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Sample records for effective elastic thickness

  1. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M.K.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2013-01-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young

  2. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.

    2013-08-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member 'hard' (HRM) and a 'soft' (SRM) rheology models of the continental crust. Temperature within the lithosphere has been estimated using a recent tomography model of Ritsema et al. (2011), which has much higher horizontal resolution than previous global models. Most of the strength is localized in the crust for the HRM and in the mantle for the SRM. These results contribute to the long debates on applicability of the "crème brulée" or "jelly-sandwich" model for the lithosphere structure. Changing from the SRM to HRM turns most of the continental areas from the totally decoupled mode to the fully coupled mode of the lithospheric layers. However, in the areas characterized by a high thermal regime and thick crust, the layers remain decoupled even for the HRM. At the same time, for the inner part of the cratons the lithospheric layers are coupled in both models. Therefore, rheological variations lead to large changes in the integrated strength and Te distribution in the regions characterized by intermediate thermal conditions. In these areas temperature uncertainties have a greater effect, since this parameter principally determines rheological behavior. Comparison of the Te estimates for both models with those determined from the flexural loading and spectral analysis shows that the 'hard' rheology is likely applicable for cratonic areas, whereas the 'soft' rheology is more representative for young orogens.

  3. Specimen thickness effect on elastic-plastic constraint parameter A

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GP Nikishkov; YuG Matvienko

    2015-01-01

    .... Distributions of the J-integral and constraint parameter A along the crack front for varying specimen thickness and crack depth are determined for edge cracked plate, center cracked plate, three...

  4. Effect of aging on breast skin thickness and elasticity: implications for breast support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltman, C E; Steele, J R; McGhee, D E

    2017-08-01

    The skin overlying a woman's breast acts as an anatomical support structure to the breast. Although aging is known to affect the thickness and elasticity of human skin, limited research has examined age-related changes to skin covering the breast or related these changes to breast support requirements. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on female breast skin thickness and elasticity. The left breast of 339 women (18-84 years), classified into four age groups (18-24 years, 25-44 years, 45-64 years, and 65 + years), was divided into four quadrants. Skin thickness (dermal layer; 20 MHz ultrasound probe) and skin elasticity (Cutometer(®) MPA 580) were measured for each breast quadrant and then compared to determine whether there was any significant (P effect of aging on breast skin. Breast skin thickness significantly decreased from 45 years of age onwards. A significant decline in breast skin elasticity was evident from the mid 20's. Aging is associated with a significant decline in breast skin thickness and elasticity, which is likely to reduce anatomical breast support. Women might therefore benefit from increased external breast support (i.e. a more supportive bra) with increasing age. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Finite-thickness effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in accelerated elastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, S. A.; Piriz, A. R.; Tahir, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    A physical model has been developed for the linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a finite-thickness elastic slab laying on top of a semi-infinite ideal fluid. The model includes the nonideal effects of elasticity as boundary conditions at the top and bottom interfaces of the slab and also takes into account the finite transit time of the elastic waves across the slab thickness. For Atwood number AT=1 , the asymptotic growth rate is found to be in excellent agreement with the exact solution [Plohr and Sharp, Z. Angew. Math. Mech. 49, 786 (1998), 10.1007/s000330050121], and a physical explanation is given for the reduction of the stabilizing effectiveness of the elasticity for the thinner slabs. The feedthrough factor is also calculated.

  6. Effect of curvature and thickness on elastic wave velocity in cornea-like structures by FEM and OCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Wave models, which have been utilized in the past to reconstruct corneal biomechanical properties based on the propagation of an elastic wave, were often developed assuming a thin-plate geometry. However, the curvature and thickness of the cornea are not considered when utilizing these models. In this work, optical coherence elastography (OCE) experiments were conducted on tissue-mimicking agar phantoms and contact lenses along with finite element (FE) modeling of four kinds of cornea-like structures to understand the effects of curvature and thickness on the group velocity of an elastic wave. As the radius of curvature increased from 19.1 to 47.7 mm, the group velocity of the elastic wave obtained by both FE and OCE from a spherical shell section model decreased from ~2.8 m/s to ~2.2 m/s. When the thickness of the agar phantom increased from 1.9 mm to 5.6 mm, the elastic wave velocity increased from ~3.0 m/s to ~4.1 m/s. Both the FE and OCE results show that the group velocity of the elastic wave decreased with radius of curvature but increased with thickness. Therefore, the curvature and thickness must be considered when developing accurate wave models for quantifying biomechanical properties of the cornea.

  7. DETERMINATION OF EFFECTIVE ELASTIC THICKNESS OF THE COLOMBIAN ANDES USING SATELLITE-DERIVED GRAVITY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casallas1 Iván

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Gravity anomaly values derived from Global Geopotential Models (calculated from the CHAMP and GRACE satellite missions, are compared with free air ground gravity data to find the best representation of surface data. Using these values and topographical heights extracted from digital topography models, we applied the isostatic response function (admittance to a collection of profiles, to find an average of elastic thickness for the Colombian Andes.

  8. Lithospheric flexural strength and effective elastic thicknesses of the Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) and surrounding region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruç, Bülent; Gomez-Ortiz, David; Petit, Carole

    2017-12-01

    The Lithospheric structure of Eastern Anatolia and the surrounding region, including the northern part of the Arabian platform is investigated via the analysis and modeling of Bouguer anomalies from the Earth Gravitational Model EGM08. The effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere (EET) that corresponds to the mechanical cores of the crust and lithospheric mantle is determined from the spectral coherence between Bouguer anomalies and surface elevation data. Its average value is 18.7 km. From the logarithmic amplitude spectra of Bouguer anomalies, average depths of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), Moho, Conrad and basement in the study area are constrained at 84 km, 39 km, 16 km and 7 km, respectively. The geometries of the LAB and Moho are then estimated using the Parker-Oldenburg inversion algorithm. We also present a lithospheric strength map obtained from the spatial variations of EET determined by Yield Stress Envelopes (YSE). The EET varies in the range of 12-23 km, which is in good agreement with the average value obtained from spectral analysis. Low EET values are interpreted as resulting from thermal and flexural lithospheric weakening. According to the lithospheric strength of the Eastern Anatolian region, the rheology model consists of a strong but brittle upper crust, a weak and ductile lower crust, and a weak lower part of the lithosphere. On the other hand, lithosphere strength corresponds to weak and ductile lower crust, a strong upper crust and a strong uppermost lithospheric mantle for the northern part of the Arabian platform.

  9. Effect of the thickness and nonlinear elasticity of tissue on the success of surgical stapling for laparoscopic liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukune, Mariko; Kobayashi, Yo; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Maeda, Testuya; Yamazaki, Nozomu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ando, Takeshi; Kaneko, Hironori; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the range of applications of surgical staplers has been extended to include laparoscopic liver resection because manipulation of a surgical stapler is very simple. Revealing the causes of stapling failure and suggesting a method to solve stapling failure are important for safe laparoscopic liver resection. Surgeons say that tissues make stapling more likely to fail if they are thick and brittle. However, the combinatorial effect of the thickness and stiffness of tissues on the success of surgical stapling for laparoscopic liver resection has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of tissue thickness and tissue stiffness on the success rate (SR) of surgical stapling. From ex vivo stapling experimental results using pig livers, it is suggested that the effect of tissue thickness is greater than the effect of tissue stiffness on the SR of stapling. If tissue thickness is 5 mm, the SR of stapling is high regardless of the magnitude of the tissue-stiffness parameter. However, if tissue thickness is >10 mm, the SR of stapling has a relationship with nonlinear viscoelastic parameters. Therefore, the SR of stapling could be predicted from tissue thickness and nonlinear elastic parameters.

  10. Tensile Instability in a Thick Elastic Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overvelde, Johannes; Dykstra, David; de Rooij, Rijk; Bertoldi, Katia

    A range of instabilities can occur in soft bodies that undergo large deformation. While most of them arise under compressive forces, it has previously been shown analytically that a tensile instability can occur in an elastic block subjected to equitriaxial tension. Guided by this result, we conducted centimeter-scale experiments on thick elastomeric samples under generalized plane strain conditions and observed for the first time this elastic tensile instability. We found that equibiaxial stretching leads to the formation of a wavy pattern, as regions of the sample alternatively flatten and extend in the out-of-plane direction. Our work uncovers a new type of instability that can be triggered in elastic bodies, enlarging the design space for smart structures that harness instabilities to enhance their functionality.

  11. Analysis of the effects of curvature and thickness on elastic wave velocity in cornea-like structures by finite element modeling and optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-06-01

    Wave models that have been used to extract the biomechanical properties of the cornea from the propagation of an elastic wave are based on an assumption of thin-plate geometry. However, this assumption does not account for the effects of corneal curvature and thickness. This study conducts finite element (FE) simulations on four types of cornea-like structures as well as optical coherence elastography (OCE) experiments on contact lenses and tissue-mimicking phantoms to investigate the effects of curvature and thickness on the group velocity of an elastic wave. The elastic wave velocity as determined by FE simulations and OCE of a spherical shell section decreased from ˜2.8 m/s to ˜2.2 m/s as the radius of curvature increased from 19.1 mm to 47.7 mm and increased from ˜3.0 m/s to ˜4.1 m/s as the thickness of the agar phantom increased from 1.9 mm to 5.6 mm. Both the FE simulation and OCE results confirm that the group velocity of the elastic wave decreases with radius of curvature but increases with thickness. These results demonstrate that the effects of the curvature and thickness must be considered in the further development of accurate wave models for reconstructing biomechanical properties of the cornea.

  12. Variations of the effective elastic thickness over the Ross Sea and Transantarctic Mountains and implications for their structure and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fei; Gao, Jinyao; Li, Fei; Shen, Zhongyan; Zhang, Qiao; Li, Yongdong

    2017-10-01

    The effective elastic thickness (Te) is a proxy for lithospheric strength, and it depends primarily on the thermal gradient and composition of the lithosphere. Accordingly, spatial variations in Te reflect changes in lithospheric properties and can be used to better understand the structure and tectonics of particular regions. In this paper, we investigate the Ross Sea and Transantarctic Mountains in terms of Te using gravity and topographic data and the fan wavelet transform technique. The results reveal that relatively high Te values dominate in the extensional basins of the Ross Sea and the hinterland of Transantarctic Mountains, whereas very low Te values occur along the Transantarctic Mountain Front and in the deep ocean basin, with the lowest Te values are found the vicinity of Ross Island and onshore in northern Victoria Land. In addition, the spatial variations in Te correlate well with lithospheric structure at the regional scale. By combining these findings with published seismic and heat flow data, we conclude that the presence of a zone of anomalously low Te values parallel to the coast indicates that the lithosphere beneath the Transantarctic Mountain Front is extremely weak due to Cenozoic volcanism and extension. The Te values increase from the Transantarctic Mountain Front (7 km) toward the center of the continent ( 80 km), which indicates that the continental lithosphere underlying East Antarctica belongs to the classic Gondwanan craton. The increase in Te indicates that the Transantarctic Mountain Front marks the continent-continent boundary between East Antarctica and West Antarctica. The Te values in the other extensional basins of the Ross Sea exhibit little variation and average approximately 35 km. The relatively high Te values are interpreted to indicate that the lithosphere cooled and became mechanically stronger between late Cretaceous extension and Eocene-Neogene deposition.

  13. The Effects of Double Oscillation Exercise Combined with Elastic Band Exercise on Scapular Stabilizing Muscle Strength and Thickness in Healthy Young Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Cho, Kyeongbong Lee, Minkyu Kim, Joohee Hahn, Wanhee Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of double oscillation exercise combined with elastic band exercise on the strength and thickness ratio of the scapular stabilizing muscles in healthy young individuals. A total of 30 subjects (17 male, 13 female were randomly assigned to an elastic band exercise group (EBG (n = 15 or an elastic band plus double oscillation exercise group (EB-DOG (n = 15. A total of 28 subjects completed the experiment and evaluation. Patients in the EBG performed the elastic band exercise for shoulder flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, horizontal abduction/adduction, and internal/external rotation for 30 minutes/session, five times/week, for four weeks. Patients in the EB-DOG performed the elastic band exercise for 15 minutes and the double oscillation exercise in three planes of motion (frontal, sagittal, and transverse, using a Bodyblade® for 15 minutes/session, five times/week, for four weeks. Shoulder muscle strength was assessed using a manual muscle test device during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC, while the thicknesses of the scapular stabilizing muscles were assessed using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging both at rest and during MVIC. Both groups had significant effects on shoulder muscle strength, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups for change value of shoulder muscle strength (Bonferroni correction p < 0.005. Significant differences were observed in the group × time interactions for horizontal abduction, external rotation, and protraction. There was a statistically significant improvement in thickness ratio of LT and SA in the EB-DOG and no significant difference was founded in EBG (Bonferroni correction p < 0.006. In comparison between the two groups, EB-DOG showed a significant change in the thickness ratio of LT compared to EBG. In addition, significant differences were observed for the group × time interactions for the thickness ratio of the LT (F

  14. The Short-Term Effect of Ketogenic Diet on Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Elastic Properties of the Carotid Artery and the Aorta in Epileptic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doksöz, Önder; Güzel, Orkide; Yılmaz, Ünsal; İşgüder, Rana; Çeleğen, Kübra; Meşe, Timur; Uysal, Utku

