodesic deviation in this space generates a dynamical curvature, resulting in (energy-dependent) criteria for unstable behavior different from the usual Lyapunov criteria. We show here that this criterion can be constructively used to modify locally the potential of a chaotic Hamiltonian model in such a way that stable motion is achieved. Since our criterion for instability is local in coordinate space, these results provide a minimal method for achieving control of a chaotic system.

  6. Effective Hamiltonian and low-lying eigenenergy clustering patterns of four-sublattice antiferromagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, N.G.; Henley, C.L.; Rischel, C.

    2002-01-01

    We study the low-lying eigenenergy clustering patterns of quantum antiferromagnets with p sublattices (in particular p = 4). We treat each sublattice as a large spin, and using second-order degenerate perturbation theory, we derive the effective (biquadratic) Hamiltonian coupling the p large spins....... In order to compare with exact diagonalizations, the Hamiltonian is explicitly written for a finite-size lattice, and it contains information on energies of excited states as well as the ground state. The result is applied to the face-centered-cubic Type-I antiferromagnet of spin 1/2, including second...

  7. Effective Floquet Hamiltonian for spin I = 1 in magic angle spinning ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Floquet Hamiltonians; contact transformations in NMR; Spin-1 MAS NMR; effective Ham- iltonians. 1. Introduction. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is an important technique to study structures, dyna- mics and electric charge distribution around nuclei in solids. It is also more difficult to perform and ana-.

  8. Effect of three-body transformed Hamiltonian (H3) using full ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 90; Issue 3 ... Research Article Volume 90 Issue 3 March 2018 Article ID 36 ... Valence universal multireference coupled cluster (VUMRCC) method via eigenvalue independent partitioning has been applied to estimate the effect of three-body transformed Hamiltonian ...

  9. Effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution of point sources of low-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, C.S.; Bialobzyski, P.J.; Yu, S.K.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1990-01-01

    Perturbation in dose distributions of point sources of low-energy electrons at planar interfaces of cortical bone (CB) and red marrow (RM) was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo codes EGS and the TIGER series. Ultrathin LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the dose distributions of point sources of 204 Tl and 147 Pm in RM. When the point sources were at 12 mg/cm 2 from a planar interface of CB and RM equivalent plastics, dose enhancement ratios in RM averaged over the region 0--12 mg/cm 2 from the interface were measured to be 1.08±0.03 (SE) and 1.03±0.03 (SE) for 204 Tl and 147 Pm, respectively. The Monte Carlo codes predicted 1.05±0.02 and 1.01±0.02 for the two nuclides, respectively. However, EGS gave consistently 3% higher dose in the dose scoring region than the TIGER series when point sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 0.75 MeV energy were considered in the homogeneous RM situation or in the CB and RM heterogeneous situation. By means of the TIGER series, it was demonstrated that aluminum, which is normally assumed to be equivalent to CB in radiation dosimetry, leads to an overestimation of backscattering of low-energy electrons in soft tissue at a CB--soft-tissue interface by as much as a factor of 2

  10. Effect of hyperon channels in low-energy k-d scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, L.H.; Gibson, B.F.

    1978-01-01

    Within the framework of a Faddeev formalism and an implicit hyperon channel approximation, we have calculated K - d elastic, total, and reaction cross sections for incident kaon laboratory momenta up to 120 Mev/c. We have used as input two different (slightly modified) multichannel M matrix fits to low-energy anti KN scattering, each of which contains explicitly the πY channels, as well as a single channel representation of the anti KN interaction in which the hyperon channels appear only through their contributions to the imaginary parts of the anti KN scattering lengths. The K - d cross sections obtained with the single channel anti KN input differ by only some 10% from those for which we used the multichannel anti KN input. The D - d cross sections calculated using anti KN input parameters from each of the two separate M matrix fits differ across the entire momentum range investigated by 25-35%. (orig.) [de

  11. Renormalization of Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazek, S.D.; Wilson, K.G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a new renormalization procedure for Hamiltonians such as those of light-front field theory. The bare Hamiltonian with an arbitrarily large, but finite cutoff, is transformed by a specially chosen similarity transformation. The similarity transformation has two desirable features. First, the transformed Hamiltonian is band diagonal: in particular, all matrix elements vanish which would otherwise have caused transitions with big energy jumps, such as from a state of bounded energy to a state with an energy of the order of the cutoff. At the same time, neither the similarity transformation nor the transformed Hamiltonian, computed in perturbation theory, contain vanishing or near-vanishing energy denominators. Instead, energy differences in denominators can be replaced by energy sums for purposes of order of magnitude estimates needed to determine cutoff dependences. These two properties make it possible to determine relatively easily the list of counterterms needed to obtain finite low energy results (such as for eigenvalues). A simple model Hamiltonian is discussed to illustrate the method

  12. Low Energy Gamma Radiation Induced Effects on Ultrasonic Velocity and Acoustic Parameters in Polyvinylidene Fluoride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modification of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF polymer properties with irradiation is of interest as it possesses unique piezo-, pyro-, and ferroelectric properties. In this paper, we report the results of acoustic parameters of irradiated PVDF mixed with dimethylacetamide (DMAC solution with low energy γ-source (Cs-137. The polymer solution covered with mica film assures only γ-ray passage and the duration was increased from 18 to 50 hours to achieve the higher dose rate. The dose rate was estimated using the strength of the radioactive source and the duration of the exposure. The ultrasonic velocity (v, density (ρ, and viscosity (η of 0.2 wt% and 0.5 wt% PVDF dissolved in pure DMAC solution, irradiated with different dose rate were measured using ultrasonic interferometer (Mittal make, Pyknometer, and Oswald’s viscometer, respectively. It is observed that the values of v, ρ, and η change with dose rate. The acoustic parameters such as adiabatic compressibility (β, intermolecular free path length (Lf, acoustic impedance (Z, relative association (RA, ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2, and relaxation time (τ are calculated using the experimental data. These results are interpreted in terms of the solute-solvent interaction in a polymer solution and scissoring chain damage.

  13. Effective Hamiltonian for 2-dimensional arbitrary spin Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sznajd, J.; Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw. Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych)

    1983-08-01

    The method of the reduction of the generalized arbitrary-spin 2-dimensional Ising model to spin-half Ising model is presented. The method is demonstrated in detail by calculating the effective interaction constants to the third order in cumulant expansion for the triangular spin-1 Ising model (the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model). (author)

  14. Powerful effective one-electron Hamiltonian for describing many-atom interacting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugo, J.O.; Vergara, L.I.; Bolcatto, P.G.; Goldberg, E.C.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present an alternative way to build the effective one-electron picture of a many-atom interacting system. By simplifying the many-body general problem we present two different options for the bond-pair model Hamiltonian. We have found that the successive approximations in order to achieve the effective description have a dramatic influence on the result. Thus, only the model that introduces the correct renormalization in the diagonal term due to the overlap is able to reproduce, even in a quantitative fashion, the main properties of simple homonuclear diatomic molecules. The success of the model resides in the accurate definitions (free of parametrization) of the Hamiltonian terms, which, therefore, could be used to describe more complex interacting systems such as polyatomic molecules, adsorbed species, or atoms scattered by a surface

  15. Binding energies of sd-shell nuclei with a realistic effective Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.J.; Vary, J.P.; Baldridge, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear shell model with a second-order effective Hamiltonian derived within Brueckner theory from the free nucleon-nucleon interaction is shown to yield accurate binding energies of nuclei with 16 < A < 40. This agreement is obtained by choosing the spectrum of low-lying unoccupied orbitals in a justified manner and, when necessary, by employing a statistical method to approximate the lowest eigenvalue of very large shell-model diagonalizations

  16. The effective Hamiltonian in curved quantum waveguides under mild regularity assumptions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčiřík, David; Šediváková, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 7 (2012), 1250018/1-1250018/39 ISSN 0129-055X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06002; GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : quantum waveguides * thin-width limit * effective Hamiltonian * twisting versus bending * norm-resolvent convergence * Dirichlet Laplacian * curved tubes * relatively parallel frame * Steklov approximation Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.092, year: 2012

  17. The Effect of Low Energy Turbulence in Estuary Margins on Fine Sediment Settling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. M.; MacVean, L. J.; Tse, I.; Mazzaro, L. J.; Stacey, M. T.; Variano, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    turbulent Reynolds number will enable more mechanistic predictions of sediment transport in low energy environments like protected estuary margins.

  18. Bone mineral density and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture: effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette F; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-energy fractures of the hip, forearm, shoulder, and spine are known consequences of osteoporosis. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture. DESIGN...

  19. Effects of irradiation with low-energy nitrogen ion injection on root tip cells of broad bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yaqin; Li Jinzhe; Huang Qunce

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the cytogenetic effects of low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation, broad bean seed embryo was irradiated by different doses of nitrogen ions. Micronucleus rate, mitotic index and chromosome aberration in root-tip cells were analyzed. The results showed that the injection of ions inhibited mitosis of root tip cells, interfered the normal process of mitosis, caused aberrations of chromosome structure, behavior and number. The frequency of micronucleus and chromosomal aberrations increased with the increasing radiation dosage, while mitotic index decreased. (authors)

  20. Low Energy Conference 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    11 of the 19 presentations have been indexed for the database. The following national organisations jointly organised the Low-energy Conference 2009: The Norwegian Society for the Conservation of Nature, the Norwegian Society of Engineers and Technologists, Norwegian Technology, the Federation of Norwegian Industries and the Low-Energy Program. Energy efficiency is often given little attention in the ongoing debates concerning different initiatives in order to reduce greenhouse emissions. The aim of the conference was to set energy efficiency on the agenda as an important environmental instrument. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - IPCC and the International Energy Agency - IEA regard energy efficiency as one of the fastest and most effective ways of reducing greenhouse emissions. Despite of this little is done. Many countries are ahead of Norway - why are we lagging behind? The Low-Energy conference has a broad approach: Nigel Jollands from the International Energy Agency -IEA puts energy efficiency in a global perspective. Soeren Rise from Teqniq in Denmark informs about the Danes' energy saving agreement, which appears to have been a success. The conference increased the competencies on concrete energy efficiency solutions, how to speed up the marketing of energy-friendly buildings and technologies, possibilities through industry and the impact of EU-directives and other instruments in order to trigger the potential. The conference closed with a discussion panel of leading energy politicians. The conference contributed to raise the debate in advance of the General election in Norway and the climate negotiations in Copenhagen during the autumn 2009. (EW)

  1. The ionizing effect of low-energy cosmic rays from a class II object on its protoplanetary disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers-Lee, D.; Taylor, A. M.; Ray, T. P.; Downes, T. P.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the ionizing effect of low-energy cosmic rays (CRs) from a young star on its protoplanetary disc (PPD). We consider specifically the effect of ∼3 GeV protons injected at the inner edge of the PPD. An increase in the ionization fraction as a result of these CRs could allow the magnetorotational instability to operate in otherwise magnetically dead regions of the disc. For the typical values assumed we find an ionization rate of ζCR ∼ 10-17 s-1 at 1 au. The transport equation is solved by treating the propagation of the CRs as diffusive. We find for increasing diffusion coefficients the CRs penetrate further in the PPD, while varying the mass density profile of the disc is found to have little effect. We investigate the effect of an energy spectrum of CRs. The influence of a disc wind is examined by including an advective term. For advective wind speeds between 1 and 100 km s-1 diffusion dominates at all radii considered here (out to 10 au) for reasonable diffusion coefficients. Overall, we find that low-energy CRs can significantly ionize the mid-plane of PPDs out to ∼1 au. By increasing the luminosity or energy of the CRs, within plausible limits, their radial influence could increase to ∼2 au at the mid-plane but it remains challenging to significantly ionize the mid-plane further out.

  2. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including with , we study the quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using modifiers of the Isozaki--Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the {\\it whole} continuous spectrum of the Hamiltonian......, including the energy . We show that the --matrices are well-defined and strongly continuous down to the zero energy threshold. Similarly, we prove that the wave matrices and generalized eigenfunctions are norm continuous down to the zero energy if we use appropriate weighted spaces. These results are used...... from positive energies to the limiting energy . This change corresponds to the behaviour of the classical orbits. Under stronger conditions we extract the leading term of the asymptotics of the kernel of at its singularities; this leading term defines a Fourier integral operator in the sense...

  3. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    2009-01-01

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including V(x):=−γ|x|−μ with 0quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using appropriate modifiers of the Isozaki–Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the whole continuous spectrum...... of the Hamiltonian, including the energy 0. We show that the modified scattering matrices S(λ) are well-defined and strongly continuous down to the zero energy threshold. Similarly, we prove that the modified wave matrices and generalized eigenfunctions are norm continuous down to the zero energy if we use...... of the kernel of S(λ) experiences an abrupt change from passing from positive energies λ to the limiting energy λ=0 . This change corresponds to the behaviour of the classical orbits. Under stronger conditions one can extract the leading term of the asymptotics of the kernel of S(λ) at its singularities....

  4. Low-energy effective theory, unitarity, and nondecoupling behavior in a model with heavy Higgs-triplet fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D.; Simmons, Elizabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the properties of a model incorporating both a scalar electroweak Higgs doublet and an electroweak Higgs triplet. We construct the low-energy effective theory for the light Higgs doublet in the limit of small (but nonzero) deviations in the ρ parameter from one, a limit in which the triplet states become heavy. For Δρ>0, perturbative unitarity of WW scattering breaks down at a scale inversely proportional to the renormalized vacuum expectation value of the triplet field (or, equivalently, inversely proportional to the square root of Δρ). This result imposes an upper limit on the mass scale of the heavy triplet bosons in a perturbative theory; we show that this upper bound is consistent with dimensional analysis in the low-energy effective theory. Recent articles have shown that the triplet bosons do not decouple, in the sense that deviations in the ρ parameter from one do not necessarily vanish at one-loop in the limit of large triplet mass. We clarify that, despite the nondecoupling behavior of the Higgs triplet, this model does not violate the decoupling theorem since it incorporates a large dimensionful coupling. Nonetheless, we show that if the triplet-Higgs boson masses are of order the grand unified theory scale, perturbative consistency of the theory requires the (properly renormalized) Higgs-triplet vacuum expectation value to be so small as to be irrelevant for electroweak phenomenology

  5. Effective Lagrangians and parity-conserving time-reversal violation at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.; Frampton, P.H.; Springer, R.P.

    1996-01-01

    Using effective Lagrangians, we argue that any time-reversal-violating but parity-conserving effects are too small to be observed in flavor-conserving nuclear processes without dramatic improvement in experimental accuracy. In the process we discuss other arguments that have appeared in the literature. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Effect of heavy particles in low-energy light-particle processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, L.H.; Hagiwara, T.; Ovrut, B.

    1979-01-01

    The ''decoupling theorem'' of Appelquist and Carazzone is found not always to be applicable to light-scalar-particle processes in spontaneously broken theories. If the Higgs scalar is considered to be light, then Higgs-scalar processes see the effect of heavy fermions and heavy vector gauge bosons at the one-loop level. If there is more than one scalar multiplet in a spontaneously broken gauge theory, the effect of a heavy Higgs particle in light-scalar-particle processes is significant at the tree level. In the latter case, such an effect can be absorbed completely into an effective phi 4 coupling constant, lambda/sub eff/, of the light particle provided that lambda/sub eff/ is positive definite

  7. Low energy constituent quark and pion effective couplings in a weak external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2018-03-01

    An effective model with pions and constituent quarks in the presence of a weak external background electromagnetic field is derived by starting from a dressed one gluon exchange quark-quark interaction. By applying the auxiliary field and background field methods, the structureless pion limit is considered to extract effective pion and constituent quark couplings in the presence of a weak magnetic field. The leading terms of a large quark and gluon masses expansion are obtained by resolving effective coupling constants which turn out to depend on a weak magnetic field. Two pion field definitions are considered for that. Several relations between the effective coupling constants and parameters can be derived exactly or in the limit of very large quark mass at zero and weak constant magnetic field. Among these ratios, the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner and the quark level Goldberger-Treiman relations are obtained. In addition to that, in the pion sector, the leading terms of Chiral Perturbation Theory coupled to the electromagnetic field are recovered. Some numerical estimates are provided for the effective coupling constants and parameters.

  8. Low-energy effective action in nonperturbative electrodynamics in curved space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramidi, Ivan G.; Fucci, Guglielmo

    2009-01-01

    We study the heat kernel for the Laplace-type partial differential operator acting on smooth sections of a complex spin-tensor bundle over a generic n-dimensional Riemannian manifold. Assuming that the curvature of the U(1) connection (that we call the electromagnetic field) is constant, we compute the first two coefficients of the nonperturbative asymptotic expansion of the heat kernel which are of zero and the first order in Riemannian curvature and of arbitrary order in the electromagnetic field. We apply these results to the study of the effective action in nonperturbative electrodynamics in four dimensions and derive a generalization of the Schwinger's result for the creation of scalar and spinor particles in electromagnetic field induced by the gravitational field. We discover a new infrared divergence in the imaginary part of the effective action due to the gravitational corrections, which seems to be a new physical effect.

  9. Assessing the role of nuclear effects in the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Ericson, M; Giunti, C; Martini, M

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of the effect of multinucleon interactions in the reconstruction of the neutrino energy on the fit of the MiniBooNE data in terms of neutrino oscillations. We obtain some improvement of the fit of the MiniBooNE low-energy excess in the framework of two-neutrino oscillations and a shift of the allowed region in the $\\sin^2 2\\vartheta$--$\\Delta{m}^2$ plane towards smaller values of $\\sin^2 2\\vartheta$ and larger values of $\\Delta{m}^2$. However this effect is not enough to solve the problem of the appearance-disappearance tension in the global fit of short-baseline neutrino oscillation data.

  10. Assessing the role of nuclear effects in the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, M.; Garzelli, M. V.; Giunti, C.; Martini, M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the impact of the effect of multinucleon interactions in the reconstruction of the neutrino energy on the fit of the MiniBooNE data in terms of neutrino oscillations. We obtain some improvement of the fit of the MiniBooNE low-energy excess in the framework of two-neutrino oscillations and a shift of the allowed region in the sin22 ϑ -Δ m2 plane toward smaller values of sin22 ϑ and larger values of Δ m2. However, this effect is not enough to solve the problem of the appearance-disappearance tension in the global fit of short-baseline neutrino oscillation data.

  11. Assessing the role of nuclear effects in the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson, M. [Lyon 1 Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). INP Lyon; CERN Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Unit; Garzelli, M.V. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Giunti, C. [INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Martini, M. [ESNT, CEA-Saclay, IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Nucleaire

    2016-02-15

    We study the impact of the effect of multinucleon interactions in the reconstruction of the neutrino energy on the fit of the MiniBooNE data in terms of neutrino oscillations. We obtain some improvement of the fit of the MiniBooNE low-energy excess in the framework of two-neutrino oscillations and a shift of the allowed region in the sin{sup 2}2θ-Δm{sup 2} plane towards smaller values of sin{sup 2}2ν and larger values of Δm{sup 2}. However this effect is not enough to solve the problem of the appearance-disappearance tension in the global fit of short-baseline neutrino oscillation data.

  12. Assessing the role of nuclear effects in the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, M.; Martini, M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the impact of the effect of multinucleon interactions in the reconstruction of the neutrino energy on the fit of the MiniBooNE data in terms of neutrino oscillations. We obtain some improvement of the fit of the MiniBooNE low-energy excess in the framework of two-neutrino oscillations and a shift of the allowed region in the sin 2 2θ-Δm 2 plane towards smaller values of sin 2 2ν and larger values of Δm 2 . However this effect is not enough to solve the problem of the appearance-disappearance tension in the global fit of short-baseline neutrino oscillation data.

  13. Dramatic nondipole effects in low-energy photoionization: Experimental and theoretical study of Xe 5s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmers, O.; Lindle, D.W.; Baker, J.; Hudson, A.; Lotrakul, M.; Tran, I.C.; Guillemin, R.; Stolte, W.C.; Wolska, A.; Yu, S.W.; Kanter, E.P.; Kraessig, B.; Southworth, S.H.; Wehlitz, R.; Rolles, D.; Amusia, M.Ya.; Cheng, K.T.; Chernysheva, L.V.; Johnson, W.R.; Manson, S.T.

    2003-01-01

    The Xe 5s nondipole photoelectron parameter γ is obtained experimentally and theoretically from threshold to ∼200 eV photon energy. Significant nondipole effects are seen even in the threshold region of this valence shell photoionization. In addition, contrary to previous understanding, clear evidence of interchannel coupling among quadrupole photoionization channels is found

  14. Kaluza-Klein reduction of low-energy effective actions: geometrical approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vysoký, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 8 (2017), č. článku 143. ISSN 1029-8479 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : differential and algebra ic geometry * effective field theories * supergravity models Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 6.063, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FJHEP08%282017%29143

  15. Low-energy scattering on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bour Bour, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we present precision benchmark calculations for two-component fermions in the unitarity limit using an ab initio method, namely Hamiltonian lattice formalism. We calculate the ground state energy for unpolarized four particles (Fermi gas) in a periodic cube as a fraction of the ground state energy of the non-interacting system for two independent representations of the lattice Hamiltonians. We obtain the values 0.211(2) and 0.210(2). These results are in full agreement with the Euclidean lattice and fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. We also give an expression for the energy corrections to the binding energy of a bound state in a moving frame. These corrections contain information about the mass and number of the constituents and are topological in origin and will have a broad applications to the lattice calculations of nucleons, nuclei, hadronic molecules and cold atoms. As one of its applications we use this expression and determine the low-energy parameters for the fermion dimer elastic scattering in shallow binding limit. For our lattice calculations we use Luescher's finite volume method. From the lattice calculations we find κa fd =1.174(9) and κr fd =-0.029(13), where κ represents the binding momentum of dimer and a fd (r fd ) denotes the scattering length (effective-range). These results are confirmed by the continuum calculations using the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian integral equation which gives 1.17907(1) and -0.0383(3) for the scattering length and effective range, respectively.

  16. Study of low energy hydrogen ion implantation effects in silicon: electric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barhdadi, A.

    1985-07-01

    Several analysis methods have been developed: hydrogen distribution analysis by nuclear reaction, crystal disorder evaluation by R.B.S., chemical impurities identification by SIMS, optical measurements, electrical characterization of surface barriers, deep level spectroscopy DLTS, ... All these analyses have been made after implantation then after thermal annealing. A model explaining the effect of implantation then after thermal annealing. A model explaining the effect of implanted hydrogen is proposed, the implantation creates an important quantity of defects in a thin layer near the surface; a chemical attack removes them. In Schottky devices, this layer has a basic role on carrier transport phenomena. Other results are given, some of them allow to give an account of the passivation by hydrogen implantation [fr

  17. Low-energy effective models for two-flavor quantum chromodynamics and the universality hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahl, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Our thesis is centered around the question of which order the chiral phase transition of two-flavor QCD is. First of all we outline several general aspects of phase transitions which are of central importance for the understanding of the RG approach towards them. Our focus lies on reviewing the universality hypothesis, a crucial ingredient when it comes to the construction of effective theories for order parameters, the credibility of which often heavily depends on universality arguments. We finish the chapter with an attempt to formulate the latter more precisely than usually done. The next chapter discusses the chiral phase transition from a general point of view. We supplement well-known facts with a detailed discussion of the so-called O(4) conjecture. Thereafter we introduce the nonperturbative method we use, the FRG method. Furthermore, we discuss the relation between effective models for QCD and the underlying fundamental theory making use of the FRG perspective. The next chapter is concerned with a mathematical subject indispensable for our approach towards the study of phase transitions, namely the systematic construction of polynomial invariants characterizing a given symmetry. With this thesis we point out its relevance in the context of high-energy physics. We present a simple, but novel, brute-force algorithm to effectively construct invariants of a given polynomial order. The next chapter is devoted to RG studies of several dimensionally reduced theories which are capable to either predict or to rule out the possible existence of a second-order phase transition. Of main interest for us is the linear sigma model, particularly in presence of the axial anomaly. It turns out that the fixed-point structure of the latter is rather complicated, requiring a deeper understanding of the underlying method and its preconditions. This leads us to a careful analysis of the fixed-point structure of several models, which is of great benefit for our review of the

  18. Effect of pion external distortion on low energy pion double-charge-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khankhasaev, M.Kh.; Kurmanov, Zh.B.; Johnson, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the external pion distortion for iso-elastic charge exchange scattering (within the framework of the isospin invariant optical model) is considered. An approximated method of taking into account the distortion based on the separable expansion of the optical potential in momentum space is developed. The result of external distortions for sequential scattering 14 C(π + , π - ) 14 O at 50 MeV is presented. It is shown that this distortion gives a small enhancement to forward and reduced the differential cross sections at large angels. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Effect of a novel low-energy pulsed-light device for home-use hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Tina S; Tanzi, Elizabeth L

    2009-03-01

    Removal of unwanted hair is the most popular skin treatment worldwide. Over the past decade, various lasers and light sources for epilation have been advocated for use in an office setting, although most people continue to treat unwanted hair with a variety of temporary physical methods (e.g., waxing, shaving) in a home setting, presumably due to cost and convenience factors. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a low-energy pulsed-light device intended for home-use hair removal. Twenty women (skin phototypes I-IV) with dark terminal hair in nonfacial sites (axilla, forearms, inguinal region, legs) self-administered three treatments at 2-week intervals using a handheld intense-pulsed-light device. Matched untreated skin sites were also studied. Hair counts and clinical photographs were obtained pretreatment and at 1, 3, and 6 months after the third treatment. Side effects and patient satisfaction scores were recorded. All patients showed a positive clinical response to treatment, with reduction of unwanted hair. No reduction of hair was noted in untreated matched areas. Hair counts were reduced 37.8% to 53.6% 6 months after the three treatments. Skin region influenced clinical response, with lower legs exhibiting greater hair reduction than arms and inguinal and axillary areas. Mild erythema was experienced in 25% of patients, but no other side effects or complications were encountered. Patient satisfaction scores were high, with all patients stating that they would purchase the device for future home use. CONCLUSIONS Low-energy pulsed light can be applied safely and effectively for at-home hair removal in a variety of nonfacial locations and skin phototypes I-IV.

  20. Effects of low energy helium plasma irradiation on potassium doped tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Xiaoyan [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Key Subject Laboratory of National Defense for Radioactive Waste and Environmental Security, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China); Huang, Bo [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Liu, Dongping; Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian (China); Liu, Ning [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Tang, Jun, E-mail: tangjun@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2017-04-15

    Effects of helium plasma irradiation on spark plasma sintering (SPS) W-K, pure W and traditionally sintered commercial W-K have been studied, concerning the density, grain size and potassium content as the influence factors. Pinholes are formed under 120 eV He ions at 600 °C and 1 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −2} fluence on the surface of all samples. It is found that SPS-sintered W-K shows the best irradiation resistance among the present samples, and SPS-sintered pure W exhibits higher irradiation tolerance than commercial W-K. Different He-plasma tolerance was observed among the SPS-sintered W-K samples due to varied potassium content and grain size. In addition, the microstructure evolution under helium irradiation, the growth-migration of helium bubbles and their interactions of potassium bubbles have also been discussed.

  1. Effects of symmetry energy and momentum dependent interaction on low-energy reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the dipole response associated with the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR and the Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR, in connection with specific properties of the nuclear effective interaction (symmetry energy and momentum dependence, in the neutron-rich systems 68Ni, 132Sn and 208Pb. We perform our investigation within a microscopic transport model based on the Landau-Vlasov kinetic equation.We observe that the peak energies of PDR and IVGDR are shifted to higher values when employing momentum dependent interactions, with respect to the results obtained neglecting momentum dependence. The calculated energies are close to the experimental values and similar to the results obtained in Hartree-Fock (HF with Random Phase Approximation (RPA calculations.

  2. Space Charge Effects and Advanced Modelling for CERN Low Energy Machines

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088716; Rumolo, Giovanni

    The strong space charge regime of future operation of CERN’s circular particle accelerators is investigated and mitigation strategies are developed in the framework of the present thesis. The intensity upgrade of the injector chain of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prepares the particle accelerators to meet the requirements of the High-Luminosity LHC project. Producing the specified characteristics of the future LHC beams imperatively relies on injecting brighter bunches into the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the downstream Proton Synchrotron (PS) and eventually the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The increased brightness, i.e. bunch intensity per transverse emittance, entails stronger beam self-fields which can lead to harmful interaction with betatron resonances. Possible beam emittance growth and losses as a consequence thereof threaten to degrade the beam brightness. These space charge effects are partly mitigated by the upgrade of the PSB and PS injection energies. Nevertheless, the space charge tune ...

  3. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Wang Xiaoteng; Gan Cailing; Fang Yanqiong; Zhang Meng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyzed biological effects of N + implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed. ► N + implantation greatly decreased seedling survival rate. ► At doses beyond 15 × 10 16 ion cm −2 , biological repair took place. ► CAT was essential for H 2 O 2 removal. POD mainly functioned as seed was severely hurt. ► HAsA–GSH cycle mainly contributed to the regeneration of HAsA. - Abstract: To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N + with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N + beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 10 16 to 15 × 10 16 ions cm −2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 10 16 ion cm −2 , biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 10 16 ions cm −2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA–GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  4. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Gang, E-mail: xg335300@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Research and Development of Fine Chemicals, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Institute of Entomology, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wang Xiaoteng [Department of Agricultural Resources and Environment, College of Agricultural, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Gan Cailing; Fang Yanqiong; Zhang Meng [College of Life Sciences, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed biological effects of N{sup +} implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup +} implantation greatly decreased seedling survival rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At doses beyond 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAT was essential for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal. POD mainly functioned as seed was severely hurt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAsA-GSH cycle mainly contributed to the regeneration of HAsA. - Abstract: To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N{sup +} with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N{sup +} beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  5. Image potential effect on the specular reflection coefficient of alkali ions scattered from a nickel surface at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemih, R.; Boudjema, M.; Benazeth, C.; Boudouma, Y.; Chami, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    The resonant charge exchange in the incoming path of alkali ions scattered at low energy from a polycrystalline nickel surface is studied by using the image effect occurring at glancing incidence (2-10 deg. from the surface plane) and for specular reflection. The part of the experimental artefacts (geometrical factor, surface roughness ...) is extracted from the reflection coefficient of almost completely neutralised projectiles (He + or Ne + ) compared with the coefficient obtained from numerical simulations (TRIM and MARLOWE codes). The present model explains very well the lowering of the reflection coefficient measured at grazing incidence (below 4 deg.). Furthermore, the optimised values of the charge fraction in the incoming path and the image potential are in agreement with the theoretical calculations in the case of Na + /Ni at 4 keV

  6. Low energy proton irradiation effects on InP/InGaAs DHBTs and InP-base frequency dividers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Feng, Jie

    2018-03-01

    InP/InGaAs DHBTs and frequency dividers are irradiated by low energy proton, and displacement damage effect of the devices are analyzed. InP/InGaAs DHBTs has been made DC characteristics measurements, and the function measurement for frequency dividers has been done both before and after proton irradiation. The breakdown voltage of InP DHBTs drop to 3.7V When the fluence up to 5x1013 protons/cm2. Meanwhile, the function of frequency dividers get out of order. Degradation of DC characteristics of DHBTs are due to the radiation-induced defects in the quasi neutral base and the space charge region of base-collector and base-emitter junctions. The performance deterioration of DHBTs induce the fault of frequency dividers, and prescaler may be the most sensitive circuit.

  7. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  8. Effects of fermionic singlet neutrinos on high- and low-energy observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis, we study both low- and high-energy observables related to massive neutrinos. Neutrino oscillations have provided indisputable evidence in favour of non-zero neutrino masses and mixings. However, the original formulation of the standard model cannot account for these observations, which calls for the introduction of new physics. Among many possibilities, we focus here on the inverse seesaw, a neutrino mass generation mechanism in which the standard model is extended with fermionic gauge singlets. This model offers an attractive alternative to the usual seesaw realisations since it can potentially have natural Yukawa couplings (O(1)) while keeping the new physics scale at energies within the reach of the LHC. Among the many possible effects, this scenario can lead to deviations from lepton flavour universality. We have investigated these signatures and found that the ratios R K and R π provide new, additional constraints on the inverse seesaw. We have also considered the embedding of the inverse seesaw in supersymmetric models. This leads to increased rates for various lepton flavour violating processes, due to enhanced contributions from penguin diagrams mediated by the Higgs and Z 0 bosons. Finally, we also found that the new invisible decay channels associated with the sterile neutrinos present in the super-symmetric inverse seesaw could significantly weaken the constraints on the mass and couplings of a light CP-odd Higgs boson. (author)

  9. Precise determination of total absorption coefficients for low-energy gamma-quanta with Moessbauer effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonchev, T.; Statev, S.; Nejkov, Kh.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of determining the total absorption coefficient applying the Moessbauer effect is proposed. This method enables the accuracy of the measurement increase. The coefficient is measured with practically no background on using the recoilless part of gamma radiation obtained from the Moessbauer source with and without the sample between the source of the gamma-quanta and the detector. Moessbauer sources and absorbers with a single line and without an isomeric shift are used. The recoilless part of the radiation is obtained by the ''two point'' method as a difference between the numbers of photons corresponding to the stationary source and to the vibrating one with a big mean square velocity, respectively. In the concrete measurements the sources 57 Co and 119 Sn are used. The total absorption coefficient for different samples beginning with water up to plumbum is determined. The mean square error for the mean result in all measurements is less than the mean statistical error for the coefficient. The obtained experimental data give a much smaller deviation from the theoretical data of the last issue of the Stom-Israel Tables than the one expected by their authors

  10. Solid-state effects on thermal-neutron cross sections and on low-energy resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.A.; Mook, H.A.; Hill, N.W.; Shahal, O.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross sections of several single crystals (Si, Cu, sapphire), several polycrystalline samples (Cu, Fe, Be, C, Bi, Ta), and a fine-powder copper sample have been measured from 0.002 to 5 eV. The Cu powder and polycrystalline Fe, Be and C data exhibit the expected abrupt changes in cross section. The cross section of the single crystal of Si is smooth with only small broad fluctuations. The data on two single Cu crystals, the sapphire crystal, cast Bi, and rolled samples of Ta and Cu have many narrow peaks approx. 10 -3 eV wide. High resolution (0.3%) transmission measurements were made on the 1.057-eV resonance in 240 Pu and the 0.433-eV resonance in 180 Ta, both at room and low temperatures to study the effects of crystal binding. Although the changes in Doppler broadening with temperature were apparent, no asymmetries due to a recoilless contribution were observed

  11. Energies and bounds from perturbative approximations to the Bloch-Horowitz effective Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darema-Rogers, F.; Vincent, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    Bloch-Horowitz perturbation theory is applied to the calculation of approximate energies and model-space eigenvectors, for the solvable large-matrix Hamiltonian H used by Pittel, Vincent, and Vergados. Two types of upper and lower bounds to the energies are discussed: moment-theory bounds, obtained by applying moment theory to the terms of perturbation theory, and norm bounds, derived from the expectation E-bar and variance sigma 2 of H with respect to an eigenvector approximated by nth order perturbation theory (n < or = 6). It is shown that lower bounds cannot be constructed unless some fourth-order quantity is known. The upper bounds are generally stricter than the lower bounds. All of the bounds apply even when back-door intruder states cause perturbation theory to diverge; but they lose their rigor and become ''quasibounds'' when there are physical intruders. The moment-theory and norm lower quasibounds always require estimation of a parameter. For the solvable Hamiltonians, it is shown that this can be done quite reliably, and that the resulting quasibounds are tight enough to have some practical utility. The energy-independent effective interaction V is constructed and its errors are displayed and discussed. Finally, a certain [1/2] pseudo-Pade approximant is empirically shown to give energies with a mean absolute error of less than 0.3 MeV in all cases

  12. Hamiltonian ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeds, E.; Leenders, R.; Welling, M.; Meila, M.; Heskes, T.

    2015-01-01

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a powerful and elegant framework for performing inference in simulation-based models. However, due to the difficulty in scaling likelihood estimates, ABC remains useful for relatively lowdimensional problems. We introduce Hamiltonian ABC (HABC), a set of

  13. Geometric phase effects in low-energy dynamics near conical intersections: A study of the multidimensional linear vibronic coupling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2013-01-01

    In molecular systems containing conical intersections (CIs), a nontrivial geometric phase (GP) appears in the nuclear and electronic wave functions in the adiabatic representation. We study GP effects in nuclear dynamics of an N-dimensional linear vibronic coupling (LVC) model. The main impact of GP on low-energy nuclear dynamics is reduction of population transfer between the local minima of the LVC lower energy surface. For the LVC model, we proposed an isometric coordinate transformation that confines non-adiabatic effects within a two-dimensional subsystem interacting with an N − 2 dimensional environment. Since environmental modes do not couple electronic states, all GP effects originate from nuclear dynamics within the subsystem. We explored when the GP affects nuclear dynamics of the isolated subsystem, and how the subsystem-environment interaction can interfere with GP effects. Comparing quantum dynamics with and without GP allowed us to devise simple rules to determine significance of the GP for nuclear dynamics in this model

  14. The effect of low-energy electrons on the response of ion chambers to ionizing photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, Daniel J.

