WorldWideScience

Sample records for effective ionization coefficients

  1. Electron Transport Coefficients and Effective Ionization Coefficients in SF6-O2 and SF6-Air Mixtures Using Boltzmann Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Linsheng; Xu, Min; Yuan, Dingkun; Zhang, Yafang; Hu, Zhaoji; Tan, Zhihong

    2014-10-01

    The electron drift velocity, electron energy distribution function (EEDF), density-normalized effective ionization coefficient and density-normalized longitudinal diffusion velocity are calculated in SF6-O2 and SF6-Air mixtures. The experimental results from a pulsed Townsend discharge are plotted for comparison with the numerical results. The reduced field strength varies from 40 Td to 500 Td (1 Townsend=10-17 V·cm2) and the SF6 concentration ranges from 10% to 100%. A Boltzmann equation associated with the two-term spherical harmonic expansion approximation is utilized to gain the swarm parameters in steady-state Townsend. Results show that the accuracy of the Boltzmann solution with a two-term expansion in calculating the electron drift velocity, electron energy distribution function, and density-normalized effective ionization coefficient is acceptable. The effective ionization coefficient presents a distinct relationship with the SF6 content in the mixtures. Moreover, the E/Ncr values in SF6-Air mixtures are higher than those in SF6-O2 mixtures and the calculated value E/Ncr in SF6-O2 and SF6-Air mixtures is lower than the measured value in SF6-N2. Parametric studies conducted on these parameters using the Boltzmann analysis offer substantial insight into the plasma physics, as well as a basis to explore the ozone generation process.

  2. Effective ionization coefficient of C5 perfluorinated ketone and its mixtures with air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aints, Märt; Jõgi, Indrek; Laan, Matti; Paris, Peeter; Raud, Jüri

    2018-04-01

    C5 perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK with UIPAC chemical name 1,1,1,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)-2-butanone and sold by 3M as Novec™ 5110) has a high dielectric strength and a low global warming potential, which makes it interesting as an insulating gas in medium and high-voltage applications. The study was carried out to determine the effective Townsend ionization coefficient α eff as a function of electric field strength and gas density for C5 PFK and for its mixtures with air. The non-self-sustained Townsend discharge between parallel plate electrodes was initiated by illuminating the cathode by UV radiation. The discharge current, I, was measured as a function of inter-electrode distance, d, at different gas densities, N, and electric field strengths, E. The effective ionization coefficient α eff was determined from the semi-logarithmic plots of I/I 0 against d. For each tested gas mixture, the density normalized effective ionization coefficient α eff/N was found to be a unique function of reduced electric field strength E/N. The measurements were carried out in the absolute pressure range of 0.05-1.3 bar and E/N range of 150-1200 Td. The increasing fraction of C5 PFK in air resulted in the decrease of effective ionization coefficient. The limiting electric field strength (E/N)lim where the effective ionization coefficient α eff became zero was 770 Td (190 kV cm-1 at 1 bar) for pure C5 PFK and decreased to 225 Td (78 kV cm-1 at 1.4 bar) for 7.6% C5 PFK/air mixture. The latter value of (E/N)lim is still more than two times higher than the (E/N)lim value of synthetic air and about two-thirds of the value corresponding to pure SF6. The investigated gas mixtures have the potential to become an alternative to SF6 in numerous high- and medium-voltage applications.

  3. Effective ionization coefficients, electron drift velocities, and limiting breakdown fields for gas mixtures of possible interest to particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datskos, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the gas-density, N, normalized effective ionization coefficient, bar a/N, and the electron drift velocity, w, as a function of the density-reduced electric field, E/N, and obtained the limiting, (E/N) lim , value of E/N for the unitary gases Ar, CO 2 , and CF 4 , the binary gas mixtures CO 2 :Ar (20: 80), CO 2 :CH 4 (20:80), and CF 4 :Ar (20:80), and the ternary gas mixtures CO 2 :CF 4 :Ar (10:10:80) and H 2 O: CF 4 :Ar (2:18:80). Addition of the strongly electron thermalizing gas CO 2 or H 2 O to the binary mixture CF 4 :Ar (1)''cools'' the mixture (i.e., lowers the electron energies), (2) has only a small effect on the magnitude of w(E/N) in the E/N range employed in the particle detectors, and (3) increases bar a/N for E/N ≥ 50 x 10 -17 V cm 2 . The increase in bar a/N, even though the electron energies are lower in the ternary mixture, is due to the Penning ionization of CO 2 (or H 2 O) in collisions with excited Ar* atoms. The ternary mixtures -- being fast, cool, and efficient -- have potential for advanced gas-filled particle detectors such as those for the SCC muon chambers. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  4. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  5. Measurements of the Townsend first ionization coefficient in pure isobutane under uniform electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petri, Anna Raquel

    2013-01-01

    In this work are presented data of Townsend first ionization coefficient, α, in pure isobutane, obtained with a parallel plate chamber of resistive anode, for the reduced electric field range of 140 Td up to 230 Td. The adopted method is based on a new version of the Pulsed Townsend Technique, where the primary ionization is produced by the incidence of nitrogen pulsed laser beam in an aluminum electrode (cathode). The glass anode of high resistivity (ρ = 2 x 10 12 Ω.cm) protects the detector against sparks. To validate the method, the α values were determined by comparing the ionization and avalanche electric currents in nitrogen, gas widely studied with well-established data in literature. This technique was successfully extended to obtain α parameters in pure isobutane. The presence of effects related to spatial charge, recombination and ohmic drop across the resistive anode was investigated by varying laser pulse repetition rate, its intensity and applied electric field. Of these secondary processes, only the ohmic drop was relevant and the reduced electric field values were corrected for it. The first Townsend coefficients obtained are compatible, within the experimental errors, with those determined with Magboltz 2 program versions 7.1 e 8.6. (author)

  6. Biology of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.; Pucheault, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present trends in biology of ionizing radiation are reviewed. The following topics are investigated: interaction of ionizing radiations with matter; the radiolysis of water and aqueous solutions; properties of the free radicals intervening in the couples O 2 /H 2 O and H 2 O/H 2 ; radiation chemistry of biological compounds; biological effects of ionizing radiations; biochemical mechanisms involving free radicals as intermediates; applications (biotechnological applications, origins of life) [fr

  7. Transport coefficients in high-temperature ionized air flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    Transport coefficients are studied in high-temperature ionized air mixtures using the modified Chapman-Enskog method. The 11-component mixture N2/N2+/N /N+/O2/O2+/O /O+/N O /N O+/e- , taking into account the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic degrees of freedom of both atomic and molecular species, is considered. Using the PAINeT software package, developed by the authors of the paper, in wide temperature range calculations of the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients for an equilibrium ionized air mixture and non-equilibrium flow conditions for mixture compositions, characteristic of those in shock tube experiments and re-entry conditions, are performed. For the equilibrium air case, the computed transport coefficients are compared to those obtained using simplified kinetic theory algorithms. It is shown that neglecting electronic excitation leads to a significant underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 25 000 K. For non-equilibrium test cases, it is shown that the thermal diffusion coefficients of neutral species and the self-diffusion coefficients of all species are strongly affected by the mixture composition, while the thermal conductivity coefficient is most strongly influenced by the degree of ionization of the flow. Neglecting electronic excitation causes noticeable underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 20 000 K.

  8. Photoionization effects in ionization fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Fontelos, Marco A; Trueba, Jose L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of photoionization processes on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharge. We show that negative fronts accelerate in the presence of photoionization events. The appearance and propagation of positive ionization fronts travelling with constant velocity is explained as the result of the combined effects of photoionization and electron diffusion. The photoionization range plays an important role in the selection of the velocity of the ionization front as we show in this work

  9. Photoionization effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Fontelos, Marco A [Departamento de Matematicas, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, C/Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Trueba, Jose L [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-12-21

    In this paper we study the effects of photoionization processes on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharge. We show that negative fronts accelerate in the presence of photoionization events. The appearance and propagation of positive ionization fronts travelling with constant velocity is explained as the result of the combined effects of photoionization and electron diffusion. The photoionization range plays an important role in the selection of the velocity of the ionization front as we show in this work.

  10. Electron lucky-drift impact ionization coefficients of ZnS : Mn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    can also be used to calculate the impact ionization coefficients of high electron energy of. ZnS:Mn without ... Electroluminescent devices (ZnS:Mn) recently are of great interest in industry as well as in information technology [1–4]. Understanding .... data in the case of electron in ZnS from two sources, which were reported by.

  11. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, B.

    1989-12-01

    Ionizing radiation is energy that travels through space as electromagnetic waves or a stream of fast moving particles. In the workplace, the sources of ionizing radiation are radioactive substances, nuclear power plants, x-ray machines and nuclear devices used in medicine, research and industry. Commonly encountered types of radiation are alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles have very little penetrating power and pose a risk only when the radioactive substance is deposited inside the body. Beta particles are more penetrating than alpha particles and can penetrate the outer body tissues causing damage to the skin and the eyes. Gamma rays are highly penetrating and can cause radiation damage to the whole body. The probability of radiation-induced disease depends on the accumulated amount of radiation dose. The main health effects of ionizing radiation are cancers in exposed persons and genetic disorders in the children, grandchildren and subsequent generations of the exposed parents. The fetus is highly sensitive to radiation-induced abnormalities. At high doses, radiation can cause cataracts in the eyes. There is no firm evidence that ionizing radiation causes premature aging. Radiation-induced sterility is highly unlikely for occupational doses. The data on the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other cancer-causing physical and chemical agents are inconclusive

  12. Stimulating effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworowski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of low doses on human organism is not definite known up to now. The worldwide discussion on this topic has been presented. A lot of analysed statistical data proved that the stimulating effect of low doses of ionizing radiation really exists and can have a beneficial influence on human health. 43 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  13. Biopositive Effects of Ionizing Radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1972-01-01

    This paper was written for a talk given by E. Broda in Vienna for an event organised by the chemical physical society, the Austrian biochemical society and the Austrian biophysical society in December 1972. In this paper Broda analyses the question of biopositive effects of ionizing radiation. (nowak)

  14. Ionizing radiations: effects and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignes, S.; Nenot, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Having first mentioned the effects of ionizing radiations in cancerogenisis, pre-natal, and genetic fields, the authors present the different sources of radiations and estimate their respective contributions to the total irradiation dose. Their paper makes reference to the main elements of a report issued by the United Nations Scientific Committee in 1977 [fr

  15. Accurate potentiometric determination of lipid membrane-water partition coefficients and apparent dissociation constants of ionizable drugs: electrostatic corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Mustafa M A; Vierl, Ulrich; Cevc, Gregor

    2009-06-01

    Potentiometric lipid membrane-water partition coefficient studies neglect electrostatic interactions to date; this leads to incorrect results. We herein show how to account properly for such interactions in potentiometric data analysis. We conducted potentiometric titration experiments to determine lipid membrane-water partition coefficients of four illustrative drugs, bupivacaine, diclofenac, ketoprofen and terbinafine. We then analyzed the results conventionally and with an improved analytical approach that considers Coulombic electrostatic interactions. The new analytical approach delivers robust partition coefficient values. In contrast, the conventional data analysis yields apparent partition coefficients of the ionized drug forms that depend on experimental conditions (mainly the lipid-drug ratio and the bulk ionic strength). This is due to changing electrostatic effects originating either from bound drug and/or lipid charges. A membrane comprising 10 mol-% mono-charged molecules in a 150 mM (monovalent) electrolyte solution yields results that differ by a factor of 4 from uncharged membranes results. Allowance for the Coulombic electrostatic interactions is a prerequisite for accurate and reliable determination of lipid membrane-water partition coefficients of ionizable drugs from potentiometric titration data. The same conclusion applies to all analytical methods involving drug binding to a surface.

  16. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    This presentation is restricted to the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. In general, these cumulative exposures are well below 100 rem, or about 50 times background or less. The two effects of interest in this dose range are genetic mutations and cancer production. The genetic effects will not be discussed in detail. The chief reason for the rise in risk estimates for cancer is the longer follow-up of exposed populations

  17. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments with small animals, tissue cultures, and inanimate materials help with understanding the effects of ionizing radiation that occur at the molecular level and cause the gross effects observed in man. Topics covered in this chapter include the following: Radiolysis of Water; Radiolysis of Organic Compounds; Radiolysis in Cells; Radiation Exposure and Dose Units; Dose Response Curves; Radiation Effects in Animals; Factors Affecting Health Risks. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heribanova, A.

    1995-01-01

    The basic principles and pathways of effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms and cells are outlined. The following topics are covered: effects of radiation on living matter (direct effects, radical or indirect effects, dual radiation action, and molecular biological theories); effects of radiation on cells and tissues (cell depletion, changes in the cytogenetic information, reparation mechanisms), dose-response relationship (deterministic effects, stochastic effects), and the effects of radiation on man (acute radiation sickness, acute local changes, fetus injuries, non-tumorous late injuries, malignant tumors, genetic changes). (P.A.). 3 tabs., 2 figs., 5 refs

  19. Determination of the Townsend primary ionization coefficient using a parallel plate avalanche counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumaki, Koji

    1988-01-01

    Gas multiplication factors were obtained from the observed fast pulse of a parallel plate avalache counter and the Townsend primary ionization coefficients for methane and isobutane were determined from the data over the ranges E/P = 150-228 V/cm·Torr and 183-411 V/cm·Torr, respectively. The results for methane agreed well with the values obtained by Heylen. (author)

  20. Effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, G.

    1984-08-01

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs [fr

  1. Progress on untargeted effects of ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jing; Chen Jihong; Li Wenjian

    2010-01-01

    The side effect of ionizing irradiation has been paid more attention with its widely using in tumor treating and mutation breeding. In recent years, untargeted effects induced by ionizing irradiation have become a hotspot of radiobiology. Here, according to reported results, we reviewed the types (genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response) and mechanisms of untargeted effects of ionizing irradiation in this paper. (authors)

  2. Ionization effects in electronic inner-shells of ionized atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchornak, G.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the atomic physics of ionization atoms has been presented. Interaction and structure effects in atomic shells, correlated to the occurrence of vacancies in several subshells of the atom have been considered. The methods of calculations of atomic states and wave functions have been reviewed. The energy shift of characteristic X-rays is discussed as a function of the ionization stage of the atom. The influence of inner and outer-shell vacancies on the energy of the X-rays is shown in detail. The influence of chemical effects on the parameters of X-rays is also taken into account. Further on, the change of transition probabilities in radiative and non-radiative transitions by changing stage of ionization is discussed; and among them the leading part of Auger and Coster-Kronig transitions by the arearrangement of the atomic states is shown. The influence of non-radiative electronic transitions on ionization cross-sections for multiple ionization is discussed. Using these results, ionization cross-sections for direct and indirect processes for several ionization stages are given

  3. Epigenetic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Naggar, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Data generated during the last three decades provide evidence of Epigenetic Effects that ave-induced by ionizing radiation, particularly those of high LET values, and low level dose exposures. Epigenesist is defined as the stepwise process by which genetic information, as modified by environmental influences, is translated into the substance and behavior of cells, tissues, organism.The epigenetic effects cited in the literature are essentially classified into fine types depending on the type and nature of the effect induced.The most accepted postulation, for the occurrence of these epigenetic effects, is a radiation induced bio electric disturbances in the environment of the non-irradiated cellular volume. This will trigger signals that will induce effects in the unirradiated cells.The epigenetic effects referenced in the literature up to date are five types; namely, Genomic Instability, Bystander. Effects, Clastogenic Plasma Factors,, Abscopal Effects, and Tran generational Effects.The demonstration of Epigenetic Effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation indicates the need to re- examine the concept of radiation dose and target size. Also an improved understanding of qualifiring and quantifying radiation risk estimates may be attained. Also, a more logical means to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation induced carcinogenic transformation of cells

  4. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  5. Electron-transport, ionization, attachment, and dissociation coefficients in SF6 and its mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, A.V.; Van Brunt, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    An improved set of electron-collision cross sections is derived for SF 6 and used to calculate transport, ionization, attachment, and dissociation coefficients for pure SF 6 and mixtures of SF 6 with N 2 , O 2 , and Ne. The SF 6 cross sections differ from previously published sets primarily at very low and high electron energies. At energies below 0.03 eV the attachment cross section is adjusted to fit recent electron swarm experiments, while the elastic momentum transfer cross section is increased to the theoretical limit. At high energies an allowance is made for the excitation of highly excited levels as observed in electron beam experiments. The cross-section sets used for the admixed gases have previously been published. Electron kinetic energy distributions computed from numerical solutions of the electron-transport (Boltzmann) equation using the two-term, spherical harmonic expansion approximation were used to obtain electron-transport and reaction coefficients as functions of E/N and the fractional concentration of SF 6 . Here E is the electric field strength and N is the gas number density. Attachment rate data for low concentrations of SF 6 in N 2 are used to test the attachment cross sections. Particular attention is given to the calculation of transport and reaction coefficients at the critical E/N = (E/N)/sub c/ at which the ionization and attachment rates are equal

  6. Determination of Ionization Coefficient of Atmospheric Helium in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo, Liang; Hai-Yun, Luo; Xin-Xin, Wang; Bo, Lv; Zhi-Cheng, Guan; Li-Ming, Wang

    2008-01-01

    A weakly luminous layer close to the anode is observed at time far ahead of the current pulse in dielectric barrier discharge of helium at atmospheric pressure and it is considered as the result of a very weak Townsend discharge. Based on the assumption that the space charge produced by this Townsend discharge is too small to distort the uniform electric field in the gas gap, the electrons have more or less the same energy over the entire gap and the spatial distribution of the discharge light is proportional to the distribution of electron density. This light distribution is obtained by processing side-view photograph of discharge gap using an intensified charge coupled device camera with an exposure time of 20 ns. By fitting a theoretically derived formula with the measured curve of light distribution, the Townsend electron ionization coefficient a is determined to be 31 cm −1 at E/p = 3.6 V·cm −1 ·Torr −1 , which is much higher than that obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation of pure helium. It is believed that penning ionization of helium metastables with impurity of nitrogen molecules makes great contribution to the experimentally determined α value. The contribution of this penning ionization to α is roughly estimated. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  7. Measurement of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, A.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Gonçalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, 01303-050 São Paulo (Brazil); Mangiarotti, A. [Instituto de Física - Universidade de São Paulo, Cidade Universitária, 05508-080 São Paulo (Brazil); Botelho, S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Bueno, C.C., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-21

    Tissue-equivalent gases (TEGs), often made of a hydrocarbon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, have been employed in microdosimetry for decades. However, data on the first Townsend ionization coefficient (α) in such mixtures are scarce, regardless of the chosen hydrocarbon. In this context, measurements of α in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas (CH{sub 4} – 64.4%, CO{sub 2} – 32.4%, and N{sub 2} – 3.2%) were performed in a uniform field configuration for density-normalized electric fields (E/N) up to 290 Td. The setup adopted in our previous works was improved for operating at low pressures. The modifications introduced in the apparatus and the experimental technique were validated by comparing our results of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane with those from the literature and Magboltz simulations. The behavior of α in the methane-based TEG was consistent with that observed for pure methane. All the experimental results are included in tabular form in the .

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on vitamins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.W.; Fox, J.B. Jr.; Lakritz, L.

    1991-01-01

    Vitamins are known to be sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation. Since most foods contain a large proportion of water, the most probable reaction of the ionizing radiation would be with water; and as vitamins are present in very small amounts compared with other substances in the food they will be affected indirectly by the radiation. This chapter discusses the effect of ionizing radiation on water soluble vitamins and fat soluble vitamins. (author)

  9. Long Term Stability Of Farmer Type Ionization Chamber Calibration Coefficient belonging To Local Radiotherapy Centres In Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhtar, A.M.; Samat, S.B.; Mohd Taufik Dolah

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of the ionization chambers calibration coefficient is one of the factors that would contribute to efficient radiotherapy treatment. The IAEA therefore has recommended that an ionization chamber be calibrated every year, with a condition that the deviations between the previous and new calibration coefficients N D,w should not differ by ±1.5 %. It has been identified that Farmer type ionization chambers is the most popular ionization chamber among the radiotherapy centres in Malaysia. For this reason, the purpose of this work is to evaluate the calibration coefficients long term stability of the Farmer type ionization chambers. A total of 33 Farmer type ionization chambers were studied and the mean μ of the N D,w deviation together with its standard error SE were calculated. This μ ±SE will be used to measure stability of N D,w . Our results showed that most chambers have μ ±SE lies within the ±1.5 %. It is thus concluded that most of the Farmer type ionization chamber were stable in their N D,w and safe to be used for radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  10. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  11. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, John B.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  12. Turbulence effect on Ohm's law in partially ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of nonuniformity on electric current flow in partially ionized plasmas is made. An Ohm's law for a nonuniform plasma was derived, from which Rosa's equation is obtained as a special case. Making use of this new Ohm's law, the effective electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient are determined for isotropically turbulent plasmas. They are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained previously. (author)

  13. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M.M.; Fabricius, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    one dimensional rock mechanical deformation. We further investigated the effect of boundary condition on the stress dependency of effective stress coefficient and discussed its application in reservoir study. As stress field in the reservoirs are most unlikely to be hydrostatic, effective stress...... determined under uniaxial strain condition will be more relevant in reservoir studies. Copyright 2012 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association....

  14. Effect of suprathermal electrons on the impurity ionization state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochando, M A; Medina, F; Zurro, B; McCarthy, K J; Pedrosa, M A; Baciero, A; Rapisarda, D; Carmona, J M; Jimenez, D

    2006-01-01

    The effect of electron cyclotron resonance heating induced suprathermal electron tails on the ionization of iron impurities in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated. The behaviour of plasma emissivity immediately after injection provides evidence of a spatially localized 'shift' towards higher charge states of the impurity. Bearing in mind that the non-inductive plasma heating methods generate long lasting non-Maxwellian distribution functions, possible implications on the deduced impurity transport coefficients, when fast electrons are present, are discussed

  15. Genetic effects of ionizing radiations in Eucaryocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jullien, Pierre

    1976-01-01

    The litterature on the genetic effects of ionizing radiations is reviewed, especially as concerns specific loci or chromosome mutations. Extrapolation from one species to another is considered as well as extra-nuclear mutations [fr

  16. The effect of ionizing radiation on cyanophyta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'eva, N.V.; Shevchenko, T.F.; Golubkova, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    Publication data on the effect of ionizing radiation on cyanophyta are generalized. The conclusion about the presence of premises for forming cyanophyta radiobiology as special direction of procaryotic algae investigation is made

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, L.

    1982-01-01

    Radiobiology in the last years was able to find detailed explanations for the effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms. But it is still impossible to make exact statements concerning the damages by radiation. Even now, science has to content itself with probability data. Moreover no typical damages of ionizing radiation can be identified. Therefore, the risks of ionizing radiation can only be determined by comparison with the spontaneous rate of cancerous or genetic defects. The article describes the interaction of high-energy radiation with the molecules of the organism and their consequences for radiation protection. (orig.)

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation of electrical properites of refractory insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Lint, V.A.J.; Bunch, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Los Alamos Reference Theta Pinch Reactor (RTPR) requires on the first wall an electrical insulator which will withstand transient high voltage at high temperature 10 sec after severe neutron and ionizing irradiation. Few measurements of electrical parameters for heavily disordered refractory insulators have been reported; estimates are made as to whether breakdown strength or conductivity will be degraded by the irradiation. The approach treats separately short-term ionization effects (free and trapped electrons and holes) and long-term gross damage effects (transmutation products and various lattice defects). The following processes could produce unacceptable conduction across the first wall insulator: (a) delayed electronic conductivity 10 sec after the prompt ionization by bremsstrahlung; (b) prompt electronic conductivity from delayed ionization; (c) electronic breakdown; (d) electronic or ionic conductivity due to thermal motion in the disordered material, possibly leading to thermal breakdown. Worst-case calculations based on lower limits to recombination coefficients limit process (a) to sigma much less than 5 x 10 -14 mho/cm. Data on ionization-induced conductivity in insulators predict for process (b) sigma much less than 10 -8 mho/cm. Electronic breakdown generally occurs at fields well above the 10 5 V/cm required for RTPR. Thermal breakdown is negligible due to the short voltage pulse. Ionic and electronic conduction must be studied theoretically and experimentally in the type of highly disordered materials that result from neutron irradiation of the first wall

  19. Determination of self-absorption coefficient in measurement of solid sample activity using 4π ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryak, P.

    1982-01-01

    Computation based on the Monte Carlo method was tested for a 4π cylindrical ionization chamber with a detection volume of 7 litres, filled with argon. The sources are placed in the geometrical centre. The correction coefficient for self-absorption was determined as being the ratio of ionization currents induced by a source of finite size and by a massless point source. A flowchart of the program is given. The computations were experimentally tested for cylindrical sources of aqueous 137 Cs and 57 Co solutions. (M.D.)

  20. Ionization versus indirect effects of ionizing radiation on cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, Jean; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed in the last decade on the elucidation of the main degradation pathways of isolated DNA mediated by hydroxyl radical (OH) and one-electron oxidation reactions as the result of indirect and direct effects of ionizing radiation respectively. This has led to the isolation and characterization of about 100 oxidized purine and pyrimidine nucleosides if hydroperoxide precursors and diastereomers are included. However, far less information is available on the mechanisms of radiation-induced degradation of bases in cellular DNA mostly due partly to analytical difficulties. It may be reminded that the measurement of oxidized nucleosides and bases in nuclear DNA is still a challenging issue which until recently has been hampered by the use of inappropriate methods such as the GC-MS that have led to overestimated values of the lesions by factors varying between two and three orders of magnitude. At the present, using the accurate and sensitive HPLC/MS/MS assay, 11 single modified nucleosides and bases were found to be generated in cellular DNA upon exposure to gamma rays and heavy ions. This validates several of the OH-mediated oxidation pathways of thymine, guanine and adenine that were previously inferred from model studies. The concomitant decrease in the yields of oxidized bases with the increase in the LET of heavy ions is accounted for by the preponderance of indirect effects in the damaging action of ionizing radiation on DNA. Further evidence for the major role played by .OH was provided by the results of exposure of cells to high intensity 266 nm laser pulses. Under these conditions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine is mostly produced by biphotonic ionization of DNA nucleobases and subsequent hole migration to guanine bases. It is likely that some of the oxidized bases that have been isolated as single lesions are in fact involved in clustered damage. Interestingly it was recently shown that a single oxidation hit is capable of generating complex

  1. Gate Control Coefficient Effect on CNFET Characteristic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanudin, Rahmat; Ma'Radzi, Ahmad Alabqari; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2009-01-01

    The development of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNFET) as alternative to existing transistor technology has long been published and discussed. The emergence of this device offers new material and structure in building a transistor. This paper intends to do an analysis of gate control coefficient effect on CNFET performance. The analysis is based on simulation study of current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of ballistic CNFET. The simulation study used the MOSFET-like CNFET mathematical model to establish the device output characteristic. Based on the analysis of simulation result, it is found that the gate control coefficient contributes to a significant effect on the performance of CNFET. The result also shown the parameter could help to improve the device performance in terms of its output and response as well. Nevertheless, the characteristic of the carbon nanotube that acts as the channel is totally important in determining the performance of the transistor as a whole.

  2. Impact ionization coefficients for electrons and holes in In0.14Ga0.86As

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearsall, T.P.; Nahory, R.E.; Pollack, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    We report the measurement of impact ionization rates for electrons and holes in the direct band-gap semiconductor alloy In 0 . 14 Ga 0 . 86 As. Our results show clearly that the ionization rate for holes is greater than that for electrons. The measurments were made for electric fields between 2.6times10 5 and 3.4times10 5 V cm -1 . In this range, the ionization coefficients can be expressed as α=α/sub infinity/ exp(-A/E) for electrons and β=β/sub infinity/ exp(-B/E) for holes with α/sub infinity/=1.0times10 9 cm -1 , A=3.6times10 6 V cm -1 , and β/sub infinity/=1.3times10 8 cm -1 , B=2.7times10 6 V cm -1

  3. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, Alexander; Burkart, Werner; Grosche, Bernd; Jung, Thomas; Martignoni, Klaus; Stephan, Guenther

    1997-01-01

    This paper approaches the long-term effects of ionizing radiation considering the common thought that killing of cells is the basis for deterministic effects and that the subtle changes in genetic information are important in the development of radiation-induced cancer, or genetic effects if these changes are induced in germ cells

  4. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  5. Fluctuation charge effects in ionization fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L; Baltanas, J P

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of charge fluctuations on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharges. We show that fronts accelerate when random charge creation events are present. This effect might play a similar role to photoionization in order to make the front move faster

  6. Fluctuation charge effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain); Baltanas, J P [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2008-05-21

    In this paper, we study the effects of charge fluctuations on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharges. We show that fronts accelerate when random charge creation events are present. This effect might play a similar role to photoionization in order to make the front move faster.

  7. Effect of ionizing radiations on connective tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, K.I.; Gerber, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiations on connective tissue in lung, heart, vasculature, kidney, skin, and skeletal tissues are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the effect of ionizing radiations on vasculo-connective tissue and fibrotic changes following radiation-induced injury to organs and tissues. In order to put the subject matter in proper prospective, the general biochemistry, physiology, and pathology of connective tissue is reviewed briefly together with the participation of connective tissue in disease. The review closes with an assessment of future problems and an enumeration and discussion of important, as yet unanswered questions

  8. Calculation of the Ionization Coefficient in the Townsend Discharge in the Mixture of Argon and Mercury Vapors with Temperature-Dependent Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, G. G.; Dubinina, M. S.; Fisher, M. R.; Kristya, V. I.

    2018-04-01

    For a hybrid model of the low-current discharge considering, along with direct ionization of the mixture components by electrons, the Penning ionization of mercury atoms by metastable argon atoms, the ionization coefficient in the argon-mercury mixture used in illuminating lamps is calculated. The analytical approximation formula describing the dependence of the ionization coefficient of the mixture on the reduced electric field strength and temperature is obtained for sufficiently wide ranges of their variations, and its accuracy is estimated. It is demonstrated that the discharge ignition voltage calculated using this formula is in agreement with the results of simulation and the available experimental data.

  9. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  10. Genetic and somatic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This is the ninth substantive report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) to the General Assembly. This report contains reviews on three special topics in the field of biological effects of ionizing radiation that are among those presently under consideration by the Committee: genetic effects of radiation, dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer and biological effects of pre-natal irradiation

  11. Effective Diffusion Coefficients in Coal Chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of effective diffusion coefficients in char particles is important when interpreting experimental reactivity measurements and modeling char combustion or NO and N2O reduction. In this work, NO and N2O reaction with a bituminous coal char was studied in a fixed-bed quartz glass reactor....... In the case of strong pore diffusion limitations, the error in the interpretation of experimental results using the mean pore radius could be a factor of 5 on the intrinsic rate constant. For an average coal char reacting with oxygen at 1300 K, this would be the case for particle sizes larger than about 50...

  12. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  13. Radiobiology: Biologic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    The biologic effects after exposure to ionizing radiation, such as cell death or tissue injury, result from a chain of complex physical, chemical, metabolic, and histologic events. The time scale of these radiation actions spans many orders of magnitude. The physical absorption of ionizing radiation occurs in about 10 -18 s, while late carcinogenic and genetic effects are expressed years or even generations later. Collectively, these effects form the science of radiobiology. Many of the concepts discussed in this chapter have been developed through the study of effects generated in tissues by external radiation sources, but they apply generally and often specifically to internally distributed radiopharmaceuticals which form the central topic of this book

  14. Determination of electron impact ionization and excitation coefficients in He-Xe gas mixtures. He-Xe kongo gas ni okeru denshi shototsu denri keisu oyobi reiki keisu no sokutei to kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K.; Tachibana, K. (Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan))

    1991-03-20

    The rare gas discharge gives a stable discharge and light emission characteristics at low temperature in comparison with the discharge of the vapor of such a metal as Hg. The present barrier for the commercialization of the color PDP lies in the lower level of its emission intensity and efficiency in comparison with that of CRT. In this report, an electron impact ionization coefficient in a gas mixture and an electron impact excitation coefficient for a XeIs {sub 4} level were analyzed using a Boltzmann equation by means of a steady state Townsend method using a drift tube. By comparing both, the elementary process in the gas mixture is investiagted to discuss the respective contributions for the effective ionization coefficient and the excitation coefficient. As a result, it was found that the ionization process in the He-Xe gas mixture could be described by the processes of direct ionization of Xe and He, and an indirect ionization (Penning effect) by an active helium. 37 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Unified solution of the Boltzmann equation for electron and ion velocity distribution functions and transport coefficients in weakly ionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Dmitry A.; Cocks, Daniel G.; White, Ronald D.

    2017-10-01

    The velocity distribution function and transport coefficients for charged particles in weakly ionized plasmas are calculated via a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation and benchmarked using a Monte-Carlo simulation. A unified framework for the solution of the original full Boltzmann's equation is presented which is valid for ions and electrons, avoiding any recourse to approximate forms of the collision operator in various limiting mass ratio cases. This direct method using Lebedev quadratures over the velocity and scattering angles avoids the need to represent the ion mass dependence in the collision operator through an expansion in terms of the charged particle to neutral mass ratio. For the two-temperature Burnett function method considered in this study, this amounts to avoiding the need for the complex Talmi-transformation methods and associated mass-ratio expansions. More generally, we highlight the deficiencies in the two-temperature Burnett function method for heavy ions at high electric fields to calculate the ion velocity distribution function, even though the transport coefficients have converged. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  16. The toxic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draghita Payet, A.C.

    2006-06-01

    The sources of radiations to which the human body is subjected are of natural or artificial origin and the irradiation of the human body can take place either by internal or external way. The ionizing radiations act at several levels of the human body, the main thing being the molecule of DNA. The ionizing radiations have no specificity, the effects on the human body can be: somatic, genetic or hereditary, teratogen. In the case of a human being irradiation, we proceed to the diagnosis and to the treatment of the irradiated person, however, to decrease the incidence of injuries we use the radiation protection. The treatment if necessary will be established according to the irradiation type. (N.C.)

  17. Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document reprints the text of the French by-law from January 8, 2002 relative to the approval and to the controls and verifications of facilities devoted to the ionizing of food products for human beings and animals. The by-law imposes the operators of such facilities to perform measurements and dosimetric verifications all along the ionization process. (J.S.)

  18. Effect of negative ions on current growth and ionizing wave propagation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    The spatiotemporal development of electron and ion densities, electric fields, and luminosity are calculated for electron pulse experiments in overvolted parallel-plane gaps by numerically solving continuity equations together with Poisson's equation. Experimental coefficients for primary ionization, cathode photoemission, photoionization, and luminosity are used. Unambiguous determination of the coefficients for attachment, detachment, and charge transfer is not possible from available experimental results. Therefore, the calculations are repeated for three sets of coefficients for these processes, corresponding to the following assumptions: unstable negative ions, stable negative ions, and no negative ions. The results of the calculations show, in each case, that the electron pulse initiates an avalanche which grows exponentially until the onset of space-charge effects. The calculated growth rate is strongly affected by the assumed attachment, detachment, and charge-transfer coefficients. When the total number of electrons in the avalanche reaches approx.10 8 , anode- and cathode-directed ionizing waves, or streamers, develop from the avalanche and produce a weakly ionized filamentary plasma. The calculated ionizing wave velocities are strongly increasing functions of the space-charge--enhanced electric field within the waves and are insensitive to the assumed attachment, detachment, and charge-transfer coefficients. The numerically calculated ionizing wave velocities are in approximate agreement with a simple analytical theory

  19. The effects of ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1975-08-01

    This paper describes the major effects of ionizing radiation on man and the relationship between such effects and radiation dose, with the conclusion that standards of radiological safety must be based on the carcinogenetic and mutagenic properties of ionizing radiation. Man is exposed to radiation from natural sources and from man-made sources. Exposure from the latter should be regulated but, since there is little observational or experimental evidence for predicting the effects of the very small doses likely to be required for adequate standards of safety, it is necessary to infer them from what is seen at high doses. Because the formal relationship between dose and effect is not fully understood, simplifying assumptions are necessary to estimate the effects of low doses. Two such assumptions are conventionally used; that there is a linear relationship between dose and effect at all levels of dose, and that the rate at which a dose of radiation is given does not alter the magnitude of the effect. These assumptions are thought to be conservative, that is they will not lead to an underestimation of the effects of small radiation doses although they may give an over-estimate. (author)

  20. Estimation of the soil-water partition coefficient normalized to organic carbon for ionizable organic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The sorption of organic electrolytes to soil was investigated. A dataset consisting of 164 electrolytes, composed of 93 acids, 65 bases, and six amphoters, was collected from literature and databases. The partition coefficient log KOW of the neutral molecule and the dissociation constant pKa were...... calculated by the software ACD/Labs®. The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation was applied to calculate dissociation. Regressions were developed to predict separately for the neutral and the ionic molecule species the distribution coefficient (Kd) normalized to organic carbon (KOC) from log KOW and pKa. The log...... KOC of strong acids (pKa correlated to these parameters. The regressions derived for weak acids and bases (undissociated at environmental pH) were similar. The highest sorption was found for strong bases (pKa > 7.5), probably due to electrical interactions. Nonetheless, their log KOC...

  1. Genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiations deal with those effects in the descendants of the individuals irradiated. The information base concerning genetic and chromosomal injury to humans from radiation is less adequate than is the information base for cancer and leukemia. As a result, it is not possible to make the kinds of quantitative estimates that have been made for carcinogenesis in previous chapters of this book. The chapter includes a detailed explanation of various types of genetic injuries such as chromosomal diseases, x-linked diseases, autosomal dominant diseases, recessive diseases, and irregularly inherited diseases. Quantitative estimates of mutation rates and incidences are given based on atomic bomb survivors data

  2. Modeling the effect of deep impurity ionization on GaAs photoconductive switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, J.H.; Khanaka, G.H.; Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization coefficient of deep traps in GaAs is determined from a gas breakdown model together with the recent experimental data obtained at LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and Boeing. Using this coefficient in our nonlinear device transport code, we have investigated theoretically the nonlinear switching phenomena in GaAs devices. The results obtained from our investigations show that if we take into consideration the effect of the field ionization of the deep traps, we can show how the Lock-On'' phenomena could occur in the device.

  3. Modeling the effect of deep impurity ionization on GaAs photoconductive switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, J.H.; Khanaka, G.H.; Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization coefficient of deep traps in GaAs is determined from a gas breakdown model together with the recent experimental data obtained at LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and Boeing. Using this coefficient in our nonlinear device transport code, we have investigated theoretically the nonlinear switching phenomena in GaAs devices. The results obtained from our investigations show that if we take into consideration the effect of the field ionization of the deep traps, we can show how the ``Lock-On`` phenomena could occur in the device.

  4. Multiple ionization and coupling effects in L-subshell ionization of heavy atoms by oxygen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.; Banas, D.; Semaniak, J.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Chojnacki, S.; Czyzewski, T.; Fijal, I.; Jaskola, M.; Glombik, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Trautmann, D.; Lapicki, G.; Mukoyama, T.

    2003-01-01

    The multiple-ionization and coupling effects in L-shell ionization of atoms by heavy-ion impact have been studied by measuring the L x-ray production cross sections in solid targets of Au, Bi, Th, and U bombarded by oxygen ions in the energy range 6.4-70 MeV. The measured L x-ray spectra were analyzed using the recently proposed method accounting for the multiple-ionization effects, such as x-ray line shifting and broadening, which enables one to obtain the ionization probabilities for outer shells. The L-subshell ionization cross sections have been obtained from measured x-ray production cross sections for resolved Lα 1,2 , Lγ 1 , and Lγ 2,3 transitions using the L-shell fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields being substantially modified by the multiple ionization in the M and N shells. In particular, the effect of closing of strong L 1 -L 3 M 4,5 Coster-Kronig transitions in multiple-ionized atoms was evidenced and discussed. The experimental ionization cross sections for the L 1 , L 2 , and L 3 subshells have been compared with the predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and the ECPSSR theory that includes the corrections for the binding-polarization effect within the perturbed stationary states approximation, the projecticle energy loss, and Coulomb deflection effects as well as the relativistic description of inner-shell electrons. These approaches were further modified to include the L-subshell couplings within the ''coupled-subshell model'' (CSM). Both approaches, when modified for the coupling effects, are in better agreement with the data. Particularly, the predictions of the SCA-CSM calculations reproduce the experimental L-subshell ionization cross section reasonably well. Remaining discrepancies are discussed qualitatively, in terms of further modifications of the L-shell decay rates caused by a change of electronic wave functions in multiple-ionized atoms

  5. Effects of ionizing radiations on insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyffon, Max.

    1978-01-01

    The most traditional effects caused by irradiation are development and morphogenesis disorders since on the whole the sensitivity of the developing organism to ionizing radiations is all the greater as the growth rate is faster. During the development of higher insects two categories of cell divide: larval cells on the one hand, which differentiate immediately after segmentation and give rise to larval organisms, and embryonic cells on the other which divide actively to form various islets or imaginal discs destined, each to its own extent, to provide the organs of the adult. Two cell categories thus coexist in the larva, one undergoing differentiation and the other multiplication, the radiosensitivity of which will be quite different for this very reason and will account at least partly, where the lethal effect of ionizing radiations is concerned, for the results observed. Three chapters deal in turn with effects on longevity, on regeneration and restoration and on morphogenesis and development. Strong doses give rise beyond a certain threshold to the appearance of acute radiodermatitis; their clinical signs and different degrees of seriousness liken them to burns of a special type [fr

  6. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovsky, K.N.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of δ- and β- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both θ- and α-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  7. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyagu, A I; Loganovsky, K N [Department of Neurology, Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Scientific Centre for Radiation Medicine of Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of {delta}- and {beta}- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both {theta}- and {alpha}-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author). 25 refs.

  8. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  9. Population densities and rate coefficients for electron impact excitation in singly ionized oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awakowicz, P.; Behringer, K.

    1995-01-01

    In non-LTE arc plasmas, O II excited state number densities were measured relative to the O II ground and metastable states. The results were compared with collisional-radiative code calculations on the basis of the JET ADAS programs. Stationary He plasmas with small oxygen admixtures, generated in a 5 mm diameter cascade arc chamber (pressures 13-70 hPa, arc current 150 A), were investigated spectroscopically in the visible and the VUV spectral range. The continuum of a 2 mm diameter pure He arc (atmospheric pressure, current 100 A) served for calibration of the VUV system response. Plasma diagnostics on the basis of Hβ Stark broadening yielded electron densities between 2.4 x 10 14 and 2.0 x 10 15 cm -3 for the low-pressure O II mixture plasmas. The agreement of measured and calculated excited state populations is generally very satisfactory, thus confirming the rate coefficients in the code. This is of particular interest in this intermediate region between corona balance and LTE, where many atomic data are required in the simulation. Clear indications were found for the diffusion of metastables lowering their number densities significantly below their statistical values. (author)

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadi, F [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia). Pasar Djumat Research Centre

    1976-10-01

    The differences of radiosensitivities among bacteria in addition to the dependence upon the species or strains also depends on the environmental condition during irradiation (temperature, medium, the presence of protective or sensitizing agents, the gas phase or atmosphere, and water activity, or degree of hydration) and on the effects of the environmental condition before and after irradiation treatment (temperature of incubation, age of culture and growth medium). In general, spores are more resistant to radiation than vegetatic bacteria, with the exception that a few cocci are the most radiation resistant bacteria (Micrococcus and Streptococcus). The application of ionizing radiation in the fields of microbiology supports the radiation sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products. In addition, microbiological aspects of food preservation, especially radurization, radicidation, and immunization studies by using irradiated microorganisms, are also important.

  11. Health Effects of Non-Ionizing Radiation on Human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubaidah-Alatas; Yanti Lusiyanti

    2001-01-01

    Increases of development and use of equipment that procedures non-ionizing radiant energy such as laser, radar, microwave ovens, power lines and hand phones, bring about public concern about the possible health effects owing to the non-ionizing radiation exposure. Non ionizing electromagnetic radiation compared to ionizing radiation, has longer wavelength, lower frequency, and lower photon energy in its interaction with body tissues. The term on non-ionizing radiation refers to the groups of electromagnetic radiations with energies less than about 10 eV corresponding to wavelengths in the ultraviolet, visible, infra red microwave and radiofrequency spectral regions. This paper describes the current state of knowledge about types of non-ionizing radiation and the health effects at molecular and cellular levels as well as its effects on human health. (author)

  12. Estimation of the contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Komarov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is proposed for estimating the differential contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation. Numerical results were obtained on the basis of published experimental data on the ability of bacterial cells Escherichia coli to undergo photoreactivation of radiation-induced damage. It was shown that inactivation by excitation may be highly significant for UV-hypersensitive cells capable of photoreactivation; inactivation by excitation increased with the energy of ionizing radiation and the volume of irradiated suspensions. The data are in qualitative agreement with the assumption of a possible contribution of the UV-component of Cerenkov radiation to the formation of excitations responsible for the lethal effect and the phenomenon of photoreactivation after ionizing radiation. Some predictions from the model are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Ionizing radiation effect on human reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirous, J.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented of the existing knowledge on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation on human reproduction. Some interesting findings have been obtained by interapolating the results of studies in mouse embryos to humans, important knowledge has been obtained in studies involving the population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The review summarizes the knowledge in the following conclusions: (1) prior to the blastocyst stage, the mammalian embryo is insensitive to teratogenic and growth retarding radiation effects but is highly sensitive to the lethal radiation effect; (2) in the early organogenesis, the embryo is very sensitive to growth retarding, teratogenic and lethal radiation effects. It can, however, partly offset growth retardation in the post-natal period; (3) in the early fetal development stage, the fetus shows reduced sensitivity to teratogenic damage of many organs; sensitivity of the central nervous system and growth retardation remain which can only be compensated post-natally with difficulties; (4) in the late stage of pregnancy the fetus is not significantly deformed as a result of irradiation but permanent cellular depletion can result in various organs and tissues post-natally if radiation doses are high. (L.O.). 22 refs

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation and steady magnetic field on erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S. P.; Galutzov, B. P.; Kuzmanova, M. A.; Markov, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    A complex biophysical test for studying the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation has been developed. The following cell and membrane parameters have been investigated: cell size, cell shape, cell distribution by size, electrophoretic mobility, extent of hemolysis, membrane transport and membrane impedance. Gamma ray doses of 2.2 Gy and 3.3 Gy were used as ionizing radiation and steady (DC) magnetic field of 5-90 mT representing the non-ionizing radiation. Erythrocytes from humans and rats were exposed in vitro to both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. In some experiments ionizing radiation was applied in vivo as well. Each of the simultaneously studied parameters have been found to change as a function of applied radiation. The proposed test allows an estimation of the changes in the elastic, rheological and electrical parameters of cells and biological membranes. Results indicate that ionizing radiation is significantly more effective in an in vivo application, while magnetic fields are more effective when applied in vitro. Surprisingly, steady magnetic fields were found to act as protector against some harmful effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  15. Calculation of effective absorption coefficient for aerosols of internal mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Bo; Huang Yinbo; Fan Chengyu; Qiao Chunhong

    2012-01-01

    The effective absorption coefficient with time of strong absorbing aerosol made of carbon dusts and water of internal mixture is analyzed, and the influence of different wavelengths and radius ratios on it is discussed. The shorter the wavelength is, the larger the effective absorption coefficient is , and more quickly it increases during 1-100 μs, and the largest increase if 132.65% during 1-100 μs. Different ratios between inner and outer radius have large influence on the effective absorption coefficient. The larger the ratio is, the larger the effective absorption coefficient is, and more quickly it increases during 1-100 μs. The increase of the effective absorption coefficient during 1-100 μs is larger than that during 100-1000 μs, and the largest increase is 138.66% during 1-100 μs. (authors)

  16. Ionizing radiation effects on silicon test structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Chen, W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Dou, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.