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the effect of a 6-month-long ketogenic diet on carotid intima-media thickness, carotid artery, and aortic vascular functions. Thirty-eight drug-resistant epileptic patients who were being treated with ketogenic diet were enrolled. Fasting total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and glucose concentrations were measured and echocardiography was performed in all patients before the beginning of ketogenic diet and at the sixth month of treatment. The body weight, height, body mass index, serum levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein increased significantly at month 6 when compared to baseline values (P ketogenic diet has no effect on carotid intima-media thickness and elastic properties of the carotid artery and the aorta. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. The effects of elastic band resistance training combined with blood flow restriction on strength, total bone-free lean body mass and muscle thickness in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiebaud, Robert S; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Fahs, Christopher A; Rossow, Lindy M; Kim, Daeyeol; Abe, Takashi; Anderson, Mark A; Young, Kaelin C; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2013-09-01

    Elastic band (EB) training is a common form of resistance training used by the elderly, individuals with joint problems or those recovering from injury. EB training performed at low intensities by these populations may have little effect on muscle hypertrophy. However, when combined with blood flow restriction (BFR), low-intensity EB resistance training may result in muscle hypertrophy. Postmenopausal women (61 ± 5 years) were assigned to a moderate-to-high-intensity EB group (MH, n = 8) or a low-intensity EB group combined with BFR (LI-BFR, n = 6). Each group performed seated chest press, seated row and seated shoulder press with EB three times a week for eight weeks. EB colours progressed in each group by having participants maintain a rating of 7-9 on the OMNI Resistance for active muscle (OMNI-RES AM) scale (0-10) throughout training. In the LI-BFR group, BFR pressure progressed during the first 4 weeks of training (80-120 mmHg), after which EB colours were progressed. 1-repetition maximum increased for chest press (P = 0.01), shoulder press (P = 0.02) and seated row (P = 0.01), but no differences were found between groups. Only pectoralis major muscle thickness in the upper body increased (P = 0.04). A trend was found for an increase in total bone-free lean body mass (P = 0.055). The main findings of this study were that moderate-to-high-intensity EB training and low-intensity EB training with BFR resulted in similar increases in strength, total bone-free lean body mass and muscle thickness. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  16. Energy trapping of thickness-shear vibration modes of elastic plates with functionally graded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Yang, Jiashi; Li, Jiangyu

    2007-03-01

    Energy trapping has important applications in the design of thickness-shear resonators. Considerable efforts have been made for the effective utilization and improvement of energy trapping with variations of plate configurations, such as adding electrodes and contouring. As a new approach in seeking improved energy trapping feature, we analyze thickness-shear vibrations in an elastic plate with functionally graded material (FGM) of in-plane variation of mechanical properties, such as elastic constants and density. A simple and general equation governing the thickness-shear modes is derived from a variational analysis. A plate with piecewise constant material properties is analyzed as an example. It is shown that such a plate can support thickness-shear vibration modes with obvious energy trapping. Bechmann's number for the existence of only one trapped mode also can be determined accordingly.

  17. Elastic Thickness Estimates for the Northern Lowlands of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, T.; Smrekar, S.

    2005-05-01

    The northern hemisphere lowlands of Mars cover approximately one-third of the surface of the planet. While crustal remnant magnetization is very strong in much of the Martian highlands, in contrast only a few low amplitude anomalies occur in the lowlands [Acuna et al., 1999]. The scarcity of magnetic anomalies in the lowlands remains unexplained. Crater counts for the northern lowlands basement based on analyses of high-resolution MOLA maps show that they are comparable in age to the southern highlands [Frey, 2004]. Since the basement age is so similar, it seems unlikely that the dynamo could have been active during formation of the highlands but not the lowlands. Topography and gravity measured by the Mars Global Surveyor have enabled the determination of elastic thickness (Te) estimates in the highlands [e.g. McGovern et al., 2002]. However, there have been no successful estimates in the Northern lowlands with the exception of Utopia basin [Zuber et al., 2002]. The failure is assumed due to insufficient power in the topography. Although the northern plains have clearly been eroded, we find that for selected Northern lowland regions, the power in the topography is smaller but comparable to areas of the southern highlands, previously used to obtain Te estimates. Previously, inversions based on isostatic response methods using eroded topography yielded incorrect results [Forsyth, 1985]. McKenzie and Fairhead [1997] find that Forsyths method can only be used to estimate Te where the power of the gravity from the uncompensated topography is comparable to that of the observed gravity at short wavelengths. If this condition is not satisfied, because the short-wavelength gravity is dominated by sub-surface loads and not by the topography, the estimated value of Te provides an upper bound. We use a multi-taper approach that has been successful at minimizing this bias for eroded cratons on Earth [Swain & Kirby, 2003]. In this study we perform detailed modeling of the

  18. Temperature- and thickness-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Zhimin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mechanical properties of polymer ultrathin films are usually different from those of their counterparts in bulk. Understanding the effect of thickness on the mechanical properties of these films is crucial for their applications. However, it is a great challenge to measure their elastic modulus experimentally with in situ heating. In this study, a thermodynamic model for temperature- (T and thickness (h-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films Ef(T,h is developed with verification by the reported experimental data on polystyrene (PS thin films. For the PS thin films on a passivated substrate, Ef(T,h decreases with the decreasing film thickness, when h is less than 60 nm at ambient temperature. However, the onset thickness (h*, at which thickness Ef(T,h deviates from the bulk value, can be modulated by T. h* becomes larger at higher T because of the depression of the quenching depth, which determines the thickness of the surface layer δ.

  19. Ideal cardiovascular health in adolescence: effect of lifestyle intervention and association with vascular intima-media thickness and elasticity (the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Children [STRIP] study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahkala, Katja; Hietalampi, Hanna; Laitinen, Tomi T; Viikari, Jorma S A; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Niinikoski, Harri; Lagström, Hanna; Talvia, Sanna; Jula, Antti; Heinonen, Olli J; Juonala, Markus; Simell, Olli; Raitakari, Olli T

    2013-05-28

    In the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Children (STRIP) study, repeated dietary counseling introduced in infancy and maintained until 20 years of age has led to lower intakes of saturated fat and serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In this study, we examined prospectively the intervention effects on the ideal cardiovascular health concept recently described by the American Heart Association. Additionally, we investigated the association between the concept and vascular intima-media thickness and elasticity in adolescence. In adolescents participating in the longitudinal, randomized, atherosclerosis-prevention STRIP study, complete data on ideal cardiovascular health metrics were available at 15 (n=394), 17 (n=376), and 19 (n=298) years of age. Aortic intima-media thickness and elasticity were measured with ultrasonography at the same ages. None of the adolescents had all 7 ideal cardiovascular health metrics. At least 5 ideal metrics was found in 60.2%, 45.5%, and 34.2% of the adolescents at 15, 17, and 19 years of age, respectively. Adolescents in the control group had an increased risk of low ideal cardiovascular health (≤3 metrics) compared with the intervention adolescents (risk ratio=1.35; 95% confidence interval=1.04-1.77). The number of ideal cardiovascular health metrics was inversely associated with aortic intima-media thickness (P85th percentile) was nearly 2-fold in adolescents with a low number of metrics (≤3) compared with those with a higher score (risk ratio=1.78; 95% confidence interval=1.31-2.43). Ideal cardiovascular health as determined by the AHA can be promoted in adolescents. The ideal cardiovascular health concept is beneficially associated with vascular health already in adolescence, supporting the relevance of targeting these metrics as part of primordial prevention. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00223600.

  20. A Comparative Study of Solutions Concerning Thick Elastic Plates on Bi-modulus Foundation

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    Ioana Vlad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical bending theory of elastic plates is based upon the assumption that the internal moments are proportional to the curvatures of the median deformed surface. This theory does not include the effects of shear and normal pressure in the plate. The model of a bi-modulus foundation is a realistic generalization of the Winkler’s classical one and is widely used to represent the subgrade of railroad systems, airport lanes [1], [2]. The derived equation of elastic thick plates on bi-modulus foundation considers shear and normal stress as linear variable across the plate thickness. This paper presents numerical solutions for thick plate resting on bi-modulus subgrade. These solutions take into account the shear distortion, and they are compared to the solution obtained by Finite Element Analysis and with the Winkler’s model. Particular solutions for the rectangular plate of clamped boundary, for the hinged rectangular plate and for a semi-elliptical plate, are discussed. The numerical solutions consist of double power series and they were obtained based on the minimum of the total strain energy [1]. Parametric studies have been performed in order to emphasize the effects of the chosen foundation and that of the geometry.

  1. In vivo measurement of breast skin elasticity and breast skin thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Alok; Miller, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    The mechanical properties of the breast skin play an important role in explaining the changes associated with radiotherapy, tissue expansion, and breast reconstruction surgery. Quantitative measurement of mechanical properties of breast skin is essential for surgical preplanning and outcome prediction. We have measured the skin elasticity properties and skin thickness of the breast using noninvasive methods. The DermaLab suction cup and the DermaScanC ultrasound were used to measure the modulus of elasticity and the skin thickness, respectively. Measurements were taken in 16 different locations on the breast in 23 female patients, also with patients in supine and upright position. Different analytical models (plate, membrane, large deformation) that can represent the experiment were studied to extract the elasticity modulus. The average modulus of breast skin elasticity found was 344 ± 88 kPa (Mean ± SD) with 95% confidence interval being 306-382 kPa. The range of the modulus was 195-480 kPa. The average thickness of breast skin was 1.55 ± 0.25 mm with a range of 0.83-2.4 mm. Regional variations of breast skin elasticity properties and breast skin thickness were observed. No direct correlations of biomechanical properties with age or breast thickness were observed. No significant difference was observed in the elasticity modulus between the supine and upright patient positions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Analysis of elastic stiffness for the leaf type holddown spring assembly with uniformly tapered thickness based on strain energy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    A formula to evaluate the elastic stiffness of the leaf type holddown spring (HDS)assembly with uniformly tapered thickness from t{sub 0} to t{sub 1} (t{sub 0} < t{sub 1}) has been analytically derived by applying the engineering beam theory and Casiliano`s theorem based on strain energies due to bending moment, shear and axial force. Comparisons on the elastic stiffnesses have been made with test results and evaluated values from the derived formula for the 14x14 and 17x17 type KOFA HDS, and it has found that most of the differences were in the range of 1-2% of the evaluated elastic stiffnesses and that the elastic stiffness of the HDS was mainly caused by bending moment because effects of shear and axial forces on the elastic stiffness were in the range of 0.09-0.16%. And in addition, it has found that the derived formula could be applicable to HDS designed by Westinghouse. Therefore, the derived formula could be applicable to evaluating the elastic stiffness of any HDS with tapered thickness only with the informations of the geometric data and material properties of leaf springs regardness of the manufacturing companies. 8 tabs., 4 figs., 22 refs. (Author) .new.

  3. Estimating material elasticity by spherical indentation load-relaxation tests on viscoelastic samples of finite thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Bo; Greenleaf, James; Oyen, Michelle; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2011-07-01

    A two-step viscoelastic spherical indentation method is proposed to compensate for 1) material relaxation and 2) sample thickness. In the first step, the indenter is moved at a constant speed and the reaction force is measured. In the second step, the indenter is held at a constant position and the relaxation response of the material is measured. Then the relaxation response is fit with a multi-exponential function which corresponds to a three-branch general Maxwell model. The relaxation modulus is derived by correcting the finite ramp time introduced in the first step. The proposed model takes into account the sample thickness, which is important for applications in which the sample thickness is less than ten times the indenter radius. The model is validated numerically by finite element simulations. Experiments are carried out on a 10% gelatin phantom and a chicken breast sample with the proposed method. The results for both the gelatin phantom and the chicken breast sample agree with the results obtained from a surface wave method. Both the finite element simulations and experimental results show improved elasticity estimations by incorporating the sample thickness into the model. The measured shear elasticities of the 10% gelatin sample are 6.79 and 6.93 kPa by the proposed finite indentation method at sample thickness of 40 and 20 mm, respectively. The elasticity of the same sample is estimated to be 6.53 kPa by the surface wave method. For the chicken breast sample, the shear elasticity is measured to be 4.51 and 5.17 kPa by the proposed indentation method at sample thickness of 40 and 20 mm, respectively. Its elasticity is measured by the surface wave method to be 4.14 kPa.

  4. Mointoring Thickness Deviations in Planar Multi-Layered Elastic Structures Using Impedance Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, K A

    2007-01-26

    In this letter, a low frequency ultrasonic resonance technique that operates in the (20 - 80 kHz) regime is presented that demonstrates detection of thickness changes on the order of +/- 10{micro}m. This measurement capability is a result of the direct correlation between the electrical impedance of an electro-acoustic transducer and the mechanical loading it experiences when placed in contact with a layered elastic structure. The relative frequency shifts of the resonances peaks can be estimated through a simple one-dimensional transmission model. Separate experimental measurements confirm this technique to be sensitive to subtle changes in the underlying layered elastic structure.