    Cavity ionization chambers are one of the most popular and widely used devices for quantifying ionizing photon beams. This popularity originates from the precision of these devices and the relative ease with which ionization measurements are converted to quantities of interest in therapeutic radiology or radiation protection, collectively referred to as radiation dosimetry. The formalisms used for these conversions, known as cavity theory, make several assumptions about the electron spectrum in the low-energy range resulting from the incident photon beam. These electrons often account for a significant fraction of the ion chamber response. An inadequate treatment of low-energy electrons can therefore significantly effect calculated quantities of interest. This thesis sets out to investigate the effect of low-energy electrons on (1) the use of Spencer-Attix cavity theory with 60Co beams; and (2) the standard temperature-pressure correction factor, P TP, used to relate the measured ionization to a set of reference temperature and pressure conditions for vented ion chambers. Problems with the PTP correction are shown to arise when used with kilovoltage x rays, where ionization measurements are due primarily to electrons that do not have enough energy to cross the cavity. A combination of measurements and Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code demonstrate the breakdown of PTP in these situations when used with non-air-equivalent chambers. The extent of the breakdown is shown to depend on cavity size, energy of the incident photons, and the composition of the chamber. In the worst case, the standard P TP factor overcorrects the response of an aluminum chamber by ≈12% at an air density typical of Mexico City. The response of a more common graphite-walled chamber with similar dimensions at the same air density is undercorrected by ≈ 2%. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code is also used to investigate Spencer-Attix cavity theory as it is used in the

  15. Possibility of a 4He2 bound state, effective range theory, and very low energy He--He scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uang, Y.; Stwalley, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The best available intermolecular potential for helium by Aziz, Nain, Carley, Taylor, and McConville is shown here for the first time to have a 4 He 2 bound state. Two numerical analyses, namely, eigenvalue solution and effective range theory, are used to support this conclusion. Unlike usual chemically bound species, the binding energy of this very weakly bound level is found to be only 8.3 x 10 -4 K, which is four orders of magnitude smaller than the potential well depth epsilon = 10.8 K. The scattering length for He+He collisions, determined from effective range theory, is used to calculate the elastic cross section in the very low energy limit. The results (1.878 x 10 5 A 2 for 4 He+ 4 He and 6.035 x 10 2 A for 3 He+ 3 He) are consistent with measurements at the lowest velocities yet attained. In terms of the estimated uncertainties of the parameters of the potential of Aziz and co-workers, it is shown that it is very likely that a bound state of the 4 He 2 molecule does in fact exist

  16. Effects of non-implantation factors on survival rate of microbe irradiated by low-energy N+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianyou; Chen Linhai; Qin Guangyong; Li Zongwei; Su Mingjie; Wang Yanping; Chang Shenghe; Huo Yuping; Li Zongyi

    2006-01-01

    The effects of non-implantation factors, such as drying, vacuum and the staying time of the E.coli LE392 culture, on survival rate of E.coli LE392 were studied when E.coli LE392 was irradiated by the low-energy N + . The results show that the survival rate of E.coli LE392 does not reduce steadily all the time but rapidly drops sometime during drying. The survival rate of E.coli LE392 declines sharply as the samples are placed in vacuum, then falls in distinctively with increasing of time. the tolerance of E.coli LE392 towards vacuum increasingly strengthens when the E.coli LE392 culture is placed at room temperature. Preparing the culture in batchs can ensure the consistency of the irradiated samples and avoid errors caused by the inconsistent samples. When the non-implantation factors are controlled, E.coli is implanted by 30 kev N + of 1 x 10 14 cm -2 and 3 x 10 15 cm -2 , respectively. And the results show no difference in the E.coli's survival rates between batchs at the same dose. (authors)

  17. Consistency of the Hamiltonian formulation of the lowest-order effective action of the complete Horava theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellorin, Jorge; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    We perform the Hamiltonian analysis for the lowest-order effective action, up to second order in derivatives, of the complete Horava theory. The model includes the invariant terms that depend on ∂ i lnN proposed by Blas, Pujolas, and Sibiryakov. We show that the algebra of constraints closes. The Hamiltonian constraint is of second-class behavior and it can be regarded as an elliptic partial differential equation for N. The linearized version of this equation is a Poisson equation for N that can be solved consistently. The preservation in time of the Hamiltonian constraint yields an equation that can be consistently solved for a Lagrange multiplier of the theory. The model has six propagating degrees of freedom in the phase space, corresponding to three even physical modes. When compared with the λR model studied by us in a previous paper, it lacks two second-class constraints, which leads to the extra even mode.

  18. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Gunion, J.; Kamon, T.; Lopez, J.L.; Kao, C.

    1995-04-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e + e - , p bar p and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. The authors then comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e + e - machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry

  19. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Eberl, H.; Feng, J.L.; Fujii, K.; Gunion, John F.; Kamon, T.; Kao, C.; Lopez, J.L.; Majerotto, W.; McIntyre, P.; Munroe, Ray B.; Murayama, H.; Paige, F.; Porod, W.; Sender, J.; Sopczak, A.; Tata, X.; Tsukamoto, T.; White, J.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, we evaluate the capabilities of various e^+e^-, p\\bar p and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, we discuss capabilities of future facilities to dis-entangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. We comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e^+e^- machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  20. Effects of low energy shock wave therapy on inflammatory moleculars, bladder pain, and bladder function in a rat cystitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Jen; Lee, Wei-Chia; Tyagi, Pradeep; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2017-08-01

    Low energy shock wave (LESW) is known to facilitate tissue regeneration with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. We examined the effects of LESW on the expression of inflammatory molecules, pain behavior, and bladder function in a rat cystitis model. Control and experimental animals were injected with saline or cyclophosphamide (CYP; 75 mg/kg intraperitoneally) on day 1 and 4. After lower midline incision, the bladders were exposed to LESW (300 pulses, 0.12 mJ/mm 2 ) or sham operation on day 2. In study 1 (N = 12, 4 for each group), the nociceptive effects of CYP were evaluated for 30 min by behavioral assessment on day 4 one hour after CYP injection. In study 2 (N = 21, 7 for each group), continuous cystometry (CMG) was performed on day 8. The bladder was harvested after behavioral assessment or CMG for histology and Western blotting. CYP-induced upregulation of COX2 and IL6 expression, caused pain behavior (eye closing and hypolocomotion), and bladder inflammation was noted on days 4 and 8 along with bladder hyperactivity. LESW treatment reduced pain behavior and downregulated the NGF expression (33.3%, P < 0.05) on day 4 and IL6 (40.9%, P < 0.05). LESW treatment suppressed bladder overactivity (intercontraction interval 77.8% increase, P < 0.05) by decreasing inflammation and COX2 (38.6%, P < 0.05) expression and NGF expression (25.2%, P = 0.0812). CYP-induced bladder pain, inflammation, and overactivity involves activation of IL6, NGF, and COX2 expression. These changes are suppressed by LESW, indicating it as a potential candidate for relieving bladder inflammatory conditions and overactivity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Urodynamic and molecular characteristics of detrusor underactivity in a rat cryoinjury model and effects of low energy shock wave therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Tyagi, Pradeep; Wang, Hung-Jen; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Chancellor, Michael B

    2018-02-01

    Low energy shock wave (LESW) has been shown to facilitate tissue regeneration and reduce inflammation. We investigated the effects of LESW in an underactive (DU) model induced by cryoinjury of rat detrusor. Forty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham, cryoinjury with or without LESW (0.12 mJ/mm 2 ; 200 pulses). Under halothane anesthesia, a low midline incision was made and a cryoinjury of detrusor was induced by placing an aluminum rod (chilled with dry ice) for 30 s on the serosal side of the bladder filled with 1 mL sterile saline bilaterally. Awake cystometrogram (CMG), molecular and histopathology studies were performed on Day 8 or 15 after cryoinjury. Significant urodynamic, histological, and molecular changes induced by cryoinjury of rat detrusor were detected on Day 8 and decrease in the contraction amplitude (54.3%), a significant increase in wet bladder weight (64.1%), edematous changes, muscle thinning and downregulation of α-SMA, IL-6, and upregulation of COX-2. LESW reversed the cryoinjury induced histological and COX-2 expression to cause a 49.0% increase in the contraction amplitude (P < 0.05). LESW induced cell proliferation was revealed by increased CD31 and Ki67 immunostaining. The effect of cryoinjury on urodynamic and histological changes was maintained till Day 15. The cryoinjury of rat detrusor models myogenic DU, which is partially reversed by LESW. LESW may afford a simple, non-invasive modality to facilitate tissue regeneration and improve voiding function in myogenic detrusor underactivity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Formulation of the low-energy effective theory of electroweak symmetry-breaking without a Higgs particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirn, J.

    2004-07-01

    The low-energy effective theory of electroweak symmetry-breaking without a Higgs particle is constructed using the methods of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Weinberg's power-counting formula demonstrates the consistency of the loop expansion, with the corresponding renormalization. We find that the suppression of effective operators by a mass scale, which was automatic in the case of the Standard Model, no longer holds in the Higgs-less case. Moreover, the incriminated operators appear at leading order in the chiral expansion, at variance with experiments. To account for their suppression, invariance under a larger symmetry is required, corresponding to the composite sector (which produces the three Goldstone modes) being decoupled from the elementary sector (quarks, leptons and Yang-Mills fields). The couplings are introduced via spurions: this reduces the symmetry to SU(2) x U(1). In the simultaneous expansion in powers of momenta and spurions, the aforementioned operators are relegated to higher orders. In addition, the method allows for a systematic treatment of weak isospin breaking. The Weinberg power-counting formula can be recovered, and small neutrino masses accounted for. The three right-handed neutrinos (lighter than the TeV), which are introduced in connection with the custodial symmetry, are quasi-sterile and stable. A constraint on the underlying theory is obtained by studying the anomaly-matching in the composite sector and generalizing the Wess-Zumino construction. The spurion formalism is also applied to open linear moose models, for which generalized Weinberg sum rules are derived. (author)

  3. Linked-cluster perturbation theory for closed and open-shell systems: derivation of effective π-electron hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandow, B.H.

    1977-01-01

    The Brueckner--Goldstone form of linked-cluster perturbation theory is derived, together with its open-shell analog, by an elementary time-independent approach. This serves to focus attention on the physical interpretation of the results. The open-shell expansion is used to provide a straightforward justification for the effective π-electron Hamiltonians of planar organic molecules

  4. Hamiltonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vilasi, Gaetano

    2001-01-01

    This is both a textbook and a monograph. It is partially based on a two-semester course, held by the author for third-year students in physics and mathematics at the University of Salerno, on analytical mechanics, differential geometry, symplectic manifolds and integrable systems. As a textbook, it provides a systematic and self-consistent formulation of Hamiltonian dynamics both in a rigorous coordinate language and in the modern language of differential geometry. It also presents powerful mathematical methods of theoretical physics, especially in gauge theories and general relativity. As a m

  5. Na,K-ATPase biostimulation by low-energy laser irradiation: comparative effects in membrane, solubilized and proteoliposomes enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigos, C.F.; Tedesco, A.C.; Ciancaglini, P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Quimica; Santos, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao Del Rei (UFSJ), MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: The mechanism of laser irradiation action on living cells is not yet understood. The role of membrane ATPases as possible targets has been analyzed. In our group we have been working with Na,K-ATPase. This enzyme is a member of the P-type family of active cation transport proteins. Thus, the aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of low-energy laser irradiation (685 nm, 35 mW) on the ATPase activity of different forms of the Na,K-ATPase. Membrane-bound and solubilized (ab)2 form of Na,K-ATPase was obtained from the rabbit kidney and DPPC:DPPE-proteoliposomes were prepared by the co-solubilization method. Irradiations were carried out at 685 nm. The ATPase activity of the membrane fraction was not altered with exposition to irradiation doses between 4 and 24 J/c m2. With irradiation doses ranging from 32 to 40 J/c m2, a 28% increase on the ATPase activity was observed while when using up to 50 J/c m2 no additional enhancement was observed. When bio stimulation was done using the purified or the reconstituted enzyme, an increase of about 36-40% on the ATPase activity was observed using only 4-8 J/c m2. With irradiation above these values (24 J/c m2) no additional increase in the activity appeared. These studies revealed that the bio stimulation of ATPase activity from different forms of the Na,K -ATPase is dose dependent in different ranges of irradiation exposure. The stimulation promoted by visible laser doses was modulated and the process was reverted after 2 h for the enzyme present in the membrane and after about 5 h for the solubilized or the reconstituted in DPPC:DPPE-liposomes.

  6. Na,K-ATPase biostimulation by low-energy laser irradiation: comparative effects in membrane, solubilized and proteoliposomes enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigos, C.F.; Tedesco, A.C.; Ciancaglini, P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The mechanism of laser irradiation action on living cells is not yet understood. The role of membrane ATPases as possible targets has been analyzed. In our group we have been working with Na,K-ATPase. This enzyme is a member of the P-type family of active cation transport proteins. Thus, the aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of low-energy laser irradiation (685 nm, 35 mW) on the ATPase activity of different forms of the Na,K-ATPase. Membrane-bound and solubilized (ab)2 form of Na,K-ATPase was obtained from the rabbit kidney and DPPC:DPPE-proteoliposomes were prepared by the co-solubilization method. Irradiations were carried out at 685 nm. The ATPase activity of the membrane fraction was not altered with exposition to irradiation doses between 4 and 24 J/c m2. With irradiation doses ranging from 32 to 40 J/c m2, a 28% increase on the ATPase activity was observed while when using up to 50 J/c m2 no additional enhancement was observed. When bio stimulation was done using the purified or the reconstituted enzyme, an increase of about 36-40% on the ATPase activity was observed using only 4-8 J/c m2. With irradiation above these values (24 J/c m2) no additional increase in the activity appeared. These studies revealed that the bio stimulation of ATPase activity from different forms of the Na,K -ATPase is dose dependent in different ranges of irradiation exposure. The stimulation promoted by visible laser doses was modulated and the process was reverted after 2 h for the enzyme present in the membrane and after about 5 h for the solubilized or the reconstituted in DPPC:DPPE-liposomes

  7. Topological color codes and two-body quantum lattice Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarian, M.; Bombin, H.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2010-02-01

    Topological color codes are among the stabilizer codes with remarkable properties from the quantum information perspective. In this paper, we construct a lattice, the so-called ruby lattice, with coordination number 4 governed by a two-body Hamiltonian. In a particular regime of coupling constants, in a strong coupling limit, degenerate perturbation theory implies that the low-energy spectrum of the model can be described by a many-body effective Hamiltonian, which encodes the color code as its ground state subspace. Ground state subspace corresponds to a vortex-free sector. The gauge symmetry Z2×Z2 of the color code could already be realized by identifying three distinct plaquette operators on the ruby lattice. All plaquette operators commute with each other and with the Hamiltonian being integrals of motion. Plaquettes are extended to closed strings or string-net structures. Non-contractible closed strings winding the space commute with Hamiltonian but not always with each other. This gives rise to exact topological degeneracy of the model. A connection to 2-colexes can be established via the coloring of the strings. We discuss it at the non-perturbative level. The particular structure of the two-body Hamiltonian provides a fruitful interpretation in terms of mapping onto bosons coupled to effective spins. We show that high-energy excitations of the model have fermionic statistics. They form three families of high-energy excitations each of one color. Furthermore, we show that they belong to a particular family of topological charges. The emergence of invisible charges is related to the string-net structure of the model. The emerging fermions are coupled to nontrivial gauge fields. We show that for particular 2-colexes, the fermions can see the background fluxes in the ground state. Also, we use the Jordan-Wigner transformation in order to test the integrability of the model via introducing Majorana fermions. The four-valent structure of the lattice prevents the

  8. Empirical Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Talman, R.

    1987-01-01

    As proton accelerators get larger, and include more magnets, the conventional tracking programs which simulate them run slower. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method, still under development, in which element-by-element tracking around one turn is replaced by a single man, which can be processed far faster. It is assumed for this method that a conventional program exists which can perform faithful tracking in the lattice under study for some hundreds of turns, with all lattice parameters held constant. An empirical map is then generated by comparison with the tracking program. A procedure has been outlined for determining an empirical Hamiltonian, which can represent motion through many nonlinear kicks, by taking data from a conventional tracking program. Though derived by an approximate method this Hamiltonian is analytic in form and can be subjected to further analysis of varying degrees of mathematical rigor. Even though the empirical procedure has only been described in one transverse dimension, there is good reason to hope that it can be extended to include two transverse dimensions, so that it can become a more practical tool in realistic cases

  9. Low energy particle composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    More than 50 papers presented at this Conference dealt with the composition of low energy particles. The topics can be divided roughly into two broad categories. The first is the study of the energy spectra and composition of the steady or 'quiet-time' particle flux, whose origin is at this time unknown. The second category includes the study of particles and photons which are associated with solar flares or active regions on the sun. (orig.) [de

  10. Solution of the effective Hamiltonian of impurity hopping between two sites in a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jinwu

    1997-07-01

    We analyze in detail all the possible fixed points of the effective Hamiltonian of a nonmagnetic impurity hopping between two sites in a metal obtained by Moustakas and Fisher (MF). We find a line of non-Fermi liquid fixed points which continuously interpolates between the two-channel Kondo fixed point (2CK) and the one-channel, two-impurity Kondo (2IK) fixed point. There is one relevant direction with scaling dimension 12 and one leading irrelevant operator with dimension 32. There is also one marginal operator in the spin sector moving along this line. The marginal operator, combined with the leading irrelevant operator, will generate the relevant operator. For the general position on this line, the leading low-temperature exponents of the specific heat, the hopping susceptibility and the electron conductivity Cimp,χhimp,σ(T) are the same as those of the 2CK, but the finite-size spectrum depends on the position on the line. No universal ratios can be formed from the amplitudes of the three quantities except at the 2CK point on this line where the universal ratios can be formed. At the 2IK point on this line, σ(T)~2σu(1+aT3/2), no universal ratio can be formed either. The additional non-Fermi-liquid fixed point found by MF has the same symmetry as the 2IK, it has two relevant directions with scaling dimension 12, and is therefore also unstable. The leading low-temperature behaviors are Cimp~T,χhimp~lnT,σ(T)~2σu(1+aT3/2) no universal ratios can be formed. The system is shown to flow to a line of Fermi-liquid fixed points which continuously interpolates between the noninteracting fixed point and the two-channel spin-flavor Kondo fixed point discussed by the author previously. The effect of particle-hole symmetry breaking is discussed. The effective Hamiltonian in the external magnetic field is analyzed. The scaling functions for the physical measurable quantities are derived in the different regimes; their predictions for the experiments are given. Finally

  11. Asymptotic solution of the coupled equations for electron collisions with atoms or positive ions using Dirac hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, I.P.

    1982-01-01

    Possible relativistic effects in low energy electron scattering from atoms or positive ions has been investigated using the Dirac hamiltonian. Single channel formula and many channel expressions indicate that asymptotic estimation of radial wavefunctions can be carried out satisfactorily for most purposes using non-relativistic methods. (U.K.)

  12. QCD at low energy: a many-body approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yépez-Martínez, T; Hess, P O; Lerma, S; Szczepaniak, A; Civitarese, O

    2011-01-01

    A review is given on recent results in the treatment of an arbitrary number of orbital levels in low energy QCD. For the pure quark part, analytic results for the dominant part of the Hamiltonian are presented. Possible extensions, including dynamic gluons, are discussed.

  13. Problem on eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for effective Hamiltonians in pair channels of four-particle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurbanovich, N.S.; Zelenskaya, I.N.

    1976-01-01

    The solution for eigenfunction and eigenvalue for effective Hamiltonians anti Hsub(p) in two-particle channels corresponding to division of four particles into groups (3.1) and (2.2) is very essential in the four-body problem as applied to nuclear reactions. The interaction of anti√sub(p) in each channel may be written in the form of an integral operator which takes account of the structure of a target nucleus or of an incident particle and satisfying the integral equation. While assuming the two-particle potentials to be central, it is possible to expand the effective interactions anti√sub(p) in partial waves and write the radial equation for anti Hsub(p). In the approximation on a mass shell the radial equations for the eigenfunctions of Hsub(p) are reduced to an algebraic equations system. The coefficients of the latter are expressed through the Fourier images for products of wave functions of bound clusters and the two-particle central potential which are localized in a momentum space

  14. A comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of low energy electronic brachytherapy sources in breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A; Reniers, Brigitte; de Jong, Evelyn E C; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-01-07

    Electronic brachytherapy sources use low energy photons to treat the tumor bed during or after breast-conserving surgery. The relative biological effectiveness of two electronic brachytherapy sources was explored to determine if spectral differences due to source design influenced radiation quality and if radiation quality decreased with distance in the breast. The RBE was calculated through the number of DNA double strand breaks (RBEDSB) using the Monte Carlo damage simulator (MCDS) in combination with other Monte Carlo electron/photon spectrum calculations. 50kVp photons from the Intrabeam (Carl Zeiss Surgical) and Axxent (Xoft) through 40-mm spherical applicators were simulated to account for applicator and tissue attenuation in a variety of breast tissue compositions. 40kVp Axxent photons were also simulated. Secondary electrons (known to be responsible for most DNA damage) spectra at different distance were inputted into MCDS to calculate the RBEDSB. All RBEDSB used a cobalt-60 reference. RBEDSB data was combined with corresponding average photon spectrum energy for the Axxent and applied to model-based average photon energy distributions to produce an RBEDSB map of an accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patient. Both Axxent and Intrabeam 50kVp spectra were shown to have a comparable RBEDSB of between 1.4 and 1.6 at all distances in spite of progressive beam hardening. The Axxent 40kVp also demonstrated a similar RBEDSB at distances. Most RBEDSB variability was dependent on the tissue type as was seen in rib (RBEDSB  ≈  1.4), gland (≈1.55), adipose (≈1.59), skin (≈1.52) and lung (≈1.50). RBEDSB variability between both sources was within 2%. A correlation was shown between RBEDSB and average photon energy and used to produce an RBEDSB map of a dose distribution in an APBI patient dataset. Radiation quality is very similar between electronic brachytherapy sources studied. No significant reductions in RBEDSB were observed with

  15. EFFECT OF LOW ENERGY VERSUS MEDIUM ENERGY RADIAL SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PLANTER FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Z. Fouda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis (PF is the most common cause of heel pain and it can often be a challenge for clinicians to treat successfully. Radial shock wave therapy (RSWT has been introduced recently for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Different energy levels of shock wave therapy have been used in the literatures for treatment of PF with no clear settled parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was intended to investigate and compare the efficacy of two different energy levels of RSWT on PF patients. Methods: Forty patients having unilateral chronic PF were recruited for the study from orthopedic outpatient clinics of Cairo University hospitals and National Institute of Neuromotor System Cairo Egypt, with a mean age of (47.15±4.57 years. Patients were randomly assigned into two equal groups. Group (A treated with low intensity level of 1.6 bars (0.16 mJ/mm2 RSWT and group (B treated with medium intensity level of 4 bars (0.38 mJ/mm2 RSWT. Functional assessment of the foot based on Foot Function Index (FFI and Present pain intensity was measured during rest by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: There was as significant decreased in the total FFI scores from (118.42 ±6.51 to (81.37 ±3.46 for group (A and from (118.93 ±6.85 to (58.50 ±3.22 for group (B. Also regarding VAS Scores there was as significant decreased in the pain intensity from (5.11 ±0.41 to (2.85 ±0.31 for group (A and from (4.95 ±0.39 to (2.05 ±0.22 for group (B. Conclusion: Radial shock wave therapy is an effective modality that should be considered in the treatment of chronic PF, while the medium energy level RSWT is better than the low energy level RSWT in regarding to the measured treatment outcomes.

  16. A mathematical approach to the effective Hamiltonian in perturbed periodic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, C.; Martinez, A.; Sjoestrand, J.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a rigorous mathematical reduction of the spectral study for a class of periodic problems with perturbations which gives a justification of the method of effective Hamiltonians in solid state physics. We study the partial differential operators of the form P=P(hy, y, D y +A(hy)) on R n (when h>0 is small enough), where P(x, y, η) is elliptic, periodic in y with respect to some lattice Γ, and admits smooth bounded coefficients in (x, y). A(x) is a magnetic potential with bounded derivatives. We show that the spectral study of P near any fixed energy level can be reduced to the study of a finite system of h-pseudodifferential operators ε(x, hD x , h), acting on some Hilbert space depending on Γ. We then apply it to the study of the Schroedinger operator when the electric potential is periodic, and to some quasiperiodic potentials with vanishing magnetic field. (orig.)

  17. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  18. Influence of low energy N+ ions pre-treatment on damage effects of UV-B irradiation on M1 rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shuaipeng; Huang Qunce; Chen Xueneng

    2011-01-01

    The seedlings of rice (xindao18) were exposed to UV-B (10.08 kJ/(m 2 ·d 1 )) irradiation following the pretreatment with three different implantation dosages of low-energy N + ions. Changes in the levels of the superoxide (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and soluble sugar were measured. The result showed that the UV-B irradiation on the seedlings of rice pretreated with low-energy ions implantation could lead to increase activities in POD and SOD, and the maximum appeared on the dose of 2.0 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 . Meanwhile, it made the content of GSH increased, and caused the activity of CAT and the content of MDA to be decreased. But there was no obvious change in soluble sugar. It was suggested that the rice pretreated by low energy ion implantation could enhance the antioxidation capacity and defensive ability when irradiated by UV-B, and the antioxidation system could be induced earlier than carbohydrate system. Therefore,the biological effects of UV-B irradiation on rice pretreated by low energy ion implantation were quite obvious. (authors)

  19. Low-energy Electro-weak Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazit, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Chiral effective field theory (EFT) provides a systematic and controlled approach to low-energy nuclear physics. Here, we use chiral EFT to calculate low-energy weak Gamow-Teller transitions. We put special emphasis on the role of two-body (2b) weak currents within the nucleus and discuss their applications in predicting physical observables.

  20. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  1. Parametrization of open systems with effective quadratic hamiltonians plus stochastic force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, E.S.; Mizrahi, S.S.

    1981-12-01

    The evolution generated by general dissipative Hamiltonians is analyzed when a stochastic force is included. A mapping technique allows to easily write the equations of motion for the observables of interest. A general dissipativity condition is extracted, whose fullfilment guarantees that thermal equilibrium is reached as the final stage of the evolution. Several existing frictional Hamiltonians are examined and it is seen that the correlation of the fluctuating force is essential to the destruction of a constant of motion inherent to pure quantal behaviour. (Author) [pt

  2. Effective and absolute cross sections for low-energy (1-30 eV) electron interactions with condensed biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Sanche, Léon

    2018-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is intensively used for therapeutic [e.g., radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT)], as well as for diagnostic medical imaging purposes. In these applications, the radiation dose given to the patient should be known and controlled. In conventional cancer treatments, absorbed dose calculations rely essentially on scattering cross sections (CSs) of the primary high-energy radiation. In more sophisticated treatments, such as combined radio- and chemo-therapy, a description of the details of energy deposits at the micro- and nano-scopic level is preferred to relate dose to radiobiological effectiveness or to evaluate doses at the biomolecular level, when radiopharmaceuticals emitting short-range radiation are delivered to critical molecular components of cancer cells (e.g., TRT). These highly radiotoxic compounds emit large densities of low-energy electrons (LEEs). More generally, LEE (0-30 eV) are emitted in large numbers by any type of high-energy radiation; i.e., about 30 000 per MeV of deposited primary energy. Thus, to optimize the effectiveness of several types of radiation treatments, the energy deposited by LEEs must be known at the level of the cell, nucleus, chromosome, or DNA. Such local doses can be evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, which account event-by-event, for the slowing down of all generations of particles. In particular, these codes require as input parameters absolute LEE CSs for elastic scattering, energy losses, and direct damage to vital cellular molecules, particularly DNA, the main target of radiation therapy. In the last decade, such CSs have emerged in the literature. Furthermore, a method was developed to transform relative yields of damages into absolute CSs by measuring specific parameters in the experiments. In this review article, we first present a general description of dose calculations in biological media via MC simulation and give an overview of the CSs available from

  3. Validation of use of the low energies library in the GATE program: assessment of the effective mass attenuation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argenta, J.; Brambilla, C.R.; Marques da Silva, A.M.; Hoff, G.

    2009-01-01

    GATE (Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography) is a versatile tool kit for nuclear medicine simulations of SPECT and PET studies. GATE takes advantage of well-validated libraries of physics processes models, geometry description, tracking of particles through materials, response of detector and visualization tools offered by Geant4. One package available to simulate electromagnetic interactions is LEP (Low Energy Electromagnetic Processes). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the LEP package used by GATE 4 for nuclear medicine shielding simulations. Several simulations were made involving a mono directional and 140 keV monoenergetic point source beam, passing through barriers of variable thickness of water and lead. The results showed good agreement with the theoretical model, indicating that GATE 4 uses correctly the LEP package. (author)

  4. Validation of use of the low energies library in the GATE program: assessment of the effective mass attenuation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argenta, Jackson; Brambilla, Claudia R.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da; Hoff, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography program (GATE) is a versatile toolkit for nuclear medicine simulations of SPECT and PET studies. GATE takes advantage of well-validated libraries of physics processes models, geometry description, tracking of particles through materials, response of detector and visualization tools offered by Geant4 (version 4.0). One package available to simulate electromagnetic interactions is low energy electromagnetic processes (LEP). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the LEP package used by GATE 4 for nuclear medicine shielding simulations. Several simulations were made involving a monodirectional and 140 keV monoenergetic point source beam, passing through barriers of variable thickness of water and lead. The results showed good agreement with the theoretical model, indicating that GATE 4 uses correctly the LEP package. (author)

  5. Effects of {Delta}-isobar degrees of freedom on the reactions {sup 3}He(n,{gamma}){sup 4}He and {sup 3}He(p,e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}){sup 4}He at low-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiavilla, R.

    1991-12-31

    The cross sections of the radiative {sup 3}He(n,{gamma}){sup 4}He and weak {sup 3}He(p,e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}){sup 4}He capture reactions at thermal neutron and keV proton energies have been calculated with the Variational Monte Carlo method. The ground state and low-energy continuum wave functions have been determined variationally from a realistic Hamiltonian, and include both nucleon and {Delta}-isobar degrees of freedom. The electroweak transition operator contains one- and two-body components in the N + {Delta} Hilbert space.

  6. Effects of. Delta. -isobar degrees of freedom on the reactions sup 3 He(n,. gamma. ) sup 4 He and sup 3 He(p,e sup +. nu. sub e ) sup 4 He at low-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiavilla, R.

    1991-01-01

    The cross sections of the radiative {sup 3}He(n,{gamma}){sup 4}He and weak {sup 3}He(p,e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}){sup 4}He capture reactions at thermal neutron and keV proton energies have been calculated with the Variational Monte Carlo method. The ground state and low-energy continuum wave functions have been determined variationally from a realistic Hamiltonian, and include both nucleon and {Delta}-isobar degrees of freedom. The electroweak transition operator contains one- and two-body components in the N + {Delta} Hilbert space.

  7. Effects of Δ-isobar degrees of freedom on the reactions 3He(n,γ)4He and 3He(p,e+νe)4He at low-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavilla, R.

    1991-01-01

    The cross sections of the radiative 3 He(n,γ) 4 He and weak 3 He(p,e + ν e ) 4 He capture reactions at thermal neutron and keV proton energies have been calculated with the Variational Monte Carlo method. The ground state and low-energy continuum wave functions have been determined variationally from a realistic Hamiltonian, and include both nucleon and Δ-isobar degrees of freedom. The electroweak transition operator contains one- and two-body components in the N + Δ Hilbert space

  8. The reduced effective vibration-rotational Hamiltonian for the nu(t ') = nu(t '')=1 levels of C-3v symmetric-top molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ceausu-Velcescu, A.; Pracna, Petr; Nová Stříteská, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 289, JUL 2013 (2013), s. 7-12 ISSN 0022-2852 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : effective Hamiltonian * reductions * combination bands Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.529, year: 2013

  9. Inside bluetooth low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) is one of the latest enhancement to Bluetooth technology and, as the name suggests, it is aimed at ultra low power devices, such as heart rate monitors, thermometers, and sensors. Due to very low power consumption, devices compliant with this standard can operate for several years on coin cell batteries without the need for recharging. This cutting-edge book helps you understand the whats , whys , and hows of Bluetooth LE. It includes a broad view of the technology, identifies the various building blocks, and explains how they come together. You also find discussions on Bluetooth basics, providing the background information needed to master Bluetooth LE.The book explains the architecture of Bluetooth LE stack and the functionality provided by each of the layers. You find expert guidance in setting up your own system in a quick and efficient manner with inexpensive, easily available hardware and just a couple of PCs running Linux. This unique volume features two chapters that are dedi...

  10. Solar low energy dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hestnes, Anne Grete

    2000-01-01

    By now, a lot has been learnt about how to reduce energy use in dwellings using solar and low energy technologies, and many good examples can be found throughout Europe. Still, they are not quite the common feature we would expect them to be, i.e. they have not really penetrated the market. The reason for this is in part a result of the fact that the designers and developers of these buildings have not looked at what the market wants and needs, but rather at how to use a set of given technologies. The buildings are the result of a technology push rather than a market pull and have therefore, often, been detached or semidetached dwellings with different solar technologies added on in less than optimal ways. In order to increase market penetration, it is time to look at the market trends and relate to these. Fortunately, quite a few European architects have realized this and have started designing somewhat different residential buildings. The paper focuses on examples of the new trends in solar residential architecture and by that, hopefully, it shows that we are on the right track. (au)

  11. Very low energy geothermics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Very low energy geothermics correspond to temperatures below 30 C and has been developed to cover heating and cooling needs of recent individual houses or tertiary industries using heat pumps and low depth aquifers (<100 m). Geothermal heat pumps industry has made great strides in European Northern countries, China, Japan and the United States of America. Geothermal heat pumps are less energy consuming than air heat pumps and require less cooling fluid and maintenance. The Aquapac procedure has been developed in France in 1983 by the AFME (French Energy Control Agency), EdF and the BRGM (Geologic and Mining Research Office) to encourage the use of geothermal heat pump for domestic and sanitary water heating and to make a survey of low-depth aquifers in the whole french territory. The decay of energy costs that started in 1986 has led to a loss of interest for the Aquapac procedure, even in the tertiary industries for which the air-conditioning demand is growing up. (J.S.). 1 tab

  12. Modeling Optical Spectra of Large Organic Systems Using Real-Time Propagation of Semiempirical Effective Hamiltonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Andersen, Amity; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2017-09-12

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent semiempirical method (INDO/S) in NWChem using real-time (RT) propagation to address, in principle, the entire spectrum of valence electronic excitations. Adopting this model, we study the UV/vis spectra of medium-sized systems such as P3B2 and f-coronene, and in addition much larger systems such as ubiquitin in the gas phase and the betanin chromophore in the presence of two explicit solvents (water and methanol). RT-INDO/S provides qualitatively and often quantitatively accurate results when compared with RT- TDDFT or experimental spectra. Even though we only consider the INDO/S Hamiltonian in this work, our implementation provides a framework for performing electron dynamics in large systems using semiempirical Hartree-Fock Hamiltonians in general.

  13. Supersymmetric Hamiltonian approach to edge excitations in ν=5/2 fractional quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ming; Zhang Xin

    2008-01-01

    A supersymmetric Hamiltonian is constructed for the edge excitations of the Moore-Read (Pfaffian) like state, which is a realization of the N=2 supersymmetric CS model. Fermionic generators and their conjugates are introduced to deal with the fermion pairing, whose condensation form a BCS like state. After Bogoliubov transformation, an N=2 supersymmetric and nonrelativistic Hamiltonian is found to take a known form, which is integrable. The main difference between the Moore-Read state and our BCS like state is that the number of fermion pairs in our formalism is not fixed. However, we have also found that the excited states in our model looks similar but not exactly the same as Moore and Read's

  14. Instability in Hamiltonian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pumarino

    2005-11-01

    Besides proving the existence of Arnold diffusion for a new family of three degrees of freedom Hamiltonian systems, another goal of this book is not only to show how Arnold-like results can be extended to substantially larger sets of parameters, but also how to obtain effective estimates on the splitting of separatrices size when the frequency of the perturbation belongs to open real sets.

  15. Effects of high- and low-energy radial shock waves therapy combined with physiotherapy in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiangzheng; Li, Zhongli; Liu, Zhengsheng; Shi, Teng; Xue, Chao

    2017-06-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of high- and low-energy radial shock waves combined with physiotherapy for rotator cuff tendinopathy patients. Data from rotator cuff tendinopathy patients received high- or low-energy radial shock waves combined with physiotherapy or physiotherapy alone were collected. The Constant and Murley score and visual analog scale score were collected to assess the effectiveness of treatment in three groups at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. In total, 94 patients were involved for our retrospective study. All groups showed remarkable improvement in the visual analog scale and Constant and Murley score compared to baseline at 24 weeks. The high-energy radial shock waves group had more marked improvement in the Constant and Murley score compared to the physiotherapy group at 4 and 8 weeks and at 4 weeks when compared with low-energy group. Furthermore, high-energy radial shock waves group had superior results on the visual analog scale at 4, 8, and 12 weeks compared to low-energy and physiotherapy groups. This retrospective study supported the usage of high-energy radial shock waves as a supplementary therapy over physiotherapy alone for rotator cuff tendinopathy by relieving the symptoms rapidly and maintaining symptoms at a satisfactory level for 24 weeks. Implications for Rehabilitation High-energy radial shock waves can be a supplemental therapy to physiotherapy for rotator cuff tendinopathy. We recommend the usage of high-energy radial shock waves during the first 5 weeks, at an interval of 7 days, of physiotherapy treatment. High-energy radial shock waves treatment combined with physiotherapy can benefit rotator cuff tendinopathy by relieving symptoms rapidly and maintain these improvements at a satisfactory level for quite a long time.

  16. Effect of laser shot peening on precipitation hardened aluminum alloy 6061-T6 using low energy laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyajith, S.; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-03-01

    Mechanical properties of engineering material can be improved by introducing compressive residual stress on the material surface and refinement of their microstructure. Variety of mechanical process such as shot peening, water jet peening, ultrasonic peening, laser shot peening were developed in the last decades on this contrast. Among these, lasers shot peening emerged as a novel industrial treatment to improve the crack resistance of turbine blades and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenic stainless steel in power plants. In this study we successfully performed laser shot peening on precipitation hardened aluminum alloy 6061-T6 with low energy (300 mJ, 1064 nm) Nd:YAG laser using different pulse densities of 22 pulses/mm 2 and 32 pulses/mm 2. Residual stress evaluation based on X-ray diffraction sin 2 ψ method indicates a maximum of 190% percentage increase on surface compressive stress. Depth profile of micro-hardness shows the impact of laser generated shock wave up to 1.2 mm from the surface. Apart from that, the crystalline size and micro-strain on the laser shot peened surfaces have been investigated and compared with the unpeened surface using X-ray diffraction in conjunction with line broadening analysis through the Williamson-Hall plot.

  17. Formation of plasmid DNA strand breaks induced by low-energy ion beam: indication of nuclear stopping effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Jiang Bingyao; Chen Youshan; Ding Xingzhao; Liu Xianghuai; Chen Ceshi; Guo Xinyou; Yin Guanglin

    1998-01-01

    Plasmid pGEM 3zf(+) was irradiated by nitrogen ion beam with energies between 20 and 100 keV and the fluence kept as 1 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 . The irradiated plasmid was assayed by neutral electrophoresis and quantified by densitometry. The yields of DNA with single-strand and double-strand breaks first increased then decreased with increasing ion energy. There was a maximal yield value in the range of 20-100 keV. The relationship between DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) cross-section and linear energy transfer (LET) also showed a peak-shaped distribution. To understand the physical process during DNA strand breaks, a Monte Carlo calculation code known as TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) was used to simulate energy losses due to nuclear stopping and to electronic stopping. It can be assumed that nuclear stopping plays a more important role in DNA strand breaks than electronic stopping in this energy range. The physical mechanisms of DNA strand breaks induced by a low-energy ion beam are also discussed. (orig.)

  18. A partial Hamiltonian approach for current value Hamiltonian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, R.; Mahomed, F. M.; Chaudhry, Azam

    2014-10-01

    We develop a partial Hamiltonian framework to obtain reductions and closed-form solutions via first integrals of current value Hamiltonian systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The approach is algorithmic and applies to many state and costate variables of the current value Hamiltonian. However, we apply the method to models with one control, one state and one costate variable to illustrate its effectiveness. The current value Hamiltonian systems arise in economic growth theory and other economic models. We explain our approach with the help of a simple illustrative example and then apply it to two widely used economic growth models: the Ramsey model with a constant relative risk aversion (CRRA) utility function and Cobb Douglas technology and a one-sector AK model of endogenous growth are considered. We show that our newly developed systematic approach can be used to deduce results given in the literature and also to find new solutions.