    1993-12-01

    The effects of 60 Co gamma irradiation on MOSCAPS and special junction diode detectors have been studied. The capacitors were used to ellicit the charge accumulation and anneal in two types of thermally grown oxides representative of those used in routine detector processing. Ion implanted, oxide passivated junction detectors having 0.25 and 1 cm 2 areas and perimeter to area ratios of 1 (a square), 2 and 5 were designed and constructed to amplify the ionizing effects expected to largely affect junction edges through changes in fixed oxide charges. Detectors were exposed to over 4 Mrad and showed clear increases in leakage current in proportion to the junction edge length. Annealing schedules were determined to provide a continuous response to incremental irradiations and subsequent room temperature anneals of leakage current. Besides an increase in gate threshold, little effect on the C(V) response was found. PISCES simulation of the edge fields using different fixed oxide charge revealed regions of very high lateral fields near the junction edges for fixed charges in the 2 x 10 12 /cm 2 range expected from the capacitor studies which could be responsible for the observed leakage currents

  17. The late biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-06-15

    Full text: The principal objective of the symposium was to review the current status of understanding of the late biological effects of ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. A second objective was to critically evaluate information obtained from epidemiological studies of human population groups as well as from animal experimentation in order to provide a solid scientific basis upon which problems of current concern, such as radiation protection standards and risk-benefit analysis, could be deliberated. Eighty-one papers were presented in 10 sessions which covered epidemiological studies of late effects in human populations exposed to internal and/or external ionizing radiation; quantitative and qualitative data from animal experimentation of late effects; methodological problems and modern approaches; factors influencing susceptibility or expression of late radiation injury; comparative evaluation of late effects induced by radiation and other environmental pollutants, and problems of risk assessment. In addition, there were two evening sessions for free discussion of problems of interpreting animal data, and of the epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations. Reports on atomic bomb survivors showed that these epidemiological studies are providing dependable data, such as dose-related excess infant mortality. The reports also revealed the need for consensus in the method employed in the interpretation of data. That was also the case with studies on occupationally exposed populations at Hanford plant, where disparate results were presented on radiation-induced neoplasia among radiation workers. These data are, however, considered not so significant in relative terms when compared to risks involved in other industries. It was recommended that national registry systems for the dosimetry and medical records of radiation workers be established and co-ordinated internationally in order to facilitate reliable epidemiological

  18. Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities

  19. Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.W. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities.

  20. Biological effects of low-level ionizing and non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Early in this century it was recognized that large doses of ionizing radiation could injure almost any tissue in the body, but small doses were generally thought to be harmless. By the middle of the century however it came to be suspected that even the smallest doses of ionizing radiation to the gonads might increase the risk of hereditary disease in subsequently-conceived offspring. Since then the hypothesis that carcinogenic and teratogenic effects also have no threshold has been adopted for purposes of radiological protection. It is estimated nevertheless that the risks that may be associated with natural background levels of ionizing irradiation are too small to be detectable. Hence validation of such risk estimates will depend on further elucidation of the dose-effect relationships and mechanisms of the effects in question, through studies at higher dose levels. In contrast to the situation with ionizing radiation, exposure to natural background levels of ultraviolet radiation has been implicated definitively in the etiology of skin cancers in fair-skinned individuals. Persons with inherited effects in DNA repair capacity are particularly susceptible. Non-ionizing radiations of other types can also affect health at high dose levels, but whether they can cause injury at low levels of exposure is not known

  1. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros da Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro; Ramos, Pedro Augusto Mendes; Nesrallah, Ana Cristina Aló; Parahyba, Cláudia Joffily; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present a literature review on the effects of the ionizing radiation from radiotherapy treatment on dental tissues. Among the effects of increasing global life expectancy and longevity of the teeth in the oral cavity, increasing rates of neoplastic diseases have been observed. One of the important treatment modalities for head and neck neoplastic diseases is radiotherapy, which uses ionizing radiation as the main mechanism of action. Therefore, it is essential for dentists to be aware of the changes in oral and dental tissues caused by ionizing radiation, and to develop treatment and prevention strategies. In general, there is still controversy about the effects of ionizing radiation on dental structures. However, qualitative and quantitative changes in saliva and oral microbiota, presence of oral mucositis and radiation-related caries are expected, as they represent the well-known side effects of treatment with ionizing radiation. Points that still remain unclear are the effects of radiotherapy on enamel and dentin, and on their mechanisms of bonding to contemporary adhesive materials. Ionizing radiation has shown important interaction with organic tissues, since more deleterious effects have been shown on the oral mucosa, salivary glands and dentin, than on enamel. With the increasing number of patients with cancer seeking dental treatment before and after head and neck radiotherapy, it is important for dentists to be aware of the effects of ionizing radiation on the oral cavity.

  2. Ionizing radiation effects on floating gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Visconti, A.; Bonanomi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Floating gate (FG) memories, and in particular Flash, are the dominant among modern nonvolatile memory technologies. Their performance under ionizing radiation was traditionally studied for the use in space, but has become of general interest in recent years. We are showing results on the charge loss from programmed FG arrays after 10 keV x-rays exposure. Exposure to ionizing radiation results in progressive discharge of the FG. More advanced devices, featuring smaller FG, are less sensitive to ionizing radiation that older ones. The reason is identified in the photoemission of electrons from FG, since at high doses it dominates over charge loss deriving from electron/hole pairs generation in the oxides

  3. Influence of effective stress coefficient on mechanical failure of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Hjuler, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The Effective stress coefficient is a measure of how chalk grains are connected with each other. The stiffness of chalk may decrease if the amount of contact cements between the grains decreases, which may lead to an increase of the effective stress coefficient. We performed CO2 injection in chal...... precise failure strength of chalk during changed stress state and under the influence of chemically reactive fluids during production of hydrocarbon and geological storage CO2....

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on gastrointestinal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertin, C; Dublineau, I; Griffiths, N M; Joubert, C; Linard, C; Martin, J M; Mathe, D; Scanff, P; Valette, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1994-10-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation (<10 Gy) on several parameters of gastrointestinal function: (a) regulatory peptides; (b) pancreatic and biliary secretions and (c) electrolyte and lipid transport using both gamma alone (cobalt-60) and a mixture of gamma/neutron ({gamma}/N Silene reactor) in two animal models, the rat and the pig. Preliminary data in rats following gamma irradiation (2-8 Gy) show that plasma nurotensin gastrin releasing peptide and substance P are increased in a dose dependent manner most markedly between two and four days after exposure. Intestinal brush border marker enzyme activities (sucrose and leucine amino-peptidase) were also reduced. Such differences were more marked and persisted longer after {gamma}/N irradiation (2-4 Gy: +Pb: {gamma}/:N =0.2). Following the latter type of irradiation (4 Gy) plasma cholesterol increased as well as the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio. Analysis of cholesterol distribution in lipoprotein actions revealed a large increase in cholesterol carried b High Density Lipoprotein-1 (HDL1). In the pig following either type of irradiation the volumes of both pancreatic and biliary secretions were reduced. Irradiation of pigs with either {gamma} (6 Gy) alone or {gamma}/N (6 Gy: {gamma}/N I :1) resulted in a marked decrease in both brush border (sucrase: leucine aminopeptidase) and basolateral (sodium ump` aden late cyclase) enzyme activities. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) stimulated adenylate cyclase was markedly attenuated and in addition specific VIP binding was modified as shown by a reduction in receptor affinity. The significance of the data will be discussed and the importance of a new therapeutic strategies or new biological markers of radiation-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  5. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrynkiewicz, A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the monograph is to review practical aspects of dosimetry. The work describes basic units which are used in dosimetry and natural as well as industrial sources of ionizing radiation. Information given in the monograph help in assessment of the radiation risk. 8 refs, 15 tabs

  6. Electrostatic perturbations in partially ionized plasma with the effects of ionization and recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranjes, J.; Tanaka, M.Y.; Kono, M.; Poedts, S.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of the electrostatic ion acoustic mode in a partially ionized plasma is studied in the presence of collisions which involve processes of ionization and recombination, taking into account the dynamics of the neutrals caused by elastic and inelastic collisions with ions. The application of the model to space plasmas, which are usually subject to gravity, is discussed in detail. A dispersion equation which includes the effects of ionization and recombination is derived and the stability/instability conditions are discussed. Parameters applicable to a region of the upper solar chromosphere are used and the increment of the ion sound wave is calculated yielding an unstable ion sound wave for wavelengths larger than 20 km

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on plant tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hell, K.G.

    1978-01-01

    A short review is done of the biological effects of ionizing radiations on plant tissues kept in culture, from the work of Gladys King, in 1949, with X-ray irradiated tobacco. The role of plant hormones is discussed in the processes of growth inhibition and growth restoration of irradiated tissues, as well as morphogenesis. Radioresistance of cells kept in culture and the use of ionizing radiations as mutagens are also commented. Some aspects of the biological effects of ionizing radiations that need to be investigated are discussed, and the problem of genome instability of plant tissues kept in culture is pointed out. (M.A.) [pt

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, F.; Bradley, D.A.; Winlove, C.P.

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve (≤20% strain), from 23±18 kPa for controls to 57±22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, α=0.05). At larger strain (≥20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92±0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31±0.56 MPa (p=0.01, α=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626±65 kPa, irradiated 474±121 kPa (p=0.02, α=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400±194 cP for controls to 1500±88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s -1 and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization

  10. Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetic Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TerMarsch, D.J.; Gentner, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Nine papers were presented at this workshop held to mark the retirement of Dr. D.K. Myers. The papers reviewed recent literature on the heritable effects of ionizing radiation and identified areas of uncertainty. (L.L.)

  11. Ground-state populations of atomic hydrogen and hydrogen-like ions in nonthermal plasmas, and collisional-radiative recombination and ionization coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawin, H.W.; Emard, F.

    1978-01-01

    The populations of atomic hydrogen and hydrogen-like ions have been calculated using a collisional-radiative model. The global collisional-radiative excitation coefficients rsub(j)sup((0)) and rsub(j)sup((1)) valid for homogeneous-stationary and/or quasi-homogeneous quasi-stationary plasmas were published recently. The present paper contains in tabulated form the ground state populations and Saha decrements for the homogeneous stationary state, and the collisional-radiative recombination and ionization coefficients. (Auth.)

  12. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Desouky; Nan Ding; Guangming Zhou

    2015-01-01

    For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT), possible ris...

  13. Characterization of the effective electrostriction coefficients in ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholkin, A. L.; Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.; Chauvy, P.-F.; Setter, N.

    2001-06-01

    Electromechanical properties of a number of ferroelectric films including PbZrxTi1-xO3(PZT), 0.9PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3-0.1PbTiO3(PMN-PT), and SrBi2Ta2O9(SBT) are investigated using laser interferometry combined with conventional dielectric measurements. Effective electrostriction coefficients of the films, Qeff, are determined using a linearized electrostriction equation that couples longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient, d33, with the polarization and dielectric constant. It is shown that, in PZT films, electrostriction coefficients slightly increase with applied electric field, reflecting the weak contribution of non-180° domains to piezoelectric properties. In contrast, in PMN-PT and SBT films electrostriction coefficients are field independent, indicating the intrinsic nature of the piezoelectric response. The experimental values of Qeff are significantly smaller than those of corresponding bulk materials due to substrate clamping and possible size effects. Electrostriction coefficients of PZT layers are shown to depend strongly on the composition and preferred orientation of the grains. In particular, Qeff of (100) textured rhombohedral films (x=0.7) is significantly greater than that of (111) layers. Thus large anisotropy of the electrostrictive coefficients is responsible for recently observed large piezoelectric coefficients of (100) textured PZT films. Effective electrostriction coefficients obtained by laser interferometry allow evaluation of the electromechanical properties of ferroelectric films based solely on the dielectric parameters and thus are very useful in the design and fabrication of microsensors and microactuators.

  14. Accounting for Missing Correlation Coefficients in Fixed-Effects MASEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jak, Suzanne; Cheung, Mike W-L

    2018-01-01

    Meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) is increasingly applied to advance theories by synthesizing existing findings. MASEM essentially consists of two stages. In Stage 1, a pooled correlation matrix is estimated based on the reported correlation coefficients in the individual studies. In Stage 2, a structural model (such as a path model) is fitted to explain the pooled correlations. Frequently, the individual studies do not provide all the correlation coefficients between the research variables. In this study, we modify the currently optimal MASEM-method to deal with missing correlation coefficients, and compare its performance with existing methods. This study is the first to evaluate the performance of fixed-effects MASEM methods under different levels of missing correlation coefficients. We found that the often used univariate methods performed very poorly, while the multivariate methods performed well overall.

  15. Effect of Variable Manning Coefficients on Tsunami Inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberopoulou, A.; Rees, D.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulations are commonly used to help estimate tsunami hazard, improve evacuation plans, issue or cancel tsunami warnings, inform forecasting and hazard assessments and have therefore become an integral part of hazard mitigation among the tsunami community. Many numerical codes exist for simulating tsunamis, most of which have undergone extensive benchmarking and testing. Tsunami hazard or risk assessments employ these codes following a deterministic or probabilistic approach. Depending on the scope these studies may or may not consider uncertainty in the numerical simulations, the effects of tides, variable friction or estimate financial losses, none of which are necessarily trivial. Distributed manning coefficients, the roughness coefficients used in hydraulic modeling, are commonly used in simulating both riverine and pluvial flood events however, their use in tsunami hazard assessments is primarily part of limited scope studies and for the most part, not a standard practice. For this work, we investigate variations in manning coefficients and their effects on tsunami inundation extent, pattern and financial loss. To assign manning coefficients we use land use maps that come from the New Zealand Land Cover Database (LCDB) and more recent data from the Ministry of the Environment. More than 40 classes covering different types of land use are combined into major classes such as cropland, grassland and wetland representing common types of land use in New Zealand, each of which is assigned a unique manning coefficient. By utilizing different data sources for variable manning coefficients, we examine the impact of data sources and classification methodology on the accuracy of model outputs.

  16. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury-Herard, A.; Boiteux, S.; Dutrillaux, B.; Toledano, M.

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  17. Densely Ionizing Radiation Effects on the Microenvironment Promote Aggressive Trp53 Null Mammary Carcinomas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Densely ionizing radiation is a major component of the space radiation environment and has potentially greater carcinogenic effect compared to sparsely ionizing...

  18. Effects of ionizing radiations on proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, M. le; Foresta, B. de; Viel, A.; Thauvette, L.; Beauregard, G.; Potier, M.

    1990-01-01

    We have reinvestigated the use of ionizing radiations to measure the molecular mass of water-soluble or membrane proteins. Exposure of purified standard proteins to increasing doses of ionizing radiation causes progressive fragmentation of the native protein into defined peptide patterns. The coloured band corresponding to the intact protein was measured on the SDS gel as a function of dose to determine the dose (D 37.t ) corresponding to 37% of the initial amount of unfragmented protein deposited on the gel. This led to a calibration curve and the known molecular mass of the standard proteins. However, we have to conclude that this method is useless to determine the state of aggregation of a protein, since, for all the oligomers tested, the best fit was obtained by using the protomeric molecular mass, suggesting that there is no energy transfer between protomers. Furthermore, SDS greatly increases the fragmentation rate of proteins, which suggests additional calibration problems for membrane proteins in detergent or in the lipid bilayer. The main drawback of the technique is that some proteins behaved anomalously, leading to very large errors in the apparent target size as compared with true molecular mass. It is thus unreliable to apply the radiation method for absolute molecular-mass determination. We then focused on the novel finding that discrete fragmentation of proteins occurs at preferential sites, and this was studied with aspartate transcarbamylase. (author)

  19. Ionizing radiation: levels and effects. Volume II. Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    The genetic effects of ionizing radiation were last reviewed comprehensively by the Committee in its 1966 report (575), whereas the particular problem of the induction of chromosome aberrations by irradiation of human somatic cells was reviewed in the Committee's 1969 report (576). The present review will consider the further experimental data that have been obtained since these reports. Of the recent advances in human genetics, those concerning the occurrence and transmission of translocations have particular relevance to the problem of estimating risks, and will be discussed in the last section of this review.

  20. On the mechanism of the biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, M.A.; Margulis, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of the biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and ultrasound (US) were considered. The current views on the nature of toxicity of IR, which is usually assigned to the formation of radicals in living tissues and to the straight-line collision of an ionizing particle with the DNA molecule, were analyzed. It was established that the amount of radicals formed in biological tissues in conditions of ultrasonically induced cavitation can be as large as that for IR; however, the biological effect of US is much softer as compared to IR. It was shown that the contribution of the indirect mechanism to the total biological effect of IR can be estimated by comparing US and IR in their chemical action; the contribution of the indirect mechanism to the biological effect of IR was found to be negligibly small. An alternative mechanism was proposed to explain the biological effect of IR. In accordance with the proposed model, IR with a high linear energy transfer (LET) value breaks through cell walls and biological membranes and causes damage to them, such that the cell can lose its regenerative capacity. Moreover, high-energy heavy ionizing particles perforate cytoplasm to form channels. Ionizing radiation with a low LET value (γ- and X-rays) causes multiple damages to biological membranes. Ionizing particles can also cause damages to membranes of mitochondria thus affecting the mechanism of cellular respiration, which will cause neoplastic diseases. The straight-line collision of an ionizing particle with a DNA molecule was found to be 5-7 orders of magnitude less probable as compared to the collision with a wall or membrane. It was shown that multiple perforations of cell walls and damages to membranes are characteristic only of ionizing particles, which have sufficiently long tracks, and do not occur upon exposure to ultrasonic waves, microwaves, UV radiation, and magnetic fields [ru

  1. Ionizing and non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The monograph is a small manual to get a knowledge of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations. The main chapters are: - Electromagnetic radiations - Ionizing and non-ionizing radiations - Non-ionizing electromagnetic radiations - Ionizing electromagnetic radiation - Other ionizing radiations - Ionizing radiation effects - The Nuclear Safety Conseil

  2. Measurements of the Townsend first ionization coefficient in pure isobutane under uniform electric fields; Medidas do primeiro coeficiente de Townsend de ionização no isobutano puro submetido a campos eletricos uniformes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, Anna Raquel

    2013-07-01

    In this work are presented data of Townsend first ionization coefficient, α, in pure isobutane, obtained with a parallel plate chamber of resistive anode, for the reduced electric field range of 140 Td up to 230 Td. The adopted method is based on a new version of the Pulsed Townsend Technique, where the primary ionization is produced by the incidence of nitrogen pulsed laser beam in an aluminum electrode (cathode). The glass anode of high resistivity (ρ = 2 x 10{sup 12} Ω.cm) protects the detector against sparks. To validate the method, the α values were determined by comparing the ionization and avalanche electric currents in nitrogen, gas widely studied with well-established data in literature. This technique was successfully extended to obtain α parameters in pure isobutane. The presence of effects related to spatial charge, recombination and ohmic drop across the resistive anode was investigated by varying laser pulse repetition rate, its intensity and applied electric field. Of these secondary processes, only the ohmic drop was relevant and the reduced electric field values were corrected for it. The first Townsend coefficients obtained are compatible, within the experimental errors, with those determined with Magboltz 2 program versions 7.1 e 8.6. (author)

  3. Nitrogen ion implantation effect on friction coefficient of tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, N.I.; Udovenko, V.F.; Markus, A.M.; Presnyakova, G.N.; Gamulya, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of nitrogen molecular ion implantation into KhVSG steel on the friction coefficient in the air and vacuum is investigated. Irradiation is carried out by the N 2 + beam with energy 120 keV and flux density 5 μ/cm 2 at room temperature in vacuum 5x10 -4 Pa. The integral dose of irradiation is 10 17 particle/cm 2 . Nitrogen ion implantation is shown to provide the formation of the modified layer changing friction properties of steel. The friction coefficient can either increase or decrease depending on implantation and test conditions. 4 refs.; 2 figs

  4. Numerical study of effects of accommodation coefficients on slip phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Jae; Kwon, Oh Joon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    An unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes solver employing a Maxwell slip boundary condition was developed. The present flow solver was applied to the simulation of flows around an axisymmetric hollow cylinder in a Mach 10.4 free stream, known as Calspan-UB Research Center (CUBRC) Run 14 case, and the velocity slip and the temperature jump on the cylinder surface were investigated. The effect of tangential momentum and thermal accommodation coefficients used in the Maxwell condition was also investigated by adjusting their values. The results show that the reverse flow region is developed on the body surface due to the interaction between the shock and the boundary layer. Also, the shock impingement makes pressure high. The flow properties on the surface agree well with the experimental data, and the velocity slip and the temperature jump vary consistently with the local Knudsen number change. The accommodation coefficients affect the slip phenomena and the size of the flow region. The slip phenomena become larger when both tangential momentum and thermal accommodation coefficients are decreased. However, the range of the reverse flow region decreases when the momentum accommodation coefficient is decreased. The characteristics of the momentum and thermal accommodation coefficients also are overlapped when they are altered together.

  5. The effect of ionizing radiation on hemoglobin synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinski, S

    1972-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on hemoglobin synthesis was studied and its effect on the quality of protein was discovered. The biological effects due to the changes in the structure of protein were also observed. The results of the experiments are presented.

  6. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Desouky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT, possible risks from exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to higher doses of radiation. This model has been challenged by numerous observations, in which cells that were not directly traversed by the ionizing radiation exhibited responses similar to those of the directly irradiated cells. Therefore, it is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects.

  7. Charge correlation effects on ionization of weak polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagiotopoulos, A Z

    2009-01-01

    Ionization curves of weak polyelectrolytes were obtained as a function of the charge coupling strength from Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast to many earlier studies, the present work treats counterions explicitly, thus allowing the investigation of charge correlation effects at strong couplings. For conditions representing typical weak polyelectrolytes in water near room temperature, ionization is suppressed because of interactions between nearby dissociated groups, as also seen in prior work. A novel finding here is that, for stronger couplings, relevant for non-aqueous environments in the absence of added salt, the opposite behavior is observed-ionization is enhanced relative to the behavior of the isolated groups due to ion-counterion correlation effects. The fraction of dissociated groups as a function of position along the chain also behaves non-monotonically. Dissociation is highest near the ends of the chains for aqueous polyelectrolytes and highest at the chain middle segments for non-aqueous environments. At intermediate coupling strengths, dissociable groups appear to behave in a nearly ideal fashion, even though chain dimensions still show strong expansion effects due to ionization. These findings provide physical insights on the impact of competition between acid/base chemical equilibrium and electrostatic attractions in ionizable systems.

  8. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  9. Determination of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography based octanol-water partition coefficients for neutral and ionizable compounds: Methodology evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chao; Qiao, Jun-Qin; Lian, Hong-Zhen

    2017-12-15

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) based octanol-water partition coefficient (logP) or distribution coefficient (logD) determination methods were revisited and assessed comprehensively. Classic isocratic and some gradient RPLC methods were conducted and evaluated for neutral, weak acid and basic compounds. Different lipophilicity indexes in logP or logD determination were discussed in detail, including the retention factor logk w corresponding to neat water as mobile phase extrapolated via linear solvent strength (LSS) model from isocratic runs and calculated with software from gradient runs, the chromatographic hydrophobicity index (CHI), apparent gradient capacity factor (k g ') and gradient retention time (t g ). Among the lipophilicity indexes discussed, logk w from whether isocratic or gradient elution methods best correlated with logP or logD. Therefore logk w is recommended as the preferred lipophilicity index for logP or logD determination. logk w easily calculated from methanol gradient runs might be the main candidate to replace logk w calculated from classic isocratic run as the ideal lipophilicity index. These revisited RPLC methods were not applicable for strongly ionized compounds that are hardly ion-suppressed. A previously reported imperfect ion-pair RPLC method was attempted and further explored for studying distribution coefficients (logD) of sulfonic acids that totally ionized in the mobile phase. Notably, experimental logD values of sulfonic acids were given for the first time. The IP-RPLC method provided a distinct way to explore logD values of ionized compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Minimizing matrix effect by femtosecond laser ablation and ionization in elemental determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bochao; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2013-05-07

    Matrix effect is unavoidable in direct solid analysis, which usually is a leading cause of the nonstoichiometric effect in quantitative analysis. In this research, experiments were carried out to study the overall characteristics of atomization and ionization in laser-solid interaction. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers were applied in a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twenty-nine solid standards of ten different matrices, including six metals and four dielectrics, were analyzed. The results indicate that the fs-laser mode offers more stable relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) with irradiance higher than 7 × 10(13) W·cm(-2), which could be more reliable in the determination of element composition of solids. The matrix effect is reduced by half when the fs-laser is employed, owing to the fact that the fs-laser ablation and ionization (fs-LAI) incurs an almost heat-free ablation process and creates a dense plasma for the stable ionization.

  11. Epidemiology and effects on health of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Artalejo, F.; Andres Manzano, B. de; Rel Calero, J. del

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the concept and aims of epidemiology, its methods and contribution to the knowledge of the effects of low ionizing radiation doses on health. The advantages of epidemiological studies for knowing the consequences of living near nuclear facilities and the effects of occupational exposure to radiations are also described. (Author) 43 refs

  12. The performance of the INER improved free-air ionization chamber in the comparison of air kerma calibration coefficients for medium-energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.-H. E-mail: jhlee@iner.gov.tw; Kotler, L.H.; Bueermann, Ludwig; Hwang, W.-S.; Chiu, J.-H.; Wang, C.-F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes modifications to an original design, correction factors and uncertainty evaluations for an improved free-air ionization chamber constructed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). In addition, a comparison of secondary standard air kerma calibration coefficients for 100-250 kV medium-energy X-rays was performed to verify the experimental accuracy and measurement consistency of the improved chamber. The comparison results showed a satisfactory agreement in the measurements which were within the combined expanded uncertainties (k=2)

  13. Effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient for solidifying aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felberbaum, M.; Landry-Desy, E.; Weber, L.; Rappaz, M.

    2011-01-01

    An effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient has been calculated for two solidifying Al - 4.5 wt.% Cu and Al - 10 wt.% Cu alloys as a function of the volume fraction of solid. For this purpose, in situ X-ray tomography was performed on these alloys. For each volume fraction of solid between 0.6 and 0.9, a representative volume element of the microstructure was extracted. Solid and liquid voxels were assimilated to solid and liquid nodes in order to solve the hydrogen diffusion equation based on the chemical potential and using a finite volume formulation. An effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient based on the volume fraction of solid only could be deduced from the results of the numerical model at steady state. The results are compared with various effective medium theories.

  14. Effect of hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing on capillary filtration coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, R S; Wangensteen, O D; Jo, J K; Tsai, M Y; Bolman, R M

    2000-07-27

    We previously demonstrated that surfactant dilution and inhibition occur immediately after pulmonary artery flushing with hypothermic modified Euro-Collins solution. Consequently, we speculated that increased capillary permeability contributed to these surfactant changes. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing on the pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), and additionally performed a biochemical analysis of surfactant. We used a murine isolated, perfused lung model to measure the pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient and hemodynamic parameters, to determine the wet to dry weight ratio, and to evaluate surfactant by biochemical analysis of lung lavage fluid. We defined three study groups. In group I (controls), we harvested lungs without hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing, and measured Kfc immediately. In group II (in situ flush), we harvested lungs after hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing with modified Euro-Collins solution, and then measured Kfc. Experiments in groups I and II were designed to evaluate persistent changes in Kfc after pulmonary artery flushing. In group III (ex vivo flush), we flushed lungs ex vivo to evaluate transient changes in Kfc during hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing. Groups I and II did not differ significantly in capillary filtration coefficient and hemodynamics. Group II showed significant alterations on biochemical surfactant analysis and a significant increase in wet-to-dry weight ratio, when compared with group I. In group III, we observed a significant transient increase in capillary filtration coefficient during pulmonary artery flushing. Hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing transiently increases the capillary filtration coefficient, leads to an increase in the wet to dry weight ratio, and induces biochemical surfactant changes. These findings could be explained by the effects of hypothermic modified Euro-Collins solution on pulmonary capillary

  15. Stefan-Maxwell Relations and Heat Flux with Anisotropic Transport Coefficients for Ionized Gases in a Magnetic Field with Application to the Problem of Ambipolar Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.; Marov, M. Ya.

    2018-01-01

    The defining relations for the thermodynamic diffusion and heat fluxes in a multicomponent, partially ionized gas mixture in an external electromagnetic field have been obtained by the methods of the kinetic theory. Generalized Stefan-Maxwell relations and algebraic equations for anisotropic transport coefficients (the multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, electric and thermoelectric conductivity coefficients as well as the thermal diffusion ratios) associated with diffusion-thermal processes have been derived. The defining second-order equations are derived by the Chapman-Enskog procedure using Sonine polynomial expansions. The modified Stefan-Maxwell relations are used for the description of ambipolar diffusion in the Earth's ionospheric plasma (in the F region) composed of electrons, ions of many species, and neutral particles in a strong electromagnetic field.

  16. Estimation of the effective distribution coefficient from the solubility constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An updated version of RESRAD has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy to derive site-specific soil guidelines for residual radioactive material. In this updated version, many new features have been added to the, RESRAD code. One of the options is that a user can input a solubility constant to limit the leaching of contaminants. The leaching model used in the code requires the input of an empirical distribution coefficient, K d , which represents the ratio of the solute concentration in soil to that in solution under equilibrium conditions. This paper describes the methodology developed to estimate an effective distribution coefficient, Kd, from the user-input solubility constant and the use of the effective K d for predicting the leaching of contaminants

  17. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T e /T h ) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter

  18. Wind shear coefficients and their effect on energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Shafiqur; Al-Abbadi, Naif M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides realistic values of wind shear coefficients calculated using measured values of wind speed at 20, 30 and 40 m above the ground for the first time in Saudi Arabia in particular and, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in the Gulf region in general. The paper also presents air density values calculated using the measured air temperature and surface pressure and the effects of wind shear factor on energy production from wind machines of different sizes. The measured data used in the study covered a period of almost three years between June 17, 1995 and December 1998. An overall mean value of wind shear coefficient of 0.194 can be used with confidence to calculate the wind speed at different heights if measured values are known at one height. The study showed that the wind shear coefficient is significantly influenced by seasonal and diurnal changes. Hence, for precise estimations of wind speed at a height, both monthly or seasonal and hourly or night time and day time average values of wind shear coefficient must be used. It is suggested that the wind shear coefficients must be calculated either (i) using long term average values of wind speed at different heights or (ii) using those half hourly mean values of wind speed for which the wind shear coefficient lies in the range 0 and 0.51. The air density, calculated using measured temperature and pressure was found to be 1.18 kg/m 3 . The air density values were also found to vary with the season of the year and hour of the day, and hence, care must be taken when precise calculations are to be made. The air density values, as shown in this paper, have no significant variation with height. The energy production analysis showed that the actual wind shear coefficient presented in this paper produced 6% more energy compared to that obtained using the 1/7 power law. Similarly, higher plant capacity factors were obtained with the wind shear factor of 0.194 compared to that with 0.143

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on gelatine films added with antioxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraide, Felipe H.; Inamura, Patricia Y.; Mastro, Nelida L. del

    2011-01-01

    This work evaluates the effect of ionizing radiation on the gelatin films in presence of antioxidant. Gelatin solutions of glycerine and poly vinil alcohol, with and without the addition were prepared until the complete homogenization. The films were irradiated with 20 and 40 kGy in a electron accelerator, in the presence of air and at the room temperature. The use of ionizing radiation and the addition of antioxidant changed the properties of the film. The result of water absorption test revealed that with increasing of radiation dose occurred a reduction in the absorption, suggesting that happen a reticulation

  20. The ionizing effect of low-energy cosmic rays from a class II object on its protoplanetary disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers-Lee, D.; Taylor, A. M.; Ray, T. P.; Downes, T. P.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the ionizing effect of low-energy cosmic rays (CRs) from a young star on its protoplanetary disc (PPD). We consider specifically the effect of ∼3 GeV protons injected at the inner edge of the PPD. An increase in the ionization fraction as a result of these CRs could allow the magnetorotational instability to operate in otherwise magnetically dead regions of the disc. For the typical values assumed we find an ionization rate of ζCR ∼ 10-17 s-1 at 1 au. The transport equation is solved by treating the propagation of the CRs as diffusive. We find for increasing diffusion coefficients the CRs penetrate further in the PPD, while varying the mass density profile of the disc is found to have little effect. We investigate the effect of an energy spectrum of CRs. The influence of a disc wind is examined by including an advective term. For advective wind speeds between 1 and 100 km s-1 diffusion dominates at all radii considered here (out to 10 au) for reasonable diffusion coefficients. Overall, we find that low-energy CRs can significantly ionize the mid-plane of PPDs out to ∼1 au. By increasing the luminosity or energy of the CRs, within plausible limits, their radial influence could increase to ∼2 au at the mid-plane but it remains challenging to significantly ionize the mid-plane further out.

  1. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  2. Electron ionization and the Compton effect in double ionization of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses ionization phenomena in helium, both photoionization and electron ionization. In particular he compares double ionization cross sections with total cross sections, as a function of electron energy, and photon energy. Data is discussed over the energy range up to 10 keV

  3. Ionization constants by curve fitting: determination of partition and distribution coefficients of acids and bases and their ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, F H; Cahoon, N M

    1987-08-01

    A convenient procedure has been developed for the determination of partition and distribution coefficients. The method involves the potentiometric titration of the compound, first in water and then in a rapidly stirred mixture of water and octanol. An automatic titrator is used, and the data is collected and analyzed by curve fitting on a microcomputer with 64 K of memory. The method is rapid and accurate for compounds with pKa values between 4 and 10. Partition coefficients can be measured for monoprotic and diprotic acids and bases. The partition coefficients of the neutral compound and its ion(s) can be determined by varying the ratio of octanol to water. Distribution coefficients calculated over a wide range of pH values are presented graphically as "distribution profiles". It is shown that subtraction of the titration curve of solvent alone from that of the compound in the solvent offers advantages for pKa determination by curve fitting for compounds of low aqueous solubility.

  4. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  5. Effects of a static electric field on nonsequential double ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyun; Wang Bingbing; Li Xiaofeng; Fu Panming; Chen Jing; Liu Jie; Jiang Hongbing; Gong Qihuang; Yan Zongchao

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional semiclassical method, we perform a systematic analysis of the effects of an additional static electric field on nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of a helium atom in an intense, linearly polarized laser field. It is found that the static electric field influences not only the ionization rate, but also the kinetic energy of the ionized electron returning to the parent ion, in such a way that, if the rate is increased, then the kinetic energy of the first returning electron is decreased, and vice versa. These two effects compete in NSDI. Since the effect of the static electric field on the ionization of the first electron plays a more crucial role in the competition, the symmetric double-peak structure of the He 2+ momentum distribution parallel to the polarization of the laser field is destroyed. Furthermore, the contribution of the trajectories with multiple recollisions to the NSDI is also changed dramatically by the static electric field. As the static electric field increases, the trajectories with two recollisions, which start at the time when the laser and the static electric field are in the same direction, become increasingly important for the NSDI

  6. Mass attenuation coefficients of X-rays in different barite concrete used in radiation protection as shielding against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A. T. Jr.; Nogueira, M.S.; Santos, M.A.P.; Campos, L.L.; Araújo, F. G. S.

    2015-01-01

    The attenuation coefficient depends on the incident photon energy and the nature of the materials. In order to minimize exposure to individuals. Barite concrete has been largely used as a shielding material in installations housing gamma radiation sources as well as X-ray generating equipment. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of different mixtures of barite concrete for shielding in diagnostic X-ray rooms. The mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ). The mass attenuation coefficients have been measured by employing the CdTe detector model XR-100T. The distance between the source and the exposed surface of all samples was measured by SSD light indicator of machine which was 350 cm. The slope of the linear plot of the intensity transmitted versus specimen thickness would yield the attenuation coefficient. The mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) were compared with the tabulations based upon the results of the XCOM program. The rectangular barite concrete blocks in different thicknesses from were used for the radiation attenuation test. The experimental values were compared with theoretical values WinXcom. The plots of the logarithm of transmitted intensity versus specimen thickness were linear for all the samples and the µ/ρ was obtained from the plots by linear regression over the 25%-2% transmission range, under good geometrical condition. There is a good agreement between theoretical and experimental values, within the 9%. In fact over the entire transmission range of 25-2% the experimental and theoretical values agree well for both the energies. (authors)

  7. Noble-gas ionization in the ion source with Penning effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monchka, D.; Lyatushinskij, A.; Vasyak, A.

    1982-01-01

    By additional use of that the ion source efficiency can be increased the Penning ionization. The results of estimates of certain coefficients for the processes taking place in the plasma ion sources are presented

  8. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  9. Irradiation spectrum and ionization-induced diffusion effects in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    There are two main components to the irradiation spectrum which need to be considered in radiation effects studies on nonmetals, namely the primary knock-on atom energy spectrum and ionizing radiation. The published low-temperature studies on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO suggest that the defect production is nearly independent of the average primary knock-on atom energy, in sharp contrast to the situation for metals. On the other hand, ionizing radiation has been shown to exert a pronounced influence on the microstructural evolution of both semiconductors and insulators under certain conditions. Recent work on the microstructure of ion-irradiated ceramics is summarized, which provides evidence for significant ionization-induced diffusion. Polycrystalline samples of MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} were irradiated with various ions ranging from 1 MeV H{sup +} to 4 MeV Zr{sup +} ions at temperatures between 25 and 650{degrees}C. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the depth-dependent microstructural of the irradiated specimens. Dislocation loop nucleation was effectively suppressed in specimens irradiated with light ions, whereas the growth rate of dislocation loops was enhanced. The sensitivity to irradiation spectrum is attributed to ionization-induced diffusion. The interstitial migration energies in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are estimated to be {le}0.4 eV and {le}0.8 eV, respectively for irradiation conditions where ionization-induced diffusion effects are expected to be negligible.

  10. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerodynamic effects in ionized gases, often neglected phenomena, have been subject of a renewed interest in recent years. After a brief historical account, we discuss a selected number of effects and unresolved problems that appear to be relevant in both aeronautic and propulsion applications in subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow. Interaction between acoustic shock waves and weakly ionized gas is manifested either as plasma-induced shock wave dispersion and acceleration or as shock-wave induced double electric layer in the plasma, followed by the localized increase of the average electron energy and density, as well as enhancement of optical emission. We describe the phenomenology of these effects and discuss several experiments that still do not have an adequate interpretation. Critical for application of aerodynamic effects is the energy deposition into the flow. We classify and discuss some proposed wall-free generation schemes with respect to the efficiency of energy deposition and overall generation of the aerodynamic body force

  11. Effects of previous ionization and excitation on the ionization wave propagation along the dielectric tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping; Bi, Zhenhua; Wang, Xueyang; Niu, Jinhai; Ji, Longfei; Song, Ying; Qi, Zhihua; Wang, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, by using a high precision synchronization system, the ignition time, velocity, and propagation properties of the ionization waves (IWs) have been investigated in detail from the 1st high voltage (HV) pulse to the sequential ones over a large range of the pulse-off time. In order to clarify the effects of previous ionization and excitation on the IW propagation, the density of the residual charges are controlled by varying the pulse-off time from 199 μs to 15 μs. The results show that the formation and propagation of IWs can be strongly affected by previous discharge. For a longer pulse-off time (100 μs–190 μs), the propagation velocity of plasma bullets are decreased from the 1st to the 10th HV pulse, then increased after the 10th pulse, and finally become stable after about 500 pulses. When the pulse-off time is reduced to 15 μs, the propagation velocity of plasma bullets will rapidly increase and become stable after the 1st HV pulse. The ignition voltage is significantly reduced after the 1st HV pulse with the decrease in pulse-off time. Consequently, the generation and propagation of IWs in the tube are strongly affected by the accumulation of long-lived metastable helium (He) species and residual charges from previous discharges, which is important for understanding the plasma bullet behavior. (paper)

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on rat parotid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraks, George; Tampelini, Flavio Silva; Pereira, Kleber Fernando; Chopard, Renato Paulo [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. of Biomedical Sciences. Dept. of Anatomy]. E-mail: rchopard@usp.br

    2008-01-15

    A common side effect of radiotherapy used in the treatment of oral cancer is the occurrence of structural and physiological alterations of the salivary glands due to exposure to ionizing radiation, as demonstrated by conditions such as decreased salivary flow. The present study evaluated ultrastructural alterations in the parotid glands of rats receiving a fractionated dose (1,500-cGy) of radiation emitted by a Cesium-137 source and rats that were not subjected to ionizing radiation. After sacrifice, the parotid glands were removed and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Damage such as cytoplasmic vacuolisation, dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum and destruction of mitochondria, as well as damage to the cellular membrane of acinar cells, were observed. These findings lead to the conclusion that ionizing radiation promotes alterations in the glandular parenchyma, and that these alterations are directly related to the dose level of absorbed radiation. Certain phenomena that appear in the cytoplasm and nuclear material indicate that ionizing radiation causes acinar cell death (apoptosis). (author)

  13. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  14. Ionization and pulse lethargy effects in inverse Cherenkov accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Hubbard, R.F.; Hafizi, B.

    1997-01-01

    Ionization processes limit the accelerating gradient and place an upper limit on the pulse duration of the electromagnetic driver in the inverse Cherenkov accelerator (ICA). Group velocity slippage, i.e., pulse lethargy, on the other hand, imposes a lower limit on the pulse duration. These limits are obtained for two ICA configurations in which the electromagnetic driver (e.g., laser or millimeter wave source) is propagated in a waveguide that is (i) lined with a dielectric material or (ii) filled with a neutral gas. In either configuration the electromagnetic driving field is guided and has an axial electric field with phase velocity equal to the speed of light in vacuum, c. The intensity of the driver in the ICA, and therefore the acceleration gradient, is limited by tunneling and collisional ionization effects. Partial ionization of the dielectric liner or gas can lead to significant modification of the dispersive properties of the waveguide, altering the phase velocity of the accelerating field and causing particle slippage, thus disrupting the acceleration process. An additional limitation on the pulse duration is imposed since the group velocity of the driving pulse is less than c and the pulse slips behind the accelerated electrons. Hence for sufficiently short pulses the electrons outrun the pulse, terminating the acceleration. Limitations on the driver pulse duration and accelerating gradient, due to ionization and pulse lethargy, are estimated for the two ICA configurations. Maximum accelerating gradients and pulse durations are presented for a 10 μm, 1 mm, and 1 cm wavelength electromagnetic driver. The combination of ionization and pulse lethargy effects impose severe limitations on the maximum energy gain in inverse Cherenkov accelerators. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Effect of ionizing radiation on Amphistome metacercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Md.; Rao, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on amphistome metacercariae and the parasitological and cytological findings of the resultant flukes were studied in lambs and kids. The flukes recovered from the metacercariae irradiated at 2.0 Krad were less in percentage with stunted growth, degenerative changes of gonads, absence of eggs in uterus and hampered spermatogenesis. The metacercariae irradiated at 2.5 and 3.0 Krad could be developed into flukes and seen only 15 days post exposure but not 87/120 days. Fifteen days flukes were showing retarded development and without any reproductive organs. 39 refs., 3 tables. (author)

  16. Study of total ionization dose effects in electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidhin, T.S.; Bhattacharyya, Anindya; Gour, Aditya; Behera, R.P.; Jayanthi, T.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation effects in electronic devices are a major challenge in the dependable application developments of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems. The main radiation effects are total ionization dose (TID) effects, displacement damage dose (DDD) effects and single event effects (SEE). In this study, we are concentrating on TID effects in electronic devices. The focus of the study is mainly on SRAM based field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) along with that the devices of our interest are voltage regulators, flash memory and optocoupler. The experiments are conducted by exposing the devices to gamma radiation in power off condition and the degradation in the performances are analysed

  17. Effect of ionizing radiation on cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliat, F.; Benderitter, M.; Gaugler, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment for cancer of the chest, mediastinal area or the neck area is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. With the increasing number of cancer patients and the increased treatment efficiency, the number of cancer survivors is increasing exponentially. The cancer survivors live longer and their long-term follow-up must be considered. The cardiovascular toxicity is mainly associated with the treatment of breast cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma and head and neck cancer. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects are insidious and chronic. Their occurrence is linked to numerous factors including the age of the patient at the beginning of the radiotherapy schedule, the number of years following radiotherapy, the doses (and volume) to the heart and the large vessels (coronary and carotid arteries), and the association with the traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear and, even if similarities with age-related atherosclerosis were established, the specificities of the radiation-induced atherosclerosis for high doses remain to be discovered. For low/moderate doses of ionising radiation, recent epidemiological studies provide evidence of increased risk of cardiovascular pathologies. A better knowledge of the mechanisms associated with the radiation-induced cardiovascular pathologies and the more precise identification of the populations at risk in the future should allow a more effective care of these patients with cardiovascular risk. (authors)

  18. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.; Chottova, O.; Kubankova, V.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on the efficacy of chymotrypsin in pancreatin prepared by the separation of enzymes from an activated pancreas extract, in the same sample in which the content of lipids was increased to 16.55%, and in pancreatin prepared by drying an incompletely activated ground pancreas were compared with the effect of radiation on crystaline lyophilized chymotrypsin. The working conditions were identical with those described in the previous communication, all samples possessed nearly identical humidity on irradiation. The efficacy of chymotrypsin was determined by the method of PhBs 3, ethyl ester L-tyrosine hydrochloride being used as the substrate. The results were statistically evaluated and after calculation for dried lipid-free substance represented in graphs. The sequence of the loss of efficacy in pancreatin corresponded to the sequence of the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy found in the previous communication. The lowest remaining efficacy was found in crystalline lyophilized chymotrypsin. Percent losses of chymotrypsin efficacy in pancreatin determined by the synthetic substrate were in good agreement with the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy of the same samples determined by casein. (author)

  19. Deterministic effects of the ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raslawski, Elsa C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The deterministic effect is the somatic damage that appears when radiation dose is superior to the minimum value or 'threshold dose'. Over this threshold dose, the frequency and seriousness of the damage increases with the amount given. Sixteen percent of patients younger than 15 years of age with the diagnosis of cancer have the possibility of a cure. The consequences of cancer treatment in children are very serious, as they are physically and emotionally developing. The seriousness of the delayed effects of radiation therapy depends on three factors: a)- The treatment ( dose of radiation, schedule of treatment, time of treatment, beam energy, treatment volume, distribution of the dose, simultaneous chemotherapy, etc.); b)- The patient (state of development, patient predisposition, inherent sensitivity of tissue, the present of other alterations, etc.); c)- The tumor (degree of extension or infiltration, mechanical effects, etc.). The effect of radiation on normal tissue is related to cellular activity and the maturity of the tissue irradiated. Children have a mosaic of tissues in different stages of maturity at different moments in time. On the other hand, each tissue has a different pattern of development, so that sequelae are different in different irradiated tissues of the same patient. We should keep in mind that all the tissues are affected in some degree. Bone tissue evidences damage with growth delay and degree of calcification. Damage is small at 10 Gy; between 10 and 20 Gy growth arrest is partial, whereas at doses larger than 20 Gy growth arrest is complete. The central nervous system is the most affected because the radiation injuries produce demyelination with or without focal or diffuse areas of necrosis in the white matter causing character alterations, lower IQ and functional level, neuro cognitive impairment,etc. The skin is also affected, showing different degrees of erythema such as ulceration and necrosis, different degrees of

  20. Side effects of ionizing radiation on healthy tissues and organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiations induce cell death, causing deterministic or stochastic side-effects. This paper briefly summarizes the biological mechanisms of early and late side-effects of ionizing radiations on healthy tissue. (author)

  1. Calculation of rate coefficients of some proton-transfer ion-molecule reactions in weakly ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    A classical collision theory is used to describe thermal bimolecular rate coefficeints for reaction between positive and negative ions and polar molecules in a carrier gas. Special attention is paid to ion-molecule reaction in which proton transfer occurs. These reactions play an important role in terrestrial plasma devices, in ionosphere, in planetary atmospheres and in interstellar matter. The equilibrium rate coefficients of the reactions are calculated based on a microscopic reactive cross section derived from a long distance polar molecule-ion potential. The results are compared with experimental values of afterglow measurements. (D.Gy.)