  5. Elastic modulus and viscoelastic properties of full thickness skin characterised at micro scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Michael L; Chen, Xianfeng; Huang, Han; Kendall, Mark A F

    2013-03-01

    The recent emergence of micro-devices for vaccine delivery into upper layers of the skin holds potential for increased immune responses using physical means to target abundant immune cell populations. A challenge in doing this has been a limited understanding of the skin elastic properties at the micro scale (i.e. on the order of a cell diameter; ~10 μm). Here, we quantify skin's elastic properties at a micro-scale by fabricating customised probes of scales from sub- to super-cellular (0.5 μm-20 μm radius). We then probe full thickness skin; first with force-relaxation experiments and subsequently by elastic indentations. We find that skin's viscoelastic response is scale-independent: consistently a ~40% decrease in normalised force over the first second, followed by further 10% reduction over 10 s. Using Prony series and Hertzian contact analyses, we determined the strain-rate independent elastic moduli of the skin. A high scale dependency was found: the smallest probe encountered the highest elastic modulus (~30 MPa), whereas the 20 μm radius probe was lowest (below 1 MPa). We propose that this may be a result of the load distribution in skin facilitated by the hard corneocytes in the outermost skin layers, and softer living cell layers below. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. STATIONARY PROBLEM OF MOISTURE-INDUCED ELASTICITY OF HETEROGENEOUS THICK-WALLED CYLINDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreev Vladimir Igorevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many problems of identification of the stress-strain state against the background of the heat and mass transfer are solved through the application of constant (averaged values of mechanical properties (elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and derivation of differential equations with constant coefficients. Due to irregular distribution of temperature and other factors of impact, including the moisture content, mechanical properties of many materials change significantly; therefore, the problems in question are solved within the framework of mechanics of heterogeneous bodies. In this paper, the authors solve the classical problem of the steady-state moisture-induced elasticity of a thick-walled cylinder by taking account of the changes in the value of the elastic modulus caused by the influence of moisture. In this case, the problem is reduced to a differential equation with variable coefficients, which makes the solution more complicated though more accurate. It is proven that due regard for the heterogeneity leads to a significant increase in stresses, if compared to the solution based on the mean values of the modulus of elasticity.

  7. Transient Response of a Fluid-Filled, Thick-Walled Spherical Shell Embedded in an Elastic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahari Ako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problem of transient elastodynamics analysis of a thick-walled, fluid-filled spherical shell embedded in an elastic medium with an analytical approach. This configuration is investigated at first step for a full-space case. Different constitutive relations for the elastic medium, shell material and filling fluid can be considered, as well as different excitation sources (including S/P wave or plane/spherical incident wave at different locations. With mapmaking visualisation, the wave propagation phenomena can be described and better understood. The methodology is going to be applied to analysis of the tunnels or other shell like structures under the effect of nearby underground explosion.

  8. How lidocaine influences the bilayer thickness and bending elasticity of biomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zheng; Nagao, Michihiro; Bossev, Dobrin P.

    2010-11-01

    We have studied how local anesthetics influence the structural and dynamical properties of model bio-membranes. The measurements of small-angle neutron scattering have been performed on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) unilamellar vesicles with different concentrations of lidocaine in D2O to determine the bilayer thickness as a function of the lidocaine concentration. The neutron-spin echo spectroscopy (NSE) has been used to study the influence of lidocaine on the bending elasticity of DMPC bilayers in fluid crystal phase (Lα) and the ripple gel (Pβ') phase.

  9. How lidocaine influences the bilayer thickness and bending elasticity of biomembranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Yi; Nagao, Michihiro; Bossev, Dobrin P, E-mail: zhyi@indiana.edu

    2010-11-01

    We have studied how local anesthetics influence the structural and dynamical properties of model bio-membranes. The measurements of small-angle neutron scattering have been performed on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) unilamellar vesicles with different concentrations of lidocaine in D{sub 2}O to determine the bilayer thickness as a function of the lidocaine concentration. The neutron-spin echo spectroscopy (NSE) has been used to study the influence of lidocaine on the bending elasticity of DMPC bilayers in fluid crystal phase (L{sub {alpha}}) and the ripple gel (P{sub {beta}}') phase.

  10. Dynamics of Geometrically Nonlinear Elastic Nonthin Anisotropic Shells of Variable Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, M. V.; Tuchapskii, R. I.

    2017-11-01

    A theory of dynamic elastic geometrically nonlinear deformation of nonthin anisotropic shells with variable thickness is constructed. Shells are assumed asymmetric about the reference surface. Functions are expanded into Legendre series. The basic equations are written in a coordinate system aligned with the lines of curvature of the reference surface. The equations of motion and appropriate boundary conditions are obtained using the Hamilton-Ostrogradsky variational principle. The change in metric across the thickness is taken into account. The theory assumes that the refinement process is regular and allows deriving equations including products of terms of Legendre series of unknown functions of arbitrary order. The behavior of a square metallic plate acted upon by a pressure pulse distributed over its face is studied.

  11. Aortic elasticity and carotid intima-media thickness in children with mitral valve prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erolu, Elif; Akalın, Figen; Çetiner, Nilüfer; Şaylan Çevik, Berna

    2017-11-07

    Aim We aimed to study the dimensions, systolic and diastolic functions of the left ventricle; dimensions and elasticity of the aorta; and carotid intima-media thickness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery in mitral valve prolapse. The study group consisted of 43 patients (mean age=13.3±3.9) and 42 healthy children (mean age=12.9±3.4). Left ventricular end-diastolic, end-systolic, left atrial diameters, interventricular septum, and left ventricular posterior wall thickness were measured. Ejection and shortening fractions were calculated by M-mode. Measurements were adjusted to the body surface area. Mitral annulus, and systolic and diastolic diameters of the aortic annulus and aorta at each level were obtained; z-scores, aortic strain, distensibility, stiffness index were calculated. Carotid intima-media thickness and flow-mediated dilatation were studied. Patients were classified as classical/non-classical mitral valve prolapse and younger/older patients. Left ventricular end-systolic, end-diastolic, and left atrial diameters (p=0.009, p=0.024, p=0.001) and aortic z-scores at annulus, sinus valsalva, and sinotubuler junction were larger (p=0.008, p=0.003, p=0.002, respectively) in the mitral valve prolapse group. Aortic strain and distensibility increased and stiffness decreased at the ascending aorta in the patient group (p=0.012, 0.020, p=0.019, respectively). Classical mitral valve prolapse had lower strain and distensibility and higher stiffness of the aorta at sinus valsalva level (p=0.010, 0.027, 0.004, respectively). Carotid intima-media thickness was thinner in the patient group, especially in the non-classical mitral valve prolapse group (p=0.037). Flow-mediated dilatation did not differ among the groups. Mitral valve prolapse is a systemic disease of the connective tissue causing enlarged cardiac chambers and increased elasticity of the aorta. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness in this group may indicate low atherosclerosis risk.

  12. A new assessment of the elastic thickness (Te structure of the Indian shield, and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshraj Trivedi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The elastic thickness (Te of continents is a matter of much debate. Recent studies have shown that a number of factors control the continental Te, including age, heat flow, and lithospheric thickness. Here, we estimate the Te structure of the whole Indian shield using an improved isotropic fan wavelet land ocean deconvolution methodology, and we compare these results with the global published Te estimates in the Archean, Proterozoic and younger geological provinces. Our study reveals low (0-45 km/0-35 km, intermediate (45-70 km and high (70-100 km Te values in the Archean/Quaternary, the Proterozoic, and the Tertiary provinces, respectively, of the Indian shield. This is in contrast with global estimates of Te in similar geological provinces. In the absence of any correlation of Te with any controlling parameters, we propose that the mantle properties, rather than the tectonic history, are responsible for influences on the Te values within the Indian shield. The global positioning system horizontal velocity vectors yielded a locking depth of ca. 20 ±4 km, and the aseismic creep beyond correlates well with the high strength of ca. 70 km to 100 km in the central Himalayan foreland.

  13. Tectonic inheritance of the Indian Shield: New insights from its elastic thickness structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratheesh-Kumar, R. T.; Windley, B. F.; Sajeev, K.

    2014-03-01

    A new evaluation of the elastic thickness (Te) structure of the Indian Shield, derived from isotropic fan wavelet methodology, documents spatial variations of lithospheric deformation in different tectonic provinces correlated with episodic tectono-thermal events. The Te variations corroborated by shear velocity, crustal thickness, and seismogenic thickness reveal the heterogeneous rheology of the Indian lithosphere. The thinned, attenuated lithosphere beneath Peninsular India is considered to be the reason for its mechanically weak strength (Western Dharwar province and a NNE-trending band of low Te anomaly in the Southern Granulite Terrane are intriguing patterns. The average Te values (40-50 km) of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone, the Bastar Craton, and the northern Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt are suggestive of old, stable, Indian lithosphere, which was not affected by any major tectono-thermal events after cratonic stabilization. We propose that the anomalously high Te (60-85 km) and high S-wave velocity zone to the north of the Narmada-Son Lineament, mainly in NW Himalaya, and the northern Aravalli and Bundelkhand Cratons, suggest that Archean lithosphere characterized by a high velocity mantle keel supports the orogenic topographic loads in/near the Himalaya. The Te map clearly segments the volcanic provinces of the Indian Shield, where the signatures of the Reunion, Marion, and Kerguelen hotspots are indicated by significantly low Te patterns that correlate with plume- and rift-related thermal and mechanical rejuvenation, magmatic underplating, and crustal necking. The correlations between Te variations and the occurrence of seismicity over seismically active zones reveal different causal relationships, which led to the current seismogenic zonation of the Indian Shield.

  14. Acute effect of hemodialysis on arterial elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağ, Saim; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yildiz, Abdulmecit; Dilek, Kamil; Şentürk, Tunay; Serdar, Osman Akın; Aydinlar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Reduced arterial elasticity is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Hemodialysis (HD) treatment per se can bring additional risk factors for vascular disease. Our study was designed to determine whether a single hemodialysis session leads to an acute alteration in parameters of arterial elasticity in ESRD. In this study, 58 patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and 29 healthy controls were enrolled. Large artery elasticity index (LAEI) and the small artery elasticity index (SAEI) were measured by applanation tonometry. The acute effect of a hemodialysis session on arterial elasticity indices was assessed by comparison of prehemodialysis and posthemodialysis determinations. At baseline, LAEI did not differ significantly in patients compared with controls. In contrast, the SAEI was significantly lower in patients (4.1 ± 2.6 mL/mmHg x 100) than in healthy individuals (8.9 ± 3.4 mL/mmHg x 100, P < 0.05). In patients with ESRD, no significant changes in LAEI was observed after HD, but SAEI deteriorated significantly (from 4.1 ± 2.6 mL/mmHg x 100 to 3.4 ± 2.3, P < 0.05). We conclude that ESRD patients face a significant reduction in SAEI, which is exacerbated by a dialysis procedure.

  15. Multitaper spectral method to estimate the elastic thickness of South China: Implications for intracontinental deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangfan Deng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effective elastic thickness (Te represents the thickness of the elastic layer or the flexural rigidity of the lithosphere, the equivalent of which can be calculated from the spectral analysis of gravity and topographic data. Studies of Te have profound influence on intracontinental deformation, and coupling of the tectonic blocks. In this paper, we use the multitaper spectral estimation method to calculate the coherence between Bouguer gravity and topography data, and to obtain the Te map of South China. Through the process of correction, we discuss the relationships of Te versus heat flow, and Te versus seismicity. The results show that Te distribution of South China is affected by three factors: the original age, which controls the basic feature; the Mesozoic evolution, which affects the Te distribution; and the neotectonic movement, which shaped the final distribution. The crust age has a positive correlation with the first-order Te distribution; thus the Yangtze Craton has a relatively higher Te (about 50 km whereas the Te in Cathaysia block is only 10–20 km. By analysis and comparison among the tectonic models of South China, the Te distribution can be well explained using the flat-subduction model. As is typical with neotectonics, the region with a higher heat flow is related with a lower Te. The seismicity does not have a clear relationship with Te, but the strong seismicity could cause a low Te. Seismogenic layer (Ts has a similar trend as Te in the craton, whereas in other areas the relationship is complex.

  16. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Elastic Analysis of Rotating Thick Cylindrical Shells with Variable Thickness Using Disk Form Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zamani Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using disk form multilayers, a semi-analytical solution has been derived for determination of displacements and stresses in a rotating cylindrical shell with variable thickness under uniform pressure. The thick cylinder is divided into disk form layers form with their thickness corresponding to the thickness of the cylinder. Due to the existence of shear stress in the thick cylindrical shell with variable thickness, the equations governing disk layers are obtained based on first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT. These equations are in the form of a set of general differential equations. Given that the cylinder is divided into n disks, n sets of differential equations are obtained. The solution of this set of equations, applying the boundary conditions and continuity conditions between the layers, yields displacements and stresses. A numerical solution using finite element method (FEM is also presented and good agreement was found.

  17. Critical head, thickness of fine-grained deposit, and skeletal elastic storage arrays of the SUB package of the Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the SUB package arrays for the model grid, critical head, thickness of fine-grained deposits, and skeletal-elastic-storage used in the...

  18. Benchmark Solution for Free Vibration of Moderately Thick Functionally Graded Sandwich Sector Plates on Two-Parameter Elastic Foundation with General Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The free vibration analysis of moderately thick functionally graded (FG sector plates resting on two-parameter elastic foundation with general boundary conditions is presented via Fourier-Ritz method, which is composed of the modified Fourier series approach and the Ritz procedure. The material properties are assumed to vary continuously along the thickness according to the power-law distribution. The bilayered and single-layered functionally graded sector plates are obtained as the special cases of sandwich plates. The first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT is adopted to construct the theoretical model. Under current framework, regardless of boundary conditions, each displacement and each rotation of plates is represented by the modified Fourier series consisting of a standard Fourier cosine series and several closed-form auxiliary functions introduced to ensure and accelerate the convergence of the series representation. Then, the accurate solutions are obtained by using the Ritz procedure based on the energy function of sector plates. The present method shows good convergence, reliability, and accuracy by comprehensive investigation with some selected classical boundary conditions. Numerous new vibration results for moderately thick FG sandwich sector plates are provided. The effects of the elastic restraint parameters and so forth on free vibration characteristic of sector plates are presented.

  19. Effect of Ratio of Visco-Elastic Material Viscosity to Fluid Viscosity on Stability of Flexible Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANBUKUMAR, S.; KUMAR, MUNENDRA

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, a flexible pipe has been considered to study the effect of ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity on the stability of flexible laminar pipe flow with axi-symmetric disturbances. The effect of thickness of visco-elastic material on the stability of flexible pipe flow with outer rigid shroud has also been studied. The stability curves are drawn for various values of the ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity. It is observed that stability of flow is increasing by decreasing the ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity.