  19. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π ± p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f 2 =0.0756±0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P 31 and P 13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  20. The effect of low energy helium ion irradiation on tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys under fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonderman, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, tungsten remains the best candidate for plasma-facing components (PFCs) for future fusion devices because of its high melting point, low erosion, and strong mechanical properties. However, continued investigation has shown tungsten to undergo severe morphology changes under fusion-like conditions. These results motivate the study of innovative PFC materials which are resistant to surface morphology evolution. The goal of this work is to examine tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys, a potential PFC material, and their response to low energy helium ion irradiation. Specifically, W-Ta samples are exposed to 100 eV helium irradiations with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, at 873 K, 1023 K, and 1173 K for 1 h duration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals significant changes in surface deterioration due to helium ion irradiation as a function of both temperature and tantalum concentration in W-Ta samples. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) studies show a slight lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples compared to pure W samples. The observed lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples (proportional to increasing Ta wt.% concentrations) reflect significant differences observed in the evolution of surface morphology, i.e., fuzz development processes for both increasing Ta wt.% concentration and target temperature. These results suggest a correlation between the observed morphology differences and the induced crystal structure change caused by the presence of tantalum. Shifts in the XRD peaks before and after 100 eV helium irradiation with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, 1023 K, for 1 h showed a significant difference in the magnitude of the shift. This has suggested a possible link between the atomic spacing of the material and the accumulated damage. Ongoing research is needed on W-Ta alloys and other innovative materials for their application as irradiation resistant materials in future fusion or irradiation environments.

  1. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 234U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-01-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution (σ e ) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of 234 U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution (σ E ) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on σ E (A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on σ E (A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on σ e (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the σ E (A) curve, and the observed peaks on σ e (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  2. Effect of low-energy coherent radiation with lambda=6328 A on the survival rate of Saccharomyces cerevisial of strain 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramova, N.V.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the continuous monochromatic coherent laser radiation on the survival rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae of strain 14 is studied. The effect of laser radiation is judged by the change in the survival rate of the yeast culture before and after the irradiation. The decrease of the number of the yeast cells in the initial moments of the irradiation was observed as a result of the laser irradiation. Then the rapid decrease of the number of cells with time changes into their constant number. It is established that the low-energy coherent radiation decreases the survival rate by 30-40%

  3. On the relationship between string low-energy effective actions and O(α'3) σ-model β-functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jack, I.; Ross, D.A.; Jones, D.R.T.

    1988-01-01

    We examine in detail the connection between low-energy string effective actions and the σ-model β-functions up to O(α' 3 ) in the torsion-free case. In particular we show that the relationship between, on the one hand, the equations of motion derived from the O(α' 3 ) string effective action, and, on the other hand, the O(α' 3 ) σ-model β-functions necessarily involves derivative operators acting on the β-functions. (orig.)

  4. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, J.K.; Novakowski, T.J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He + ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C + ion impurities in He + ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C + ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH 4 have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He + ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He + ions) and 100% H + ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04–2.0% H + ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 10 24  ions m −2 ), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He + ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C + ion impurities in He + ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C + ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H + ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H + ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04–2.0% H + ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications. - Highlights: • Mo Fuzz evolutions due to low-energy high-flux 100% He + ion irradiation. • Sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions with increasing C + ion impurities in He + ions. • Almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C + ion impurity in He + ions. • No Mo fuzz formation for 100% H + ion

  5. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of {sup 234}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado Postal 31-139, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: mmontoya@ipen.gob.pe

    2008-07-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub e}) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of {sup 234}U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub E}) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on {sigma}{sub e} (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the {sigma}{sub E} (A) curve, and the observed peaks on {sigma}{sub e} (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  6. Microscopic approach to critical behaviour in 3He-4He mixtures (II). Thermodynamics of the effective Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.K.; Goswami, P.

    1984-08-01

    Thermodynamics of a weakly interacting fermion-boson mixture has been worked out on the basis of the effective Hamiltonian derived in an earlier paper. Tricritical point behaviour is discussed in terms of the fields (T,μ 3 ,μ 4 ). For the degenerate phase of the mixture, the theory reproduces the classical Landau expansion near a tricritical point. For the non-degenerate phase, the theory differs materially from the Landau theory; it predicts tricritical exponents in agreement with those calculated by applying renormalization group theory to phenomenological models, and a slope for the upper line larger than that of the lambda-line in the chi-T plane. (author)

  7. Next-to-leading order strong interaction corrections to the ΔF = 2 effective Hamiltonian in the MSSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuchini, Marco; Franco, E.; Guadagnoli, D.; Lubicz, Vittorio; Porretti, V.; Silvestrini, L.

    2006-01-01

    We compute the next-to-leading order strong interaction corrections to gluino-mediated ΔF = 2 box diagrams in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. These corrections are given by two loop diagrams which we have calculated in three different regularization schemes in the mass insertion approximation. We obtain the next-to-leading order Wilson coefficients of the ΔF = 2 effective Hamiltonian relevant for neutral meson mixings. We find that the matching scale uncertainty is largely reduced at the next-to-leading order, typically from about 10-15% to few percent

  8. An associative and noncommutative product for the low energy effective theory of a D-brane in curved backgrounds and bi-local fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Nakayama, Ryuichi

    2002-01-01

    We point out that when a D-brane is placed in an NS-NS B field background with nonvanishing field strength (H=dB) along the D-brane worldvolume, the coordinate of one end of the open string does not commute with that of the other in the low energy limit. The degrees of the freedom associated with both ends are not decoupled and accordingly, the effective action must be quite different from that of the ordinary noncommutative gauge theory for a constant B background. We construct an associative and noncommutative product * which operates on the coordinates of both ends of the string and propose a new type of noncommutative gauge action for the low energy effective theory of a Dp-brane. This effective theory is bi-local and lives in twice as large dimensions (2D=2(p+1)) as in the H=0 case. When viewed as a theory in the D-dimensional space, this theory is nonlocal and we must force the two ends of the string to coincide. We will then propose a prescription for reducing this bi-local effective action to that in D dimensions and obtaining a local effective action

  9. Effects of 2p-2h configurations on low-energy dipole states in neutron-rich N=80, 82 and 84 isotones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenyev N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the Skyrme interaction SLy4 we study the effects of phonon-phonon coupling on the low-energy electric dipole response in 130−134Sn, 132−136Te and 134−138Xe. Our calculations are performed within the finite-rank separable approximation, which enables one to perform quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations in very large two-quasiparticle configuration spaces. A dependence of the pygmy dipole resonance strengths on the neutron skin thickness is found. The inclusion of the two-phonon configurations gives a considerable contribution to the low-lying strength.

  10. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, J.K., E-mail: jtripat@purdue.edu; Novakowski, T.J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-09-15

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He{sup +} ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C{sup +} ion impurities in He{sup +} ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C{sup +} ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH{sub 4} have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He{sup +} ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He{sup +} ions) and 100% H{sup +} ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04–2.0% H{sup +} ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2}), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He{sup +} ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C{sup +} ion impurities in He{sup +} ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C{sup +} ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H{sup +} ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H{sup +} ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04–2.0% H{sup +} ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications. - Highlights: • Mo Fuzz evolutions due to low-energy high-flux 100% He{sup +} ion irradiation. • Sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions with increasing C{sup +} ion impurities in He{sup +} ions. • Almost complete prevention of Mo

  11. Effects of a premolt calcium and low-energy molt program on laying hen behavior and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, E R; Bregendahl, K; Stalder, K; Fitzgerald, R; Johnson, A K

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the behaviors, postures, and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios (H:L) of laying hens housed in a cage system when offered a Ca premolt treatment and low-energy molt diets vs. a traditional feed withdrawal (FW) treatment during and after molt. A total of 144 Hy-Line W-36 hens (85 wk of age), housed 3 hens/cage (413 cm(2)/hen), were used. Hens were allotted to treatments according to a randomized complete block design, with the cage location and initial BW as the blocking criteria. Six treatments were compared in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with 2 Ca premolt treatments (fine or coarse) and 3 low-energy molt diets (FW, soybean hulls, or wheat middlings). The 2 Ca premolt treatments differed only in Ca particle size (fine was 0.14 mm and coarse was 2.27 mm mean diameter). Two postures and 5 behaviors were recorded and H:L was measured. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS, with P postures, or H:L during the premolt baseline period. The Ca premolt treatment had no carryover effects during or after molt for behaviors or postures. During molt, hens in the FW treatment were more active, and they ate and drank less compared with hens fed soybean hulls or wheat middlings, but there were no differences in aggression, nonnutritive pecking, or sitting. Drinking and aggression during and after molt were not different, but hens postmolt engaged in more sitting and feeding and less activity, nonnutritive pecking, and preening compared with during molt. There were no differences in H:L during or after molt. In conclusion, a Ca premolt treatment did not affect the behavior of the laying hen. The low-energy molt diets did not adversely affect behavior compared with FW and did not increase H:L; therefore, they could be useful alternatives for inducing molt in laying hens.

  12. Contact Hamiltonian mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravetti, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.bravetti@iimas.unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Matemáticas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A. P. 70543, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Cruz, Hans, E-mail: hans@ciencias.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A. P. 70543, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Tapias, Diego, E-mail: diego.tapias@nucleares.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70543, México, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2017-01-15

    In this work we introduce contact Hamiltonian mechanics, an extension of symplectic Hamiltonian mechanics, and show that it is a natural candidate for a geometric description of non-dissipative and dissipative systems. For this purpose we review in detail the major features of standard symplectic Hamiltonian dynamics and show that all of them can be generalized to the contact case.

  13. Effective Floquet Hamiltonian theory of multiple-quantum NMR in anisotropic solids involving quadrupolar spins: Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Vinay; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2017-10-01

    The response of a quadrupolar nucleus (nuclear spin with I > 1/2) to an oscillating radio-frequency pulse/field is delicately dependent on the ratio of the quadrupolar coupling constant to the amplitude of the pulse in addition to its duration and oscillating frequency. Consequently, analytic description of the excitation process in the density operator formalism has remained less transparent within existing theoretical frameworks. As an alternative, the utility of the "concept of effective Floquet Hamiltonians" is explored in the present study to explicate the nuances of the excitation process in multilevel systems. Employing spin I = 3/2 as a case study, a unified theoretical framework for describing the excitation of multiple-quantum transitions in static isotropic and anisotropic solids is proposed within the framework of perturbation theory. The challenges resulting from the anisotropic nature of the quadrupolar interactions are addressed within the effective Hamiltonian framework. The possible role of the various interaction frames on the convergence of the perturbation corrections is discussed along with a proposal for a "hybrid method" for describing the excitation process in anisotropic solids. Employing suitable model systems, the validity of the proposed hybrid method is substantiated through a rigorous comparison between simulations emerging from exact numerical and analytic methods.

  14. On the Effects of Pickup Ion-driven Waves on the Diffusion Tensor of Low-energy Electrons in the Heliosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, N. Eugene, E-mail: n.eugene.engelbrecht@gmail.com [Center for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom, 2522 (South Africa)

    2017-11-01

    The effects of Alfvén cyclotron waves generated due to the formation in the outer heliosphere of pickup ions on the transport coefficients of low-energy electrons is investigated here. To this end, parallel mean free path (MFP) expressions are derived from quasilinear theory, employing the damping model of dynamical turbulence. These are then used as inputs for existing expressions for the perpendicular MFP and turbulence-reduced drift coefficient. Using outputs generated by a two-component turbulence transport model, the resulting diffusion coefficients are compared with those derived using a more typically assumed turbulence spectral form, which neglects the effects of pickup ion-generated waves. It is found that the inclusion of pickup ion effects greatly leads to considerable reductions in the parallel and perpendicular MFPs of 1–10 MeV electrons beyond ∼10 au, which are argued to have significant consequences for studies of the transport of these particles.

  15. Construction of Hamiltonians by supervised learning of energy and entanglement spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yuya O.; Sugiura, Sho; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2018-02-01

    Correlated many-body problems ubiquitously appear in various fields of physics such as condensed matter, nuclear, and statistical physics. However, due to the interplay of the large number of degrees of freedom, it is generically impossible to treat these problems from first principles. Thus the construction of a proper model, namely, effective Hamiltonian, is essential. Here, we propose a simple supervised learning algorithm for constructing Hamiltonians from given energy or entanglement spectra. We apply the proposed scheme to the Hubbard model at the half-filling, and compare the obtained effective low-energy spin model with several analytic results based on the high-order perturbation theory, which have been inconsistent with each other. We also show that our approach can be used to construct the entanglement Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body state from its entanglement spectrum as well. We exemplify this using the ground states of the S =1 /2 two-leg Heisenberg ladders. We observe a qualitative difference between the entanglement Hamiltonians of the two phases (the Haldane and the rung singlet phase) of the model due to the different origin of the entanglement. In the Haldane phase, we find that the entanglement Hamiltonian is nonlocal by nature, and the locality can be restored by introducing the anisotropy and turning the ground state into the large-D phase. Possible applications to the model construction from experimental data and to various problems of strongly correlated systems are discussed.

  16. Empirical Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Talman, R.

    1986-08-01

    As proton accelerators get larger, and include more magnets, the conventional tracking programs which simulate them run slower. At the same time, in order to more carefully optimize the higher cost of the accelerators, they must return more accurate results, even in the presence of a longer list of realistic effects, such as magnet errors and misalignments. For these reasons conventional tracking programs continue to be computationally bound, despite the continually increasing computing power available. This limitation is especially severe for a class of problems in which some lattice parameter is slowly varying, when a faithful description is only obtained by tracking for an exceedingly large number of turns. Examples are synchrotron oscillations in which the energy varies slowly with a period of, say, hundreds of turns, or magnet ripple or noise on a comparably slow time scale. In these cases one may with to track for hundreds of periods of the slowly varying parameter. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method, still under development, in which element-by-element tracking around one turn is replaced by a single map, which can be processed far faster. Similar programs have already been written in which successive elements are ''concatenated'' with truncation to linear, sextupole, or octupole order, et cetera, using Lie algebraic techniques to preserve symplecticity. The method described here is rather more empirical than this but, in principle, contains information to all orders and is able to handle resonances in a more straightforward fashion

  17. Investigating the Effect of Voltage-Switching on Low-Energy Task Scheduling in Hard Real-Time Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swaminathan, Vishnu; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the effect of voltage-switching on task execution times and energy consumption for dual-speed hard real-time systems, and present a new approach for scheduling workloads containing periodic tasks...

  18. Investigating the Effect of Voltage-Switching on Low-Energy Task Scheduling in Hard Real-Time Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the effect of voltage-switching on task execution times and energy consumption for dual-speed hard real - time systems , and present a...scheduling algorithm and apply it to two real-life task sets. Our results show that energy can be conserved in embedded real - time systems using energy...aware task scheduling. We also show that switching times have a significant effect on the energy consumed in hard real - time systems .

  19. Low energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1982-02-01

    In these lectures we present the liquid drop model of fission and compare some of its prediction with experiment. The liquid drop analogy allows to define in a rather simple and intuitive way a number of useful concepts and possible observables. We then discuss, using the example of the oscillator model, the generality of shell effects. We show how a synthesis of the liquid drop model and of the shell model can be made using the Strutinsky shell averaging procedure. Some experimental data related to the existence of shape isomers are presented and discussed. We conclude by discussing some aspects, both experimental and theoretical, of fission dynamics

  20. Surface sterilization by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Tabei, Masae

    1989-01-01

    The germicidal effectiveness of low energy electron beams (175 KV) against bacterial cells was investigated. The dry spores of Bacillus pumilus ATCC 27142 and Bacillus globigii ATCC 9372 inoculated on carrier materials and irradiated by gamma rays showed the exponential type of survival curves whereas they showed sigmoidal ones when exposed to low energy electron beams. When similarly irradiated, the wet spores inoculated on membrane filter showed the same survival curves as the dry spores inoculated on carrier materials. The wet vegetative cells of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 showed exponential curves when exposed to gamma and electron beam irradiation. Low energy electron beams in air showed little differences from nitrogen stream in their germicidal effectiveness against dry spores of B. pumilus. The D values of B. pumilus spores inoculated on metal plates decreased as the amounts of backscattering electrons from the plates increased. There was adequate correlation between the D value (linear region of survival curve), average D value (6D/6) and 1% survival dose and backscattering factor. Depth dose profile and backscatterig dose of low energy electron beams were measured by radiochromic dye film dosimeter (RCD). These figures were not always in accord with the observed germicidal effectiveness against B. pumilus spores because of varying thickness of RCD and spores inoculated on carrier material. The dry spores were very thin and this thinness was useful in evaluating the behavior of low energy electrons. (author)

  1. The effectiveness of the microbiological radiation decontamination process of agricultural products with the use of low energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryczka, Urszula; Migdał, Wojciech; Bułka, Sylwester

    2018-02-01

    The effectiveness of the radiation decontamination process was tested for electron beam of energy 200 keV and 300 keV. The energy of electrons was controlled by the measurements of its penetration ability in stack of B3 dosimetric film. In the presented work, the reduction of total aerobic bacteria count was observed, depending on time of irradiation for samples of dried black pepper, onion flakes and bay leaves. The results were compared with the effect observed for the process where high energy electron beam was used.

  2. A study on the ranges of low energy ions in biological samples and its mechanism of biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ting; Xie Liqing; Li Junping; Xia Ji

    1993-01-01

    The seeds of wheat and bean are irradiated by iron ion beam with energy 100 keV. The RBS spectra of the samples are observed and the ranges and distributions of the iron ions in the wheat and bean are calculated theoretically by means of Monte Carlo method. The results of theory and experiment are compared and the mechanism of biological effects induced by ion is discussed

  3. Low energy physics from superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The developments of the past year have resulted in growing interest in the theory of superstrings, a subject which is on the one hand extraordinarily exciting in the promise it holds for solutions of many of the outstanding problems of particle physics and on the other hand rather forbidding in the amount of new knowledge which needs to be acquired by the average theorist to understand the papers that are now being published on the recent developments. In a sense the term low energy superstrings is misleading: the work of the past fifteen years in string theory, culminating in last summer's stunning developments by Green and Schwartz have led theorists to believe a finite, consistent superstring theory can be formulated. An enormous amount of work is going on in this subject, the premise that an effective field theory in ten space-time dimensions can be obtained from the superstring theory is the start of the lectures. The lectures will cover this later stage, namely how does one proceed from the effective ten dimensional theory to an effective four dimensional theory, describing the world as we see it. 87 references, 2 tables

  4. Sputtering effect of low-energy ions on biological target: The analysis of sputtering product of urea and capsaicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lili; Xu, Xue; Wu, Yuejin

    2013-01-01

    Sputtering is a process whereby atoms are ejected from a solid target material due to bombardment of the target by energetic particles. Recent years, ion implantation was successfully applied to biological research based on the fragments sputtering and form open paths in cell structure caused by ion sputtering. In this study, we focused on urea and chilli pepper pericarp samples implanted with N + and Ar + ions. To investigate the sputtering effect, we designed a collecting unit containing a disk sample and a glass pipe. The urea content and capsaicin content recovered from glass pipes were adopted to represent the sputtering product. The result of urea showed that the sputtering effect is positively correlated with the ion energy and dose, also affected by the ion type. The result of capsaicin was different from that of urea at 20 keV and possibly due to biological complex composition and structure. Therefore the sputtering yield depended on both the parameters of incident ions and the state of target materials. The sputtering yield of urea was also simulated by computational method achieved through the TRIM program. The trajectories of primary and recoiled atoms were calculated on the basis of the binary collision approximation using Monte Carlo method. The experimental results were much higher than the calculated results. The possible explanation is that in the physical model the target were assumed as a disordered lattice and independent atoms, which is much less complicated than that of the biological models

  5. Strong nondipole effects in low-energy photoionization of the 5s and 5p subshells of xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W. R.; Cheng, K. T.

    2001-01-01

    Large nondipole effects are predicted in the angular distribution of photoelectrons from the 5s and 5p subshells of xenon for photon energies below 200 eV. The nondipole parameter γ 5s exhibits a dispersion-curve variation near the first minimum of the 5s cross section at 35 eV, reaching a minimum value of -0.8 near 40 eV. Rapid variation of γ 5s is also found near the second minimum of the 5s cross section at 150 eV, where γ 5s reaches a maximum value of 1.2. Smaller, but significant, nondipole effects are also found in the parameter ζ 5p =γ 5p +3δ 5p , which has a maximum value of 0.15 near 50 eV, and a second maximum value of 0.18 near 160 eV. The higher energy maxima in γ 5s and ζ 5p arise from correlation enhanced by shape resonances in the 4p→f quadrupole photoionization channels. These predictions are based on relativistic random-phase approximation calculations in which excitations from 5p, 5s, 4d, 4p, and 4s subshells are coupled

  6. The Raman effects in γ-LiAlO2 induced by low-energy Ga ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Hong-Lian; Qiao, Mei; Wang, Tie-Jun; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2017-10-01

    The tetragonal γ-LiAlO2 crystal, known as a promising solid breeding material in future fusion reactors, has attracted much attention for its irradiation effects. This work focused on the Raman effects in ion-implanted γ-LiAlO2. Ga ions of 30, 80 and 150 keV were implanted on the z-cut γ-LiAlO2 sample surfaces at a fluence of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2 or 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The average ion range varied from 230 to 910 Å. The Raman spectra were collected from the implanted surfaces before and after the implantation. Evident changes were reflected in the Raman modes intensities, with abnormal increments for the most detected modes. According to the assignments of Raman modes, the Al-O vibration was enhanced to a greater extent than the Li-Al-O vibration, and the LiO4-AlO4 vibration gained a lesser enhancement. The discussion, including the factors of roughness, crystalline disorder and influence by Ga ions, attempts to explain the increments of Raman intensity.

  7. Collective Hamiltonians for dipole giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, L.I.

    1991-07-01

    The collective hamiltonian for the Giant Dipole resonance (GDR), in the Goldhaber-Teller-Model, is analytically constructed using the semiclassical and generator coordinates method. Initially a conveniently parametrized set of many body wave functions and a microscopic hamiltonian, the Skyrme hamiltonian - are used. These collective Hamiltonians are applied to the investigation of the GDR, in He 4 , O 16 and Ca 40 nuclei. Also the energies and spectra of the GDR are obtained in these nuclei. The two sets of results are compared, and the zero point energy effects analysed. (author)

  8. Effect of single-particle splitting in the exact wave function of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma H, S.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the exact wave function of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian with nondegenerate single-particle levels is discussed. The way that the single-particle splittings break the quartet condensate solution found for N=Z nuclei in a single degenerate level is established. After a brief review of the exact solution, the structure of the wave function is analyzed and some particular cases are considered where a clear interpretation of the wave function emerges. An expression for the exact wave function in terms of the isospin triplet of pair creators is given. The ground-state wave function is analyzed as a function of pairing strength, for a system of four protons and four neutrons. For small and large values of the pairing strength a dominance of two-pair (quartets) scalar couplings is found, whereas for intermediate values enhancements of the nonscalar couplings are obtained. A correlation of these enhancements with the creation of Cooper-like pairs is observed.

  9. The Exergetic, Environmental and Economic Effect of the Hydrostatic Design Static Pressure Level on the Pipe Dimensions of Low-Energy District Heating Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tol, Hakan İbrahim; Svendsen, Svend

    2013-01-01

    to be used in a low-energy DH network to carry the heat produced by renewable and/or low grade energy sources to low-energy Danish buildings. In this study, a comparison of various design considerations with different levels of maximum design static pressures was performed, and their results evaluated...... in terms of energetic, exergetic, economic, and environmental perspectives....

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature effects on low energy near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo; Sun, Jiangping; Guo, Xiongxiong; Zou, Xixi; Zhang, Libin; Gan, Zhiyin

    2017-06-01

    The temperature effects on near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu(0 0 1) surface under 500 eV argon ion bombardment were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) method. In present MD model, substrate system was fully relaxed for 1 ns and a read-restart scheme was introduced to save total computation time. The temperature dependence of damage production was calculated. The evolution of near-surface cascades and spatial distribution of adatoms at varying temperature were analyzed and compared. It was found that near-surface vacancies increased with temperature, which was mainly due to the fact that more atoms initially located in top two layers became adatoms with the decrease of surface binding energy. Moreover, with the increase of temperature, displacement cascades altered from channeling-like structure to branching structure, and the length of collision sequence decreased gradually, because a larger portion of energy of primary knock-on atom (PKA) was scattered out of focused chain. Furthermore, increasing temperature reduced the anisotropy of distribution of adatoms, which can be ascribed to that regular registry of surface lattice atoms was changed with the increase of thermal vibration amplitude of surface atoms.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature effects on low energy near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Guo; Sun, Jiangping; Guo, Xiongxiong; Zou, Xixi; Zhang, Libin; Gan, Zhiyin, E-mail: ganzhiyin@126.com

    2017-06-15

    The temperature effects on near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu(0 0 1) surface under 500 eV argon ion bombardment were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) method. In present MD model, substrate system was fully relaxed for 1 ns and a read-restart scheme was introduced to save total computation time. The temperature dependence of damage production was calculated. The evolution of near-surface cascades and spatial distribution of adatoms at varying temperature were analyzed and compared. It was found that near-surface vacancies increased with temperature, which was mainly due to the fact that more atoms initially located in top two layers became adatoms with the decrease of surface binding energy. Moreover, with the increase of temperature, displacement cascades altered from channeling-like structure to branching structure, and the length of collision sequence decreased gradually, because a larger portion of energy of primary knock-on atom (PKA) was scattered out of focused chain. Furthermore, increasing temperature reduced the anisotropy of distribution of adatoms, which can be ascribed to that regular registry of surface lattice atoms was changed with the increase of thermal vibration amplitude of surface atoms.

  12. Correlation effects on double electron capture in highly-charged, low-energy ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F.W.; Griffin, D.C.; Havener, C.C.; Huq, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Stolterfoht, N.

    1987-01-01

    The method of zero-degree Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to study two-electron excited states populated in slow double capture collisions of highly charged ions with He and H 2 . The focus of this study is on production of autoionization electrons originating from the non-equivalent 1s 2 2pnl electron configurations in comparison with electron production resulting from the Auger decay of (near) equivalent 1s 2 nln'l' (with n∼n') configurations. It is shown that production of non-equivalent electron configurations is significant and involves electron-electron correlation effects whose analysis leads beyond the independent-particle model. Recent results that include a measurement at non-zero angles are presented to illustrate the angular dependence of electron emission from non-equivalent electron configurations, as well as the dependence on projectile charge state and target species. Comparison of high resolution scans over two lines of the 1s 2 2pnl sequence for the O 6+ + He system with accurate transition energy calculations shows preferential population of high angular momentum substation

  13. Technical Note: Effect of explicit M and N-shell atomic transitions on a low-energy x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Peter G. F., E-mail: peter.watson@mail.mcgill.ca; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: In EGSnrc, atomic transitions to and from the M and N-shells are treated in an average way by default. This approach is justified in which the energy difference between explicit and average M and N-shell binding energies is less than 1 keV, and for most applications can be considered negligible. However, for simulations of low energy x-ray sources on thin, high-Z targets, characteristic x-rays can make up a significant portion of the source spectra. As of release V4-2.4.0, EGSnrc has included an option to enable a more complete algorithm of all atomic transitions available in the EADL compilation. In this paper, the effect of M and N-shell averaging on the calculation of half-value layer (HVL) and relative depth dose (RDD) curve of a 50 kVp intraoperative x-ray tube with a thin gold target was investigated. Methods: A 50 kVp miniature x-ray source with a gold target (The INTRABEAM System, Carl Zeiss, Germany) was modeled with the EGSnrc user code cavity, both with and without M and N-shell averaging. From photon fluence spectra simulations, the source HVLs were determined analytically. The same source model was then used with egs-chamber to calculate RDD curves in water. Results: A 4% increase of HVL was reported when accounting for explicit M and N-shell transitions, and up to a 9% decrease in local relative dose for normalization at 3 mm depth in water. Conclusions: The EGSnrc default of using averaged M and N-shell binding energies has an observable effect on the HVL and RDD of a low energy x-ray source with high-Z target. For accurate modeling of this class of devices, explicit atomic transitions should be included.

  14. Low energy (soft) x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Russell, W.J.; Miller, R.C.; Nakamura, Nori; Mizuno, Masayoshi; Nishio, Shoji.

    1987-05-01

    Dosimetry of low-energy (soft) X rays produced by the SOFTEX Model CMBW-2 was performed using Nuclear Associates Type 30 - 330 PTW, Exradin Type A2, and Shonka-Wyckoff ionization chambers with a Keithley Model 602 electrometer. Thermoluminescent (BeO chip) dosimeters were used with a Harshaw Detector 2000-A and Picoammeter-B readout system. Beam quality measurements were made using aluminum absorbers; exposure rates were assessed by the current of the X-ray tube and by exposure times. Dose distributions were established, and the average factors for non-uniformity were calculated. The means of obtaining accurate absorbed and exposed doses using these methods are discussed. Survival of V79 cells was assessed by irradiating them with soft X rays, 200 kVp X rays, and 60 Co gamma rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for soft X rays with 0, 0.2, 0.7 mm added thicknesses of aluminum were 1.6, which were compared to 60 Co. The RBE of 200 kVp X rays relative to 60 Co was 1.3. Results of this study are available for reference in future RERF studies of cell survival. (author)

  15. Toric codes and quantum doubles from two-body Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brell, Courtney G; Bartlett, Stephen D; Doherty, Andrew C [Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Flammia, Steven T, E-mail: cbrell@physics.usyd.edu.au [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    We present here a procedure to obtain the Hamiltonians of the toric code and Kitaev quantum double models as the low-energy limits of entirely two-body Hamiltonians. Our construction makes use of a new type of perturbation gadget based on error-detecting subsystem codes. The procedure is motivated by a projected entangled pair states (PEPS) description of the target models, and reproduces the target models' behavior using only couplings that are natural in terms of the original Hamiltonians. This allows our construction to capture the symmetries of the target models.

  16. Nested Sampling with Constrained Hamiltonian Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Betancourt, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Nested sampling is a powerful approach to Bayesian inference ultimately limited by the computationally demanding task of sampling from a heavily constrained probability distribution. An effective algorithm in its own right, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo is readily adapted to efficiently sample from any smooth, constrained distribution. Utilizing this constrained Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, I introduce a general implementation of the nested sampling algorithm.

  17. Hamiltonian closures in fluid models for plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Emanuele

    2017-11-01

    This article reviews recent activity on the Hamiltonian formulation of fluid models for plasmas in the non-dissipative limit, with emphasis on the relations between the fluid closures adopted for the different models and the Hamiltonian structures. The review focuses on results obtained during the last decade, but a few classical results are also described, in order to illustrate connections with the most recent developments. With the hope of making the review accessible not only to specialists in the field, an introduction to the mathematical tools applied in the Hamiltonian formalism for continuum models is provided. Subsequently, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of models based on the magnetohydrodynamics description, including those based on the adiabatic and double adiabatic closure. It is shown how Dirac's theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems can be applied to impose the incompressibility closure on a magnetohydrodynamic model and how an extended version of barotropic magnetohydrodynamics, accounting for two-fluid effects, is amenable to a Hamiltonian formulation. Hamiltonian reduced fluid models, valid in the presence of a strong magnetic field, are also reviewed. In particular, reduced magnetohydrodynamics and models assuming cold ions and different closures for the electron fluid are discussed. Hamiltonian models relaxing the cold-ion assumption are then introduced. These include models where finite Larmor radius effects are added by means of the gyromap technique, and gyrofluid models. Numerical simulations of Hamiltonian reduced fluid models investigating the phenomenon of magnetic reconnection are illustrated. The last part of the review concerns recent results based on the derivation of closures preserving a Hamiltonian structure, based on the Hamiltonian structure of parent kinetic models. Identification of such closures for fluid models derived from kinetic systems based on the Vlasov and drift-kinetic equations are presented, and

  18. P-odd effects in πN-scattering at low energies and determination of the isotopical structure of the weak nonleptonic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtein, S.S.; Folomeshkin, V.N.; Khlopov, M.Yu.

    1974-01-01

    P-odd effects in the πN-scattering on a target polarized along and again a pion beam have been considered. The P-odd correlations are intensified by interference of weak and strong interactions, whose amplitude is great in the energy range of the order of 100 to 300 MeV. When measuring cross-section differences of the πN-scattering at meson factories, it is possible to hope that the Lobashow integral method may be used in this range. The P-odd amplitudes have been calculated in the approximation of low-energy pions from the P-odd πNN vertex. High-energy meson effects are taken account of in the model of a rho-meson exchange. A kinematic analysis shows that the P-odd effects in a backward charge exchange reaction are sensitive to the presence of neutral currents. Investigation of the P-odd effects in a forward (elastica and with charge exchange) πN-scattering makes it possible to establish the isotopic structure of the nonlepton weak interaction and in particular to check the assumption of an intensified rho-meson exchange which has been offered by. Danilov to explain the high value of circular polarization of γ-quanta in the np → dγ reaction

  19. Adenosine Receptors as a Biological Pathway for the Anti-Inflammatory and Beneficial Effects of Low Frequency Low Energy Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Varani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies explored the biological effects of low frequency low energy pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs on human body reporting different functional changes. Much research activity has focused on the mechanisms of interaction between PEMFs and membrane receptors such as the involvement of adenosine receptors (ARs. In particular, PEMF exposure mediates a significant upregulation of A2A and A3ARs expressed in various cells or tissues involving a reduction in most of the proinflammatory cytokines. Of particular interest is the observation that PEMFs, acting as modulators of adenosine, are able to increase the functionality of the endogenous agonist. By reviewing the scientific literature on joint cells, a double role for PEMFs could be hypothesized in vitro by stimulating cell proliferation, colonization of the scaffold, and production of tissue matrix. Another effect could be obtained in vivo after surgical implantation of the construct by favoring the anabolic activities of the implanted cells and surrounding tissues and protecting the construct from the catabolic effects of the inflammatory status. Moreover, a protective involvement of PEMFs on hypoxia damage in neuron-like cells and an anti-inflammatory effect in microglial cells have suggested the hypothesis of a positive impact of this noninvasive biophysical stimulus.

  20. The Exergetic, Environmental and Economic Effect of the Hydrostatic Design Static Pressure Level on the Pipe Dimensions of Low-Energy District Heating Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan İbrahim Tol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-Energy District Heating (DH systems, providing great energy savings by means of very low operating temperatures of 55 °C and 25 °C for supply and return respectively, were considered to be the 4th generation of the DH systems for a low-energy future. Low-temperature operation is considered to be used in a low-energy DH network to carry the heat produced by renewable and/or low grade energy sources to low-energy Danish buildings. In this study, a comparison of various design considerations with different levels of maximum design static pressures was performed, and their results evaluated in terms of energetic, exergetic, economic, and environmental perspectives.

  1. Renormalization of Hamiltonian QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrasi, A.; Taylor, John C.

    2009-01-01

    We study to one-loop order the renormalization of QCD in the Coulomb gauge using the Hamiltonian formalism. Divergences occur which might require counter-terms outside the Hamiltonian formalism, but they can be cancelled by a redefinition of the Yang-Mills electric field.

  2. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic field line Hamiltonian and the associated canonical form for the magnetic field are important concepts both for understanding toroidal plasma physics and for practical calculations. A number of important properties of the canonical or Hamiltonian representation are derived and their importance is explained

  3. Geometry of Hamiltonian chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Zion, Yossi Ben; Lewkowicz, Meir

    2007-01-01

    The characterization of chaotic Hamiltonian systems in terms of the curvature associated with a Riemannian metric tensor in the structure of the Hamiltonian is extended to a wide class of potential models of standard form through definition of a conformal metric. The geodesic equations reproduce ...

  4. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1985-02-01

    The basic properties of the Hamiltonian representation of magnetic fields in canonical form are reviewed. The theory of canonical magnetic perturbation theory is then developed and applied to the time evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a toroidal plasma. Finally, the extension of the energy principle to tearing modes, utilizing the magnetic field line Hamiltonian, is outlined

  5. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  6. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  7. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Doses of Low Energy Shock Wave Therapy on the Erectile Function of Streptozotocin (STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Cheng Xin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the therapeutic effect of different doses of low energy shock wave therapy (LESWT on the erectile dysfunction (ED in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. SD rats (n = 75 were randomly divided into 5 groups (normal control, diabetic control, 3 different dose LESWT treated diabetic groups. Diabetic rats were induced by intra-peritoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg and rats with fasting blood glucose ≥ 300 mg/dL were selected as diabetic models. Twelve weeks later, different doses of LESWT (100, 200 and 300 shocks each time treatment on penises were used to treat ED (7.33 MPa, 2 shocks/s three times a week for two weeks. The erectile function was evaluated by intracavernous pressure (ICP after 1 week washout period. Then the penises were harvested for histological study. The results showed LESWT could significantly improve the erectile function of diabetic rats, increase smooth muscle and endothelial contents, up-regulate the expression of α-SMA, vWF, nNOS and VEGF, and down- regulate the expression of RAGE in corpus cavernosum. The therapeutic effect might relate to treatment dose positively, and the maximal therapeutic effect was noted in the LESWT300 group. Consequently, 300 shocks each time might be the ideal LESWT dose for diabetic ED treatment.

  8. Low-energy neutrino measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-05

    Oct 5, 2012 ... Abstract. Low-energy solar neutrino detection plays a fundamental role in ... the experimental point of view, there are multiple ways to shed light among the different .... compared to the two metallicity expectations [16]. ..... from the Earth; solar neutrinos; indirect dark matter searches) and GeV physics (pro-.

  9. Low-energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The 1985 annual report of the Schuster Laboratory, Manchester University, England, on low-energy nuclear physics, is presented. The report includes experiments involving: high spin states, nuclei far from stability, reactions and fission, spectroscopy and related subjects. Technical developments are also described. (U.K.)

  10. Low-energy neutrino measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low-energy solar neutrino detection plays a fundamental role in understanding both solar astrophysics and particle physics. After introducing the open questions on both fields, we review here the major results of the last two years and expectations for the near future from Borexino, Super-Kamiokande, SNO and KamLAND ...

  11. Diagonalization of Hamiltonian; Diagonalization of Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, L M; Pascual, P

    1960-07-01

    We present a general method to diagonalized the Hamiltonian of particles of arbitrary spin. In particular we study the cases of spin 0,1/2, 1 and see that for spin 1/2 our transformation agrees with Foldy's and obtain the expression for different observables for particles of spin C and 1 in the new representation. (Author) 7 refs.