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on enzymes. VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Pipota, J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect was examined of gamma radiation on the efficacy of cellulase irradiated with doses graded from 10 to 120 kGy. The results were statistically evaluated. The dose dependence of inactivation corresponds to the course of the decrease in efficacy of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes and pepsin investigated in previous communications. In the semilogarithmical arrangement of the graph this dependence is linear. It can be seen from the graph that a dose of 10 kGy, usually sufficient to achieve microbiological indefectibility, produces an approximately 7% loss in efficacy. With a dose of 25 kGy necessary to achieve sterility, cellulase already loses approximately 17% of its efficacy. With 120 kGy, the largest dose used, the efficacy was reduced to only 47.9%. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  3. V. Physical effects in ionizing radiation passage through matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The ionization of the medium during absorption of alpha particles is described. The ranges are given of alpha particles in the air and in certain liquids and solids. The absorption of protons and deuterons takes place similarly as in alpha particles but protons and deuterons have a bigger range at the same energy. The term half-thickness has been introduced for the absorption of beta particles. For different energies of beta particles the absorption of these particles is graphically represented for different materials. The greatest attention is devoted to the absorption of electromagnetic radiation, i.e., X radiation and gamma radiation. The mechanisms are explained of absorption by photoelectric effect, the Compton effect and electron pair formation. In X radiation radiotherapy, filters are used, mostly aluminium, copper or zinc plates. The values are given of radiation intensity for different thicknesses of aluminium and copper filters and a survey is given of combined filters for 220 to 400 kV. For radiotherapy purposes great attention is devoted to the calculation of the depth dose. The effects are discussed of ionizing radiation on photographic emulsion, on changes in the colouring of some substances and fluorescence. Also given are the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the theory of direct and indirect effects is briefly described. (E.S.)

  4. Effect of electrostatic field on dynamic friction coefficient of pistachio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H Aghkhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Separation and grading of agricultural products from the production to supply, has notable importance. The separation can be done based on physical, electrical, magnetic, optical properties and etc. It is necessary for any development of new systems to study enough on the properties and behavior of agricultural products. Some characteristics for separation are size (length, width and thickness, hardness, shape, density, surface roughness, color, speed limit, aerodynamic properties, electrical conductivity, elasticity and coefficient of static friction point. So far, the friction properties of agricultural products used in the separating process, but the effect of electrostatic charging on static and dynamic coefficients of friction for separation had little attention. The aim of this study was to find out the interactions between electrostatic and friction properties to find a way to separate products that separation is not possible with conventional methods or not sufficiently accurate. In this paper, the separation of close and smiley pistachios by electrostatic charging was investigated. Materials and Methods: Kallehghoochi pistachio cultivar has the top rank in production in Iran. Therefore, it was used as a sample. The experimental design that used in this study, had moisture content at three levels (24.2, 14.5 and 8.1 percent, electric field intensity at three levels (zero, 4000 and 7000 V, speed of movement on the surface at three levels (1300, 2500 and 3300 mm per minute, friction surface (galvanized sheet iron, aluminum and flat rubber and pistachio type at two levels (filled splits and closed that was measured and analyzed in completely randomized factorial design. A friction measuring device (built in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad used to measure the friction force. It has a removable table that can move in two directions with adjustable speed. The test sample put into the vessel with internal dimensions of 300 × 150

  5. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Chottova, O.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect was studied of gamma radiation on the proteolytic activity of pancreatin prepared either by separating enzymes from an activated extract of the pancreas, containing 2.15% of lipids, or by drying the not completely activated ground pancreas, containing 6.14% of lipids. A part of the first sample in which the proportion of lipids was additionally increased to 16.55% was also irradiated. The moisture content was practically the same in all three samples. The source of radiation was 60 Co, the dose rate 1.27 kGy/h. The samples of pancreatin in test-tubes were irradiated at 25 degC, doses ranging from 1x10 4 to 12x10 4 Gy. The results were statistically evaluated and are given in tables, and converted to the dried lipid-free substance they are expressed in graphs. The technological procedure of pancreatin preparation and the content of lipids do not influence the decrease in proteolytic activity (Graph 3). (author)

  6. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Husakova, A.; Urban, J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect was studied of 60 Co gamma radiation on the total proteolytic efficacy of pancreatin with gradually differentiated humidity, both in a preparation obtained by separating the active ingredients from an extract from the pancreas destroyed by autolysis, and in a preparation containing the remains of the pancreatic tissue, where the basic operation of manufacture was drying of the ground pancreas. The samples were irradiated with doses of 2.5x10 4 and 12x10 4 , or 14.2x10 4 Gy. The mean values found of the residual proteolytic efficacy expressed in the units of PhBs 3, calculated to the dried substance, are tabulated. At the same time the efficacy of samples before irradiation was tested. The evaluation of results included in the individual tables by variance analysis and Lord's u-test shows that there is no statistically significant difference between the mean values of the efficacy of samples with the initial humidity and the samples with increased humidity (maximally 16.20%). (author)

  7. Thyroid cancer due to biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvão, T.; Castro, N.; Teixeira, D.; Matuo, R.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is considered the most common in the region of the head and neck. It can be caused by spontaneous mutations, but also by ionizing radiation. The effect of ionizing radiation on the thyroid has been studied for several decades. The exact cause of the cancer is not known, but people with certain risk factors are more vulnerable, such as exposure to radiation, family history and age over 40 years. The thyroid is susceptible to the effects of radiation and is involved in the field of diagnostic or therapeutic irradiation, and may present functional and structural changes. Radiation can act in different ways, such as inhibiting or activating specific functions of the follicular epithelium, reducing the number of functioning follicles, altering vascularization or vascular permeability and inducing immune reactions. These morphological and histological changes may be related to the development of thyroid cancer

  8. Effects of air humidity on ionization chamber response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meger, C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Venci, R.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effect of air humidity on four different ionization chamber cap materials verified earlier studies (Kristensen and Sundbom, 1981; Mijnheer et al., 1983) and extended our understanding of the problem. We found nylon and A-150 plastic caps swell as they absorb water from the air. This accounts for as much as 2.5% increase in ionization response. Graphite chambers readily absorb and desorb water from the air. This creates a problem in maintaining dry air in a wet graphite chamber. Humid air has a different density and W value than dry air (Niatel, 1969, 1975). This decreases the charge collected in a wet graphite chamber. We observe a decrease in response of approximately 2%, a value greater than can be accounted for by these effects alone. Polyethylene chambers are unaffected by humid air. 4 refs., 9 figs

  9. Experimental research on transient ionizing radiation effects of CMOS microcontroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xiaoming; Fan Ruyu; Chen Wei; Wang Guizhen; Lin Dongsheng; Yang Shanchao; Bai Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental test system of CMOS microcontroller EE80C196KC20. Based on this system, the transient ionizing radiation effects on microcontroller were investigated using 'Qiangguang-I' accelerator. The gamma pulse width was 20 ns and the dose rate (for the Si atom) was in the range of 6.7 x 10 6 to 2.0 x 10 8 Gy/s in the experimental study. The disturbance and latchup effects were observed at different dose rate levels. Latchup threshold of the microcontroller was obtained. Disturbance interval and the system power supply current have a relationship with the dose rate level. The transient ionizing radiation induces photocurrent in the PN junctions that are inherent in CMOS circuits. The photocurrent is responsible for the electrical and functional degradation. (authors)

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation; Effecten van ioniserende straling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M.; Hardeman, F.; Holmstock, L.; Hurtgen, C.; Mahieu, L.; Sohier, A.; Vandecasteele, C.; Vanhavere, F.; Vanmaercke, H.; Zeevaert, T

    1998-12-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on.

  11. Simulation experiment on total ionization dose effects of linear CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Benqi; Zhang Yong; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Shaoyan

    2004-01-01

    We carry out the ionization radiation experiment of linear CCDs operated in unbiased, biased, biased and driven mode respectively by Co-60 γ source with our self-designed test system, and offline test the Dark signal and Saturation voltage and SNR varied with total dose for TCD132D, and get some valuable results. On the basis of above work, we set forth a primary experiment approaches to simulate the total dose radiation effects of charge coupled devices. (authors)

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo Soriani, Renata; Satomi, Lucilia Cristina; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus A.

    2005-01-01

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) and guarana (Paullinia cupana H.B.K.)

  13. Determination of the n-octanol/water partition coefficients of weakly ionizable basic compounds by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with neutral model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chao; Han, Shu-ying; Qiao, Jun-qin; Lian, Hong-zhen; Ge, Xin

    2014-11-01

    A strategy to utilize neutral model compounds for lipophilicity measurement of ionizable basic compounds by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography is proposed in this paper. The applicability of the novel protocol was justified by theoretical derivation. Meanwhile, the linear relationships between logarithm of apparent n-octanol/water partition coefficients (logKow '') and logarithm of retention factors corresponding to the 100% aqueous fraction of mobile phase (logkw ) were established for a basic training set, a neutral training set and a mixed training set of these two. As proved in theory, the good linearity and external validation results indicated that the logKow ''-logkw relationships obtained from a neutral model training set were always reliable regardless of mobile phase pH. Afterwards, the above relationships were adopted to determine the logKow of harmaline, a weakly dissociable alkaloid. As far as we know, this is the first report on experimental logKow data for harmaline (logKow = 2.28 ± 0.08). Introducing neutral compounds into a basic model training set or using neutral model compounds alone is recommended to measure the lipophilicity of weakly ionizable basic compounds especially those with high hydrophobicity for the advantages of more suitable model compound choices and convenient mobile phase pH control. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Bystander effect induced by ionizing radiation and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Tu Yu

    2009-01-01

    An indirect effect induced by ionizing radiation called bystander effect is being highly concentrated. Many domestic and foreign researchers have verified the existence of bystander effect and have got more understanding of the mechanism with advanced detection techniques and methods. So far, the research about it has expanded from a single cell to multiple cells, from the in vitro to the whole, and has extended to in vivo from in vitro, which provides powerful evidence to explain how bystander effects happen and the regulation mechanism and especially gives scientific evidence to clinical radiation oncology application in the future. (authors)

  15. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  16. The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, A.N.; Dixit, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by various researches, that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health. There is substantial controversy regarding the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause radiation injury, and these injuries can be relatively severe with sufficiently high radiation doses. Prolonged exposure to low levels of radiation may lead to cancer, although the nature of our response to very low radiation levels is not well known at this time. Many of our radiation safety regulations and procedures are designed to protect the health of those exposed to radiation occupationally or as members of the public. According to the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, any amount, however small, of radiation is potentially harmful, even down to zero levels. The threshold hypothesis, on the other hand, emphasizes that below a certain threshold level of radiation exposure, any deleterious effects are absent. At the same time, there are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). These effects cannot be anticipated by extrapolating from harmful effects noted at high doses. Evidence indicates an inverse relationship between chronic low-dose radiation levels and cancer incidence and/or mortality rates. Examples are drawn from: 1) state surveys for more than 200 million people in the United States; 2) state cancer hospitals for 200 million people in India; 3) 10,000 residents of Taipei who lived in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; 4) high-radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 5) 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; 6) almost 300,000 radon measurements of homes in the United States; and 7) non-smokers in high-radon areas of early Saxony, Germany. This evidence conforms to the hypothesis that

  17. Ionizing radiation effects in MgAl2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra Sanchez, A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation in MgAl2O4 has been studied, paying special interest to the influence of the high concentration of intrinsic dsefects of this material. Optical absorption, ESR, photoluminiscence, radioluminiscence, and thermoluminiscence are the main techniques used. The ionizing radiation induces to formation of V centres. During the work its characteristics (structure, thermal stability, absorption spectra, etc.) has been studied. The thermoluminiscence spectra allowed the discovery of several charge release processes between 85 and 650 K, all of them associated to electron release. The V-centres and several impurities (Cr, Mn,...) appear as recombination centres. The obtained data show that the kinetic of these charge release processes is regulated by the presence of a point defect with a very high concentration. This defect is an electron trap and its structure is an Al ion in a lattice site of tetraedral symmetry. (Author)

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    After reviewing the different lymphoid organs and the essential phases of the immune response, we studied the morphological and functional effects of ionizing radiation on the immunological system. Histologic changes in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, and different lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in relation with the radiation dose and irradiated volume (whole body irradiation, localized irradiation). Functional changes in the immune system induced by ionizing radiation were also investigated by a study of humoral-mediated immunity (antibody formation) and cell-mediated immunity (behavior of macrophages, B-cells, T suppressor cells, T helper cells, T effector cells, and natural killer cells). A study into the mechanisms of action of ionizing radiation and the immune processes it interferes with suggests several likely hypotheses (direct action on the immune cells, on their precursors, on seric mediators or on cell mediators). The effects on cancer patients' immune reactions of low radiation doses delivered to the various lymphoid organs are discussed, as well as the relationships between the host and the evolution of the tumor [fr

  19. The mechanism for the primary biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byakov, Vsevolod M; Stepanov, Sergei V

    2006-01-01

    The primary biological response of living organisms to the passage of fast charged particles is traditionally believed to be dominated by the chemical reactions of the radical products from the radiolysis of cellular water (OH, H, e aq - , O 2 - , H 2 O 2 ) and by the bioradicals that they produce (and which can also result from the direct electronic activation of biomolecules). This understanding has provided insight into how ionizing radiations affect biological systems and, most importantly, what radioprotection and radiosensibilizing effects are produced by chemical compounds introduced into an organism. However, a number of key radiobiological facts remain unexplained by the current theory, stimulating a search for other biologically active factors that may be triggered by radiation. This review examines a fact that is usually ignored in discussing the biological impact of ionizing radiation: the local increase in acidity in the water solution along the track of a charged particle. The acidity in the track is very different from its value for cellular water in a living organism. Biological processes are well-known to be highly sensitive to changes in the environmental acidity. It seems that the biological impact of ionizing radiations is dominated not by the water radiolysis products (mostly radicals) listed above but particles of a different nature, hydroxonium ions H 3 O + , where the term hydroxonium refer to protonated water molecules. This modification of the mechanism of primary radiobiological effects is in good agreement with experimental data. In particular, the extremal dependence of the relative biological efficiency (RBE) of radiations on their ionizing energy losses is accounted for in quantitative terms, as is the increase in the RBE in the relativistic energy range. (reviews of topical problems)

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on starch and cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenha, J.; Bockova, J.

    1973-09-01

    The investigation is reported of the effects of ionizing radiation both on macromolecular systems generally and on polysaccharides, starch and cellulose. Attention is focused on changes in the physical and physico-chemical properties of starch and cellulose, such as starch swelling, gelation, viscosity, solubility, reaction with iodine, UV, IR and ESR spectra, chemical changes resulting from radiolysis and from the effect of amylases on irradiated starch, changes in cellulose fibre strength, water absorption, stain affinity, and also the degradation of cellulose by radiation and the effect of cellulases on irradiated cellulose. Practical applications of the findings concerning cellulose degradation are discussed. (author)

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A panel of experts in November 1971 specifically considered the effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems and formulated detailed suggestions for research in the area. A further panel meeting took place in April 1974. The results of the work are presented in this report which is divided into 3 chapters in the first chapter the concentrations of natural and artificial radionuclides in aquatic environments and the radiation dose rates received by aquatic organisms are discussed. In particular, simple dosimetry models for phytoplankton, zooplankton, mollusca, crustacea and fish are presented which permit the estimation of the dose rates from incorporated radionuclides and from radionuclides in the external environment. In the second chapter the somatic and genetic effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms are reviewed. Somatic effects are discussed separately as effects due to short-term (acute) exposure to near-lethal doses of radiation. Great attention is paid to the effects due to long-term (chronic) exposure at lower doses rates. Consideration is given to behaviour, repair mechanisms and metabolic stimulation after exposure, and also the influence of environmental factors on radiation effects. In the third chapter the potential effects of low-level irradiation on aquatic populations are considered. First, the possible consequences of somatic effects on egg and larval mortality, stock-recruitment, fecundity and ecosystem stability are discussed. Subsequently, the assessment of genetic effects as they relate to population genetics and increased mutation rates are considered

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  3. Non-carcinogenic late effects of ionizing radiation; human data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The late effects of ionizing radiation may be somatic effect or potential effect, about which such informations as follows are required: teratogenesis the disturbances in growth and development, cataracts, infertility, cytogenetic aberration, and accelerated aging. Although much is known about the nature of the malformations produced by ionizing radiation, and about the vulnerability of human embryonal and fetal tissues during various stages of organogenesis, the quantitative information is uncertain and incomplete. The data on A-bomb survivors were flawed by confounding radiation dose with nutritional and other influences caused by the disasters created by war-time bombings. If the effects of radiation are real, they are quite small for the dose below 100 rad (kerma), are confined to the children of pre-pubertal age at the time of exposure, and are of much less consequence for low-LET radiation than for high. Radiation-induced lenticular changes are of graded severity, and as for cataracts, the threshold is in the range from 600 to 1,000 rad of low-LET radiation, and perhaps 75 to 100 rad for fast neutrons; the average latent period is 2 to 7 years. The estimate of the RBE for neutrons is in the range from 2 to 10, and dose-dependent. Ionizing radiation has important effects on fertility only at very high dose. The relationship of the quantitative aspects of the biologic significance of chromosomal aberration in somatic cells to dose may provide an interesting parallel to the carcinogenic effect. For neutrons, the dose-response curve appears to be linear, at least for stable aberration. (Yamashita, S.)

  4. The role of multiple ionization and subshell coupling effects in L-shell ionization of Au by oxygen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Pajek, M.; Semaniak, J.; Czyzewski, T.; Fijal, I.; Jaskola, M.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization of L-subshell electrons in gold by the impact of 0.4-2.2 MeV amu -1 O ions was studied by observing excited Lγ(L-N, O) x-rays. We demonstrate that both the multiple ionization in outer M- and N-shells as well as the coupling effects in the L-shell play an important role in understanding the measured L-subshell ionization cross sections. The multiple ionization was found to be important in two aspects: first, the analysis of x-ray energy shifts and line broadening was crucial for proper interpretation of measured x-ray spectra; second, the additional vacancies in the M- and N-shells substantially influenced the L 1 -subshell fluorescence and Coster-Kronig (CK) yields, mainly by closing strong L 1 -L 3 M 4,5 CK transitions. The data are compared with the simplified coupled-channels calculations using the 'coupled-subshell model' (CSM) based on the semiclassical approximation (SCA), which describes both direct Coulomb ionization as well as the L-subshell couplings within the same theoretical approach. A good agreement of the present data with the theoretical predictions based on the discussed SCA-CSM approach is observed. Present findings partly explain the long-standing problem of inadequate theoretical description of L-shell ionization by heavy ion impact. (author)

  5. Biological effects of ionizing radiation; Efectos biologicos de la radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  6. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  7. Ionization of deep quantum wells: Optical trampoline effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, E. Yu.; Levitskiĭ, R. S.

    2007-02-01

    A new mechanism of transitions of an electronic system from the ground state to states with excitation energies exceeding many times the energy of a light photon initiating the transitions has been considered. This mechanism is based on the so-called optical “trampoline” effect: one of the interacting electrons receives energy from another electron and, simultaneously absorbing a photon ħω, overcomes the energy gap significantly exceeding ħω. Ionization of deep quantum wells by low-frequency light of moderate intensity due to the optical trampoline effect was calculated.

  8. Genetics and ionizing radiations. 2. The genetic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1980-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are the best known mutagenic agents. Their relative importance as compared to other mutagens cannot be determined. Experiments show that male germinal cells are more sensitive than female germinal cells. This sensitivity is determined by the cell phase at the time of agression. Acute X-exposure results in a mutation rate of about 1.7x10 -7 rad -1 per gamete and per gene in the male. This rate is lower in case of chronic exposure. Pathological effects will appear in the first (dominant genes, and unbalanced chromosomal anomalies) or n-th generation (recessive genes and balanced chromosomal rearrangements). Direct studies on humans have brought contradictory results. Only X or γ-emitters induce a true genetic risk, the other radiations being too little penetrating to reach the gonads. The doubling dose of the mutation rate is estimated at over 100 rad in males and over 1,000 rad in females. However, one cannot conclude that low doses are not harmless because their effects are difficult to demonstrate. The individual risk, that remains low, must be distinguished from the collective risk for which the safeguard of the quality of the genetic material of our species must remain our prime purpose [fr

  9. Ionizing radiation: levels and effects. Volume I. Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This is the sixth substantive report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation to the General Assembly. It reviews the levels of radiation received from all sources to which man is exposed and, among the effects of ionizing radiation, it considers the genetic effects, the effects on the immune response and the induction of malignancies in animals and man. These are not the only effects of ionizing radiation. The acute consequences of massive amounts of radiation that may be received accidentally or during nuclear warfare are not reviewed here (the short discussion of this subject in the 1962 report is still largely valid, at least as an introduction), nor are the effects on the nervous system and the induction of chromosome anomalies in somatic cells, which were both considered by the Committee in its 1969 report. Unlike previous reports of the Committee, the present report is submitted to the General Assembly without the technical annexes in which the evidence considered by the Committee is discussed in detail and in which the bases for the Committee's conclusions, which are stated in the report, are fully documented. However, the annexes are being made available at the same time as the report in a separate publication, issued in two volumes and the Committee wishes to draw the attention of the General Assembly to the fact that the separation of the report from the annexes is for convenience only and that major importance attaches to the scientific evidence given in the annexes.

  10. Possibilities to reduce the effect of ionizing radiation by interaction of two types of radiation into a matter: ionized and non-ionized radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanvir

    2007-01-01

    Full text: At present it has been accepted that ionized radiation can cause biological effects on the human body and the only way of preventing this effect, is by shielding the source of radiation by absorbing materials. On the other hand, the technology of non-ionizing radiation is upgraded. The canalization of radiation through the wave-guide based structures and optical fiber is well established. This reminds us that passing through benzene non-ionized radiation give the 'Raman' effect, which can ensure the secondary generation of non-ionized radiation with the wave length of nanometer and so far. These types of non-ionized radiation can easily be correlated with the gamma radiation, which is ionized. We know that high-energized photon usually interacts with matter and reduces its energy to the matter and generate electro-magnetic waves into the molecules of the matter. It is also well known that through the wave-guide based structures and optical fiber; the path of energy distribution of photon is likely to be optical energetic modes. If two types of photon from two types of radiation (ionized and non-ionized) interact with matter and pass through the optical fiber, they can generate optical modes with various wavelengths and phase velocities. With 'Raman' effect we can generate secondary electromagnetic waves of nanometer; as well as optical modes into the optical fiber. These optical modes from two types of radiation with various phase velocities, having the similar wavelength, can decrease or accelerate some modes. On the view of signal distribution, we can assume that if two similar signals pass through the circuit with phase difference 180P 0 P, then the result posses no signal. We are also reminded that photon of γ - radiation can spread from 0 deg. to 180 deg. C, where the 'Compton' loss of radiation is minimum. In view of the electro-magnetic theory of Maxwell we can assume the energetic field of optical modes, which are generated into the optical

  11. Effects of total dose of ionizing radiation on integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marcilei A.G.; Cirne, K.H.; Gimenez, S.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Added, N.; Barbosa, M.D.L.; Medina, N.H.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de; Seixas Junior, L.E.; Melo, W. [Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Paulo Archer, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The study of ionizing radiation effects on materials used in electronic devices is of great relevance for the progress of global technological development and, particularly, it is a necessity in some strategic areas in Brazil. Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by radiation and the need for IC's featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics. On the other hand, aerospace agencies are encouraging both scientific community and semiconductors industry to develop hardened-by-design components using standard manufacturing processes to achieve maximum performance, while significantly reducing costs. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the integrated circuits are usually divided into two categories: total ionizing dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; single events effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits. TID is one of the most common effects and may generate degradation in some parameters of the CMOS electronic devices, such as the threshold voltage oscillation, increase of the sub-threshold slope and increase of the off-state current. The effects of ionizing radiation are the creation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide layer changing operation mode parameters of the electronic device. Indirectly, there will be also changes in the device due to the formation of secondary electrons from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the material, since the charge carriers can be trapped both in the oxide layer and in the interface with the oxide. In this work we have investigated the behavior of MOSFET devices fabricated with

  12. Effects of calcium and magnesium on strontium distribution coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Liszewski, M.J.; Hemming, C.H.; Welhan, J.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of calcium and magnesium on the distribution of strontium between a surficial sediment and simulated wastewater solutions were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium transport properties of surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. The investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine strontium linear sorption isotherms and distribution coefficients (K(d)'s) using simulated wastewater solutions prepared at pH 8.0??0.1 with variable concentrations of calcium and magnesium. Strontium linear sorption isotherm K(d)'s ranged from 12??1 to 85??3 ml/g, increasing as the concentration of calcium and magnesium decreased. The concentration of sorbed strontium and the percentage of strontium retained by the sediment were correlated to aqueous concentrations of strontium, calcium, and magnesium. The effect of these cation concentrations on strontium sorption was quantified using multivariate least-squares regression techniques. Analysis of data from these experiments indicates that increased concentrations of calcium and magnesium in wastewater discharged to waste disposal ponds at the INEL increases the availability of strontium for transport beneath the ponds by decreasing strontium sorption to the surficial sediment.

  13. Effect of rolling motion on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, B.H.; Gu, H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The expansion and contraction loss coefficients in rolling motion are analyzed. ► Effects of rolling motion on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients are different. ► The spanwise and transverse additional forces contribute slightly to the local loss. ► The oscillations of loss coefficients increase as the strengthening of rolling motion. - Abstract: The sudden expansion and sudden contraction loss coefficients in rolling motion are investigated with CFD code FLUENT. The calculation results are validated with experimental and theoretical results in steady state. The effects of rolling motion on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients are different. The effects of spanwise and transverse additional forces on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients are weak. The effect of velocity oscillation on the contraction loss coefficient is more significant than that on the expansion loss coefficient. The oscillation of local loss coefficient also becomes more and more irregular as the strengthening of rolling motion

  14. Effect of Interband Interaction on Isotope Effect Coefficient of Mg B2 Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Kumvongsa, C.; Burakorn, A.; Changkanarth, P.; Maneeratanakul, S.

    2005-10-01

    In this research, the exact formula of Tc s equation and the isotope effect coefficient of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of interband interaction .In each band ,our model consist of two paring interactions : the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction . According to the numerical calculation, we find that the isotope effect coefficient of MgB 2 , α=3 . 0 with T c 40 K can be found in the weak coupling regime and interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope effect coefficient than interband interaction of non-phonon-electron

  15. Effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalovidouris, A.E.; Papayannis, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function was investigated in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (300x10 9 /l) was irradiated with doses of 1, 4, 10, 20 and 50 Gy. Platelet function tests were performed on both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) platelet samples. The platelet function tests were (1) platelet aggregation by ADP (1, 2, 4 μmol final concentration), adrenaline and collagen, (2) ADP-release from platelets, (3) clot retraction and (4) platelet factor-3 availability. It was found that roentgen irradiation of platelets in vitro did not affect these platelet function tests. (Auth.)

  16. Cytotoxic Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Chlorpyrifos on White Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bahkery, A.M.L.H.

    2014-01-01

    The hazard of accidental exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and/or neurotoxic insecticides like the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) represent series health problem for human. In the present work, the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation and chlorpyrifos on rats were studied where animals were under glutathione (GSH) depletion. Animals were pre-treated with single dose of Buthionine Sulfoximine (BSO) (200 mg/kg body weight, by oral intubation), then treated with high dose of CPF (30 mg/kg body weight) and or exposure to IR (single dose of 6 Gy whole body gamma ray) one hour after BSO treatment. Another groups of animals pertreated with N-acetyl cystiene (NAC) one hour before treated with CPF and/or IR. After 24 hours blood sample, liver and brain were taken and used for estimate the GSH level and the activities of glutathione-stransferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), acetyl cholinesterase (AChE), carboxyl esterase (CE), paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (AE). Also, native PAGE electrophoresis was undertaken for separating the CE and PON isozymes in plasma, liver and brain. The results indicated that CPF produced no change in GSH level. Whereas, treatment with either BSO or IR, produced decrease in GSH level. NAC restored GSH level near the control level in all treated groups CPF had no effect on GST activity and pretreatment with either BSO or NAC increased GST activity in CPF treated groups. Also, exposure to IR had no effect on GST activity. Whereas, IR in combination with CPF and/or NAC and/or BSO produced inhibition in plasma GST activity and increased liver GST activity. In addition, both CPF and IR had no effect on the activity of GR. Whereas, pre-treatment with either BSO or NAC produced inhibition in plasma and liver GR activity in CPF treated groups. No change had observed in the IR exposed groups. Treatment with CPF inhibited AChE activity in plasma, liver and brain. Whereas, exposure to IR inhibited AChE activity in brain only

  17. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusciac D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists’ demands for high-energy (6 – 9 MeV photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes, a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this “realistic” radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  18. Non-targeted bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to those responses occurring in cells that were not subject to energy deposition events following ionizing radiation. These bystander cells may have been neighbors of irradiated cells, or physically separated but subject to soluble secreted signals from irradiated cells. Bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in vivo and for various radiation qualities. In tribute to an old friend and colleague, Anthony V. Carrano, who would have said 'well what are the critical questions that should be addressed, and so what?', we review the evidence for non-targeted radiation-induced bystander effects with emphasis on prevailing questions in this rapidly developing research field, and the potential significance of bystander effects in evaluating the detrimental health effects of radiation exposure

  19. Effect of applied mechanical stress on absorption coefficient of compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: mkgupta.sliet@gmail.com [Department of Applied Sciences, Bhai Gurdas Institute of Engineering and Technology, Sangrur (India); Singh, Gurinderjeet; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Kahlon, K. S. [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering & Technology Deemed University, Longowal (Sangrur) India-148106 (India)

    2015-08-28

    The absorption coefficient of given materials is the parameter required for the basic information. The measurement of absorption coefficient of compounds Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, ZnO{sub 2}, SmO{sub 2} and PbO has been taken at different incident photon energies 26, 59.54, 112, 1173, 1332keV. The studies involve the measurements of absorption coefficient of the self supporting samples prepared under different mechanical stress. This mechanical stress is render in terms of pressure up to 0-6 ton by using hydraulic press. Measurements shows that absorption coefficient of a material is directly proportional to applied mechanical stress on it up to some extent then become independent. Experimentally measured results are in fairly good agreement with in theoretical values obtained from WinXCOM.

  20. Skin-effect in a dense ionizing plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenkov, G.V.; Taranenko, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of multiple ionization and radiation (bremmstrahlung and photorecombination) on skin effect in a dense plasma is investigated. Limiting cases are considered: 1) fast skin-effect, when plasma movement and any types of losses (radiation, electron thermal conductivity) have no time to manifest themselves during short heating times; 2) deceleration of skinning under effect of radiation achieving equilibrium with Joule heating. Self-simulating solutions of the problem for half-space are investigated. The results are applied to analysing experiments with exploding wires. It is shown that under conditions, typical of heavy-current decelerators tubular structures are produced as a result of heat and current skinning under free dispersion of plasma produced during the explosion. Their dimensions are of the order of dozens of microns, and the temperature exceeds 50 eV. The linear power and complete ''tube'' radiation yield at this stage are able to make a substantial contribution to the energy balance in the group

  1. Single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Jianshe; Cai Nan; Liu Jiaxin; Wu Qinzhi; Wang Jia

    2012-01-01

    In this work, single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays and 252 Cf source were studied. The single event burnout and single event gate rupture (SEB/SEGR) effects were investigated, and the relationship between drain-source breakdown voltage and ionizing dose was obtained. The results showed that the VDMOSFET devices were sensitive to SEB and SEGR, and measures to improve their resistance to SEB and SEGR should be considered seriously for their space applications. The drain-source breakdown voltage was sensitive to total ionizing dose effects as the threshold voltage. In assessing the devices' resistance to the total ionizing dose effects, both the threshold voltage and the drain-source breakdown voltage should be taken into account. (authors)

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on active thyroid immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.I.; Abdelaal, A.E.; AL-Gachari, A.I.; Hindy, O.W.; Abdalla, M.I.; Said, M.M.; Shoucha, M.A.; and Salama, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was carried out to explore the effect of exposure to ionizing radiation on the immune system in cocks. A total number of 36 mature Fayoumi cocks were randomly assigned to: control, 300 R and 600 r groups. Whole body irradiation was carried out in co-60 unit 24 hours. Prior to induction of immunity. Thyroglobulin (T G) immunity was induced in all birds and sera were collected before, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 16 weeks. After immunization. T G antibodies were evaluated by using radioisotopic techniques: i- Ammonium sulphate method, ii-polyethylene glycol method and iii-The circulating thyroid hormones. The results obtained indicated the formation of thyroglobulin antibodies in all immunized birds at 6 weeks. After immunization and thereafter, although it was detected in some birds at 4 weeks. after immunization. The antibody titer increased sharply after the sixth Th week reaching its peak value at the sixteenth week interval. The suppressive effect of ionizing radiation on the immune response was evident in the irradiated groups, particularly the 600 r group. Some birds in the 600 r group were not able to respond appropriately to the challenge and did not survive until the end of observation period

  3. THE EFFECTS OF THE IONIZING RADIATION BACKGROUND ON GALAXY EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambrick, D. Clay; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    We find that the amount and nature of the assumed ionizing background can strongly affect galaxy formation and evolution. Galaxy evolution simulations typically incorporate an ultraviolet background which falls off rapidly above z = 3; e.g., that of Haardt and Madau. However, this decline may be too steep to fit the Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe constraints on electron scattering optical depth or observations of intermediate redshift (z ∼ 2-4) Lyα forest transmission. As an alternative, we present simulations of the cosmological formation of individual galaxies with UV backgrounds that decline more slowly at high redshift: both a simple intensity rescaling and the background recently derived by Faucher-Giguere, which softens the spectrum at higher redshifts. We also test an approximation of the X-ray background with a similar z dependence. We find for the test galaxies that an increase in either the intensity or hardness of ionizing radiation generically pushes star formation toward lower redshifts: although overall star formation in the simulation boxes is reduced by 10%-25%, the galaxies show a factor of ∼2 increase in the fraction of stars within a 30 kpc radius that are formed after z = 1. Other effects include late gas inflows enhanced up to 30 times, stellar half-mass radii decreased by up to 30%, central velocity dispersions increased up to 40%, and a strong reduction in substructure. The magnitude of the effects depends on the environmental/accretion properties of the particular galaxy.

  4. Biological effects of ionizing radiation - changing worker attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.; Schenley, C.

    1989-01-01

    Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) Radiation Protection Training Special Interest Group has taken an innovative approach to providing DOE contractors with radiation worker training material information. Newly-hired radiation workers may be afraid to work near radiation and long-term radiation workers may become indifferent to the biological hazard of radiation. Commercially available training material is often presented at an inappropriate technical level or in an uninteresting style. These training problems have been addressed in the DOE system through development of a training videotape and supporting material package entitled Understanding Ionizing Radiation and its Biological Effects. The training package, developed and distributed by TRADE specifically to meet the needs of DOE contractor facilities, contains the videotape and accompanying paper supporting materials designed to assist the instructor. Learning objectives, presentation suggestion for the instructor, trainee worksheets, guided discussion questions, and trainee self-evaluation sheets are included in the training package. DOE contractors have agreed that incorporating this training module into radiation worker training programs enhances the quality of the training and increase worker understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation

  5. Health effects of low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1979-04-01

    It is now assumed that any exposure to radiaton at low levels of dose carries some risk of deleterious effects. How low this level may be, or the probability or magnitude of the risk, still are not known. Our best scientific knowledge and advice are essential for the protection of the public health, for the effective application of new technologies in medicine and industry and for guidance in the production of nuclear energy. Unless man wishes to dispense with those activities which inevitably involve exposure to low levels of ionizing radiations, he must recognize that some degree of risk to health, however small, exists. A pragmatic appraisal of how man wishes to continue to derive the benefits of health and happiness from such activities involving ionizing radiaton in times of everchanging conditions and public attitudes in our resource-limited society is the task which lies before all of us - all men and women of our society, of science and of medicine, and of law and government - now and in the future

  6. Current research in Canada on biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    A survey of current research in Canada on the biological effects of ionizing radiation has been compiled. The list of projects has been classified according to structure (organizational state of the test system) as well as according to the type of effects. Using several assumptions, ballpark estimates of expenditures on these activities have been made. Agencies funding these research activities have been tabulated and the break-down of research in government laboratories and in academic institutions has been designated. Wherever possible, comparisons have been made outlining differences or similarities that exist between the United States and Canada concerning biological radiation research. It has been concluded that relevant research in this area in Canada is inadequate. Wherever possible, strengths and weaknesses in radiation biology programs have been indicated. The most promising course for Canada to follow is to support adequately fundamental studies of the biological effects of radiation. (auth)

  7. Genetic effects of ionizing radiation and repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.

    1986-11-01

    Since DNA (=desoxyribonucleic acid) is the largest molecule within the cell it is the most important target for direct and indirect radiation effects. Within DNA the total genetic information is stored, thus damage to DNA in germ cells causes genetic disorders and damage in somatic cells is implicated in cancer and immunodeficiences. Alterations of DNA structure are not only due to ionizing radiation effects, but also to spontaneous DNA modifications and damage from interactions with environmental ultraviolet light and chemical agents. To maintain its genetic integrity, each organism had to develop different repair systems able to recognize and remove DNA damage. Repeated exposure to a DNA damaging agent can even lead to adaptation processes and increased resistance to the same agent. At normal function of repair systems it can be assumed that the capacity of those systems is adequate to scope with the effects of low radiation doses. (Author)

  8. Untargeted effects of ionizing radiation: Implications for radiation pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Eric G; Coates, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    The dogma that genetic alterations are restricted to directly irradiated cells has been challenged by observations in which effects of ionizing radiation, characteristically associated with the consequences of energy deposition in the cell nucleus, arise in non-irradiated cells. These, so called, untargeted effects are demonstrated in cells that have received damaging signals produced by irradiated cells (radiation-induced bystander effects) or that are the descendants of irradiated cells (radiation-induced genomic instability). Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by a number of delayed adverse responses including chromosomal abnormalities, gene mutations and cell death. Similar effects, as well as responses that may be regarded as protective, have been attributed to bystander mechanisms. Whilst the majority of studies to date have used in vitro systems, some adverse non-targeted effects have been demonstrated in vivo. However, at least for haemopoietic tissues, radiation-induced genomic instability in vivo may not necessarily be a reflection of genomically unstable cells. Rather the damage may reflect responses to ongoing production of damaging signals; i.e. bystander responses, but not in the sense used to describe the rapidly induced effects resulting from direct interaction of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. The findings are consistent with a delayed and long-lived tissue reaction to radiation injury characteristic of an inflammatory response with the potential for persisting bystander-mediated damage. An important implication of the findings is that contrary to conventional radiobiological dogma and interpretation of epidemiologically-based risk estimates, ionizing radiation may contribute to malignancy and particularly childhood leukaemia by promoting initiated cells rather than being the initiating agent. Untargeted mechanisms may also contribute to other pathological consequences

  9. Ionizing radiation: effects upon acquisition and performance of behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Laercia Abreu

    1999-03-01

    The present study, using rats as subjects, attempted to assess the effects of multiple exposures to gamma radiation upon behavior in two procedures of a multiple schedule of repeated acquisition and performance. With an experimental chamber containing three levers displaced horizontally, left (l), center (c) and right (r), different levels of complexity were programmed for procedures A and B. In both procedures a new sequence of three responses was programmed for each session (lcr, lrc, clr, crl, rlc) for the acquisition component, whereas for the performance component the same sequence was maintained throughout the sessions. The completion of three sequences (nine responses) was followed by reinforcement and incorrect responses were followed by time-out without correction procedures. In procedure A the sequences consisted of one response in each lever (for example, crl→crl→crl→reinforcement) while in procedure B a sequence consisted of three response in the same lever, with the following three responses having to occur in a different lever (for example, ccc→rrr→lll→reinforcement). Six subjects were trained in each procedure. Base line data showed, by means of error percentage, that procedure B regardless of being more complex represented a lower difficulty level than procedure A: subjects in procedure B displayed, in general, a lower number of errors per session. After training in these procedures of repeated acquisition and performance, the subjects were exposed to doses of ionizing radiation of 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 and 8.0 Gy, with an interval of 45 days between exposures. With measurements of response rate and obtained reinforcers, the data showed a dose-response relation, with higher doses producing lower rates of responses and reinforcers. Percentage of errors was higher after doses of 6.0 and 8.0 Gy in the performance component, while changes in error patterns occurred in the acquisition component. The effects of radiation was more evident and orderly

  10. Novel approach to analyzing the carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, O; Cleland, M R

    2006-01-01

    Cancer incidence of ionizing radiations exposure is considered to be proportional to the absorbed dose. However, there are disagreements between substantial amounts of epidemiological studies. In this study, we question the basic relationship of the risk estimate with total accumulated dose, and reanalyse available data on the basis of a daily dose concept. The data analysed were relative mortality risk from all cancers vs. total-body dose on a daily basis. References have been selected on the basis of objective criteria. We found that this relationship removes major discrepancies. It revises estimates of low-level exposures, with consequences regarding nuclear power plants safety, wastes management, medical applications or homeland security. The idea that the dose rate may have a significant impact on health effects of ionizing radiations is not new, but has always been considered as a parameter in models based on integrated dose. The novel approach in this paper is to consider the primary relevant parameter as an average of dose rate over a time period of one day. This is an argument to revise the whole philosophy in radioprotection, and place regulatory limits on specific locations instead of annual limits relevant to individual persons.

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation in the quality of exportable asparagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio C, T.; Espinoza B, J.; Godoy, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the severe restriction which has been set upon the use of chemical fumigant by the importing countries of our horticulture products it has been studied the use of ionizing radiation in asparagus as an alternative treatment for quarantine restriction. The used are 0,15; 0,5; 1.0 y 2.0 kGy. Argenteuil and UC-157 varieties were used. The harvest, handing and storage conditions were the same as the ones export companies use. Both varieties were studied by the following quality parameters: pH, acidity, moisture, soluble solids, vitamin C, fibre content, dissecation, seeding and spreading, shooting, spear lengh, weight loss, microbial and moulds contamination, cutting resistance, respiratory rate, color and sensorial evaluation. From the result obtained it is possible to conclude that the irradiation did not produce deleterous effects on chemical, microbiological or organoleptic parameters in both varieties. From the point of view of the market quality the ionizing radiation could be used as a quarantine treatment under the normal marketing conditions used in Chile. Dose of 2.0 kGy does not produce a shelf life extention. (author)

  12. [Biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowski, A; Steciwko, A

    1998-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, when Adey discovered that extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) may affect the calcium ions efflux from various cells, bioeffects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) have become the subject of growing interest and numerous research projects. At present, the fact that NIR exerts both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on different physiological cellular parameters is rather unquestionable. At the same time, some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to EMF is potentially harmful even if its intensity is very low. It has been proved that thermal factors are not responsible for these effects, therefore nowadays, they are called 'non-thermal effects'. Our paper deals with three different aspects of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation, bioelectromagnetism, electromagnetobiology and electromagnetic bioinformation. Firstly, we describe how EMF and photons can be produced within a living cell, how biological cycles are controlled, and what are the features of endogenous electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, we discuss various facets of external EMF interactions with living matter, focusing on extremely-low-frequencies, radio- and microwaves. Possible mechanisms of these interactions are also mentioned. Finally, we present a short overview of current theories which explain how electromagnetic couplings may control an open and dissipative structure, namely the living organism. The theory of electromagnetic bioinformation seems to explain how different physiological processes are triggered and controlled, as well as how long-range interactions may possibly occur within the complex biological system. The review points out that the presented research data must be assessed very carefully since its evaluation is crucial to set the proper limits of EMF exposure, both occupational and environmental. The study of biological effects of non-ioinizing radiation may also contribute to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic

  13. Effects on vegetable seeds due to non ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acri, G.; Oliva, A.; Falcone, G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Fisica, Cosenza (Italy); Acri, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Ecologia, Cosenza (Italy); Bitonti, M.B.; Chiappetta, A. [Universita di Messina, Dipt. di Protezionistica Ambientale, Sanitaria, Sociale ed Industriale, Messina (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Based on the tightly relationship between light and plants growth and development, the present work aims to obtain some further insight into the effects of non ionizing radiation the photo-autotrophic organisms, due to the relevant implications for both scientific knowledge and economical and social effects. In this context, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the influence of a long-lasting exposition to both RF at 1850 MHz and polarized light source on roots elongation of corn kernels. The radical apparatus was chosen as a sensible parameter and the elongation of the roots was monitored as a function of time. Mitotic index and length of meta-xylem cells were estimated in root apex as an index of cell proliferation and cell expansion activity, respectively. (N.C.)

  14. Effects on vegetable seeds due to non ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acri, G.; Oliva, A.; Falcone, G.; Acri, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G.; Bitonti, M.B.; Chiappetta, A.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the tightly relationship between light and plants growth and development, the present work aims to obtain some further insight into the effects of non ionizing radiation the photo-autotrophic organisms, due to the relevant implications for both scientific knowledge and economical and social effects. In this context, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the influence of a long-lasting exposition to both RF at 1850 MHz and polarized light source on roots elongation of corn kernels. The radical apparatus was chosen as a sensible parameter and the elongation of the roots was monitored as a function of time. Mitotic index and length of meta-xylem cells were estimated in root apex as an index of cell proliferation and cell expansion activity, respectively. (N.C.)

  15. Effect of increased ionization on the atmospheric electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    This study is a review of atmospheric electrical theory with the purpose of predicting the atmospheric electrical effects of increased ionization caused by radioactive inert gases. A time-independent perturbation model for the global atmospheric electric circuit precdicts that the electric field at the sea surface would be reduced to about 76% of its unperturbed value by a surface 85 Kr concentration of 3 nCi/m 3 . The electric field at a typical land station is predicted to be about 84% of its unperturbed value. Some scientists have suggested that the atmospheric electric field is part of a closed electrical feedback loop. The present model does not include such a closed feedback loop and may underestimate the total effects. This model is also useful for interpreting atmospheric electrical responses to natural fluctuations in the cosmic-ray component of background radiation

  16. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the data measured by the authors and reported earlier. The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon ..... This photon build-up is a function of thickness and atomic number of the sample and also the incident photon energy, which combine to ...