  20. Investigations of thickness-shear mode elastic constant and damping of shunted piezoelectric materials with a coupling resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-Ying; Li, Zhao-Hui; Sun, Yang; Li, Qi-Hu

    2016-12-01

    Shear-mode piezoelectric materials have been widely used to shunt the damping of vibrations where utilizing surface or interface shear stresses. The thick-shear mode (TSM) elastic constant and the mechanical loss factor can change correspondingly when piezoelectric materials are shunted to different electrical circuits. This phenomenon makes it possible to control the performance of a shear-mode piezoelectric damping system through designing the shunt circuit. However, due to the difficulties in directly measuring the TSM elastic constant and the mechanical loss factor of piezoelectric materials, the relationships between those parameters and the shunt circuits have rarely been investigated. In this paper, a coupling TSM electro-mechanical resonant system is proposed to indirectly measure the variations of the TSM elastic constant and the mechanical loss factor of piezoelectric materials. The main idea is to transform the variations of the TSM elastic constant and the mechanical loss factor into the changes of the easily observed resonant frequency and electrical quality factor of the coupling electro-mechanical resonator. Based on this model, the formular relationships are set up theoretically with Mason equivalent circuit method and they are validated with finite element (FE) analyses. Finally, a prototype of the coupling electro-mechanical resonator is fabricated with two shear-mode PZT5A plates to investigate the TSM elastic constants and the mechanical loss factors of different circuit-shunted cases of the piezoelectric plate. Both the resonant frequency shifts and the bandwidth changes observed in experiments are in good consistence with the theoretical and FE analyses under the same shunt conditions. The proposed coupling resonator and the obtained relationships are validated with but not limited to PZT5A. Project supported by the National Defense Foundation of China (Grant No. 9149A12050414JW02180).

  1. Effect of thickness on airfoil surface noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, W.; Wagner, J.

    1982-01-01

    Noise emission from very small chord and very large chord airfoils was measured with eleven 0.63 cm microphones placed along a horizontal semicircle (4.57 m radius) that was centered at the leading edge of the test airfoil. The noise signals were analyzed by an automated spectrum analyzer which yielded 1/3-octave band sound pressure level spectra for each microphone, and the data were corrected to remove the effects of atmospheric attenuation and jet noise. It is found that the effect of thickness is large and must be accounted for in any fundamental airfoil noise theory that attempts to describe the noise emitted from real airfoils. Incident mean velocity gradients and compressibility must also be taken into account. The effect of thickness increases with frequency, with thick airfoils being quieter than thin ones.

  2. Effect of geometry on hydrodynamic film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.; Taylor, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of geometry on the isothermal hydrodynamic film separating two rigid solids was investigated. Pressure-viscosity effects were not considered. The minimum film thickness is derived for fully flooded conjunctions by using the Reynolds boundary conditions. It was found that the minimum film thickness had the same speed, viscosity, and load dependence as Kapitza's classical solution. However, the incorporation of Reynolds boundary conditions resulted in an additional geometry effect. Solutions using the parabolic film approximation are compared with those using the exact expression for the film in the analysis. Contour plots are shown that indicate in detail the pressure developed between the solids.

  3. Boundary layer thickness effect on boattail drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Chamberlain, R.; Bober, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to investigate the effects of boundary layer changes on the flow over high angle boattail nozzles. The tests were run on an isolated axisymmetric sting mounted model. Various boattail geometries were investigated at high subsonic speeds over a range of boundary layer thicknesses. In general, boundary layer effects were small at speeds up to Mach 0.8. However, at higher speeds significant regions of separated flow were present on the boattail. When separation was present large reductions in boattail drag resulted with increasing boundary layer thickness. The analysis predicts both of these trends.

  4. New Bouguer Gravity Maps of Venezuela: Representation and Analysis of Free-Air and Bouguer Anomalies with Emphasis on Spectral Analyses and Elastic Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sanchez-Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new gravity data compilation for Venezuela was processed and homogenized. Gravity was measured in reference to the International Gravity Standardization Net 1971, and the complete Bouguer anomaly was calculated by using the Geodetic Reference System 1980 and 2.67 Mg/m3. A regional gravity map was computed by removing wavelengths higher than 200 km from the Bouguer anomaly. After the anomaly separation, regional and residual Bouguer gravity fields were then critically discussed in term of the regional tectonic features. Results were compared with the previous geological and tectonic information obtained from former studies. Gravity and topography data in the spectral domain were used to examine the elastic thickness and depths of the structures of the causative measured anomaly. According to the power spectrum analysis results of the gravity data, the averaged Moho depths for the massif, plains, and mountainous areas in Venezuela are 42, 35, and 40 km, respectively. The averaged admittance function computed from the topography and Free-Air anomaly profiles across Mérida Andes showed a good fit for a regional compensation model with an effective elastic thickness of 15 km.

  5. Monitoring ice thickness and elastic properties from the measurement of leaky guided waves: A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Ludovic; Lachaud, Cédric; Théry, Romain; Predoi, Mihai V; Marsan, David; Larose, Eric; Weiss, Jérôme; Montagnat, Maurine

    2017-11-01

    The decline of Arctic sea ice extent is one of the most spectacular signatures of global warming, and studies converge to show that this decline has been accelerating over the last four decades, with a rate that is not reproduced by climate models. To improve these models, relying on comprehensive and accurate field data is essential. While sea ice extent and concentration are accurately monitored from microwave imagery, an accurate measure of its thickness is still lacking. Moreover, measuring observables related to the mechanical behavior of the ice (such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc.) could provide better insights in the understanding of sea ice decline, by completing current knowledge so far acquired mostly from radar and sonar data. This paper aims at demonstrating on the laboratory scale that these can all be estimated simultaneously by measuring seismic waves guided in the ice layer. The experiment consisted of leaving a water tank in a cold room in order to grow an ice layer at its surface. While its thickness was increasing, ultrasonic guided waves were generated with a piezoelectric source, and measurements were subsequently inverted to infer the thickness and mechanical properties of the ice with very good accuracy.

  6. Percolation effect in thick film superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sali, R.; Harsanyi, G. [Technical Univ. of Budapest (Hungary)

    1994-12-31

    A thick film superconductor paste has been developed to study the properties of granulated superconductor materials, to observe the percolation effect and to confirm the theory of the conducting mechanism in the superconducting thick films. This paste was also applied to make a superconducting planar transformer. Due to high T{sub c} and advantageous current density properties the base of the paste was chosen to be of Bi(Pb)SrCaCuO system. For contacts a conventional Ag/Pt paste was used. The critical temperature of the samples were between 110 K and 115 K depending on the printed layer thickness. The critical current density at the boiling temperature of the liquid He- was between 200-300 A/cm{sup 2}. The R(T) and V(I) functions were measured with different parameters. The results of the measurements have confirmed the theory of conducting mechanism in the material. The percolation structure model has been built and described. As an application, a superconducting planar thick film transformer was planned and produced. Ten windings of the transformer were printed on one side of the alumina substrate and one winding was printed on the other side. The coupling between the two sides was possible through the substrate. The samples did not need special drying and firing parameters. After the preparation, the properties of the transformer were measured. The efficiency and the losses were determined. Finally, some fundamental advantages and problems of the process were discussed.

  7. Effect of Faces Type and Thickness on Mechanical Properties of Sandwich Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jabbari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich panels are new kind of layered composites that usually are composed of three layers and their core layers thickness is higher but the top layers are determinative indetermination of the products strength and stiffness. In this study, effect of faces type and thickness on mechanical properties of sandwich panels was investigated. The variables included, faces type with 3, 4 and 5 mm thickness (beech face, popular face and adhesive type (PMDI. After making panels, sampling test (based on DIN- EN 326-1 was considered. Mechanical properties of panels included modulus of elasticity as well as module of rupture (based on DIN- EN 310 standard and impact bending strength (IBS (based on ASTM- D 3499 standard were measured. The gathered data were analyzed as completely randomized factorial design. The results showed that, the thickness of faces has a significant effect on the mechanical properties. With increasing thickness of 3 to 5 mm, modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity and impact bending strength (IBS increased. The interaction effect between species and thickness showed that using of beech genus with 5 mm thickness leads to increase of mechanical properties in sandwich panels.

  8. Simultaneous determination of the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film utilizing vibrating doubly clamped micro-/nanobeams

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo Stachiv; Chih-Yun Kuo; Te-Hua Fang; Vincent Mortet

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of ultrathin film thickness and its basic properties can be highly challenging and time consuming due to necessity of using several very sophisticated devices. Here, we report an easy accessible resonant based method capable to simultaneously determinate the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film coated on doubly clamped micro-/nanobeam. We show that a general dependency of the resonant frequencies on the axial load is also valid for in-plane vib...

  9. Frequency dependence of the effective elastic moduli of cavernous bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibiryakov, E. B.

    2014-09-01

    The dependence of the effective parameters of microheterogeneous media on the frequency and structure of the pore space is obtained using the boundary integral equation method. The potential method is first used to solve dynamic three-dimensional elastic problems in multiply connected domains in the case of stationary oscillations. It is shown that if the wavelength corresponds to a finite number of blocks, the effective elastic moduli decrease.

  10. THE STRESS-STRAIN STATE OF AN INFINITELY LONG ELASTIC ARRAYS OF DIFFERENT WIDTHS AND LIMITED THICKNESS ON THE HARD GROUND WHEN THEY HAVE FLAT DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Badalakha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of solving several problems of a flat deformation of elastic infinitely long massifs of different width and limited thickness. Various cases of conditions at the massif/base contact. The relationships between stressed and strained states previously suggested by the author, which differ from the generalized Hooke’s law, are used in the solutions.

  11. Effects of ablation depth and repair time on the corneal elastic modulus after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaona; Chen, Weiyi; He, Rui; Gao, Zhipeng; Feng, Pengfei

    2017-01-17

    The biomechanical properties of the cornea should be taken into account in the refractive procedure in order to perform refractive surgery more accurately. The effects of the ablation depth and repair time on the elastic modulus of the rabbit cornea after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) are still unclear. In this study, LASIK was performed on New Zealand rabbits with different ablation depth (only typical LASIK flaps were created; residual stroma bed was 50 or 30% of the whole cornea thickness respectively). The animals without any treatment were served as normal controls. The corneal thickness was measured by ultrasonic pachymetry before animals were humanly killed after 7 or 28 days post-operatively. The corneal elastic modulus was measured by uniaxial tensile testing. A mathematical procedure considering the actual geometrics of the cornea was created to analyze the corneal elastic modulus. There were no obvious differences among all groups in the elastic modulus on after 7 days post-operatively. However, after 28th days post-operatively, there was a significant increase in the elastic modulus with 50 and 30% residual stroma bed; only the elastic modulus of the cornea with 30% residual stroma bed was significantly higher than that of 7 days. Changes in elastic modulus after LASIK suggest that this biomechanical effect may correlate with the ablation depth and repair time.

  12. Interference effect in elastic parton energy loss in a finitemedium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Similar to the radiative parton energy loss due to gluonbremsstrahlung, elastic energy loss of a parton undergoing multiplescattering in a finite medium is demonstrated to be sensitive tointerference effect. The interference between amplitudes of elasticscattering via a gluon exchange and that of gluon radiation reduces theeffective elastic energy loss in a finite medium and gives rise to anon-trivial length dependence. The reduction is most significant for apropagation length L<4/\\pi T in a medium with a temperature T. Thoughthe finite size effect is not significant for the average partonpropagation in the most central heavy-ion collisions, it will affect thecentrality dependence of its effect on jet quenching.

  13. Simultaneous determination of the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film utilizing vibrating doubly clamped micro-/nanobeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachiv, Ivo, E-mail: stachiv@fzu.cz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Kuo, Chih-Yun [Tzu-Chi University, Hualian City, Hualian, Taiwan (China); Fang, Te-Hua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Mortet, Vincent [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-04-15

    Measurement of ultrathin film thickness and its basic properties can be highly challenging and time consuming due to necessity of using several very sophisticated devices. Here, we report an easy accessible resonant based method capable to simultaneously determinate the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film coated on doubly clamped micro-/nanobeam. We show that a general dependency of the resonant frequencies on the axial load is also valid for in-plane vibrations, and the one depends only on the considered vibrational mode. As a result, we found that the film elastic modulus, density and thickness can be evaluated from two measured in-plane and out-plane fundamental resonant frequencies of micro-/nanobeam with and without film under different prestress forces. Whereas, the residual stress can be determined from two out-plane (in-plane) measured consecutive resonant frequencies of beam with film under different prestress forces without necessity of knowing film and substrate properties and dimensions. Moreover, we also reveal that the common uncertainties in force (and thickness) determination have a negligible (and minor) impact on the determined film properties. The application potential of the present method is illustrated on the beam made of silicon and SiO{sub 2} with deposited 20 nm thick AlN and 40 nm thick Au thin films, respectively.

  14. Simultaneous determination of the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film utilizing vibrating doubly clamped micro-/nanobeams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Stachiv

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of ultrathin film thickness and its basic properties can be highly challenging and time consuming due to necessity of using several very sophisticated devices. Here, we report an easy accessible resonant based method capable to simultaneously determinate the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film coated on doubly clamped micro-/nanobeam. We show that a general dependency of the resonant frequencies on the axial load is also valid for in-plane vibrations, and the one depends only on the considered vibrational mode. As a result, we found that the film elastic modulus, density and thickness can be evaluated from two measured in-plane and out-plane fundamental resonant frequencies of micro-/nanobeam with and without film under different prestress forces. Whereas, the residual stress can be determined from two out-plane (in-plane measured consecutive resonant frequencies of beam with film under different prestress forces without necessity of knowing film and substrate properties and dimensions. Moreover, we also reveal that the common uncertainties in force (and thickness determination have a negligible (and minor impact on the determined film properties. The application potential of the present method is illustrated on the beam made of silicon and SiO2 with deposited 20 nm thick AlN and 40 nm thick Au thin films, respectively.