  12. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics, phase equivalence, and low energy scattering anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, R.D.; Cannata, F.; Dedonder, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics links two Hamiltonians with the same scattering (phase equivalence) but different number of bound states. We examine the Green's functions for these Hamiltonians as a prelude to embedding the two-body dynamics in a many-body system. We study the effect of the elimination of a two-body bound state near zero energy for the Efimov effect and Beg's theorem

  13. Is the concept of the non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian relevant in the case of potential scattering?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, Dmitry V.; Sokolov, Valentin V.; Sommers, Hans-Juergen

    2003-01-01

    We examine the notion and properties of the non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian of an unstable system using as an example potential resonance scattering with a fixed angular momentum. We present a consistent self-adjoint formulation of the problem of scattering on a finite-range potential, which is based on the separation of the configuration space into two segments, internal and external. The scattering amplitude is expressed in terms of the resolvent of a non-Hermitian operator H. The explicit form of this operator depends on both the radius of separation and the boundary conditions at this place, which can be chosen in many different ways. We discuss this freedom and show explicitly that the physical scattering amplitude is, nevertheless, unique, although not all choices are equally adequate from the physical point of view. The energy-dependent operator H should not be confused with the non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian H eff which is usually exploited to describe interference of overlapping resonances. We note that the simple Breit-Wigner approximation is as a rule valid for any individual resonance in the case of few-channel scattering on a flat billiardlike cavity, leaving no room for nontrivial H eff to appear. The physics is appreciably richer in the case of an open chain of L connected similar cavities whose spectrum has a band structure. For a fixed band of L overlapping resonances, the smooth energy dependence of H can be ignored so that the constant LxL submatrix H eff approximately describes the time evolution of the chain in the energy domain of the band and the complex eigenvalues of H eff define the energies and widths of the resonances. We apply the developed formalism to the problem of a chain of L δ barriers, whose solution is also found independently in a closed form. We construct H eff for the two commonly considered types of boundary conditions (Neumann and Dirichlet) for the internal motion. Although the final results are in perfect

  14. Low Energy Neutrino Cross Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    Present atmospheric and accelerator based neutrino oscillation experiments operate at low neutrino energies (Ev ∼ 1 GeV) to access the relevant regions of oscillation parameter space. As such, they require precise knowledge of the cross sections for neutrino-nucleon interactions in the sub-to-few GeV range. At these energies, neutrinos predominantly interact via quasi-elastic (QE) or single pion production processes, which historically have not been as well studied as the deep inelastic scattering reactions that dominate at higher energies.Data on low energy neutrino cross sections come mainly from bubble chamber, spark chamber, and emulsion experiments that collected their data decades ago. Despite relatively poor statistics and large neutrino flux uncertainties, these measurements provide an important and necessary constraint on Monte Carlo models in present use. The following sections discuss the current status of QE, resonant single pion, coherent pion, and single kaon production cross section measurements at low energy

  15. A low energy solar town

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, Svend; Balocco, Carla

    1998-12-31

    The use of solar energy at large scale is necessary to support the energy savings and a more efficient energy use, like besides the quality of the ambient and the quality of the available energy sources. The solar heating systems with seasonal storage can be combined with heat from refuse incineration plants and other renewable heat sources. These systems combined with district heating are an example of the sustainable energy planning and the reduction of the environmental stress. Strategies for sustainability in the settlements can be defined by and energy model to planning that individuates development and economic and financial supports to. The aim of the work concerns the development of a small sun city with no use of fossil fuels. The new low energy solar town is an idealised urban an energy system. The studied settlement regards one thousand new low-energy houses supplied by a district heating with a central solar heating system with seasonal heat storage. The heating and ventilation demand in the studied low energy buildings are less than 40 kWh/m{sup 2}/year, the electricity demand is less than 2000 kWh per house year. The result of the work is an useful tool to the energy planning of the urban areas and it is also a necessary support to the political and energetic decisions. (EG) 58 refs.

  16. A low energy solar town

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svendsen, Svend; Balocco, Carla

    1998-01-01

    The use of solar energy at large scale is necessary to support the energy savings and a more efficient energy use, like besides the quality of the ambient and the quality of the available energy sources. The solar heating systems with seasonal storage can be combined with heat from refuse incineration plants and other renewable heat sources. These systems combined with district heating are an example of the sustainable energy planning and the reduction of the environmental stress. Strategies for sustainability in the settlements can be defined by and energy model to planning that individuates development and economic and financial supports to. The aim of the work concerns the development of a small sun city with no use of fossil fuels. The new low energy solar town is an idealised urban an energy system. The studied settlement regards one thousand new low-energy houses supplied by a district heating with a central solar heating system with seasonal heat storage. The heating and ventilation demand in the studied low energy buildings are less than 40 kWh/m 2 /year, the electricity demand is less than 2000 kWh per house year. The result of the work is an useful tool to the energy planning of the urban areas and it is also a necessary support to the political and energetic decisions. (EG) 58 refs

  17. Effect of low-energy extracorporeal shock wave on vascular regeneration after spinal cord injury and the recovery of motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yuquan; Jiang, Zheng; Han, Lizhang

    2016-01-01

    Latest studies show that low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can upregulate levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF can ease nervous tissue harm after spinal cord injury (SCI). This study aims to explore whether low-energy ESWT can promote expression of VEGF, protect nervous tissue after SCI, and improve motor function. Ninety adult female rats were divided into the following groups: Group A (simple laminectomy), Group B (laminectomy and low-energy ESWT), Group C (spinal cord injury), and Group D (spinal cord injury and low-energy ESWT). Impinger was used to cause thoracic spinal cord injury. Low-energy ESWT was applied as treatment after injury three times a week, for 3 weeks. After SCI, the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale was used to evaluate motor function over a period of 42 days at different time points. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining was used to evaluate nerve tissue injury. Neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) staining was also used to evaluate loss of neurons. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of VEGF and its receptor fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt-1). Immunostaining was used to evaluate VEGF protein expression level in myeloid tissue. BBB scores of Groups A and B showed no significant result related to dyskinesia. HE and NeuN staining indicated that only using low-energy ESWT could not cause damage of nervous tissue in Group B. Recovery of motor function at 7, 35, and 42 days after SCI in Group D was better than that in Group C (Pfunction. It can be regarded as one mode of clinical routine adjunctive therapy for spinal injury.

  18. From Real Materials to Model Hamiltonians With Density Matrix Downfolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihuo Zheng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to advances in computer hardware and new algorithms, it is now possible to perform highly accurate many-body simulations of realistic materials with all their intrinsic complications. The success of these simulations leaves us with a conundrum: how do we extract useful physical models and insight from these simulations? In this article, we present a formal theory of downfolding–extracting an effective Hamiltonian from first-principles calculations. The theory maps the downfolding problem into fitting information derived from wave functions sampled from a low-energy subspace of the full Hilbert space. Since this fitting process most commonly uses reduced density matrices, we term it density matrix downfolding (DMD.

  19. Nuclei far from stability. Individual and collective excitations at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The low energy structure of exotic nuclei is discussed in terms of self-consistent microscopic models. The experimental striking features of the spectroscopy of these nuclei are briefly surveyed and the schematic steps performed to obtain from effective N-N interactions their spectroscopic properties are presented. Their saturation and deformation properties are given by the Hartree-Fock approximation (HF). Then it is shown how to describe the dynamics of even-even exotic nuclei excited states by solving the complete Bohr Hamiltonian, built microscopically using the HF approximation and the adiabatic limit (and its derivatives) of the time-dependent HF approximation (ATDHF). The structure of odd and doubly odd nuclei is discussed in the framework of the unified model, ie the microscopic rotor + quasiparticles model. Finally possible future directions of experimental research concerning exotic nuclei are described and improvements or new theoretical approaches discussed [fr

  20. Food irradiation by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    For some special cases, the use of low energy electrons has advantages over the use of gamma-rays or higher energy electrons for the direct irradiation of food. These advantages arise from details of the interaction processes which are responsible for the production of physical, chemical and biological effects. Factors involved include depth of penetration, dose distribution, irradiation geometry, the possible production of radioactivity and costs

  1. Effects of fusion relevant transient energetic radiation, plasma and thermal load on PLANSEE double forged tungsten samples in a low-energy plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Ouyang, B.; Zhang, Z.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salar Elahi, A.; Rawat, R. S.

    2018-06-01

    Tungsten is the leading candidate for plasma facing component (PFC) material for thermonuclear fusion reactors and various efforts are ongoing to evaluate its performance or response to intense fusion relevant radiation, plasma and thermal loads. This paper investigates the effects of hot dense decaying pinch plasma, highly energetic deuterium ions and fusion neutrons generated in a low-energy (3.0 kJ) plasma focus device on the structure, morphology and hardness of the PLANSEE double forged tungsten (W) samples surfaces. The tungsten samples were provided by Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), Germany via International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria. Tungsten samples were irradiated using different number of plasma focus (PF) shots (1, 5 and 10) at a fixed axial distance of 5 cm from the anode top and also at various distances from the top of the anode (5, 7, 9 and 11 cm) using fixed number (5) of plasma focus shots. The virgin tungsten sample had bcc structure (α-W phase). After PF irradiation, the XRD analysis showed (i) the presence of low intensity new diffraction peak corresponding to β-W phase at (211) crystalline plane indicating the partial structural phase transition in some of the samples, (ii) partial amorphization, and (iii) vacancy defects formation and compressive stress in irradiated tungsten samples. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed the distinctive changes to non-uniform surface with nanometer sized particles and particle agglomerates along with large surface cracks at higher number of irradiation shots. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated the reduction in relative tungsten oxide content and the increase in metallic tungsten after irradiation. Hardness of irradiated samples initially increased for one shot exposure due to reduction in tungsten oxide phase, but then decreased with increasing number of shots due to increasing concentration of defects. It is demonstrated that the plasma focus device provides

  2. Low energy bar pp physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsler, C.; Crowe, K.

    1989-02-01

    A detailed investigation of proton-antiproton interactions at low energy has become feasible with the commissioning of the LEAR facility in 1983. We shall shortly review the status of bar pp annihilation at rest and the physics motivations for second generation experiments with the Crystal Barrel detector. This type of detector would be adequate for the study of both Kp and bar pp interactions on an extracted beam of the KAON Factory. We shall conclude with a few remarks on the physics opportunities with bar p's at the KAON Factory which, in our opinion, will not be covered by the present LEAR facility. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Low-energy heavy-ion reactions: Some recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    We address three areas: behavior of the optical model at low energies and associated phenomena, fusion at near- and sub-barrier energies; where does fusion occur?, and recent examples of explicit coupled-channels effects at low energies. 74 refs., 18 figs

  4. Low energy dynamics of self-dual A1 strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    We examine the interrelation between the (2,0) supersymmetric six-dimensional effective action for the A 1 theory, and the corresponding low-energy theory for the collective coordinates associated to selfdual BPS strings. We argue that this low energy theory is a two-dimensional N=4 supersymmetric sigma model

  5. The low-energy geothermics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Low-energy geothermal resources are characterized by temperatures ranging from 30 to 100 C. The principal worldwide applications are: towns and greenhouses heating, spa bathing, agriculture products drying, etc.. Sources depth ranges from 1500 to 2500 m in porous and permeable formations (sandstones, sands, conglomerates, limestones..) carrying aquifers. The worldwide installed power was of about 11500 MWth in 1990, with an annual production of about 36000 GWh (about 1% of worldwide energy consumption). The annual production rate is estimated to 10% and would represent a 30000 and 80000 MWth power in 2000 and 2010, respectively. In France, low-energy geothermal resources are encountered principally in Mesozoic sediments of the Parisian and Aquitanian basins. French geothermics has developed during the last 30 years and principally between 1980 and 1985 after the second petroleum crack. After 1985, the decay of fossil fuel costs and the development of corrosion problems in the geothermal wells have led to the abandonment of the less productive fields and to the study of technical solutions to solve the corrosion problems. (J.S.). 1 fig., 5 photos

  6. On the effects of the two-body non-fine-structure operators of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badnell, N.R.

    1997-01-01

    We have incorporated the two-body non-fine-structure operators of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian, namely contact spin-spin, two-body Darwin and orbit-orbit, into the program AUTOSTRUCTURE. Illustrative results are presented, including some for reactions involving the process of autoionization. (author)

  7. Equivalence of ADM Hamiltonian and Effective Field Theory approaches at next-to-next-to-leading order spin1-spin2 coupling of binary inspirals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, Michele [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS-UMR 7095, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Steinhoff, Jan, E-mail: michele.levi@upmc.fr, E-mail: jan.steinhoff@ist.utl.pt [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-12-01

    The next-to-next-to-leading order spin1-spin2 potential for an inspiralling binary, that is essential for accuracy to fourth post-Newtonian order, if both components in the binary are spinning rapidly, has been recently derived independently via the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches, using different gauges and variables. Here we show the complete physical equivalence of the two results, thereby we first prove the equivalence of the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches at next-to-next-to-leading order with the inclusion of spins. The main difficulty in the spinning sectors, which also prescribes the manner in which the comparison of the two results is tackled here, is the existence of redundant unphysical spin degrees of freedom, associated with the spin gauge choice of a point within the extended spinning object for its representative worldline. After gauge fixing and eliminating the unphysical degrees of freedom of the spin and its conjugate at the level of the action, we arrive at curved spacetime generalizations of the Newton-Wigner variables in closed form, which can also be used to obtain further Hamiltonians, based on an Effective Field Theory formulation and computation. Finally, we make use of our validated result to provide gauge invariant relations among the binding energy, angular momentum, and orbital frequency of an inspiralling binary with generic compact spinning components to fourth post-Newtonian order, including all known sectors up to date.

  8. Theory of collective Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qingying

    1982-02-01

    Starting from the cranking model, we derive the nuclear collective Hamiltonian. We expand the total energy of the collective motion of the ground state of even--even nuclei in powers of the deformation parameter ..beta... In the first approximation, we only take the lowest-order non-vanished terms in the expansion. The collective Hamiltonian thus obtained rather differs from the A. Bohr's Hamiltonian obtained by the irrotational incompressible liquid drop model. If we neglect the coupling term between ..beta..-and ..gamma..-vibration, our Hamiltonian then has the same form as that of A. Bohr. But there is a difference between these collective parameters. Our collective parameters are determined by the state of motion of the nucleous in the nuclei. They are the microscopic expressions. On the contrary, A. Bohr's collective parameters are only the simple functions of the microscopic physical quantities (such as nuclear radius and surface tension, etc.), and independent of the state of motion of the nucleons in the nuclei. Furthermore, there exist the coupling term between ..beta..-and ..gamma..-vibration and the higher-order terms in our expansion. They can be treated as the perturbations. There are no such terms in A. Bohr's Hamiltonian. These perturbation terms will influence the rotational, vibrational spectra and the ..gamma..-transition process, etc.

  9. Low-energy mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Wessel; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    and with as little energy consumption as 41.1 kWh/m2/year including heating and all building services with no use of renewable energy such as PVcells or solar heating. One of the key means of reaching the objectives was to implement mechanical ventilation with low pressure loss and therefore low energy consumption....... The project consists of two buildings, building one is 6 stories high, and building two is 4 stories high. The buildings have a gross area of 50,500 m2 including underground parking. The ventilation and indoor climate concept was to use mechanical ventilation together with mechanical cooling and fanassisted......, with an average of 1.1 kJ/m3. The yearly mean SFP based on estimated runtime is approx. 0.8 kJ/m3. The case shows the unlocked potential that lies within mechanical ventilation for nearzero energy consuming buildings....

  10. Theory of low energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparenberg, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The basic notions of low-energy quantum scattering theory are introduced (cross sections, phase shifts, resonances,... ), in particular for positively-charged particles, in view of nuclear physics applications. An introduction to the reaction-matrix (or R-matrix) method is then proposed, as a tool to both solve the Schroedinger equation describing collisions and fit experimental data phenomenologically. Most results are established without proof but with a particular emphasis on their intuitive understanding and their possible analogs in classical mechanics. Several choices are made consequently: (i) the text starts with a detailed reminder of classical scattering theory, (ii) the concepts are first introduced in ideal theoretical cases before going to the more complicated formalism allowing the description of realistic experimental situations, (iii) a single example is used throughout nearly the whole text, (iv) all concepts are established for the elastic scattering of spinless particles, with only a brief mention of their multichannel generalization at the end of the text. (author)

  11. Time dependent drift Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    The motion of individual charged particles in a given magnetic and an electric fields is discussed. An idea of a guiding center distribution function f is introduced. The guiding center distribution function is connected to the asymptotic Hamiltonian through the drift kinetic equation. The general non-stochastic magnetic field can be written in a contravariant and a covariant forms. The drift Hamiltonian is proposed, and the canonical gyroradius is presented. The proposed drift Hamiltonian agrees with Alfven's drift velocity to lowest non-vanishing order in the gyroradius. The relation between the exact, time dependent equations of motion and the guiding center equation is clarified by a Lagrangian analysis. The deduced Lagrangian represents the drift motion. (Kato, T.)

  12. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Peter

    2018-01-01

    An introductory textbook exploring the subject of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, with a relaxed and self-contained setting. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics is the continuation of Newton's classical physics into new formalisms, each highlighting novel aspects of mechanics that gradually build in complexity to form the basis for almost all of theoretical physics. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics also acts as a gateway to more abstract concepts routed in differential geometry and field theories and can be used to introduce these subject areas to newcomers. Journeying in a self-contained manner from the very basics, through the fundamentals and onwards to the cutting edge of the subject, along the way the reader is supported by all the necessary background mathematics, fully worked examples, thoughtful and vibrant illustrations as well as an informal narrative and numerous fresh, modern and inter-disciplinary applications. The book contains some unusual topics for a classical mechanics textbook. Mo...

  13. Quantifying the effects of higher order coupling terms on fits using a second order Jahn-Teller Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Henry K.; Stanton, John F.; Miller, Terry A.

    2018-01-01

    The limitations associated with the common practice of fitting a quadratic Hamiltonian to vibronic levels of a Jahn-Teller system have been explored quantitatively. Satisfactory results for the prototypical X∼2E‧ state of Li3 are obtained from fits to both experimental spectral data and to an "artificial" spectrum calculated by a quartic Hamiltonian which accurately reproduces the adiabatic potential obtained from state-of-the-art quantum chemistry calculations. However the values of the Jahn-Teller parameters, stabilization energy, and pseudo-rotation barrier obtained from the quadratic fit differ markedly from those associated with the ab initio potential. Nonetheless the RMS deviations of the fits are not strikingly different. Guidelines are suggested for comparing parameters obtained from fits to experiment to those obtained by direct calculation, but a principal conclusion of this work is that such comparisons must be done with a high degree of caution.

  14. [Effect of low-energy 633 nm red light stimulation on proliferation and reactive oxygen species level of human epidermal cell line HaCaT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z Y; Li, D L; Duan, X D; Peng, D Z

    2016-09-20

    group was observed by confocal laser scanning microscope. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, analysis of variance for repeated measurement, and t test. (1) Irradiation distance was 10 cm. Proliferative activity of cells in blank control group and 0.082, 0.164, 0.245, 0.491, 1.472, 2.453, 4.910, and 9.810 J/cm(2) irradiation groups was 1.000, 1.116±0.031, 1.146±0.016, 1.162±0.041, 1.179±0.016, 1.207±0.016, 1.247±0.040, 1.097±0.059, and 0.951±0.118, respectively. Compared with that in blank control group, proliferative activity of cells in 0.082-2.453 J/cm(2) irradiation groups was significantly higher (with t values from -22.803 to -6.779, P values below 0.05). Proliferative activity of cells in 4.910 and 9.810 J/cm(2) irradiation groups was similar to that in blank control group (with t values respectively -2.854 and 0.711, P values above 0.05). (2) Compared with that in blank control group, reactive oxygen species level of cells was significantly enhanced at PCM 0 and 30 in 0.164-2.453 J/cm(2) irradiation groups (with t values from -12.453 to -4.684, Poxygen species level of cells was significantly enhanced at PCM 60 in 0.082-2.453 J/cm(2) irradiation groups (with t values from -11.387 to -4.717, Poxygen species level of cells was significantly enhanced at PCM 120 in 0.491-2.453 J/cm(2) irradiation groups (with t values from -10.657 to -6.644, Poxygen species of cells was increased in 0.082, 0.491, and 2.453 J/cm(2) irradiation groups and positive control group. The expression of reactive oxygen species of cells in 9.810 J/cm(2) irradiation group was attenuated when compared with the expressions in the other irradiation groups. Reactive oxygen species expressed in mitochondria of cells in each group. Low-energy 633 nm red light can enhance the proliferation of human epidermal cell line HaCaT, and the effect is closely related to the increase of reactive oxygen species produced by mitochondria after being stimulated by red light irradiation.

  15. Investigation of timing effects in modified composite quadrupolar echo pulse sequences by mean of average Hamiltonian theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2018-01-01

    The utility of the average Hamiltonian theory and its antecedent the Magnus expansion is presented. We assessed the concept of convergence of the Magnus expansion in quadrupolar spectroscopy of spin-1 via the square of the magnitude of the average Hamiltonian. We investigated this approach for two specific modified composite pulse sequences: COM-Im and COM-IVm. It is demonstrated that the size of the square of the magnitude of zero order average Hamiltonian obtained on the appropriated basis is a viable approach to study the convergence of the Magnus expansion. The approach turns to be efficient in studying pulse sequences in general and can be very useful to investigate coherent averaging in the development of high resolution NMR technique in solids. This approach allows comparing theoretically the two modified composite pulse sequences COM-Im and COM-IVm. We also compare theoretically the current modified composite sequences (COM-Im and COM-IVm) to the recently published modified composite pulse sequences (MCOM-I, MCOM-IV, MCOM-I_d, MCOM-IV_d).

  16. Effect of orlistat on weight regain and cardiovascular risk factors following a very-low-energy diet in abdominally obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richelsen, Bjørn; Tonstad, Serena; Rössner, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of orlistat on the maintenance of weight loss over 3 years following a major weight loss induced by very-low-energy diet (VLED) in obese patients with metabolic risk factors such as dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, and diet-treated type 2 diabetes...... circumference was significantly more reduced in the orlistat group (P risk factors were observed between the two groups. The incidences of new cases of type 2 diabetes were significantly reduced in the orlistat group (8 cases out of 153 subjects) versus placebo (17 cases...

  17. Low-energy limit of two-scale field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, J.; Perez-Mercader, J.; Sanchez, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    We present a full and self-contained discussion of the decoupling theorem applied to several general models in four-dimensional field theory. We compute in each case the low-energy effective action and show the explicit one-loop expressions for each of the effective parameters. We find that for suitable conditions one can always build an effective low-energy theory where the conditions of the decoupling theorem are satisfied

  18. Intense low energy positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e + beams exist producing of the order of 10 8 - 10 9 e + /sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e + beams with intensities greater than 10 9 e + /sec and current densities of the order of 10 13 - 10 14 e + sec - 1 cm -2 . Intense e + beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B + moderators or by increasing the available activity of B + particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e + collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e + beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e + microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e + diffraction and other fields. Intense e + beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies

  19. NLO renormalization in the Hamiltonian truncation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias-Miró, Joan; Rychkov, Slava; Vitale, Lorenzo G.

    2017-09-01

    Hamiltonian truncation (also known as "truncated spectrum approach") is a numerical technique for solving strongly coupled quantum field theories, in which the full Hilbert space is truncated to a finite-dimensional low-energy subspace. The accuracy of the method is limited only by the available computational resources. The renormalization program improves the accuracy by carefully integrating out the high-energy states, instead of truncating them away. In this paper, we develop the most accurate ever variant of Hamiltonian Truncation, which implements renormalization at the cubic order in the interaction strength. The novel idea is to interpret the renormalization procedure as a result of integrating out exactly a certain class of high-energy "tail states." We demonstrate the power of the method with high-accuracy computations in the strongly coupled two-dimensional quartic scalar theory and benchmark it against other existing approaches. Our work will also be useful for the future goal of extending Hamiltonian truncation to higher spacetime dimensions.

  20. Dissipative systems and Bateman's Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, I.A.; Baseia, B.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown, by using canonical transformations, that one can construct Bateman's Hamiltonian from a Hamiltonian for a conservative system and obtain a clear physical interpretation which explains the ambiguities emerging from its application to describe dissipative systems. (Author) [pt

  1. CoSi2 growth on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy: Effects of high-flux, low-energy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C. W.; Greene, J. E.; Petrov, I.

    2006-01-01

    CoSi 2 layers, CoSi 2 (parallel sign)(001) Si and [100] CoSi 2 (parallel sign)[100] Si , contain fourfold symmetric (111) twinned domains oriented such that (221) CoSi 2 (parallel sign)(001) Si and CoSi 2 (parallel sign)[110] Si . We demonstrate that high-flux low-energy (E Ar + =9.6 eV) Ar + ion irradiation during deposition dramatically increases the area fraction f u of untwinned regions from 0.17 in films grown under standard magnetically balanced conditions in which the ratio J Ar + /J Co of the incident Ar + to Co fluxes is 1.4 to 0.72 with J Ar + /J Co =13.3. TEM analyses show that the early stages of RDE CoSi 2 (001) film growth proceed via the Volmer-Weber mode with independent nucleation of both untwinned and twinned islands. Increasing J Ar + /J Co results in larger values of both the number density and area of untwinned with respect to twinned islands. The intense Ar + ion bombardment creates additional low-energy adsorption sites that favor the nucleation of untwinned islands while collisionally enhancing Co surface mobilities which, in turn, increases the probability of itinerant Co adatoms reaching these sites

  2. Low-energy QCD and ultraviolet renormalons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peris, S.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the contribution of ultraviolet (UV) renormalons in QCD to two-point functions of quark current operators. This explicitly includes effects due to the exchange of one renormalon chain as well as two chains. It is shown that, when the external Euclidean momentum of the two-point functions becomes smaller than the scale Λ L associated with the Landau singularity of the QCD one-loop running coupling constant, the positions of the UV renormalons in the Borel plane become true singularities in the integration range of the Borel transform. This introduces ambiguities in the evaluation of the corresponding two-point functions. The ambiguities associated with the leading UV renormalon singularity are of the same type as the contribution due to the inclusion of dimension d=6 local operators in a low-energy effective Lagrangian valid at scales smaller than Λ L . We then discuss the inclusion of an infinite number of renormalon chains and argue that the previous ambiguity hints at a plausible approximation scheme for low-energy QCD, resulting in an effective Lagrangian similar to the one of the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (ENJL) model of QCD at large N c . (orig.)

  3. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  4. Low-energy hadronic interactions beyond the current algebra approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.N.; Troitskaya, N.I.; Nagy, M.

    1993-06-01

    The new low-energy AP 3 -interaction, which is produced by convergent box-constituent-quark-loop diagrams, is obtained within chiral perturbation theory at the quark level (CHPT) q with linear realization of chiral U(3) x U(3) symmetry. Its contributions to processes of low-energy interactions of low-lying mesons are investigated. The new interaction goes beyond the framework of the low-energy current algebra approach and of the effective chiral Lagrangians with linear realization of chiral symmetry, constructed at the hadronic level. (author). 17 refs, 3 figs

  5. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: 2007 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of low energy nuclear reactions, a subset of the field of condensed matter nuclear science. Condensed matter nuclear science studies nuclear effects in and/or on condensed matter, including low energy nuclear reactions, an entirely new branch of science that gained widespread attention and notoriety beginning in 1989 with the announcement of a previously unrecognized source of energy by Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons that came to be known as cold fusion. Two branches of LENR are recognized. The first includes a set of reactions like those observed by Fleischmann and Pons that use palladium and deuterium and yield excess heat and helium-4. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to explain these reactions, however there is no consensus for, or general acceptance of, any of the theories. The claim of fusion is still considered speculative and, as such, is not an ideal term for this work. The other branch is a wide assortment of nuclear reactions that may occur with either hydrogen or deuterium. Anomalous nuclear transmutations are reported that involve light as well as heavy elements. The significant questions that face this field of research are: 1) Are LENRs a genuine nuclear reaction? 2) If so, is there a release of excess energy? 3) If there is, is the energy release cost-effective?

  6. Safety of transvenous low energy cardioversion of atrial fibrillation in patients with a history of ventricular tachycardia: effects of rate and repolarization time on proarrhythmic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, G R; Newby, K H; Kearney, M M; Brandon, M J; Natale, A

    1998-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of transvenous low energy cardioversion of atrial fibrillation in patients with ventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation and to study the mechanisms of proarrhythmia. Previous studies have demonstrated that cardioversion of atrial fibrillation using low energy, R wave synchronized, direct current shocks applied between catheters in the coronary sinus and right atrium is feasible. However, few data are available regarding the risk of ventricular proarrhythmia posed by internal atrial defibrillation shocks among patients with ventricular arrhythmias or structural heart disease. Atrial defibrillation was performed on 32 patients with monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and left ventricular dysfunction. Shocks were administered during atrial fibrillation (baseline shocks), isoproterenol infusion, ventricular pacing, ventricular tachycardia, and atrial pacing. Baseline shocks were also administered to 29 patients with a history of atrial fibrillation but no ventricular arrhythmias. A total of 932 baseline shocks were administered. No ventricular proarrhythmia was observed after well-synchronized baseline shocks, although rare inductions of ventricular fibrillation occurred after inappropriate T wave sensing. Shocks administered during wide-complex rhythms (ventricular pacing or ventricular tachycardia) frequently induced ventricular arrhythmias, but shocks administered during atrial pacing at identical ventricular rates did not cause proarrhythmia. The risk of ventricular proarrhythmia after well-synchronized atrial defibrillation shocks administered during narrow-complex rhythms is low, even in patients with a history of ventricular tachycardia. The mechanism of proarrhythmia during wide-complex rhythms appears not to be related to ventricular rate per se, but rather to the temporal relationship between shock delivery and the repolarization time of the previous QRS complex.

  7. Complex Hamiltonian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bountis, Tassos

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces and explores modern developments in the well established field of Hamiltonian dynamical systems. It focuses on high degree-of-freedom systems and the transitional regimes between regular and chaotic motion. The role of nonlinear normal modes is highlighted and the importance of low-dimensional tori in the resolution of the famous FPU paradox is emphasized. Novel powerful numerical methods are used to study localization phenomena and distinguish order from strongly and weakly chaotic regimes. The emerging hierarchy of complex structures in such regimes gives rise to particularly long-lived patterns and phenomena called quasi-stationary states, which are explored in particular in the concrete setting of one-dimensional Hamiltonian lattices and physical applications in condensed matter systems.  The self-contained and pedagogical approach is blended with a unique balance between mathematical rigor, physics insights and concrete applications. End of chapter exercises and (more demanding) res...

  8. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Walsh

    2015-09-01

    . Efficient transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation.

  9. Noncanonical Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litteljohn, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Noncanonical variables in Hamiltonian mechanics were first used by Lagrange in 1808. In spite of this, most work in Hamiltonian mechanics has been carried out in canonical variables, up to this day. One reason for this is that noncanonical coordinates are seldom needed for mechanical problems based on Lagrangians of the form L = T - V, where T is the kinetic energy and V is the potential energy. Of course, such Lagrangians arise naturally in celestial mechanics, and as a result they form the paradigms of nineteenth-century mechanics and have become enshrined in all the mechanics textbooks. Certain features of modern problems, however, lead to the use of noncanonical coordinates. Among these are issues of gauge invariance and singular Lagrange a Poisson structures. In addition, certain problems, like the flow of magnetic-field lines in physical space, are naturally formulated in terms of noncanonical coordinates. None of these features is present in the nineteenth-century paradigms of mechanics, but they do arise in problems involving particle motion in the presence of magnetic fields. For example, the motion of a particle in an electromagnetic wave is an important one in plasma physics, but the usual Hamiltonian formulation is gauge dependent. For this problem, noncanonical approaches based on Lagrangians in phase space lead to powerful computational techniques which are gauge invariant. In the limit of strong magnetic fields, particle motion becomes 'guiding-center motion'. Guiding-center motion is also best understood in terms of noncanonical coordinates. Finally the flow of magnetic-field lines through physical space is a Hamiltonian system which is best understood with noncanonical coordinates. No doubt many more systems will arise in the future for which these noncanonical techniques can be applied. (author)

  10. Discrete variational Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lall, S; West, M

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to present a canonical choice of a Hamiltonian theory corresponding to the theory of discrete Lagrangian mechanics. We make use of Lagrange duality and follow a path parallel to that used for construction of the Pontryagin principle in optimal control theory. We use duality results regarding sensitivity and separability to show the relationship between generating functions and symplectic integrators. We also discuss connections to optimal control theory and numerical algorithms

  11. Approximate symmetries of Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Christopher T.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-08-01

    We explore the relationship between approximate symmetries of a gapped Hamiltonian and the structure of its ground space. We start by considering approximate symmetry operators, defined as unitary operators whose commutators with the Hamiltonian have norms that are sufficiently small. We show that when approximate symmetry operators can be restricted to the ground space while approximately preserving certain mutual commutation relations. We generalize the Stone-von Neumann theorem to matrices that approximately satisfy the canonical (Heisenberg-Weyl-type) commutation relations and use this to show that approximate symmetry operators can certify the degeneracy of the ground space even though they only approximately form a group. Importantly, the notions of "approximate" and "small" are all independent of the dimension of the ambient Hilbert space and depend only on the degeneracy in the ground space. Our analysis additionally holds for any gapped band of sufficiently small width in the excited spectrum of the Hamiltonian, and we discuss applications of these ideas to topological quantum phases of matter and topological quantum error correcting codes. Finally, in our analysis, we also provide an exponential improvement upon bounds concerning the existence of shared approximate eigenvectors of approximately commuting operators under an added normality constraint, which may be of independent interest.

  12. Low energy accelerators for research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle accelerators are instruments for producing a variety of radiations under controlled conditions for basic and applied research as well as applications. They have helped enormously to study the matter, atoms, nuclei, sub-nuclear particles and their constituents, forces involved in the related phenomena etc. No other man-made instrument has been so effective in such studies as the accelerator. The large accelerator constructed so far is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) housed in a tunnel of 27 km circumference, while a small accelerator can fit inside a room. Small accelerators accelerate charged particles such as electrons, protons, deuterons, alphas and, in general ions to low energy, generally, below several MeV. These particle beams are used for studies in nuclear astrophysics, atomic physics, material science, surface physics, bio sciences etc. They are used for ion beam analysis such as RBS, PIXE, NRA, AMS, CPAA etc. More importantly, the ion beams have important industrial applications like ion implantation, surface modification, isotope production etc. while electron beams are used for material processing, material modification, sterilization, food preservation, non destructive testing etc. In this talk, role of low energy accelerators in research and industry as well as medicine will be discussed. (author)

  13. Low energy theorems of hidden local symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Masayasu; Kugo, Taichiro; Yamawaki, Koichi.

    1994-01-01

    We prove to all orders of the loop expansion the low energy theorems of hidden local symmetries in four-dimensional nonlinear sigma models based on the coset space G/H, with G and H being arbitrary compact groups. Although the models are non-renormalizable, the proof is done in an analogous manner to the renormalization proof of gauge theories and two-dimensional nonlinear sigma models by restricting ourselves to the operators with two derivatives (counting a hidden gauge boson field as one derivative), i.e., with dimension 2, which are the only operators relevant to the low energy limit. Through loop-wise mathematical induction based on the Ward-Takahashi identity for the BRS symmetry, we solve renormalization equation for the effective action up to dimension-2 terms plus terms with the relevant BRS sources. We then show that all the quantum corrections to the dimension-2 operators, including the finite parts as well as the divergent ones, can be entirely absorbed into a re-definition (renormalization) of the parameters and the fields in the dimension-2 part of the tree-level Lagrangian. (author)

  14. The low energy nuclear spectrum in terms of IBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Akito

    1985-01-01

    The importance of the L = 4 pair in well deformed nuclei is pointed out. Two possibilities to include the effects of g-bosons are mentioned. One is the explicit addition of g-bosons to s and d bosons and the other is the use of a renormalized hamiltonian and renormalized operators. (orig.)

  15. A novel setup for the determination of absolute cross sections for low-energy electron induced strand breaks in oligonucleotides - The effect of the radiosensitizer 5-fluorouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rackwitz, J.; Rankovic, M.L.; Milosavljevic, A.R.; Bald, I.

    2017-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in DNA radiation damage. Here we present a method to quantify LEE induced strand breakage in well-defined oligonucleotide single strands in terms of absolute cross sections. An LEE irradiation setup covering electron energies <500 eV is constructed and optimized to irradiate DNA origami triangles carrying well-defined oligonucleotide target strands. Measurements are presented for 10.0 and 5.5 eV for different oligonucleotide targets. The determination of absolute strand break cross sections is performed by atomic force microscopy analysis. An accurate fluence determination ensures small margins of error of the determined absolute single strand break cross sections σ SSB . In this way, the influence of sequence modification with the radiosensitive 5-Fluorouracil ( 5F U) is studied using an absolute and relative data analysis. We demonstrate an increase in the strand break yields of 5F U containing oligonucleotides by a factor of 1.5 to 1.6 compared with non-modified oligonucleotide sequences when irradiated with 10 eV electrons. (authors)

  16. An effective Hamiltonian approach for Donor-Bridge-Acceptor electronic transitions: Exploring the role of bath memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Bittner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here a formally exact model for electronic transitions between an initial (donor and final (acceptor states linked by an intermediate (bridge state. Our model incorporates a common set of vibrational modes that are coupled to the donor, bridge, and acceptor states and serves as a dissipative bath that destroys quantum coherence between the donor and acceptor. Taking the memory time of the bath as a free parameter, we calculate transition rates for a heuristic 3-state/2 mode Hamiltonian system parameterized to represent the energetics and couplings in a typical organic photovoltaic system. Our results indicate that if the memory time of the bath is of the order of 10-100 fs, a two-state kinetic (i.e., incoherent hopping model will grossly underestimate overall transition rate.

  17. Particle Settling in Low Energy Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rachel; MacVean, Lissa; Tse, Ian; Mazzaro, Laura; Stacey, Mark; Variano, Evan

    2014-11-01

    Particle settling velocities can be altered by turbulence. In turbulence, dense particles may get trapped in convergent flow regions, and falling particles may be swept towards the downward side of turbulent eddies, resulting in enhanced settling velocities. The degree of velocity enhancement may depend on the Stokes number, the Rouse number, and the turbulent Reynolds number. In a homogeneous, isotropic turbulence tank, we tested the effects of particle size and type, suspended sediment concentration, and level of turbulence on the settling velocities of particles typically found in muddy estuaries. Two Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs), separated vertically, measured turbulent velocities and suspended sediment concentrations, which yield condition dependent settling velocities, via ∂/á C ñ ∂ t = -∂/∂ z (ws á C ñ + á w ' C ' ñ) . These results are pertinent to fine sediment transport in estuaries, where high concentrations of suspended material are transported and impacted by low energy turbulence.