  17. Redox Couples with Unequal Diffusion Coefficients: Effect on Redox Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Mathwig, Klaus; Kang, Shuo; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy

    2013-01-01

    Redox cycling between two electrodes separated by a narrow gap allows dramatic amplification of the faradaic current. Unlike conventional electrochemistry at a single electrode, however, the mass-transport-limited current is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of both the reduced and oxidized

  18. The ionization effects from nuclear explosions in high-altitude and their effect to radio propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Rongsheng; Li Qin

    1997-01-01

    A high-altitude nuclear explosions releases large quantities of energetic particles and electromagnetic radiation capable of producing ionization in the atmosphere. These particles and rays radiation character in the atmosphere are discussed. Ionizations due to explosion X rays, γ rays, neutrons and β particles are considered separately. The time-space distribution of additional electron density is computed and its nature is analyzed. The effects of explosion-induced ionization on the absorption of radio wave is considered and the dependence of the absorption on explosion characteristics, distance from the earth's atmosphere, and frequency of the radio wave is determined

  19. Information on biological health effects of ionizing radiation and radionuclides: the rule of a web site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comte, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Flury-Herard, A.; Ourly, F.; Hemidy, P.; Lallemand, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a source of information on biological and health effects of radionuclides and ionizing radiation in an easy to use format. Reported work is made up of two distinct parts: data sheets for selected radionuclides and a web file. Data sheets: Specific radiation data sheets provide an overview of the properties, the environmental behaviour, the different pathways of human exposure and the biological and health consequences of selected radionuclides. Radionuclides that have been selected are those commonly dealt with in nuclear industry (and in other areas such as medicine) and released to the environment or naturally occurring (plutonium, tritium, carbon 14). Data sheets corresponding to the different radionuclides are based on the main sources of scientific information in dosimetry, epidemiology, radiobiology and radiation protection. These data sheets are intended for radiation protection specialists and physicians. They include: main physical and chemical characteristics, main radiation protection data: dose coefficients (public, workers), dose limits sources, total released estimate (nuclear industry, atmospheric tests, main pathway of human exposure and biological behaviour, biological and health effects, medical supervision, treatment a list of the main references, appendix providing accurate information. Web file: http://www-dsv.cea.fr/doc/carmin_ext/fond.php This web file provides a source of information on biological and health effects of ionizing radiation and biological basic knowledge of radiation protection. Available for consultation via Internet, compiled information provides, in a same file, subjects as varied as biological mechanisms, ionizing radiations action, biological and health effects, risk assessment This file is mainly intended to assist in informing and training of non-specialist readership (students, teaching on radiation protection basic knowledge. This electronic document is divided in three

  20. The effect of ionizing radiation on intraocular lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellerin, Bruce E.; Nisce, Lourdes Z.; Roberts, Calvin W.; Thornell, Cliff; Sabbas, Albert; Wang Huili; Li, P. Mark; Nori, Dattatreyudu

    2001-01-01

    artifactual aberrations inherent in analyzing convex lenses on a conventional flat-plate spectrophotometer, post-irradiation absorption spectra were subsequently reanalyzed on a Cary 300 spectrophotometer outfitted with a Labsphere Diffused Reflectance Accessory (DRA-CA-30-I) incorporating a Spectralon-coated integrating sphere. Main Outcome Measures: Primary: Changes in UV absorbance after irradiation. Secondary: Changes in visible and low-end near-infrared absorbance after irradiation. Results: Photon ionizing radiation in the 2-Gy to 100-Gy range produced no detectable alterations in the UV (280 nm ≤ λ < 400 nm), visible (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 700 nm), or low-end near-infrared (700 nm < λ ≤ 830 nm) absorption spectra of any of the lenses irradiated. However, silicone IOLs as a group revealed peak post-irradiation UV absorption at a shorter wavelength than did PMMA IOLs, with marginally greater UV transmission at the uppermost extreme of the UV spectrum (λ = 384.5-400 nm). Conclusions: At clinically relevant doses used in radiation therapy, megavoltage photon ionizing radiation produces no significant alterations in the absorption spectra of PMMA and silicone IOLs over the range λ = 280-830 nm. These findings indicate that, even at supraclinical doses, the UV-absorbing capacity of chromophore-bearing PMMA and silicone IOLs remains unimpaired. It is not clear whether the lower UV peak of silicone lenses represents a radiation effect or a peculiarity of the chromophore used in the lenses tested

  1. Effects of molecular orientation in the laser ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xinhua Xie; Gerald Jordan; Christopher Ede; Armin Scrinzi

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Time-dependent electron momentum distributions are calculated during ionization of linear molecules by a strong laser pulse and upon recollision. For typical experimental laser parameters, we find a strong influence of molecular orientation and initial state symmetry on the total ionization rates and also on momentum distributions, compared to which the effect of electron correlation is less important for simple molecules. The dynamics of electron release and subsequent recollision with the parent ion largely determines the time-frequency structure of harmonic radiation, which underlies the generation of attosecond XUV pulses and the time-resolved imaging techniques for the electronic structure of molecules. In the present work, the effects of orientation and initial orbital symmetry are investigated by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a two-dimensional diatomic molecule in the single-active electron approximation. As in the presence of strong external fields recolliding electrons cannot be easily separated from bound electrons, the electron wave packet is probed at some distance from where all electrons can be safety considered as detached. We find that momentum distributions strongly depend on molecular size, orientation of the molecular axis, and node structure of the initial state. In order to determine the momentum spectra at the time of electron release and upon recollision, we classically propagate the Wigner distributions of probed wavepackets backward and forward in time, respectively. We find that the times of peak recollision current can vary strongly with the orientation of the molecule. Moreover, correlation effects on the electron spectra are included using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method. The calculations are performed in three spatial dimensions with the restriction to cylindrical symmetry, where the molecule is aligned with the laser field. Correlation is studied

  2. Effective elasticity coefficients of native rocks and consolidated granular matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Beatrix M.; Schulz, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The elastic coefficients of binary heterogeneous materials, such as several native rock materials or consolidated granular matter will be determined in terms of a perturbation expansion. Furthermore, in order to check the validity of the obtained results, these are compared with numerical investigations using Boole's model of randomly distributed spheres. Finally, we apply the results on several classes of native rocks and consolidated granular materials

  3. Training strategic community agents in health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Teresa C.S.B.; Silva, IIson P.M. da; Jannuzzi, Denise M.S.; Maurmo, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The main motivation for the development of training was the need to train agents (opinion makers) with proximity and credibility among the population, to clarify the most frequently asked questions in relation to ionizing radiation, the operation of nuclear power plants, emergency plans and about the possibility of there effects of radiation on the health of inhabitants in regions close to the central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto - CNAAA. The project has a target audience of 420 agents, 60 of them have already been trained in a pilot project . The results indicate that the topics of training were adequate and the agents have expanded their knowledge. On the other hand, the information passed on to communities by agents, recognized by this population as ' the most reliable people', is of greater credibility and likelihood of success in communicating important issues for the population living in the vicinity of the CNAAA. (author)

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included

  5. Effect of ionizing radiation on transmembrane potential of Streptococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Akoev, I.G.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of Streptococcus faecalis with ionizing radiation at doses of 5 to 100 krad is shown to reduce the energy-dependent accumulation of dibenzyldimethylammonium (DDA + ) by the cell. Since transmembrane potential is the moving force of DDA + transport across the membrane, the decrease in DDA + accumulation is suggested to be due to potential reduction. This radiation effect was not due to inactivation of the potential-generating mechanism; thus, the ATPase activity and glycolytic activity of the irradiated cells were higher than in the control. At the same time, the membranes exhibited an increased permeability for K + and protons, which is probably due to structural rearrangements in the membranes after irradiation. It is suggested that the potential reduction results from the increase in proton permeability of membranes

  6. Non controlled effect of ionizing radiations : involvement for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely accepted that damage to DNA is the critical event on irradiated cells, and that double strand breaks are the primary DNA lesions responsible for the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This has lead to the long standing paradigm that these effects, be they cytotoxicity, mutagenesis or malignant transformation, occur in irradiated cells as a consequences of the DNA damage they incur. Evidence has been accumulating over the past decade, however, to indicate that radiation may induce effects that ar not targeted to the irradiated cells itself. Two non-targeted effects will be described in this review. The first, radiation-induced genomic instability, is a phenomenon whereby signals are transmitted to the progeny of the irradiated cell over many generations, leading to the occurrence of genetic effects such as mutations and chromosomal aberrations arising in the distant descendants of the irradiated cell. Second, the bystander effect, is a phenomenon whereby irradiated cells transmit damage signals to non-irradiated cells in a mixed population, leading to genetic effects arising in these bystander cells that received no radiation exposure. the model system described in this review involves dense monolayer cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles. The potential implications of these two phenomena for the analysis of the risk to the human population of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation is discussed. (Author) 111 refs

  7. Characterization of ionizing radiation effects on human skin allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourroul, Selma Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The skin has a fundamental role in the viability of the human body. In the cases of extensive wounds, allograft skin provides an alternative to cover temporarily the damaged areas. After donor screening and preservation in glycerol (above 85%), the skin can be stored in the Skin Banks. The glycerol at this concentration has a bacteriostatic effect after certain time of preservation. On the other hand, skin sterilization by ionizing radiation may reduces the quarantine period for transplantation in patients and its safety is considered excellent. The objectives of this work were to establish procedures using two sources of ionizing radiation for sterilization of human skin allograft, and to evaluate the skin after gamma and electron beam irradiation. The analysis of stress-strain intended to verify possible effects of the radiation on the structure of preserved grafts. Skin samples were submitted to doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy in an irradiator of 60 Co and in an electron beam accelerator. Morphology and ultra-structure studies were also accomplished. The samples irradiated with a dose of 25 kGy seemed to maintain the bio mechanic characteristics. The gamma irradiated samples with a dose of 50 kGy and submitted to an electron beam at doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy presented significant differences in the values of the elasticity modulus, in relation to the control. The analysis of the ultramicrographies revealed modifications in the structure and alterations in the pattern of collagen fibrils periodicity of the irradiated samples. (author)

  8. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    M?ller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null...

  9. Studies of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of silica-based commercial glasses used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Sabina; Barua, Bijoy Sonker; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Chowdhury, Faruque-Uz-Zaman; Rashid, Md. Abdur; Bradley, David A.; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Kamal, Masud

    2018-06-01

    Following the rapid growing economy, the Bangladeshi dwellers are replacing their traditional (mud-, bamboo-, and wood-based) houses to modern multistoried buildings, where different types of glasses are being used as decorative as well as structural materials due to their various advantageous properties. In this study, we inquire the protective and dosimetric capability of commercial glasses for ionizing radiation. Four branded glass samples (PHP-Bangladesh, Osmania-Bangladesh, Nasir-Bangladesh, and Rider-China) of same thickness and color but different elemental weight fractions were analyzed for shielding and dosimetric properties. The chemical composition of the studied material was evaluated by EDX technique. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for 59 keV, 661 keV, 1173 keV and 1332 keV photon energies. A number of shielding parameters- half value layer (HVL), radiation protection efficiency (RPE) and effective atomic number (Zeff) were also evaluated. The data were compared with the available literature (where applicable) to understand its shielding capability relative to the standard materials such as lead. Among the studied brands, Rider (China) shows relatively better indices to be used as ionizing radiation shielding material. The obtained, Zeff of the studied glass samples showed comparable values to the TLD-200 dosimeter, thus considered suitable for environmental radiation monitoring purposes.

  10. Effect of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurdana, Mihaela; Cemazar, Maja; Pegan, Katarina; Mars, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Long term effects of different doses of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle myoblast proliferation, cytokine signalling and stress response capacity were studied in primary cell cultures. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts obtained from muscle biopsies were cultured and irradiated with a Darpac 2000 X-ray unit at doses of 4, 6 and 8 Gy. Acute effects of radiation were studied by interleukin – 6 (IL-6) release and stress response detected by the heat shock protein (HSP) level, while long term effects were followed by proliferation capacity and cell death. Compared with non-irradiated control and cells treated with inhibitor of cell proliferation Ara C, myoblast proliferation decreased 72 h post-irradiation, this effect was more pronounced with increasing doses. Post-irradiation myoblast survival determined by measurement of released LDH enzyme activity revealed increased activity after exposure to irradiation. The acute response of myoblasts to lower doses of irradiation (4 and 6 Gy) was decreased secretion of constitutive IL-6. Higher doses of irradiation triggered a stress response in myoblasts, determined by increased levels of stress markers (HSPs 27 and 70). Our results show that myoblasts are sensitive to irradiation in terms of their proliferation capacity and capacity to secret IL-6. Since myoblast proliferation and differentiation are a key stage in muscle regeneration, this effect of irradiation needs to be taken in account, particularly in certain clinical conditions

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on the human body are the consequences of biological ones. They have been observed from the first few years after the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity: between 1902 and 1907, 170 cases of various lesions attributable to radiation were described. The pathological manifestations which result from a radio-exposure are of two kinds: short-term effects which inevitably occur after certain thresholds have been exceeded. More often than not they are reversible, their severity being a function of the dose; and delayed effects, slowly evolving, apparently random, more often than not irreversible. Here it is not the severity but the probability of their appearance which is proportional to the dose. It is, at the present time, impossible statistically, to prove the existence or non-existence of thresholds for delayed effect; thus, in the fixing of norms, the ICRP has cautiously chosen the hypothesis of the absence of thresholds, assuming a linear dose/effect relationship. This has probably led to an over-estimation of the risks associated with weak doses. Radio-exposure can be total, affecting the entire body, or may be localized in all or part of a specific organ or tissue

  12. Mechanisms of poliovirus inactivation by the direct and indirect effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the effects of ionizing radiation on poliovirus particles when given under conditions where either direct (in broth) or indirect (in water) effects were predominant. Under direct conditions, inactivation of poliovirus was found to be due primarily to RNA damage, although capsid damage could account for about one-third of the viral inactivation. RNA damage did not appear to be due to strand breakage and therefore was probably caused primarily by base damage or crosslink formation. Capsid damage under direct irradiation conditions did not result in significant alterations of either the sedimentation coefficients or the isoelectric points of the poliovirus particles or detectable modification of the sizes of the viral proteins. It did, however, cause loss of availability to bind to host cells. Under indirect conditions no more than 25% of viral inactivation appeared to be due to RNA damage. However, the sedimentation coefficients and isoelectric points of the viral particles were greatly altered, and their abilities to bind to cells were lost at about three-fourths the rate of loss of infectivity. Capsid damage in this case did result in changes in the sizes of capsid proteins. Therefore, the majority of the radiation inactivation under indirect conditions appeared to be due to protein damage

  13. Ecological effects of exposure to enhanced levels of ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geras'kin, Stanislav A

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation of plants and animals can result in disruption of ecological relationships between the components of ecosystems. Such effects may act as triggers of perturbation and lead to consequences that may differ essentially from expected ones based on effects observed at the organismal level. Considerable differences in ecology and niches occupied by different species lead to substantial differences in doses of ionizing radiation absorbed by species, even when they all are present in the same environment at the same time. This is especially evident for contamination with α-emitting radionuclides. Radioactive contamination can be considered an ecological factor that is able to modify the resistance in natural populations. However, there are radioecological situations when elevated radioresistance does not evolve or persist. The complexity and non-linearity of the structure and functioning of ecosystems can lead to unexpected consequences of stress effects, which would appear harmless if they were assessed within the narrower context of organism-based traditional radioecology. Therefore, the use of ecological knowledge is essential for understanding responses of populations and ecosystems to radiation exposure. Integration of basic ecological principles in the design and implementation of radioecological research is essential for predicting radiation effects under rapidly changing environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of buffer ionization in protein transition volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung; Heerklotz, Heiko; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2010-05-01

    Protein denaturation events are generally associated with a change in the state of ionization of abnormally titrating groups and, therefore, are coupled with changes in buffer ionization/neutralization equilibria. Consequently, buffer ionization should influence the measured change in volume accompanying protein denaturation. Changes in volume accompanying protein denaturation reflect the differential packing and hydration of polypeptide chains in their native and denatured conformations while also describing the pressure stability of proteins. A characteristic feature of conformational transitions of globular proteins is a near zero change in volume that is comparable in magnitude with the volume of ionization of biologically relevant buffers. Thus, the impact of buffer ionization on the volume of protein denaturation could be very significant with the potential to affect not only its magnitude but also its sign. To investigate this point quantitatively, we performed pressure perturbation calorimetric (PPC) studies of lysozyme and ribonuclease A at pH 3.0 in four buffers differing in their ionization volumes. Our results identify buffer ionization as an important determinant of protein transition volume that needs to be carefully taken into account. We emphasize that the importance of our results is not limited to PPC measurements but is more general and applies to all volumetric investigations, in particular, extending to the derivation of the pressure-temperature phase diagram of protein stability.

  15. The influence of ultrasound on ionizing radiation effects, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Takeo; Fujita, Katsuzo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1976-01-01

    The effects of simultaneous administration of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co gamma-rays) and ultrasound (1 MHz, 3 W/cm 2 ) on normal tissues of the auricules and kidneys, of rabbits were examined. Irreversible damages of the auricules were obtained with simultaneous irradiation of 690 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and exposure to ultrasound for 15 minutes, but with only irradiation of 2760 R of 60 Co gamma-rays or only administration of ultrasound for 60 minutes, damages were reversible. In 5 of 6 kidneys, interstitial nephritis was demonstrated histopathologically after simultaneous administration of 200 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and ultrasound for 5 minutes. However, with each alone (600 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and ultrasound for 60 minutes) no detectable changes were found. The results obtained from these experiments suggest that the effect of simultaneous irradiation with 60 Co gamma-rays and exposure to ultrasound on normal tissues may be synergistic and that ultrasound may potentiate the effects of 60 Co gamma-rays. (Evans, J.)

  16. Ionizing radiation biological effects and the proper protective measures against it's harmful effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hhalel, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book intrduces a good knowledge in specifications of ionizing radiation biological effects and the proper protective measures againest harmful effectes. The book is devided in to five main sections, the first one introduces the hostorical bachground of the contributions of a number of scietists in the basic knolwledge of radiation and its biological effects. The second section deals with the physical and chemical principles of radiation the third one talks about radiation detection. While the fourth section talks (via seven chapter) about the effectes of ionizing radiation on living organisms molecules cells, tissues organs systems and the living organism the fifth section talks about the uses of radiation sources, the probability of radiation accidents, protective measures, international recommendations related to doses and safe use of ionizing radiation. (Abed Al-wali Al-ajlouni). 53 refs., 107 figs., 13 tabs

  17. Non-Ionizing Radiation - sources, exposure and health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hietanen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Non-ionizing radiation contains the electromagnetic wavelengths from ultraviolet (UV) radiation to static electric and magnetic fields. Optical radiation consists of UV, visible and infrared (IR) radiation while EM fields include static, extremely low (ELF), low frequency (LF) and radiofrequency (RF) fields. The principal scientific organization on non-ionizing radiation is the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The main activity of ICNIRP is to provide guidance on safe exposure and protection of workers and members of the public by issuing statements and recommendations. (orig.)

  18. Effective diffusion coefficient of radon in concrete, theory and method for field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culot, M.V.J.; Olson, H.G.; Schiager, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A linear diffusion model serves as the basis for determination of an effective radon diffusion coefficient in concrete. The coefficient was needed to later allow quantitative prediction of radon accumulation within and behind concrete walls after application of an impervious radon barrier. A resolution of certain discrepancies noted in the literature in the use of an effective diffusion coefficient to model diffusion of a radioactive gas through a porous medium is suggested. An outline of factors expected to affect the concrete physical structure and the effective diffusion coefficient of radon through it is also presented. Finally, a field method for evaluating effective radon diffusion coefficients in concrete is proposed and results of measurements performed on a concrete foundation wall are compared with similar published values of gas diffusion coefficients in concrete. (author)

  19. Problems linked to effects of ionizing radiations low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    The question of exposure to ionizing radiations low doses and risks existing for professional and populations has been asked again, with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) to lower the previous standards and agreed as guides to organize radiation protection, by concerned countries and big international organisms. The sciences academy presents an analysis which concerned on epidemiological and dosimetric aspects in risk estimation, on cellular and molecular aspects of response mechanism to irradiation. The observation of absence of carcinogen effects for doses inferior to 200 milli-sieverts and a re-evaluation of data coming from Nagasaki and Hiroshima, lead to revise the methodology of studies to pursue, to appreciate more exactly the effects of low doses, in taking in part, particularly, the dose rate. The progress of molecular and cellular biology showed that the extrapolation from high doses to low doses is not in accordance with actual data. The acknowledge of DNA repair and carcinogenesis should make clearer the debate. (N.C.). 61 refs., 9 annexes

  20. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  1. Salt effects on ionization equilibria of histidines in myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Y H; Fitch, C A; Bhattacharya, S; Sarkisian, C J; Lecomte, J T; García-Moreno E, B

    2000-09-01

    The salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in sperm whale and horse myoglobin and in histidine-containing peptides was measured by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Structure-based pK(a) calculations were performed with continuum methods to test their ability to capture the effects of solution conditions on pK(a) values. The measured pK(a) of most histidines, whether in the protein or in model compounds, increased by 0.3 pH units or more between 0.02 M and 1.5 M NaCl. In myoglobin two histidines (His(48) and His(36)) exhibited a shallower dependence than the average, and one (His(113)) showed a steeper dependence. The (1)H-NMR data suggested that the salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in the protein was determined primarily by the preferential stabilization of the charged form of histidine with increasing salt concentrations rather than by screening of electrostatic interactions. The magnitude and salt dependence of interactions between ionizable groups were exaggerated in pK(a) calculations with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann method applied to a static structure, even when the protein interior was treated with arbitrarily high dielectric constants. Improvements in continuum methods for calculating salt effects on pK(a) values will require explicit consideration of the salt dependence of model compound pK(a) values used for reference in the calculations.

  2. Effect of sunitinib combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haiping; Jiao Xiaodong; Li Rui; Wang Jiejun; Takayama, Koichi; Su Bo

    2011-01-01

    The aims of present study were to evaluate the efficacy of combining sunitinib with ionizing radiation (IR) on endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to IR with or without sunitinib pretreatment. Apoptosis assay and cell cycle distribution were analyzed by flow cytometry. Clonogenic survival assay at 3 Gy dose with or without sunitinib was performed. The activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signal pathway was detected by Western immunoblot. Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model was built to examine the effect of combination therapy on endothelial cells in vivo. Microvasculature changes were detected by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD31 antibody. Our results showed combination therapy of sunitinib and IR significantly increased apoptosis of endothelial cells and inhibited colony formation compared to sunitinib or radiotherapy alone. It also resulted in cell cycle redistribution (decreasing cells in S phase and increasing cells in G2/M phase). The activity of PI3K/Akt signal pathway was inhibited, which could be the potential mechanisms that account for the enhanced radiation response induced by sunitinib. In vivo analysis showed that combination therapy significantly decreased microvasculature formation. The results demonstrated that combination therapy of sunitinib and IR has the potential to increase the cytotoxic effects on endothelial cells. (author)

  3. Effect of the ionizing radiation in polyurethane of medical grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron, P.; Rivera, T.; Calderon, J. A.; Paredes, L.

    2011-10-01

    The polyurethane is a material broadly used in implant medical devices, such as the connection blocks of the pacemakers and the insulator of the electrodes. Some patients that are users of these devices possibly have the necessity to receive external radiotherapy. For that reason is necessary to know the effects induced by the ionizing radiation in this polymer. In this study samples of Pellethane 2363 80a (thermoplastic polyurethane of medical grade) were irradiated. It was used the same energy and absorbed dose of a treatment of external radiotherapy in pelvis, by means of a linear accelerator of X-rays of 6 MeV and absorbed dose of 60 Gy to isocenter. The irradiation corresponding to the gamma sterilization of the material was reproduced (1, 5, 7.5, 10 and 25 kGy for the Co 60) the effects induced by the radiotherapy and for the sterilization in the material were studied by means of an analysis of the chemical connection, the molecular structure and identification of the functional groups of the polymer, by means of the infrared spectroscopy by Fourier transform in the infrared half region. (Author)

  4. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P wall , P stem , and P cel ) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude of

  5. Effects of prenatal ionizing irradiation on neural function and behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizzee, K.R.; Ordy, J.M.; Pennwalt Corp., Rochester, NY

    1986-01-01

    Behavioral studies in the past decade on postnatal effects of prenatal ionizing irradiation (125-R) revealed alterations in circadian locomotor activity and modifications of duration, frequency and sequences of certain behavioral acts in irradiated rats. Other studies have shown that the effect of irradiation (150-R) and enriched environment were both significant in initial, repetitive and total error scores while at 200-R enrichment was less effective. Rats irradiated on the 13th, 14th and 15th day of gestation were born with a hopping gait, paired hind and forelimbs moving in unison. Thoracic cord section led to crossed extention hind-limb reflexes in control rats and simultaneus withdrawal of hind limbs in hopping rats, in response to pinprick. In 90 day old squirrel monkeys the percent of correct response in visual orientation, discrimination and reversal learning in 50- and 100-R offspring (Co 60 irradiation at 89-90 days gestation) were significantly lower than those of controls, and differences in reversal learning persisted undiminished at 2 years of age. Time required for body righting, head-up orientation and climbing at 45 0 incline was significantly greater in irradiated (mainly 100-R) than control animals at from 2 to 28 days of age. Visual acuity levels of 50- and 100-R 30 day old infants were significantly lower than in control infants. Stabilimeter activity in the dark was significantly higher in 50- and 100-R 30 day old infants than in controls. In the squirrel monkey studies effects of Co 60 irradiation (100-R) on postnatal development of the brain and behaviour can be identified at statistically significant levels of confidence independent of offspring nursery rearing effects. (orig.)

  6. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Broock, M. van; Gillette, V.H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  7. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  8. Effect of reorientation of anisotropic point defects on relaxation of crystal elastic coefficients of high order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topchyan, I.I.; Dokhner, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of reorientation of anisotropic point defects in uniform fields of elastic stresses on the relaxation of the elastic coefficients of a crystal was investigated in the nonlinear elasticity theory approximation. In calculating the interaction of point defects with elastic-stress fields was taken into consideration. The expression for the relaxations of the elasticity coefficients are obtained in an analytical form. The relaxation of the second-order elasticity coefficients is due to the dimentional interaction of a point defect with an applied-stress field, whereas the relaxation of the higher-order elasticity coefficients is determined both by dimentional and module effects

  9. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  10. Effects of the ionizing radiation in natural food colours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosentino, Helio Morrone

    2005-01-01

    The world's fast growing population and its consequent increase in demand for food has driven mankind into improving technologies which ensure a safer supply of such commodities. Both food radiation processing and its constituents are highlighted as a feasible alternative technique capable of meeting food safety standards. Natural dyes are extensively employed in the food industry thanks to their colour enhancing properties on food products. This paper has aimed at studying the effects of ionizing radiation on three natural dyes: carminic acid and its derivatives (cochineal dyes), bixine and its salts (annatto dyes) and curcumin (turmeric dyes), used in the food and cosmetic industries within dilutions and doses those goods might eventually be processed in. It also envisages clarifying the compatibility of the irradiation technique with the keeping of such relevant sensorial attribute which is the product colour. Spectrophotometry and capillary electrophoresis were the analytic methods employed. All in all, a colour decrease proportional to the increase on the applied gamma radiation (1 to 32 kGy) has been observed. The annatto dyes have proven moderately stable whereas turmeric has shown to be highly sensitive to radiation. Those results shall be taken into account as far as the need to alter the formulae additive amount in the product is concerned whenever undergoing radiation processing. (author)

  11. Model of comet comae. II. Effects of solar photodissociative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Giguere, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to our computer model of coma plotochemistry are described. These include an expansion of the chemical reactions network and new rate constants that have been measured only recently. Photolytic reactions of additional molecules are incorporated, and photolytic branching ratios are treated in far greater detail than in our previous work. A total of 25 photodissociative ionization (PDI) reactions are now considered (as compared to only 3 PDI reactions previously). Solar PDI of the mother molecule CO 2 is shown to compete effectively with photoionization of CO in the production of observed CO + . The CO + density peak predicted by our improved model, for COP 2 or CO mother molecules, is deep in the inner coma, in better agreement with observation than our old CO 2 model. However, neither CO 2 nor CO mother molecule calculations reproduce the CO + /H 2 O + ratio observed in comet Kohoutek. PDI products of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , and NH 3 mother molecules fuel a complex chemistry scheme, producing inner coma abundances of CN, C 2 , and C 3 much greater than previously calculated

  12. Modeling Natural Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on External Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  13. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation results in biological damage that differs from other hazardous substances and is highly dangerous to man. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by man's sense organs and the biological damage cannot be detected immediately afterwards (except in very high doses). Every human being is exposed to low doses of radiation. The structure of the atom; sources of ionizing radiation; radiation units; biological effects; norms for radiation protection; and the national control in South Africa are discussed. 1 fig., 5 refs

  14. Health and biological effects of non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Seze, R.; Souques, M.; Aurengo, A.; Bach, V.; Burais, N.; Cesarini, J.P.; Cherin, A.; Decobert, V.; Dubois, G.; Hours, M.; Lagroye, I.; Leveque, Ph.; Libert, J.P.; Lombard, J.; Loos, N.; Mir, L.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Thuroczy, G.; Wiart, J.; Lehericy, St.; Pelletier, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Douki, Th.; Guibal, F.; Tordjman, I.; Gaillot de Saintignon, J.; Collard, J.F.; Scoretti, R.; Magne, I.; Veyret, B.; Katrib, J.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day on the biological and health effects of non-ionizing radiations. Sixteen presentations out of 17 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - NMR: biological effects and implications of Directive 2004/40 on electromagnetic fields (S. Lehericy); 2 - impact of RF frequencies from mobile telephone antennas on body homeostasis (A. Pelletier); 3 - expression of stress markers in the brain and blood of rats exposed in-utero to a Wi-Fi signal (I. Lagroye); 4 - people exposure to electromagnetic waves: the challenge of variability and the contribution of statistics to dosimetry (J. Wiart); 5 - status of knowledge about electromagnetic fields hyper-sensitivity (J.P. Marc-Vergnes; 6 - geno-toxicity of UV radiation: respective impact of UVB and UVA (T. Douki); 7 - National day of prevention and screening for skin cancers (F. Guibal); 8 - UV tan devices: status of knowledge about cancer risks (I. Tordjman, and J. Gaillot de Saintignon); 9 - modulation of brain activity during a tapping task after exposure to a 3000 μT magnetic field at 60 Hz (M. Souques and A. Legros); 10 - calculation of ELF electromagnetic fields in the human body by the finite elements method (R. Scoretti); 11 - French population exposure to the 50 Hz magnetic field (I. Magne); 12 - LF and static fields, new ICNIRP recommendations: what has changed, what remains (B. Veyret); 13 - risk assessment of low energy lighting systems - DELs and CFLs (J.P. Cesarini); 14 - biological effects to the rat of a chronic exposure to high power microwaves (R. De Seze); 15 - theoretical and experimental electromagnetic compatibility approaches of active medical implants in the 10-50 Hz frequency range: the case of implantable cardiac defibrillators (J. Katrib); French physicians and electromagnetic fields (M. Souques). (J.S.)

  15. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  16. Effect of flow rate on the adsorption coefficient of radioactive krypton on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.S.C.; Underhill, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    For some time, there have been questions relative to the effect of carrier gas velocity on the adsorption coefficient for radioactive noble gases on activated charcoal. Resolution of these questions is particularly important in terms of developing standard procedures for determining such coefficients under laboratory conditions. Studies at the Harvard Air Cleaning Laboratory appear to confirm that the adsorption coefficient for radioactive krypton on activated charcoal is independent of the velocity of the carrier gas

  17. Space charge effect measurements for a multi-channel ionization chamber used for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, Amgad

    2012-01-01

    In vivo coronary angiography is one of the techniques used to investigate the heart diseases, by using catheter to inject a contrast medium of a given absorption coefficient into the heart vessels. Taking X-ray images produced by X-ray tube or synchrotron radiation for visualizing the blood in the coronary arteries. As the synchrotron radiation generated by the relativistic charged particle at the bending magnets, which emits high intensity photons in comparison with the X-ray tube. The intensity of the synchrotron radiation is varies with time. However for medical imaging it's necessary to measure the incoming intensity with the integrated time. The thesis work includes building a Multi-channel ionization chamber which can be filled with noble gases N 2 , Ar and Xe with controlled inner pressure up to 30 bar. This affects the better absorption efficiency in measuring the high intensity synchrotron beam fluctuation. The detector is a part of the experimental setup used in the k-edge digital subtraction angiography project, which will be used for correcting the angiography images taken by another detector at the same time. The Multi-channel ionization chamber calibration characteristics are measured using 2 kW X-ray tube with molybdenum anode with characteristic energy of 17.44 keV. According to the fast drift velocity of the electrons relative to the positive ions, the electrons will be collected faster at the anode and will induce current signals, while the positive ions is still drifting towards the cathode. However the accumulation of the slow ions inside the detector disturbs the homogeneous applied electric field and leads to what is known a space charge effect. In this work the space charge effect is measured with very high synchrotron photons intensity from EDR beam line at BESSYII. The strong attenuation in the measured amplitude signal occurs when operating the chamber in the recombination region. A plateau is observed at the amplitude signal when

  18. Space charge effect measurements for a multi-channel ionization chamber used for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Amgad

    2012-07-18

    In vivo coronary angiography is one of the techniques used to investigate the heart diseases, by using catheter to inject a contrast medium of a given absorption coefficient into the heart vessels. Taking X-ray images produced by X-ray tube or synchrotron radiation for visualizing the blood in the coronary arteries. As the synchrotron radiation generated by the relativistic charged particle at the bending magnets, which emits high intensity photons in comparison with the X-ray tube. The intensity of the synchrotron radiation is varies with time. However for medical imaging it's necessary to measure the incoming intensity with the integrated time. The thesis work includes building a Multi-channel ionization chamber which can be filled with noble gases N{sub 2}, Ar and Xe with controlled inner pressure up to 30 bar. This affects the better absorption efficiency in measuring the high intensity synchrotron beam fluctuation. The detector is a part of the experimental setup used in the k-edge digital subtraction angiography project, which will be used for correcting the angiography images taken by another detector at the same time. The Multi-channel ionization chamber calibration characteristics are measured using 2 kW X-ray tube with molybdenum anode with characteristic energy of 17.44 keV. According to the fast drift velocity of the electrons relative to the positive ions, the electrons will be collected faster at the anode and will induce current signals, while the positive ions is still drifting towards the cathode. However the accumulation of the slow ions inside the detector disturbs the homogeneous applied electric field and leads to what is known a space charge effect. In this work the space charge effect is measured with very high synchrotron photons intensity from EDR beam line at BESSYII. The strong attenuation in the measured amplitude signal occurs when operating the chamber in the recombination region. A plateau is observed at the amplitude signal when

  19. Ionization waves caused by the effects of a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kosuke; Imazu, Shingo

    1980-01-01

    The self-excited ionization waves was observed in the Ne positive column. The experiments were made for Ne gas from 0.07 to 1.0 Torr, with the magnetic field from 0 to 3.33 kG. The discharge current were 10 to 300 mA. The longitudinal magnetic field was made by an air-core solenoid coil. The axial electric field was measured by two wall probes. The frequency, wave length and amplitude of waves were measured with a photo multiplier. It was found that the longitudinal magnetic field caused new self-excited ionization waves. The frequency of these waves decreased monotonously with increasing field. The behaviors of the wave length and amplitude were complicate, and the cause of these phenomena is related to the ionization waves due to the spatial resonance of electron gas, namely s-waves, p-waves and fluid γ-waves. The threshold of the magnetic field to cause the ionization waves increased with increasing gas pressure, and with decreasing discharge current in the range 0.07 to 0.44 Torr. The frequency of the self-excited ionization waves occurred at zero field was almost constant in the field-frequency relation. A simple dispersion equation was derived, and the Novak constant can be introduced. (J.P.N.)

  20. Biomarker- and similarity coefficient-based approaches to bacterial mixture characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Smart, Sonja; Sandrin, Todd R

    2015-11-05

    MALDI-TOF MS profiling has been shown to be a rapid and reliable method to characterize pure cultures of bacteria. Currently, there is keen interest in using this technique to identify bacteria in mixtures. Promising results have been reported with two- or three-isolate model systems using biomarker-based approaches. In this work, we applied MALDI-TOF MS-based methods to a more complex model mixture containing six bacteria. We employed: 1) a biomarker-based approach that has previously been shown to be useful in identification of individual bacteria in pure cultures and simple mixtures and 2) a similarity coefficient-based approach that is routinely and nearly exclusively applied to identification of individual bacteria in pure cultures. Both strategies were developed and evaluated using blind-coded mixtures. With regard to the biomarker-based approach, results showed that most peaks in mixture spectra could be assigned to those found in spectra of each component bacterium; however, peaks shared by two isolates as well as peaks that could not be assigned to any individual component isolate were observed. For two-isolate blind-coded samples, bacteria were correctly identified using both similarity coefficient- and biomarker-based strategies, while for blind-coded samples containing more than two isolates, bacteria were more effectively identified using a biomarker-based strategy.

  1. Effective electron recombination coefficient in ionospheric D-region during the relaxation regime after solar flare from February 18, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nina, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Cadez, V. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Sulic, D., E-mail: dsulic@ipb.ac.rs [Faculty of Ecology and Environmental Protection, Union - Nikola Tesla University, Cara Dusana 62, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sreckovic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Zigman, V. [University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 13, Rona Dolina, SI-5000 Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a model for determination of a weakly time dependent effective recombination coefficient for the perturbed terrestrial ionospheric D-region plasma. We study consequences of a class M1.0 X-ray solar flare, recorded by GOES-15 satellite on February 18, 2011 between 14:00 and 14:15 UT, by analyzing the amplitude and phase real time variations of very low frequency (VLF) radio waves emitted by transmitter DHO (located in Germany) at frequency 23.4 kHz and recorded by the AWESOME receiver in Belgrade (Serbia). Our analysis is limited to ionospheric perturbations localized at altitudes around 70 km where the dominant electron gain and electron loss processes are the photo-ionization and recombination, respectively.

  2. Effective electron recombination coefficient in ionospheric D-region during the relaxation regime after solar flare from February 18, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nina, A.; Čadež, V.; Šulić, D.; Srećković, V.; Žigman, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model for determination of a weakly time dependent effective recombination coefficient for the perturbed terrestrial ionospheric D-region plasma. We study consequences of a class M1.0 X-ray solar flare, recorded by GOES-15 satellite on February 18, 2011 between 14:00 and 14:15 UT, by analyzing the amplitude and phase real time variations of very low frequency (VLF) radio waves emitted by transmitter DHO (located in Germany) at frequency 23.4 kHz and recorded by the AWESOME receiver in Belgrade (Serbia). Our analysis is limited to ionospheric perturbations localized at altitudes around 70 km where the dominant electron gain and electron loss processes are the photo-ionization and recombination, respectively.

  3. Studies of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of silica-based commercial glasses used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Yasmin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the rapid growing economy, the Bangladeshi dwellers are replacing their traditional (mud-, bamboo-, and wood-based houses to modern multistoried buildings, where different types of glasses are being used as decorative as well as structural materials due to their various advantageous properties. In this study, we inquire the protective and dosimetric capability of commercial glasses for ionizing radiation. Four branded glass samples (PHP-Bangladesh, Osmania-Bangladesh, Nasir-Bangladesh, and Rider-China of same thickness and color but different elemental weight fractions were analyzed for shielding and dosimetric properties. The chemical composition of the studied material was evaluated by EDX technique. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for 59 keV, 661 keV, 1173 keV and 1332 keV photon energies. A number of shielding parameters- half value layer (HVL, radiation protection efficiency (RPE and effective atomic number (Zeff were also evaluated. The data were compared with the available literature (where applicable to understand its shielding capability relative to the standard materials such as lead. Among the studied brands, Rider (China shows relatively better indices to be used as ionizing radiation shielding material. The obtained, Zeff of the studied glass samples showed comparable values to the TLD-200 dosimeter, thus considered suitable for environmental radiation monitoring purposes. Keywords: Silica-based commercial glass, HPGe γ-ray spectrometry, EDX analyses, Shielding effectiveness, Dosimetric properties

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on food packaging materials and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welle, F.; Franz, R.

    1999-01-01

    Tests have shown that ionizing radiation induces a characteristic smell in the packaging laminates which also affects the simulated foods used, which however were relatively neutral in flavour, so that the tests represent the worst case. The paper explains that due to the various additives used in the production of the plastic packaging materials, the same types of polymers may react differently to the ionizing radiation, so that the results obtained from the tests are not suitable for general application. It is recommended to very carefully select the suitable packaging material for given foods and intended irradiation processes. Aspects of particular importance are discusses. (orig./CB) [de

  5. Effect of ionization on the oxidation kinetics of aluminum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yao-Ting; He, Min; Cheng, Guang-xu; Zhang, Zaoxiao; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Wang, Zhengdong

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) of the observed stepwise oxidation of core-shell structured Al/Al2O3 nanoparticles is presented. Different from the metal ion hopping process in the Cabrera-Mott model, which is assumed to occur only at a certain distance from the oxide layer, the MD simulation shows that Al atoms jump over various interfacial gaps directly under the thermal driving force. The energy barrier for Al ionization is found to be increased along with the enlargement of interfacial gap. A mechanism of competition between thermal driving force and ionization potential barrier is proposed in the interpretation of stepwise oxidation behavior.

  6. Electron-impact ionization of atomic ions: Theoretical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loch, S D; Burgos, J M Munoz; Ballance, C P; Ludlow, J; Lee, T-G; Fogle, M; Pindzola, M S [Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Griffin, D C [Rollins College, Winter Park, FL 32789 (United States); Yumak, A; Yavuz, I; Altun, Z, E-mail: loch@physics.auburn.ed [Marmara University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    A brief overview is given of theoretical results for electron-impact ionization of atoms and ions. A description is given of the main theoretical methods, along with the databases where the data are archived. It is shown that for light species, ground and metastable ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with experiment when non-perturbative data are used for the near neutrals and distorted wave data are used for ions greater than a few times ionized. Some discrepancies between theory and experiment still remain for systems with open d and open p subshells. The sensitivity of ionization rate coefficients to the near threshold part of the ionization cross section is shown. The role of excited states in effective ionization rate coefficients is demonstrated and recent excited state ionization cross section results for H, He, He{sup +}, B{sup 2+} and Ne are presented.

  7. The apparent and effective chloride migration coefficients obtained in migration tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The apparent (Dapp) and effective (Deff) migration coefficients obtained in chloride migration tests are investigated in this study. The presented Dapp profiles in concrete show that the apparent migration coefficient is strongly concentration-dependent. As demonstrated, the binding of chlorides is

  8. The study of the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on birth weight of newborns to exposed mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Shirazi, K. R.; Mortazavi, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Life evolved in an environment filled with a wide variety of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. It was previously reported that medical exposures to pregnant women increases the risk of low birth weight. This study intends to investigate the relationship between exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and the risk of low birth weight. Materials and Methods: One thousand two hundred mothers with their first-term labor (vaginal or cesarean) whose newborns? history had been...

  9. Effect of fuel burnup on the mechanical safety coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyashkevich, V.Ju.; Sidorenko, V.D.; Shishkov, L.K.

    2001-01-01

    )In the paper the results of studies of changes in the process of campaign 'disturbances' of local heat flux and local fuel burnup, resulting from the 'mechanical' deviations in the composition and geometrical characteristics of fuel rods from the nominal are given. As example, the WWER-440 fuel assembly with burnable poisons used in the five-year fuel cycle is considered. The effect of deviations in fuel enrichment, fuel content, gadolinium content and geometrical size was studied (Authors)

  10. Transport coefficients of Dirac ferromagnet: Effects of vertex corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Junji

    2018-03-01

    As a strongly spin-orbit-coupled metallic model with ferromagnetism, we have considered an extended Stoner model to the relativistic regime, named Dirac ferromagnet in three dimensions. In a previous paper [J. Fujimoto and H. Kohno, Phys. Rev. B 90, 214418 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.214418], we studied the transport properties giving rise to the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) with the impurity potential being taken into account only as the self-energy. The effects of the vertex corrections (VCs) to AMR and AHE are reported in this paper. AMR is found not to change quantitatively when the VCs are considered, although the transport lifetime is different from the one-electron lifetime and the charge current includes additional contributions from the correlation with spin currents. The side-jump and the skew-scattering contributions to AHE are also calculated. The skew-scattering contribution is dominant in the clean case as can be seen in the spin Hall effect in the nonmagnetic Dirac electron system.

  11. Biological effects of very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with a qualitative microdosimetric analysis of a new radiobiological phenomenon (physiological reaction of the cell as a whole to very low doses of ionizing radiations). The analysis is aimed at identifying the type of the primary interaction of radiation with the cell and finding its place in the cell

  12. The effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-11-01

    In the summer of 1970, the Federal Radiation Council (whose activities have since been transferred to the Radiation Office of the EPA) asked the National Academy of Sciences for information relevant to an evaluation of present radiation protection guides. This report is in response to that request. It presents a summary and analysis, by members of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and its subcommittees, of current knowledge relating to risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. In many respects, the report is a sequel to the reports of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation, published by the NAS-NRC from 1956 to 1961

  13. The effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-11-01

    In the summer of 1970, the Federal Radiation Council (whose activities have since been transferred to the Radiation Office of the EPA) asked the National Academy of Sciences for information relevant to an evaluation of present radiation protection guides. This report is in response to that request. It presents a summary and analysis, by members of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and its subcommittees, of current knowledge relating to risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. In many respects, the report is a sequel to the reports of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation, published by the NAS-NRC from 1956 to 1961.

  14. Long-term biological effects induced by ionizing radiation--implications for dose mediated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, S D; Astărăstoae, V

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are considered to be risk agents that are responsible for the effects on interaction with living matter. The occurring biological effects are due to various factors such as: dose, type of radiation, exposure time, type of biological tissue, health condition and the age of the person exposed. The mechanisms involved in the direct modifications of nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA are reviewed. Classical target theory of energy deposition in the nucleus that causes DNA damages, in particular DNA double-strand breaks and that explanation of the biological consequences of ionizing radiation exposure is a paradigm in radiobiology. Recent experimental evidences have demonstrated the existence of a molecular mechanism that explains the non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation exposure. Among these novel data, genomic instability and a variety of bystander effects are discussed here. Those bystander effects of ionizing radiation are fulfilled by cellular communication systems that give rise to non-targeted effects in the neighboring non irradiated cells. This paper provides also a commentary on the synergistic effects induced by the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and various physical agents such as electromagnetic fields and the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and chemical environmental contaminants such as metals. The biological effects of multiple stressors on genomic instability and bystander effects are also discussed. Moreover, a brief presentation of the methods used to characterize cyto- and genotoxic damages is offered.

  15. Human exposure to non-ionizing radiation and potential adverse health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulevic, B.; Maric, B.; Zivkovic, D.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of protection from the non-ionizing radiation has presented an actual subject in the last twenty years both worldwide and in our country. Great attention has been paid to this problem throughout the world and there is not almost a field of human activities that disregards the effect of non-ionizing radiation to the human health.The object of this work is to point concisely, on the basis of numerous domestic and foreign referential data, to the potential adverse health effects caused by uncontrolled exposure to non-ionizing radiation. (author)

  16. The linear non threshold conception 'Dose-effect' as a base for standardization of human exposure to ionizing radiation. Arguments pro and con

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.