  15. Simultaneous determination of the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film utilizing vibrating doubly clamped micro-/nanobeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachiv, Ivo; Kuo, Chih-Yun; Fang, Te-Hua; Mortet, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of ultrathin film thickness and its basic properties can be highly challenging and time consuming due to necessity of using several very sophisticated devices. Here, we report an easy accessible resonant based method capable to simultaneously determinate the residual stress, elastic modulus, density and thickness of ultrathin film coated on doubly clamped micro-/nanobeam. We show that a general dependency of the resonant frequencies on the axial load is also valid for in-plane vibrations, and the one depends only on the considered vibrational mode. As a result, we found that the film elastic modulus, density and thickness can be evaluated from two measured in-plane and out-plane fundamental resonant frequencies of micro-/nanobeam with and without film under different prestress forces. Whereas, the residual stress can be determined from two out-plane (in-plane) measured consecutive resonant frequencies of beam with film under different prestress forces without necessity of knowing film and substrate properties and dimensions. Moreover, we also reveal that the common uncertainties in force (and thickness) determination have a negligible (and minor) impact on the determined film properties. The application potential of the present method is illustrated on the beam made of silicon and SiO2 with deposited 20 nm thick AlN and 40 nm thick Au thin films, respectively.

  16. Effects of nanosecond pulse electric fields on cellular elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Diganta; Asmar, Anthony; Stacey, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the effects of a single 60 nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) of low (15 kV/cm) and high (60 kV/cm) field strengths on cellular morphology and membrane elasticity in Jurkat cells using fluorescent microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We performed force displacement measurements on cells using AFM and calculated the Young's modulus for membrane elasticity. Differential effects were observed depending upon pulsing conditions. We found that a single nsPEF of low field strength did not induce any apparent cytoskeletal breakdown and had minor morphological changes. Interestingly, force measurements and calculation of Young's modulus showed a significant decrease in membrane elasticity. A single nsPEF of high field strength induced stark morphological changes due to disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and a marked decrease in elasticity likely caused by irreversible membrane damage. We suggest that the cellular morphology is mainly dependent on stabilization by the actin cytoskeleton, while the elasticity changes are partially dependent on the cytoskeletal integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Condylar Elastic Properties to Temporomandibular Joint Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular condyle plays an important role in the growth and reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. We aimed to obtain orthotropic elastic parameters of the condyle using a continuous-wave ultrasonic technique and to observe the effects of condylar elastic parameters on stress distribution of the TMJ using finite element analysis (FEA. Using the ultrasonic technique, all nine elastic parameters were obtained, which showed that the mandibular condyle was orthotropic. With the condyle defined as orthotropic, the occlusal stress was transferred fluently and uniformly from the mandible to the TMJ. The stress distribution in the isotropic model showed stepped variation among different anatomical structures with higher stress values in the cartilage and condyle than in the orthotropic model. We conclude that anisotropy has subtle yet significant effects on stress distribution of the TMJ and could improve the reality of simulations.

  18. THE EFFECT OF PROCESS PARAMETERS ON THICKNESS DISTRIBUTION IN THERMOFORMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Eksi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cylindrical, conical and hemispherical molds were used to form flat thermoplastic sheets which are 1.5 mm in thickness. The effect of plug assist on thickness distribution was investigated. The sheets were formed with and without plug assist. Then thickness distributions on thermoformed products were obtained for two experimental procedures by a digital caliper (Resolution: 0.01mm. As a result, plug assist thermoforming provides more uniform thickness distributions than negative forming.

  19. Fluid-like elasticity induced by anisotropic effective mass density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guancong; Fu, Caixing; Wang, Guanghao

    shows the systems can have distinctive responses to waves with each polarization. In particular, we demonstrate that only longitudinal wave can propagate within a finite frequency regime, whereas transverse (flexural) waves meet a bandgap — a property conventionally found only in fluids. Effective......We present a three-dimensional anisotropic elastic metamaterial, which can generate dipolar resonances. Repeating these subwavelength units can lead to one-dimensional arrays, which are essentially elastic rods that can withstand both longitudinal, and flexural vibrations. Band structure analysis...... scenarios such as civil engineering and seismic wave control....

  20. Surface and elastic effects in isovector giant resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringari, S.; Lipparini, E.

    1986-07-01

    The role of elastic and surface effects in the isovector collective excitations is investigated by using a sum rule approach. Simple and accurate relations among the frequencies of different giant resonances are derived. The recently observed M-italic1 rotational state in deformed nuclei is also discussed.

  1. Resonance Elastic Scattering and Interference Effects Treatments in Subgroup Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhao Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the resonance integral (RI tables produced by the NJOY program, the conventional subgroup method usually ignores both the resonance elastic scattering and the resonance interference effects. In this paper, on one hand, to correct the resonance elastic scattering effect, RI tables are regenerated by using the Monte Carlo code, OpenMC, which employs the Doppler broadening rejection correction method for the resonance elastic scattering. On the other hand, a fast resonance interference factor method is proposed to efficiently handle the resonance interference effect. Encouraging conclusions have been indicated by the numerical results. (1 For a hot full power pressurized water reactor fuel pin-cell, an error of about +200 percent mille could be introduced by neglecting the resonance elastic scattering effect. By contrast, the approach employed in this paper can eliminate the error. (2 The fast resonance interference factor method possesses higher precision and higher efficiency than the conventional Bondarenko iteration method. Correspondingly, if the fast resonance interference factor method proposed in this paper is employed, the kinf can be improved by ∼100 percent mille with a speedup of about 4.56.

  2. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the structural, elastic and electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we present the results obtained from first-principles calculations of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the strucural, elastic and electronic properties of (B3) boron phosphide, using the pseudopotential plane-wave method (PP-PW) based on density functional theory within the Teter and Pade ...

  3. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the structural, elastic and electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results showed a phase transition pressure from the zinc blende to rock-salt phase at around 1.56 Mbar, which is in good agreement with the theoretical data reported in the literature. Keywords. Hydrostatic pressure effect; structural, elastic and electronic properties; (B3) boron phosphide. PACS Nos 45.10.Ab; 62.20.

  4. Effects of elastic and inelastic scattering in giving electrons tortuous paths in matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J E; Hamm, R N

    1995-09-01

    Heavy charged particles travel in essentially straight lines in matter, while electrons travel in tortuous paths. Frequent multiple elastic Coulomb scattering by atomic nuclei is often cited as the reason for this electron behavior. Heavy charged particles also undergo multiple Coulomb scattering. However, because they are massive, significant deflections occur only in rare, close encounters with nuclei. In contrast to heavy particles, the inelastic interaction of an electron with an atomic electron represents a collision with a particle of equal mass. In principle, therefore, repeated inelastic scattering of an electron can also produce large-angle deflections and thus contribute to the tortuous nature of an electron's track. To investigate the relative importance of elastic and inelastic scattering on determining the appearance of electron tracks, detailed Monte Carlo transport computations have been carried out for monoenergetic pencil beams of electrons normally incident on a water slab with initial energies from 1 keV to 1 MeV. The calculations have been performed with deflections due to (1) inelastic scattering only, (2) elastic scattering only, and (3) both types of scattering. Results are presented to show the spreading of the pencil beams with depth in the slab, the transmission through slabs of different thicknesses, and back-scattering from the slab. The results show that elastic nuclear scattering is indeed the principal physical process that causes electron paths to be tortuous; however, the smaller effect of inelastic electronic scattering is far from negligible.

  5. Effect of Cyclic Loading on Modulus of Elasticity of Aspen Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Gaff; Miroslav Gašparík

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the modulus of elasticity of solid and laminated aspen wood of various thicknesses after cyclic loading. A three-point static bending test was carried out to determine the modulus of elasticity. Cyclically loaded samples were compared with samples without cyclic loading. For the laminated wood, the results demonstrated a statistically significant impact of cyclic loading on the elasticity modulus. In contrast, no significant impact of cyclic loading was shown for the...

  6. Effect of Trypan Blue on Descemet Membrane Elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Thomas; Patel, Alpesh; Vasavada, Abhay; Singh, Man; Nath, Vandana; Cheng, Anny M S; Sheha, Hosam

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of trypan blue on the elastic property of Descemet membrane (DM) by atomic force microscopy. Human corneas (n = 10) were obtained from the Illinois Eye Bank (Chicago, IL). The DM was isolated and divided into two halves, one half was stained with ophthalmic trypan blue (Vision Blue, 0.06%, DORC International), whereas the unstained other half served as control. The DM samples were then tested using the atomic force microscope. Data were analyzed using the Hertz model for the evaluation of the Young modulus of elasticity. Atomic force microscopy showed higher cantilever deflection on trypan blue-stained DM compared with control, and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.03). Force-distance curve analysis also revealed a statistically significant increase in the Young modulus of elasticity in the trypan blue-stained samples (10.5 ± 1.4 kPa) compared with the control (5.8 ± 0.8 kPa), (P elasticity and consequently increase its stiffness. This may influence the graft adherence when used for endothelial keratoplasty.

  7. Surface effects on static bending of nanowires based on non-local elasticity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface elasticity and non-local elasticity effects on the elastic behavior of statically bent nanowires are investigated in the present investigation. Explicit solutions are presented to evaluate the surface stress and non-local elasticity effects with various boundary conditions. Compared with the classical Euler beam, a nanowire with surface stress and/or non-local elasticity can be either stiffer or less stiff, depending on the boundary conditions. The concept of surface non-local elasticity was proposed and its physical interpretation discussed to explain the combined effect of surface elasticity and non-local elasticity. The effect of the nanowire size on its elastic bending behavior was investigated. The results obtained herein are helpful to characterize mechanical properties of nanowires and aid nanowire-based devices design.

  8. [The effect of elastic taping on patients with patellofemoral syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Jiang, Jun-Liang; Liang, Qiu; Lei, Zhong-Jie; He, Cheng-Qi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of elastic taping on patients with patellofemoral pain and its impact on the onset time of vastusmedialis and vastuslateralis. Eligible patients were assigned into the treatment and control groups randomly. Patients in the treatment group received a 5-day taping with therapeutic stretch. Patients in the control group were give placebo taping without therapeutic stretch. Ultrasound therapy was applied to all of the participants as a basic treatment. The levels of pain and surface electromyography were evaluated before treatment, after the first taping and on the Gh day (without taping). Patients in the treatment group experienced immediate improvement in pain and onset time of vastusmedialis and vastuslateralis compared with the controls. On the 6th day (without taping), further improvement was achieved in pain and onset time of vastusmedialis and vastuslateralis in the treatment group compared with the controls (P Elastic taping can effectively improve pain and onset time of vastusmedialis and vastuslateralis.

  9. Shape memory effect and super elasticity. Its dental applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Kotian R

    2001-01-01

    The shape memory alloys are quite fascinating materials characterized by a shape memory effect and super elasticity which ordinary metals do not have. This unique behaviour was first found in a Au-47.5 at % Cd alloy in 1951, and was published in 1963 by the discovery of Ti-Ni alloy. Shape memory alloys now being practically used as new functional alloys for various dental and medical applications.

  10. The effect of eggshell thickness on hatchability of quail eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Oguz Fatih; Yamak, Umut Sami

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the successful incubation period is to achieve maximum health chicks in each batch. Therefore, all factors affecting incubation have to be investigated in detail. This study investigated the effect of eggshell thickness on hatchability of quail eggs. A total of 1415 eggs were collected from the same flock at the ages of 23 and 41 weeks. Two different incubations were performed at these eggs. Eggshell thicknesses of all eggs were determined with an ultrasonic gauge before incubation. Incubation period was applied as for 18 days. After 15 days of incubation, eggs were transferred to hatching machine. Eggs were classified as thin-, medium-, and thick-shelled according to eggshell thickness values. Eggshell thicknesses were ranged between 0.24 and 0.36 mm, and the differences between the hatching rates of thickness values were not found significant. Hatchability of thin-, medium-, and thick-shelled eggs was found as 69.2%, 69.4%, and 82.4% for Experiment 1. These values were as 87.8%, 89.2%, and 91.9% for Experiment 2, respectively. Similar to eggshell thickness frequencies, the differences between hatching rates of eggshell thickness groups were found insignificant. Results of this study showed that eggshell thickness does not affect hatchability.

  11. Effect of thermoplastic appliance thickness on initial stress distribution in periodontal ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Shin Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation into the initial stress distribution induced within the periodontal ligament by thermoplastic appliances with different thicknesses is performed. Based on the plaster model of a 25-year-old male patient, a finite element model of the maxillary lateral incisors and their supporting structures is constructed. In addition, four finite element models of thermoplastic appliances with different thicknesses in the range of 0.5–1.25 mm are also constructed based on the same plaster model. Finite element analysis simulations are performed to examine the effects of the force delivered by the thermoplastic appliances on the stress response of the periodontal ligament during the elastic recovery process. The results show that the stress induced in the periodontal ligament increases with an increasing appliance thickness. For example, the stress triples from 0.0012 to 0.0038 MPa as the appliance thickness is increased from 0.75 to 1.25 mm. The results presented in this study provide a useful insight into as a result of the compressive and tensile stresses induced by thermoplastic appliances of different thicknesses. Moreover, the results enable the periodontal ligament stress levels produced by thermoplastic appliances of different thicknesses to be reliably estimated.