  18. Knowledge from the low energy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1988-01-01

    Before being used at very high energies, in order to search for the quark-gluon plasma, nucleus-nucleus central collisions have been studied at low energy, between about 20 MeV per nucleon and 10 GeV per nucleon, with the same objective to explore the phase diagram of nuclear matter, but in a regime where both temperature and energy are too small for plasma formation. Approaching this very complicated problem of nuclear physics led to many difficulties. They are first reviewed, and various means developed in order to solve them are considered. These difficulties are then detailed along discussions about temperature and nuclear collective flow. Temperature is a concept which is commonly used but also a quantity which is difficult to measure. Nuclear collective flow is a very interesting compression effect; it has been observed experimentally after being predicted theoretically, but its interpretation in terms of the nuclear matter equation of state remains quite difficult [fr

  19. Theorems of low energy in Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahine, J.

    1984-01-01

    We have obtained the low energy theorems in Compton scattering to third and fouth order in the frequency of the incident photon. Next we calculated the polarized cross section to third order and the unpolarized to fourth order in terms of partial amplitudes not covered by the low energy theorems, what will permit the experimental determination of these partial amplitudes. (Author) [pt

  20. Hamiltonian path integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, L.V.

    1982-01-01

    Problems related to consideration of operator nonpermutability in Hamiltonian path integral (HPI) are considered in the review. Integrals are investigated using trajectories in configuration space (nonrelativistic quantum mechanics). Problems related to trajectory integrals in HPI phase space are discussed: the problem of operator nonpermutability consideration (extra terms problem) and corresponding equivalence rules; ambiguity of HPI usual recording; transition to curvilinear coordinates. Problem of quantization of dynamical systems with couplings has been studied. As in the case of canonical transformations, quantization of the systems with couplings of the first kind requires the consideration of extra terms

  1. Ultrafine tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices: effect of high flux, high fluence low energy helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, Sean; Allain, J.P.; Efe, Mert; Klenosky, Daniel; Qiu, Tian; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas; Bystrov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This work discusses the response of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials to high-flux, high-fluence, low energy pure He irradiation. Ultrafine-grained tungsten samples were exposed in the Pilot-PSI (Westerhout et al 2007 Phys. Scr. T128 18) linear plasma device at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The He flux on the tungsten samples ranged from 1.0 × 10 23 –2.0 × 10 24  ions m −2  s −1 , the sample bias ranged from a negative (20–65) V, and the sample temperatures ranged from 600–1500 °C. SEM analysis of the exposed samples clearly shows that ultrafine-grained tungsten materials have a greater fluence threshold to the formation of fuzz by an order or magnitude or more, supporting the conjecture that grain boundaries play a major role in the mechanisms of radiation damage. Pre-fuzz damage analysis is addressed, as in the role of grain orientation on structure formation. Grains of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) orientation showed only pore formation, while (0 0 1) oriented grains showed ripples (higher structures) decorated with pores. Blistering at the grain boundaries is also observed in this case. In situ TEM analysis during irradiation revealed facetted bubble formation at the grain boundaries likely responsible for blistering at this location. The results could have significant implications for future plasma-burning fusion devices given the He-induced damage could lead to macroscopic dust emission into the fusion plasma. (paper)

  2. Low energy demonstration accelerator technical area 53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) need to maintain the capability of producing tritium in support of its historic and near-term stewardship of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile, the agency has recently completed a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling. The resulting Record of Decision (ROD) determined that over the next three years the DOE would follow a dual-track acquisition strategy that assures tritium production for the nuclear weapon stockpile in a rapid, cost effective, and safe manner. Under this strategy the DOE will further investigate and compare two options for producing tritium: (1) purchase of an existing commercial light-water reactor or irradiation services with an option to purchase the reactor for conversion to a defense facility; and (2) design, build, and test critical components of a system for accelerator production of tritium (APT). The final decision to select the primary production option will be made by the Secretary of Energy in the October 1998 time frame. The alternative not chosen as the primary production method, if feasible, would be developed as a back-up tritium supply source. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end low-energy section of the accelerator, at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) would be incrementally developed and tested in five separate stages over the next seven years. The following issues were evaluated for the proposed action: utility demands, air, human health, environmental restoration, waste management, transportation, water, threatened and endangered species, wetlands, cultural resources, and environmental justice

  3. Global integration of the Schrödinger equation within the wave operator formalism: the role of the effective Hamiltonian in multidimensional active spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicard, Georges; Viennot, David; Leclerc, Arnaud; Killingbeck, John P

    2016-01-01

    A global solution of the Schrödinger equation, obtained recently within the wave operator formalism for explicitly time-dependent Hamiltonians (Leclerc and Jolicard 2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 225205), is generalized to take into account the case of multidimensional active spaces. An iterative algorithm is derived to obtain the Fourier series of the evolution operator issuing from a given multidimensional active subspace and then the effective Hamiltonian corresponding to the model space is computed and analysed as a measure of the cyclic character of the dynamics. Studies of the laser controlled dynamics of diatomic models clearly show that a multidimensional active space is required if the wavefunction escapes too far from the initial subspace. A suitable choice of the multidimensional active space, including the initial and target states, increases the cyclic character and avoids divergences occuring when one-dimensional active spaces are used. The method is also proven to be efficient in describing dissipative processes such as photodissociation. (paper)

  4. Charmless B{sub s}{yields}PP, PV, VV decays based on the six-quark effective Hamiltonian with strong phase effects II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Huazhong Normal University, Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhuang, Ci [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Yang, Yi-Bo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2012-03-15

    We provide a systematic study of charmless B{sub s}{yields}PP, PV, VV decays (P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector mesons, respectively) based on an approximate six-quark operator effective Hamiltonian from QCD. The calculation of the relevant hard-scattering kernels is carried out, the resulting transition form factors are consistent with the results of QCD sum-rule calculations. By taking into account important classes of power corrections involving ''chirally enhanced'' terms and the vertex corrections as well as weak annihilation contributions with non-trivial strong phase, we present predictions for the branching ratios and CP asymmetries of B{sub s} decays into PP, PV and VV final states, and also for the corresponding polarization observables in VV final states. It is found that the weak annihilation contributions with non-trivial strong phase have remarkable effects on the observables in the color-suppressed and penguin-dominated decay modes. In addition, we discuss the SU(3) flavor symmetry and show that the symmetry relations are generally respected. (orig.)

  5. Experimental investigation on the effect of surface electric field in the growth of tungsten nano-tendril morphology due to low energy helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woller, K.B.; Whyte, D.G.; Wright, G.M.; Brunner, D.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for and controlling the growth of tungsten nano-tendrils (or “fuzz”) under low-energy helium plasma exposure remain unclear. For the first time in nano-tendril experiments, the plasma sheath-produced electric field and the helium (He) ion energy have been decoupled, showing that the sheath electric field has little impact on nano-tendril growth, eliminating a possible cause for tendril growth. The well-established necessary growth conditions for W fuzz were maintained with He ion flux density Γ He  > 10 21  He m −2  s −1 , surface temperature T s  = 1273 K, He ion energy E He  = 64 eV, and He ion fluence Φ He  > 10 24  He m −2 . A grid is situated between the tungsten sample and plasma, with the grid and sample potentials independently controlled in order to control the electric field at the surface of the sample while maintaining the same incident He ion energy to the surface. A calculation of the potential profile in the drift space between the grid and sample was used to account for space charge and calculate the electric field at the surface of the sample. Tungsten fuzz formed at all electric fields tested, even near zero electric field. Also, the depth of the resulting W fuzz layer was unaltered by the electric field when compared to the calculated depth determined from an empirical growth model. The conclusion is that the sheath electric field is not necessary to cause the changes in surface morphology. - Highlights: • Surface electric field is proposed as a possible driver of tungsten fuzz growth. • A method that decouples plasma sheath electric field and ion energy is described. • Tungsten fuzz is shown to grow even without direct exposure to plasma. • Tungsten fuzz grows to the same depth with and without the plasma sheath.

  6. Low energy fermion number violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peccei, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    After a brief aside on charge quantization in the standard electroweak theory, I concentrate on various aspects of anomaly induced fermion number violation in the standard model. A critical analysis of the role of sphalerons for the universe's baryon asymmetry is presented and the importance of calculating directly fermion number violating Green's functions is stressed. A physical interpretation of the recent observation of Ringwald, that coherent effects in the electroweak theory lead to catastrophic fermion number violation at 100 TeV, is discussed. Possible quantum effects which might spoil this semi-classical picture are examined

  7. Solar-assisted low energy dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbensen, T V

    1980-02-01

    The Zero Energy House Group was formed as a subproject of the CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study in 1974 by seven participating countries experimenting with solar-assisted low-energy dwellings for temperate and northern European climatic conditions. A Zero Energy House is one in which solar energy is used to meet the reduced energy needs of buildings incorporating various thermal energy conservation features. This final report of the Zero Energy House Group includes brief descriptions of 13 major low-energy dwellings in the participating CCMS countries. An overall assessment of the state-of-the-art in solar-assisted low-energy dwellings is also included.

  8. Hamiltonian formulation of quantum error correction and correlated noise: Effects of syndrome extraction in the long-time limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, E.; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the long-time behavior of a quantum computer running a quantum error correction (QEC) code in the presence of a correlated environment. Starting from a Hamiltonian formulation of realistic noise models, and assuming that QEC is indeed possible, we find formal expressions for the probability of a given syndrome history and the associated residual decoherence encoded in the reduced density matrix. Systems with nonzero gate times (“long gates”) are included in our analysis by using an upper bound on the noise. In order to introduce the local error probability for a qubit, we assume that propagation of signals through the environment is slower than the QEC period (hypercube assumption). This allows an explicit calculation in the case of a generalized spin-boson model and a quantum frustration model. The key result is a dimensional criterion: If the correlations decay sufficiently fast, the system evolves toward a stochastic error model for which the threshold theorem of fault-tolerant quantum computation has been proven. On the other hand, if the correlations decay slowly, the traditional proof of this threshold theorem does not hold. This dimensional criterion bears many similarities to criteria that occur in the theory of quantum phase transitions.

  9. Low-energy limit of the extended Linear Sigma Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divotgey, Florian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kovacs, Peter [Wigner Research Center for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, ExtreMe Matter Institute, Darmstadt (Germany); Giacosa, Francesco [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Jan-Kochanowski University, Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Rischke, Dirk H. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); University of Science and Technology of China, Interdisciplinary Center for Theoretical Study and Department of Modern Physics, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2018-01-15

    The extended Linear Sigma Model is an effective hadronic model based on the linear realization of chiral symmetry SU(N{sub f}){sub L} x SU(N{sub f}){sub R}, with (pseudo)scalar and (axial-)vector mesons as degrees of freedom. In this paper, we study the low-energy limit of the extended Linear Sigma Model (eLSM) for N{sub f} = flavors by integrating out all fields except for the pions, the (pseudo-)Nambu-Goldstone bosons of chiral symmetry breaking. The resulting low-energy effective action is identical to Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) after choosing a representative for the coset space generated by chiral symmetry breaking and expanding it in powers of (derivatives of) the pion fields. The tree-level values of the coupling constants of the effective low-energy action agree remarkably well with those of ChPT. (orig.)

  10. Robust online Hamiltonian learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granade, Christopher E; Ferrie, Christopher; Wiebe, Nathan; Cory, D G

    2012-01-01

    In this work we combine two distinct machine learning methodologies, sequential Monte Carlo and Bayesian experimental design, and apply them to the problem of inferring the dynamical parameters of a quantum system. We design the algorithm with practicality in mind by including parameters that control trade-offs between the requirements on computational and experimental resources. The algorithm can be implemented online (during experimental data collection), avoiding the need for storage and post-processing. Most importantly, our algorithm is capable of learning Hamiltonian parameters even when the parameters change from experiment-to-experiment, and also when additional noise processes are present and unknown. The algorithm also numerically estimates the Cramer–Rao lower bound, certifying its own performance. (paper)

  11. Chromatic roots and hamiltonian paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    We present a new connection between colorings and hamiltonian paths: If the chromatic polynomial of a graph has a noninteger root less than or equal to t(n) = 2/3 + 1/3 (3)root (26 + 6 root (33)) + 1/3 (3)root (26 - 6 root (33)) = 1.29559.... then the graph has no hamiltonian path. This result...

  12. Fundamental physics with low-energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy neutrons are playing a prominent role in a growing number of fundamental physics studies. This paper provides a brief description of the physics that some of the experiments in the area are addressing. (paper)

  13. Pion nucleon interaction at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, M.K.

    1979-03-01

    A theory of the πN interaction at low energy is described. An analogy is made with an unusual approach to potential scattering theory. Phase shifts, cross sections, and scattering amplitudes and lengths are calculated. 28 references

  14. Current status of low energy EB machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshiro Nishikimi; Shuichi Taniguchi; Kenichi Mizusawa

    1999-01-01

    Electron beam processing systems have been in use in a variety of applications such as curing of paints and printing inks, crosslinking of PE products, treating of rubber tire and so on. Low energy electron processing systems have become popular as self-shielded machines, which are compact and easy to use and do not require special facility as an irradiation room. This manuscript introduces the status of low energy EB (electron beam) machine through Nissin's products current

  15. Enhancement Mechanisms of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    2005-01-01

    The review of possible stimulation mechanisms of LENR (low energy nuclear reaction) is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - the universal resonance synchronization principle [1] and based on its different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes [2]. The excitation and ionization of atoms may play role as a trigger for LENR. Superlow energy o...

  16. Exploring the Hidden Sector @ Low Energies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Over the years we have accumulated a large number of indications for physics beyond the standard model. This new physics is often sought-after at high masses and energies. Here collider experiments can bring decisive insights. However, over recent years it has become increasingly clear that new physics can also appear at low energy, but extremely weak coupling. Experiments and observations at this `low energy frontier' therefore provide a powerful tool to gain insight into fundamental physics, which is complementary to accelerators.

  17. Equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian BRST quantizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, G.V.; Grigoryan, R.P.; Tyutin, I.V.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches to the quantization of gauge theories using BRST symmetry are widely used nowadays: the Lagrangian quantization, developed in (BV-quantization) and Hamiltonian quantization, formulated in (BFV-quantization). For all known examples of field theory (Yang-Mills theory, gravitation etc.) both schemes give equivalent results. However the equivalence of these approaches in general wasn't proved. The main obstacle in comparing of these formulations consists in the fact, that in Hamiltonian approach the number of ghost fields is equal to the number of all first-class constraints, while in the Lagrangian approach the number of ghosts is equal to the number of independent gauge symmetries, which is equal to the number of primary first-class constraints only. This paper is devoted to the proof of the equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian quantizations for the systems with first-class constraints only. This is achieved by a choice of special gauge in the Hamiltonian approach. It's shown, that after integration over redundant variables on the functional integral we come to effective action which is constructed according to rules for construction of the effective action in Lagrangian quantization scheme

  18. Low energy scattering with a nontrivial pion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fariborz, Amir H.; Jora, Renata; Schechter, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    An earlier calculation in a generalized linear sigma model showed that the well-known current algebra formula for low energy pion-pion scattering held even though the massless Nambu Goldstone pion contained a small admixture of a two-quark two-antiquark field. Here we turn on the pion mass and note that the current algebra formula no longer holds exactly. We discuss this small deviation and also study the effects of a SU(3) symmetric quark mass type term on the masses and mixings of the eight SU(3) multiplets in the model. We calculate the s-wave scattering lengths, including the beyond current algebra theorem corrections due to the scalar mesons, and observe that the effect of the scalar mesons is to improve the agreement with experiment. In the process, we uncover the way in which linear sigma models give controlled corrections (due to the presence of scalar mesons) to the current algebra scattering formula. Such a feature is commonly thought to exist only in the nonlinear sigma model approach

  19. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the ''universality'' of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter

  20. Low Energy Desalination Using Battery Electrode Deionization

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Taeyoung

    2017-09-21

    New electrochemical technologies that use capacitive or battery electrodes are being developed to minimize energy requirements for desalinating brackish waters. When a pair of electrodes is charged in capacitive deionization (CDI) systems, cations bind to the cathode and anions bind to the anode, but high applied voltages (>1.2 V) result in parasitic reactions and irreversible electrode oxidation. In the battery electrode deionization (BDI) system developed here, two identical copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) battery electrodes were used that release and bind cations, with anion separation occurring via an anion exchange membrane. The system used an applied voltage of 0.6 V, which avoided parasitic reactions, achieved high electrode desalination capacities (up to 100 mg-NaCl/g-electrode, 50 mM NaCl influent), and consumed less energy than CDI. Simultaneous production of desalinated and concentrated solutions in two channels avoided a two-cycle approach needed for CDI. Stacking additional membranes between CuHCF electrodes (up to three anion and two cation exchange membranes) reduced energy consumption to only 0.02 kWh/m3 (approximately an order of magnitude lower than values reported for CDI), for an influent desalination similar to CDI (25 mM decreased to 17 mM). These results show that BDI could be effective as a very low energy method for brackish water desalination.

  1. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.; Azuah, R.T.; Stirling, W.G.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 ± δ,0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, ± δ) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions

  2. Low energy pion-16O scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wafelbakker, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of some outward appearances, the modern microscopic theories of the pion-nucleus (πA) interaction are not fundamentally very different from each other. They can all be derived from the same source, multiple-scattering theory. They all treat the first-order optical potential in a comparatively detailed way and in all of them it is necessary to incorporate higher-order effects in general and pion-annihilation in particular phenomenologically. Basically the same physical features can be embodied in all of them. The presentation of the theoretical scheme underlying the present thesis is designed to stress this conceptual unity of current πA theory. In this thesis the methods developed by De Kam to incorporate Pauli- and binding-corrections to the impulse-approximation first-order optical potential for 4 He are extended to a more complicated nucleus, 16 O, for the first time. In concreto two situations are considered: π- 16 O scattering at energies below nucleon-knockout threshold (13.5 MeV) - 7 and 12 MeV - and at energies 40 and 49.7 MeV, above nucleon-knockout threshold but still well within the low-energy region. (Auth.)

  3. DOD low energy model installation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, D.F. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Model Low Energy Installation Program is a demonstration of an installation-wide, comprehensive energy conservation program that meets the Department of Defense (DoD) energy management goals of reducing energy usage and costs by at least 20%. It employs the required strategies for meeting these goals, quantifies the environmental compliance benefits resulting from energy conservation and serves as a prototype for DoD wide application. This project will develop both analysis tools and implementation procedures as well as demonstrate the effectiveness of a comprehensive, coordinated energy conservation program based on state-of-the-art technologies. A military installation is in reality a small to medium sized city. It generally has a complete utilities infrastructure including water supply and distribution, sewage collection and treatment, electrical supply and distribution, central heating and cooling plants with thermal distribution, and a natural gas distribution system. These utilities are quite extensive and actually consume about 10-15% of the energy on the facility not counting the energy going into the central plants

  4. The effect of short-term low-energy ultraviolet B irradiation on bone mineral density and bone turnover markers in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: A randomized single-blinded controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micić Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The importance of vitamin D on bone health and osteoporosis was studied by many researchers. The main role of the Vitamin D is to absorb calcium and phosphate and increase bone mineralization. Older people are at an increased risk of the inadequate vitamin D production in the skin because of lower sun exposure and reduced ability of the skin to synthesize vitamin D. Objective. The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of short-term (2 weeks low energy UVB irradiation in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis using bone mineral density and bone turnover markers. Methods. A three-month, single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at the University hospital in Daegu, Republic of Korea. Fifty-two postmenopausal Korean women (older than 65 years with osteoporosis were randomly allocated to have either low energy UVB or placebo for 30 minutes a day for two weeks of treatment during winter. Laboratory analysis and physical examination before and 4, 8 and 12 weeks after treatment were carried out and BMD was measured before and 8 and 12 weeks after treatment. The effects of time and treatment interaction between these two groups were evaluated by repeated-measure two-factor analysis, and subgroup analysis was performed to examine UVB effect on the vitamin D insufficient group [serum 25(OHD3 concentration <30 ng/mL]. Results. In vitamin D insufficient group, the effect of UVB irradiation on vitamin D and bone ALP as well as additional benefit on bone formation was confirmed. The vitamin D insufficient group showed statistically significant increment in serum 25(OHD3 compared with the normal group (p<0.05. However, there was no significant difference between two groups in the other bone turnover markers, such as serum calcium, PTH-C, serum osteocalcin, serum CTX and BMD. Conclusion. Low-energy-short-term UVB radiation for postmenopausal women may be of use in vitamin D

  5. Energy-efficient and cost-effective use of district heating bypass for improving the thermal comfort in bathrooms in low-energy buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Brand, Marek; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    , in the example considered 10-35% lower than in the traditional “intermittent bypass” case; secondly, it can be used to increase the thermal comfort outside the heating-season in bathrooms through floor heating, without causing overheating. It is important that the building design foresees the use of shading......, the utilization of the bypass in bathroom floor heating is a cost-effective solution, both for the DH utilities (reduced heat loss from the DH network and higher revenues), the end-users (improved thermal comfort) and the society (reduction of greenhouse gas emissions)....... floor heating to increase the users’ comfort; its techno-economic analysis, including the modelling of the in-house space heating system; the effect of the bypass to the DH network. Some conclusions were derived. First, the “continuous bypass” guarantees low heat losses in the service pipe...

  6. Low energy p anti p strong interactions: theoretical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Several of the frontier problems in low energy nucleon-antinucleon phenomenology are addressed. Spin observables and dynamical selection rules in N anti N annihilation are used as examples of phenomena which offer particularly strong constraints on theoretical models, formulated either in terms of meson and baryon exchange or as effective operators in a non-perturbative quark-gluon picture. 24 refs

  7. Ground-state inversion method applied to calculation of molecular photoionization cross-sections by atomic extrapolation: Interference effects at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, P.R.; Nordholm, S.; Hush, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The ground-state inversion method, which we have previously developed for the calculation of atomic cross-sections, is applied to the calculation of molecular photoionization cross-sections. These are obtained as a weighted sum of atomic subshell cross-sections plus multi-centre interference terms. The atomic cross-sections are calculated directly for the atomic functions which when summed over centre and symmetry yield the molecular orbital wave function. The use of the ground-state inversion method for this allows the effect of the molecular environment on the atomic cross-sections to be calculated. Multi-centre terms are estimated on the basis of an effective plane-wave expression for this contribution to the total cross-section. Finally the method is applied to the range of photon energies from 0 to 44 eV where atomic extrapolation procedures have not previously been tested. Results obtained for H 2 , N 2 and CO show good agreement with experiment, particularly when interference effects and effects of the molecular environment on the atomic cross-sections are included. The accuracy is very much better than that of previous plane-wave and orthogonalized plane-wave methods, and can stand comparison with that of recent more sophisticated approaches. It is a feature of the method that calculation of cross-sections either of atoms or of large molecules requires very little computer time, provided that good quality wave functions are available, and it is then of considerable potential practical interest for photoelectorn spectroscopy. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion modelling of low-energy ion-implanted BF{sub 2} in crystalline silicon: Study of fluorine vacancy effect on boron diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcon, J. [Laboratoire Electronique Microtechnologie et Instrumentation (LEMI), University of Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France)], E-mail: Jerome.Marcon@univ-rouen.fr; Merabet, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux Metalliques, Departement d' O.M.P., Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Universite de Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria)

    2008-12-05

    We have investigated and modelled the diffusion of boron implanted into crystalline silicon in the form of boron difluoride BF{sub 2}{sup +}. We have used published data for BF{sub 2}{sup +} implanted with an energy of 2.2 keV in crystalline silicon. Fluorine effects are considered by using vacancy-fluorine pairs which are responsible for the suppression of boron diffusion in crystalline silicon. Following Uematsu's works, the simulations satisfactory reproduce the SIMS experimental profiles in the 800-1000 deg. C temperature range. The boron diffusion model in silicon of Uematsu has been improved taking into account the last experimental data.

  9. Low energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reasoner, D.L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1977-08-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS-6 Satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and plasma sheet populations. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods, this low energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, enhanced plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection. (author)

  10. Low-energy meson physics (chiral theory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, M.K.; Pervushin, V.N.

    1976-01-01

    A quantum chiral theory which allows to obtain low-energy expansions of various hadron processes without introducing arbitrary parameters into the theory with the exception of hadron masses and interaction constants is presented. A hypothesis about the dynamic symmetry of strong interactions is suggested. The interaction lagrangian is derived which satisfies conditions of the dynamic symmetry. Examples of the use of the quantum chiral theory for describing low-energy processes of meson interaction are given. It is noted that the results obtained reproduce the actual qualitative pattern of various physical processes and in most cases result in good quantitative agreement with experiments

  11. Alternative Hamiltonian representation for gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas-RodrIguez, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal J-48, 72570, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    By using a Hamiltonian formalism for fields wider than the canonical one, we write the Einstein vacuum field equations in terms of alternative variables. This variables emerge from the Ashtekar's formalism for gravity.

  12. Alternative Hamiltonian representation for gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosas-RodrIguez, R

    2007-01-01

    By using a Hamiltonian formalism for fields wider than the canonical one, we write the Einstein vacuum field equations in terms of alternative variables. This variables emerge from the Ashtekar's formalism for gravity

  13. Effects of low-energy laser irradiation on the distalization velocity during experimental canine tooth movement in humans: 'comparative clinical study'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Delma Rebelo

    2003-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) upon the velocity of canine tooth movement and consequently bone remodeling. A total of eleven patients were treated with a 780 nm diode laser. One side of the upper arcade was considered control group and was not irradiated but received mechanical activation every thirty days. The opposite side received the same mechanical activation but was also irradiated at days 0, 3, 7 and 14 of each month. Data of the biometrical progress were taken on both sides on days 3,7,14,21 and 30 of each month. The results indicate that all patients showed significant acceleration of the distalization velocity on the side treated with LLLT when compared to the control. (author)

  14. Beverages containing low energy sweeteners do not differ from water in their effects on appetite, energy intake and food choices in healthy, non-obese French adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantino, Marc; Fantino, Agnès; Matray, Marie; Mistretta, Frédéric

    2018-06-01

    The usefulness of replacement of caloric sugars by low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) for weight management has been questioned on the grounds that the uncoupling of LCS sweet taste and dietary energy may confuse physiological mechanisms, leading potentially to higher energy and sugar intake. The aim of the present study was to determine whether LCS beverages compared to water, when consumed with meals, differ in their effects on energy and food intake in acute trials and after long-term habituation. Ad libitum food intake of 166 (80 women; 86 men) healthy non-obese adults (BMI between 19 and 28 kg/m2), infrequent consumers of LCS was measured in four 2-consecutive-day testing sessions (Day 1 in the laboratory, Day 2 free-living). During the first 3 sessions, held one-week apart, participants were required to drink either water or commercial non-carbonated LCS lemonade (330 ml) with their main meals (randomised cross-over design). On Day 1, motivational ratings were obtained using visual analogue scales and ad libitum food intakes (amounts and types of foods selected) were measured using the plate waste method. On Day 2, participants reported their ad libitum intakes using a food diary. After Session 3, participants were randomly assigned to the LCS habituation group or to the water control group. The habituation (660 ml LCS lemonade daily vs 660 ml water) lasted 5 weeks. The fourth and final test session measured food intakes and motivational ratings after habituation. Water and LCS beverage did not differ in their effects on total energy intake, macronutrient intakes or the selection of sweet foods and on motivational ratings. Similar results were obtained in both LCS-naïve and LCS-habituated individuals.

  15. Scattering theory for Stark Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Arne

    1994-01-01

    An introduction to the spectral and scattering theory for Schroedinger operators is given. An abstract short range scattering theory is developed. It is applied to perturbations of the Laplacian. Particular attention is paid to the study of Stark Hamiltonians. The main result is an explanation of the discrepancy between the classical and the quantum scattering theory for one-dimensional Stark Hamiltonians. (author). 47 refs

  16. An online low energy gaseous ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Shuoxue; Guo Liping; Peng Guoliang; Zhang Jiaolong; Yang Zheng; Li Ming; Liu Chuansheng; Ju Xin; Liu Shi

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation of helium and/or hydrogen in nuclear materials may cause performance deterioration of the materials. In order to provide a unique tool to investigate the He-and/or H-caused problems, such as interaction of helium with hydrogen and defects, formation of gas bubbles and its evolution, and the related effects, we designed a low energy (≤ 20 keV) cold cathode Penning ion source, which will be interfaced to a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM), for monitoring continuously the evolution of micro-structure during the He + or H + ion implantation. Studies on discharge voltage-current characteristics of the ion source, and extraction and focusing of the ion beam were performed. The ion source works stably with 15-60 mA of the discharge current.Under the gas pressure of 5 x 10 -3 Pa and 1.5 x 10 -2 Pa, the discharge voltage are about 380 V and 320 V, respectively. The extracted ion current under lower gas pressure is greater than that under higher gas pressure, and it increases with the discharge current and extraction voltage. The ion lens consisting of three equal-diameter metal cylinder focus the ion beam effectively, so that the beam density at the 150 cm away from the lens exit increases by a over one order of magnitude. For ion beams of around 10 keV, the measured beam density is about 200 nA · cm -2 , which is applicable for ion implantation and in situ TEM observation for many kinds of nuclear materials. (authors)

  17. Degradation of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells due to the ionization effect of low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Shirou, E-mail: kawakita.shirou@jaxa.jp [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Imaizumi, Mitsuru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Okuda, Shuichi [Osaka Prefecture University (OPU), Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Kusawake, Hiroaki [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Cu (In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells were irradiated with 100 keV electrons to reveal the characteristics of created radiation defects. 100 keV electrons cannot produce any displacement defects in CIGS. Low-fluence electrons improve the electrical performance of the CIGS solar cells due to the change in the conductive type of donor to acceptor in a metastable defect, which is equivalent to the light-soaking effect. However, high fluence electrons cause the cell performance to decline. From analysis based on changes in carrier density and electroluminescence, defects causing the decline in performance include donor- and non-radiative types. In addition, red-on-bias experiments showed an increase in III{sub Cu} defects due to electron irradiation. Based on these results, the degradation in the electrical performance of the CIGS solar cells irradiated with high electron fluence would be attributable to a change in the conductive type of III{sub Cu} defects. - Highlights: • Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar cells were irradiated with 100 and 250 keV electrons at low temperature. • These electrons degraded the electrical performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 sola cells. • The electrons induced ⅢCu defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2.

  18. A study on the effect of low energy ion beam irradiation on Au/TiO_2 system for its application in photoelectrochemical splitting of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Anuradha; Srivastav, Anupam; Sharma, Dipika; Banerjee, Anamika; Sharma, Shailja; Satsangi, Vibha Rani; Shrivastav, Rohit; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar; Dass, Sahab

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO_2 thin films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate via sol–gel technique and were modified by plasmonic Au layer. The plasmonic Au modified TiO_2 (Au/TiO_2) thin films were then irradiated with 500 keV Ar"2"+ ion beam at different ion fluences viz. 1 × 10"1"6, 3 × 10"1"6 and 1 × 10"1"7 to study the effect of nuclear energy deposition on the morphology, crystallinity, band gap, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak exhibited by Au particles and photoelectrochemical properties of the system. Prepared thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements and UV–visible spectroscopy. The photoelectrochemical measurements revealed that both Au/TiO_2 and Au/TiO_2 thin film irradiated at 1 × 10"1"6 fluence exhibits enhanced photoelectrochemical response in comparison to pristine TiO_2. The film irradiated at 1 × 10"1"6 fluence offered maximum applied bias photon-to-current efficiency (ABPE) and shows 6 times increment in photocurrent density which was attributed to more negative flat band potential, maximum decrease in band gap, high open circuit voltage (V_o_c) and reduced charge transfer resistance.

  19. Low energy nuclear reactions: 2007 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivit, S. B.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents an overview of the field of low energy nuclear reactions (LENR), a branch of condensed matter nuclear science. It explains some of the various terminologies that have been used to describe this field since it debuted as 'cold fusion' in 1989. The paper also reviews some of the most interesting news and developments regarding low energy nuclear reaction experiments and theory, and some of the sociological and political trends that have affected the field over the last 18 years. It concludes with a list of resources and information for scientists, journalists and decision makers. Understanding the Nature of the Reactions The worldwide LENR research effort includes 200 researchers in 13 nations. Over the last 18 years, 12 international conferences have been held, as well as 7 regional conferences in Italy, 14 in Russia and 7 in Japan. The significant questions that face this field of research are: a) Are LENRs a genuine nuclear reaction? b) If so, is there a release of excess energy? and c) Are transmutations possible? If the answers to these questions turn out to be positive, the next questions will be: d) Is the energy release cost-effective? and e) Are the transmutations useful? Despite the fact that repeatability and reproducibility are challenging, the required parameters for achieving the excess heat effect are well understood. First, a high atomic loading ratio of D into Pd is required. In most conditions, 0.90 is the minimum threshold required to produce an excess heat effect. Second, a high electrical current density in the cathode is needed, 250 mA/cm 2 under most conditions. The third requirement is for some kind of dynamic trigger to impose a deuterium flux in, on or around the cathode. The challenge that researchers face is how to achieve these conditions. Some of the Most Interesting Research Developments Work by Stanislaw Szpak, Pamela Boss and Frank Gordon at the U.S. Navy's SPAWAR Systems Center in San Diego has

  20. Solid Adsorbents for Low-Temperature CO{sub 2} Capture with Low-Energy Penalties Leading to More Effective Integrated Solutions for Power Generation and Industrial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Nannan [Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Low-Carbon Conversion Science and Engineering, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Tang, Zhiyong; Wei, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Low-Carbon Conversion Science and Engineering, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Snape, Colin Edward [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Sun, Yuhan, E-mail: sunyh@sari.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Low-Carbon Conversion Science and Engineering, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-09

    CO{sub 2} capture represents the key technology for CO{sub 2} reduction within the framework of CO{sub 2} capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). In fact, the implementation of CO{sub 2} capture extends far beyond CCUS since it will link the CO{sub 2} emission and recycling sectors, and when renewables are used to provide necessary energy input, CO{sub 2} capture would enable a profitable zero- or even negative-emitting and integrated energy–chemical solution. To this end, highly efficient CO{sub 2} capture technologies are needed, and adsorption using solid adsorbents has the potential to be one of the ideal options. Currently, the greatest challenge in this area is the development of adsorbents with high performance that balances a range of optimization-needed factors, those including costs, efficiency, and engineering feasibility. In this review, recent advances on the development of carbon-based and immobilized organic amines-based CO{sub 2} adsorbents are summarized, the selection of these particular categories of materials is because they are among the most developed low-temperature (<100°C) CO{sub 2} adsorbents up to date, which showed important potential for practical deployment at pilot-scale in the near future. Preparation protocols, adsorption behaviors as well as pros and cons of each type of the adsorbents are presented, it was concluded that encouraging results have been achieved already, however, the development of more effective adsorbents for CO{sub 2} capture remains challenging and further innovations in the design and synthesis of adsorbents are needed.

  1. Interstellar propagation of low energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Wave particles interactions prevent low energy cosmic rays from propagating at velocities much faster than the Alfven velocity, reducing their range by a factor of order 50. Therefore, supernovae remnants cannot fill the neutral portions of the interstellar medium with 2 MeV cosmic rays [fr

  2. Virtual compton scattering at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhuillier, D.

    1997-09-01

    The work described in this PhD is a study of the Virtual Compton scattering (VCS) off the proton at low energy, below pion production threshold. Our experiment has been carried out at MAMI in the collaboration with the help of two high resolution spectrometers. Experimentally, the VCS process is the electroproduction of photons off a liquid hydrogen target. First results of data analysis including radiative corrections are presented and compared with low energy theorem prediction. VCS is an extension of the Real Compton Scattering. The virtuality of the incoming photon allows us to access new observables of the nucleon internal structure which are complementarity to the elastic form factors: the generalized polarizabilities (GP). They are function of the squared invariant mass of the virtual photo. The mass limit of these observables restore the usual electric and magnetic polarizabilities. Our experiment is the first measurement of the VCS process at a virtual photon mass equals 0.33 Ge V square. The experimental development presents the analysis method. The high precision needed in the absolute cross-section measurement required an accurate estimate of radiative corrections to the VCS. This new calculation, which has been performed in the dimensional regulation scheme, composes the theoretical part of this thesis. At low q', preliminary results agree with low energy theorem prediction. At higher q', substraction of low energy theorem contribution to extract GP is discussed. (author)

  3. Physics with low energy pions and muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.

    1981-01-01

    This document is a collection of texts used for a course of lectures given by the author at the Technical University of Delft (NL) in 1981. It is therefore a comprehensive, Dutch language, review article starting with the discovery of pions and muons, describing their properties and finally discussing their applications in low energy physics. (C.F.)

  4. Cooking exhaust systems for low energy dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Borsboom, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Especially in airtight low energy dwellings exhaust systems are of utmost importance as cooking can be a major source of PM2.5 exposure. Dwellings should be designed including facilities enabling extraction of at least 83 dm3/s (300 m3/h) directly to outside. Residents should be able to select an

  5. Low energy antiproton experiments - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, KP; Yamazaki, Y; Wada, M

    2005-01-01

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by

  6. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  7. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-01

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  8. Low energy analysis techniques for CUORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduino, C.; Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Alfonso, K.; Huang, H.Z.; Sakai, M.; Schmidt, J. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Artusa, D.R.; Rusconi, C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Azzolini, O.; Camacho, A.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V.; Pira, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F.; Piperno, G. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Benato, G.; Singh, V. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bersani, A.; Caminata, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Fiorini, E.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Nastasi, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pozzi, S.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Branca, A.; Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Bucci, C.; Cappelli, L.; D' Addabbo, A.; Gorla, P.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Canonica, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Ma, Y.G.; Wang, H.W.; Zhang, G.Q. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P.J.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Copello, S.; Di Domizio, S.; Marini, L.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Cremonesi, O.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Cushman, J.S.; Davis, C.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); D' Aguanno, D.; Pagliarone, C.E. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Meccanica, Cassino (Italy); Dell' Oro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Di Vacri, M.L.; Santone, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, L' Aquila (Italy); Drobizhev, A.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Wagaarachchi, S.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Franceschi, M.A.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Freedman, S.J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fujikawa, B.K.; Mei, Y.; Schmidt, B.; Smith, A.R.; Welliver, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Giuliani, A.; Novati, V. [Universite Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Gladstone, L.; Leder, A.; Ouellet, J.L.; Winslow, L.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Han, K. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China); Hansen, E. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Saragossa (Spain); Moggi, N.; Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna - Alma Mater Studiorum, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (IT); Nones, C. [CEA/Saclay, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette (FR); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (US); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (US); O' Donnell, T. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Center for Neutrino Physics, Blacksburg, VA (US); Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (US); Wise, T. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (US); University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (US); Woodcraft, A. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, Edinburgh (GB); Zimmermann, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Engineering Division, Berkeley, CA (US)

    2017-12-15

    CUORE is a tonne-scale cryogenic detector operating at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) that uses tellurium dioxide bolometers to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 130}Te. CUORE is also suitable to search for low energy rare events such as solar axions or WIMP scattering, thanks to its ultra-low background and large target mass. However, to conduct such sensitive searches requires improving the energy threshold to 10 keV. In this paper, we describe the analysis techniques developed for the low energy analysis of CUORE-like detectors, using the data acquired from November 2013 to March 2015 by CUORE-0, a single-tower prototype designed to validate the assembly procedure and new cleaning techniques of CUORE. We explain the energy threshold optimization, continuous monitoring of the trigger efficiency, data and event selection, and energy calibration at low energies in detail. We also present the low energy background spectrum of CUORE-0 below 60 keV. Finally, we report the sensitivity of CUORE to WIMP annual modulation using the CUORE-0 energy threshold and background, as well as an estimate of the uncertainty on the nuclear quenching factor from nuclear recoils in CUORE-0. (orig.)