    2000-01-01

    Examples and argument are presented for reconsidering of the application of the threshold conception in low dose risk assessment. Some of the reasons mentioned are: inapplicability of the quantity 'collective dose' for low doses; serious reassessment of risk coefficients for radiation mutagenesis; report on increasing data on the so called hormesis - stimulation and potential effects from exposure of test animals nas humans to low doses of ionizing radiation

  17. Effects of autoionizing states on two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Koesterke, Lars; Schneider, Barry I

    2014-01-01

    We report angle-resolved and angle-integrated cross sections for two-photon double-ionization of H by a strong laser pulse. The effect of doubly excited states on the predicted cross sections is addressed.

  18. Multi-fluid Modeling of Magnetosonic Wave Propagation in the Solar Chromosphere: Effects of Impact Ionization and Radiative Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Laguna, Alejandro Alvarez; Poedts, Stefaan [Department of Mathematics, Center for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Catholic University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lani, Andrea, E-mail: yana.maneva@ws.kuleuven.be, E-mail: stefaan.poedts@wis.kuleuven.be, E-mail: alejandro.alvarez.laguna@vki.ac.be, E-mail: lani@vki.ac.be [von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, CFD group, Aeronautics and Aerospace, Rhode Saint-Genèse (Belgium)

    2017-02-20

    In order to study chromospheric magnetosonic wave propagation including, for the first time, the effects of ion–neutral interactions in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, we have developed a new multi-fluid computational model accounting for ionization and recombination reactions in gravitationally stratified magnetized collisional media. The two-fluid model used in our 2D numerical simulations treats neutrals as a separate fluid and considers charged species (electrons and ions) within the resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskiis transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations and the solenoidality of the magnetic field is enforced with a hyperbolic divergence-cleaning scheme. The initial density and temperature profiles are similar to VAL III chromospheric model in which dynamical, thermal, and chemical equilibrium are considered to ensure comparison to existing MHD models and avoid artificial numerical heating. In this initial setup we include simple homogeneous flux tube magnetic field configuration and an external photospheric velocity driver to simulate the propagation of MHD waves in the partially ionized reactive chromosphere. In particular, we investigate the loss of chemical equilibrium and the plasma heating related to the steepening of fast magnetosonic wave fronts in the gravitationally stratified medium.

  19. Anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, I.P.; Mamontov, A.P.; Botaki, A.A.; Cherdantsev, P.A.; Chakhlov, B.V.; Sharov, S.R.; Timoshnikov, Yu.A.; Filipenko, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of small doses of 60 Co gamma rays on copper, tungsten, and WCo alloys has been investigated. A decrease in the concentration of material defects under the influence of small doses of ionizing radiation was found. Also the structural rearrangement of the crystal was found to be still in progress after irradiation ceased. The mechanism of the anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys is discussed in terms of the electron energy scheme. (U.K.)

  20. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  1. Effect of ionizing radiation on humoral and cellular immunity in pigs vaccinated against Aujeszky's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartoszcze, M.; Roszkowski, J.

    1991-01-01

    An effect of ionizing radiation on the immune response in pigs of both sexes weighing 35 kg vaccinated with an attenuated Aujeszky's disease virus was investigated. Ionizing radiation in a dose of 200 or 400 r reduced the number of IgM and IgG antibodies produced in vaccinated pigs. Additionally, the 400 r dose delyed the cellular immune response. No effect of the radiation on a clinical course of postvaccinal reaction was found

  2. Effective stresses and shear failure pressure from in situ Biot's coefficient, Hejre Field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regel, Jeppe Bendix; Orozova-Bekkevold, Ivanka; Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2017-01-01

    , is significantly different from 1. The log-derived Biot's coefficient is above 0.8 in the Shetland Chalk Group and in the Tyne Group, and 0.6-0.8 in the Heno Sandstone Formation. We show that the effective vertical and horizontal stresses obtained using the log-derived Biot's coefficient result in a drilling......We propose a combination of Biot's equations for effective stress and the expression for shear failure in a rock to obtain an expression for minimum pore pressure in a stable vertical well bore. We show that a Biot's coefficient calculated from logging data in the Hejre Field, North Sea...

  3. Effective diffusion coefficients of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O in several porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Y [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kumaki, T

    1976-12-01

    Diffusion coefficients of radionuclides in some porous structural materials and porous components of earth stratum are important as the basis for the safety evaluation of the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. In our previous works, the method of analysis and experiment using a permeative type diffusion cell for measurement of effective diffusion coefficient was established, and experimental results were reported. In this paper, effective diffusion coefficients of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O in mortar, concrete, brick, clay layer, and sand layer were measured, and characteristics of these pore structure were discussed on the basis of tourtusity factor.

  4. Effective diffusion coefficients of 3H2O in several porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Yutaka; Kumaki, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of radionuclides in some porous structural materials and porous components of earth stratum are important as the basis for the safety evaluation of the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. In our previous works, the method of analysis and experiment using a permeative type diffusion cell for measurement of effective diffusion coefficient was established, and experimental results were reported. In this paper, effective diffusion coefficients of 3 H 2 O in mortar, concrete, brick, clay layer, and sand layer were measured, and characteristics of these pore structure were discussed on the basis of tourtusity factor. (auth.)

  5. Effect of the refraction factor of a plastic fiber shell on the internal reflection coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pkrksypkin, A.I.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1992-01-01

    Results of pilot studies of the effect of refraction factor of plastic fiber shell on the coefficient of light internal reflection in the fiber are presented. It is pointed, that the shell does not absorb the light, but effects the surface layer of the fiber centre so, that dependence of the coefficient of internal reflection on refraction factor of the shell may be described using Fresnel formulae. It is shown, that coefficient of internal reflection decreases with the increase of refraction factor. Technique to determine volume length of scintillation light absorption in the fiber is suggested

  6. Spatial dispersion effects in spectral line broadening by pressure. I. The Bouguer Law and absorption coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasov, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the general principles of semiclassical electrodynamics, the Bouguer law is derived, and the expression for the absorption coefficient is obtained, formally including all effects related to the phenomenon of spatial dispersion

  7. Effect of ionizing radiation on advanced life support medications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, D.J.; Hubbard, L.B.; Broadbent, M.V.; Stewart, P.; Jaeger, M.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced life support medications stored in emergency department stretcher areas, diagnostic radiology rooms, and radiotherapy suites are exposed to ionizing radiation. We hypothesized that radiation may decrease the potency and thus the shelf life of medications stored in these areas. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were exposed to a wide range of ionizing radiation. The potency of the four drugs was unaffected by levels of radiation found in ED stretcher areas and high-volume diagnostic radiograph rooms (eg, chest radiograph, computed tomography, fluoroscopy). The potency of atropine may be reduced by gamma radiation in high-use radiotherapy suites. However, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were unaffected by high doses of gamma radiation. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol may be safely kept in ED stretcher areas and diagnostic radiology rooms without loss of potency over the shelf life of the drugs

  8. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilia Anisa, Nor; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10-11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10-11 m2/s.

  9. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisa, Nor Ilia; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10 −11 m 2 /s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10 −11 m 2 /s.

  10. Effect of retardation coefficient for radionuclide migration on assessment results of environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiming

    2004-01-01

    Environmental impact report is an important content in enforcing environmental impact assessment system. Effect of retardation coefficient used in models of radionuclide migration in geological media on the calculated results of maximum concentration of calculated points at the lower reaches is discussed in this paper. It is shown from experimental results that the retardation coefficient is not a constant. And it is shown from calculated results that retardation coefficient obviously affect the calculated results of maximum concentration of calculated point at the lower reaches. Conservation level of the assessment results would considerably be affected, and hence confidence level of results would be affected if the aspects are not paid enough attention and solved. The paper suggests that retardation coefficient used in migration models should directly be obtained by measurement in the field or in column, rather than using the result derived from distribution coefficients according to some formula in order to prevent the nonconservative results

  11. Ionizing radiation, radiation sources, radiation exposure, radiation effects. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 deals with radiation exposure due to artificial radiation sources. The article describes X-ray diagnosis complete with an analysis of major methods, nuclear-medical diagnosis, percutaneous radiation therapy, isotope therapy, radiation from industrial generation of nucler energy and other sources of ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the authors attempt to asses total dose, genetically significant dose and various hazards of total radiation exposure by means of a summation of all radiation impacts. (orig./WU) [de

  12. Study of ionizing radiation effect on human spermatozoa chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseaux, S.

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the radio-induced chromosomal aberrations in spermatozoa. After a brief recall on ionizing radiations, the author reviews the radio-induced chromosomal anomalies on somatic cells and on germinal line cells and spermatozoa. The author presents the technical aspects of human spermatozoa karyotype and finally studies the radio induced chromosomal anomalies of sperm to patients undergoing a radiotherapy. 13 tabs., 28 figs., 28 photos

  13. X-RAY SIGNATURES OF NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION EFFECTS IN GALAXY CLUSTER ACCRETION SHOCK REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Sarazin, Craig L.; Ji Li

    2011-01-01

    The densities in the outer regions of clusters of galaxies are very low, and the collisional timescales are very long. As a result, heavy elements will be under-ionized after they have passed through the accretion shock. We have studied systematically the effects of non-equilibrium ionization for relaxed clusters in the ΛCDM cosmology using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. We found that non-equilibrium ionization effects do not depend on cluster mass, but depend strongly on redshift which can be understood by self-similar scaling arguments. The effects are stronger for clusters at lower redshifts. We present X-ray signatures such as surface brightness profiles and emission lines in detail for a massive cluster at low redshift. In general, soft emission (0.3-1.0 keV) is enhanced significantly by under-ionization, and the enhancement can be nearly an order of magnitude near the shock radius. The most prominent non-equilibrium ionization signature we found is the O VII and O VIII line ratio. The ratios for non-equilibrium ionization and collisional ionization equilibrium models are different by more than an order of magnitude at radii beyond half of the shock radius. These non-equilibrium ionization signatures are equally strong for models with different non-adiabatic shock electron heating efficiencies. We have also calculated the detectability of the O VII and O VIII lines with the future International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Depending on the line ratio measured, we conclude that an exposure of ∼130-380 ks on a moderate-redshift, massive regular cluster with the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) on the IXO will be sufficient to provide a strong test for the non-equilibrium ionization model.

  14. Relative effectiveness of ionizing radiations in relation to LET and the influence of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1966-01-01

    For the investigation of the mechanism by which effects of ionizing radiations in living cells are initiated an important consideration is the comparison of responses caused by radiations which differ with regard to their ionization density. Many biological effects of ionizing radiations on living cells and organisms are produced more efficiently by radiations with a high as compared with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The assumption has generally been made that the nature and yield of ionizations and excitations produced by ionizing particles in biological material depend only to a relatively small extent on the charge and energy of the particles. Consequently differences in effectiveness per unit dose between various radiations must be due to differences in the spatial distributions of the ionizations produced in the irradiated objects. he high relative effectiveness of densely as compared with sparsely ionizing radiations, observed for various biological systems, implies that interaction occurs between primary effects of ionizations, e. g. chemical changes of various molecules produced close together, and that this interaction is required for, or at least enhances, the production of biological damage. As discussed previously by Pollard, Howard-Flanders and Brustad for inactivation of enzymes and reproductive death of bacteria and yeast cells, investigations of the relation between the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and LET may provide information about the number of ionizations which are required and the dimensions of the value in which the effects must be produced to initiate the sequence of biophysical, biochemical and biological changes which finally results in the observed effect, e.g. death of a cell. This type of analysis has also been applied to data obtained from irradiations of cultured human cells with α-particles and deuterons of different energies (Barendsen). An important characteristic of any interpretation of radiobiological

  15. Friction coefficient and effective interference at the implant-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Niklas B; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E

    2015-09-18

    Although the contact pressure increases during implantation of a wedge-shaped implant, friction coefficients tend to be measured under constant contact pressure, as endorsed in standard procedures. Abrasion and plastic deformation of the bone during implantation are rarely reported, although they define the effective interference, by reducing the nominal interference between implant and bone cavity. In this study radial forces were analysed during simulated implantation and explantation of angled porous and polished implant surfaces against trabecular bone specimens, to determine the corresponding friction coefficients. Permanent deformation was also analysed to determine the effective interference after implantation. For the most porous surface tested, the friction coefficient initially increased with increasing normal contact stress during implantation and then decreased at higher contact stresses. For a less porous surface, the friction coefficient increased continually with normal contact stress during implantation but did not reach the peak magnitude measured for the rougher surface. Friction coefficients for the polished surface were independent of normal contact stress and much lower than for the porous surfaces. Friction coefficients were slightly lower for pull-out than for push-in for the porous surfaces but not for the polished surface. The effective interference was as little as 30% of the nominal interference for the porous surfaces. The determined variation in friction coefficient with radial contact force, as well as the loss of interference during implantation will enable a more accurate representation of implant press-fitting for simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Wavefunction effects in inner shell ionization of light atoms by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aashamar, K.; Amundsen, P.A.

    An efficient computer code for calculating the impact parameter distribution of atomic ionization probabilities caused by charged particle impact, has been developed. The programme is based on the semiclassical approximation, and it allows the use of an arbitrary atomic central potential for deriving the one-electron orbitals that form the basis for the description of the atomic states. Extensive calculations are reported for proton induced K-shell ionization in carbon and neon, covering energies in the range 0.1-10 MeV. Some calculations on proton-argon L-shell ionization are also reported. Comparison of the results obtained using (screened) hydrogenic potentials and the recently reported energy- optimized effective atomic central potentials, respectively demonstrates that wavefunction effects are generally important for inner-shell ionization of light atoms. The agreement between theory and experiment in the K-shell case is improved for fast collisions upon using better wavefunctions. (Auth.)

  17. Chemical effect on total mass attenuation coefficients of V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeguet, Oe.; Colak, S.; Bueyuekkasap, E.; Kuecuekoender, A.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed interpretation of data obtained from X-ray transmission measurements usually depends on the assumption that the contribution of each element is additive. This assumption yields the mixture rule for X-ray attenuation coefficients which is valid if molecular and chemical effects are negligible. Total mass attenuation coefficients of V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni in various their compounds was measured. Absorption corrections were carried on data for ligands in the compounds. It was found that V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni had different total mass attenuation coefficients in the different compounds. Results were compared with theoretical values of HUBBELL and SELTZER. (author)

  18. The effect of chalk on the finger-hold friction coefficient in rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amca, Arif Mithat; Vigouroux, Laurent; Aritan, Serdar; Berton, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chalk on the friction coefficient between climber's fingers and two different rock types (sandstone and limestone). The secondary purpose was to investigate the effects of humidity and temperature on the friction coefficient and on the influence of chalk. Eleven experienced climbers took part in this study and 42 test sessions were performed. Participants hung from holds which were fixed on a specially designed hang board. The inclination of the hang board was progressively increased until the climber's hand slipped from the holds. The angle of the hang board was simultaneously recorded by using a gyroscopic sensor and the friction coefficient was calculated at the moment of slip. The results showed that there was a significant positive effect of chalk on the coefficient of friction (+18.7% on limestone and +21.6% on sandstone). Moreover sandstone had a higher coefficient of friction than limestone (+15.6% without chalk, +18.4% with chalk). These results confirmed climbers' belief that chalk enhances friction. However, no correlation with humidity/temperature and friction coefficient was noted which suggested that additional parameters should be considered in order to understand the effects of climate on finger friction in rock climbing.

  19. Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Effects in Thin Layer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    capacitance and voltage) in the h-BN/Si heterojunction and between -1 to 1 V. Current and capacitance is studied before and after gamma and...resultant capacitance is calculated. 28 The high-frequency C-V data allow the following parameters to be extracted: oxide thickness, flat...band capacitance, flat band voltage, and effective and total bulk oxide charge. Initially, the oxide thickness was used to characterize the quality and

  20. Effect of an improved molecular potential on strong-field tunneling ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Songfeng; Jin Cheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of one-electron model potentials on the tunneling ionization rates of molecules in strong fields. By including electron correlation using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LB α) model, the binding energies of outer shells of molecules are significantly improved. However, we show that the tunneling ionization rates from the LB α do not differ much from the earlier calculations [Phys. Rev. A 81, 033423 (2010)], in which the local correlation potential was neglected.

  1. Non-ionizing radiations : physical characteristics, biological effects and health hazard assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repacholi, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Workshop was a project of the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee of IRPA and comprised a series of educational lectures and demonstrations intended to give a comprehensive overview of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation: physical characteristics, sources of concern, levels of exposure, mechanisms of interaction and reported effects of these fields and radiations with biological tissues, human studies, health risk assessment, national and international standards and guidelines, and protective measures

  2. Ionizing radiation effects on food vitamins: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionisio, Ana Paula; Gomes, Renata Takassugui; Oetterer, Marilia

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been widely used in industrial processes, especially in the sterilization of medicines, pharmaceuticals, cosmetic products, and in food processing. Similar to other techniques of food processing, irradiation can induce certain alterations that can modify both the chemical composition and the nutritional value of foods. These changes depend on the food composition, the irradiation dose and factors such as temperature and presence or absence of oxygen in the irradiating environment. The sensitivity of vitamins to radiation is unpredictable and food vitamin losses during the irradiation are often substantial. The aim of this study was to discuss retention or loss of vitamins in several food products submitted to an irradiation process. (author)

  3. The effect of radionuclides and their carriers on diffusion coefficient of radionuclides in local rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Takriti, S.

    1995-07-01

    The diffusion coefficient of sup 9 sup 0 Sr and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs has been calculated for different local rocks in stationary and dynamic state. The effect of pH radioisotope solution dependence in shown by diffusion coefficient in some rocks. The results show that the cement and dolomite have the best quality of radioisotope retention which do not allow them to pollute the environment. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs

  4. Collective effects on transport coefficients of relativistic nuclear matter. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornas, L.

    1993-04-01

    The transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, shear and bulk viscosities) of symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter are calculated in the Walecka model with a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck collision term by means of a Chapman-Enskog expansion in first order. The order of magnitude of the influence of collective effects induced by the presence of the mean σ and ω fields on these coefficients is evaluated. (orig.). 9 figs

  5. Semiclassical approach to trajectory effects on the anisotropy coefficient of L3-subshell X-rays induced by slow heavy particles collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, E.C.; Pinho, A.G. de

    1982-01-01

    The deflection and the retardation of a slow bare heavy particle by the repulsive Coulomb field of the target nucleus are known to modify the ionization cross sections of inner shells. It is shown how to calculate these effects in the magnetic substates of the 2p-subshell in the frame of the impact parameter picture. These corrections are essential to understand the energy dependence of the anisotropy coefficient of X-ray emitted in transitions filling an L 3 -subshell vacancy produced by massive particle bombardment. (Author) [pt

  6. Growth of carbon nanocone arrays on a metal catalyst: The effect of carbon flux ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, I.; Khachan, J.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Ostrikov, K.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of carbon nanocone arrays on metal catalyst particles by deposition from a low-temperature plasma is studied by multiscale Monte Carlo/surface diffusion numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the variation in the degree of ionization of the carbon flux provides an effective control of the growth kinetics of the carbon nanocones, and leads to the formation of more uniform arrays of nanostructures. In the case of zero degree of ionization (neutral gas process), a width of the distribution of nanocone heights reaches 360 nm with the nanocone mean height of 150 nm. When the carbon flux of 75% ionization is used, the width of the distribution of nanocone heights decreases to 100 nm, i.e., by a factor of 3.6. A higher degree of ionization leads to a better uniformity of the metal catalyst saturation and the nanocone growth, thus contributing to the formation of more height-uniform arrays of carbon nanostructures.

  7. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered

  8. Multiple ionization effects in atomic collisions in the K-L matching region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piticu, I.; Ciortea, C.; Dumitriu, D.; Enulescu, A.; Fluerasu, D.; Szilagyi, S.Z.; Zoran, V.; Bucur, B.I.

    1994-01-01

    The multiple ionization effect in the determination of 3dσ vacancy production cross sections and sharing probabilities in asymmetric quasimolecular collisions near K-L level matching, for the collision systems Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu + Bi in the energy range 0.25 - 1.75 MeV/u have been studied. The experimental energy and intensity shifts of some projectile and target X-ray lines, as well as Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations, have been used to estimate average single particle probabilities for multiple ionization of projectile L- and target M-shells. Using these estimates and a standard procedure, the experimental 3dσ vacancy production cross sections and sharing probabilities have been corrected for multiple ionization. The influence of the multiple ionization-induced increase in binding energy of the molecular orbitals implied in vacancy sharing is discussed. (Author)

  9. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Yahui; Tong Jian

    2007-01-01

    Non-targeted and delayed effects are relative phenomena in cellular responses to ionizing radiation. These effects (bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. It is clear that adaptive responses, bystander effects and genomic instability will play an important role in the low dose-response to radiation. This review will provide a synthesis of the known, and proposed interrelationships amongst low-dose cellular responses to radiation, It also will examine the potential biological significance of non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. (authors)

  10. Effects of the blockage ratio of a valve disk on loss coefficient in a butterfly valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Hyung Joon; Lee, Jee Keun; Choi, Hee Joo

    2008-01-01

    The loss coefficient of the butterfly valve which allows partial opening of the valve at closed position and is applicable to the small-sized pipe system with the diameter of 1 inch was measured for the variation of the valve disk blockage ratio. Two different types of the valve disk configuration to adjust the blockage ratio were considered. One was the solid type valve disk of which the diameter was changed into the smaller size rather than the pipe diameter, and the other was the perforate type valve disk on which some holes were perforated. The results from two types of valve disk were compared to identify their characteristics in the loss coefficient distributions. The loss coefficient and the controllable angle of the valve disk were decreased exponentially with the decrease of the blockage ratio. In addition, the perforate valve disk had the effect on the higher loss coefficient rather than the solid type valve disk

  11. Scale dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient: Evidence and preliminary interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, Yingqi; Molz, Fred J.

    2006-01-01

    The exchange of solute mass (through molecular diffusion) between fluid in fractures and fluid in the rock matrix is called matrix diffusion. Owing to the orders-of-magnitude slower flow velocity in the matrix compared to fractures, matrix diffusion can significantly retard solute transport in fractured rock, and therefore is an important process for a variety of problems, including remediation of subsurface contamination and geological disposal of nuclear waste. The effective matrix diffusion coefficient (molecular diffusion coefficient in free water multiplied by matrix tortuosity) is an important parameter for describing matrix diffusion, and in many cases largely determines overall solute transport behavior. While matrix diffusion coefficient values measured from small rock samples in the laboratory are generally used for modeling field-scale solute transport in fractured rock (Boving and Grathwohl, 2001), several research groups recently have independently found that effective matrix diffusion coefficients much larger than laboratory measurements are needed to match field-scale tracer-test data (Neretnieks, 2002; Becker and Shapiro, 2000; Shapiro, 2001; Liu et al., 2003, 2004a). In addition to the observed enhancement, Liu et al. (2004b), based on a relatively small number of field-test results, reported that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient might be scale dependent, and, like permeability and dispersivity, it seems to increases with test scale. This scale-dependence has important implications for large-scale solute transport in fractured rock. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the enhancement of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, the potential scale dependence and its mechanisms are not fully investigated at this stage. The major objective of this study is to again demonstrate (based on more data published in the literature than those used in Liu et al. [2004b]) the potential scale dependence of the effective

  12. Scale Dependence of the Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient : Evidence and Preliminary Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.H. Liu; Y. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The exchange of solute mass (through molecular diffusion) between fluid in fractures and fluid in the rock matrix is called matrix diffusion. Owing to the orders-of-magnitude slower flow velocity in the matrix compared to fractures, matrix diffusion can significantly retard solute transport in fractured rock, and therefore is an important process for a variety of problems, including remediation of subsurface contamination and geological disposal of nuclear waste. The effective matrix diffusion coefficient (molecular diffusion coefficient in free water multiplied by matrix tortuosity) is an important parameter for describing matrix diffusion, and in many cases largely determines overall solute transport behavior. While matrix diffusion coefficient values measured from small rock samples in the laboratory are generally used for modeling field-scale solute transport in fractured rock (Boving and Grathwohl, 2001), several research groups recently have independently found that effective matrix diffusion coefficients much larger than laboratory measurements are needed to match field-scale tracer-test data (Neretnieks, 2002; Becker and Shapiro, 2000; Shapiro, 2001; Liu et al., 2003,2004a). In addition to the observed enhancement, Liu et al. (2004b), based on a relatively small number of field-test results, reported that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient might be scale dependent, and, like permeability and dispersivity, it seems to increases with test scale. This scale-dependence has important implications for large-scale solute transport in fractured rock. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the enhancement of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, the potential scale dependence and its mechanisms are not fully investigated at this stage. The major objective of this study is to again demonstrate (based on more data published in the literature than those used in Liu et al. [2004b]) the potential scale dependence of the effective

  13. Mechanism of the flame ionization detector. II. Isotope effects and heteroatom effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1997-01-01

    The relative molar flame ionization detecton (FID) response (RMR) for a hydrocarbon does not change when deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. The exception is methane for which an inverse deuterium effect of 3..5% is observed for tetradeuteriomethane. [13C]Methane shows an inverse isotope effect...... of 2%. The reason for the small or non-existent isotope effects is that H/2H exchange takes place in the pre-combustion hydrogenolysis in the flame. This was shown by taking samples from the lower part of the flame by means of a fused silica capillary probe. By the same technique the hydrogenolytic...

  14. Genetic effects of ionizing radiation – some questions with no answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosse, Irma B.

    2012-01-01

    There are a lot of questions about genetic effects of ionizing radiation, the main one is does ionizing radiation induce mutations in humans? There is no direct evidence that exposure of parents to radiation leads to excess heritable disease in offspring. What is the difference between human and other species in which radiation induced mutations are easily registered? During evolution germ cell selection ex vivo has been changed to a selection in vivo and we cannot observe such selection of radiation damaged cells in human. Low radiation doses – are they harmful or beneficial? The “hormesis” phenomenon as well as radioadaptive response proves positive effects of low radiation dose. Can analysis of chromosomal aberration rate in lymphocytes be used for dosimetry? Many uncontrolled factors may be responsible for significant mistakes of this method. Why did evolution preserve the bystander effect? This paper is discussion one and its goal is to pay attention on some effects of ionizing radiation. - Highlights: ► There are a lot of questions about genetic effects of ionizing radiation. ► Does ionizing radiation induce mutations in human? ► During evolution germ cell selection ex vivo has been changed to a selection in vivo. ► Radioadaptive response proves positive effects of low radiation doses. ► Many uncontrolled factors may be responsible for significant biodosimetry mistakes.

  15. Proceedings of the 15. Berzelius symposium on somatic and genetic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stigbrand, T.

    1989-01-01

    The symposium begins with a brush up on the physics of ionizing radiation and a background to the natural and man-made source of radiation to which we are exposed. The next section deals with the origin and nature of radiation-induced damage to DNA. The somatic effects of ionizing radiation span from DNA lesions to various effects on cell structure and cell function and effects on whole organs. The somatic effects are immediate as well as long-term, with mental impairment and an increased risk for carcinogenesis as consequences of main concern. The genetic effects of ionizing radiation can result in: infertility, spontaneous abortions, genetic diseases and malformations and increased risk for cancer. This leads over to the problems of risk estimation. Risk estimation which is mainly based on experimental data using animal models, human cell lines and epidemiological studies of exposed and unexposed populations

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on cholesterol in aqueous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakritz, L.; Maerker, G.

    1989-01-01

    Aqueous sodium stearate dispersions of cholesterol were irradiated at 0-2 degrees C with absorbed doses ranging from 2.5 to 50 kGy. The resulting mixture of cholesterol derivatives was isolated and examined for 7-ketocholesterol and cholesterol 5 alpha, 6 alpha-epoxide and 5 beta, 6 beta-epoxide content. Concentrations of all three compounds increased with dose, while the ratio of 7-ketocholesterol to total epoxides decreased with increasing dose. The ratio of 7-ketocholestrol to the epoxides was approximately 1 or below at all dose levels while the same ratio in autoxidations of cholesterol in dispersions was normally 6 or greater. The change in the keto/epoxide ratio may be a means for determining whether meat or other foods containing cholesterol have been subjected to ionizing radiation

  17. Octanol-water partition coefficients for predicting the effects of tannins in ruminant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Mlambo, Victor; Sikosana, Joe L N; Smith, Tim; Owen, Emyr; Brown, Ron H

    2007-07-11

    Tannins can cause beneficial or harmful nutritional effects, but their great diversity has until now prevented a rational distinction between tannin structures and their nutritional responses. An attempt has been made to study this problem by examining the octanol-water solubilities of tannins. A relatively simple HPLC method has been developed for screening mixtures of plant tannins for their octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow coefficients). Tannins were isolated from the fruits and leaves of different Acacia, Calliandra, Dichrostachys, and Piliostigma species, which are known to produce beneficial or harmful effects. The Kow coefficients of these tannins ranged from 0.061 to 13.9, average coefficients of variation were 9.2% and recoveries were 107%. Acacia nilotica fruits and leaves had the highest Kow coefficients, that is, 2.0 and 13.9, respectively. These A. nilotica products also have high concentrations of tannins. The combined effects of high octanol solubilities and high tannin concentrations may explain their negative effects on animal nutrition and health. It is known that compounds with high octanol solubilities are more easily absorbed into tissues, and it is, therefore, proposed that such compounds are more likely to cause toxicity problems especially if consumed in large quantities. According to the literature, tannins in human foods tend to have low Kow coefficients, and this was confirmed for the tannins in Piliostigma thonningii fruits. Therefore, unconventional feeds or browse products should be screened not only for their tannin concentrations but also for low octanol-water partition coefficients in order to identify nutritionally safe feeds and to avoid potentially toxic feeds.

  18. FIELD-SCALE EFFECTIVE MATRIX DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR FRACTURED ROCK: RESULTS FROM LITERATURE SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Q.; Hui-Hai Liu; Molz, F.J.; Zhang, Y.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solute transport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey on the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, D m e , a key parameter for describing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty field tracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selected for the study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale D m e values were calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature or by reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed data indicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor F D (defined as the ratio of D m e to the lab-scale matrix diffusion coefficient [D m ] of the same tracer) is generally larger than one, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the field is comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at the rock-core scale. This larger value can be attributed to the many mass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous, fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend toward systematic increase in the F D value with observation scale, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely to be statistically scale dependent. The F D value ranges from 1 to 10,000 for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the F D value varies by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differing degrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition, the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivity generally increases with observation scale, which is consistent with previous studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusion coefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications for assessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transport events in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal and contaminant remediation

  19. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  20. Random effects coefficient of determination for mixed and meta-analysis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidenko, Eugene; Sargent, James; Onega, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of a mixed model is the presence of random effects. We have developed a coefficient, called the random effects coefficient of determination, [Formula: see text], that estimates the proportion of the conditional variance of the dependent variable explained by random effects. This coefficient takes values from 0 to 1 and indicates how strong the random effects are. The difference from the earlier suggested fixed effects coefficient of determination is emphasized. If [Formula: see text] is close to 0, there is weak support for random effects in the model because the reduction of the variance of the dependent variable due to random effects is small; consequently, random effects may be ignored and the model simplifies to standard linear regression. The value of [Formula: see text] apart from 0 indicates the evidence of the variance reduction in support of the mixed model. If random effects coefficient of determination is close to 1 the variance of random effects is very large and random effects turn into free fixed effects-the model can be estimated using the dummy variable approach. We derive explicit formulas for [Formula: see text] in three special cases: the random intercept model, the growth curve model, and meta-analysis model. Theoretical results are illustrated with three mixed model examples: (1) travel time to the nearest cancer center for women with breast cancer in the U.S., (2) cumulative time watching alcohol related scenes in movies among young U.S. teens, as a risk factor for early drinking onset, and (3) the classic example of the meta-analysis model for combination of 13 studies on tuberculosis vaccine.

  1. The study of the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on birth weight of newborns to exposed mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Shirazi, K R; Mortazavi, G

    2013-01-01

    Life evolved in an environment filled with a wide variety of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. It was previously reported that medical exposures to pregnant women increases the risk of low birth weight. This study intends to investigate the relationship between exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and the risk of low birth weight. One thousand two hundred mothers with their first-term labor (vaginal or cesarean) whose newborns' history had been registered in neonates' screening program in Shiraz were interviewed and surveyed. Data collection was performed by the assessment of mother's history of radiography before and during pregnancy, physical examination of the mother for height and weight and weighing and examining the newborn for any diagnosis of disease and anomalies. There were no statistical significant differences between the mean weight of newborns whose mothers had been exposed to some common sources of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations such as dental or non dental radiographies, mobile phone, cordless phone and cathode ray tube (CRT) and those of non-exposed mothers. The findings of this study cast doubt on previous reports, which indicated that exposure to ionizing radiation during pregnancy increased the risk of low birth weight.

  2. Obtaining the general forms of the effective coefficients of laminate magneto-electro - elastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabañas, J. H.; Otero, A.; Castillero, B.; Rodríguez, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this work using the asymptotic homogenization method obtained general expressions for the calculation of the effective characteristics of magnetoelectro-elastic laminates with layers of any symmetry. You will reach an array of auxiliary functions for determining the effective coefficients for a serial connection and displays a result similar to the case of parallel connection.

  3. Ionization versus displacement damage effects in proton irradiated CMOS sensors manufactured in deep submicron process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Saint-Pe, O.; Bernard, F.; Rolland, G.

    2009-01-01

    Proton irradiation effects have been studied on CMOS image sensors manufactured in a 0.18μm technology dedicated to imaging. The ionizing dose and displacement damage effects were discriminated and localized thanks to 60 Co irradiations and large photodiode reverse current measurements. The only degradation observed was a photodiode dark current increase. It was found that ionizing dose effects dominate this rise by inducing generation centers at the interface between shallow trench isolations and depleted silicon regions. Displacement damages are is responsible for a large degradation of dark current non-uniformity. This work suggests that designing a photodiode tolerant to ionizing radiation can mitigate an important part of proton irradiation effects.

  4. Transfer coefficients of energy in mass for X radiation-air: the kV relation and effective energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, G.J.; Sousa, C.H.S.; Peixoto, J.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine, through specific software, the mass-energy transfer coefficients by X-ray beams in air between 30-150 kV. Were generated by the Spectrum Processor program, the spectra and calculated their mass coefficients. The results behaved numerically decreasing order, ranging between 0.3733 and 0.0439 cm 2 /g, inversely proportional to the voltage used and differing behavior of mono-energetic beams above 100 keV. Values align with literal definitions of the interaction of radiation with matter, being useful for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology, including for systems not using an ionization chamber. (author)

  5. Surplus thermal energy model of greenhouses and coefficient analysis for effective utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.H.; Son, J.E.; Lee, S.D.; Cho, S.I.; Ashtiani-Araghi, A.; Rhee, J.Y.

    2016-11-01

    If a greenhouse in the temperate and subtropical regions is maintained in a closed condition, the indoor temperature commonly exceeds that required for optimal plant growth, even in the cold season. This study considered this excess energy as surplus thermal energy (STE), which can be recovered, stored and used when heating is necessary. To use the STE economically and effectively, the amount of STE must be estimated before designing a utilization system. Therefore, this study proposed an STE model using energy balance equations for the three steps of the STE generation process. The coefficients in the model were determined by the results of previous research and experiments using the test greenhouse. The proposed STE model produced monthly errors of 17.9%, 10.4% and 7.4% for December, January and February, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of the coefficients on the model accuracy were revealed by the estimation error assessment and linear regression analysis through fixing dynamic coefficients. A sensitivity analysis of the model coefficients indicated that the coefficients have to be determined carefully. This study also provides effective ways to increase the amount of STE. (Author)

  6. Surplus thermal energy model of greenhouses and coefficient analysis for effective utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwan Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available If a greenhouse in the temperate and subtropical regions is maintained in a closed condition, the indoor temperature commonly exceeds that required for optimal plant growth, even in the cold season. This study considered this excess energy as surplus thermal energy (STE, which can be recovered, stored and used when heating is necessary. To use the STE economically and effectively, the amount of STE must be estimated before designing a utilization system. Therefore, this study proposed an STE model using energy balance equations for the three steps of the STE generation process. The coefficients in the model were determined by the results of previous research and experiments using the test greenhouse. The proposed STE model produced monthly errors of 17.9%, 10.4% and 7.4% for December, January and February, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of the coefficients on the model accuracy were revealed by the estimation error assessment and linear regression analysis through fixing dynamic coefficients. A sensitivity analysis of the model coefficients indicated that the coefficients have to be determined carefully. This study also provides effective ways to increase the amount of STE.

  7. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  8. Initial events in the cellular effects of ionizing radiations: clustered damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Ionizing radiations produce many hundreds of different simple chemical products in DNA and also multitudes of possible clustered combinations. The simple products, including single-strand breaks, tend to correlate poorly with biological effectiveness. Even for initial double-strand breaks, as a broad class, there is apparently little or no increase in yield with increasing ionization density, in contrast with the large rise in relative biological effectiveness for cellular effects. Track structure analysis has revealed that clustered DNA damage of severity greater than simple double-strand breaks is likely to occur at biologically relevant frequencies with all ionizing radiations. Studies are in progress to describe in more detail the chemical nature of these clustered lesions and to consider the implications for cellular repair. (author)

  9. The effect of ionizing radiation with different ionizing density on the uni-cellular Alga Micrasterias denticulate Breb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reubel, B.

    1982-01-01

    The uni-cellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata Breb is very suitable for cytological, ultrastructural investigations as well as for growth studies of cell populations because of its size and its specific cellular pattern. Therefore these cells were investigated for their cell-cycle-dependent reaction to different types of radiation, dose-rates and cumulated doses and compared with results from the literature on radiobiological effects on single cells. Different types of ionizing radiation were used such as gamma rays ( 60 Co, 241 Am), alpha rays ( 241 Am) neutrons ( 252 Cf and 14 MeV-neutrons from a particle-accelerator) and protons (20-MeV-protons from a particle-accelerator). Irradiation with low doses (gamma-, neutron irradiation) did not show any statistically significant results. No effects could be observed after alpha irradiation because of the alpha particles could not penetrate the mucus cover. Irradiation with gamma rays and protons showed statistically significant reversible and irreversible effects. The reversible effect appeared in a dose-dependent division-delay of the populations. The results from literature, cell-cycle observations and ultra-structural investigations point to a block in the G 2 -phase and prolongation of the S-phase. Irreversible irradiation damage is caused by neutron- and proton irradiation. In the first case the length of division delay shows no dose-dependence. In the second case the following cell-cycles are retarded. The dose-effect-curves of proton-irradiations with different dose-rates show a plateau at high doses, which seems to be effected by the turn-on of an additional repair-mechanism. (Author)

  10. Effect of anomalous transport coefficients on the thermal structure of the storm time auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontheim, E.G.; Ong, R.S.B.; Roble, R.G.; Mayr, H.G.; Hoegy, W.H.; Baron, M.J.; Wickwar, V.B.

    1978-01-01

    By analyzing an observed storm time auroral electron temperature profile it is shown that anomalous transport effects strongly influence the thermal structure of the disturbed auroral ionosphere. Such anomalous transport effects are a consequence of plasma turbulence, the existence of which has been established by a large number of observations in the auroral ionosphere. The electron and composite ion energy equations are solved with anomalous electron thermal conductivity and parallel electrical resistivity coefficients. The solutions are parameterized with respect to a phenomenological altitude-dependent anomaly coefficient A and are compared with an observed storm time electron temperature profile above Chatanika. The calculated temperature profile for the classical case (A=1)disagrees considerably with the measured profile over most of the altitude range up to 450km. It is shown that an anomaly coefficient with a sharp peak of the order of 10 4 centered aroung the F 2 peak is consistent with observations

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiro, B D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1995-08-01

    The Field-Irradiator-Gamma (FIG) project chronically exposed a section of the boreal forest to ionizing radiation by placing a {sup 137}Cs source on tope of a 20-m tower at a forest site in southeastern Manitoba. The irradiation continued from 1973 to 1986 and the forest was exposed to radiological dose rates ranging from 65 mGy.h{sup -1} to 0.005 mGy.h{sup -1} along a gradient extending 500 m from the source. The irradiation killed the tree canopy close to the irradiator, resulting in the formation of a herbaceous zone of vegetation at high dose rates. After 14 years of irradiation, some tree species were still being affected at dose rates as low as about 1 mGy.h{sup -1}. The data gathered at the FIG site can be used to identify radiological dose rates that forest communities can tolerate. This information allows decisions to be made concerning guidelines for protection of the general environment from radionuclide emissions from various anthropogenic sources, such as nuclear reactors and uranium tailings. This report reviews the previous data collected at the FIG site during the pre-irradiation and irradiation phases and the methodology used to establish a baseline for future comparisons. Permanently marked sampling plots are a particular strength to the study, whereby researchers can compare the present forest community with that measured during the past 25 years. (author). 53 refs., 6 tabs., 22 figs.

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation on the boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.D.

    1995-08-01

    The Field-Irradiator-Gamma (FIG) project chronically exposed a section of the boreal forest to ionizing radiation by placing a 137 Cs source on tope of a 20-m tower at a forest site in southeastern Manitoba. The irradiation continued from 1973 to 1986 and the forest was exposed to radiological dose rates ranging from 65 mGy.h -1 to 0.005 mGy.h -1 along a gradient extending 500 m from the source. The irradiation killed the tree canopy close to the irradiator, resulting in the formation of a herbaceous zone of vegetation at high dose rates. After 14 years of irradiation, some tree species were still being affected at dose rates as low as about 1 mGy.h -1 . The data gathered at the FIG site can be used to identify radiological dose rates that forest communities can tolerate. This information allows decisions to be made concerning guidelines for protection of the general environment from radionuclide emissions from various anthropogenic sources, such as nuclear reactors and uranium tailings. This report reviews the previous data collected at the FIG site during the pre-irradiation and irradiation phases and the methodology used to establish a baseline for future comparisons. Permanently marked sampling plots are a particular strength to the study, whereby researchers can compare the present forest community with that measured during the past 25 years. (author). 53 refs., 6 tabs., 22 figs

  13. Investigation of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of decorative building materials used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesmin, Sabina; Sonker Barua, Bijoy; Uddin Khandaker, Mayeen; Tareque Chowdhury, Mohammed; Kamal, Masud; Rashid, M. A.; Miah, M. M. H.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    Following the rapid growing per capita income, a major portion of Bangladeshi dwellers is upgrading their non-brick houses by rod-cement-concrete materials and simultaneously curious to decorate the houses using luxurious marble stones. Present study was undertaken to investigate the gamma-ray attenuation co-efficient of decorative marble materials leading to their suitability as shielding of ionizing radiation. A number of commercial grades decorative marble stones were collected from home and abroad following their large-scale uses. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the mass attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for high energy photons. Some allied parameters such as half-value layer and radiation protection efficacy of the investigated marbles were calculated. The results showed that among the studied samples, the marble 'Carrara' imported from Italy is suitable to be used as radiation shielding material.

  14. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, W.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to simplify some of the relevant points of legislation, biological effects and protection for the benefit of the occupational health nurse not familiar with the nuclear industries. The subject is dealt with under the following headings; Understanding atoms. What is meant by ionizing radiation. Types of ionizing radiation. Effects of radiation: long and short term somatic effects, genetic effects. Control of radiation: occupational exposure, women of reproductive age, medical aspects, principles of control. The occupational health nurse's role. Emergency arrangements: national arrangements for incidents involving radiation, action to be taken by the nurse. Decontamination procedures: external and internal contamination. (U.K.)

  15. Indirect effect of ionizing radiation on adehylate cyclase activity of liver cells in rat embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slozhenikina, L.V.; Ushakova, T.E.; Mikhajlets, L.P.; Kuzin, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the effect of ionizing radiation on basal and catecholamine-stimulating activity of adenylate cyclase in the liver of 20-day embroys under in vivo and in vitro conditions (a membrane fraction and plasma membranes). The authors discuss the share of the indirect effect of radiation in modifying the adenylate cyclase activity

  16. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference

  17. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference. Refs, figs, tabs.

  18. Perturbed stationary-state description of the polarization effect in innershell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basbas, G.; Land, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A one-parameter trial initial-state wavefunction correlated to a projectile (polarized) is described and used to calculate innershell ionization cross sections for collisions with heavy charged particles. The variational principle is used to determine the parameter. The minimized energy gives the binding effect as a function of projectile position. Existing codes can be readily adapted to incorporate the trial wavefunction. Comparison with the previous theory of the polarization effect is made. Results for K-shell ionization of titanium by protons in the 0.3 to 2.4 MeV energy range agree with measured values

  19. The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation - A question of ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    Three ethical questions are asked and answered about the current state of affairs concerning how those in power manipulate public understanding of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The questions are as follows: (1) Is it ethical to frighten people when you do not know that there is anything to be frightened of? (2) Is it ethical to be so conservative that resources are spent to solve a problem that may not exist? (3) Is it ethical not to tell the whole truth about the effects of low levels of ionizing radiation?

  20. Study on the non-target effect of ionizing radiation using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Deguan; Liu Jianfeng; Chu Liping; Liu Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the non-target effect of ionizing radiation by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Methods: Cross incubated the irradiated( 137 Cs; 2Gy) or non-irradiated lymphocytes of human peripheral blood in the irradiated or non-irradiated plasma respectively, then, assess the DNA damage of lymphocytes using SCGE analysis. Results: The lymphocytes incubated in the irradiated plasma presented more obvious DNA damage than the incubated in the non-irradiated plasma dose (P<0.05). Conclusion: The non-target effect of ionizing radiation can be assessed by SCGE, and the results confirm that cytokines may play a great role in it. (authors)

  1. Assessment of public awareness of the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation in Kontagora, Niger State, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temaugee, S.T.; Daniel, T.A.; Oladejo, K.O.; Daniel, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the level of public awareness of detrimental effects of ionizing radiation in Nigeria, a case study of Federal College of Education Kontagora Niger State. A total of thirty-five (35) lecturers and seventy-five (75) students were randomly selected from the five schools in the College. The instrument used for data collection was a questionnaire. Data obtained from the questionnaire was analysed using simple percentages. The result of the study revealed that 10 (28.6%) out of 35 lecturers and 32 (42.7%) out of 75 students of the sampled population were totally unaware of ionization radiation and its health detriments. Moreover, the remaining percentage of both lecturers and students had limited knowledge about ionizing radiation and its detrimental effects to humans. The research also shows that a significant percentage of both lecturers and students claimed that the topic 'Ionizing radiations and their health detriments' is not relevant to their field of academic inclination. Based on the findings of the research, it was therefore recommended that the government, Nigeria Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NNRA), physicists and concerned individuals should enlighten the general public on ionizing radiations, its health detriment and safety measures through seminars and the mass media.

  2. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resat, Marianne S.; Arthurs, Benjamin J.; Estes, Brian J.; Morgan, william F.