  12. Thick lens chromatic effective focal length variation versus bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrold, Scott

    2017-11-01

    Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) can limit the optical performance in refractive optical systems. Understanding a singlet's chromatic change of effective focal leads to insights and methods to control LCA. Long established, first order theory, shows the chromatic change in focal length for a zero thickness lens is proportional to it's focal length divided by the lens V number or inverse dispersion. This work presents the derivation of an equation for a thick singlet's chromatic change in effective focal length as a function of center thickness, t, dispersion, V, index of refraction, n, and the Coddington shape factor, K. A plot of bending versus chromatic focal length variation is presented. Lens thickness does not influence chromatic variation of effective focal length for a convex plano or plano convex lens. A lens's center thickness'influence on chromatic focal length variation is more pronounced for lower indices of refraction.

  13. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of thickness on the electronic structure of e-beam evaporated thin titanium films were studied using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) technique at titanium 2,3 edge in total electron yield (TEY) mode and transmission yield mode. Thickness dependence of 2,3 branching ratio (BR) of titanium was ...

  14. The Effect of Endometrial Thickness on In vitro Fertilization (IVF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The value of measuring the endometrial thickness and studying the endometrial receptivity in the context of assisted conception remains a contentious issue. A prospective analysis was carried out to determine the effect of endometrial thickness on IVF - embryo transfer / ICSI outcome in dedicated Assisted Reproductive ...

  15. Thickness effect in composite laminates in static and fatigue loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahuerta Calahorra, F.

    2017-01-01

    Thick Laminates (above 6mm) are increasingly present in large composites structures such as wind turbine blades. Designs are based on static and fatigue coupon tests performed on 1-4mm thin laminates. However, a thickness effect has been observed in limited available experimental data. For this

  16. Nonlinear theory for laminated and thick plates and shells including the effects of transverse shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, M.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear strain displacement relations for three-dimensional elasticity are determined in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates. To develop a two-dimensional theory, the displacements are expressed by trigonometric series representation through-the-thickness. The nonlinear strain-displacement relations are expanded into series which contain all first and second degree terms. In the series for the displacements only the first few terms are retained. Insertion of the expansions into the three-dimensional virtual work expression leads to nonlinear equations of equilibrium for laminated and thick plates and shells that include the effects of transverse shearing. Equations of equilibrium and buckling equations are derived for flat plates and cylindrical shells. The shell equations reduce to conventional transverse shearing shell equations when the effects of the trigonometric terms are omitted and to classical shell equations when the trigonometric terms are omitted and the shell is assumed to be thin.

  17. Evaluation of intima-media thickness and vascular elasticity of the common carotid artery in patients with isolated systolic hypertension using ultrasound radiofrequency-data technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Hai-Jun; Wang, Yan; Zeng, Min-Xia; Luan, Yan-Yan; Hu, Bing

    2011-07-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) data technology is a newly developed method to evaluate vascular disease, especially subclinical atherosclerotic change. Data regarding predictors of intima-media thickness (IMT) and vascular elasticity of the common carotid artery (CCA) in subjects with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) using ultrasound RF-data technology are scarce. We evaluated the change in IMT and vascular elasticity of the CCA in patients with ISH at an early phase using US RF-data technology. Thirty-nine patients with ISH and 41 age-matched control subjects were the study population. The common carotid arterial systolic diameter (Ds), diastolic diameter (Dd), IMT, carotid distensibility (CD), local pulse wave velocity (PWVβ) and stiffness (β) were compared between the two groups, as were correlations between pulse pressure (PP) and parameters of vascular stiffness. Common carotid arterial Ds, Dd, IMT, PWVβ and β increased whereas CD decreased more significantly in the ISH group than in age-matched controls. The level of PP in the ISH group had significant positive correlations with PWVβ (r = 0·298, Ptechnology could be used to accurately and quantitatively evaluate increased IMT and decreased arterial elasticity of the CCA in patients with ISH compared with normal subjects. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2011 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  18. Surface effect on band structure of flexural wave propagating in magneto-elastic phononic crystal nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shunzu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2017-11-01

    A theoretical model is established to study the size-dependent performance of flexural wave propagation in magneto-elastic phononic crystal (PC) nanobeam with surface effect based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Gurtin-Murdoch theory. Considering the magneto-mechanical coupling constitutive relation of magnetostrictive material, the influence of surface effect on band structure is calculated by the plane wave expansion method for PC nanobeam subjected to pre-stress and magnetic field loadings. Through the example of an epoxy/Terfenol-D PC nanobeam, it can be observed that the characteristics of flexural wave band structures are size-dependent, and remarkably affected by surface effect when the dimension of the PC beam reduces to the nanoscale. The edges and width of the band gap with surface effect are higher than those without surface effect, especially for high frequency region. And surface effect gradually reduces with the increasing of bulk layer-to-surface layer thickness ratio until the band gap descends to a constant for the conventional one in the absence of surface effect. The effects of surface elasticity and piezomagneticity on band gap are more prominent than the residual surface stress. In addition, a distinctly nonlinear variation of band gap appears under the combined effects of pre-stress and magnetic field. Moreover, with the varying of filling fraction, multi-peaks of the width of the band gap are obtained and discussed. These results could be helpful for the intelligent regulation of magneto-elastic PC nanobeam and the design of nanobeam-based devices.

  19. Effects of elastic taping, non-elastic taping and static stretching on recovery after intensive eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobphachart, Disaphon; Manimmanakorn, Nuttaset; Manimmanakorn, Apiwan; Thuwakum, Worrawut; Hamlin, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of elastic tape (Kinesio tape) to placebo tape or static stretching on delayed onset muscle soreness. Fifty-one untrained female healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 17/group), elastic tape, placebo tape and stretching group. Muscle soreness was induced by 4 sets of 25 maximal isokinetic (60°.s -1 ) eccentric contractions of dominant quadriceps on an isokinetic dynamometer. Compared with placebo tape, the elastic tape participants had less muscle soreness at 72 h post-exercise (p = 0.01). The elastic tape also increased isometric strength at 72 h post-exercise compared with the placebo (p = 0.03) and stretching group (p = 0.02). However, there was little effect between groups for changes in thigh circumference, jumping, pressure pain threshold, rate of perceived exertion, creatine kinase activity and joint motion. Elastic taping increased muscle strength recovery and reduced muscle soreness after intensive exercise.

  20. Effect of Rotation in an Orthotropic Elastic Slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santra S.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental equations of the two dimensional generalized thermoelasticity (L-S model with one relaxation time parameter in orthotropic elastic slab has been considered under effect of rotation. The normal mode analysis is used to the basic equations of motion and heat conduction equation. Finally, the resulting equations are written in the form of a vector-matrix differential equation which is then solved by the eigenvalue approach. The field variables in the space time domain are obtained numerically. The results corresponding to the cases of conventional thermoelasticity CTE, extended thermoelasticity (ETE and temperature rate dependent thermoelasticity (TRDTE are compared by means of graphs.

  1. Three-dimensional finite-element modelling of Earth's viscoelastic deformation: effects of lateral variations in lithospheric thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shijie; Paulson, Archie; Wahr, John

    2003-11-01

    We have developed a 3-D spherical finite-element model to study the dynamic response to surface loads of a self-gravitating and incompressible Earth with 3-D viscoelastic structure. We have forced our model with the ICE-3G deglaciation history of Tushingham & Peltier to study the effects of laterally varying lithospheric thickness on observations of post-glacial rebound (PGR). The laterally varying lithospheric thicknesses are derived from estimates of the thermal structure of the oceanic lithosphere and from elastic thicknesses on continents as estimated from studies of long-term geological loads. Our calculations show that the effects of lithospheric structure on the relative sea level change (RSLC) depend on the locations of the observation sites and on the size of loads. The RSLC at the centre of the North American ice sheet is significantly less sensitive to lithospheric thickness, compared with the RSLC at the centre of the Fennoscandian ice sheet. At the peripheral bulges the RSLC tends to be more sensitive to lithospheric thickness. The RSLC is controlled by local lithospheric thickness. The RSLC at a given location, as predicted using models with laterally varying lithospheric thickness, can be reproduced using a 1-D model with a uniform lithospheric thickness equal to the local lithospheric thickness. Coupled with efficient parallel computing, we believe that the finite-element model that we present here can be used to address a variety of viscoelastic deformation problems in geodynamics.

  2. Effect of Corneal Thickness on the Penetration of Topical Vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierer, Oriel; Regenbogen, Michael; Lazar, Moshe; Yatziv, Yossi

    2015-10-01

    To study the influence of corneal thickness on intraocular penetration of topical ophthalmic drops, using vancomycin 50 mg/mL drops as a model. The study included 58 eyes of 58 patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract extraction. The central corneal thickness was measured by ultrasonic pachymetry on the day of surgery. Thirty minutes before the surgery, one drop of topical vancomycin 50 mg/mL was instilled three times with 10-minute intervals: 30 minutes, 20 minutes, and 10 minutes before the surgery. At the beginning of surgery, a small specimen of aqueous humor was aspirated and sent to the laboratory for measurement of drug concentration to determine the effect of corneal thickness on vancomycin concentration in the anterior chamber. There was insufficient amount of aqueous humor for analysis in 9 samples, leaving a total of 49 samples. The mean central corneal thickness was 539.7 (±39.5) μm (range, 458 to 635 μm). The mean vancomycin concentration in the anterior chamber was 0.220 (±0.209) μg/mL. There was no significant association between vancomycin concentration and corneal thickness (r = -0.07, p = 0.62, Pearson correlation). When patients were divided into three groups based on the mean (±1 SD) central corneal thickness, no significant differences in vancomycin concentrations (in micrograms per milliliter) were encountered: 0.267 (±0.247) (for corneal thickness thickness of 500.2 to 579.2 μm), and 0.200 (±0.160) (for corneal thickness >579.2 μm) (p = 0.73, analysis of variance). Corneal thickness does not influence the penetration of topically applied vancomycin into the anterior chamber.

  3. Effect of large elastic strains on cavitation instability predictions for elastic-plastic solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    For an infinite solid containing a void, the cavitation instability limit is defined as the remote stress-and strain state, at which the void grows without bound, driven by the elastic energy stored in the surrounding material. Such cavitation limits have been analysed by a number of authors...

  4. Dilatation and curettage effect on the endometrial thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davar, Robab; Dehghani Firouzabadi, Razieh; Chaman Ara, Kefayat

    2013-04-01

    Endometrial receptivity is required for successful implantation and pregnancy. Despite the remaining controversy, many studies have shown that ultrasonographic endometrial thickness can be considered as an indicator of endometrial receptivity. The study objective was to investigate the effect of dilatation and curettage on the endometrial thickness. Enrolled in the study were 444 patients visited in Obstetrics & Gynecology clinic of Shahid Sadoughi hospital between Jan. 2011 to Sep. 2012. Only patients whose menstrual cycle was regular were included in study. Patients with myoma, adenomyosis, endometrial polyps or other uterine anomaly, those who smoked, whose BMI was greater than 30 and who were taking medications that could affect endometrial thickness were excluded. Endometrial thickness was measured one day before evolution (n = 444) and 5-7 days after it (n = 444) using transvaginal ultrasonography. The endometrial thicknesses were correlated to the patients' history of dilatation and curettage. Data analysis was done through SPSS software version 16 and using descriptive statistics, independent T-test and Anova. Endometrial thickness in patients who had 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 D&C were 10.00 ± 0.58, 9.83 ± 0.47, 8.90 ± 0.92, 7.42 ± 0.18 and 7.40 ± 0.07, respectively one day before ovulation (spearman's correlation coefficient = -0.33) and 10.62 ± 0.68, 9.64 ± 0.49, 8.48 ± 0.96, 6.32 ± 0.15 and 6.90 ± 0.04, respectively, 5-7 days after ovulation (spearman's correlation coefficient = -0.66) estradiol and progesterone levels, measured in the day of 2nd ultrasonography had not statistic relation with endometrial thickness (P = 0.27 and 0.31). The relation of endometrial thickness and age was not significant (P = 0.54 and 0.06). Dilatation and curettage has a significant effect on the endometrial thinning.

  5. Effects of high temperature and film thicknesses on the texture evolution in Ag thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, F.; Zolanvari, A.

    2017-04-01

    In situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the effect of high temperatures (up to 600°C) on the texture evolution in silver thin films. Ag thin films with different thicknesses of 40, 80, 120 and 160nm were sputtered on the Si(100) substrates at room temperature. Then, microstructure of thin films was determined using X-ray diffraction. To investigate the influence of temperature on the texture development in the Ag thin films with different thicknesses, (111), (200) and (220) pole figures were evaluated and orientation distribution functions were calculated. Minimizing the total energy of the system which is affected by competition between surface and elastic strain energy was a key factor in the as-deposited and post annealed thin films. Since sputtering depositions was performed at room temperature and at the same thermodynamic conditions, the competition growth caused the formation of the {122} fiber texture in as-deposited Ag thin films. It was significantly observed that the post annealed Ag thin films showed {111} fiber texture varied with the thickness of thin films. Increasing thin film thickness from 40nm to 160nm led to decreasing the intensity of the {111} fiber texture.