  9. Large solid angle detectors (low energy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Hote, D.

    1988-01-01

    This lecture deals with large solid angle detectors used in low energy experiments (mainly in Nuclear Physics). The reasons for using such detectors are discussed, and several basic principles of their design are presented. Finally, two examples of data analysis from such detectors are given [fr

  10. Heavy ion reactions at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Some general features of the heavy ion reactions at low energies are presented. Some kinds of processes are studied, such as: elastic scattering, peripherical reactions, deep inelastic collisions and fusion. Both, theoretical and experimental perspectives on this field are discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  11. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R. Brune; Steven M. Grimes

    2010-01-13

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between March 1, 2006 and October 31, 2009 which were supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG52-06NA26187.

  12. Formulation of the low-energy effective theory of electroweak symmetry-breaking without a Higgs particle; Formulation de la theorie effective a basse energie du secteur electrofaible sans particule de Higgs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirn, J

    2004-07-01

    The low-energy effective theory of electroweak symmetry-breaking without a Higgs particle is constructed using the methods of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Weinberg's power-counting formula demonstrates the consistency of the loop expansion, with the corresponding renormalization. We find that the suppression of effective operators by a mass scale, which was automatic in the case of the Standard Model, no longer holds in the Higgs-less case. Moreover, the incriminated operators appear at leading order in the chiral expansion, at variance with experiments. To account for their suppression, invariance under a larger symmetry is required, corresponding to the composite sector (which produces the three Goldstone modes) being decoupled from the elementary sector (quarks, leptons and Yang-Mills fields). The couplings are introduced via spurions: this reduces the symmetry to SU(2) x U(1). In the simultaneous expansion in powers of momenta and spurions, the aforementioned operators are relegated to higher orders. In addition, the method allows for a systematic treatment of weak isospin breaking. The Weinberg power-counting formula can be recovered, and small neutrino masses accounted for. The three right-handed neutrinos (lighter than the TeV), which are introduced in connection with the custodial symmetry, are quasi-sterile and stable. A constraint on the underlying theory is obtained by studying the anomaly-matching in the composite sector and generalizing the Wess-Zumino construction. The spurion formalism is also applied to open linear moose models, for which generalized Weinberg sum rules are derived. (author)

  13. Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid mechanics is examined from a Hamiltonian perspective. The Hamiltonian point of view provides a unifying framework; by understanding the Hamiltonian perspective, one knows in advance (within bounds) what answers to expect and what kinds of procedures can be performed. The material is organized into five lectures, on the following topics: rudiments of few-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems illustrated by passive advection in two-dimensional fluids; functional differentiation, two action principles of mechanics, and the action principle and canonical Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid; noncanonical Hamiltonian dynamics with examples; tutorial on Lie groups and algebras, reduction-realization, and Clebsch variables; and stability and Hamiltonian systems

  14. Hamiltonian kinetic theory of plasma ponderomotive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, S.W.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear nonresonant interaction of plasma waves and particles is formulated in Hamiltonian kinetic theory which treats the wave-action and particle distributions on an equal footing, thereby displaying reciprocity relations. In the quasistatic limit, a nonlinear wave-kinetic equation is obtained. The generality of the formalism allows for applications to arbitrary geometry, with the nonlinear effects expressed in terms of the linear susceptibility

  15. Hamiltonian kinetic theory of plasma ponderomotive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, S.W.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    The nonlinear nonresonant interaction of plasma waves and particles is formulated in a Hamiltonian kinetic theory which treats the wave-action and particle distributions on an equal footing, thereby displaying reciprocity relations. In the quasistatic limit, a nonlinear wave-kinetic equation is obtained. The generality of the formalism allows for applications to arbitrary geometry, with the nonlinear effects expressed in terms of the linear susceptibility

  16. Convergent close-coupling calculations of low-energy positron-atomic-hydrogen scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A.T.

    1993-07-01

    The convergent close coupling approach developed by the authors is applied to positron scattering from atomic hydrogen below the first excitation threshold. In this approach the multi-channel expansion one-electron states are obtained by diagonalizing the target Hamiltonian in a large Laguerre basis. It is demonstrated that this expansion of the scattering wave function is sufficient to reproduce the very accurate low-energy variational results, provided target states with l≤ 15 are included in the expansions. 10 refs., 1 tab

  17. Low energy intense electron beams with extra-low energy spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.V.; Calabrese, R.; Ciullo, G.; Dikansky, N.S.; Guidi, V.; Kot, N.C.; Kudelainen, V.I.; Lamanna, G.; Lebedev, V.A.; Logachov, P.V.; Tecchio, L.; Yang, B.

    1994-01-01

    Maximum achievable intensity for low energy electron beams is a feature that is not very often compatible with low energy spread. We show that a proper choice of the source and the acceleration optics allows one to match them together. In this scheme, a GaAs photocathode excited by a single-mode infrared laser and adiabatic acceleration in fully magnetised optics enables the production of a low-energy-spread electron beam with relatively high intensity. The technological problems associated with the method are discussed together with its limitations. (orig.)

  18. Phase transitions in the Hubbard Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, C.M.; Lederer, P.; Gomes, A.A.

    1977-05-01

    Phase transition in the isotropic non-degenerate Hubbard Hamiltonian within the renormalization group techniques is studied, using the epsilon = 4 - d expansion to first order in epsilon. The functional obtained from the Hubbard Hamiltonian displays full rotation symmetry and describes two coupled fields: a vector spin field, with n components and a non-soft scalar charge field. This coupling is pure imaginary, which has interesting consequences on the critical properties of this coupled field system. The effect of simple constraints imposed on the charge field is considered. The relevance of the coupling between the fields in producing Fisher renormalization of the critical exponents is discussed. The possible singularities introduced in the charge-charge correlation function by the coupling are also discussed

  19. Experimentation with low-energy positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, A.P. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of studying the interactions of positrons with surfaces has recently been exploited by using ultra-high-vacuum techniques. The result has been a new understanding of how positrons interact with surfaces and because of this we are now able to make much stronger fluxes of slow positrons. The higher beam strengths in turn are opening up new possibilities for experimentation on surfaces and solids and for studying the atomic physics of positronium and positron-molecule scattering at low energies. The lectures are intended to review some of the history of this subject and to outline the present state of our knowledge of experimentation with low-energy positron beams. (orig./TW)

  20. Natural gas in low energy house Zittau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maertens, L.; Koschack, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a low-energy house in Zittau, Germany. The house consists of two parts A and B. Part A is heated by means of gas boilers and condensed boilers, while part B is solar heated. Energy for heating and warming of tap water is an important part of the primary energy consumption in Germany. Therefore, one way of reducing the CO2 emissions is to reduce the heat losses of buildings through outer facades and air ventilation, to use regenerative energy sources, to use fuels with low CO2 emissivity like natural gas, and to install efficient heating- and hot water preparation systems. The low-energy house in Zittau is used for energy research

  1. LINAC4 low energy beam measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hein, L M; Lallement, J B; Lombardi, A M; Midttun, O; Posocco, P; Scrivens, R

    2012-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator for negative Hydrogen ions (H−), which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac (Linac2) as linear injector for the CERN accelerators. The low energy part, comprising a 45 keV Low Energy Beam Transport system (LEBT), a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) is being assembled in a dedicated test stand for pre-commissioning with a proton beam. During 2011 extensive measurements were done after the source and after the LEBT with the aim of preparing the RFQ commissioning and validating the simulation tools, indispensable for future source upgrades. The measurements have been thoroughly simulated with a multi-particle code, including 2D magnetic field maps, error studies, steering studies and the generation of beam distribution from measurements. Emittance, acceptance and transmission measurements will be presented and compared to the results of the simulations.

  2. Enhancement mechanisms of low energy nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I.E.; Ratis, Yu.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, 6 Joliot Curie Street, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The full review of Russian low energy nuclear reactors is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies, LENR, is possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - excitation and ionization of atoms and universal resonance synchronization principle are responsible for it. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches of science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics. The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor reproducibility of experimental data is due to the fact that LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical reproducibility principle should be reconsidered for LENR experiments. Poor reproducibility and unexplained results do not means that the experiment is wrong.

  3. Enhancement mechanisms of low energy nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I.E.; Ratis, Yu.L.

    2006-01-01

    The full review of Russian low energy nuclear reactors is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies, LENR, is possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - excitation and ionization of atoms and universal resonance synchronization principle are responsible for it. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches of science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics. The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor reproducibility of experimental data is due to the fact that LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical reproducibility principle should be reconsidered for LENR experiments. Poor reproducibility and unexplained results do not means that the experiment is wrong

  4. A Low-Energy Ring Lattice Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yunhai

    2002-01-01

    The PEP-N project at SLAC [1] consists of a Very Low-Energy small electron Ring (VLER) that will collide with the low-energy 3.1 GeV positron beam (LER) of PEP-II, producing center-of-mass energies between the 1.1 GeV and the J/ψ. The beams will collide head-on and will be separated in the detector magnetic field which is part of the Interaction Region [2]. The IP β functions were chosen such as to optimize both luminosity and beam-beam tune shifts, while keeping the LER tune shifts small. This paper describes the lattice design of the VLER for the ''baseline'' at 500 MeV

  5. Architectural Quality of Low Energy Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Michael; Marsh, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This paper expounds a systematic vocabulary concerning architectural quality in houses in general and low energy houses in particular. The vocabulary consists of nine themes. Inside each theme, examples are given of how to achieve both architectural quality and good environmental performance....... The purpose is to provide a useful tool for communication and argumentation in order to further integrated design of houses with good architecture and good environmental performance. ...

  6. Physics with ultra-low energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtkamp, D.B.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental observation that all forms of matter experience the same gravitational acceleration is embodied in the weak equivalence principle of gravitational physics. However no experiment has tested this principle for particles of antimatter such as the antiproton or the antihydrogen atom. Clearly the question of whether antimatter is in compliance with weak equivalence is a fundamental experimental issue, which can best be addressed at an ultra-low energy antiproton facility. This paper addresses the issue. 20 refs

  7. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  8. Workshop on low energy neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The main topics of the workshop are: the determination of the neutrino mixing angle theta-13, the experiments concerning the monitoring of reactors based on the measurement of neutrino spectra, solar neutrinos, supernovae neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, neutrino properties, neutrinoless double beta decay and future low energy neutrino detectors. This document gathers together the program of the workshop, the slides of the presentations, some abstracts and some posters

  9. The low-energy experiment on EXOSAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleeker, J.A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The present concept of the Low-Energy-Experiment (LEE) for EXOSAT was proposed by a collaboration of the X-ray astronomy groups at Mullard Space Science Laboratories at University College London, the Space Research Laboratory at Utrecht and the Cosmic Ray Working Group at Leiden. In the following paragraphs the major characteristics of the instrumentation and the expected scientific return will be discussed. The summary comprises both the approved baseline configuration and the proposed option of a small imaging telescope

  10. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiebing, K.E.; Alexandrov, V.; Doerner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N.Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Boecking, H.; Voelp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-01-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut fuer Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  11. Low-energy scattering data for oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, S.; Plompen, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A survey of literature data of the scattering lengths of oxygen is performed, and these values are compared to low-energy precise total cross-section data. To check the quality of the data and the correctness of the relation between coherent scattering lengths and low-energy total cross-sections the situation is examined first for carbon. A value and uncertainty for the coherent scattering length of oxygen is recommended for use in future evaluations of 16 O. This coherent scattering length is fully consistent with the high-precision, low-energy total cross-section data. The consistency requires the use of a larger uncertainty than claimed in the most accurate cross-section papers. This larger uncertainty is nevertheless very small and well within the requirements of applications of this cross-section. The recommended value is b c ( 16 O) = 5.816±0.015 fm and the associated total cross-section for the neutron-energy range 0.5 to 2 000 eV is 3.765±0.025 b. The stated uncertainties are one standard deviation total uncertainty. (authors)

  12. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  13. The Low-Energy Neutrino Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brass, Alan; Geer, Steve; Ellis, Malcolm; Mena, Olga; Pascoli, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    To date most studies of Neutrino Factories have focused on facilities where the energy of the muon in the storage ring has been in the range of 25-50 GeV. In this paper we present a concept for a Low-Energy (∼ 4 GeV) neutrino factory. For baselines of O(1000 km), the rich oscillation pattern at low neutrino interaction energy (0.5 - ∼3 GeV) provides the unique performance of this facility with regard to its sensitivity to CP violation and the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy. A unique neutrino detector is needed, however, in order to exploit this oscillation pattern. We will describe the basic accelerator facility, demonstrate the methodology of the analysis and give an estimate on how well the Low-Energy neutrino factory can measure θ 13 , CP violation and the mass hierarchy. We will also describe the detector concept that is used, show a preliminary analysis regarding its performance and indicate what R and D is still needed. Finally we will show how the Low-Energy neutrino factory could be a step towards an energy frontier muon collider.

  14. First principles of Hamiltonian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard; Foster, Kevin; Úbeda, Francisco

    2014-05-19

    We introduce the field of Hamiltonian medicine, which centres on the roles of genetic relatedness in human health and disease. Hamiltonian medicine represents the application of basic social-evolution theory, for interactions involving kinship, to core issues in medicine such as pathogens, cancer, optimal growth and mental illness. It encompasses three domains, which involve conflict and cooperation between: (i) microbes or cancer cells, within humans, (ii) genes expressed in humans, (iii) human individuals. A set of six core principles, based on these domains and their interfaces, serves to conceptually organize the field, and contextualize illustrative examples. The primary usefulness of Hamiltonian medicine is that, like Darwinian medicine more generally, it provides novel insights into what data will be productive to collect, to address important clinical and public health problems. Our synthesis of this nascent field is intended predominantly for evolutionary and behavioural biologists who aspire to address questions directly relevant to human health and disease.

  15. Variational identities and Hamiltonian structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wenxiu

    2010-01-01

    This report is concerned with Hamiltonian structures of classical and super soliton hierarchies. In the classical case, basic tools are variational identities associated with continuous and discrete matrix spectral problems, targeted to soliton equations derived from zero curvature equations over general Lie algebras, both semisimple and non-semisimple. In the super case, a supertrace identity is presented for constructing Hamiltonian structures of super soliton equations associated with Lie superalgebras. We illustrate the general theories by the KdV hierarchy, the Volterra lattice hierarchy, the super AKNS hierarchy, and two hierarchies of dark KdV equations and dark Volterra lattices. The resulting Hamiltonian structures show the commutativity of each hierarchy discussed and thus the existence of infinitely many commuting symmetries and conservation laws.

  16. Dynamical decoupling of unbounded Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenz, Christian; Burgarth, Daniel; Facchi, Paolo; Hillier, Robin

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the possibility to suppress interactions between a finite dimensional system and an infinite dimensional environment through a fast sequence of unitary kicks on the finite dimensional system. This method, called dynamical decoupling, is known to work for bounded interactions, but physical environments such as bosonic heat baths are usually modeled with unbounded interactions; hence, here, we initiate a systematic study of dynamical decoupling for unbounded operators. We develop a sufficient decoupling criterion for arbitrary Hamiltonians and a necessary decoupling criterion for semibounded Hamiltonians. We give examples for unbounded Hamiltonians where decoupling works and the limiting evolution as well as the convergence speed can be explicitly computed. We show that decoupling does not always work for unbounded interactions and we provide both physically and mathematically motivated examples.

  17. Spacelike penguin diagram effects in B implies PP decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, D.; Yang, M.; Zhang, D.

    1996-01-01

    The spacelike penguin diagram contributions to branching ratios and CP asymmetries in charmless decays of B to two pseudoscalar mesons are studied using the next-to-leading order low energy effective Hamiltonian. Both the gluonic penguin and the electroweak penguin diagrams are considered. We find that the effects are significant. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  18. Invariant metrics for Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, G.; Dragt, A.J.; Neri, F.

    1991-05-01

    In this paper, invariant metrics are constructed for Hamiltonian systems. These metrics give rise to norms on the space of homeogeneous polynomials of phase-space variables. For an accelerator lattice described by a Hamiltonian, these norms characterize the nonlinear content of the lattice. Therefore, the performance of the lattice can be improved by minimizing the norm as a function of parameters describing the beam-line elements in the lattice. A four-fold increase in the dynamic aperture of a model FODO cell is obtained using this procedure. 7 refs

  19. Utilization of bio-resources by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2003-01-01

    Utilization of bio-resources by radiation has been investigated for recycling the natural resources and reducing the environmental pollution. Polysaccharides such as chitosan and sodium alginate were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities, i.g. anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction. Radiation degraded chitosan was effective to enhance the growth of plants in tissue culture. It was demonstrated that the liquid sample irradiation system using low energy EB was effective for the preparation of degraded polysaccharides. Methylcellulose (MC) can be crosslinked under certain radiation condition as same as carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and produced the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use. Treatment of soybean seeds by low energy EB enhanced the growth and the number of rhizobia on the root. (author)

  20. Emittance measurements in low energy ion storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. R.; Carli, C.; Resta-López, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2018-07-01

    The development of the next generation of ultra-low energy antiproton and ion facilities requires precise information about the beam emittance to guarantee optimum performance. In the Extra-Low ENergy Antiproton storage ring (ELENA) the transverse emittances will be measured by scraping. However, this diagnostic measurement faces several challenges: non-zero dispersion, non-Gaussian beam distributions due to effects of the electron cooler and various systematic errors such as closed orbit offsets and inaccurate rms momentum spread estimation. In addition, diffusion processes, such as intra-beam scattering might lead to emittance overestimates. Here, we present algorithms to efficiently address the emittance reconstruction in presence of the above effects, and present simulation results for the case of ELENA.

  1. Revealing low-energy part of the beta spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Celiktas, C.

    2002-01-01

    An effective method is proposed to separate electronic noise from the beta-particle spectra revealing lower energy part of the spectra. The available methods for reducing the noise problem cut the noise along with the low-energy part of the beta spectra by using a discriminator. Our setup eliminates this undesirable effect by shifting the noise toward the lowest energy scale leaving the low-energy part of spectra undisturbed. We achieved this noise-pulse-separation by treating the noise as a pulse so that we can exploit the application of the pulse-shape analyzer equipment used for pulse shape identification of particles and rejection of defective pulses. To the best of our knowledge this method of the noise separation is a novel approach

  2. Low-energy phenomenology of a realistic composite model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpa, C.; Ryzak, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The low-energy limit of the strongly coupled standard model (Abbott-Farhi composite model) is analyzed. The effects of the excited W isotriplet and isoscalar bosons are investigated and compared with experimental data. As a result, constraints on parameters (masses, coupling constants, etc.) of these vector bosons are obtained. They are not severe enough (certain cancellations are possible) to exclude the model on experimental basis

  3. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons by hydrogen molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, L.C.G.; Mu-Tao, L.; Botelho, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    The coherent version of the Renormalized Multiple-Centre Potential Model (RMPM) has been extended to treat the elastic scattering of low energy electrons by H2 molecule. The intramolecular Multiple Scattering (MS) effect has also been included. The comparison against the experimental data shows that the inclusion of the MS improves significantly with experiment. The extension of the present method to study electron-polyatomic molecule interaction is also discussed. (author) [pt

  4. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.

    1996-08-01

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy β radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were β spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy β radiation field a moderated spectrum from a 14 C source (E β , max =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 μm in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for 147 Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for β radiation from 14 C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to β radiation for radiation fields with maximum β energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum β energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a β dose higher than about 10 μGy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the βenergy for E β , max values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs

  5. Derivation of Hamiltonians for accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symon, K.R.

    1997-09-12

    In this report various forms of the Hamiltonian for particle motion in an accelerator will be derived. Except where noted, the treatment will apply generally to linear and circular accelerators, storage rings, and beamlines. The generic term accelerator will be used to refer to any of these devices. The author will use the usual accelerator coordinate system, which will be introduced first, along with a list of handy formulas. He then starts from the general Hamiltonian for a particle in an electromagnetic field, using the accelerator coordinate system, with time t as independent variable. He switches to a form more convenient for most purposes using the distance s along the reference orbit as independent variable. In section 2, formulas will be derived for the vector potentials that describe the various lattice components. In sections 3, 4, and 5, special forms of the Hamiltonian will be derived for transverse horizontal and vertical motion, for longitudinal motion, and for synchrobetatron coupling of horizontal and longitudinal motions. Hamiltonians will be expanded to fourth order in the variables.

  6. Hamiltonian cycles in polyhedral maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a necessary and sufficient condition for existence of a contractible, non-separating and non-contractible separating Hamiltonian cycle in the edge graph of polyhedral maps on surfaces.We also present algorithms to construct such cycles whenever it exists where one of them is linear time and another is ...

  7. Maslov index for Hamiltonian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Portaluri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to give an explicit formula for computing the Maslov index of the fundamental solutions of linear autonomous Hamiltonian systems in terms of the Conley-Zehnder index and the map time one flow.

  8. Hamiltonian formulation of the supermembrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Tanii, Y.

    1987-06-01

    The Hamiltonian formulation of the supermembrane theory in eleven dimensions is given. The covariant split of the first and second class constraints is exhibited, and their Dirac brackets are computed. Gauge conditions are imposed in such a way that the reparametrizations of the membrane with divergence free 2-vectors are unfixed. (author). 10 refs

  9. Relativistic non-Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2010-01-01

    Relativistic particle subjected to a general four-force is considered as a nonholonomic system. The nonholonomic constraint in four-dimensional space-time represents the relativistic invariance by the equation for four-velocity u μ u μ + c 2 = 0, where c is the speed of light in vacuum. In the general case, four-forces are non-potential, and the relativistic particle is a non-Hamiltonian system in four-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space-time. We consider non-Hamiltonian and dissipative systems in relativistic mechanics. Covariant forms of the principle of stationary action and the Hamilton's principle for relativistic mechanics of non-Hamiltonian systems are discussed. The equivalence of these principles is considered for relativistic particles subjected to potential and non-potential forces. We note that the equations of motion which follow from the Hamilton's principle are not equivalent to the equations which follow from the variational principle of stationary action. The Hamilton's principle and the principle of stationary action are not compatible in the case of systems with nonholonomic constraint and the potential forces. The principle of stationary action for relativistic particle subjected to non-potential forces can be used if the Helmholtz conditions are satisfied. The Hamilton's principle and the principle of stationary action are equivalent only for a special class of relativistic non-Hamiltonian systems.

  10. Electron spin polarization effects in low-energy electron diffraction, ion neutralization, and metastable-atom deexcitation at solid surfaces. Progress report No. 3, January 1-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, G.K.; Dunning, F.B.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of electron spin polarization (ESP) effects in the various spectroscopies used to study solid surfaces has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Recent low energy electron diffraction (LEED) investigations in this laboratory and elsewhere have shown that a great deal of new information contributing to the understanding of the geometrical arrangements of atoms at a surface can be obtained if the polarization of the various LEED beams is measured, or if the incident electron beam is polarized. Polarized LEED studies have shown large polarization features that are very sensitive to the presence of adsorbed layers, surface reconstruction, etc. In addition, theory suggests that polarization measurements can provide a more sensitive test of many of the parameters used in a surface model than can conventional LEED intensity measurements alone. Polarized LEED has also been applied to the study of surface magnetism. In the present contract year, polarized LEED has been used, together with Auger analysis and LEED intensity measurements, as a diagnostic to characterize Ni(001) surfaces produced by laser annealing

  11. Hydrogen-antihydrogen interactions at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.; Carr, J.M.; Zeman, V.

    1999-01-01

    The main cause of loss of trapped AH is due to collisions with H 2 and He. As a first step towards treating these reactions we are studying the interaction of AH with H. We have carried out variational calculations to determine an upper bound to the smallest internuclear distance at which the light particles are still bound to the nuclei. We are currently in the process of taking into account the motion of the nuclei. This will enable us to calculate cross-sections for low energy H-AH scattering

  12. The low energy booster project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, G.W.

    1993-05-01

    In order to achieve the required injection momentum, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) has an accelerator chain comprised of a Linear Accelerator and three synchrotrons. The Low Energy Booster (LEB) is the first synchrotron in this chain. The LEB project has made significant progress in the development of major subsystems and conventional construction. This paper briefly reviews the performance requirements of the LEB and describes significant achievements in each of the major subsystem areas. Highlighted among these achievements are the LEB foreign collaborations with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) located in Novosibirsk, Russia

  13. Low energy constraints and scalar leptoquarks⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajfer Svjetlana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a colored weak doublet scalar state with mass below 1 TeV can provide an explanation of the observed branching ratios in B → D(∗τντ decays. Constraints coming from Z → bb̄, muon g − 2, lepton flavor violating decays are derived. The colored scalar is accommodated within 45 representation of SU(5 group of unification. We show that presence of color scalar can improve mass relations in the up-type quark sector mass. Impact of the colored scalar embedding in 45-dimensional representation of SU(5 on low-energy phenomenology is also presented.

  14. Round Gating for Low Energy Block Ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banik, Subhadeep; Bogdanov, Andrey; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    design techniques for implementing block ciphers in a low energy fashion. We concentrate on round based implementation and we discuss how gating, applied at round level can affect and improve the energy consumption of the most common lightweight block cipher currently used in the internet of things....... Additionally, we discuss how to needed gating wave can be generated. Experimental results show that our technique is able to reduce the energy consumption in most block ciphers by over 60% while incurring only a minimal overhead in hardware....

  15. Low-energy phenomenological chiral Lagrangians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavopol, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    We develop a phenomenological Lagrangian that satisfies the requirements of the so called alternative schemes designed to model low energy meson phenomenology. Linear and nonlinear σ type Lagrangians and symmetry breaking schemes are used to describe pions that exhibit masses proportional to the square of the symmetry breaking term's coefficient, ε. (m π 2 ∼ 0(ε 2 )). The invariance of the theory under coordinate dependent transformations is achieved by introducing gauge fields for both linear and nonlinear Lagrangians. Finally, analogies between the minimal symmetry breaking terms in Quantum Electrodynamics and in our phenomenological lagrangians are used to generate a discussion of the quark-pion mass dependence indicated by the model

  16. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiebing, K. E.; Alexandrov, V.; Dörner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Böcking, H.; Völp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-02-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut für Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  17. Luminescence model with quantum impact parameter for low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz G, H.S.; Michaelian, K.; Galindo U, S.; Martinez D, A.; Belmont M, E.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical model of induced light production in scintillator materials by energetic ions proposed by Michaelian and Menchaca (M-M) adjusts very well the luminescence substance data in a wide energy interval of the incident ions (10-100 MeV). However at low energies, that is, under to 10 MeV, the experimental deviations of the predictions of M-M model, show that the causes may be certain physical effects, all they important at low energies, which were not considered. We have modified lightly the M-M model using the basic fact that the Quantum mechanics gives to a different limit for the quantum impact parameter instead of the classic approximation. (Author)

  18. Colorado School of Mines low energy nuclear physics project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecil, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    A major accomplishment of this project in the past year is the completion of a fairly comprehensive paper describing the survey of radiative capture reactions of protons on light nuclei at low energies. In addition we have completed a preliminary set of measurements of (d,p)/(d,α) cross section ratios on the charge symmetric nuclei 6 Li and 10 B as a test of the Oppenheimer-Phillips effect. While the 6 Li data remain inconclusive, the 10 B data show solid evidence for the Oppenheimer-Phillips enhancement of the (d,p) reaction relative to the (d,α) reaction for deuteron bombarding energies below about 100 keV. We have continued our investigation of fusion reaction products from deuterium-metal systems at room temperatures with the startling observation of intense burst of energetic charged particles from deuterium gas loaded thin titaium foils subject to non-equilibrium thermal and electrical conditions. We have completed two projects involving the application of the low energy particle accelerator to material science problems; firstly a study of the transformation of crystalline to amorphous Fe-Zr systems by proton irradiation and secondly the effects of ion bombardment on the critical temperature of YBCO high-temperature superconductors. Finally we have made progress in several instrumentation projects which will be used in some of the up-coming measurements of nuclear cross sections at very low energies

  19. Radiation processing of natural polymers using low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2004-01-01

    Radiation processing is widely used in Japan and the economic scale of radiation application amounted to about 71 b$ (ratio relative to GDP: 1.7%) in total. It consisted of 60 b$ (85%) in industry, 10 b$ (14%) in medicine and 1 b$ (1%) in agriculture. Irradiation using gamma-ray from 60 Co and electron beam is commercially used for the sterilization and modification of materials. Utilization of natural polymers by radiation has been investigated for recycling the natural resources and reducing the environmental pollution. Polysaccharides such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities, i.e. anti-bacterial activity, elicitor activity, plant growth promotion, suppression of environmental stress on plants. Radiation degraded chitosan was effective to enhance the growth of plants in tissue culture. Low energy electron beam (EB) irradiation has a variety of applications and good safety. A self-shielded low energy electron accelerator system needs an initial investment much lower than a 60 Co facility. It was demonstrated that the liquid sample irradiation system using low energy EB was effective not only for the preparation of degraded polysaccharides but also for radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL). Some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), carboxymethyl-starch and carboxymethyl-chitin/chitosan, can be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produced the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use. Treatment of soybean seeds by low energy EB enhanced the growth and the number of rhizobia on the root. (author)

  20. Short-term effects of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis and Rosmarinus eriocalyx) on sustained attention and on energy and fatigue mood states in young adults with low energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindheimer, Jacob B; Loy, Bryan D; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose was to test whether a single dose of black pepper or rosemary produced short-term enhancements in sustained attention, motivation to perform cognitive tasks, or feelings of mental energy and fatigue. Outcomes were measured in 40 young adults with below average feelings of energy before and twice after they orally consumed capsules containing either black pepper (2.0 g), rosemary (1.7 g), or a placebo (3.1 g rice flour). Sustained attention was measured using a 16-min dual task, in which, single-digit numbers were presented every second on a screen and the participant performed both a primary task [detection of three successive, different odd digits] and a secondary task [detection of the number 6]. Feelings of energy and fatigue were measured using the vigor and fatigue subscales of the Profile of Mood States and visual analog scales (VAS). Analysis of variance showed nonsignificant condition (spice versus placebo)×time (T1, T2, & T3) effects for motivation, measured with a VAS, and the intensity of energy and fatigue feelings. Unadjusted effect sizes revealed that rosemary induced small, transient reductions in false alarm errors (d=0.21) and mental fatigue (d=0.40) at isolated time periods. Time-varying analysis of covariance, controlling for motivation to perform cognitive tasks, showed no significant effects on the primary or secondary task outcomes of correct responses (hits), errors (false alarms, misses), speed of response (reaction time), and signal detection sensitivity. It is concluded that black pepper and rosemary, consumed in a capsule form, in the doses used and while wearing a nose clip to block olfactory effects, do not induce consistent short-term improvements in sustained attention, motivation to perform cognitive tasks, or feelings of mental energy and fatigue in young adults with low energy.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Constrained Hamiltonian Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, A.J. van der; Maschke, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Network modelling of unconstrained energy conserving physical systems leads to an intrinsic generalized Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics. Constrained energy conserving physical systems are directly modelled as implicit Hamiltonian systems with regard to a generalized Dirac structure on the

  2. Hamiltonian quantum simulation with bounded-strength controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bookatz, Adam D; Wocjan, Pawel; Viola, Lorenza

    2014-01-01

    We propose dynamical control schemes for Hamiltonian simulation in many-body quantum systems that avoid instantaneous control operations and rely solely on realistic bounded-strength control Hamiltonians. Each simulation protocol consists of periodic repetitions of a basic control block, constructed as a modification of an ‘Eulerian decoupling cycle,’ that would otherwise implement a trivial (zero) target Hamiltonian. For an open quantum system coupled to an uncontrollable environment, our approach may be employed to engineer an effective evolution that simulates a target Hamiltonian on the system while suppressing unwanted decoherence to the leading order, thereby allowing for dynamically corrected simulation. We present illustrative applications to both closed- and open-system simulation settings, with emphasis on simulation of non-local (two-body) Hamiltonians using only local (one-body) controls. In particular, we provide simulation schemes applicable to Heisenberg-coupled spin chains exposed to general linear decoherence, and show how to simulate Kitaev's honeycomb lattice Hamiltonian starting from Ising-coupled qubits, as potentially relevant to the dynamical generation of a topologically protected quantum memory. Additional implications for quantum information processing are discussed. (papers)

  3. Analysis of low energy beta-emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.L.

    1979-10-01

    A survey was made of the instruments used for the determination of low energy beta radioactivity. Techniques commonly used are gas flow proportional counting, liquid scintillation counting, solid scintillation counting, and internal ionization chamber counting, solid state detector counting, and radiochemical separation followed by counting using one of the preceeding techniques. The first four techniques were examined and compared with each other. The sensitivities of the techniques were compared on the basis of the detection limits quoted for instruments described in the technical and reviewed literature. The detection limits were then related to the occupational and public individual maximum levels for air and water. Attention is focused primarily on the continuous monitoring of air for 3 H and 85 Kr, a medium energy β-emitter. It is clear that several continuous air monitoring instruments are readily available for measuring low energy β concentrations, even in presence of certain other activity, at occupational levels. However, these instruments do not typically have sensitivities comparable to the public individual levels. Moreover, their capabilities for giving results in real time and for differentiating among the radionuclides actually present is limited

  4. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, Carl R.; Grimes, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between March 1, 2006 and October 31, 2009 which were supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG52-06NA26187. We describe here research into low-energy nuclear reactions and structure. The statistical properties of nuclei have been studied by measuring level densities and also calculating them theoretically. Our approach of measuring level densities via evaporation spectra is able to reach a very wide range of nuclei by using heavy ion beams (we expect to develop experiments using radioactive beams in the near future). Another focus of the program has been on γ-ray strength functions. These clearly impact nuclear reactions, but they are much less understood than corresponding transmission coefficients for nucleons. We have begun investigations of a new approach, using γ-γ coincidences following radiative capture. Finally, we have undertaken several measurements of cross sections involving light nuclei which are important in various applications. The 9 Be(α,n) and B(d,n) reactions have been measured at Ohio University, while neutron-induced reactions have been measured at Los Alamos (LANSCE).

  5. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity 14 C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate 14 C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect 14 C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible

  6. Experimental perspectives in low energy lepton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, E.

    1986-01-01

    Low energy nuclear physics has been and is going to be an essential tool for the study of weak interaction and neutrino physics. The use of the atomic nucleus as a ''microlaboratory'' with well defined quantum numbers is undoubtedly going to yield important and sometimes perhaps unexpected results on the symmetry laws governing the subnuclear world. These searches are however very hard experimentally and the bottleneck on obtaining more stringent results only rarely depends on the need of large and expensive apparatuses as those used in high energy physics: more limiting are technical difficulties. The author believes therefore that a real break-through to overcome the present experimental limitations can only be obtained with totally new and sometime ''non canonical'' technical approaches. This paper is an admittedly incomplete discussion of some of them. The author considers separately searches for rare decays, detection of low energy neutrinos and measurements of the neutrino mass, even if some of these new techniques are common to more than one of these subjects

  7. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  8. Occupant satisfaction with new low-energy houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose; Jensen, Ole Michael; Kristensen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The development and the erection of low-energy buildings have been intensified in recent years. Still, there are only few studies of the energy performance and occupant satisfaction with living in low-energy houses. A questionnaire survey was therefore carried out among occupants of low-energy ho......The development and the erection of low-energy buildings have been intensified in recent years. Still, there are only few studies of the energy performance and occupant satisfaction with living in low-energy houses. A questionnaire survey was therefore carried out among occupants of low......-energy houses. The purpose was to study occupant satisfaction with new low-energy houses concerning i.a. the perceived indoor climate and the technical installations for heating and ventilation. The survey showed an overall satisfaction with the new low-energy houses, but also that there were problems...... occupant satisfaction in existing and future low-energy houses are given....

  9. Geometric Hamiltonian structures and perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omohundro, S.

    1984-08-01

    We have been engaged in a program of investigating the Hamiltonian structure of the various perturbation theories used in practice. We describe the geometry of a Hamiltonian structure for non-singular perturbation theory applied to Hamiltonian systems on symplectic manifolds and the connection with singular perturbation techniques based on the method of averaging

  10. Notch filters for port-Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksz, D.A.; Scherpen, J.M.A.; van der Schaft, A.J.; Steinbuch, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a standard notch filter is modeled in the port-Hamiltonian framework. By having such a port-Hamiltonian description it is proven that the notch filter is a passive system. The notch filter can then be interconnected with another (nonlinear) port-Hamiltonian system, while preserving the

  11. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  12. The Hamiltonian of QED. Zero mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zastavenko, L.G.

    1990-01-01

    We start with the standard QED Lagrangian. New derivation of the spinor QED Hamiltonian is given. We have taken into account the zero mode. Our derivation is faultless from the point of view of gauge invariance. It gives important corrections to the standard QED Hamiltonian. Our derivation of the Hamiltonian can be generalized to the case of QCD. 5 refs

  13. Energy sharing and sputtering in low-energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.A.; Weller, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Using a non-linear transport equation to describe the energy-sharing process in an isotropic collision cascade, we have numerically calculated sputtered particle velocity spectra for several very low energy (=< 10 eV) primary recoil distributions. Our formulation of the sputtering process is essentially that used in the linear model and our equations yield the familiar linear model results in the appropriate limit. Discrepancies between our calculations and the linear model results in other cases may be understood by considering the effects of the linear model assumptions on the sputtering yield at very low energies. Our calculations are also compared with recent experimental results investigating ion-explosion sputtering. The results of this comparison support the conclusion that in insulators sputtering is initiated by very low energy recoil atoms when the energy of the incident beam is high enough that the stopping power is dominated by the electronic contribution. The calculations also suggest that energy spectra similar to those for evaporation may result from non-equilibrium processes but that the apparent temperatures of evaporation are not related in a simple way to any real temperature within the target. (author)

  14. Nuclear Computational Low Energy Initiative (NUCLEI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Sanjay K. [University of Washington

    2017-08-14

    This is the final report for University of Washington for the NUCLEI SciDAC-3. The NUCLEI -project, as defined by the scope of work, will develop, implement and run codes for large-scale computations of many topics in low-energy nuclear physics. Physics to be studied include the properties of nuclei and nuclear decays, nuclear structure and reactions, and the properties of nuclear matter. The computational techniques to be used include Quantum Monte Carlo, Configuration Interaction, Coupled Cluster, and Density Functional methods. The research program will emphasize areas of high interest to current and possible future DOE nuclear physics facilities, including ATLAS and FRIB (nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics), TJNAF (neutron distributions in nuclei, few body systems, and electroweak processes), NIF (thermonuclear reactions), MAJORANA and FNPB (neutrino-less double-beta decay and physics beyond the Standard Model), and LANSCE (fission studies).