    2006-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizing radiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation

  3. Ionization balance for Ti and Cr ions: effects of uncertainty in dielectronic recombination rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Il H

    2003-01-01

    The available electron-impact ionization cross sections for Ti and Cr ions are reviewed, and calculations of the ionization balance for the ions under coronal equilibrium are presented. The calculated ionic abundance fractions are compared with those of previous works. The effects of modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination on isoelectronic line ratios, which are formed using the same spectral line from two elements of slightly different atomic numbers, are discussed concentrating on high temperature ranges. Also discussed are the effects of modelling uncertainty on inter-ionization stage line ratios formed from adjacent ionization stages. It is demonstrated that the modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination tends to cancel out only when the isoelectronic line ratio of He-like ions is considered, and that the sensitivity of the isoelectronic line ratios to the modelling uncertainty tends to increase for less ionized stages. It is also found that the interstage line ratios are less sensitive to the typical ∼20% uncertainties of dielectronic rates than the isoelectronic line ratios, and that the interstage line ratio of He-to Li-like ions in Ti and Cr plasmas is a better choice for a temperature diagnostic in the temperature ranges from ∼0.6 to ∼1.5 keV in which Li-like ions have maximum ionic abundances

  4. Effect of geomagnetic storm conditions on the equatorial ionization anomaly and equatorial temperature anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Gaurav; Bag, T.; Sunil Krishna, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the geomagnetic storm on the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and equatorial temperature anomaly (ETA) has been studied using the atomic oxygen dayglow emissions at 577.7 nm (OI 557.7 nm) and 732.0 nm (OII 732.0 nm). For the purpose of this study, four intense geomagnetic storms during the ascending phase of solar cycle 24 have been considered. This study is primarily based on the results obtained using photochemical models with necessary inputs from theoretical studies and experimental observations. The latest reaction rate coefficients, quantum yields and the corresponding cross-sections have also been incorporated in these models. The volume emission rate of airglow emissions has been calculated using the neutral densities from NRLMSISE-00 and charged densities from IRI-2012 model. The modeled volume emission rate (VER) for OI 557.7 nm shows a positive correlation with the Dst index at 150 km and negative correlation with Dst at 250 and 280 km altitudes. Latitudinal profile of the greenline emission rate at different altitudes show a distinct behaviour similar to what has been observed in EIA with crests on either sides of the equator. The EIA crests are found to show poleward movement in the higher altitude regions. The volume emission rate of 732.0 nm emission shows a strong enhancement during the main phase of the storm. The changes observed in the airglow emission rates are explained with the help of variations induced in neutral densities and parameters related to EIA and ETA. The latitudinal variation of 732.0 nm emission rate is correlated to the variability in EIA during the storm period.

  5. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different composite nanolubricant concentrations on Aluminium 2024 plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, N. N. M.; Azmi, W. H.; Redhwan, A. A. M.; Sharif, M. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Wear of sliding parts and operational machine consistency enhancement can be avoided with good lubrication. Lubrication reduce wear between two contacting and sliding surfaces and decrease the frictional power losses in compressor. The coefficient of friction and wear rate effects study were carried out to measure the friction and anti-wear abilities of Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants a new type of compressor lubricant to enhanced the compressor performances. The tribology test rig employing reciprocating test conditions to replicate a piston ring contact in the compressor was used to measure the coefficient of friction and wear rate. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different Al2O3-SiO2/PAG composite nanolubricants of Aluminium 2024 plate for 10-kg load at different speed were investigated. Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG 46) lubricant using two-steps method of preparation. The result shows that the coefficient friction and wear rate of composite nanolubricants decreased compared to pure lubricant. The maximum reduction achievement for friction of coefficient and wear rate by Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants by 4.78% and 12.96% with 0.06% volume concentration. Therefore, 0.06% volume concentration is selected as the most enhanced composite nanolubricants with effective coefficient of friction and wear rate reduction compared to other volume concentrations. Thus, it is recommended to be used as the compressor lubrication to enhanced compressor performances.

  6. Revisiting the thermal effect on shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated shock propagation in weakly ionized plasmas and observed the following anomalous effects: shock acceleration, shock recovery, shock weakening, shock spreading, and splitting. It was generally accepted that the thermal effect can explain most of the experimental results. However, little attention was paid to the shock recovery. In this paper, the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas is studied by fluid simulation. It is found that the shock acceleration, weakening, and splitting appear after it enters the plasma (thermal) region. The shock splits into two parts right after it leaves the thermal region. The distance between the splitted shocks keeps decreasing until they recover to one. This paper can explain a whole set of features of the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas. It is also found that both the shock curvature and the splitting present the same photoacoustic deflection (PAD) signals, so they cannot be distinguished by the PAD experiments.

  7. 'K' contribution to the biological effect of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissiere, Arnaud

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the importance of 'K' ionizations on DNA as critical physical events initiating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, in particular in human cells. Ultra-soft X-rays are used as a probe of core ionization events. A decisive test consists in comparing the biological effects at 250 eV and 350 eV (before and after the carbon K - threshold). The results show a sharp increase of the biological efficiency for both cellular inactivation and chromosomal exchange aberration above the carbon K-threshold, correlated with the one of core events occurring in DNA atoms. The heavy ion irradiation displays again the paradoxical behaviour of cellular inactivation cross sections as a function of LET. Finally, the 'K' event contribution to cellular inactivation of usual low LET radiation is estimated to be about 75%. (author) [fr

  8. Effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation on reproductive and child health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienefeld, M.K.; McLaughlin, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The evidence regarding the effects of occupational exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation on reproductive health is limited. However, exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation is associated with increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes. The resulting uncertainty about the effects of occupational exposures has caused concern among some workers, therefore, we have designed a study to examine this question among Canadian medical radiation technologists. A short mailed questionnaire will be sent to all CAMRT members to obtain information about reproductive history, and a sample of respondents will receive a second questionnaire requesting information about other important exposures. Occupational dose records will be retrieved from the National Dose Registry. Using this information, relative risks for each outcome will be calculated for different radiation dose levels. This article provides a brief review of the literature on ionizing radiation exposure and reproductive outcomes, and an outline of the proposed study

  9. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damla, N.; Baltas, H.; Celik, A.; Kiris, E.; Cevik, U.

    2008-01-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic, numbers (Z eff ), effective electron densities (N e ) and photon interaction cross section (σ a ) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. (authors)

  10. The influence of reactor core parameters on effective breeding coefficient Keff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li-Po; Liu Yi-Bao; Wang Juan; Yang Bo; Zhang Tao

    2008-01-01

    The values of effective breeding coefficient Keff in a reactor core of nuclear power plant are calculated for different values of parameters (core structure, fuel assembly component) by using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained values of Keff are compared and analysed, which can provide theoretical basis for reactor design.

  11. Investigation of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of decorative building materials used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesmin, Sabina; Sonker Barua, Bijoy; Uddin Khandaker, Mayeen; Tareque Chowdhury, Mohammed; Kamal, Masud; Rashid, M.A.; Miah, M.M.H.; Bradley, D.A.

    2017-01-01

    Following the rapid growing per capita income, a major portion of Bangladeshi dwellers is upgrading their non-brick houses by rod-cement-concrete materials and simultaneously curious to decorate the houses using luxurious marble stones. Present study was undertaken to investigate the gamma-ray attenuation co-efficient of decorative marble materials leading to their suitability as shielding of ionizing radiation. A number of commercial grades decorative marble stones were collected from home and abroad following their large-scale uses. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the mass attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for high energy photons. Some allied parameters such as half-value layer and radiation protection efficacy of the investigated marbles were calculated. The results showed that among the studied samples, the marble ‘Carrara’ imported from Italy is suitable to be used as radiation shielding material. - Highlights: • Studies of decorative building materials for shielding of ionizing radiation. • High energy photon beam were used to obtain various interaction properties. • Marble stone ‘Carrara’ from Italy shows suitability to be used as shielding material.

  12. Model planetary nebulae: the effect of shadowed filaments on low ionization potential ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, A.

    1977-01-01

    Previous homogeneous model planetary nebulae calculations No. 4 have yielded emission strengths for low ionization potential No. 4 ions which are considerably lower than those observed. Several attempts were to correct this problem by the inclusion of optically thin condensations, the use of energy flux distributions from stellar model calculations instead of blackbody spectrum stars, and the inclusion of dust in the nebulae. The effect that shadowed filaments have on the ionization and thermal structure of model nebulae and the resultant line strengths are considered. These radial filaments are shielded from the direct stellar ionizing radiation by optically thick condensations in the nebula. Theoretical observational evidence exists for the presence of condensations and filaments. Since the only source of ionizing photons in the shadowed filaments is due to diffuse photons produced by recombination, ions of lower ionization potential are expected to exist there in greater numbers than those found in the rest of the nebula. This leads to increased line strengths from these ions and increases their values to match the observational values. It is shown that these line strengths in the filaments increase by over one to two orders of magnitude relative to values found in homogeneous models. This results in an increase of approximately one order of magnitude for these lines when contributions from both components of the nebula are considered. The parameters that determine the exact value of the increase are the radial location of the filaments in the nebula and the fraction of the nebular volume occupied by the filaments

  13. High doses of ionizing radiation on bone repair: is there effect outside the irradiated site?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Flaviana Soares; Dias, Pâmella Coelho; Limirio, Pedro Henrique Justino Oliveira; Lara, Vitor Carvalho; Batista, Jonas Dantas; Dechichi, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Local ionizing radiation causes damage to bone metabolism, it reduces blood supply and cellularity over time. Recent studies indicate that radiation promotes biological response outside the treatment field. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on bone repair outside the irradiated field. Ten healthy male Wistar rats were used; and five animals were submitted to radiotherapy on the left femur. After 4 weeks, in all animals were created bone defects in the right and left femurs. Seven days after surgery, animals were euthanized. The femurs were removed and randomly divided into 3 groups (n=5): Control (C) (right femur of the non-irradiated animals); Local ionizing radiation (IR) (left femur of the irradiated animals); Contralateral ionizing radiation (CIR) (right femur of the irradiated animals). The femurs were processed and embedded in paraffin; and bone histologic sections were evaluated to quantify the bone neoformation. Histomorphometric analysis showed that there was no significant difference between groups C (24.6±7.04) and CIR (25.3±4.31); and IR group not showed bone neoformation. The results suggest that ionizing radiation affects bone repair, but does not interfere in bone repair distant from the primary irradiated site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of ionization, bedding, and feeding on air quality in a horse stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegers, Esther Willemijn; Anthonisse, Milou; van Eerdenburg, Frank J C M; van den Broek, Jan; Wouters, Inge M; Westermann, Cornélie Martine

    2018-05-01

    Organic dust is associated with Equine asthma. Ionization should reduce airborne dust levels. To determine the effect of ionization of air, type of bedding, and feed on the levels of airborne dust, endotoxin, and fungal colonies in horse stables. 24 healthy University-owned horses occupied the stables. A randomized controlled cross-over study. Four units with 6 stables were equipped with an ionization installation (25 VA, 5000 Volt Direct Current). Horses were kept either on wood shavings and fed haylage (2 units), or on straw and fed dry hay (2 units). Measurements were performed with and without activated ionization, during daytime and nighttime, repeatedly over the course of a week and repeatedly during 4-6 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using a mixed effect model with Akaike's Information Criterion for model reduction and 95% profile (log) likelihood confidence intervals (CI). Ionization did not alter concentrations of dust, endotoxin, or fungi, fewer. In the units with straw and hay, the concentration of dust, endotoxin, and fungi (difference in logarithmic mean 1.92 (95%CI 1.71-2.12); 2.86 (95%CI 2.59-3.14); 1.75 (95%CI 1.13-2.36)) were significantly higher compared to wood shavings and haylage. The installation of a negative air-ionizer in the horse stable did not reduce concentrations of dust, endotoxin, and viable fungal spores. The substantial effect of low dust bedding and feed is confirmed. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  16. Investigation of steady plasma actuation effect on aerodynamic coefficients of oscillating airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mahboubidoust

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, numerical study of two dimensional laminar incompressible flow around an oscillating NACA0012 airfoil is proceeded using the open source code OpenFOAM. Oscillatory motion types including pitching and flapping are considered. Reynolds number for these motions is assumed to be 12000 and effects of these motions and also different unsteady parameters such as amplitude and reduced frequency on aerodynamic coefficients are studied. For flow control on airfoil, dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator is used in two different positions on airfoil and its effect is compared for the two types of considered oscillating motions. It is observed that in pitching motion, imposing plasma leads to an improvement in aerodynamic coefficients, but it does not have any positive effect on flapping motion. Also, for the amplitudes and frequencies investigated in this paper, the trailing edge plasma had a more desirable effect than other positions. Keywords: Airfoil, Flapping, Oscillating, Plasma, Pitching

  17. Effects of autoionizing states on two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Schneider, Barry I; Koesterke, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Treating the effects of autoionizing intermediate states on two-photon double ionization (DI) of the H 2 molecule using time-dependent laser pulses is a significant computational challenge. Relatively long exposure times are critical to understanding the dynamics. Using the fixed-nuclei approximation, we demonstrate how the doubly excited states enhance the angle-integrated generalized cross sections in H 2 , and how they affect the angular distribution pattern of the ejected electrons. As the energy approaches the threshold for sequential DI, there is a sharp rise in the cross section due to virtual sequential ionization

  18. Effect of ''pasteurizing'' doses of ionizing radiations on drug sensitivity of microbes isolated at pharmacentical factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, E.P.; Shcheglova, S.G.; Sedov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiations on drug sensitivity of microorganisms has been investigated, particularly, the influence of pasteurizing'' doses of ionizing radia''ons on the drug sensitivity of microorganisms isolated at a Moscow pharmaceutical factory to a number of widely used antibiotics. 250 krad single irradiation of dry microbial culture resulted in a change of the antibiotic sensitivity in 0.5% of 686 strains studied. All changes were toward the appearance of sensitivity to one or several antibiotics. When cultures were irradiated 3 times, this value increased up to 9%. In no case the appearance of resistance to antibiotics was observed

  19. Numerical simulation of the ionization effects of low- and high-altitude nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhengyu; Wang Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Low-altitude and high-altitude nuclear explosions are sources of intensive additional ionization in ionosphere. In this paper, in terms of the ionization equilibrium equation system and the equation of energy deposition of radiation in atmosphere, and considering the influence of atmosphere, the temporal and spatial distribution of ionization effects caused by atmospheric nuclear detonation are investigated. The calculated results show that the maximum of additional free electron density produced by low-altitude nuclear explosion is greater than that by the high-altitude nuclear burst. As to the influence of instant nuclear radiation, there is obvious difference between the low-altitude and the high-altitude explosions. The influence range and the continuance time caused by delayed nuclear radiation is less for the low-altitude nuclear detonation than that for the high-altitude one. (authors)

  20. Interference effects in double ionization of spatially aligned hydrogen molecules by fast highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landers, A.L.; Alnaser, A.S.; Tanis, J.A.; Wells, E.; Osipov, T.; Carnes, K.D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C.L.; McGuire, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Cross sections differential in target orientation angle were measured for 19 MeV F 8+ +D 2 collisions. Multihit position-sensitive detectors were used to isolate the double-ionization channel and determine a posteriori the full momentum vectors of both ejected D + fragments. A strong dependence of the double ionization cross section on the angle between the incident ion direction and the target molecular axis is observed with a ≅3.5:1 enhancement for molecules aligned perpendicular to the projectile axis. This clear asymmetry is attributed to interference effects, analogous to Young's two-slit experiment, arising from coherent contributions to the ionization from both atomic centers. The data are compared to a simple scattering model based on two center interference

  1. Theory of tunneling ionization of molecules: Weak-field asymptotics including dipole effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of the parabolic adiabatic expansion approach to the problem of ionization of atomic systems in a static electric field, originally developed for the axially symmetric case [ Phys. Rev. A 82 023416 (2010)], is generalized to arbitrary potentials. This approach is used to rederive...... the asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization in the weak-field limit. In the atomic case, the resulting formulas for the ionization rate coincide with previously known results. In addition, the present theory accounts for the possible existence of a permanent dipole moment of the unperturbed system and, hence......, applies to polar molecules. Accounting for dipole effects constitutes an important difference of the present theory from the so-called molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory. The theory is illustrated by comparing exact and asymptotic results for a set of model polar molecules and a realistic molecular...

  2. Effect of pH and dissociation on the fate and exposure of ionizable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Ionizable organic chemicals comprise an important fraction of pharmaceuticals, pesticides as well as industrial chemicals. It has been estimated that 33% of the preregistered REACH substances is mostly ionized at pH 7. To extend the appliccability of existing exposure models, a Multimedia Activity...... parameters. The sensitivity analysis showed that the parameters describing ionization, pH and the dissociation constant (pKa), are among the most sensitive model parameters. The uncertainty analysis, however, indicated that these parameters are not the major source of uncertainty, which statistically...... and sediments. In most cases, the uncertainty of PECs and of persistance is largely explained by the uncertainty of (bio)degradation rates, which may be caused by model assumptions, experimental or estimation errors or by the environmental variability, including the effect of pH....

  3. Chemical effects and their consequences for individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, C.; Kahl, G.G.; Kühn, P.; Zottis, A.D.; Flôr, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    By legal determination, workers exposed to ionizing radiation should use individual dosimeters in the most exposed region of the body, designed to estimate the effective dose, as well as radiation protective clothing to minimize occupational exposures. Regarding dosimetry, in most cases it is perceived that the monthly values of exposure are within the limits of normality, however, even being below the limit can not rule out the possibility of damage that the low dose of ionizing radiation can cause. The objective of this article is to highlight the main chemical effects caused by exposure to ionizing radiation, especially biochemical damage in DNA, chromosomal aberrations and the correlation with the exposure of occupationally exposed individuals, as well as individuals from the public. A bibliographic search was carried out in indexed databases from February to April 2017 with the following descriptors: Radiation Ionizing, DNA Damage and Occupational Exposure. In the 'Science Direct' database were found 1205 articles, in the 'Scopus' 19 articles, in the 'Web of Science' 83 articles, in the 'PubMed' 22 articles and in the 'VHL' 60 articles related to the theme. It was concluded that exposure to ionizing radiation can affect the DNA molecule despite its repair mechanisms, which may result in genotoxicity. It has been reported a correlation between occupationally exposed individuals and chromosomal aberrations, demonstrating that even low doses of ionizing radiation can compromise the genetic material integrity of exposed workers, leading to the need for a periodic cytogenetic study for this group of workers

  4. Ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C. A.; Grigoryev, Y. G.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation encountered in space are considered. Biological experiments conducted in space and some experiences of astronauts during space flight are described. The effects of various levels of radiation exposure and the determination of permissible dosages are discussed.

  5. Influence of γ ionizing radiation on anti-oxidative effect of vegetables polyphenolic parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuyck, S.; Connaulte, J.; Lesgards, G.; Prost, M.; Raffi, J.

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of vegetables is a cleaning up and preservation physical treatment which consists in submitting them to γ radiation, X radiation or electrons beam. This study deals with the influence of γ radiation on anti-oxidative effect of vegetables polyphenolic parts. In that purpose, we use a simple biological test based on erythrocytes hemolysis. (authors)

  6. Mercury, phthalates, and ionizing radiations in neonatal intensive care controls. Adverse effects and preventive measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, Mercedes; Somaruga, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Studies realized by important institutions in the world have demonstrated that the load of illnesses associated with environmental and occupational conditions are affected by the current generation, especially to the most vulnerable populations as are the newborn babies. In the present work, the effects of the mercury, the phthalates and the ionizing radiations on the neonates health are described [es

  7. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that t he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... . In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved

  8. Blackness coefficients, effective diffusion parameters, and control rod worths for thermal reactors - Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretscher, M M [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Simple diffusion theory cannot be used to evaluate control rod worths in thermal neutron reactors because of the strongly absorbing character of the control material. However, reliable control rod worths can be obtained within the framework of diffusion theory if the control material is characterized by a set of mesh-dependent effective diffusion parameters. For thin slab absorbers the effective diffusion parameters can be expressed as functions of a suitably-defined pair of 'blackness coefficients'. Methods for calculating these blackness coefficients in the P1, P3, and P5 approximations, with and without scattering, are presented. For control elements whose geometry does not permit a thin slab treatment, other methods are needed for determining the effective diffusion parameters. One such method, based on reaction rate ratios, is discussed. (author)

  9. Change in Biot's effective stress coefficient of chalk during pore collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    the grains could also change during elastic deformation of the grains in a rock mechanics test. Diagenetic change in grain contact cement of chalk can be compared with stress-induced change in the laboratory. The change in porosity is studied with reference to the change in effective stress on grain contacts...... and porosity reduces at a slower rate. We noticed that presence of non carbonates and hydrocarbon could increase σ'm. During rock mechanics test in the lab, with increased applied stress, σ'm increases, Biot's effective stress coefficient shows a decreasing trend, while a minor porosity reduction was observed......Biot's effective stress coefficient (α) is a measure of how well grains in the rocks are connected with each other. The amount of contact cements between the grains determines the stiffness of rocks. Change in grain contact occurs during natural diagenesis of sedimentary rock. Contact between...

  10. Age-dependent conversion coefficients for organ doses and effective doses for external neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Chihiro; Endo, Akira; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-06-01

    To utilize dose assessment of the public for external neutron irradiation, conversion coefficients of absorbed doses of organs and effective doses were calculated using the numerical simulation technique for six different ages (adult, 15, 10, 5 and 1 years and newborn), which represent the member of the public. Calculations were performed using six age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for two irradiation geometries, anterior-posterior and rotational geometries, for 20 incident energies from thermal to 20 MeV. Effective doses defined by the 1990 Recommendation of ICRP were calculated from the absorbed doses in 21 organs. The calculated results were tabulated in the form of absorbed doses and effective doses per unit neutron fluence. The calculated conversion coefficients are used for dose assessment of the public around nuclear facilities and accelerator facilities. (author)

  11. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on solid and water solution Penicillin G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salem, I.; Amine, Kh.M.; Mabrouk, Y.; Saidi, M.; Mezni, M; Boulila, N; Hafez, E

    2015-01-01

    Penicillin G is a conventional antibiotic used for treatment of different kinds of infectious diseases. Due to its huge quantity production and resistance to biodegradability, this molecule has been a serious concern for clinicians and environmentalists. In this study, the effect of ionizing radiation on the penicillin G powder and in water solution was investigated. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis showed that the ionizing radiation at 50 kGy has no effect on the integrity of solid Penicillin G. The anti-microbial assays revealed that the activity of irradiated solid Penicillin G did not reduce and was stable after storage for one month. Ionizing radiation at 50 kGy led to degradation of water solution Penicillin G. The complete disappear of peaks observed in the control sample confirmed the broken of β-lactam ring, the decarboxylation and cleavage of the thiazolidine ring. The product issued from the irradiation of Penicillin G, was completely removed by the bacterium Cupriavidus.metallidurans. Thus, the ionizing irradiation followed by a biological treatment was very effective method for removing of Penicillin G antibiotics residuals from water solution.

  13. The effect of extreme ionization rates during the initial collapse of a molecular cloud core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R.; Price, Daniel J.

    2018-05-01

    What cosmic ray ionization rate is required such that a non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of a collapsing molecular cloud will follow the same evolutionary path as an ideal MHD simulation or as a purely hydrodynamics simulation? To investigate this question, we perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal MHD simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating, one solar mass, magnetized molecular cloud cores, which include Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. We assume a uniform grain size of ag = 0.1 μm, and our free parameter is the cosmic ray ionization rate, ζcr. We evolve our models, where possible, until they have produced a first hydrostatic core. Models with ζcr ≳ 10-13 s-1 are indistinguishable from ideal MHD models, and the evolution of the model with ζcr = 10-14 s-1 matches the evolution of the ideal MHD model within 1 per cent when considering maximum density, magnetic energy, and maximum magnetic field strength as a function of time; these results are independent of ag. Models with very low ionization rates (ζcr ≲ 10-24 s-1) are required to approach hydrodynamical collapse, and even lower ionization rates may be required for larger ag. Thus, it is possible to reproduce ideal MHD and purely hydrodynamical collapses using non-ideal MHD given an appropriate cosmic ray ionization rate. However, realistic cosmic ray ionization rates approach neither limit; thus, non-ideal MHD cannot be neglected in star formation simulations.

  14. Zebrafish as an In Vivo Model to Assess Epigenetic Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Yi Kong; Shuk Han Cheng; Kwan Ngok Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiations (IRs) is ubiquitous in our environment and can be categorized into ?targeted? effects and ?non-targeted? effects. In addition to inducing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, IR exposure leads to epigenetic alterations that do not alter DNA sequence. Using an appropriate model to study the biological effects of radiation is crucial to better understand IR responses as well as to develop new strategies to alleviate exposure to IR. Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a sci...

  15. Simulation of photon attenuation coefficients for high effective shielding material Lead-Boron Polyethyene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Jia, M. C.; Gong, J. J.; Xia, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    The mass attenuation coefficient of various Lead-Boron Polyethylene samples which can be used as the photon shielding materials in marine reactor, have been simulated using the MCNP-5 code, and compared with the theoretical values at the photon energy range 0.001MeV—20MeV. A good agreement has been observed. The variations of mass attenuation coefficient, linear attenuation coefficient and mean free path with photon energy between 0.001MeV to 100MeV have been plotted. The result shows that all the coefficients strongly depends on the photon energy, material atomic composition and density. The dose transmission factors for source Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60 have been worked out and their variations with the thickness of various sample materials have also been plotted. The variations show that with the increase of materials thickness the dose transmission factors decrease continuously. The results of this paper can provide some reference for the use of the high effective shielding material Lead-Boron Polyethyene.

  16. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Condensation on Force Coefficients in Transonic Airfoil Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Min; Kang, Hui Bo; Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Soon Bum [Kyungpook National Univeristy, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heung Kyun [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The present study investigated the effects of non-equilibrium condensation with the angle of attack on the coefficients of pressure, lift, and drag in the transonic 2-D flow of NACA0012 by numerical analysis of the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. At T{sub 0}=298 K and α=3°, the lift coefficients for M{sub ∞}=0.78 and 0.81 decreased monotonically with increasing Φ{sub 0}. In contrast, for M{sub ∞} corresponding to the Mach number of the force break, CL increased with Φ{sub 0}. For α=3° and Φ{sub 0}=0%, CD increased markedly as M{sub ∞} increased. However, at Φ{sub 0}=60% and α=3°, which corresponded to the case of the condensation having a large influence, CD increased slightly as M{sub ∞} increased. The decrease in profile drag by non-equilibrium condensation grew as the angle of attack and stagnation relative humidity increased for the same free stream transonic Mach number. At Φ{sub 0}=0%, the coefficient of the wave drag increased with the attack angle and free stream Mach number. When Φ{sub 0}>50%, the coefficient of the wave drag decreased as α and M{sub ∞} increased. Lowering Φ{sub 0} and increasing M{sub ∞} increased the maximum Mach number.

  17. Effect of graphene nanoplatelets on coefficient of thermal expansion of polyetherimide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Huang; Drzal, Lawrence T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal expansion is one of the major concerns for polymer composites. In this research, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were added to polyetherimide (PEId) thermoplastic polymer in order to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the injection molded composite. First, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (LTE) was measured in three directions in the anisotropic coupon: 0°, 90° and the out of plane Z direction. It is found that the GNP particles are very effective in terms of reducing the LTE in 0° direction due to high degree of alignment. After annealing above glass transition temperature, significant increase of 0° LTE and decrease of Z° LTE were observed. The bulk CTE was calculated by adding up the LTEs in all three directions and is found to be independent of annealing. Second, several models were applied to predict both CTE and LTE. It is found that Schapery's lower limit model fits the experimental CTE very well. Chow's model was applied for LTEs in three directions. The behavior of GNP-5/PEId composites is explained by the combination of Chow's model and morphology obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). - Highlights: • Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of polymer composite is characterized. • Reduction of linear thermal expansion depends on filler orientation. • Filler orientation is characterized based on the location of the specimen. • Filler orientation is changed by annealing, causing subsequent change in CTE. • CTE and linear thermal expansion coefficient are modeled

  18. Precise determination of total absorption coefficients for low-energy gamma-quanta with Moessbauer effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonchev, T.; Statev, S.; Nejkov, Kh.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of determining the total absorption coefficient applying the Moessbauer effect is proposed. This method enables the accuracy of the measurement increase. The coefficient is measured with practically no background on using the recoilless part of gamma radiation obtained from the Moessbauer source with and without the sample between the source of the gamma-quanta and the detector. Moessbauer sources and absorbers with a single line and without an isomeric shift are used. The recoilless part of the radiation is obtained by the ''two point'' method as a difference between the numbers of photons corresponding to the stationary source and to the vibrating one with a big mean square velocity, respectively. In the concrete measurements the sources 57 Co and 119 Sn are used. The total absorption coefficient for different samples beginning with water up to plumbum is determined. The mean square error for the mean result in all measurements is less than the mean statistical error for the coefficient. The obtained experimental data give a much smaller deviation from the theoretical data of the last issue of the Stom-Israel Tables than the one expected by their authors

  19. Heath effects and medical application of non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusslin, F.; Van Deventer, E.; Shannoun, F.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term effects (Cancer) Childhood leukemia ELF magnetic fields classified as Group 2B Possibly Carcinogenic based on limited human data (epidemiologic studies) of childhood leukemia and inadequate animal data Other exposures and outcomes considered inadequate to classify IARC Monograph (vol. 80, 2002) WHO EHC Monograph (vol. 238, 2007) Breast cancer The evidence has been weakened considerably and does not support an association Adult brain cancer and leukaemia. Short-term effects Established biological effects from acute exposure at high levels (well above 100 µT) that are explained by recognized biophysical mechanisms Consistent epidemiological evidence suggests that an increased risk for childhood leukaemia is associated with chronic low intensity ELF magnetic field exposure However, the evidence for a causal association is weak and the impact on public health uncertain.Thermal effects Radiofrequency waves can cause tissue heating, so-called thermal effects Heating >1oC activates physiological processes, which can influence activity of the nervous system, influence fertility, fetal development, cause cataracts All established health effects of RF exposure are clearly related to heating Non-thermal effects (?)While RF energy can interact with body tissues at levels too low to cause any significant heating, no study has shown adverse health effects at exposure levels below international guideline limits

  20. Effect of Ionizing Beta Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of Poly(ethylene under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarik Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found in this study, that ionizing beta radiation has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of poly(ethylene. In recent years, there have been increasing requirements for quality and cost effectiveness of manufactured products in all areas of industrial production. These requirements are best met with the polymeric materials, which have many advantages in comparison to traditional materials. The main advantages of polymer materials are especially in their ease of processability, availability, and price of the raw materials. Radiation crosslinking is one of the ways to give the conventional plastics mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of expensive and highly resistant construction polymers. Several types of ionizing radiation are used for crosslinking of polymers. Each of them has special characteristics. Electron beta and photon gamma radiation are used the most frequently. The great advantage is that the crosslinking occurs after the manufacturing process at normal temperature and pressure. The main purpose of this paper has been to determine the effect of ionizing beta radiation on the tensile modulus, strength and elongation of low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 99 kGy were compared and on the test temperature. Radiation cross-linking of LDPE and HDPE results in increased tensile strength and modulus, and decreased of elongation. The measured results indicate that ionizing beta radiation treatment is effective tool for improvement of mechanical properties of LDPE and HDPE under thermal stress.

  1. Chromium effect on the Young modulus and thermoelastic coefficient of elinvars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, A.V.; Khomenko, O.A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect was studied of thermal and thermal-mechanical treatment upon the elastic modules and its temperature coefficient in iron-nickel Elinvars with different chromium contents (from 0 to 6.7%). It has been shown that doping with chromium results in an increase in the modulus of elasticity of Elinvars after hardening. The elastic modulus of alloys containing no chromium increases after a cold plastic deformation (drawing), whereas that of chromous Elinvars decreases upon such a treatment. It has been established that the elastic modulus of hardened and cold drawn after hardening Elinvars increases upon ageing. An increase in chromium content in iron-nickel Elinvars reduces the effect of the temperature of ageing upon the thermoelastic coefficient during the usual heat treatment and the thermalmechanical treatment and lowers its sensitivity to the influence of an external magnetic field [ru

  2. Stimulatory effects of low ionizing radiation on plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, S.; Kurisu, Y.; Murata, I.; Takahashi, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Masui, H.; Iida, T. [Department of Electronic, Information Systems and Energy Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis was strongly carried out for animals and plants; subharmful dose of radiation may stimulate any organism. The concept of radiation hormesis effect consists of 1) biopositive effects of low dose radiation; influence caused by low dose radiation is totally different from one caused by high dose radiation, low dose radiation produces physiological useful effects against high dose radiation, and 2) radio-adaptive response; radiation also acts the organism as stress. Irradiated with small dose radiation previously, it raises its own defense response against the stress (radiation), resulting in the phenomenon that radiation influence decreases in appearance. In this paper we have investigated the phenomenon of radiation hormesis effects for plants through irradiation experiments with neutrons and gamma-rays to find out the mechanism. In the present experiment, dry seeds of Raphanus sativus were irradiated with D-T neutrons (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 100 kGy), D-D neutrons (1 mGy {approx} 100 mGy), thermal and fast neutrons (irradiation in a nuclear reactor: 100 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy), 60Co gamma-rays (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy). To confirm existence of the radiation hormesis effects, germination percentage, length of hypocotyl, length of root and total weight of seed leaf were measured at 7th day after starting cultivation. We estimated relative effectiveness as the hormesis effect, that is the ratio of mean values of measured subjects for the irradiated and control groups. For Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effect on seed leaf growth has been observed in the seed group irradiated by D-T neutrons and D-D neutrons. The observed hormesis effect is from 5 to 25 percents. (author)

  3. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C D; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-22

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF THE HUMIDITY EFFECT ON THE FAC-IR-300 IONIZATION CHAMBER RESPONSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyed Mostafa; Tavakoli-Anbaran, Hossein

    2018-02-01

    The free-air ionization chamber is communicating with the ambient air, therefore, the atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure and humidity effect on the ionization chamber performance. The free-air ionization chamber, entitled as FAC-IR-300, that design at the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, AEOI, is required the atmospheric correction factors for correct the chamber reading. In this article, the effect of humidity on the ionization chamber response was investigated. For this reason, was introduced the humidity correction factor, kh. In this article, the Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the kh factor. The simulation results show in relative humidities between 30% to 80%, the kh factor is equal 0.9970 at 20°C and 0.9975 at 22°C. From the simulation results, at low energy the energy dependence of the kh factor is significant and with increasing energy this dependence is negligible. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Specific Effects of Ionizing Energy on the Displacement Damage Calculation in Insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, R.; Mota, F.; Ortiz, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The level of damage expected in functional materials for future fusion reactors is generally much lower than structural materials, but the degradation of their physical properties is also generally observed at very low dose levels compared to the latter. Normally the properties of interest (DC Electrical resistivity, HF dielectric absorption, optical transmission etc.) degrade long before mechanical integrity is an issue. This weakness is in part related to the more important effects of ionizing energy on both, covalent and ionic, insulators or semiconductors. As irradiation in fission and fusion reactors (even spallation sources) also involves the participation of gamma radiation, it has to be taken into account for total damage calculation. In the case of ions, the energy partition provides the amount of electronic (ionizing) energy lost in the material. In general and regarding radiation, insulating materials can be divided in two groups depending on whether they experience radiolysis, (i.e. purely ionizing radiation can produce noticeable amounts of atomic displacements) or not. First group includes for example alkali halides and fluorides. But, although radiolysis is negligible in the second group (radiation-hard materials), collateral effects of ionizing radiation have been observed (when combined with displacement damage). Therefore it is important to make some comments about the concept and use of dpa (displacements per atom) in this large family of materials

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum (Solanaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaldaferro, M.A.; Prina, A.R.; Moscone, E.A.; Kwasniewska, J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic and somatic effects of various x-ray treatments were evaluated in pepper, Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum cv. “Cayenne”, with the aim to assess optimal conditions for obtaining viable lines. The cytogenetic effects were quantified by counting chromosome aberrations. The level of DNA fragmentation was estimated with TUNEL test (terminal transferase mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling). Irradiation to 20 Gy with 16-h presoaking can be a suitable treatment of the selected pepper cultivar for a mutagenesis program. - Highlights: • Cytogenetic and somatic effects of x-rays treatments in Capsicum were evaluated. • Frequencies of chromosome aberrations correlated with radiation doses. • Highest frequency of chromosome aberrations occurred with 20 Gy+soaking seeds. • In TUNEL test, the nuclei with DNA fragmentation were higher than in the control. • The strongest effects were observed with doses of 300 Gy or 20 Gy after soaking

  7. Radiotherapy and antitumor immunity. An immunomodifying effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimovich, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found that a tumor is formed and spread under the influence of opposite but not mutually exlusive immune reactions. Radiation effect along with direct injury of tumoral cells and feeding neoplasms vessels changes the established equilibrium of immunologic factors, therefore it should be considered as immunomodifying one. The wide spread opinion according to which the therapeutic effect in case of radiotherapy is attained despite its depressive effect on immunity, should be revised as not corresponding to the facts. The data available allow one to assume that immunologic factors may play an essential role in realization of therapeutic effect of irradiation as well as in limitation of its efficiency. Investigations into immunologic aspects of oncology and radiology should be therefore directed to the search of methods of control of immune reactions of organism - the tumor bearer. This may discover considerable reserves of increasing radiotherapeutic efficiency

  8. The effects of ionizing radiations on in utero development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lallemand, J.

    1984-01-01

    Following a reminder of embryology and methodology, a review is made of the main teratogenic effects related to radiation exposure, i.e. lethal effects, radioinduced malformations, maldevelopment and cancers. The sensitivity of the embryo and foetus to radiation seems to last during the whole gestation. Howewer, the latest investigations indicate that the main damage is mental retardation. This review concludes on practical considerations of radiation protection in the field of radiographic examinations of pregnant women [fr

  9. Varying Coefficient Panel Data Model in the Presence of Endogenous Selectivity and Fixed Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Malikov, Emir; Kumbhakar, Subal C.; Sun, Yiguo

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers a flexible panel data sample selection model in which (i) the outcome equation is permitted to take a semiparametric, varying coefficient form to capture potential parameter heterogeneity in the relationship of interest, (ii) both the outcome and (parametric) selection equations contain unobserved fixed effects and (iii) selection is generalized to a polychotomous case. We propose a two-stage estimator. Given consistent parameter estimates from the selection equation obta...

  10. Atomistic calculation of size effects on elastic coefficients in nanometre-sized tungsten layers and wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, P.; Beauchamp, P.; Badawi, K.F.; Goudeau, P.; Renault, P.-O.

    2004-01-01

    Equilibrium state and elastic coefficients of nanometre-sized single crystal tungsten layers and wires are investigated by atomistic simulations. The variations of the equilibrium distances as a function of the layer thickness or wire cross-section are mainly due to elastic effects of surface tension forces. A strong decrease of the Young's modulus is observed when the transverse dimensions are reduced below 2-3 nm

  11. Investigation of steady plasma actuation effect on aerodynamic coefficients of oscillating airfoil at low Reynolds number

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Mahboubidoust; Abas Ramiar; Morteza Dardel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, numerical study of two dimensional laminar incompressible flow around an oscillating NACA0012 airfoil is proceeded using the open source code OpenFOAM. Oscillatory motion types including pitching and flapping are considered. Reynolds number for these motions is assumed to be 12000 and effects of these motions and also different unsteady parameters such as amplitude and reduced frequency on aerodynamic coefficients are studied. For flow control on airfoil, dielectric barrier disc...

  12. Approximate effective nonlinear coefficient of second-harmonic generation in KTiOPO(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaumi, K

    1993-10-20

    A simplified approximate expression for the effective nonlinear coefficient of type-II second-harmonicgeneration in KTiOPO(4) was obtained by observing that the difference between the refractive indices n(x) and n(y) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than the difference between n(z) and n(y) (or n(x)). The agreement of this approximate equation with the true definition is good, with a maximum discrepancy of 4%.

  13. Epidemiological studies on the effects of low-level ionizing radiation on cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    2010-01-01

    The health effects of low-level ionizing radiation are yet unclear. As pointed out by Upton in his review (Upton, 1989), low-level ionizing radiation seems to have different biological effects from what high-level radiation has. If so, the hazard identification of ionizing radiation should he conducted separately for low- and high-level ionizing radiation; the hazard identification of low-level radiation is yet to be completed. What makes hazard identification of ionizing radiation difficult, particularly in the case of carcinogenic effect, is the difficulty in distinguishing radiation-induced cancer from other cancers with respect to clinicopathological features and molecular biological characteristics. Actually, it is suspected that radiation-induced carcinogenesis involves mechanisms not specific for radiation, such as oxidative stress. Excess risk per dose in medium-high dose ranges can be extrapolated to a low-dose range if dose-response can be described by the linear-non-threshold model. The cancer risk data of atomic-bomb survivors describes leukemia risk with a linear-quadratic (LQ) model and solid-cancer risk with linear non-threshold (LNT) model. The LQ model for leukemia and the LNT model for solid cancer correspond to the two-hit model and the one-hit model, respectively. Although the one-hit model is an unlikely dose-response for carcinogenesis, there is no convincing epidemiological evidence supporting the LQ model or non-threshold model for solid cancer. It should be pointed out, however, even if the true dose response is non-linear various noises involved in epidemiological data may mask the truth. In this paper, the potential contribution of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers and residents in high background radiation areas will be discussed. (author)

  14. The Hall coefficient: a tool for characterizing graphene field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrfritz, Peter; Seyller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Graphene field effect transistors are considered as a candidate for future high-frequency applications. For their realization, the optimal combination of substrate, graphene preparation, and insulator deposition and composition is required. This optimization must be based on an in-depth characterization of the obtained graphene insulator metal (GIM) stack. Hall effect measurements are frequently employed to study such systems, thereby focussing primarily on the charge carrier mobility. In this work we show how an analysis of the sheet Hall coefficient can reveal further important properties of the GIM stack, like, e.g., the interface trap density and the spacial charge inhomogeneity. To that end, we provide an extensive description of the GIM diode, which leads to an accurate calculation of the sheet Hall coefficient dependent on temperature and gate voltage. The gate dependent inverse sheet Hall coefficient is discussed in detail before we introduce the concept of an equivalent temperature, which is a measure of the spacial charge inhomogeneity. In order to test the concept, we apply it to evaluate already measured Hall data taken from the literature. This evaluation allows us to determine the Drude mobility, even at the charge neutrality point, which is inaccessible with a simple one band Hall mobility analysis, and to shed light on the spacial charge inhomogeneity. The formalism is easily adaptable and provides experimentalists a powerful tool for the characterization of their graphene field effect devices. (paper)

  15. Resolving the controversy over beneficial effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of the extensive research carried out during the past century, intense controversy continues over the health effects of low-level radiation. This controversy is largely due to political, social and economic issues among scientists and analysts in a variety of disciplines. These issues cloud objectivity and strengthen paradigms. Over the past ten years, in 14 universities and two research institutes, Japanese scientists have conducted exceptional research which clearly demonstrates beneficial effects of low-level radiation and cancer cures following therapy with low doses of radiation. Assessment, replication and extension of this work in North America could lead to greater appreciation of its significance. Cancer patients would demand such treatments, leading to universal acceptance of these bio-positive effects and reducing public fear of nuclear technology. (author)

  16. Bio-effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in context of cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliev, Timur; Tachibana, Katsuro; Bulanin, Denis; Mikhalovsky, Sergey; Whitby, Ray D L

    2014-01-01

    Bio-effects mediated by non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMF) have become a hot topic of research in the last decades. This interest has been triggered by a growing public concern about the rapid expansion of telecommunication devices and possible consequences of their use on human health. Despite a feasibility study of potential negative impacts, the therapeutic advantages of EMF could be effectively harnessed for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This review aims to examine recent findings relating to the mechanisms of action underlying the bio-effects induced by non-ionizing EMF. The potential of non-thermal and thermal effects is discussed in the context of possible applications for the induction of apoptosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, and increase of membrane permeability in malignant cells. A special emphasis has been put on the combination of EMF with magnetic nano-particles and ultrasound for cancer treatment. The review encompasses both human and animal studies.

  17. Inconsistencies and open questions regarding low-dose health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, R.H.; Koehnlein, W.

    1994-01-01

    The state of knowledge of health effects from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation has recently been reviewed in extensive reports by three prestigious national and international commissions of scientific and medical experts with partially overlapping membership, known by their acronyms UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation), BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation), and ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). Publication of these reports was followed by a number of summaries in scientific journals, authored by recognized radiation experts, that purport to present a scientific consensus of low-dose effects in a more accessible format for health professionals. A critical comparison between various presentations of accepted views, however, reveals inconsistencies regarding open-quotes establishedclose quotes facts and unsettled questions

  18. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on Luminous Bacteria Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryasheva, N.; Rozhko, T.; Alexandrova, M.; Vasyunkina, E.; Arkhipova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Marine luminous bacteria were used to monitor toxicity of alpha- (Am-241, U-235+238) and beta- (tritium) radionuclide solutions. Increase or inhibition of bacterial luminescence was observed under exposure to radionuclides. Radiation toxicity of Am and chemical toxicity of U were demonstrated. Effects of U were similar to those of stable heavy metals: sensitivity was about 10-5 M. Sensitivity of the bacteria to Am-241 was 300 Bq/L (10 -11 M). Inhibition of bacterial growth was observed under exposure to Am-241 and tritium. Role of peroxides and electron transfer processes in the effects of radionuclides on luminous bacteria is discussed.

  19. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: characteristics of ionizing radiations; biological effects; comparison of radiation and other industrial risks; principles of protection; cost-benefit analysis; dose limits; the control and monitoring of radiation; reference levels; emergency reference levels. (U.K.)

  20. The effect of ionizing radiation on immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyuleva, I.

    1999-01-01

    Delayed radiation effects of irradiation at relatively high doses - 0.52- 2 Gy in result of severe accidents are discussed. The immune response of lymphocyte populations manifested in formation of different kind of mutant cells at Hiroshima-A-bombing and Chernobyl accident are presented. It is of great interest the hypothesis presented launched by RERF (Japanese Foundation for Radiation Effect Research, Hiroshima) for radiation induced predominant of T H2 -lymphocytes in comparison to T H1 as delayed immune response at the Hiroshima-A-bomb survivors. The aspect of immune status is quite different at low doses irradiation (0.02 - 0.2 Gy). There is some stimulation in immune response known as hormesis effect. It is suggested that T-cell activation has key role in immune system stimulation at doses under 0.2 Gy. There is also activation of DNA-reparation mechanisms. Suppression of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-suprarenal axis brings to enhancing of immune potential. Chinese people living in a region with three-times higher background radiation, X-ray examined patients as well as occupationally exposed personnel have been investigated. Radioprotective effect of some cytokines and their influence on the individual radiosensitivity are also discussed.The investigations have to be continued because of some inconsistent results

  1. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-01-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed

  2. Progress on Beam-Plasma Effect Simulations in Muon Ionization Cooling Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, James [IIT, Chicago; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    New computational tools are essential for accurate modeling and simulation of the next generation of muon-based accelerators. One of the crucial physics processes specific to muon accelerators that has not yet been simulated in detail is beam-induced plasma effect in liquid, solid, and gaseous absorbers. We report here on the progress of developing the required simulation tools and applying them to study the properties of plasma and its effects on the beam in muon ionization cooling channels.

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse Peyer's patches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    The relationship of time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in mouse Peyer's patches after whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays was studied by the method of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). The results showed that the number of TUNEL positive cells in mouse Peyer's patches were significantly increased following WBI with 2 Gy irradiation, While the number of TUNEL positive cells were decreased after WBI with doses of 0.05 Gy and 0.075 Gy X-rays. the results support the view that 2 Gy irradiation promote the apoptosis of immune cells and the low doses of radiation suppress the apoptosis of immune cells

  4. Long term effects of ionizing radiation on mouse spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker-Klom, U.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of acute or split dose exposure to radiation on murine stem cell spermatogonia were analysed. Flow cytometry was applied to estimate the percentages of haploid germ cells (round and elongated spermatids) up to 12 months after irradiation. The recovery in the number of haploid germ cells continued gradually during the period under observation. The intervals between the two equal doses in split dose exposures were 0, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours. Split doses that were 24 h or 48 h apart had more harmful effects on spermatogenesis than split doses with 4 or 8 hours intervals or acute exposures. The repair capacity of the stem cell spermatogonia was remarkably high. (orig.)