  6. Thickness effect on flexural strength of natural stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellopede, Rossana; Marini, Paola; Castelletto, Eleonora

    2016-04-01

    Few scientific works deal with size effect on mechanical resistance in the case of stone, but for the concrete size effect has been widely verified. In fact, the stone size effect is not always ruled by well-known statistical laws as Weibull because of the intrinsic complex structure and features of the materials analysed. Previous studies on natural stone size effect have been made mainly taking into account compression strength. However, flexural strength test under concentrated load, according EN12372, is applied to assess the mechanical resistance of stone and it is well correlated with the petrographic properties of stone. For this reason, to further investigate the size effect on stone , this research analyses the variation of mechanical resistance in relation to thickness of the specimens, taking into account the petrographic characteristics (mineralogical composition, heterogeneity, anisotropy, porosity)of different kinds of rock. From previous studies on 15 different stones (Bellopede et al. 2015) it was observed a negligible values variation for different thickness and a data scattering caused by: intrinsic properties (porosity and structure), defects distribution (fractures, cracks, voids), heterogeneity characterizing each specimen. According to EN 12372:2006, the suggested dimensions for the determination of flexural strength under concentrated load are 50x50x300mm. Other dimensions are possible, but the following requirement need to be fulfilled. The thickness should be minimum 25mm and maximum 100 mm, the width should be within 50 mm and 3 times the thickness and the distance between the supporting rollers span should be 5 times the thickness. In this research, in order to further investigate the thickness effect even in relation with the stone structure and heterogeneity, eight different stones have been tested: four with anisotropic features and four homogeneous. The distance between the support knife was equal to 2/3 to specimens length. The

  7. Geodynamic inversion to constrain the rheology of the lithosphere: What is the effect of elasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Tobias; Kaus, Boris; Thielmann, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The concept of elastic thickness (T_e) is one of the main methods to describe the integrated strength of oceanic lithosphere (e.g. Watts, 2001). Observations of the Te are in general agreement with yield strength envelopes estimated from laboratory experiments (Burov, 2007, Goetze & Evans 1979). Yet, applying the same concept to the continental lithosphere has proven to be more difficult (Burov & Diament, 1995), which resulted in an ongoing discussion on the rheological structure of the lithosphere (e.g. Burov & Watts, 2006, Jackson, 2002; Maggi et al., 2000). Recently, we proposed a new approach, which constrains rheological properties of the lithosphere directly from geophysical observations such as GPS-velocity, topography and gravity (Baumann & Kaus, 2015). This approach has the advantage that available data sets (such as Moho depth) can be directly taken into account without making the a-priori assumption that the lithosphere is thin elastic plate floating on the mantle. Our results show that a Bayesian inversion method combined with numerical thermo-mechanical models can be used as independent tool to constrain non-linear viscous and plastic parameters of the lithosphere. As the rheology of the lithosphere is strongly temperature dependent, it is even possible to add a temperature parameterisation to the inversion method and constrain the thermal structure of the lithosphere in this manner. Results for the India-Asia collision zone show that existing geophysical data require India to have a quite high effective viscosity. Yet, the rheological structure of Tibet less well constrained and a number of scenarios give a nearly equally good fit to the data. Yet, one of the assumptions that we make while doing this geodynamic inversion is that the rheology is viscoplastic, and that elastic effects do not significantly alter the large-scale dynamics of the lithosphere. Here, we test the validity of this assumption by performing synthetic forward models and retrieving

  8. Effects of compression force on elasticity index and elasticity ratio in ultrasound elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Y; Sakamoto, J; Kamio, T; Nishikawa, K; Otonari-Yamamoto, M; Wako, M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between compression force and hardness values in ultrasound elastography. Methods: Ultrasound elastography was performed using an elastography phantom, comprising inclusions with different elasticities and echogenicities. The compression force was set to approximately 100 gw (light force) and approximately 500 gw (heavy force). The elasticity index (EI) of the inclusion was measured. The EI was a relative hardness value of a structure within an elastographic image. Similarly, the EI of the background was measured as a reference. The elasticity ratio (ER) was calculated as the EI of the inclusion divided by the EI of the reference. Results: The hardness of the phantom could be discerned with both the EI and ER, regardless of the compression force. The EI and ER with heavy force tended to be higher than those with light force, but the difference was not significant. A strong correlation was observed between the EI and ER of soft structures, whereas the correlation between the EI and ER of hard structures was weak, and the ER values varied widely. Conclusions: The EI offers potential as a good indicator for assessing the hardness. PMID:24592929

  9. The acute effect of pseudoephedrine on choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovet, G; Alpfidan, I; Sakarya, Y; Sakarya, R; Ozcimen, M; Göktaş, S; Erdoğan, E

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the acute effects of pseudoephedrine (PE) on choroidal thickness in healthy young patients. Fifty patients with nasal and sinus congestion who were prescribed 60 mg oral PE at the otolaryngology department were recruited for this study. The enhanced depth imaging (EDI) optic coherence tomography (OCT) (Spectralis OCT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) choroidal thickness measurements were performed at baseline and 1, 3 and 6 hours at 7 points. The right eyes of 50 healthy subjects (22 women and 28 men) were included in this study. The mean choroidal thickness at fovea was 293.12 μm, 279.80 μm, 295.80 μm, and 294.52 μm at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 hours respectively. A significant reduction in choroidal thickness versus baseline was observed at all points at 1 hour. The choroidal thickness decreased 1 hour after oral administration of PE and returned to baseline thickness at 3 hours. We suppose that this transient decrease might be associated with vasoconstriction due to activation of sympathetic alpha adrenoceptors.

  10. The effect of strabismus surgery on choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Kamil; Niyaz, Leyla

    2017-09-07

    To determine the effects of strabismus surgery on choroidal thickness. This was a prospective randomized study. The measurements of subfoveal and macular choroidal thickness of patients who underwent strabismus surgery were obtained by enhanced depth imaging optic coherence tomography. The patients were grouped as patients who had 1 horizontal muscle surgery (group 1), 1 oblique muscle surgery (group 2), 2 horizontal muscle surgeries (group 3), or 1 horizontal and 1 oblique muscle surgery (group 4). Choroidal thickness of the patients was measured preoperatively and on the postoperative first day, second week, first month, and third month. Choroidal thickness was measured at subfoveal area (S) and at the nasal (N1, N2) and temporal (T1, T2) fovea with 500-μm intervals. The average age of the 37 patients was 15.59 ± 13.84 years. In preoperative and postoperative first day comparison, a decrease in choroidal thickness was found in all areas in group 1. In group 2, a significant decrease was found in N2, N1, and S values. In group 3, a significant decrease was found in N2, N1, and T2 values. In group 4, a significant decrease was found in N1 value. The second week comparison of all groups showed significant postoperative decrease in choroidal thickness in all areas. On the postoperative first month, a significant decrease in choroidal thickness was found only in the subfoveal area of group 1 and the N1 area of group 2. At the postoperative third month, there was no change in any group. Strabismus surgery causes a decrease in choroidal thickness in the early postoperative period.

  11. Effect of Dermal Thickness on Scars in Women with Type III-IV Fitzpatrick Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Bilsev; Dadaci, Mehmet; Oltulu, Pembe; Altuntas, Zeynep; Bilgen, Fatma

    2015-06-01

    Both patients and physicians desire minimal scarring after surgical procedures. The removal of foreign bodies from around the wound, prevention of infection, and wound closure without tension is recommended for reducing scarring. The reasons underlying the differing appearance of scars between different anatomical regions of the same individual are not fully understood. Moreover, to our knowledge, the relationship between incision width and dermal thickness in different anatomical regions has yet to be investigated. Hence, in the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of dermal thickness on scar formation. Fifty patients who were treated and followed up for breast hypertrophy between 2010 and 2013 were retrospectively investigated. In all patients, a 2 × 2-cm skin biopsy specimen was obtained from the medial right breast at the horizontal line of the T scar. A routine superomedial pedicle breast reduction was subsequently performed. The extracted excision materials and skin biopsy specimens were examined pathologically. Dermal thickness was measured from the starting point of the subcutaneous tissue to the end point of the epidermis, at four different sites. The average dermal thickness was then calculated for each patient. The skin color of all patients was determined according to the Fitzpatrick classification. Scar width was measured in three different regions, including a combination of the vertical and horizontal portions of the T scar and the flap confluence. After the measurements, the scars were evaluated for vascularity, pigmentation, elasticity, thickness, and height by two plastic surgeons and a clinical nurse, who were blinded to patient data. The mean age of the 50 female patients was 40.8 years (range 18-65 years). The average follow-up period was 16 months (range 12-18 months). An average of 987.5 g (range 505-1621 g) of breast and fatty tissue was removed. The average dermal thickness was 4.99 mm (range 3.5-6.8 mm). The most common skin

  12. Effects of an elastic membrane on tube waves in permeable formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.; Johnson, D.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper, the modified properties were calculated for tube wave propagation in a fluid-filled borehole penetrating a permeable rock due to the presence of a mudcake which forms on the borehole wall. The mudcake was characterized by an impermeable elastic layer. The mudcake partial sealing mechanism was simulated using a finite membrane stiffness. Consequently, it was shown that the mudcake can reduce, but not eliminate, the permeability effects on the tube wave slowness and attenuation. Moreover, this paper discusses a variety of values for the relevant parameters especially the mudcake thickness and membrane stiffness. The important combinations of mudcake parameters were clarified by using an analytic expression for the low-frequency limit.

  13. Impact of Hydration Media on Ex Vivo Corneal Elasticity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noël M

    2015-09-01

    To determine the effect of hydration media on ex vivo corneal elasticity. Experiments were conducted on 40 porcine eyes retrieved from an abattoir (10 eyes each for phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), balanced salt solution, Optisol, 15% dextran). The epithelium was removed, and the cornea was excised with an intact scleral rim and placed in 20% dextran overnight to restore its physiological thickness. For each hydration media, corneas were evenly divided into two groups: one with an intact scleral rim and the other without. Corneas were mounted onto a custom chamber and immersed in a hydration medium for elasticity testing. Although in each medium, corneal elasticity measurements were performed for 2 hr: at 5-min intervals for the first 30 min and then 15-min intervals for the remaining 90 min. Elasticity testing was performed using nanoindentation with spherical indenters, and Young modulus was calculated using the Hertz model. Thickness measurements were taken before and after elasticity testing. The percentage change in corneal thickness and elasticity was calculated for each hydration media group. Balanced salt solution, PBS, and Optisol showed an increase in thickness and Young moduli for corneas with and without an intact scleral rim. Fifteen percent dextran exhibited a dehydrating effect on corneal thickness and provided stable maintenance of corneal elasticity for both groups. Hydration media affects the stability of corneal thickness and elasticity measurements over time. Fifteen percent dextran was most effective in maintaining corneal hydration and elasticity, followed by Optisol.

  14. Effect of reinforcement volume fraction on the density & elastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was found the elastic moduli of high volume fraction composites are improved with the introduction of certain materials reinforcement such as Mo, Pt, Cr, Fe, U, etc. However, they decrease with some other materials reinforcements, as in the case of glass E and Cd. Moreover, we showed that the densities and elastic ...

  15. Thickness effect on properties of titanium film deposited by dc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 5. Thickness effect on properties of titanium film deposited by d.c. magnetron sputtering and electron beam evaporation techniques. Nishat Arshi Junqing Lu Chan Gyu Lee Jae Hong Yoon Bon Heun Koo Faheem Ahmed. Volume 36 Issue 5 October 2013 pp ...

  16. Effect of Thickness Stress in Stretch-Bending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Emmens, W.C.; Huetink, Han; Barlat, F; Moon, Y.H.; Lee, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    In any situation where a strip is pulled over a curved tool, locally a contact stress acts on the strip in thickness direction. This contact stress changes the stress state in the material, which will influence the deformation. One effect is that the yield stress in the plane of the strip is

  17. Transitional behaviour of thickness effects in shipbuilding materials (MS plate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, S. M. Ikhtiar; Razib, Amirul Hasan; Rahman, Md. Rabab Raiyatur

    2017-12-01

    Majority of the crack propagation in ships and offshore structures are caused due to fatigue. Previously, it was known that fatigue strength of notched specimen is dependent on size, but recently it came to light that fatigue strength of some welded joints depends on the thickness. Much investigation is done on the fatigue growth of welded joints. Fatigue often results in fracture accidents, which starts from the sites of structural discontinuities because of the reason that they may induce local stress concentrations. Structural discontinuities include notches, holes, sharp corners, and weld defects. Weld defects include undercut, porosity, lack of fusion, slag inclusion, incomplete weld root penetration, and misalignments. In order to investigate the effects of plate thickness on fatigue strength, semi-elliptical side notches (U and V shaped) in plates are studied in the present research. First consider a simple problem of crack emanating from notches in plates where the solution of stress intensity factor is given by an empirical formula so that the thickness effect on fatigue strength can easily be investigated for a variety of geometrical parameters. The present study aims to investigate the transitional behaviour of thickness effect in plates on fatigue strength. In order to calculate the stress, finite element analysis is carried by using ANSYS.

  18. A viscoelastic biomechanical model of the cornea describing the effect of viscosity and elasticity on hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Dianne H; Roberts, Cynthia J; Litsky, Alan S; Weber, Paul A

    2008-09-01

    To develop a method for evaluating viscosity and elasticity of the cornea and to examine the effect that both properties have on hysteresis. A three-component spring and dashpot model was created in Simulink in Matlab to represent the purely elastic and viscoelastic behavior of the cornea during a measurement using device called an ocular response analyzer (ORA). Values for elasticity and viscosity were varied while sinusoidal stress was applied to the model. The simulated stresses were used to determine how hysteresis is affected by the individual components of elasticity, viscosity, and maximum stress. To validate the model, high-speed photography was used to measure induced strain in a corneal phantom during ORA measurement. This measured strain was compared with the strains simulated by the model. When the spring in the viscoelastic portion of the model was stiffened, hysteresis decreased. When the spring in the purely elastic element was stiffened, hysteresis increased. If both springs were stiffened together, hysteresis peaked strongly as a function of the viscosity of the viscoelastic element. Below the peak value, lower elasticity was associated with higher hysteresis. Above the peak value, higher elasticity was associated with higher hysteresis. In addition, hysteresis increased as the air maximum pressure was increased. Measurements from phantom corresponded to predictions from the model. A viscoelastic model is presented to illustrate how changing viscosity and elasticity may affect hysteresis. Low hysteresis can be associated with either high elasticity or low elasticity, depending on the viscosity, a finding consistent with clinical reports.