  15. Redesign of a Low Energy Probe Head

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Yi-Nong; Ries, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present situation of the low energy probe LE2 in TRIUMF cyclotron is that the thickness of the finger 5 is uniform over a radial length of 3.25 inch and its weight which amounts to ~447 g is affecting its re-circulating ball mechanism and causing it to fall below the median plane over its range of movement. We therefore re-design it in order to reduce its weight. First, we made simulations and determined the optimum thickness of the probe head vs its radial length. These simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements made. Finally, we calculated the temperature rise caused by the beam power dumped on the probe, and figured out the maximum current of beam that can be dumped on the finger.

  16. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, J.M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  17. Windows in Low Energy Houses. Size Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Mari-Louise

    2004-06-01

    A generally accepted way of building passive houses has been to have small windows facing north and a large glass facade to the south. This is to minimize losses on the north side while gaining as much solar heat as possible on the south. In spring 2001, twenty terraced houses were built outside Goeteborg partly in this way. The indoor temperature is kept at a comfortable level by passive methods, using solar gains and internal gains from household appliances and occupants. Heat losses are very low, since the building envelope is well insulated and since modern coated triple-glazed windows have been installed. The purpose of this work is to investigate how decreasing the window size facing south and increasing the window size facing north in low energy houses will influence the energy consumption and maximum power needed to keep the indoor temperature between 23 and 26 deg C. Different climates and orientations have been investigated and so have the influence of occupancy and window type. A dynamic building simulation tool, DEROB, has been used and the simulations indicate an extremely low energy demand for the houses. The results show that the size of the energy efficient windows does not have a major influence on the heating demand in winter, but is of relevant signification looking at the cooling need in summer. This indicates that instead of the traditional technique of building passive houses it is possible to enlarge the window area facing north and get better lighting conditions. To decrease the energy need for cooling, there is an optimal window size facing south that is smaller than the original size of the investigated buildings.

  18. Hamiltonian PDEs and Frobenius manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrovin, Boris A

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of this paper the theory of Frobenius manifolds is applied to the problem of classification of Hamiltonian systems of partial differential equations depending on a small parameter. Also developed is a deformation theory of integrable hierarchies including the subclass of integrable hierarchies of topological type. Many well-known examples of integrable hierarchies, such as the Korteweg-de Vries, non-linear Schroedinger, Toda, Boussinesq equations, and so on, belong to this subclass that also contains new integrable hierarchies. Some of these new integrable hierarchies may be important for applications. Properties of the solutions to these equations are studied in the second part. Consideration is given to the comparative study of the local properties of perturbed and unperturbed solutions near a point of gradient catastrophe. A Universality Conjecture is formulated describing the various types of critical behaviour of solutions to perturbed Hamiltonian systems near the point of gradient catastrophe of the unperturbed solution.

  19. Hamiltonian PDEs and Frobenius manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrovin, Boris A [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-12-31

    In the first part of this paper the theory of Frobenius manifolds is applied to the problem of classification of Hamiltonian systems of partial differential equations depending on a small parameter. Also developed is a deformation theory of integrable hierarchies including the subclass of integrable hierarchies of topological type. Many well-known examples of integrable hierarchies, such as the Korteweg-de Vries, non-linear Schroedinger, Toda, Boussinesq equations, and so on, belong to this subclass that also contains new integrable hierarchies. Some of these new integrable hierarchies may be important for applications. Properties of the solutions to these equations are studied in the second part. Consideration is given to the comparative study of the local properties of perturbed and unperturbed solutions near a point of gradient catastrophe. A Universality Conjecture is formulated describing the various types of critical behaviour of solutions to perturbed Hamiltonian systems near the point of gradient catastrophe of the unperturbed solution.

  20. Weak KAM for commuting Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavidovique, M

    2010-01-01

    For two commuting Tonelli Hamiltonians, we recover the commutation of the Lax–Oleinik semi-groups, a result of Barles and Tourin (2001 Indiana Univ. Math. J. 50 1523–44), using a direct geometrical method (Stoke's theorem). We also obtain a 'generalization' of a theorem of Maderna (2002 Bull. Soc. Math. France 130 493–506). More precisely, we prove that if the phase space is the cotangent of a compact manifold then the weak KAM solutions (or viscosity solutions of the critical stationary Hamilton–Jacobi equation) for G and for H are the same. As a corollary we obtain the equality of the Aubry sets and of the Peierls barrier. This is also related to works of Sorrentino (2009 On the Integrability of Tonelli Hamiltonians Preprint) and Bernard (2007 Duke Math. J. 136 401–20)

  1. Hamiltonian dynamics of extended objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capovilla, R.; Guven, J.; Rojas, E.

    2004-12-01

    We consider relativistic extended objects described by a reparametrization-invariant local action that depends on the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the object as it evolves. We provide a Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics of such higher derivative models which is motivated by the ADM formulation of general relativity. The canonical momenta are identified by looking at boundary behaviour under small deformations of the action; the relationship between the momentum conjugate to the embedding functions and the conserved momentum density is established. The canonical Hamiltonian is constructed explicitly; the constraints on the phase space, both primary and secondary, are identified and the role they play in the theory is described. The multipliers implementing the primary constraints are identified in terms of the ADM lapse and shift variables and Hamilton's equations are shown to be consistent with the Euler Lagrange equations.

  2. A Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldiotti, M.C., E-mail: baldiotti@uel.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, 86051-990, Londrina-PR (Brazil); Fresneda, R., E-mail: rodrigo.fresneda@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC, Av. dos Estados 5001, 09210-580, Santo André-SP (Brazil); Molina, C., E-mail: cmolina@usp.br [Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Arlindo Bettio 1000, CEP 03828-000, São Paulo-SP (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    In the present work we develop a strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics. A thermodynamic description based on symplectic geometry is introduced, where all thermodynamic processes can be described within the framework of Analytic Mechanics. Our proposal is constructed on top of a usual symplectic manifold, where phase space is even dimensional and one has well-defined Poisson brackets. The main idea is the introduction of an extended phase space where thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. We are then able to apply the canonical transformation toolkit to thermodynamic problems. Throughout this development, Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. To illustrate the formalism, we consider paradigmatic examples, namely, the ideal, van der Waals and Clausius gases. - Highlights: • A strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics is proposed. • Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. • Thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. • Thermodynamic potentials are related by canonical transformations.

  3. Hamiltonian description of bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimov, A. O.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of a nonspherical bubble in a liquid is described within the Hamiltonian formalism. Primary attention is focused on the introduction of the canonical variables into the computational algorithm. The expansion of the Dirichlet-Neumann operator in powers of the displacement of a bubble wall from an equilibrium position is obtained in the explicit form. The first three terms (more specifically, the second-, third-, and fourth-order terms) in the expansion of the Hamiltonian in powers of the canonical variables are determined. These terms describe the spectrum and interaction of three essentially different modes, i.e., monopole oscillations (pulsations), dipole oscillations (translational motions), and surface oscillations. The cubic nonlinearity is analyzed for the problem associated with the generation of Faraday ripples on the wall of a bubble in an acoustic field. The possibility of decay processes occurring in the course of interaction of surface oscillations for the first fifteen (experimentally observed) modes is investigated.

  4. Hamiltonian dynamics of extended objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capovilla, R; Guven, J; Rojas, E

    2004-01-01

    We consider relativistic extended objects described by a reparametrization-invariant local action that depends on the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the object as it evolves. We provide a Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics of such higher derivative models which is motivated by the ADM formulation of general relativity. The canonical momenta are identified by looking at boundary behaviour under small deformations of the action; the relationship between the momentum conjugate to the embedding functions and the conserved momentum density is established. The canonical Hamiltonian is constructed explicitly; the constraints on the phase space, both primary and secondary, are identified and the role they play in the theory is described. The multipliers implementing the primary constraints are identified in terms of the ADM lapse and shift variables and Hamilton's equations are shown to be consistent with the Euler-Lagrange equations

  5. Hamiltonian dynamics of extended objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capovilla, R [Departamento de FIsica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Guven, J [School of Theoretical Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 10 Burlington Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Rojas, E [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2004-12-07

    We consider relativistic extended objects described by a reparametrization-invariant local action that depends on the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the object as it evolves. We provide a Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics of such higher derivative models which is motivated by the ADM formulation of general relativity. The canonical momenta are identified by looking at boundary behaviour under small deformations of the action; the relationship between the momentum conjugate to the embedding functions and the conserved momentum density is established. The canonical Hamiltonian is constructed explicitly; the constraints on the phase space, both primary and secondary, are identified and the role they play in the theory is described. The multipliers implementing the primary constraints are identified in terms of the ADM lapse and shift variables and Hamilton's equations are shown to be consistent with the Euler-Lagrange equations.

  6. A Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldiotti, M.C.; Fresneda, R.; Molina, C.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we develop a strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics. A thermodynamic description based on symplectic geometry is introduced, where all thermodynamic processes can be described within the framework of Analytic Mechanics. Our proposal is constructed on top of a usual symplectic manifold, where phase space is even dimensional and one has well-defined Poisson brackets. The main idea is the introduction of an extended phase space where thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. We are then able to apply the canonical transformation toolkit to thermodynamic problems. Throughout this development, Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. To illustrate the formalism, we consider paradigmatic examples, namely, the ideal, van der Waals and Clausius gases. - Highlights: • A strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics is proposed. • Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. • Thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. • Thermodynamic potentials are related by canonical transformations.

  7. On the domain of the Nelson Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, M.; Wünsch, A.

    2018-04-01

    The Nelson Hamiltonian is unitarily equivalent to a Hamiltonian defined through a closed, semibounded quadratic form, the unitary transformation being explicitly known and due to Gross. In this paper, we study the mapping properties of the Gross-transform in order to characterize the regularity properties of vectors in the form domain of the Nelson Hamiltonian. Since the operator domain is a subset of the form domain, our results apply to vectors in the domain of the Hamiltonian as well. This work is a continuation of our previous work on the Fröhlich Hamiltonian.

  8. Hamiltonian systems in accelerator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laslett, L.J.

    1985-06-01

    General features of the design of annular particle accelerators or storage rings are outlined and the Hamiltonian character of individual-ion motion is indicated. Examples of phase plots are presented, for the motion in one spatial degree of freedom, of an ion subject to a periodic nonlinear focusing force. A canonical transformation describing coupled nonlinear motion also is given, and alternative types of graphical display are suggested for the investigation of long-term stability in such cases. 7 figs

  9. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production

  10. Generic Local Hamiltonians are Gapless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movassagh, Ramis

    2017-12-01

    We prove that generic quantum local Hamiltonians are gapless. In fact, we prove that there is a continuous density of states above the ground state. The Hamiltonian can be on a lattice in any spatial dimension or on a graph with a bounded maximum vertex degree. The type of interactions allowed for include translational invariance in a disorder (i.e., probabilistic) sense with some assumptions on the local distributions. Examples include many-body localization and random spin models. We calculate the scaling of the gap with the system's size when the local terms are distributed according to a Gaussian β orthogonal random matrix ensemble. As a corollary, there exist finite size partitions with respect to which the ground state is arbitrarily close to a product state. When the local eigenvalue distribution is discrete, in addition to the lack of an energy gap in the limit, we prove that the ground state has finite size degeneracies. The proofs are simple and constructive. This work excludes the important class of truly translationally invariant Hamiltonians where the local terms are all equal.

  11. Hamiltonian dynamics of preferential attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuev, Konstantin; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment (PA), known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton’s equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in PA. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by PA is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree distributions. In other words, PA generates nothing but random graphs with power-law degree distribution. The extension of the developed canonical formalism for network analysis to richer geometric network models with non-degenerate groups of symmetries may eventually lead to a system of equations describing network dynamics at small scales. (paper)

  12. Non-stoquastic Hamiltonians in quantum annealing via geometric phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Walter; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-09-01

    We argue that a complete description of quantum annealing implemented with continuous variables must take into account the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan geometric phase that arises when the system Hamiltonian changes during the anneal. We show that this geometric effect leads to the appearance of non-stoquasticity in the effective quantum Ising Hamiltonians that are typically used to describe quantum annealing with flux qubits. We explicitly demonstrate the effect of this geometric non-stoquasticity when quantum annealing is performed with a system of one and two coupled flux qubits. The realization of non-stoquastic Hamiltonians has important implications from a computational complexity perspective, since it is believed that in many cases quantum annealing with stoquastic Hamiltonians can be efficiently simulated via classical algorithms such as Quantum Monte Carlo. It is well known that the direct implementation of non-stoquastic Hamiltonians with flux qubits is particularly challenging. Our results suggest an alternative path for the implementation of non-stoquasticity via geometric phases that can be exploited for computational purposes.

  13. Low energy electron beam processing of YBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chromik, Š., E-mail: stefan.chromik@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Camerlingo, C. [CNR-SPIN, Istituto Superconduttori, Materiali Innovativi e Dispositivi, via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Sojková, M.; Štrbík, V.; Talacko, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Malka, I.; Bar, I.; Bareli, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Jung, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of superconducting properties of irradiated bridges under certain conditions. • 30 keV irradiation influence CuO{sub 2} planes as well as oxygen chains. • Direct confirmation of changes in oxygen chains using micro-Raman spectroscopy. • Possibility of electron writing. - Abstract: Effects of low energy 30 keV electron irradiation of superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} thin films have been investigated by means of transport and micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The critical temperature and the critical current of 200 nm thick films initially increase with increasing fluency of the electron irradiation, reach the maximum at fluency 3 − 4 × 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}, and then decrease with further fluency increase. In much thinner films (75 nm), the critical temperature increases while the critical current decreases after low energy electron irradiation with fluencies below 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The Raman investigations suggest that critical temperature increase in irradiated films is due to healing of broken Cu−O chains that results in increased carrier’s concentration in superconducting CuO{sub 2} planes. Changes in the critical current are controlled by changes in the density of oxygen vacancies acting as effective pinning centers for flux vortices. The effects of low energy electron irradiation of YBCO turned out to result from a subtle balance of many processes involving oxygen removal, both by thermal activation and kick-off processes, and ordering of chains environment by incident electrons.

  14. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M.

    2011-01-01

    Full text. Accurate and precise values of absolute total cross section (TCS) represent important information in many scientific and technological applications. In our case, for example, we are motivated to provide such information for electron-fuel collision processes which are specifically relevant to modeling spark ignition in alcohol-fuelled internal combustion engines. Many electron scattering TCS measurements are presently available for a diverse range of atomic and molecular targets. However, lack of data for important bio-molecular targets still remains. Disagreements between the available TCS data for the alcohols have prompted several studies of electron scattering collision of slow electrons with these molecules which are currently important in applications as bio- fuels. This relevance, which has attracted much attention, has been one of the subjects of a recent collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. Recently this collaboration reported first measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering by several primary alcohols. In this work we address methanol and ethanol TCSs at low energy range and report additional studies of resonant structure in ethanol using the detection of metastable states produced by electron impact excitation with high energy resolution. We have recently constructed a TCS apparatus in our laboratory at Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, based on the well-known linear transmission technique. The experimental setup is based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through a gas cell containing the atoms or molecules to be studied at a given pressure. It consists essentially of an electron gun, a gas cell and an electron energy analyzer composed of an array of decelerating electrostatic lenses, a cylindrical dispersive 127o analyzer and a Faraday cup. To our knowledge, there exist

  15. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Yates, Brent; Hong, Ling; Khakoo, Murtadha A. [California State University at Fullerton, CA (US). Physics Department; Bettega, Marcio H.F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Costa, Romarly F. da [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, Marco A.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Accurate and precise values of absolute total cross section (TCS) represent important information in many scientific and technological applications. In our case, for example, we are motivated to provide such information for electron-fuel collision processes which are specifically relevant to modeling spark ignition in alcohol-fuelled internal combustion engines. Many electron scattering TCS measurements are presently available for a diverse range of atomic and molecular targets. However, lack of data for important bio-molecular targets still remains. Disagreements between the available TCS data for the alcohols have prompted several studies of electron scattering collision of slow electrons with these molecules which are currently important in applications as bio- fuels. This relevance, which has attracted much attention, has been one of the subjects of a recent collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. Recently this collaboration reported first measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering by several primary alcohols. In this work we address methanol and ethanol TCSs at low energy range and report additional studies of resonant structure in ethanol using the detection of metastable states produced by electron impact excitation with high energy resolution. We have recently constructed a TCS apparatus in our laboratory at Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, based on the well-known linear transmission technique. The experimental setup is based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through a gas cell containing the atoms or molecules to be studied at a given pressure. It consists essentially of an electron gun, a gas cell and an electron energy analyzer composed of an array of decelerating electrostatic lenses, a cylindrical dispersive 127o analyzer and a Faraday cup. To our knowledge, there exist

  16. Low energy, low cost, efficient CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael C. Trachtenberg; Lihong Bao; David A. Smith; Remy Dumortier [Carbozyme, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses the development and some characteristics of a new, enzyme-based, contained liquid membrane contactor to capture CO{sub 2}. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the removal of CO{sub 2} while the membrane contactor increases the surface area to allow the reduction of the size of the system. The modular system design is easily scaled to any required size reducing the investment costs. The system captures CO{sub 2} at a low energy and low cost promising to be a cost effective technology for CO{sub 2} capture. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  17. GEANT4 simulations for low energy proton computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milhoretto, Edney; Schelin, Hugo R.; Setti, Joao A.P.; Denyak, Valery; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Evseev, Ivan G.; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Yevseyeva, O.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Vinagre Filho, Ubirajara M.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the recent results of computer simulations for the low energy proton beam tomographic scanner installed at the cyclotron CV-28 of IEN/CNEN. New computer simulations were performed in order to adjust the parameters of previous simulation within the first experimental results and to understand some specific effects that affected the form of the final proton energy spectra. To do this, the energy and angular spread of the initial proton beam were added, and the virtual phantom geometry was specified more accurately in relation to the real one. As a result, a more realistic view on the measurements was achieved.

  18. GEANT4 simulations for low energy proton computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milhoretto, Edney [Federal University of Technology-Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R. [Federal University of Technology-Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba-PR (Brazil)], E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.br; Setti, Joao A.P.; Denyak, Valery; Paschuk, Sergei A. [Federal University of Technology-Parana, UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Evseev, Ivan G.; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Yevseyeva, O. [Polytechnic Institute/UERJ, Rua Alberto Rangel s/n, N. Friburgo, RJ, Brazil 28630-050 (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo T. [Nuclear Instr. Lab./COPPE/UFRJ, Av. Horacio Macedo 2030, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Vinagre Filho, Ubirajara M. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering-IEN/CNEN, Rua Helio de Almeida 75, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    This work presents the recent results of computer simulations for the low energy proton beam tomographic scanner installed at the cyclotron CV-28 of IEN/CNEN. New computer simulations were performed in order to adjust the parameters of previous simulation within the first experimental results and to understand some specific effects that affected the form of the final proton energy spectra. To do this, the energy and angular spread of the initial proton beam were added, and the virtual phantom geometry was specified more accurately in relation to the real one. As a result, a more realistic view on the measurements was achieved.

  19. The interaction of low-energy electrons with fructose molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, I. V.; Kontrosh, E. E.; Markush, P. P.; Shpenik, O. B.

    2017-11-01

    Using a hypocycloidal electronic spectrometer, the interactions of low energy electrons (0-8.50 eV) with fructose molecules, namely, electron scattering and dissociative attachment, are studied. The results of these studies showed that the fragmentation of fructose molecules occurs effectively even at an electron energy close to zero. In the total electron-scattering cross section by molecules, resonance features (at energies 3.10 and 5.00 eV) were first observed near the formation thresholds of light ion fragments OH- and H-. The correlation of the features observed in the cross sections of electron scattering and dissociative attachment is analyzed.

  20. The EU CONCERTO project Class 1 - Demonstrating cost-effective low-energy buildings - Recent results with special focus on comparison of calculated and measured energy performance of Danish buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Ove; Thomsen, K.E.; Rose, J.

    2012-01-01

    -chip heating plant has been added. The project demonstrates the benefits of ultra-low-energy buildings integrated with biomass- and solar heating energy supply. The CLASS1 project involves 4 other countries: Estonia, France, Italy and Romania. These countries develop training activities based on the results......In 2007 the Class1 project commenced. Originally, 442 dwellings were to be designed and constructed as "low-energy class 1" houses according to requirements set by the Municipality of Egedal/Denmark. This means that the energy consumption is 50% below the existing energy regulations. 65 dwellings...... and experiences gained from the Danish housing projects. This paper describes the comparisons between measured and calculated energy consumption in a social housing settlement and in a detached single-family house. Results show relatively large discrepancies between measured and calculated results...

  1. Low energy atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    The semiclassical theory of atom-atom potential scattering and of low energy inelastic atom-atom scattering is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the origin and interpretation of rainbow structure, diffraction oscillations and exchange oscillations in the potential scattering differential cross-section, and to the glory structure and symmetry oscillations in the integral cross-section. Available methods for direct inversion of the cross-section data to recover the potential are reviewed in some detail. The theory of non-adiabatic transitions is introduced by a short discussion of interaction mechanisms and of diabetic and adiabatic representations. Analytical S matrix elements are presented for two state curve-crossing (Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg), Demkov and Nikitin models. The relation between Stuckelberg oscillations in the S matrix and in the differential cross-section is discussed in terms of interference between trajectories belonging to two different classical deflection functions. The energy dependences of the inelastic integral cross-section for curve-crossing and Demkov type transitions are also discussed. Finally the theory is reviewed in relation to a recent close-coupled study of fine structure transitions in F( 2 P) + Xe( 2 S) scattering

  2. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, Carl R.; Grimes, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2005 and supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG03-03NA00074. Cross sections measured with high resolution have been subjected to an Ericson theory analysis to infer information about the nuclear level density. Other measurements were made of the spectral shape of particles produced in evaporation processes; these also yield level density information. A major project was the development of a new Hauser-Feshbach code for analyzing such spectra. Other measurements produced information on the spectra of gamma rays emitted in reactions on heavy nuclei and gave a means of refining our understanding of gamma-ray strength functions. Finally,reactions on light nuclei were studied and subjected to an R-matrix analysis. Cross sections fora network of nuclear reactions proceedingthrough a given compound nucleus shouldgreatly constrain the family of allowed parameters. Modifications to the formalism andcomputer code are also discussed.

  3. Operating Characteristics of the low energy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Baki, M.M.; Abd El-Rahman, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to describe the construction and operation of low energy accelerator with energy in the range from (zero to 100 KeV.). This accelerator includes an ion source of the cold cathode penning type (with pierce geometry for ion beam extraction), an accelerating tube (with 8 electrodes) and faraday cup for measuring ion current. A vacuum system which gives vacuum of the order 3.0 x 10 8 torr is used. A palladium tube is used to supply the source with pure hydrogen atoms. It was possible to operate this accelerator with an energy 50 KeV. at minimum hydrogen pressure. 6.3 x 10 6 torr. The total resistance applied between the accelerating electrodes R T = 31.5 M OMEGA. These data includes the influence of the pressure in the accelerating tube, the magnetic field of the ion source, the extraction potential and the accelerating potential on the collector ion current. It was possible to accelerate protons with an energy 50 KeV with current about 100 MU A at pressure 6.3 x 10 6 Torr, the source magnetic field + 1100 gauss (I B = 2A), the current = 0.4 A and the extraction potential = 10 K. V

  4. Low-energy electron microdosimetry of CS-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1980-09-01

    The mass of tissue irradiated by an internal emitter depends upon the distribution of the radionuclide within the organism and the type of radiation emitted. The range (95% absorption) of low-energy electron effectively defines the sensitive volume in which the energy of the emitted electron is deposited. Accordingly, in the case of Auger electron microdosimetry of internal emitters the correct definition of the sensitive volume is of paramount importance. The amount of energy delivered by the monoenergetic electrons emitted by the decay system 137 Cs → sup(137m)Ba to spherical volumes of water-like tissue media of radii equivalent to the estimated ranges of those electrons in water is calculated and discussed as far as the variations of the estimated ranges of electrons as a function of the initial energy of emission are concerned. Although there are still many uncertainties on the actual ranges of low-energy electrons, one can state confidently that the ranges of the Auger electrons of the decay system 137 Cs → 137 sup(m) Ba → 137 Ba can be considered to be in the same order of magnitude of the diameter of a cell. The energy deposition in spherical volumes of water-like tissue media, considered equivalent to the sensitive volumes for the Auger electrons of the decay system 137 Cs → 137 sub(m) Ba → 137 Ba, range for several orders of magnitude from 10 2 to about 10 10 times higher than the energy deposition in similar media by the internal conversion electrons of this decay system. If equivalent variations of energy deposition per unit mass occur when the masses considered are cellular, and subcellular structures, then the effects into the sensitive volume should be taken into biological consideration as far as the microdosimetry of low-energy electrons (approximately equal to 10 keV) is considered, whenever there is internal localization of Auger emitters. (Author) [pt

  5. Study on the application of low energy U-window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Binghai; Liu Shikai; Chen Guosheng

    2012-01-01

    For using the low energy U-window information, based on the theory and experiment, the advantage of identifying the subtle anomaly that the low energy U-window information has given is discussed, the method of drawing the low energy U-window information is stated; a method of calibration and obtaining the calibration parameters was developed which was applied to Dongsheng region. The result indicated that the anomaly of low energy U-window information upon known field is more easy identified by comparing with the standard three windows U-window information, which proved the practicability of the method of low energy U-windows information. (authors)

  6. New cooperative mechanisms of low-energy nuclear reactions using super low-energy external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Zhidkova, I.E.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system, nuclei + atoms + condensed matter, can occur at a smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. The cooperative processes can be induced and enhanced by low-energy external fields. The excess heat is the emission of internal energy and transmutations at LENR are the result of redistribution of inner energy of the whole system. (author)

  7. New Cooperative Mechanisms of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions Using Super Low-Energy External Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    We propose a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system, nuclei + atoms + condensed matter, can occur at a smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. The cooperative processes can be induced and enhanced by low-energy external fields. The excess heat is the emission of internal energy and transmutations at LENR are the result of redistribution of inner energy of the whole system.

  8. Determining the Parameters of the Effective Rovibrational Hamiltonian of the ν7+ν8 Band of the Ethylene-1-13C Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslapovskaya, Yu. S.

    2018-06-01

    The spectrum of the ν7 + ν8 band of the ethylene-1-13C (13C12CH4) molecule is recorded with a Bruker IFS 125 HR Fourier spectrometer in the range from 1500 to 2100 cm-1 with a resolution of 0.0025 cm-1. As a result of analysis of the experimental spectrum, more than 1000 transitions belonging to the ν7 + ν8 band are assigned. Parameters of the Hamiltonian obtained as a result of solving the inverse spectroscopic problem reproduce 400 initial experimental energies with error close to the experimental one.

  9. Hamiltonian Chaos and Fractional Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combescure, M

    2005-01-01

    This book provides an introduction and discussion of the main issues in the current understanding of classical Hamiltonian chaos, and of its fractional space-time structure. It also develops the most complex and open problems in this context, and provides a set of possible applications of these notions to some fundamental questions of dynamics: complexity and entropy of systems, foundation of classical statistical physics on the basis of chaos theory, and so on. Starting with an introduction of the basic principles of the Hamiltonian theory of chaos, the book covers many topics that can be found elsewhere in the literature, but which are collected here for the readers' convenience. In the last three parts, the author develops topics which are not typically included in the standard textbooks; among them are: - the failure of the traditional description of chaotic dynamics in terms of diffusion equations; - he fractional kinematics, its foundation and renormalization group analysis; - 'pseudo-chaos', i.e. kinetics of systems with weak mixing and zero Lyapunov exponents; - directional complexity and entropy. The purpose of this book is to provide researchers and students in physics, mathematics and engineering with an overview of many aspects of chaos and fractality in Hamiltonian dynamical systems. In my opinion it achieves this aim, at least provided researchers and students (mainly those involved in mathematical physics) can complement this reading with comprehensive material from more specialized sources which are provided as references and 'further reading'. Each section contains introductory pedagogical material, often illustrated by figures coming from several numerical simulations which give the feeling of what's going on, and thus is very useful to the reader who is not very familiar with the topics presented. Some problems are included at the end of most sections to help the reader to go deeper into the subject. My one regret is that the book does not

  10. Coherent states for quadratic Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez C, David J; Velazquez, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    The coherent states for a set of quadratic Hamiltonians in the trap regime are constructed. A matrix technique which allows us to directly identify the creation and annihilation operators will be presented. Then, the coherent states as simultaneous eigenstates of the annihilation operators will be derived, and will be compared with those attained through the displacement operator method. The corresponding wavefunction will be found, and a general procedure for obtaining several mean values involving the canonical operators in these states will be described. The results will be illustrated through the asymmetric Penning trap.

  11. Integrable and nonintegrable Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, I.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally Hamiltonian systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom have been divided into those with few degrees of freedom which were supposed to exhibit some kind of regular ordered motions and those with large numbers of degrees of freedom for which the methods of statistical mechanics should be used. The last few decades have seen a complete change of view. The change of view affects almost all the practical applications, particularly in mathematical physics, which has been dominated for many decades by linear mathematics, coming from quantum theory. The authors consider how this change of view affects some specific applications of dynamics and also the relation between dynamical theory and applications

  12. Clinical application of low energy intracardiac cardioversion of atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Liqun; Gu Gang; Su Kan; Su Renying; Shen Yongchu; Shen Weifeng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low energy intracardiac cardioversion in persistent atria fibrillation. Methods: Low energy intracardiac cardioversion was performed by delivering R wave-synchronized biphasic shocks in 7 patients (4 men, 3 women) with persistent atrial fibrillation. Prior to the procedure, all patients underwent transesophageal echocardiographic examinations to rule out the presence of intracardiac thrombus and received subcutaneous injection of low molecular weight heparin for 3-5 days. Two custom-made 6 Fr catheters (Rhythm Technologies of Getz, USA) were used for de-fibrillation shock delivery. One catheter was positioned in the lower right atrium so that the majority of the catheter electrodes had firm contact with the right atrial free wall. The second catheter was placed randomly either in coronary sinus through right internal jugular vein or in the left pulmonary artery through femoral vein. In addition, a standard diagnostic 6-F quadrupolar catheter was placed at the right ventricular apex for ventricular synchronization and postshock ventricular pacing. Shocks were delivered by Implant Support Device (Model 4510, Teleceronics). After conversion, all patients were treated with intravenous amiodarone in the first 24 hours followed by oral administration. Results: In all 7 patients cardioversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm was successfully obtained. A mean of 2 ± 1 shocks per patient has been delivered with a total amount of 13 shocks. The average delivered energy was 7.8 ± 2.2 Joules. No complication occurred. At a mean follow-up of 18 ± 9 months, 4 of the 7 patients treated successfully showed sinus rhythm there after. Atrial fibrillation recurred in 3 patients at the second, fifth day and eighth month after cardioversion. Conclusions: Low energy intracardiac cardioversion is effective and safe, and can be easily performed in patients without general anesthesia. It offers a new option for restoring sinus

  13. Perspective: Quantum Hamiltonians for optical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.; Jones, Garth A.; Salam, A.; Woolley, R. Guy

    2018-01-01

    The multipolar Hamiltonian of quantum electrodynamics is extensively employed in chemical and optical physics to treat rigorously the interaction of electromagnetic fields with matter. It is also widely used to evaluate intermolecular interactions. The multipolar version of the Hamiltonian is commonly obtained by carrying out a unitary transformation of the Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian that goes by the name of Power-Zienau-Woolley (PZW). Not only does the formulation provide excellent agreement with experiment, and versatility in its predictive ability, but also superior physical insight. Recently, the foundations and validity of the PZW Hamiltonian have been questioned, raising a concern over issues of gauge transformation and invariance, and whether observable quantities obtained from unitarily equivalent Hamiltonians are identical. Here, an in-depth analysis of theoretical foundations clarifies the issues and enables misconceptions to be identified. Claims of non-physicality are refuted: the PZW transformation and ensuing Hamiltonian are shown to rest on solid physical principles and secure theoretical ground.

  14. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni Lα 1 2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures

  15. Low energy beam transport system developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudnikov, V., E-mail: vadim@muonsinc.com [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dudnikova, G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 3261 (United States); Institute of Computational Technologies SBRAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  16. Low energy beam transport for HIDIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meusel, O.; Pozimski, J.; Jakob, A.; Lakatos, A.

    2001-01-01

    Low energy beam transport (LEBT) for a heavy ion inertial fusion (HIDIF, I. Hofmann and G. Plass, Report of the European Study Group on Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion for the Period 1995-1998) facility suffers from high space charge forces and high ion mass. Space charge compensation reduces the necessary focusing force of the lenses and the radius of the beam in the LEBT, and therefrom the emittance growth due to aberrations and self fields is reduced. Gabor lenses (D. Gabor, Nature 160 (1947)) providing a stable space charge cloud for focusing and combine strong cylinder symmetric focusing with partly space charge compensation and low emittance growth. A high tolerance against source noise and current fluctuations and reduced investment costs could be other possible advantages. The proof of principle has already been demonstrated (J.A. Palkovic, Measurements on a Gabor lens for Neutralizing and Focusing a 30 keV Proton beam, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1989; J. Pozimski, P. Gross, R. Doelling and T. Weis, First experimental studies of a Gabor plasma-lens in Frankfurt, Proceedings of the 3rd EPAC Conference, Berlin, 1992). To broaden the experiences and to investigate the realisation of a LEBT concept for the HIDIF injector an experimental program using two Gabor lenses for independent variation of beam radius and envelope angel at RFQ injection was started. Therefrom the first experimental results using a double Gabor lens (DGPL) LEBT system for transporting an high perveance Xe + beam are presented and the results of numerical simulations are shown

  17. Low energy beam transport for HIDIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meusel, O. E-mail: o.meusel@iap.uni-frankfurt.de; Pozimski, J.; Jakob, A.; Lakatos, A

    2001-05-21

    Low energy beam transport (LEBT) for a heavy ion inertial fusion (HIDIF, I. Hofmann and G. Plass, Report of the European Study Group on Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion for the Period 1995-1998) facility suffers from high space charge forces and high ion mass. Space charge compensation reduces the necessary focusing force of the lenses and the radius of the beam in the LEBT, and therefrom the emittance growth due to aberrations and self fields is reduced. Gabor lenses (D. Gabor, Nature 160 (1947)) providing a stable space charge cloud for focusing and combine strong cylinder symmetric focusing with partly space charge compensation and low emittance growth. A high tolerance against source noise and current fluctuations and reduced investment costs could be other possible advantages. The proof of principle has already been demonstrated (J.A. Palkovic, Measurements on a Gabor lens for Neutralizing and Focusing a 30 keV Proton beam, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1989; J. Pozimski, P. Gross, R. Doelling and T. Weis, First experimental studies of a Gabor plasma-lens in Frankfurt, Proceedings of the 3rd EPAC Conference, Berlin, 1992). To broaden the experiences and to investigate the realisation of a LEBT concept for the HIDIF injector an experimental program using two Gabor lenses for independent variation of beam radius and envelope angel at RFQ injection was started. Therefrom the first experimental results using a double Gabor lens (DGPL) LEBT system for transporting an high perveance Xe{sup +} beam are presented and the results of numerical simulations are shown.

  18. Geometry and Hamiltonian mechanics on discrete spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talasila, V; Clemente-Gallardo, J; Schaft, A J van der

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulation is often crucial for analysing the behaviour of many complex systems which do not admit analytic solutions. To this end, one either converts a 'smooth' model into a discrete (in space and time) model, or models systems directly at a discrete level. The goal of this paper is to provide a discrete analogue of differential geometry, and to define on these discrete models a formal discrete Hamiltonian structure-in doing so we try to bring together various fundamental concepts from numerical analysis, differential geometry, algebraic geometry, simplicial homology and classical Hamiltonian mechanics. For example, the concept of a twisted derivation is borrowed from algebraic geometry for developing a discrete calculus. The theory is applied to a nonlinear pendulum and we compare the dynamics obtained through a discrete modelling approach with the dynamics obtained via the usual discretization procedures. Also an example of an energy-conserving algorithm on a simple harmonic oscillator is presented, and its effect on the Poisson structure is discussed

  19. Nonextensive formalism and continuous Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Lutsko, James F.

    2011-01-01

    A recurring question in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics is what deviation from standard statistical mechanics gives rise to non-Boltzmann behavior and to nonlinear response, which amounts to identifying the emergence of 'statistics from dynamics' in systems out of equilibrium. Among several possible analytical developments which have been proposed, the idea of nonextensive statistics introduced by Tsallis about 20 years ago was to develop a statistical mechanical theory for systems out of equilibrium where the Boltzmann distribution no longer holds, and to generalize the Boltzmann entropy by a more general function S q while maintaining the formalism of thermodynamics. From a phenomenological viewpoint, nonextensive statistics appeared to be of interest because maximization of the generalized entropy S q yields the q-exponential distribution which has been successfully used to describe distributions observed in a large class of phenomena, in particular power law distributions for q>1. Here we re-examine the validity of the nonextensive formalism for continuous Hamiltonian systems. In particular we consider the q-ideal gas, a model system of quasi-particles where the effect of the interactions are included in the particle properties. On the basis of exact results for the q-ideal gas, we find that the theory is restricted to the range q<1, which raises the question of its formal validity range for continuous Hamiltonian systems.

  20. Can cellulite be treated with low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo; Kuhn, Christoph; Voss, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of low-energy defocused extracorporeal generated shock waves on collagen structure of cellulite afflicted skin. Cellulite measurement using high-resolution ultrasound technology was performed before and after low-energy defocused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in 21 female subjects. ESWT was applied onto the skin at the lateral thigh twice a week for a period of six weeks. Results provide evidence that low-energy defocused ESWT caused remodeling of the collagen within the dermis of the tested region. Improving device-parameters and therapy regimes will be essential for future development of a scientific based approach to cellulite treatment. PMID:18225463

  1. Generalized oscillator representations for Calogero Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutin, I V; Voronov, B L

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a natural continuation of the previous paper (Gitman et al 2011 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 425204), where oscillator representations for nonnegative Calogero Hamiltonians with coupling constant α ⩾ − 1/4 were constructed. In this paper, we present generalized oscillator representations for all Calogero Hamiltonians with α ⩾ − 1/4. These representations are generally highly nonunique, but there exists an optimum representation for each Hamiltonian. (comment)

  2. Low energy description of quantum gravity and complementarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Varela, Jaime; Weinberg, Sean J.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a framework in which low energy dynamics of quantum gravity is described preserving locality, and yet taking into account the effects that are not captured by the naive global spacetime picture, e.g. those associated with black hole complementarity. Our framework employs a “special relativistic” description of gravity; specifically, gravity is treated as a force measured by the observer tied to the coordinate system associated with a freely falling local Lorentz frame. We identify, in simple cases, regions of spacetime in which low energy local descriptions are applicable as viewed from the freely falling frame; in particular, we identify a surface called the gravitational observer horizon on which the local proper acceleration measured in the observer's coordinates becomes the cutoff (string) scale. This allows for separating between the “low-energy” local physics and “trans-Planckian” intrinsically quantum gravitational (stringy) physics, and allows for developing physical pictures of the origins of various effects. We explore the structure of the Hilbert space in which the proposed scheme is realized in a simple manner, and classify its elements according to certain horizons they possess. We also discuss implications of our framework on the firewall problem. We conjecture that the complementarity picture may persist due to properties of trans-Planckian physics.