  5. Studying the Effect of Ionization Radiation of 60Co on the Spirulina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuang-Sheng; Ai, Weidang; Dong, Wen-Ping; Qin, Li-Feng; Tang, Yong-Kang

    It studied the effect of ionization radiation on the Spirulina plastensis(No.6) by using the γ-rays of 60 Co. In the experiment, Spirulina were irradiated, and the dose of the ionization radiation covered 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0kGy. After irradiating, these Spirulina were cultured under the same conditions. During the course of the experiment, the growth rate, photosynthetic efficiency and nutrition quality of the Spirulina, were analyzed. From the results, low dose of γ-rays (less than 1.5kGy) could improve the content of phycobilin and protein of Spirulina. Only small changes in the morphology of algae filament were found at dose less than 1.0kGy. But with the increase of the dose of γ-rays (more than 1.5kGy), the filaments would break up or even disintegrate. Spirulina had stronger ionization radiation proof and self-rehabilitation capacity, but the growth of Spirulina was stagnated. The LD50 (i.e. the dose resulted in 50% death of the Spirulina) of the colony was 2.0kGy. Considering the capacity of being resistant to γ-rays irradiation, Spirulina can be considered as one of the key biological components in the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for future long-term space missions. Keywords: Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS); Spirulina; ionization radiation; biological component

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on salamander orientation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoop, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Pens were stocked with larvae of Am, bystoma opacum, A. maculatum, and Rana sylvatica and observations were made on survivorship, metamorphosis, size of juveniles, length of larval period, and migration. Migrating adults were irradiated with a 137 Cs source; the control and experimental animals were then returned to their points of capture and released. Radiation effects were not evident. Studies were conducted on the uptake and turnover of sodium, praseodymium, and europium by larval and hatchling amphibians and reptiles

  7. Biological and sanitary effects of non ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugere, H.; Hours, M.; Seze, R. de; Bernier, M.; Letertre, Th.; Aurengo, A.; Burais, N.; Bedja, M.; Merckel, O.; Decat, G.; Lagroye, I.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier de Gannes, F.; Aurengo, A.; Souques, M.; Cesarini, J.P.; Lagroye, I.; Aurengo, A.; Cesarini, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this day was to encourage the collaborations, especially multidisciplinary, on the biological, clinical, epidemiological and dosimetry aspects. The different presentations are as follow: the magneto reception among animals; the health and radio frequencies foundation; expo-metry to radio frequency fields: dosemeters evaluation; the electro-optical probes as tool of hyper frequency dosimetry; characterisation of emissions produced by the low consumption fluo-compact lamps in the perspective of persons exposure; strong and weak points of epidemiology; numerical dosimetry in low frequency magnetic and/or electric field; exposure of the French population to the 50 Hz magnetic field: first results for the Ile-de-france and Rhone alpes areas; characterisation of the exposure to the very low frequency magnetic fields in the town of Champlan; measurement of the residential exposure of children to the extremely low frequency, very low frequency and radiofrequency (E.L.F., V.L.F. and R.F.) fields and modeling of the high voltage magnetic field face to the child leukemia; effects of radiofrequency signals of wireless communications on the young animals; study of combined effects of 2.45 GHz microwaves and a known mutagen on DNA by two different approaches; effects on the oxidizing stress of nervous cells exposure to an (enhanced data rates for GSM evolution) E.D.G.E. signal; is environmental epidemiology still a science; cardiac implants and exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields in occupational environment; the tanning by artificial UV radiation: norms and legislation; mobiles phones, Wi Fi and other wireless communications; effects on health of 50-60 Hz electromagnetic fields; natural and artificial ultraviolet radiations: a proved risk. (N.C.)

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation and the molecular and cellular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This symposium with its 60 contributions presents a survey of the current state of the art in molecular radiation biophysics and radiobiology in the FRG. Many contributions show the trend of applying findings in these fields to cancer research. The various sessions have been devoted to: 1) Radiation chemistry of biomolecules; 2) DNA damage and repair; 3) Repair of DNA damage; 4) Cell proliferation and cell inactivation; 5) Cancerogenesis, mutation and chromosomal damage; 6) Effects of heavy ions. (AJ) [de

  9. Ionizing radiation effects in Brazilian grape tree wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, Marcia N.C.; Gutierrez, Érika M.R.; Arthur, Valter; Silva, Lúcia C.A.S.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to irradiate brazilian grape tree wines with gamma radiation (Co 60 ) to investigate the effect of radiation on its components and to create a new product for the superior quality fermented beverages market. For this wine was produced in an artisan way, but with all the care of hygiene and sanitation. The brazilian grape tree was fermented for five days and the wine was then filtered and stored in inert material containers then irradiated at 2.5 and 5 kGy doses. The samples were evaluated in relation to the radiation doses used. Physical and chemical analyzes of pH; total and volatile acidity; alcohol content; anthocyanins; tannins and colorimetry were performed. As a result, in most product analysis, had little effect on irradiation, except for anthocyanins and tannins. For this can be concluded that it is possible to develop a new fermented drink based on brazilian grape tree, according to the standards required by the legislation and that the irradiation at the dose of 5kGy was the sample that shown to have the most effect on the color because it was the one that degraded most molecules of anthocyanins and tannins. (author)

  10. Ionizing radiation effects in Brazilian grape tree wine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, Marcia N.C.; Gutierrez, Érika M.R., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br, E-mail: emrgutierrez@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Piracicaba (FATEC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Curso de Tecnologia em Alimentos. Dep. Roque Trevisan; Pires, Juliana A., E-mail: juliana.angelo@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Silva, Lúcia C.A.S., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br, E-mail: lcasilva@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work was to irradiate brazilian grape tree wines with gamma radiation (Co{sup 60}) to investigate the effect of radiation on its components and to create a new product for the superior quality fermented beverages market. For this wine was produced in an artisan way, but with all the care of hygiene and sanitation. The brazilian grape tree was fermented for five days and the wine was then filtered and stored in inert material containers then irradiated at 2.5 and 5 kGy doses. The samples were evaluated in relation to the radiation doses used. Physical and chemical analyzes of pH; total and volatile acidity; alcohol content; anthocyanins; tannins and colorimetry were performed. As a result, in most product analysis, had little effect on irradiation, except for anthocyanins and tannins. For this can be concluded that it is possible to develop a new fermented drink based on brazilian grape tree, according to the standards required by the legislation and that the irradiation at the dose of 5kGy was the sample that shown to have the most effect on the color because it was the one that degraded most molecules of anthocyanins and tannins. (author)

  11. Spatially varying cross-correlation coefficients in the presence of nugget effects

    KAUST Repository

    Kleiber, William; Genton, Marc G.

    2012-01-01

    We derive sufficient conditions for the cross-correlation coefficient of a multivariate spatial process to vary with location when the spatial model is augmented with nugget effects. The derived class is valid for any choice of covariance functions, and yields substantial flexibility between multiple processes. The key is to identify the cross-correlation coefficient matrix with a contraction matrix, which can be either diagonal, implying a parsimonious formulation, or a fully general contraction matrix, yielding greater flexibility but added model complexity. We illustrate the approach with a bivariate minimum and maximum temperature dataset in Colorado, allowing the two variables to be positively correlated at low elevations and nearly independent at high elevations, while still yielding a positive definite covariance matrix. © 2012 Biometrika Trust.

  12. Spatially varying cross-correlation coefficients in the presence of nugget effects

    KAUST Repository

    Kleiber, William

    2012-11-29

    We derive sufficient conditions for the cross-correlation coefficient of a multivariate spatial process to vary with location when the spatial model is augmented with nugget effects. The derived class is valid for any choice of covariance functions, and yields substantial flexibility between multiple processes. The key is to identify the cross-correlation coefficient matrix with a contraction matrix, which can be either diagonal, implying a parsimonious formulation, or a fully general contraction matrix, yielding greater flexibility but added model complexity. We illustrate the approach with a bivariate minimum and maximum temperature dataset in Colorado, allowing the two variables to be positively correlated at low elevations and nearly independent at high elevations, while still yielding a positive definite covariance matrix. © 2012 Biometrika Trust.

  13. Biological effects of radiation and health risks from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotian, Rahul P.; Kotian, Sahana Rahul; Sukumar, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    The very fact that ionizing radiation produces biological effects is known from many years. The first case of injury reported by Sir Roentgen was reported just after a few months after discovery of X-rays in 1895. As early as 1902, the first case of X-ray induced cancer was reported in the literature. Early human evidence of harmful effects as a result of exposure to radiation in large amounts existed in the 1920s and 1930s, based upon the experience of early radiologists, miners exposed to airborne radioactivity underground, persons working in the radium industry, and other special occupational groups. The long-term biological significance of smaller, repeated doses of radiation, however, was not widely appreciated until relatively recently, and most of our knowledge of the biological effects of radiation has been accumulated since World War II. The mechanisms that lead to adverse health effects after exposure to ionizing radiation are still not fully understood. Ionizing radiation has sufficient energy to change the structure of molecules, including DNA, within the cells of the body. Some of these molecular changes are so complex that it may be difficult for the body's repair mechanisms to mend them correctly. However, the evidence is that only a small fraction of such changes would be expected to result in cancer or other health effects. The most thoroughly studied individuals for the evaluation of health effects of ionizing radiation are the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings, a large population that includes all ages and both sexes.The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Japan has conducted followup studies on these survivors for more than 50 years. An important finding from these studies is that the occurrence of solid cancers increases in proportion to radiation dose. More than 60% of exposed survivors received a dose of radiation of less than 100 mSv (the definition of low dose used by the BEIR VII report). (author)

  14. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  15. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  16. Investigation of ionizing radiation effect on albumin aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizikov, A.M.; Adeeva, L.N.; Ogryzkova, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    Gamma radiation effect on 0.1-0.5%-albumin aqueous solutions has been investigated; variations of viscosity and optical density of solutions at pH medium different values and completeness of protein separation owing to radiation coagulation have been determined. It is shown that due to radiation coagulation it is possible to quantitatively separate albumin from irradiated aqueous solutions. The albumin coagulation is caused by OH radicals the action of which on albumin macromolecules results in destruction of intramolecular bonds and albumin conformation transformations

  17. The effect of ionizing radiation on analog characteristics of MOSFET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Diyuan; Yu Xuefeng; Lu Wu; Gao Wenyu; Fan Long; Zhang Guoqiang; Yan Rongliang

    1994-01-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ-ray on the linearity and output characteristics of MOSFETs were investigated. The relations of oxide-trapped charge and Si/SiO 2 interface state density to the decrease of mobility μ-bar and transconductance g m , and the shift of the output curves for both P-MOSFETs and N-MOSFETs were qualitatively described. It was shown that degradation of analog characteristics, for P-MOSFETs, resulted from both oxide-trapped charge and interface state, but the degradation for N-MOSFETs was mainly due to the increase of radiation induced Si-SiO 2 interface state density

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on nitric oxide myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarei, A.R.; Karel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Bovine nitric oxide myoglobin (NOMb) was irradiated with 40-4000 krad of γ-radiation, and the effects on the haem studied using absorption spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (e.s.r.) spectroscopy. The results show the following behaviour: (a) The bright red colour of NOMb changes to brown upon irradiation. This is similar to changes observed in radiation sterilized, nitrite-containing meats. (b) NOMb becomes progressively denitrosylated, with met-myoglobin (metMb) as the immediate product. (c) Upon increasing doses of radiation (up to 800 krad) at O 0 C parallel to NOMb denitrosylation, metMb is gradually converted, by water radiolytic products, to other products, believed to be ferromyoglobin and ferrimyoglobin peroxide. A minor quantity of 'choleglobin-type' pigments may also be formed at the highest doses. (d) Freezing of NOMb has a substantial protective effect against radiation. (e) Native bovine NOMb behaves as a pentaco-ordinate (hfs of 3 peaks with equal intensity); the bond between iron and Nsub(epsilon) is thus dramatically stretched and weakened. (f) Using a thermal energy analyser, no NO could be detected over irradiated NOMb solution, indicating rapid reaction of NO liberated from NOMb by radiation, with radiolytic products of water. (author)

  19. Effect on intelligence of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, Masanori.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of intelligence test scores at 10 - 11 years of age of individuals exposed prenatally to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has revealed the following: 1) For those individuals exposed in the first eight weeks after fertilization or after the 25th week, there is no evidence of a radiation-related effect on intelligence; 2) The mean test scores but not the variances are significantly heterogeneous among exposure categories for individuals exposed at 8 - 15 weeks after fertilization, and to a lesser extent those exposed at 16 - 25 weeks; 3) The regression of intelligence score on estimated fetal tissue dose is linear or linear-quadratic for the 8 - 15 week group and possibly linear for the 16 - 25 week group; 4) The cumulative distributions of test scores suggest a progressive shift downwards in the scores with increasing exposure; and 5) Within the group most sensitive to the occurrence of clinically recognizable, severe mental retardation, individuals exposed 8 to 15 weeks after fertilization, the diminution in intelligence score under the linear-quadratic model is 21 - 27 points at 1 gray (Gy = 100 cGy = 100 rad). The effect is somewhat greater when the controls receiving less than 0.01 Gy are excluded, 33 - 41 points at 1 Gy; but the two estimates are not statistically significantly different. (author)

  20. Scientific projection paper on biologic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.

    1980-01-01

    There is widespread knowledge about the effects of radiation in human populations but the studies have had some limitations which have left gaps in our knowledge. Most populations have had exposure to high doses with little information on the effect of dose rate. The characteristics of the populations have been restricted by the location of the disaster, the occupational limitations, or the basic risks associated with the under-lying disease for which radiation was given. All doses have been estimated and such values are subject to marked variability particularly when they rely on sources of data such as hospital records. The biological data although extensive have several deficits in information. Which are the sites in which cancer is produced by irradiation and what are the cell types which are produced. The sensitivity of various tissues and organs are not similar and it is important to rank them according to susceptibility. This has been done in the past but the results are not complete for all cell types and organs. The temporal patterns for tumor development, the latent period, the period of expressed excess, the life-time risks need to be defined more precisely for the cancers. Many populations have not been followed long enough to express the complete risk

  1. Oxidation-reduction enzymes of myocardium under ionizing radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uteshev, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Tissue respiration proceses under radiation effect were investigated which allowed one to reveal slight biochemical disturbances in a cell which make up the base of functional changes of different organs and tissues and to get to know the essence of tissue respiration processes. An attempt to explain significant value of oxidation enzyme system radiosensitivity in the course of cell respiration process altogether is made when studying the state of separate links of oxidation-reduction chain. It is shown that at early periods of radiation injury activity of catalase, dehydrogenases (isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, malic, succinic acids) is suppressed, concentration of a number of cytochromes is reduced and general ferrum content is increased which is connected with conformation changes of ultrastructure of mitochondrial membranes

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on moist air systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of nitrogen/oxygen/water systems is reviewed. General radiolytic effects in dry nitrogen/oxygen systems are relatively well characterized. Irradiation results in the formation of steady state concentrations of ozone, nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide. In closed systems, the concentration observed depends on the total dose, temperature and initial gas composition. Only three studies have been published that focus on the radiation chemistry of nitrogen/oxygen/water homogeneous gas systems. Mixed phase work that is relevant to the gaseous system is also summarized. The presence of water vapor results in the formation of nitric acid and significantly changes the chemistry observed in dry air systems. Mechanistic evidence from the studies reviewed are summarized and discussed in relation to characterizing the gas phase during the containment period of a repository in tuff

  3. A Role for Bioelectric Effects in the Induction of Bystander Signals by Ionizing Radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, C.; Moran, G.; McNeill, F.; Gow, M.D.; Denbeigh, J.; Prestwich, W.; Seymour, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    The induction of “bystander effects” i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary explants of mouse bladder and fish skin, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation or treated in a variety of bystander protocols. Exposure of cells was conducted by shielding one group of flasks using lead, to reduce the dose below the threshold of 2mGy 60Cobalt gamma rays established for the bystander effect. The endpoint for the bystander effect in the reporter system used was reduction in cloning efficiency (RCE). The magnitude of the RCE was similar in shielded and unshielded flasks. When cells were placed in a Faraday cage the magnitude of the RCE was less but not eliminated. The results suggest that liquid media or cell-cell contact transmission of bystander factors may be only part of the bystander mechanism. Bioelectric or bio magnetic fields may have a role to play. To test this further, cells were placed in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine for 10min using a typical head scan protocol. This treatment also induced a bystander response. Apart from the obvious clinical relevance, the MRI results further suggest that bystander effects may be produced by non-ionizing exposures. It is concluded that bioelectric or magnetic effects may be involved in producing bystander signaling cascades commonly seen following ionizing radiation exposure. PMID:18648606

  4. Optical coefficients in a semiconductor quantum ring: Electric field and donor impurity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, C. M.; Acosta, Ruben E.; Morales, A. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ojeda, J. H.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    The electron states in a two-dimensional quantum dot ring are calculated in the presence of a donor impurity atom under the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. The effect of an externally applied electric field is also taken into account. The wavefunctions are obtained via the exact diagonalization of the problem Hamiltonian using a 2D expansion within the adiabatic approximation. The impurity-related optical response is analyzed via the optical absorption, relative refractive index change and the second harmonics generation. The dependencies of the electron states and these optical coefficients with the changes in the configuration of the quantum ring system are discussed in detail.

  5. Calculating the Effect of External Shading on the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient of Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shukla, Yash [CEPT Univ., Ahmedabad (India); Rawal, Rajan [CEPT Univ., Ahmedabad (India)

    2017-08-09

    Current prescriptive building codes have limited ways to account for the effect of solar shading, such as overhangs and awnings, on window solar heat gains. We propose two new indicators, the adjusted Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (aSHGC) which accounts for external shading while calculating the SHGC of a window, and a weighted SHGC (SHGCw) which provides a seasonal SHGC weighted by solar intensity. We demonstrate a method to calculate these indices using existing tools combined with additional calculations. The method is demonstrated by calculating the effect of an awning on a clear double glazing in New Delhi.

  6. Study of ionizing radiation effects in human costal cartilage by thermogravimetry and optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from post mortem donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of use Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) to identify possible structural modifications caused by both preservation methods of cartilage and gamma irradiation doses. Cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -70 deg C or preserved in glycerol. Irradiation was performed by 60 Co source with doses of 15, 25 and 50 kGy. Our TGA results showed that glycerolized cartilages irradiated with different doses of radiation does not presented statistical differences when compared to the control group for the dehydration rate. However, the same was not observed for deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 15 kGy. The results of OCT associated to total optical attenuation coefficient showed that doses of 15 kGy promote cross-link between collagen fibrils, corroborating the results obtained from TGA. Moreover, total optical attenuation coefficient values are proportional to stress at break of cartilages, what will be very useful in a near future to predict the quality of the allografts, without unnecessary loss of biological tissue, once OCT is a nondestructive technique. By PS-OCT images, we found that high doses of ionizing radiation does not promote sufficient impairments to promote complete loss of tissue birefringence. Thus, TGA and OCT are techniques that can be used for tissue banks to verify tissue quality before its transplant. (author)

  7. Estimation of Inbreeding Coefficient and Its Effects on Lamb Survival in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad almasi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The mating of related individuals produces an inbred offspring and leads to an increased homozygosity in the progeny, genetic variance decrease within families and increase between families. The ration of homozygosity for individuals was calculated by inbreeding coefficient. Inbred individuals may carry two alleles at a locus that are replicated from one gene in the previous generations, called identical by descent. The inbreeding coefficient should be monitored in a breeding program, since it plays an important role at decreasing of homeostasis, performance, reproduction and viability. The trend of inbreeding is an indicator for determining of inbreeding level in the herd. Inbreeding affects both phenotypic means of traits and genetic variances within population, thus it is an important factor for delimitations of genetic progress in a population. Reports showed an inbreeding increase led to decrease of phenotypic value in some of the productive and reproductive traits. Materials and Methods In the current study, the pedigree data of 14030 and 6215 records of Baluchi and Iranblack lambs that collected from 1984 to 2011 at the Abbasabad Sheep Breeding Station in Mashhad, Iran, 3588 records of Makoei lambs that collected from 1994 to 2011 at the Makoei sheep breeding station and 6140, records of Zandi lambs that collected from 1991 to 2011 at the Khejir Sheep Breeding Station in Tehran, Iran were used to estimating the inbreeding coefficient and its effects on lamb survival in these breeds. Lamb survival trait was scored as 1 and 0 for lamb surviving and not surviving at weaning weight, respectively. Inbreeding coefficient was estimated by relationship matrix algorithm (A=TDT' methodology using the CFC software program. Effects of inbreeding coefficient on lamb survival were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood (REML method under 12 different animal models using ASReml 3.0 computer programme. Coefficient of inbreeding for each

  8. Row spacing effects on light extinction coefficients of corn, sorghum, soybean, and sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flénet, F.; Kiniry, J.R.; Board, J.E.; Westgate, M.E.; Reicosky, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    In many crop models, light intercepted by a canopy (IPAR) is calculated from a Beer's Law equation: IPAR = PAR x [1- exp(-k x LAI)], where k is the extinction coefficient, PAR the photosynthetically active radiation, and LAI the leaf area index. The first objective of this study was to investigate the effect of row spacing on k for corn (Zea mays L.), sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) to provide information for modeling. Data from literature and from an experiment conducted at Temple, TX, were evaluated. The second objective was to investigate effects of time of day and stage of crop development on k for different row spacings. Seeds of all four species were sown in rows 0.35, 0.66, or 1.00 m apart. Measurements of canopy light interception were taken near solar noon on two dates before anthesis. At anthesis, extinction coefficients were determined at 0845, 1015, and 1145 h (solar time). The extinction coefficient showed a linear decrease as row spacing increased. For each crop, the effect of row spacing on k was described by one linear regression for most data. Stage of crop development and stage of development x row spacing interaction did not significantly affect k during the period of measurements. The effect of time of day was significant for all four crops, and the time of day x row spacing interaction was significant for soybean and sunflower. Thus, modeling light interception for different row spacings should account for these effects

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tak- Hyun; Nam, Yun-Ku; Joo Lim, Seung

    2014-01-01

    Livestock wastewater is generally very difficult to be treated by conventional wastewater treatment techniques because it contains high-strength organics (COD), ammonium (NH 4 + ), phosphate (PO 4 3− ) and suspended solids. Struvite crystallization has been recently studied for the simultaneous removal of NH 4 + and PO 4 3− . In this study, gamma ray irradiation was carried out prior to struvite crystallization of the anaerobically digested livestock wastewater. The effects of gamma ray irradiation on the struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater were investigated. As a result, gamma ray irradiation can decrease the concentration of COD, NH 4 + and PO 4 3− contained in the livestock wastewater. This results in not only an enhancement of the struvite crystallization efficiency but also a decrease in the chemical demands for the struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater. - Highlights: • Gamma ray was applied prior to struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater. • Gamma ray resulted in an enhancement of struvite crystallization efficiency. • This is due to the decrease of COD concentration by gamma ray irradiation

  10. [Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the ''apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference

  11. Effect of ionizing radiations on sperm of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, F.I.; Hassan, N.H.A.; Eldawt, H.A.; Roushdy, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of both gamma rays and reactor beams of mixed neutrons and gamma rays on sperms were investigated. Caudal sperms of adult male mice were examined 3 and 6 weeks post-exposure to 0.5 , 1.5, 3.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma rays and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks in animals exposed to 42.5 and 58.5 R of mixed neutrons and gamma-rays. Sperms were seriously affected due to exposure to both types of irradiation. There were dose dependent changes in the mean frequency of abnormal sperms. The peak values were at dose level of 3.0 Gy recording 26.43% and 29.82% in both groups sacrificed 3 and 6 weeks respectively compared with 1.57% for the control group. The increase in the abnormal sperms in the groups of the animals exposed to the reactor beam was always related to the time interval between treatment and observation, the longer the time the more sperms with abnormal head were encountered. 14 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Microstructural effect on radiative scattering coefficient and asymmetry factor of anisotropic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. W.; Zhao, C. Y.; Wang, B. X.

    2018-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are common porous materials coated on the surface of devices operating under high temperatures and designed for heat insulation. This study presents a comprehensive investigation on the microstructural effect on radiative scattering coefficient and asymmetry factor of anisotropic thermal barrier coatings. Based on the quartet structure generation set algorithm, the finite-difference-time-domain method is applied to calculate angular scattering intensity distribution of complicated random microstructure, which takes wave nature into account. Combining Monte Carlo method with Particle Swarm Optimization, asymmetry factor, scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient are retrieved simultaneously. The retrieved radiative properties are identified with the angular scattering intensity distribution under different pore shapes, which takes dependent scattering and anisotropic pore shape into account implicitly. It has been found that microstructure significantly affects the radiative properties in thermal barrier coatings. Compared with spherical shape, irregular anisotropic pore shape reduces the forward scattering peak. The method used in this paper can also be applied to other porous media, which designs a frame work for further quantitative study on porous media.

  13. Coffee-ring effects in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie-Bi; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L

    2013-03-05

    This report focuses on the heterogeneous distribution of small molecules (e.g. metabolites) within dry deposits of suspensions and solutions of inorganic and organic compounds with implications for chemical analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Taking advantage of the imaging capabilities of a modern mass spectrometer, we have investigated the occurrence of "coffee rings" in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) sample spots. It is seen that the "coffee-ring effect" in MALDI/SALDI samples can be both beneficial and disadvantageous. For example, formation of the coffee rings gives rise to heterogeneous distribution of analytes and matrices, thus compromising analytical performance and reproducibility of the mass spectrometric analysis. On the other hand, the coffee-ring effect can also be advantageous because it enables partial separation of analytes from some of the interfering molecules present in the sample. We report a "hidden coffee-ring effect" where under certain conditions the sample/matrix deposit appears relatively homogeneous when inspected by optical microscopy. Even in such cases, hidden coffee rings can still be found by implementing the MALDI-MS imaging technique. We have also found that to some extent, the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed during SALDI sample preparation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of the ionizing radiation in the sensorial characteristics of the pineapple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Josenilda Maria da; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet; Silva, Juliana Pizarro

    2007-01-01

    The post-harvest quality of the pineapple cultivar Smooth Cayenne was evaluated after the fruit was irradiated with doses of 100 and 150 Gy and stored for 10, 20 and 30 days at 12 deg C ( +-1) and relative humidity of 85% (+- 5). The controls were untreated fruits. Sensorial analyses were made for each storage period to obtain information about the effects of ionizing radiation on the quality of the fruit. The ionizing radiation dosage had little effect on the sensorial characteristics of the pineapple, although the best results were obtained with fruit irradiated with 100 Gy. The 20-day storage period resulted in the highest consumer acceptability, while the 30-day storage period impaired the fruit's external and internal appearance. (author)

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on blood and blood components: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The present publication reviews, in a comprehensive manner, the relevant literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on whole blood, blood cells, and other blood components. It presents the interested reader with sufficient information and data to facilitate rational decisions in relation to the feasibility of irradiation of blood and blood products for the purposes stated above. The IAEA expects that this can promote a wider use of the technology for improving health care practice in Member States, particularly in view of the recent spread of conventional as well as ''modern'' diseases which exert immunosuppressive effects in afflicted patients, with pathological consequences. Innumerable patients could thus benefit from this application of ionizing energy. 209 refs, 1 tab

  16. Graphene Field Effect Transistor-Based Detectors for Detection of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Cazalas, Edward; Childres, I.; Patil, A.; Koybasi, O.; Chen, Y-P.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of our recent efforts to develop novel ionizing radiation sensors based on the nano-material graphene. Graphene used in the field effect transistor architecture could be employed to detect the radiation-induced charge carriers produced in undoped semiconductor absorber substrates, even without the need for charge collection. The detection principle is based on the high sensitivity of graphene to ionization-induced local electric field perturbations in the electrically biased substrate. We experimentally demonstrated promising performance of graphene field effect transistors for detection of visible light, X-rays, gamma-rays, and alpha particles. We propose improved detector architectures which could result in a significant improvement of speed necessary for pulsed mode operation. (authors)

  17. Mechanism of effect of ionizing radiation on bcl-2 protein expression and apoptosis in mouse thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Chen Dong; Liu Shuzheng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of effect of ionizing radiation in varied doses of X-rays on bcl-2 express and apoptosis in mouse thymus. Methods: Immunohistochemistry, image analysis and transmission electron microscope were used in the study. Results: The expression of bcl-2 protein was limited within thymic medulla, decreased with 2 Gy, however, increased with 0.075 Gy after whole-body irradiation. Some typical apoptotic cells were found in thymic cortex after 2 Gy irradiation. The apoptotic cells decreased and mitotic metaphase increased after 0.075 Gy irradiation. Conclusion: The mechanism of effect of ionizing radiation on apoptosis of thymus was related with the expression of bcl-2 proteins

  18. Effects of stellar evolution and ionizing radiation on the environments of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Mohamed, S.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Neilson, H. R.; Meyer, D. M.-A.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss two important effects for the astrospheres of runaway stars: the propagation of ionizing photons far beyond the astropause, and the rapid evolution of massive stars (and their winds) near the end of their lives. Hot stars emit ionizing photons with associated photoheating that has a significant dynamical effect on their surroundings. 3-D simulations show that H ii regions around runaway O stars drive expanding conical shells and leave underdense wakes in the medium they pass through. For late O stars this feedback to the interstellar medium is more important than that from stellar winds. Late in life, O stars evolve to cool red supergiants more rapidly than their environment can react, producing transient circumstellar structures such as double bow shocks. This provides an explanation for the bow shock and linear bar-shaped structure observed around Betelgeuse.

  19. Investigating the Effect of Soil Texture and Fertility on Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficient of Maize Forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbanian Kerdabadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crop coefficient varies in different environmental conditions, such as deficit irrigation, salinity and intercropping. The effect of soil fertility and texture of crop coefficient and evapotranspiration of maize was investigated in this study. Low soil fertility and food shortages as a stressful environment for plants that makes it different evapotranspiration rates of evapotranspiration calculation is based on the FAO publication 56. Razzaghi et al. (2012 investigate the effect of soil type and soil-drying during the seed-filling phase on N-uptake, yield and water use, a Danish-bred cultivar (CV. Titicaca was grown in field lysimeters with sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soil. Zhang et al (2014 were investigated the Effect of adding different amounts of nitrogen during three years (from 2010 to 2012 on water use efficiency and crop evapotranspiration two varieties of winter wheat. The results of their study showed. The results indicated the following: (1 in this dry land farming system, increased N fertilization could raise wheat yield, and the drought-tolerant Changhan No. 58 showed a yield advantage in drought environments with high N fertilizer rates; (2 N application affected water consumption in different soil layers, and promoted wheat absorbing deeper soil water and so increased utilization of soil water; and (3 comprehensive consideration of yield and WUE of wheat indicated that the N rate of 270 kg/ha for Changhan No. 58 was better to avoid the risk of reduced production reduction due to lack of precipitation; however, under conditions of better soil moisture, the N rate of 180 kg/ha was more economic. Materials and Methods: The study was a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three soil texture treatment, including silty clay loam, loam and sandy-loam soil and three fertility treatment, including without fertilizer, one and two percent fertilizer( It was conducted at the experimental farm in

  20. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veinot, K.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Hertel, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above ∼30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater. (authors)

  1. Connection between effective-range expansion and nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmukhamedov, R.; Baye, D.

    2011-01-01

    Explicit relations between the effective-range expansion and the nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay B→A+a are derived for an arbitrary orbital momentum together with the corresponding location condition for the (A+a) bound-state energy. They are valid both for the charged case and for the neutral case. Combining these relations with the standard effective-range function up to order six makes it possible to reduce to two the number of free effective-range parameters if an ANC value is known from experiment. Values for the scattering length, effective range, and form parameter are determined in this way for the 16 O+p, α+t, and α+ 3 He collisions in partial waves where a bound state exists by using available ANCs deduced from experiments. The resulting effective-range expansions for these collisions are valid up to energies larger than 5 MeV.

  2. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that {sup t}he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... {sup .} In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved.

  3. On the effect of electron's runaway in partially ionized hydrogen semiclassical nonideal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turekhanova, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The effect of runaway electrons occurs frequently in tokamak plasmas. The majority of experiments in tokamak research have been devoted to the study of confinement properties of runaway electrons. Runaway electrons are reason of various destroying untolarance in tokamak plasmas. At high plasma density, when the critical energy is comparable with the rest energy the multiplication of runaway electrons accelerate at the sacrifice of increase of plasma density. The plasma conductivity is determined by electrons with energy several times higher than the thermal one and does not practically depend on slower electrons distribution. It is important to analyze the probability of runaway electrons at investigation of physical properties of nonideal plasmas under external electric field and running numerical simulations of their. The present paper is devoted to the investigation of effect of runaway electrons in partially ionized hydrogen dense plasma using the effective potentials of particle's interaction. At the investigation of composition of plasma we used the Saha equation with corrections to nonideality (lowering of ionization potentials). The Saha equation was solved for obtaining of plasma ionization stages at the different number density and temperature. As well, when take into account quantum-mechanical diffraction and screening effects, whereas free path of electrons increases with increase of plasma coupling parameter. The condition for appearance of runaway electrons in semiclassical partially ionized plasma is more favorable in regime of dense plasma. In summary it means that the probability of runaway electron in dense plasma is more than the same in rarified plasma that is possibly connected with formation of some ordered structures in dense plasma.

  4. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Kelly, Ryan T [Wet Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02

    A system and method are disclosed that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. A novel "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates the electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer.

  5. Studies on the effects of ionizing radiation on the normal and diseased liver in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the present study primarily concerned with the effects of ionizing radiations on the normal and diseased liver in experimental animals (mice). Different radiation intensities and different exposure schemes were used to irradiate both healthy and schistosoma mansoni infected animals. A group of uninfected and unirradiated animals were used as controls. Follow up studies were performed every 6 weeks for 30 weeks. These included histopathological studies of the liver damage at every observation periods for all animal groups

  6. The damaging effect of densely ionizing radiations on stem cells of mammalian critical organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplyannikov, A.G.; Konoplyannikova, O.A.

    1985-01-01

    Literature and experimental data on foundation of conceptions for cell determinants of survival rate in irradiated animals are analysed. Experimental confirmation of conceptions for cell determinants for both CFU of hemopoietic organs and for cases of intestinal death after densely ionizing radiation effect is obtained. The explanation of causes for difference in interrelation of two types of radiation death of animals in such a case is suggested

  7. Measurement of effective piezoelectric coefficients of PZT thin films for energy harvesting application with interdigitated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Nachiappan; Mazzalai, Andrea; Muralt, Paul

    2012-08-01

    Interdigitated electrode (IDE) systems with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films play an increasingly important role for two reasons: first, such a configuration generates higher voltages than parallel plate capacitor-type electrode (PPE) structures, and second, the application of an electric field leads to a compressive stress component in addition to the overall stress state, unlike a PPE structure, which results in tensile stress component. Because ceramics tend to crack at relatively moderate tensile stresses, this means that IDEs have a lower risk of cracking than PPEs. For these reasons, IDE systems are ideal for energy harvesting of vibration energy, and for actuators. Systematic investigations of PZT films with IDE systems have not yet been undertaken. In this work, we present results on the evaluation of the in-plane piezoelectric coefficients with IDE systems. Additionally, we also propose a simple and measurable figure of merit (FOM) to analyze and evaluate the relevant piezoelectric parameter for harvesting efficiency without the need to fabricate the energy harvesting device. Idealized effective coefficients e(IDE) and h(IDE) are derived, showing its composite nature with about one-third contribution of the transverse effect, and about two-thirds contribution of the longitudinal effect in the case of a PZT film deposited on a (100)-oriented silicon wafer with the in-plane electric field along one of the Si directions. Randomly oriented 1-μm-thick PZT 53/47 film deposited by a sol-gel technique, was evaluated and yielded an effective coefficient e(IDE) of 15 C·m(-2). Our FOM is the product between effective e and h coefficient representing twice the electrical energy density stored in the piezoelectric film per unit strain deformation (both for IDE and PPE systems). Assuming homogeneous fields between the fingers, and neglecting the contribution from below the electrode fingers, the FOM for IDE structures with larger electrode gap is derived to be

  8. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1988-01-01

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  9. Effects of non-uniformities on electrical conduction in weakly ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.; Murakami, Y.; Nitta, T.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of non-uniformities on the flow of electric current in weakly ionized plasmas is investigated by taking into account the ion slip as well as the Hall current. An Ohm's law for a non-uniform plasma is derived, from which the formula previously obtained by Numano, i.e. an extension of Rosa's equation, is obtainable as a special case. Making use of this new Ohm's law, the effective electrical conductivity and the effective Hall parameter are determined for isotropically turbulent plasmas. It is found that when the ion-slip effect is absent they are in good agreement with the results obtained previously. (author)

  10. Organ and Effective Dose Coefficients for Cranial and Caudal Irradiation Geometries: Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; Hiller, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations by ICRP Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors, and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to neutrons ranging in energy from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6 radiation transport code and the adult reference voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above about 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.

  11. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  12. Evaluation of ionizing radiation effects in bone tissue by FTIR spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo N.; Santin, Stefany P.; Benetti, Carolina; Pereira, Thiago M.; Mattor, Monica B.; Politano, Rodolfo; Zezell, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    In many medical practices the bone tissue exposure to ionizing radiation is necessary. However, this radiation can interact with bone tissue in a molecular level, causing chemical and mechanical changes related with the dose used. The aim of this study was verify the changes promoted by different doses of ionizing radiation in bone tissue using spectroscopy technique of Attenuate Total Reflectance - Fourier Transforms Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and dynamic mechanical analysis. Samples of bovine bone were irradiated using irradiator of Cobalt-60 with five different doses between 0.01 kGy, 0.1 kGy,1 kGy, 15 kGy and 75 kGy. To study the effects of ionizing irradiation on bone chemical structure the sub-bands of amide I and the crystallinity index were studied. The mechanical changes were evaluated using the elastic modulus and the damping value. To verify if the chemical changes and the bone mechanic characteristics were related, it was made one study about the correlation between the crystallinity index and the elastic modulus, between the sub-bands ratio and the damping value and between the sub-bands ratio and the elastic modulus. It was possible to evaluate the effects of different dose of ionizing radiation in bone tissue. With ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analysis, it was possible observe changes in the organic components and in the hydroxyapatite crystals organization. Changes were also observed in the mechanical properties. A good correlation between the techniques was found, however, it was not possible to establish a linear or exponential dependence between dose and effect. (author)

  13. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, F.R.A. [Centro regional de Ciencias Nucleares, CRCN/CNEN, Rua Conego Barata, 999, Tamarineira, Recife, PE (Brazil); Kramer, R.; Vieira, J.W.; Khoury, H.J. [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, DEN/UFPE, Cidade Universitaria, Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br

    2004-07-01

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  14. The effect of pipecol angles for the magnetic electron lens on the aberration coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khshab, A. M.; Al-Khshab, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    The symmetric mag etic objective lens of great importance for the electronic microscopes intended for hi g resolution. Such lens is determined, not only by its geometries structure and shape parameters, but also by the influence of the variation of the pole piece angles. the results show that the Objective lens having the pole piece angle of 55 a has a considerable effect on the electron optical Properties. When this pole piece is appropriately and highly saturated, the lens possesses low spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients. This hind of pole piece lens leads to more favourable design than other lenses. (authors). 14 refs., 7 figs.1 table

  15. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Vieira, J.W.; Khoury, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  16. Effect of design and operation parameters on heat transfer coefficient in condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskin, N.; Arslan, G.; Balci, T.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate and optimum usage of energy sources is gaining importance all over the world due to the increase of energy need and limited energy sources. Increasing condenser efficiency, reduce both the dimensions and the material usage and also the investment cost of the devices. This can be maintained by increasing the heat transfer coefficient in condensers. Generally, tubes having plain inner surfaces are mounted horizontally in serpentine type condenser applications and due to the performance loss results from the congestion in serpentine connections, vertical tube mounting is not preferred. Due to the complexity of the two-phase flow, a single set of correlation for heat transfer cannot be used. Average and local heat transfer coefficient for condensers are determined. Moreover, for each experiments flow pattern is determined and the validity of the correlations are compared according to that flow pattern. In Table 2, some of the experiments for R134a are listed. Local heat transfer coefficient is also important for condenser design. As a result, to design effective condensers the accuracy of the correlations is very important. When all the experiments are taken into account, it is seen that deviation of the correlations differs according to the refrigerant type, tube dimensions, mass flux, saturation temperature and flow pattern. For high mass flux (>400 kg/m 2 s) Traviss (1973) correlation failed. For small diameters (<3.14 mm) Tandon (1985) correlation estimate the heat transfer coefficient with a high deviation. Most accurate results are obtained for Akers et al. (1959), M.M. Shah (1978), Cavallini and Zecchlin (1974), J.R. Thome - J. El Hajal - A. Cavallini (2003) correlations. For high mass flux and annular flow, M.M. Shah (1978) correlation estimates the heat transfer coefficient with high precision. However, as the tube diameter decrease, this deviation increases. For small tube diameter such as 0.691 mm Cavallini and Zecchlin (1974) gives the most

  17. Ecological effects of various toxic agents on the aquatic microcosm in comparison with acute ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuma, S.; Ishii, N.; Takeda, H.; Miyamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Ichimasa, Y.; Saito, M.; Kawabata, Z.; Polikarpov, G.G.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was an evaluation of the effect levels of various toxic agents compared with acute doses of ionizing radiation for the experimental model ecosystem, i.e., microcosm mimicking aquatic microbial communities. For this purpose, the authors used the microcosm consisting of populations of the flagellate alga Euglena gracilis as a producer, the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila as a consumer and the bacterium Escherichia coli as a decomposer. Effects of aluminum and copper on the microcosm were investigated in this study, while effects of γ-rays, ultraviolet radiation, acidification, manganese, nickel and gadolinium were reported in previous studies. The microcosm could detect not only the direct effects of these agents but also the community-level effects due to the interspecies interactions or the interactions between organisms and toxic agents. The authors evaluated doses or concentrations of each toxic agent which had the following effects on the microcosm: (1) no effects; (2) recognizable effects, i.e., decrease or increase in the cell densities of at least one species; (3) severe effects, i.e., extinction of one or two species; and (4) destructive effects, i.e., extinction of all species. The resulting effects data will contribute to an ecological risk assessment of the toxic agents compared with acute doses of ionizing radiation

  18. Importance of polarization effects in electron impact single ionization of argon atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, G., E-mail: g_vpurohit@yahoo.co [Department of Basic Sciences, School of Engineering, Sir Padampat Singhania University, Bhatewar, Udaipur 313 601 (India); Patidar, Vinod; Sud, K.K. [Department of Basic Sciences, School of Engineering, Sir Padampat Singhania University, Bhatewar, Udaipur 313 601 (India)

    2009-12-15

    We report the results of our calculations of triple differential cross section (TDCS) for electron impact single ionization (i.e. (e, 2e) processes) from the 3s shell of argon using a modified distorted wave Born approximation formalism by including correlation-polarization potential, which accounts for both correlation and polarization effects. We observe that DWBA formalism including polarization potential is able to reproduce most of the trends of experimental data and hence provide a future direction for further investigation of ionization process from the 3s shell of argon. We also compare our results with the available theoretical and experimental results. The present calculations significantly improve the agreement with the experimental results but still there are certain discrepancies, which is a matter of further investigation.

  19. Comparison of the PCI distortion effects on the Auger lineshape for electron and photon impact ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paripas, B.; Vitez, G.; Vikor, Gy.; Tokesi, K.; Sankari, R.; Calo, A.

    2005-01-01

    The distortion effects of the post-collision interaction (PCI) on the Ar LMM Auger electron lineshape for electron and photon impact ionization have been calculated. The calculations were based on the eikonal model of Kuchiev and Sheinerman [Sov. Phys. - Tech. Phys. 32 (1987) 879]. It is shown that the Auger peak asymmetry depends on the emission angle of the Auger electron relative to the primary beam (and the polarization vector of the photon beam). At a given excess energy, defined as the difference between the impact energy and the binding energy, the absolute value of the Auger peak asymmetry is always larger for electron impact ionization than for photoionization. At the same time, the angular dependence of the PCI distortion is stronger for photoionization. In both cases the Auger peak asymmetry has a maximum when the energy of the ejected electron and that of the Auger electron are nearly equal. The calculations are in good agreement with our previous experimental results

  20. The effect of ionizing radiation on the filamentous actin of vascular endothelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Xiaowu; Chen Shisheng; Yang Lihe; Lin Juelong; Yang Haiwei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the ionizing radiation effect on filamentous actin of vascular endothelial cell and explore its mechanism. Methods: The vascular endothelial cells were irradiated with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. The cytoskeleton was observed with CLSM at 6 hs after the irradiation and the cytoskeleton protein F-actin detected with flow cytometry after 12 and 24 hs. Results: The damage to cytoskeletons increased with the radiation dose. The cytoskeleton protein F-actin was significantly decreased at 12 hs after the irradiation, and then recovered after 24 hs. Conclusion: Ionizing radiation caused vascular endothelial cell injury by damaging the cytoskeleton and depolymerizating the F-actin. (authors)

  1. Effects of ionizing scrape-off layers on local recycling in Tore Supra pump limiter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, L.W.; Hogan, J.T.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Uckan, T.; Chatelier, M.; Loarer, T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of ohmic discharges with active pumping in the Tore Supra outboard pump limiter has been analyzed with the DEGAS neutrals transport code and an analysis scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma model. Pumping speed and plenum pressure measurements indicated 5--10 torr-L/s throughput with only modest effects on density (dN core /dt + source rate from ionization and dissociation of wall-desorbed molecules is seen to peak very near the radial position of the limiter throat. Consequently, a strong recycling vortex is created in the region of the limiter, with the ion flux amplified by factors of ∼2 at the outer limiter surfaces and >3 within the limiter throat. The calculations indicate that less than 30% of the pump throughput is due to first-generation ions from the core efflux, with the balance from local recycling in the strongly ionizing scrape-off layer

  2. Combined effect of thermal sterilization and ionizing radiation on storage life of preserved foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozova, B.; Sorman, L.; Fazekasova, H.

    1986-01-01

    The effect was studied of the binary combination of preservation methods, i.e., of a reduced intensity of thermosterilization and diverse doses of ionizing radiation, on the content of microorganisms in single-component tinned products (tinned beef and gravy, tinned pickled cauliflower) and in tins containing two components (beef with cauliflower) over a period of 115 days of storage at a laboratory temperature of 20 degC ± 2 degC. The experimental results showed that the chosen combined process of preservation guaranteed sufficient storage stability to the products over several months of storage. An ionizing radiation dose of 5 kGy was sufficient for both types of model samples, this both from microbiological, nutritional aspects (some group B vitamins, vitamin C, -SH groups, etc.) and with regard to organoleptic properties (outlook, color, odor, flavor, consistence, juiciness). The problems will further be studied. (author) 2 tabs., 4 figs., 14 refs

  3. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Loughlin, J.E.; Friedlander, E.R.; Clapp, R.W.; Fahey, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public

  4. Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air using combined laser ionization and ambient metastable ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.N.; Xie, Z.Q.; Gao, Y.; Hu, W.; Guo, L.B.; Jiang, L.; Lu, Y.F.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air was carried out using combined laser ionization and metastable ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-MI-TOFMS) in ambient environment for qualitative and semiquantitative (relative analyte information, not absolute information) analysis. Ambient metastable ionization using a direct analysis in realtime (DART) ion source was combined with laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-TOFMS) to study the effects of combining metastable and laser ionization. A series of metallic samples from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST 494, 495, 498, 499, and 500) and a pure carbon target were characterized using LI-TOFMS in open air. LI-MI-TOFMS was found to be superior to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Laser pulse energies between 10 and 200 mJ at the second harmonic (532 nm) of an Nd:YAG laser were applied in the experiment to obtain a high degree of ionization in plasmas. Higher laser pulse energy improves signal intensities of trace elements (such as Fe, Cr, Mn, Ni, Ca, Al, and Ag). Data were analyzed by numerically calculating relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) and limit of detections (LODs) from mass spectrometry (MS) and LIBS spectra. Different parameters, such as boiling point, ionization potential, RSC, LOD, and atomic weight, were shown to analyze the ionization and MS detection processes in open air.

  5. Effects of ionizing scrape-off layers on local recycling in Tore Supra pump limiter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.; Loarer, T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of ohmic discharges with active pumping in the Tore Supra outboard pump limiter has been analyzed with the DEGAS neutrals transport code and an analytic scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma model. Pumping speed and plenum pressure measurements indicated 5-10 torr.L/s throughput with only modest effects on density. A model is developed in which large exhaust fluxes, with little attendant effect on core plasma density, are explained in terms of SOL ionization of recycled and wall-desorbed neutrals. Particle balance with active pumping and constant line density requires that the wall return flux exceed the incident flux by approximately the pump throughput in the absence of external fueling. The radial profile of the H + source rate from ionization and dissociation of wall-desorbed molecules is seen to peak very near the radial position of the limiter throat. Consequently, a strong recycling vortex is created in the region of the limiter, with the ion flux amplified by factors of 2 at the outer limiter surfaces and > 3 within the limiter throat. The calculations indicate that less than 30% of the pump throughput is due to first-generation ions from the core efflux, with the balance from local recycling in the strongly ionizing SOL

  6. A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Wu, Wan-fan; Song, Jia-liang; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with PTC effect is first prepared. • It provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices. • The switching temperature of the materials is about 25 °C. • The most appropriate component of the material is found out by experimental study. • The NTC effect of the new PCMs is eliminated effectively by heat treatment. - Abstract: A new kind of shape-stabilized phase change materials (PCMs) with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was prepared in this paper. The materials were prepared by adding graphite powder (GP) to the paraffin/low density polyethylene (LDPE) composite and the PTC characteristic was found by adjusting the component ratio of the material. Then the physical structures and thermal properties of the materials were investigated and the effect of various GP mass fractions and paraffin/LDPE mass proportions on the PTC behavior of the materials was studied experimentally. The results showed that the switching temperature of the materials was about 25 °C (room temperature) which approached to the first phase change temperature of paraffin dispersed in the materials. The PTC behavior of the materials was the best when the GP mass fraction and the mass proportion of LDPE/paraffin were 40 wt% and 30:70, respectively. Furthermore, the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect of the materials could be eliminated effectively with heat treatment. This new kind of materials is different from the former PTC materials which the switching temperatures focus on high temperature ranges. It makes up for the defect of previous materials that the switching temperatures only range in high temperature rather than room temperature and provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices or other room temperature thermal control applications

  7. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  8. The effect of core configuration on temperature coefficient of reactivity in IRR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettan, M.; Silverman, I.; Shapira, M.; Nagler, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1997-08-01

    Experiments designed to measure the effect of coolant moderator temperature on core reactivity in an HEU swimming pool type reactor were performed. The moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity ({alpha}{sub {omega}}) was obtained and found to be different in two core loadings. The measured {alpha}{sub {omega}} of one core loading was {minus}13 pcm/{degrees}C at the temperature range of 23-30{degrees}C. This value of {alpha}{sub {omega}} is comparable to the data published by the IAEA. The {alpha}{sub {omega}} measured in the second core loading was found to be {minus}8 pcm/{degrees}C at the same temperature range. Another phenomenon considered in this study is core behavior during reactivity insertion transient. The results were compared to a core simulation using the Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants. It was found that in the second core loading factors other than the moderator temperature influence the core reactivity more than expected. These effects proved to be extremely dependent on core configuration and may in certain core loadings render the reactor`s reactivity coefficient undesirable.

  9. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2005-06-01

    The efficacy of Adra wastewater treatment plant for removing of parasitic eggs and other pathogens was various as the results of this work showed many eggs detected on and numeration referenced methods were applied for liquid and dried sledges. Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. In conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the division of the ascaris eggs embryo nations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts not affected. Therefor the UV technique couldn't be the alternative technology of ionizing radiation. (author)

  10. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using many vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results showed that for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. On the contrary, conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the ascaris eggs embryonations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts were not affected. In the light of the current experiments, it is possible to conclude that using the UV technique instead of the ionizing radiation for killing the helminths eggs and protozoa is not usable. (Authors)

  11. Study on ionizing radiation effects of bipolar transistor with BPSG films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Man; Zhang Xiaoling; Xie Xuesong; Sun Jiangchao; Wang Pengpeng; Lu Changzhi; Zhang Yanxiu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because of the damage induced by ionizing radiation, bipolar transistors in integrated voltage regulator could induce the current gain degradation and increase leakage current. This will bring serious problems to electronic system. Purpose: In order to ensure the reliability of the device work in the radiation environments, the device irradiation reinforcement technology is used. Methods: The characteristics of 60 Co γ irradiation and annealing at different temperatures in bipolar transistors and voltage regulators (JW117) with different passive films for SiO 2 +BPSG+SiO 2 and SiO 2 +SiN have been investigated. Results: The devices with BPSG film enhanced radiation tolerance significantly. Because BPSG films have better absorption for Na + in SiO 2 layer, the surface recombination rate of base region in a bipolar transistor and the excess base current have been reduced. It may be the main reason for BJT with BPSG film having a good radiation hardness. And annealing experiments at different temperatures after irradiation ensure the reliability of the devices with BPSG films. Conclusions: A method of improving the ionizing irradiation hardness of bipolar transistors is proposed. As well as the linear integrated circuits which containing bipolar transistors, an experimental basis for the anti-ionizing radiation effects of bipolar transistors is provided. (authors)

  12. Time- and dose-dependent effects of total-body ionizing radiation on muscle stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Tsubasa; Seko, Daiki; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ono, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of genotoxic stress, such as high-dose ionizing radiation, increases both cancer and noncancer risks. However, it remains debatable whether low-dose ionizing radiation reduces cellular function, or rather induces hormetic health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of total-body γ-ray radiation on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to γ-radiation at low- to high-dose rates (low, 2 or 10 mGy/day; moderate, 50 mGy/day; high, 250 mGy/day) for 30 days. No hormetic responses in proliferation, differentiation, or self-renewal of satellite cells were observed in low-dose radiation-exposed mice at the acute phase. However, at the chronic phase, population expansion of satellite cell-derived progeny was slightly decreased in mice exposed to low-dose radiation. Taken together, low-dose ionizing irradiation may suppress satellite cell function, rather than induce hormetic health benefits, in skeletal muscle in adult mice. PMID:25869487

  13. Ionization effects on Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Shirou; Imaizumi, Mitsuru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0031 (Japan); Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime [Institute of National Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Okuda, Shuichi [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuenmachi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Cu (In, Ga) Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells were irradiated with 60, 100, and 250 keV electrons to reveal the characteristics of radiation induced defects. Electrons with less than 200 keV energy cannot generate any displacement defects in CIGS materials. In addition, a low amount of the electrons can improve the roll-over behavior in current-voltage characteristics of CIGS solar cells. However, the deterioration of the electrical performance in CIGS solar cells irradiated with a high amount of electrons was observed. The deterioration rate on the cells irradiated with lower-energy electrons was higher than that induced by electrons with higher-energy. The degradation curve of J{sub SC} based on the ionizing dose estimated from the ionizing energy loss model does not depend on the energy of electrons. Therefore, it implies that the electrons can degrade CIGS solar cells due to the ionization effect. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Solitary wave evolution in a magnetized inhomogeneous plasma under the effect of ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyoti; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2011-01-01

    A modified form of Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation appropriate to nonlinear ion acoustic solitary waves in an inhomogeneous plasma is derived in the presence of an external magnetic field and constant ionization in the plasma. This equation differs from usual version of the KdV equation because of the inclusion of two terms arising due to ionization and density gradient present in the plasma. In this plasma, only the compressive solitary waves are found to propagate corresponding to the fast and slow modes. The amplitude of the solitary wave increases with an enhancement in the ionization for the fast mode as well as for the slow mode. The effect of magnetic field is to enhance the width of the solitary structure. The amplitude is found to increase (decrease) with an enhancement in charge number of the ions for the fast (slow) mode. The tailing structure becomes more (less) prominent with the rise in ion drift velocity for the case of fast (slow) mode.

  15. Effect of complexing reagents on the ionization constant of boric acid and its relation to isotopic exchange separation factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of change in concentration of complexing reagents having two or more hydroxyl groups, viz., ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dextrose and mannitol on the ionization constant of boric acid has been studied by pH-metric titration method. The effect of increase in ionization constant of boric acid on isotopic exchange separation factor for the separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography has been studied by the batch method. (author). 9 refs

  16. Bilogical effects of ionizing radiation: epidemiological surveys and laboratory animal experiments. Implications for risk evaluation and decision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-04-01

    General background is given for an understanding of the potential health effects in populations exposed to low-level ionizing radiations. The discussion is within the framework of the scientific deliberations and controversies that arose during preparation of the current report of the committee on the biological effects of ionizing radiation of the National Academy of Science - National Research Council (1980 Beir-III Report)

  17. Modeling and data analysis of the NASA-WSTF frictional heating apparatus - Effects of test parameters on friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sheng-Hu; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.; Yuen, Walter W.

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical model is being developed jointly by the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) to analyze data generated from the WSTF frictional heating test facility. Analyses of the data generated in the first seconds of the frictional heating test are shown to be effective in determining the friction coefficient between the rubbing interfaces. Different friction coefficients for carobn steel and Monel K-500 are observed. The initial condition of the surface is shown to affect only the initial value of the friction coefficient but to have no significant influence on the average steady-state friction coefficient. Rotational speed and the formation of oxide film on the rotating surfaces are shown to have a significant effect on the friction coefficient.

  18. Resonance Spectrum Characteristics of Effective Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient of High-Overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-overtone bulk acoustic resonator (HBAR consisting of a piezoelectric film with two electrodes on a substrate exhibits a high quality factor (Q and multi-mode resonance spectrum. By analyzing the influences of each layer’s material and structure (thickness parameters on the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient (Keff2, the resonance spectrum characteristics of Keff2 have been investigated systematically, and the optimal design of HBAR has been provided. Besides, a device, corresponding to one of the theoretical cases studied, is fabricated and evaluated. The experimental results are basically consistent with the theoretical results. Finally, the effects of Keff2 on the function of the crystal oscillators constructed with HBARs are proposed. The crystal oscillators can operate in more modes and have a larger frequency hopping bandwidth by using the HBARs with a larger Keff2·Q.

  19. Cost-effective degradation test plan for a nonlinear random-coefficients model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong-Joon; Bae, Suk Joo

    2013-01-01

    The determination of requisite sample size and the inspection schedule considering both testing cost and accuracy has been an important issue in the degradation test. This paper proposes a cost-effective degradation test plan in the context of a nonlinear random-coefficients model, while meeting some precision constraints for failure-time distribution. We introduce a precision measure to quantify the information losses incurred by reducing testing resources. The precision measure is incorporated into time-varying cost functions to reflect real circumstances. We apply a hybrid genetic algorithm to general cost optimization problem with reasonable constraints on the level of testing precision in order to determine a cost-effective inspection scheme. The proposed method is applied to the degradation data of plasma display panels (PDPs) following a bi-exponential degradation model. Finally, sensitivity analysis via simulation is provided to evaluate the robustness of the proposed degradation test plan.

  20. Towards next-to-leading order transport coefficients from the four-particle irreducible effective action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, M. E.; Kovalchuk, E.

    2010-01-01

    Transport coefficients can be obtained from two-point correlators using the Kubo formulas. It has been shown that the full leading order result for electrical conductivity and (QCD) shear viscosity is contained in the resummed two-point function that is obtained from the three-loop three-particle irreducible resummed effective action. The theory produces all leading order contributions without the necessity for power counting, and in this sense it provides a natural framework for the calculation. In this article we study the four-loop four-particle irreducible effective action for a scalar theory with cubic and quartic interactions, with a nonvanishing field expectation value. We obtain a set of integral equations that determine the resummed two-point vertex function. A next-to-leading order contribution to the viscosity could be obtained from this set of coupled equations.

  1. Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients Dan Wendt, Greg Mines Idaho National Laboratory The use of mixed working fluids in binary power plants can provide significant increases in plant performance, provided the heat exchangers are designed to take advantage of these fluids non-isothermal phase changes. In the 1980's testing was conducted at DOE's Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) where mixtures of different compositions were vaporized at supercritical pressures and then condensed. This testing had focused on using the data collected to verify that Heat Transfer Research Incorporated (HTRI) codes were suitable for the design of heat exchangers that could be used with mixtures. The HCRF data includes mixture compositions varying from 0% to 40% isopentane and condenser tube orientations of 15{sup o}, 60{sup o}, and 90{sup o} from horizontal. Testing was performed over a range of working fluid and cooling fluid conditions. Though the condenser used in this testing was water cooled, the working fluid condensation occurred on the tube-side of the heat exchanger. This tube-side condensation is analogous to that in an air-cooled condenser. Tube-side condensing heat transfer coefficient information gleaned from the HCRF testing is used in this study to assess the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs for use with mixtures. Results of an air-cooled binary plant process model performed with Aspen Plus indicate that that the optimal mixture composition (producing the maximum net power for the scenario considered) is within the range of compositions for which data exist. The HCRF data is used to assess the impact of composition, tube orientation, and process parameters on the condensing heat transfer coefficients. The sensitivity of the condensing coefficients to these factors is evaluated and the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs with mixtures is assessed. This paper summarizes the evaluation

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on DNA-mediated gene transfer efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, J.S.; Hall, E.J.; Hei, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes a number of molecular changes in cells including DNA damage and gene amplification. In this study the authors examined whether radiation can effect the efficiency of integration and expression of exogenous DNA sequences. They examined both 137 Cs γ rays and various monoenergetic neutron beams. This enabled them to test whether the LET or RBE of the radiation had any effect. Rat2 cells were transfected with various amounts of the bacterial plasmid pSV2-GPT along with carrier DNA for 24 hours

  3. Polarization effects in above-threshold ionization with a mid-infrared strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hui-Peng; Xu, Song-Po; Wang, Yan-Lan; Yu, Shao-Gang; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Hao, Xiao-Lei; Lai, Xuan-Yang; Pfeifer, Thomas; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2018-05-01

    Using a semiclassical approach, we theoretically study the above-threshold ionization of magnesium by intense, mid-infrared laser pulses. The formation of low-energy structures in the photoelectron spectrum is found to be enhanced by comparing with a calculation based on the single-active electron approximation. By performing electron trajectory and recollision-time distribution analysis, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to the laser-induced ionic core polarization effects on the recolliding electrons. We also show that the polarization effects should be experimentally detectable. Our finding provides new insight into ultrafast control of strong-field photoionization and imaging of polar molecules.

  4. Hydrotropic effect and thermodynamic analysis on the solubility and mass transfer coefficient enhancement of ethylbenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Antony Bertie; Jayakumar, Chinnakannu; Gandhi, Nagarajan Nagendra

    2013-01-01

    Concentrated aqueous solutions of a large number of hydrotropic agents, urea, nicotinamide, and sodium salicylate, have been employed to enhance the aqueous solubilities of poorly water soluble organic compounds. The influence of a wide range of hydrotrope concentrations (0-3.0mol·L"−"1) and different system temperatures (303-333 K) on the solubility of ethylbenzene has been studied. The solubility of ethylbenzene increases with increase in hydrotrope concentration and also with system temperature. Consequent to the increase in the solubility of ethylbenzene, the mass transfer coefficient was also found to increase with increase in hydrotrope concentration at 303 K. The enhancement factor, which is the ratio of the value in the presence and absence of a hydrotrope, is reported for both solubility and mass transfer coefficient of ethylbenzene. The Setschenow constant, K_s, a measure of the effectiveness of a hydrotrope, was determined for each case. To ascertain the hydrotropic aggregation behavior of ethylbenzene, thermodynamic parameters such as Gibb’s free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of ethylbenzene were determined

  5. Hydrotropic effect and thermodynamic analysis on the solubility and mass transfer coefficient enhancement of ethylbenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Antony Bertie; Jayakumar, Chinnakannu; Gandhi, Nagarajan Nagendra [Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2013-04-15

    Concentrated aqueous solutions of a large number of hydrotropic agents, urea, nicotinamide, and sodium salicylate, have been employed to enhance the aqueous solubilities of poorly water soluble organic compounds. The influence of a wide range of hydrotrope concentrations (0-3.0mol·L{sup −1}) and different system temperatures (303-333 K) on the solubility of ethylbenzene has been studied. The solubility of ethylbenzene increases with increase in hydrotrope concentration and also with system temperature. Consequent to the increase in the solubility of ethylbenzene, the mass transfer coefficient was also found to increase with increase in hydrotrope concentration at 303 K. The enhancement factor, which is the ratio of the value in the presence and absence of a hydrotrope, is reported for both solubility and mass transfer coefficient of ethylbenzene. The Setschenow constant, K{sub s}, a measure of the effectiveness of a hydrotrope, was determined for each case. To ascertain the hydrotropic aggregation behavior of ethylbenzene, thermodynamic parameters such as Gibb’s free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of ethylbenzene were determined.

  6. Entrainment coefficient and effective mass for conduction neutrons in neutron star crust: simple microscopic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Brandon; Chamel, Nicolas; Haensel, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    In the inner crust of a neutron star, at densities above the 'drip' threshold, unbound 'conduction' neutrons can move freely past through the ionic lattice formed by the nuclei. The relative current density ni=nv-bar i of such conduction neutrons will be related to the corresponding mean particle momentum pi by a proportionality relation of the form ni=Kpi in terms of a physically well defined mobility coefficient K whose value in this context has not been calculated before. Using methods from ordinary solid state and nuclear physics, a simple quantum mechanical treatment based on the independent particle approximation, is used here to formulate K as the phase space integral of the relevant group velocity over the neutron Fermi surface. The result can be described as an 'entrainment' that changes the ordinary neutron mass m to a macroscopic effective mass per neutron that will be given-subject to adoption of a convention specifying the precise number density n of the neutrons that are considered to be 'free'-by m-bar =n/K. The numerical evaluation of the mobility coefficient is carried out for nuclear configurations of the 'lasagna' and 'spaghetti' type that may be relevant at the base of the crust. Extrapolation to the middle layers of the inner crust leads to the unexpected prediction that m-bar will become very large compared with m

  7. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday’s law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  8. Effect of Drying Method on the Permeability Coefficient of Oak Wood (Quercus infactoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuboo Salehpour

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of drying method on the permeability coefficient of the oak wood (Quercus infectoria Oliv was studied. Freshly-cut logs of oak were prepared from Oureman, the east area of Kourdistan in Iran. Then, boards with nominal thickness of 6 cm were cut. The boards were dried using two methods. In the first method, the boards were air dried to the moisture content close to FSP for 45 days and then they were kiln dried using T5-D1 schedule. In the second method, the boards were dried from green condition to the final moisture content of 10% using T5-D1 schedule. Then, the permeability coefficient in the transverse and longitudinal directions in both heartwood and sapwood regions was measured, separately. Results showed that the permeability of oak boards dried by kiln drying method both in the transverse and longitudinal directions and also in the heartwood and sapwood regions was greater than that of those dried by the combined method (air drying + kiln drying.

  9. Bystander effects of the ionizing radiation and his implications in radiotherapy and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Ayala, Irene Maria; Sanchez Luthard, Maria de los Angeles; Martins Schmitz; Gomez, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    According to the classical paradigm, biological effects of ionizing radiation are attributed to DNA damage induced in each irradiated cell. Demonstration of ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) has generated a deep change in current understanding of radiobiology. RIBE are radiation-induced effects produced in cells that have not been actually irradiated. Several technical advances, particularly the use of microbeams, allowed in vitro study of RIBE. There are two known ways by which irradiated cells can communicate with non-irradiated cells, namely: through gap junctions connecting the cytoplasms of adjacent cells, and through the secretion of soluble factors to the extracellular medium. These factors include several cytokines and reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. In the affected cells, signalling pathways mostly involve activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), NF-kB transcription factor and of the enzymes cyclooxygenase 2, nitric oxide synthase 2 and NAD (P)H oxidase. RIBE induce point mutations and epigenetic changes. Effects on cellular signalling pathways can persist indefinitely and even be transmitted to the progeny of affected cells. Paradoxically, under certain conditions RIBE may be adaptive, which means that they turn affected cells more resistant to ionizing radiation. Adaptation demands protein synthesis. It enhances DNA repair mechanisms and resistance to oxidative stress. RIBE have also been demonstrated in vivo. Thus, they may have important implications for radiotherapy, both to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce the incidence of adverse effects. Furthermore, a better understanding of RIBE may have an influence on international radioprotection standards. (authors) [es

  10. Effect of oxyfluorinated multi-walled carbon nanotube additives on positive temperature coefficient/negative temperature coefficient behavior in high-density polyethylene polymeric switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Byong Chol; Kang, Seok Chang; Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Se Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electrical properties of MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches and their effect on oxyfluorination. Highlights: → Oxyfluorinated MWCNTs were used to reduce the PTC/NTC phenomenon in MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. → Electron mobility is difficult in MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups (C-O, C=O) increases by oxyfluorination. → A mechanism of improved electrical properties of oxyfluorinated MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches was suggested. -- Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were embedded into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to improve the electrical properties of HDPE polymeric switches. The MWCNT surfaces were modified by oxyfluorination to improve their positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behaviors in HDPE polymeric switches. HDPE polymeric switches exhibit poor electron mobility between MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups is increased by oxyfluorination. Thus, the PTC intensity of HDPE polymeric switches was increased by the destruction of the electrical conductivity network. The oxyfluorination of MWCNTs also leads to weak NTC behavior in the MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. This result is attributed to the reduction of the mutual attraction between the MWCNT particles at the melting temperature of HDPE, which results from a decrease in the surface free energy of the C-F bond in MWCNT particles.

  11. Trans-generational effects induced by alpha and gamma ionizing radiations at Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisot, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities related to the nuclear industry contribute to continuous discharges of radionuclides into terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Over the past decades, the ecological risk of ionizing radiation has become a growing public, regulatory and scientific concern for ecosystems protection. Until recently, only few studies focus on exposure situations at low doses of irradiation, although these situations are representative of realistic environmental conditions. Understanding how ionizing radiation affects species over several generations and at various levels of biological organization is a major research goal in radioecology. The aim of this PhD was to bring new knowledge on the effects of ionizing radiation during a multi-generational expose of the aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna. A two-step strategy was implemented. First, an external gamma radiation at environmentally relevant dose rates was performed on D. magna over three successive generations (F0, F1 and F2). The objective of this experiment was to examine whether low dose rates of radiation induced increasing effects on survival, growth and reproduction of daphnids over generations and to test a possible accumulation and transmission of DNA alterations from adults to offspring. Results showed an accumulation and a transmission of DNA alterations over generations, together with an increase in effect severity on growth and reproduction from generation F0 to generation F2. Transiently more efficient DNA repair leading to some recovery at the organism level was suggested in generation F1. Second, data from the external gamma irradiation and those from an earlier study of internal alpha contamination were analyzed with DEBtox models (Dynamic Energy Budget applied to toxicology), to identify and compare the causes of the trans-generational increase in effect severity between the two types of radiation. In each case, two distinct metabolic modes of action were necessary to explain effects on

  12. [Dose rate-dependent cellular and molecular effects of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Wideł, Maria; Szurko, Agnieszka; Maniakowski, Zbigniew

    2008-09-11

    The aim of radiation therapy is to kill tumor cells while minimizing damage to normal cells. The ultimate effect of radiation can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death as well as cytogenetic damage resulting in genetic instability and/or cell death. The destructive effects of radiation arise from direct and indirect ionization events leading to peroxidation of macromolecules, especially those present in lipid-rich membrane structures as well as chromatin lipids. Lipid peroxidative end-products may damage DNA and proteins. A characteristic feature of radiation-induced peroxidation is an inverse dose-rate effect (IDRE), defined as an increase in the degree of oxidation(at constant absorbed dose) accompanying a lower dose rate. On the other hand, a low dose rate can lead to the accumulation of cells in G2, the radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle since cell cycle control points are not sensitive to low dose rates. Radiation dose rate may potentially be the main factor improving radiotherapy efficacy as well as affecting the intensity of normal tissue and whole-body side effects. A better understanding of dose rate-dependent biological effects may lead to improved therapeutic intervention and limit normal tissue reaction. The study reviews basic biological effects that depend on the dose rate of ionizing radiation.

  13. Intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways mediating ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Hara, Takamitsu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    A rapidly growing body of experimental evidence indicates that ionizing radiation induces biological effects in non-irradiated bystander cells that have received signals from adjacent or distant irradiated cells. This phenomenon, which has been termed the ionizing radiation-induced bystander effect, challenges the long-standing paradigm that radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is a prerequisite to elicit genetic damage or a biological response. Bystander effects have been observed in a number of experimental systems, and cells whose nucleus or cytoplasm is irradiated exert bystander responses. Bystander cells manifest a multitude of biological consequences, such as genetic and epigenetic changes, alterations in gene expression, activation of signal transduction pathways, and delayed effects in their progeny. Several mediating mechanisms have been proposed. These involve gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, secreted soluble factors, oxidative metabolism, plasma membrane-bound lipid rafts, and calcium fluxes. This paper reviews briefly the current knowledge of the bystander effect with a focus on proposed mechanisms. The potential benefit of bystander effects to cancer radiotherapy will also be discussed. (author)

  14. General approach to the computation of local transport coefficients with finite Larmor effects in the collision contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, P.

    1986-10-01

    We expand the distribution functions on a basis of Hermite functions and obtain a general scheme to compute the local transport coefficients. The magnetic field dependence due to finite Larmor radius effects during the collision process is taken into account

  15. Interpatient variation in normal peripheral zone apparent diffusion coefficient: effect on the prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, G.J.S.; Hambrock, T.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Huisman, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the interpatient variability of prostate peripheral zone (PZ) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and its effect on the assessment of prostate cancer aggressiveness. Materials and Methods: The requirement for institutional review board approval was waived. Intra- and

  16. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Light Interception and Light Extinction Coefficient in Different Wheat Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Samadiyan

    2016-07-01

    amount of a third off chemical fertilizer of urea, 46 % Nitrogen was given to the plant and two third by the end of clawing the plot. In the period of growing in order to control brushes 2, 4, D herbicide and Fenitrothion insecticidal was used for countering the louse pest and other insects. In the laboratory, leaf area was measured using scanner and 4.Image 0.2 software program. To determine changes of growth indices, regression relations were used. Total dry matter, leaf area index, net assimilation rate, crop growth rate, light interception extinction were measured. Results and Discussion The results showed that the effects of N fertilizilation were significant on the maximum leaf area index, total dry matter and light interception percent were related to Pishtaz cultivar and 150 kg N ha-1 fertilizer treatment significantly resulted Maximum light interception percent, net assimilation rate, with other treatments. Effects of cultivar were significant on maximum light absorption. The Maximum absorption of light, crop growth rate, total dry matter was related to Pishtaz. The interaction between nitrogen and the harvest index was significant at the five percent level. The evidence showed that higher light interception in plants, is associated with the higher performance of plant. The increase of light interception promote the biological and economic performance. Conclusions The results showed that application of 150 kg nitrogen per hectare, with the highest level of leaf area index and higher light absorption caused higher extinction coefficient of light in the canopy. Nitrogen fertilizer consumption increased light absorption by leaves, therefore the light extinction coefficient consuming more nitrogen in the plant community. The Maximum absorption of light, crop growth rate, total dry matter was related to pishtaz. Scale of light extinction coefficient for fertilizer treatment control, 50, 100, 150 kg ha-1, was 0.4675, 0.4794, 0.4858 and 0.495, respectively and for

  17. Developmental effects of magnetic field (50 Hz) in combination with ionizing radiation and chemical teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafková, H; Jerábek, J; Tejnorová, I; Bednár, V

    1996-11-01

    The influence of a 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) on avian and mammalian embryogenesis, the MF level and vector, as well as the effect of exposure to MF (50 Hz, 10 mT) in combination with X-rays has been recently reported [2,3]. No significant alterations of chick or rat embryogenesis were found after repeated exposures to 50 Hz MF at 10 mT or 6 microT or with different vectors. However, X-ray chick embryotoxicity was significantly affected by repeated exposures of developing organisms to MF. A strong dependence of effect on the type of interaction was revealed. A decrease of X-ray induced teratogenicity was observed when MF preceded X-ray exposure (indirect interaction), while MF exposure applied immediately after X-ray radiation (direct interaction) non-significantly potentiated adverse developmental effects of ionizing radiation. This study deals with the effects of MF in combination with insulin or tetracycline. Exposure of chick embryos to MF influenced the sensitivity of embryonic morphogenetic systems to the subsequently administered chemical teratogens, insulin and/or tetracycline. A protective effect of MF was detected similarly as in the case of indirect interaction with ionizing radiation.

  18. Effects of the ionizing radiations in the different stages of the embryo-fetal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    'In utero' exposures to ionizing radiation are a very important subject in radiological protection concerning not only the prevention but also the estimation of the associated risks. In these situations the perception of risks by the pregnant woman and the involved professionals could not always be correlated with their objective magnitude. In this communication we describe the effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation, the thresholds and their relation with the gestational age, taking into account occupationally exposed women, patients undergoing medical procedures and public members. The dose estimation, the evaluation of the potential associated risks and the relation with the spontaneous incidence of the considered effects are analyzed in the framework of the basic principles of radiological protection. Most of diagnostic procedures properly done do not imply induction of deterministic effects in embryo/fetus. Therapeutical procedures and accidental overexposures could be associated with significant risks of deterministic effects. Childhood cancer induction is an stochastic effect without threshold and every 'in utero' exposure will increase their probability. (author)

  19. Effect of EDTA and gypsum on self diffusion coefficient of zinc in alkali soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.N.; Deb, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of EDTA and gypsum application on the rate of zinc diffusion was studied in an alkali soil. Gypsum application at the rate of half gypsum requirement (GR) increased the apparent self diffusion coefficient of zinc (DaZn) and decreased the capacity factor (B) of soil. The higher rates (full GR and double GR) depressed the rate of zinc diffusion and increased the B value. Application of EDTA at the rate of 0.77 μeg -1 of soil produced 1600 and 24 fold increase in DaZn and DpZn values respectively and 100 times drop in B value. Addition of 55 ppm Zn to the soil significantly increased the DaZn and DpZn values. (author)

  20. Annealing effects on resistivity and Hall coefficient of neutron irradiated silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggeri, U.

    1995-01-01

    High Temperature Annealing (HTA) treatment has been carried out on fast-neutron irradiated silicon samples with temperatures up to 300 C. Fluences of irradiation up to 1x10 14 n/cm 2 were used. Before annealing, samples irradiated with fluences higher than 1x10 13 n/cm 2 suffered the type conductivity inversion from n-type to p-type. The changes in the resisitivity and Hall coefficient during each annealing step have been measured by Hall effect analysis. Results indicate the possible creation of acceptors for low temperature annealing up to 150 C and the phosphorous release by E centres at annealing temperatures among 150 C and 200 C. Heating samples up to 300 C allows the recovering of the sample resistivity to its value before irradiation, with the peculiarity that bulks inverted to p-type after irradiation does not come back to n-type after annealing. (orig.)

  1. Apparent diffusion coefficient of the renal tissue. The effect of diuretic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Jin; Munechika, Hirotsugu [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the renal tissue was studied at diffusion-weighted images of the kidney which were obtained from spin-echo type sequence before and after furosemide (100 mg) injection in twelve healthy volunteers. ADC (mm{sup 2}/sec) of the renal cortex and medulla before furosemide injection was 2.08{+-}0.52 and 1.96{+-}0.52, respectively. No appreciable ADC difference was seen between the cortex and the medulla of the kidney. After furosemide injection, ADC of the renal cortex and medulla became 2.09{+-}0.42 and 1.78{+-}0.38, respectively. It was found that furosemide produced no significant effect on ADC of the renal tissue. (author)

  2. Determination of coupling coefficients at various zenith angles of the basis of the cosmic ray azimuth effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belskiy, S. A.; Dmitriev, B. A.; Romanov, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The value of EW asymmetry and coupling coefficients at different zenith angles were measured by means of a double coincidence crossed telescope which gives an opportunity to measure simultaneously the intensity of the cosmic ray hard component at zenith angles from 0 to 84 deg in opposite azimuths. The advantages of determining the coupling coefficients by the cosmic ray azimuth effect as compared to their measurement by the latitudinal effect are discussed.

  3. Damage indication in smart structures using modal effective electromechanical coupling coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajmi, M A; Benjeddou, A

    2008-01-01

    This work explores the use, in structural health monitoring, of the so-called modal effective electromechanical coupling coefficient (EMCC) as a damage indicator for structures with failures such as cracks. For this purpose, a discrete layered finite element (FE) model for smart beams is proposed and applied to short-circuit (SC) and open-circuit (OC) modal analyses of healthy and damaged (cracked) cantilever beams with symmetrically surface-bonded piezoelectric patches. Focus is made here on enhancing the electrical behavior modeling by introducing a quadratic bubble function in the electric potential through-the-thickness approximation. Therefore, the corresponding higher-order potential (HOP) degree of freedom is condensed at the ply level, leading to a passive stiffening effect (SE) similar to the so-called higher-order induced potential (HIP); then the physical equipotential (EP) electrode effect, often neglected in the piezoelectric FE literature, is here implemented after the electrodes' FE assembly. After its validation against available analytical and experimental results, the proposed piezoelectric FE is used for parametric analyses of SC-based and OC-based EMCC change factors (ECFs) and frequency change factors (FCFs) in terms of the crack depth and position ratios. It was found that the EP effect was more influential on the ECF than the SE. However, for the FCFs, the EP effect was influential only when it is defined from the OC frequencies. Finally, the ECFs were found to be higher than the FCFs, in particular for higher modes

  4. The Effect of Nonzero Autocorrelation Coefficients on the Distributions of Durbin-Watson Test Estimator: Three Autoregressive Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yu LEE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the nonzero autocorrelation coefficients on the sampling distributions of the Durbin-Watson test estimator in three time-series models that have different variance-covariance matrix assumption, separately. We show that the expected values and variances of the Durbin-Watson test estimator are slightly different, but the skewed and kurtosis coefficients are considerably different among three models. The shapes of four coefficients are similar between the Durbin-Watson model and our benchmark model, but are not the same with the autoregressive model cut by one-lagged period. Second, the large sample case shows that the three models have the same expected values, however, the autoregressive model cut by one-lagged period explores different shapes of variance, skewed and kurtosis coefficients from the other two models. This implies that the large samples lead to the same expected values, 2(1 – ρ0, whatever the variance-covariance matrix of the errors is assumed. Finally, comparing with the two sample cases, the shape of each coefficient is almost the same, moreover, the autocorrelation coefficients are negatively related with expected values, are inverted-U related with variances, are cubic related with skewed coefficients, and are U related with kurtosis coefficients.

  5. The Effect of a Variable Disc Pad Friction Coefficient for the Mechanical Brake System of a Railway Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Kang, Chul-Goo

    2015-01-01

    A brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) system for a railway vehicle is widely applied to estimate and validate braking performance in research studies and field tests. When we develop a simulation model for a full vehicle system, the characteristics of all components are generally properly simplified based on the understanding of each component's purpose and interaction with other components. The friction coefficient between the brake disc and the pad used in simulations has been conventionally considered constant, and the effect of a variable friction coefficient is ignored with the assumption that the variability affects the performance of the vehicle braking very little. However, the friction coefficient of a disc pad changes significantly within a range due to environmental conditions, and thus, the friction coefficient can affect the performance of the brakes considerably, especially on the wheel slide. In this paper, we apply a variable friction coefficient and analyzed the effects of the variable friction coefficient on a mechanical brake system of a railway vehicle. We introduce a mathematical formula for the variable friction coefficient in which the variable friction is represented by two variables and five parameters. The proposed formula is applied to real-time simulations using a brake HILS system, and the effectiveness of the formula is verified experimentally by testing the mechanical braking performance of the brake HILS system.

  6. The Effect of a Variable Disc Pad Friction Coefficient for the Mechanical Brake System of a Railway Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Kang, Chul-Goo

    2015-01-01

    A brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) system for a railway vehicle is widely applied to estimate and validate braking performance in research studies and field tests. When we develop a simulation model for a full vehicle system, the characteristics of all components are generally properly simplified based on the understanding of each component’s purpose and interaction with other components. The friction coefficient between the brake disc and the pad used in simulations has been conventionally considered constant, and the effect of a variable friction coefficient is ignored with the assumption that the variability affects the performance of the vehicle braking very little. However, the friction coefficient of a disc pad changes significantly within a range due to environmental conditions, and thus, the friction coefficient can affect the performance of the brakes considerably, especially on the wheel slide. In this paper, we apply a variable friction coefficient and analyzed the effects of the variable friction coefficient on a mechanical brake system of a railway vehicle. We introduce a mathematical formula for the variable friction coefficient in which the variable friction is represented by two variables and five parameters. The proposed formula is applied to real-time simulations using a brake HILS system, and the effectiveness of the formula is verified experimentally by testing the mechanical braking performance of the brake HILS system. PMID:26267883

  7. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants. Petit dejeuner de presse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flury-Herard, A [CEA, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 75 - Paris (France); Boiteux, S; Dutrillaux, B [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 92 (France); Toledano, M [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  8. A technical review and assessment of the BEIR V [Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V] report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report was prepared by the DOE BEIR V Technical Review Committee (TRC) to provide a technical review and assessment of the National Research Council's Bilogical Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) Committee's Report entitled ''Health Effects of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation'' (BEIR V). This report contains seven sections. The first section serves as an introduction and reviews the charge to the TRC. The second section is a chapter-by- chapter summary of the BEIR V Report. The third section is a summary of the risk estimates and conclusions of the BEIR V Committee for genetic effects, cancer induction, and in utero effects. The fourth section is a summary and analysis of the new scientific information used by the BEIR V Committee in developing its risk recommendations and conclusions. The fifth section is an assessment of the scientific information and methods used by the BEIR V Committee in developing their risk estimates and conclusions and an analysis of the key assumptions underlying the use of these risk estimates in risk assessment. The sixth section is the TRC'S assessment of the regulatory implications of the BEIR V risk estimates and conclusions for DOE nuclear operations. The seventh and final section is the TRC'S recommended actions for DOE's consideration concerning the BEIR V Report risk estimates and conclusions. 23 refs., 5 tabs

  9. The effect of ionizing radiation and radionuclides on the embrional development of fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, K.

    1975-01-01

    The work is an attempt to review the bibliography on the effect of ionizing radiation on embrional development of fish, based mainly on Russian literature. The effect of ionizing radiation from exterior sources, as also of radioactive elements in a solution on successive fish embrional development was examined. A list of works on studies carried out with different radioactive elements affecting selected fish species is given. From several indices expressing the effects of radiation, the following are discussed in detail: survival rate, normality of development, histological changes, chromosomal changes, biochemical and physiological indexes. It is pointed out that due to varying experimental conditions it is impossible to compare the results of different authors. The phenomenon of stimulating effect of radiation on production of sex hormones, development of sexual products, survival rate of progeny, and heredity of such features, observed by several authors is still unexplained. Nevertheless, embrional development of fish remains a very sensitive biological element, suitable for testing the toxicity of radioactive substance. (author)

  10. Effect of ionization of impurity centres by electric field on the conductivity of superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Clement, A.

    1994-11-01

    The study of the effect of ionization of impurity centres by electric field E 0 on the conductivity of superlattice (SL) has been studied theoretically. It is observed that as the field E 0 increases the current rises reaches a maximum then falls off i.e. show a negative differential conductivity (NDC). Further increase in E 0 leads to an exponential rise of the current. This occur around E 0 = 3 x 10 4 V cm -1 . Hence the current density field shows a ''N'' shape characteristics as against the ''n'' shape characteristics in the absence of impurity. (author). 23 refs, 3 figs

  11. ICRP and UNSCEAR: Their roles in defining the most important biomedical effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.

    The history of ICRP from its origin in the British X-ray and Radiation Protection Committee (1921) to the present is described. Particular attention is directed to the evolution of occupational dose limits, which show a gradual decline, and to the perceptions of the most important effects on human beings. Recent developments in derived (or secondary) dose limits are also described. Basic to the dose limits are the risk estimates. UNSCEAR, since its establishment in 1955, has provided leadership in estimating numerically the risks of genetic defects and malignancy from exposure to ionizing radiation. The usefulness of providing risk estimates for public education has severe limitations. (author)

  12. Information value and prospects of rhythmocardiography in assessment of ionizing radiation effect on the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalenko, O.S.; Ivasenko, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work is to select methods for evaluation of heart operation and substantiate its information value for determination of radiation factor effect on the organism of mongrel white rats. Study results of cardiovascular system state, using rhythmography show, that integral indicators of regulatory mechanisms of chronotropic heart function, determined in the course of functional samples, may be considered as indicator of early reaction of the organism to ionizing radiation. Prospects of rhythmography application, which along with registration of other biologically essential functions, allows to determine in dynamics which regulatory mechanisms influence functional changes in the organism are shown. 11 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation in the physico-chemical characteristics of red wine Cabernet Sauvignon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fellipe Souza da; Leiras, Anderson; Wagner, Walsan

    2014-01-01

    The oenology in the current days is increasingly aimed obtain improvements on wine quality produced without there the deterioration of characteristics of the same, using new technologies for such order. The objective of present work will be the application of the radiation ionizing in wines Cabernet Sauvignon, with the interest of analyzing its effects on physic-chemical characteristics of this wines, such as quality, aging and etc. Were analyzed the following strands: degree alcoholic; dry extract; density and absorbance with spectrometer (420, 520 and 620 nm). (author)

  14. Radiation effect of polyether-urethane under action of different ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Chen Xiaojun; Gao Xiaoling; Xu Yunshu; Fu Yibei

    2006-01-01

    The research concerns in the radiation effect of γ-ray and electron beam on polyether-urethane. The thermal property and radical intensity were determined by differential thermal gravimetric analysis and electron spin resonance. The composition and content of gas products from samples irradiated by different ionizing radiation were analyzed by gas chromatography. The action mechanism of these two radiation resources of γ-ray and electron beam are same, but the means of energy deposit is different. It results in the differences of radical intensity and the thermal property of polyether-urethane as well as its gas products from the radiation decomposition. (authors)

  15. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  16. Plasma-screening effects upon energy levels and electron scattering from neutral and ionized caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.J.; Radtke, R.; Zimmermann, R.

    1988-01-01

    Using interaction potentials screened with the Debye-Hueckel length, the effects of plasma shielding on energy levels and electrons scattering from neutral and ionized caesium are estimated. Both energy levels and atomic scattering cross-sections are found to be sensitive to the inclusion of screening. Relating to the scattering by the Cs + ion, a low-energy resonance near E = 0.3 Ryd is found which arises from the f-wave phase shift and reflects the individual behaviour of the scattering ion. (author)

  17. Plasma-screening effects upon energy levels and electron scattering from neutral and ionized caesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Y J; Radtke, R; Zimmermann, R

    1988-01-01

    Using interaction potentials screened with the Debye-Hueckel length, the effects of plasma shielding on energy levels and electrons scattering from neutral and ionized caesium are estimated. Both energy levels and atomic scattering cross-sections are found to be sensitive to the inclusion of screening. Relating to the scattering by the Cs/sup +/ ion, a low-energy resonance near E = 0.3 Ryd is found which arises from the f-wave phase shift and reflects the individual behaviour of the scattering ion.

  18. Application of spectroscopic methods to the study of ionizing radiation effects in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez P, G.

    1995-01-01

    In general the interaction of ionizing radiation with polymers generates physic-chemical changes. Aiming to quantity these changes, three spectroscopic analytical techniques were used (UV, IR and EPR) and the chemical corrosion technique was used for three DSTN (CR39, Lexan and Makrofol) which were exposed to two radiation types: electrons and gammas. The effects of radiation are compared. Also a correlation between the UV and Vg results in function of dose is presented. The possible causes of the increase in chemical corrosion are discussed. (Author)

  19. Electron-ion correlation effects in ion-atom single ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colavecchia, F.D.; Garibotti, C.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Gasaneo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2000-06-28

    We study the effect of electron-ion correlation in single ionization processes of atoms by ion impact. We present a distorted wave model where the final state is represented by a correlated function solution of a non-separable three-body continuum Hamiltonian, that includes electron-ion correlation as coupling terms of the wave equation. A comparison of the electronic differential cross sections computed with this model with other theories and experimental data reveals that the influence of the electron-ion correlation is more significant for low energy emitted electrons. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  20. Ionizing radiation effect on physico-mechanical characteristics of thermoplastic polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevich, V.M.; Pleskachevsky, Yu.M.; Smirnov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation results in the field of ionizing radiation effect on structure and physico-mechanical properties of novel polymer materials are presented. The materials under study are various grades of PETP, PA-6 and polyethylene concentrate of technical carbon (PECC) commercially produced and extensively used in Belarus and abroad. It has been proved using EPR, thermomechanical and gel analyses that a combined effect of ionizing radiation within 0 to 10 MGy of absorbed dose range under different concentrations of mineral fillers (TiO 2 , kaolin, carbon black, graphite) and intensive cross-linking processes in amorphous phase are able to considerably improve strength characteristics of the studied polymers and their compositions. Most informative parameter was found to be breaking strength at rapture (σ r ) which enables to estimate the character of ionizing effect on the targets. At 0.01-0.05 MGy absorbed dose the highest σ r was shown as compared to initial PETP by the following materials: PN grade - 9 times, D - two and a half. When absorbed dose of PETP reached 0.2 MGy, σ r of PN surpassed the initial material 7.8 times, that of D - by 30% and E - by 1,5%. This is the evidence of elevated resistance of named materials to ionizing radiation in contrast to non-filled PETP 215. Growth of σ r in PA-6 has been noticed at absorbed dose above 2 MGy in response to maximum gel-formation values. Abrupt reduction of the studied parameters of PP upon irradiation is attributed to its destruction. Domination of cross-linking processes has been observed in PEVP and PECC which reduces macromolecular mobility and elasticity of the material as a whole but promotes polymer strengthening. Drop of PEVP impact strength can be related to its embrittlement. Presence of the filler (carbon black) in PECC at the initial stage of exposure resulted in improvement of studied parameters. Their further impairment is the result of limited mobility of macromolecules owing to cross-linking in