  3. EMR-related problems at the interface between the crystal field Hamiltonians and the zero-field splitting Hamiltonians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudowicz Czesław

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The interface between optical spectroscopy, electron magnetic resonance (EMR, and magnetism of transition ions forms the intricate web of interrelated notions. Major notions are the physical Hamiltonians, which include the crystal field (CF (or equivalently ligand field (LF Hamiltonians, and the effective spin Hamiltonians (SH, which include the zero-field splitting (ZFS Hamiltonians as well as to a certain extent also the notion of magnetic anisotropy (MA. Survey of recent literature has revealed that this interface, denoted CF (LF ↔ SH (ZFS, has become dangerously entangled over the years. The same notion is referred to by three names that are not synonymous: CF (LF, SH (ZFS, and MA. In view of the strong need for systematization of nomenclature aimed at bringing order to the multitude of different Hamiltonians and the associated quantities, we have embarked on this systematization. In this article, we do an overview of our efforts aimed at providing a deeper understanding of the major intricacies occurring at the CF (LF ↔ SH (ZFS interface with the focus on the EMR-related problems for transition ions.

  4. Lie transforms and their use in Hamiltonian perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.

    1978-06-01

    A review is presented of the theory of Lie transforms as applied to Hamiltonian systems. We begin by presenting some general background on the Hamiltonian formalism and by introducing the operator notation for canonical transformations. We then derive the general theory of Lie transforms. We derive the formula for the new Hamiltonian when one uses a Lie transform to effect a canonical transformation, and we use Lie transforms to prove a very general version of Noether's theorem, or the symmetry-equals-invariant theorem. Next we use the general Lie transform theory to derive Deprit's perturbation theory. We illustrate this perturbation theory by application to two well-known problems in classical mechanics. Finally we present a chapter on conventions. There are many ways to develop Lie transforms. The last chapter explains the reasons for the choices made here

  5. Hamiltonian formulation of reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) has become a principal tool for understanding nonlinear processes, including disruptions, in tokamak plasmas. Although analytical studies of RMHD turbulence have been useful, the model's impressive ability to simulate tokamak fluid behavior has been revealed primarily by numerical solution. The present work describes a new analytical approach, not restricted to turbulent regimes, based on Hamiltonian field theory. It is shown that the nonlinear (ideal) RMHD system, in both its high-beta and low-beta versions, can be expressed in Hanmiltonian form. Thus a Poisson bracket, [ , ], is constructed such that each RMHD field quantitity, xi/sub i/, evolves according to xi/sub i/ = [xi/sub i/,H], where H is the total field energy. The new formulation makes RMHD accessible to the methodology of Hamiltonian mechanics; it has lead, in particular, to the recognition of new RMHD invariants and even exact, nonlinear RMHD solutions. A canonical version of the Poisson bracket, which requires the introduction of additional fields, leads to a nonlinear variational principle for time-dependent RMHD

  6. General technique to produce isochronous Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calogero, F; Leyvraz, F

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new technique-characterized by an arbitrary positive constant Ω, with which we associate the period T = 2π/Ω-to 'Ω-modify' a Hamiltonian so that the new Hamiltonian thereby obtained is entirely isochronous, namely it yields motions all of which (except possibly for a lower dimensional set of singular motions) are periodic with the same fixed period T in all their degrees of freedom. This technique transforms real autonomous Hamiltonians into Ω-modified Hamiltonians which are also real and autonomous, and it is widely applicable, for instance, to the most general many-body problem characterized by Newtonian equations of motion ('acceleration equal force') provided it is translation invariant. The Ω-modified Hamiltonians are of course not translation invariant, but for Ω = 0 they reduce (up to marginal changes) to the unmodified Hamiltonians they were obtained from. Hence, when this technique is applied to translation-invariant Hamiltonians yielding, in their center-of-mass systems, chaotic motions with a natural time scale much smaller than T, the corresponding Ω-modified Hamiltonians shall display a chaotic behavior for quite some time before the isochronous character of the motions takes over. We moreover show that the quantized versions of these Ω-modified Hamiltonians feature equispaced spectra

  7. Canonical transformations and hamiltonian path integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, L.V.

    1982-01-01

    Behaviour of the Hamiltonian path integrals under canonical transformations produced by a generator, is investigated. An exact form is determined for the kernel of the unitary operator realizing the corresponding quantum transformation. Equivalence rules are found (the Hamiltonian formalism, one-dimensional case) enabling one to exclude non-standard terms from the action. It is shown that the Hamiltonian path integral changes its form under cononical transformations: in the transformed expression besides the classical Hamiltonian function there appear some non-classical terms

  8. Noncanonical Hamiltonian methods in plasma dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, A.N.

    1981-11-01

    A Hamiltonian approach to plasma dynamics has numerous advantages over equivalent formulations which ignore the underlying Hamiltonian structure. In addition to achieving a deeper understanding of processes, Hamiltonian methods yield concise expressions (such as the Kubo form for linear susceptibility), greatly shorten the length of calculations, expose relationships (such as between the ponderomotive Hamiltonian and the linear susceptibility), determine invariants in terms of symmetry operations, and cover situations of great generality. In addition, they yield the Poincare invariants, in particular Liouville volume and adiabatic actions

  9. Necessary conditions for super-integrability of Hamiltonian systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Gora, Podgorna 50, PL-65-246 Zielona Gora (Poland)], E-mail: maciejka@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl; Przybylska, Maria [Torun Centre for Astronomy, N. Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, PL-87-100 Torun (Poland)], E-mail: maria.przybylska@astri.uni.torun.pl; Yoshida, Haruo [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, 181-8588 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: h.yoshida@nao.ac.jp

    2008-08-18

    We formulate a general theorem which gives a necessary condition for the maximal super-integrability of a Hamiltonian system. This condition is expressed in terms of properties of the differential Galois group of the variational equations along a particular solution of the considered system. An application of this general theorem to natural Hamiltonian systems of n degrees of freedom with a homogeneous potential gives easily computable and effective necessary conditions for the super-integrability. To illustrate an application of the formulated theorems, we investigate: three known families of integrable potentials, and the three body problem on a line.

  10. Phase transition in the non-degenerate Hubbard Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, C.M.; Lederer, P.; Gomes, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Phase transition in the isotropic non-degenerate Hubbard Hamiltonian within the renormalization group techniques, using the epsilon = 4 - d expansion to first order in epsilon, is studied. The functional obtained from the Hubbard Hamiltonian displays full rotation symmetry and describes two coupled fields: a vector spin field, with n components and a non-soft scalar charge field. The possibility of tricritical behavior then emerges. The effects of simple constraints imposed on the charge field is considered. The relevance of the coupling between the fields in producing Fisher renormalization of the critical exponents is discussed. The possible singularities introduced in the charge-charge correlation function by the coupling are also discussed

  11. Floquet-Green function formalism for harmonically driven Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, D F

    2003-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of the Floquet-Green function of a general Hamiltonian with harmonic time dependence. We use matrix continued fractions to derive an expression for the 'dynamical effective potential' that can be used to calculate the Floquet-Green function of the system. We demonstrate the formalism for the simple case of a space-periodic (in the tight-binding approximation) Hamiltonian with a defect whose on-site energy changes harmonically with time. We study the local density of states for this system and the behaviour of the localized states as a function of the different parameters that characterize the system

  12. The intrinsic stochasticity of near-integrable Hamiltonian systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krlin, L [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Ustav Fyziky Plazmatu

    1989-09-01

    Under certain conditions, the dynamics of near-integrable Hamiltonian systems appears to be stochastic. This stochasticity (intrinsic stochasticity, or deterministic chaos) is closely related to the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem of the stability of near-integrable multiperiodic Hamiltonian systems. The effect of the intrinsic stochasticity attracts still growing attention both in theory and in various applications in contemporary physics. The paper discusses the relation of the intrinsic stochasticity to the modern ergodic theory and to the KAM theorem, and describes some numerical experiments on related astrophysical and high-temperature plasma problems. Some open questions are mentioned in conclusion. (author).

  13. Hamiltonian models for the Madelung fluid and generalized Langevin equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonnenmacher, T.F.

    1985-01-01

    We present a Hamiltonian formulation of some type of an 'electromagnetic' Madelung fluid leading to a fluid mechanics interpretation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and to a subsidary condition to be required in order to make the correspondence between Schroedinger's quantum mechanics and Madelung's fluid mechanics unique. Then we discuss some problems related with the Brownian oscillator. Our aim is to start out with a Hamiltonian for the composite system with surrounding heat bath) and to finally arrive at a stochastic differential equation with completely determined statistical properties. (orig./HSI)

  14. Useful forms of the Hamiltonian for ion-optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, W.G.

    1991-04-01

    The symbiosis of differential algebra and the Lie-algebraic formulation of optics provides a set of very powerful tools for analyzing and understanding the orbit dynamics of complex accelerators up to very high orders. In order to use these tools effectively it is usually necessary to express the Hamiltonian in the appropriate coordinate system. In this report, the relativistic Hamiltonian is derived in curvilinear (the fundamental coordinate system for ion-optics), Cartesian and polar coordinates, in forms suitable for solving problems in ion optics and accelerator physics both with and without the help of differential algebra

  15. Identity of the SU(3) model phenomenological hamiltonian and the hamiltonian of nonaxial rotator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Avramenko, V.I.; Sokolov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Interpretation of nonspheric atomic nuclei spectra on the basis of phenomenological hamiltonians of SU(3) model showed satisfactory agreement of simulation calculations with experimental data. Meanwhile physical sense of phenomenological hamiltonians was not yet discussed. It is shown that phenomenological hamiltonians of SU(3) model are reduced to hamiltonian of nonaxial rotator but with additional items of the third and fourth powers angular momentum operator of rotator

  16. Development of the low energy linac systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Kwon, H. J.; Kim, Y. H.

    2005-08-01

    The project 'Development of the Low Energy Linac System' is aiming to develop the 20 MeV proton linac system. This consists of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV RFQ, and a 20 MeV DTL. We obtained the first beam signal after the 20 MeV linac. The high power switch installed in the ion source supplies the pulsed beam into the following LEBT. The pulse operation was successfully tested. The main role of the LEBT is to match the beam into the 3 MeV RFQ. The total length of the four-vane type RFQ is about 3.26m. For the field stabilization, we used the resonant coupling scheme and dipole stabilizer rods. An 1 MW klystron supplies the RF power into the RFQ. After tuning, the field deviation of the quadrupole mode is less than 2% of the design value and the dipole fraction is less than 5% of the operating mode. The following accelerating structure is DTL which accelerate 20 mA proton beams up to 20 MeV. It consists of 4 tanks and the length of each tank is less than 5 m. The lattice is FFDD type and the integrated fields of the quadrupole magnets are 1.75 T. The inner walls of the tanks are copper-plated by PR plating method. The thickness is 100m with the roughness of 0.3m. Each drift tube consists of 6 parts and assembled by e-beam welding. The tanks and drift tubes are aligned under the installation limit of 50m by using the laser-tracker. The tuning by the slug tuners and post couplers results in the field uniformity of 2% and field sensitivity of 100%/MHz. In order to detect the beam signal, we installed the Faraday cup after the RFQ or the DTL. For the RFQ, we observed the beam of 12 A under the forward RF power of 450 kW. The beam current after DTL is about 0.5 A when RF power of 150 kW was fed into each tank

  17. Low-energy district heating in energy-efficient building areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2011-01-01

    of a low-energy network for low-energy houses in Denmark. We took into account the effect of human behaviour on energy demand, the effect of the number of buildings connected to the network, a socio-economic comparison with ground source heat pumps, and opportunities for the optimization of the network...... to 0.20 MWh/(m year), and that the levelized cost of energy in low-energy DH supply is competitive with a scenario based on ground source heat pumps. The investment costs represent up to three quarters of the overall expenditure, over a time horizon of 30 years; so, the implementation of an energy...... system that fully relies on renewable energy needs substantial capital investment, but in the long term this is sustainable from the environmental and socio-economic points of view. Having demonstrated the value of the low-energy DH concept, we evaluated various possible designs with the aim of finding...

  18. Evolution of the low-energy excitation spectrum from the pure Hubbard ladder to the SO(5) ladder: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, D.; Haas, S.; Kim, E.

    1998-01-01

    The Hubbard Hamiltonian on a two-leg ladder is studied numerically using quantum Monte Carlo and exact diagonalization techniques. A rung interaction, V, is turned on such that the resulting model has an exact SO(5) symmetry when V=-U. The evolution of the low-energy excitation spectrum is presented from the pure Hubbard ladder to the SO(5) ladder. It is shown that the low-energy excitations in the pure Hubbard ladder have an approximate SO(5) symmetry. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  19. Colorado School of Mines low energy nuclear physics project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecil, F.E.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the project ''Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies''. This project was undertaken in 1987 and completed in 1993. All but one of the major objectives of this study have been accomplished. Specifically the authors have completed their investigation of the (p,γ) on light nuclei, a study of the Oppenheimer-Phillips effect, a measurements of the astrophysically interesting reaction D(α,γ) 6 Li at low energies and an extension of the reaction D(d,γ) 4 He to lower energies than previously observed. Preliminary investigation of te reaction 7 Li( 3 He,p) 9 Be was begun and is continuing under a separate DOE grant. In addition to these tasks, they have completed some very interesting projects which were not included in the original proposal. These include a study of the (d,γ) reactions on 6 Li, 7 Li and 10 B and an investigation of the possibility of observing terrestrial antineutrinos from the beta decay chains of U and Th as a diagnostic of terrestrial heat flow

  20. Development of Low Energy Gap and Fully Regioregular Polythienylenevinylene Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M. S. David

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low energy gap and fully regioregular conjugated polymers find its wide use in solar energy conversion applications. This paper will first briefly review this type of polymers and also report synthesis and characterization of a specific example new polymer, a low energy gap, fully regioregular, terminal functionalized, and processable conjugated polymer poly-(3-dodecyloxy-2,5-thienylene vinylene or PDDTV. The polymer exhibited an optical energy gap of 1.46 eV based on the UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum. The electrochemically measured highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO level is −4.79 eV, resulting in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO level of −3.33 eV based on optical energy gap. The polymer was synthesized via Horner-Emmons condensation and is fairly soluble in common organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran and chloroform with gentle heating. DSC showed two endothermic peaks at 67°C and 227°C that can be attributed to transitions between crystalline and liquid states. The polymer is thermally stable up to about 300°C. This polymer appears very promising for cost-effective solar cell applications.

  1. Homestake result, sterile neutrinos, and low energy solar neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, P. C.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2004-06-01

    The Homestake result is about ˜2σ lower than the Ar-production rate, QAr, predicted by the large mixing angle (LMA) Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution of the solar neutrino problem. Also there is no apparent upturn of the energy spectrum (R≡Nobs/NSSM) at low energies in SNO and Super-Kamiokande. Both these facts can be explained if a light, Δm201˜(0.2 2)×10-5 eV2, sterile neutrino exists which mixes very weakly with active neutrinos: sin2 2α˜(10-5 10-3). We perform both the analytical and numerical study of the conversion effects in the system of two active neutrinos with the LMA parameters and one weakly mixed sterile neutrino. The presence of sterile neutrino leads to a dip in the survival probability in the intermediate energy range E=(0.5 5) MeV thus suppressing the Be, or/and pep, CNO, as well as B electron neutrino fluxes. Apart from diminishing QAr it leads to decrease of the Ge-production rate and may lead to the decrease of the BOREXINO signal as well as the CC/NC ratio at SNO. Future studies of the solar neutrinos by SNO, SK, BOREXINO, and KamLAND as well as by the new low energy experiments will allow us to check this possibility.

  2. Calculation and Measurement of Low-Energy Radiative Moller Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Charles; DarkLight Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A number of current nuclear physics experiments have come to rely on precise knowledge of electron-electron (Moller) and positron-electron (Bhabha) scattering. Some of these experiments, having lepton beams on targets containing atomic electrons, use these purely-QED processes as normalization. In other scenarios, with electron beams at low energy and very high intensity, Moller scattering and radiative Moller scattering have such enormous cross-sections that the backgrounds they produce must be understood. In this low-energy regime, the electron mass is also not negligible in the calculation of the cross section. This is important, for example, in the DarkLight experiment (100 MeV). As a result, we have developed a new event generator for the radiative Moller and Bhabha processes, with new calculations that keep all terms of the electron mass. The MIT High Voltage Research Laboratory provides us a unique opportunity to study this process experimentally and compare it with our work, at a low beam energy of 2.5 MeV where the effects of the electron mass are significant. We are preparing a dedicated apparatus consisting of a magnetic spectrometer in order to directly measure this process. An overview of the calculation and the status of the experiment will be presented.

  3. Dynamical black holes in low-energy string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniceto, Pedro [Departamento de Matemática, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Rocha, Jorge V. [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB),Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-05-08

    We investigate time-dependent spherically symmetric solutions of the four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-axion-dilaton system, with the dilaton coupling that occurs in low-energy effective heterotic string theory. A class of dilaton-electrovacuum radiating solutions with a trivial axion, previously found by Güven and Yörük, is re-derived in a simpler manner and its causal structure is clarified. It is shown that such dynamical spacetimes featuring apparent horizons do not possess a regular light-like past null infinity or future null infinity, depending on whether they are radiating or accreting. These solutions are then extended in two ways. First we consider a Vaidya-like generalisation, which introduces a null dust source. Such spacetimes are used to test the status of cosmic censorship in the context of low-energy string theory. We prove that — within this family of solutions — regular black holes cannot evolve into naked singularities by accreting null dust, unless standard energy conditions are violated. Secondly, we employ S-duality to derive new time-dependent dyon solutions with a nontrivial axion turned on. Although they share the same causal structure as their Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton counterparts, these solutions possess both electric and magnetic charges.

  4. On the existence of star products on quotient spaces of linear Hamiltonian torus actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbig, Hans-Christian; Iyengar, Srikanth B.; Pflaum, Markus J.

    2009-01-01

    that the Koszul complex on the moment map of an effective linear Hamiltonian torus action is acyclic. We rephrase the nonpositivity condition of Arms and Gotay (Adv Math 79(1):43–103, 1990) for linear Hamiltonian torus actions. It follows that reduced spaces of such actions admit continuous star products....

  5. Rigorous RG Algorithms and Area Laws for Low Energy Eigenstates in 1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arad, Itai; Landau, Zeph; Vazirani, Umesh; Vidick, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    One of the central challenges in the study of quantum many-body systems is the complexity of simulating them on a classical computer. A recent advance (Landau et al. in Nat Phys, 2015) gave a polynomial time algorithm to compute a succinct classical description for unique ground states of gapped 1D quantum systems. Despite this progress many questions remained unsolved, including whether there exist efficient algorithms when the ground space is degenerate (and of polynomial dimension in the system size), or for the polynomially many lowest energy states, or even whether such states admit succinct classical descriptions or area laws. In this paper we give a new algorithm, based on a rigorously justified RG type transformation, for finding low energy states for 1D Hamiltonians acting on a chain of n particles. In the process we resolve some of the aforementioned open questions, including giving a polynomial time algorithm for poly( n) degenerate ground spaces and an n O(log n) algorithm for the poly( n) lowest energy states (under a mild density condition). For these classes of systems the existence of a succinct classical description and area laws were not rigorously proved before this work. The algorithms are natural and efficient, and for the case of finding unique ground states for frustration-free Hamiltonians the running time is {\\tilde{O}(nM(n))} , where M( n) is the time required to multiply two n × n matrices.

  6. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  7. Instrumentation for continuous monitoring of low energy cosmic ray intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S; Prasad, R; Yadav, R S [Aligarh Muslim Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics; Naqvi, T H [Z.H. Engineering Coll., Aligarh (India); Ahmed, Rais [National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi (India)

    1975-12-01

    A high counting rate neutron monitor developed at Aligarh for continuous monitoring of low energy nucleonic component of cosmic rays is described. Transistorized electronic circuits used are described.

  8. Hamiltonian analysis of Plebanski theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffenoir, E; Henneaux, M; Noui, K; Roche, Ph

    2004-01-01

    We study the Hamiltonian formulation of Plebanski theory in both the Euclidean and Lorentzian cases. A careful analysis of the constraints shows that the system is non-regular, i.e., the rank of the Dirac matrix is non-constant on the non-reduced phase space. We identify the gravitational and topological sectors which are regular subspaces of the non-reduced phase space. The theory can be restricted to the regular subspace which contains the gravitational sector. We explicitly identify first- and second-class constraints in this case. We compute the determinant of the Dirac matrix and the natural measure for the path integral of the Plebanski theory (restricted to the gravitational sector). This measure is the analogue of the Leutwyler-Fradkin-Vilkovisky measure of quantum gravity

  9. Quantum Statistical Operator and Classically Chaotic Hamiltonian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantum Statistical Operator and Classically Chaotic Hamiltonian System. ... Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... In a Hamiltonian system von Neumann Statistical Operator is used to tease out the quantum consequence of (classical) chaos engendered by the nonlinear coupling of system to its ...

  10. A Direct Method of Hamiltonian Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qi; Chen Dengyuan; Su Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    A direct method of constructing the Hamiltonian structure of the soliton hierarchy with self-consistent sources is proposed through computing the functional derivative under some constraints. The Hamiltonian functional is related with the conservation densities of the corresponding hierarchy. Three examples and their two reductions are given. (general)

  11. Port Hamiltonian modeling of Power Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, F.; van der Schaft, Abraham; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Zonetti, Daniele; Ortega, R

    2012-01-01

    In this talk a full nonlinear model for the power network in port–Hamiltonian framework is derived to study its stability properties. For this we use the modularity approach i.e., we first derive the models of individual components in power network as port-Hamiltonian systems and then we combine all

  12. Hamiltonian representation of divergence-free fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-11-01

    Globally divergence-free fields, such as the magnetic field and the vorticity, can be described by a two degree of freedom Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian function provides a complete topological description of the field lines. The formulation also separates the dissipative and inertial time scale evolution of the magnetic and the vorticity fields

  13. Hamiltonian structure of linearly extended Virasoro algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakelyan, T.A.; Savvidi, G.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Hamiltonian structure of linearly extended Virasoro algebra which admits free bosonic field representation is described. An example of a non-trivial extension is found. The hierarchy of integrable non-linear equations corresponding to this Hamiltonian structure is constructed. This hierarchy admits the Lax representation by matrix Lax operator of second order

  14. Momentum and hamiltonian in complex action theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, Keiichi; Nielsen, Holger Frits Bech

    2012-01-01

    $-parametrized wave function, which is a solution to an eigenvalue problem of a momentum operator $\\hat{p}$, in FPI with a starting Lagrangian. Solving the eigenvalue problem, we derive the momentum and Hamiltonian. Oppositely, starting from the Hamiltonian we derive the Lagrangian in FPI, and we are led...

  15. A parcel formulation for Hamiltonian layer models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno; Oliver, M.

    Starting from the three-dimensional hydrostatic primitive equations, we derive Hamiltonian N-layer models with isentropic tropospheric and isentropic or isothermal stratospheric layers. Our construction employs a new parcel Hamiltonian formulation which describes the fluid as a continuum of

  16. On Distributed Port-Hamiltonian Process Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopezlena, Ricardo; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we use the term distributed port-Hamiltonian Process Systems (DPHPS) to refer to the result of merging the theory of distributed Port-Hamiltonian systems (DPHS) with the theory of process systems (PS). Such concept is useful for combining the systematic interconnection of PHS with the

  17. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics as a Hamiltonian system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, D.D.; Kupershmidt, A.

    1985-01-01

    The equations of ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in the laboratory frame form a noncanonical Hamiltonian system with the same Poisson bracket as for the nonrelativistic system, but with dynamical variables and Hamiltonian obtained via a regular deformation of their nonrelativistic counterparts [fr

  18. Hamiltonian Cycles on Random Eulerian Triangulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guitter, E.; Kristjansen, C.; Nielsen, Jakob Langgaard

    1998-01-01

    . Considering the case n -> 0, this implies that the system of random Eulerian triangulations equipped with Hamiltonian cycles describes a c=-1 matter field coupled to 2D quantum gravity as opposed to the system of usual random triangulations equipped with Hamiltonian cycles which has c=-2. Hence, in this case...

  19. Almost periodic Hamiltonians: an algebraic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellissard, J.

    1981-07-01

    We develop, by analogy with the study of periodic potential, an algebraic theory for almost periodic hamiltonians, leading to a generalized Bloch theorem. This gives rise to results concerning the spectral measures of these operators in terms of those of the corresponding Bloch hamiltonians

  20. Novel Role of Superfluidity in Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierski, Piotr; Sekizawa, Kazuyuki; Wlazłowski, Gabriel

    2017-07-28

    We demonstrate, within symmetry unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, the existence of new effects in low-energy nuclear reactions which originate from superfluidity. The dynamics of the pairing field induces solitonic excitations in the colliding nuclear systems, leading to qualitative changes in the reaction dynamics. The solitonic excitation prevents collective energy dissipation and effectively suppresses the fusion cross section. We demonstrate how the variations of the total kinetic energy of the fragments can be traced back to the energy stored in the superfluid junction of colliding nuclei. Both contact time and scattering angle in noncentral collisions are significantly affected. The modification of the fusion cross section and possibilities for its experimental detection are discussed.

  1. Assessing risk from low energy radionuclide aerosol dispersal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, Edward; Perera, Sharman; Erhardt, Lorne; Cousins, Tom; Desrosiers, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Full text: When considering the potential dispersal of radionuclides into the environment, there are two broad classifications: explosive and non-explosive dispersal. An explosive dispersal relies on a violent and sudden release of energy, which may disrupt or vapourised any source containment. As such, the explosion provides the energy to both convert the source into a dispersable physical form and provides initial kinetic energy to transport the source away from the initiation point. This would be the case for sources of radiation in proximity to a steam or chemical explosion of high energy density. A low energy dispersal, on the other hand, may involve a lower energy initiator event (such as a fire or water spray) that transports particles into the near release zone, to be spread via wind or mechanical fields. For this type of dispersion to take place, the source must be in physical form ready for dispersal. In broad terms, this suggests either an ab initio powder form, or soluble/insoluble particulate form in a liquid matrix. This may be the case for radioactive material released from pressurized piping systems, material released through ventilation systems, or deliberate dispersals. To study aerosol dispersion of radionuclides and risk from low energy density initiators, there are a number of important parameters to consider. For example, particle size distribution, physicochemical form, atmospheric effects, charge effects, coagulation and agglomeration. At the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) a unique small scale aerosol test chamber has been developed to study the low energy dispersal properties of a number of radioactive source simulant. Principle emphasis has been given to salts (CsCl and CoCl 2 ) and oxides (SrTiO 3 , CeO 2 and EuO 2 ). A planetary ball mill has been utilized to reduce particle size distributions when required. Particle sizing has been performed using Malvern Spraytec spray particle analyzers, cascade impactors, and

  2. A Hamiltonian five-field gyrofluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keramidas Charidakos, I.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Morrison, P. J. [Institute for Fusion Studies and Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A Lie-Poisson bracket is presented for a five-field gyrofluid model, thereby showing the model to be Hamiltonian. The model includes the effects of magnetic field curvature and describes the evolution of the electron and ion gyro-center densities, the parallel component of the ion and electron velocities, and the ion temperature. The quasineutrality property and Ampère's law determine, respectively, the electrostatic potential and magnetic flux. The Casimir invariants are presented, and shown to be associated with five Lagrangian invariants advected by distinct velocity fields. A linear, local study of the model is conducted both with and without Landau and diamagnetic resonant damping terms. Stability criteria and dispersion relations for the electrostatic and the electromagnetic cases are derived and compared with their analogs for fluid and kinetic models.

  3. Hamiltonian circuited simulations in reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio Hirowati Shariffudin

    2002-01-01

    In the assessment of suitability of reactor designs and in the investigations into reactor safety, the steady state of a nuclear reactor has to be studied carefully. The analysis can be done through mockup designs but this approach costs a lot of money and consumes a lot of time. A less expensive approach is via simulations where the reactor and its neutron interactions are modelled mathematically. Finite difference discretization of the diffusion operator has been used to approximate the steady state multigroup neutron diffusion equations. The steps include the outer scheme which estimates the resulting right hand side of the matrix equation, the group scheme which calculates the upscatter problem and the inner scheme which solves for the flux for a particular group. The Hamiltonian circuited simulations for the inner iterations of the said neutron diffusion equation enable the effective use of parallel computing, especially where the solutions of multigroup neutron diffusion equations involving two or more space dimensions are required. (Author)

  4. Strong coupling expansion for scattering phases in hamiltonian lattice field theories. Pt. 1. The (d+1)-dimensional Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, Bernd

    1994-01-01

    A systematic method to obtain strong coupling expansions for scattering quantities in hamiltonian lattice field theories is presented. I develop the conceptual ideas for the case of the hamiltonian field theory analogue of the Ising model, in d space and one time dimension. The main result is a convergent series representation for the scattering states and the transition matrix. To be explicit, the special cases of d=1 and d=3 spatial dimensions are discussed in detail. I compute the next-to-leading order approximation for the phase shifts. The application of the method to investigate low-energy scattering phenomena in lattice gauge theory and QCD is proposed. ((orig.))

  5. The effects of illumination on deep levels observed in as-grown and low-energy electron irradiated high-purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, G.; Knoll, L.; Kranz, L.; Sundaramoorthy, V.

    2018-05-01

    High-purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC can find a variety of applications, ranging from power electronics to quantum computing applications. However, data on the electronic properties of deep levels in this material are scarce. For this reason, we present a deep level transient spectroscopy study on HPSI 4H-SiC substrates, both as-grown and irradiated with low-energy electrons (to displace only C-atoms). Our investigation reveals the presence of four deep levels with activation energies in the 0.4-0.9 eV range. The concentrations of three of these levels increase by at least one order of magnitude after irradiation. Furthermore, we analyzed the behavior of these traps under sub- and above-band gap illumination. The nature of the traps is discussed in the light of the present data and results reported in the literature.

  6. A New Instrument Design for Imaging Low Energy Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John W.; Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, Dennis; Rozmarynowski, Paul; Getty, Stephanie; Cooper, John F.; Smith, Billy

    2007-01-01

    The MidSTAR-2 satellite, to be built at the US Naval Academy as a follow-on to the successful MidSTAR-1 satellite (http://web.ew.usna.edu/midstar/), will launch in 2011 and carry three Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) experiments developed under Goddard's Internal Research and Development (IRAD) program. One of these GSFC instruments, the Miniature Imager for Neutral Ionospheric atoms and Magnetospheric Electrons (MINI-ME) builds on the heritage of the Goddard-developed Low-Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager launched on the IMAGE spacecraft in 2000. MINI-ME features a Venetian-blind conversion surface assembly that improves both light rejection and conversion efficiency in a smaller and lighter package than LENA making this an highly effective instrument for viewing solar wind charge exchange with terrestrial and planetary exospheres. We will describe the MINI-ME prototyping effort and its science targets.

  7. Degradation of carrageenan by low energy electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relleve, L.; Aranilla, C.; Abad, L.; Dela Rosa, A.; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yagi, Toshiaki; Kume, Tamikazu; Yoshii, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of κ-carrageenan using vessel-type low energy electron accelerator was investigated. Carrageenan with different molecular weights were obtained from irradiation of high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) κ-carrageenan. Other results presented were obtained from degradation studies of carrageenan by gamma rays. The decrease in molecular weight was accompanied by partial desulfation. From comparison of radiation degradation yield (Gd), it was found that the susceptibility to radiation of the three types of carrageenans in aqueous/gel forms follows the order of λ->ι->>κ- and could have been influenced by their conformational state. κ-carrageenan with molecular weight of ca. 10,000 showed strong growth promotion effect for potato in tissue culture. (author)

  8. The low-energy frontier of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg

    2010-02-01

    Most embeddings of the Standard Model into a more unified theory, in particular the ones based on supergravity or superstrings, predict the existence of a hidden sector of particles which have only very weak interactions with the visible sector Standard Model particles. Some of these exotic particle candidates (such as e.g. ''axions'', ''axion-like particles'' and ''hidden U(1) gauge bosons'') may be very light, with masses in the sub-eV range, and have very weak interactions with photons. Correspondingly, these very weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) may lead to observable effects in experiments (as well as in astrophysical and cosmological observations) searching for light shining through a wall, for changes in laser polarisation, for non-linear processes in large electromagnetic fields and for deviations from Coulomb's law. We present the physics case and a status report of this emerging low-energy frontier of fundamental physics. (orig.)

  9. A Low Energy Intelligent Clustering Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Cui, Lingguo; Zhang, Baihai

    2010-01-01

    LEACH (low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy) is a well-known self-organizing, adaptive clustering protocol of wireless sensor networks. However it has some shortcomings when it faces such problems as the cluster construction and energy management. In this paper, LEICP (low energy intelligent...

  10. Passive and low energy cooling techniques for the Czech Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lain, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Santamouris, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the applicability of passive and low energy cooling technologies in the Czech Republic. The work includes climate analysis as well as buildings and systems analysis in order to estimate the potential of passive and low energy cooling technologies. The latter is based on case

  11. Low-energy antiprotons physics and the FLAIR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, E

    2015-01-01

    FLAIR, the Facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research has been proposed in 2004 as an extension of the planned FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. FLAIR was not included into the modularized start version of FAIR, but the recent installation of the CRYRING storage ring at GSI Darmstadt has opened new perspectives for physics with low-energy antiprotons at FAIR. (paper)

  12. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen at low energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of low energy ionization of atomic hydrogen has undergone a rapid ... Three distinct theories for describing low energy ionization can now .... clear evidence that the backward peak for ΘЅѕ = 180° is due to positron-nucleus scat-.

  13. Low-energy-consumption hybrid lasers for silicon photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Ran, Qijiang; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed.......Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed....

  14. Non-negligible electroweak penguin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Libo; Li Xingyi

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the leading logarithmic low energy effective Hamiltonian and the Bauer-Stech-Wirbe (BSW) model, the authors calculate the electroweak penguin effects in the two-body hadronic pure penguin processes of B-meson. In the case of B→PP and PV decay, the authors find that the processes involving external penguin diagrams receive large contribution from electroweak penguin effects which can even play dominant role

  15. Hamiltonian-Driven Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Continuous Nonlinear Dynamical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Wunsch, Donald; Yin, Yixin

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a Hamiltonian-driven framework of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) for continuous time nonlinear systems, which consists of evaluation of an admissible control, comparison between two different admissible policies with respect to the corresponding the performance function, and the performance improvement of an admissible control. It is showed that the Hamiltonian can serve as the temporal difference for continuous-time systems. In the Hamiltonian-driven ADP, the critic network is trained to output the value gradient. Then, the inner product between the critic and the system dynamics produces the value derivative. Under some conditions, the minimization of the Hamiltonian functional is equivalent to the value function approximation. An iterative algorithm starting from an arbitrary admissible control is presented for the optimal control approximation with its convergence proof. The implementation is accomplished by a neural network approximation. Two simulation studies demonstrate the effectiveness of Hamiltonian-driven ADP.

  16. What is a low-energy house and who cares?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, B.R.

    1994-12-01

    Most energy analysts view low-energy houses as good things, yet differ in their expectations of what exactly a low energy house is. There are two intertwining threads to this report. The first is an evaluation of 50 buildings that have been claimed to be low-energy residences, for which monitored energy performance data have been collected. These data represent the preliminary effort in the ongoing update of the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base for new residences. The second thread concerns the definition of a low-energy house. After the elements of a definition are presented, their implications for actors involved in providing housing are identified. Several more tractable definitions are applied to the houses in this compilation. The outcomes illustrate ways in which different interests are served by various definitions. Different definitions can yield very different energy rankings. No single definition of a low-energy house is universally applicable.

  17. The present state and perspectives of low-energy heavy ion biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chengling; Yu Zengliang

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between low-energy ions and matter has been concerned rarely comparing to that of high-energy ions. It is even more unusual to find studies of the interaction of low-energy ions and complicated organisms. However, the discovery of bioeffects induced by ion beam implantation has opened a new branch in the field of ion beam applications in the life science--Low-energy Heavy Ion Biology. The mutagenic effect of low energy heavy ions was firstly reported in 1986 in rice. Since then, a damage mechanism involved in energy absorption, mass deposition, and charge exchange has been proposed. Accumulating evidence has indicated that these three factors are key determinants in the bioeffects induced by low energy heavy ions, which has opened new opportunities for mutational breeding, gene transferring, cell modification, and cell fusion. In recent years, the ion beam implantation technique has been widely applied in many fields, and increasing research interest in the field has been seen. The authors summarize recent advances in research on the role of low-energy ions in terms of the mechanisms and applications

  18. Neighbouring charge fragmentations in low energy fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.

    1986-10-01

    Shell and odd-even effects in fission have been largely studied until now. The structure in fragment mass, charge and kinetic energy distributions of fragments were interpreted as shell and even-odd effects. In this paper, we want to show that the discret change of fragment charge symmetry should produce also structures in those distribution. 19 refs

  19. Performance of broiler chicken fed multicarbohydrases supplemented low energy diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Govil

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Objective of this study was to investigate the effect of multicarbohydrases supplementation on performance of broilers fed low energy diet. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 days old chicks were selected and randomly divided into three treatments groups (T1, T2, and T3; each group contained 25 chicks distributed in five replicates of five chicks each. T1 group (positive control was offered control ration formulated as per Bureau of Indian Standards recommendations. In T2 group (negative control ration, metabolizable energy (ME was reduced by 100 kcal/kg diet. T3 group ration was same as that of T2 except that it was supplemented with multicarbohydrases (xylanase at 50 g/ton+mannanase at 50 g/ton+amylase at 40 g/ton. Feed intake and body weight of all experimental birds were recorded weekly. Metabolic trial was conducted for 3 days at the end of experiment to know the retention of nutrients. Results: Significant improvement (p<0.01 was observed in total weight gain, feed conversion efficiency, and performance index in broilers under supplementary group T3 as compared to T1 and T2 groups. Retention of crude protein and ether extract was significantly increased (p<0.05 in T3 group supplemented with multicarbohydrases as compared to other groups. Retention of dry matter, crude fiber, and nitrogen-free extract was comparable in all the three groups. Significantly highest dressed weight, eviscerated weight, and drawn weight (% of live body weight were observed in multicarbohydrases supplemented T3 group, however it was comparable in T1 and T2 groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the supplementation of multicarbohydrases (xylanase at 50 g/ton+mannanase at 50 g/ton+amylase at 40 g/ton in low energy diet improved overall performance of broilers.

  20. Nucleon-deuteron low energy parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankel, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1983-01-01

    Momentum space Fadeev equations are solved for nucleon-deuteron scattering and effective range parameters are calculated. A reverse trend is found in the two spin states by 4 asub(nd) 4 asub(pd) and 2 asub(pd) 2 asub(nd) which is in agreement with a configuration space calculation, but in conflict with all existing experiments. The Coulomb contributions to the effective range are small in quartet but sizeable in doublet scattering. (Author)