  19. Average elasticity in the framework of the fixed effects logit model

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshitsugu Kitazawa

    2011-01-01

    This note proposes the average elasticity of the logit probabilities with respect to the exponential functions of explanatory variables in the framework of the fixed effects logit model. The average elasticity is able to be calculated using the consistent estimators of parameters of interest and the average of binary dependent variables, regardless of the fixed effects.

  20. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  1. Measuring Elastic Modulus of Sintered Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. F.; Eastman, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Technique minimizes effect of substrate on thin sintered coating. Uniaxial tension test yields approximate value for elastic modulus of sintered material on thin substrate. Electrode composed of central perforated nickel plated steel sheet about 4 mils (0.1mm) thick, coated on each face by porous sintered nickel about 8 mils (0.2mm) thick.

  2. Cellulose effects on morphology and elasticity of Vibrio fischeri biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Christopher; Shabtai, Yael; Piatkovsky, Maria; Herzberg, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose effects on Vibrio fischeri biofilm morphology were tested for the wild-type and two of its isogenic mutants that either exhibit increased cellulose production or do not produce cellulose at all. Confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging of each biofilm revealed that total sessile volume increases with cellulose expression, but the size of colonies formed with cellulose was smaller, creating a more diffuse biofilm. These morphological differences were not attributed to variations in bacterial deposition, extracellular polymeric substances affinity to the surface or bacterial growth. A positive correlation was found between cellulose expression, Young's (elastic) modulus of the biofilm analyzed with atomic force microscope and shear modulus of the related extracellular polymeric substances layers analyzed with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Cellulose production also correlated positively with concentrations of extracellular DNA. A significant negative correlation was observed between cellulose expression and rates of diffusion through the extracellular polymeric substances. The difference observed in biofilm morphology is suggested as a combined result of cellulose and likely extracellular DNA (i) increasing biofilm Young's modulus, making shear removal more difficult, and (ii) decreased diffusion rate of nutrients and wastes into and out of the biofilm, which effectively limits colony size.

  3. The effect of thickness measurement on numerical arterial models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gelidi, Serena; Tozzi, Gianluca; Bucchi, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Several optical-based techniques for measuring the sample thickness (ST) of soft tissues have been proposed in the literature to overcome the limits of hand-operated procedures. However, ST measurement still remains arbitrary. The stress calculated during an experimental procedure, usually based on a constant thickness value for all samples, cannot be considered representative of the actual stress experienced by the tissue. Therefore, a new optical methodology to measure ST is proposed and compared to four different thickness estimations. A simplified aortic geometry, under physiologic pulsatile conditions, is used to assess the impact of ST measurement on stress predictions. An additional computational model investigates the effect of such thickness values on critical pressure levels that may instigate aneurysm formation in a homogeneous or artificially modified geometry. Comparing the results obtained for the application of a pulsatile load, wall stress values associated to minimum ST are at least 24kPa inferior to maximum ST. Critical pressure values appear to be inversely proportional to ST estimation: simulations, associated to maximum ST, predict aneurysm formation for pressure levels at least 7kPa inferior to minimum ST outcomes. Finally, the role of the strain-energy function used to fit the experimental data is demonstrated to be fundamental for predictions of aneurysm formation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Effect of thick barrier in a gapped graphene Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannasit, Tatnatchai; Liewrian, Watchara

    2017-09-01

    We study the Josephson effect in a gapped graphene-based superconductor/barrier/superconductor junction using the Dirac-Bogoliubov de Gennes (DBdG) equation for theoretical prediction. A massive gap of this regime is induced by fabricating a monolayer graphene on substrate-induced bandgap and superconductivity is acquired by the proximity effect of conventional superconductor (s-wave superconductor) through top gate electrodes. This Josephson junction is investigated in case of thick barrier limit that is pointed out the effect of applying a gate voltage VG in the barrier. We find that the switching supercurrent can be controlled by the gate VG and the effect of thick barrier can influence the switching linear curve. When the barrier is adjusted to manner of a potential well which is inside the range of -m{v}F2≤ {V}G≤ 0, the supercurrent in the thick barrier case is examined to the same behavior as the thin barrier case. The controlling supercurrent through the electrostatic gate is suitable for alternative mechanism into experimental test.

  5. Nonlinear dispersion effects in elastic plates: numerical modelling and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Radecki, Rafal; Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear features of elastic wave propagation have attracted significant attention recently. The particular interest herein relates to complex wave-structure interactions, which provide potential new opportunities for feature discovery and identification in a variety of applications. Due to significant complexity associated with wave propagation in nonlinear media, numerical modeling and simulations are employed to facilitate design and development of new measurement, monitoring and characterization systems. However, since very high spatio- temporal accuracy of numerical models is required, it is critical to evaluate their spectral properties and tune discretization parameters for compromise between accuracy and calculation time. Moreover, nonlinearities in structures give rise to various effects that are not present in linear systems, e.g. wave-wave interactions, higher harmonics generation, synchronism and | recently reported | shifts to dispersion characteristics. This paper discusses local computational model based on a new HYBRID approach for wave propagation in nonlinear media. The proposed approach combines advantages of the Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) and Cellular Automata for Elastodynamics (CAFE). The methods are investigated in the context of their accuracy for predicting nonlinear wavefields, in particular shifts to dispersion characteristics for finite amplitude waves and secondary wavefields. The results are validated against Finite Element (FE) calculations for guided waves in copper plate. Critical modes i.e., modes determining accuracy of a model at given excitation frequency - are identified and guidelines for numerical model parameters are proposed.

  6. Effect of damage on elastically tailored composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanios, Erian; Badir, Ashraf; Berdichevsky, Victor

    1991-01-01

    A variationally consistent theory is derived in order to predict the response of anisotropic thin-walled closed sections subjected to axial load, torsion and bending. The theory is valid for arbitrary cross-sections made of laminated composite materials with variable thickness and stiffness. Closed form expressions for the stiffness coefficients are provided as integrals in terms of lay-ups parameters and cross-sectional geometry. A comparison of stiffness coefficients and response with finite element predictions and a closed form solution is performed. The theory is applied to the investigation of the effect of damage on the extension-twist coupling in a thin-walled closed section beam. The damage is simulated as a progressive ply-by-ply failure. Results show that damage can have a significant effect on the extension-twist coupling.

  7. [Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metal-ceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99) and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C) were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) (Oxford Instruments) and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM) analysis (JEOL) were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual informations (KVI POPOVAC). Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  8. Size effects in piezoelectric cantilevers at submicron thickness levels due to flexoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Adriane G.; Erturk, Alper

    2017-04-01

    In elastic dielectrics, piezoelectricity is the response of polarization to applied mechanical strain, and vice versa. Piezoelectric coupling is controlled by a third-rank tensor and is allowed only in materials that are non-centrosymmetric. Flexoelectricity, however, is the generation of electric polarization by the application of a non-uniform mechanical strain field, i.e. a strain gradient, and is expected to be pronounced at submicron thickness levels, especially at the nano-scale. Flexoelectricity is controlled by a fourth-rank tensor and is therefore allowed in materials of any symmetry. As a gradient effect, flexoelectricity is size dependent, while piezoelectric coupling has no size dependence. Any ordinary piezoelectric cantilever model developed for devices above micron-level thickness has to be modified for nano-scale piezoelectric devices since the effect of flexoelectric coupling will change the electroelastic dynamics at such small scales. In this work, we establish and explore a complete analytical framework by accounting for both the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects. The focus is placed on the development of governing electroelastodynamic piezoelectric-flexoelectric equations for the problems of energy harvesting, sensing, and actuation. The coupled governing equations are analyzed to obtain the frequency response. The coupling coefficient for the bimorph configuration is identified and its size dependence is explored.

  9. Mössbauer spectroscopy under acoustical excitation: thick target effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, E. K.; Yurichuk, A. A.; Vagizov, F. G.; Mubarakshin, Sh. I.; Valiullin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    A new model of Mössbauer absorption (transmission) spectra with an adequate analysis of the possible effects of acoustic excitation in the thick targets is proposed. In particular, the dependence of the line width of acoustical satellites on the degree of phase correlation of the sound oscillations of resonant nuclei in the target is established by calculations and confirmed in experiment. Such a model is stimulated by an increase in the informativeness of the Mössbauer experiments, using thick samples in ultrasound (US) field, and by possible applications of this research technique. The test measurements of Mössbauer absorption spectra on stainless steel are carried out. The fitting of these spectra confirms the relevance of modifications of the model base of Mössbauer processes in US field.

  10. Effect of elasticity on wall shear stress inside cerebral aneurysm at anterior cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijian; Sugawara, Michiko; Tanaka, Gaku; Ohta, Makoto; Liu, Hao; Yamaguchi, Ryuhei

    2016-05-18

    Many numerical studies have been published with respect to about flow structures around cerebral aneurysm assuming to be rigid. Furthermore, there is little experimental research concerning aneurysm with elastic wall. Wall shear stress in elastic wall comparing with rigid wall should be clarified in experimental approach and verified in CFD. We have experimentally realized elastic aneurysm model accompanying with wall deformation. Wall shear stress was examined for both rigid and elastic aneurysm models in pulsatile flow. Effect of elasticity on wall shear stress inside aneurysm induced at the apex of anterior cerebral artery was experimentally examined by particle image velocimetry in vitro. In order to adjust the wall deformation, the pressure adjustment chamber was specially equipped outside the aneurysm wall. Effect of elasticity on wall shear stress was noticed on the comparison with that of rigidity. Wall elasticity reduced the peak magnitude, the spatial and temporal averaged wall shear stress comparing with those of wall rigidity experimentally. These reductions were endorsed by fluid-structure interaction simulation. Elastic wall comparing with rigid wall would reduce the peak magnitude, the spatial and temporal averaged wall shear stress acting on vascular wall.

  11. A metamaterial having a frequency dependent elasticity tensor and a zero effective mass density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Graeme [Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Seppecher, Pierre [Institut de Mathematiques de Toulon, Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France)

    2012-07-15

    Within the context of linear elasticity we show that a two-terminal network of springs and masses, can respond exactly the same as a normal spring, but with a frequency dependent spring constant. A network of such springs can have a frequency dependent effective elasticity tensor but zero effective mass density. The internal masses influence the elasticity tensor, but do not contribute to the effective mass density. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Effect of dentinal tubule orientation on the modulus of elasticity of resin-infiltrated demineralized dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongprueksa, Pong; Senawongse, Pisol; Vongphan, Nataya

    2014-01-01

    The effect of tubule orientation of dentin on the elastic modulus of resin-infiltrated dentin was evaluated. Rectangular cylindricalshaped dentin specimens with their long axis parallel to and perpendicular to dentinal tubules were prepared from extracted premolars. Twenty-five mineralized specimens of each orientation were evaluated. The remaining specimens were then demineralized. The demineralized specimens and the demineralized following by infiltration with one of these adhesives; Optibond Solo Plus, Single Bond 2 or Prime & Bond NT, from each orientation were evaluated (25 specimens per group). The tubular orientation only affected the elastic modulus of mineralized dentin. The highest elastic modulus was observed for the mineralized dentin when the tensile force was applied parallel to the direction of tubules. The elastic modulus of demineralized dentin was the lowest. The adhesive resins increased the elastic modulus of demineralized dentin, but the differences among the three were insignificant.

  13. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiraouani Boucetta K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenza Qiraouani Boucetta,1 Zoubida Charrouf,2 Hassan Aguenaou,3 Abdelfattah Derouiche,4 Yahya Bensouda1 1Research Team on Formulation and Biopharmacy, Research Center for Drug, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco; 2Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco; 3Mixed Unit of Research in Nutrition, ITU / CNESTEN, Ibn Tofail University, Kenitra, Morocco; 4Faculty of Sciences, Hassan II University, Casablanca, Morocco Background: During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity.Materials and methods: Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group of 30 participants received dietary argan oil, the control group of 30 participants received olive oil, and both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a 60-day period. Assessments of skin elasticity parameters, ie, the three R-parameters (R2 or gross-elasticity of the skin, R5 or net elasticity of the skin, and R7 or biological elasticity, and the resonance running time (RRT at both volar forearms of the two groups were performed during three visits: before starting oils consumption and application, after 30 days of oils consumption and application, and after 60 days of oils consumption and application.Results: The consumption of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2 (P<0.001, net elasticity of the skin (R5 (P<0.001, biological elasticity (R7 (P<0.001, and a significant decrease of RRT (P=0.002. The application of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2 (P<0.001, net

  14. The effect of bearing congruency, thickness and alignment on the stresses in unicompartmental knee replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D J; Gray, H; D'Lima, D; Murray, D W; Gill, H S

    2008-11-01

    Unicompartmental knee replacement offers an effective treatment for patients with single compartment knee disease and is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to total knee replacement. An important cause of failure in a unicompartmental knee replacement implant is polyethylene wear. Significant contributory factors to the amount of polyethylene wear are contact stress, bearing alignment, congruency and thickness. Four different unicompartmental knee replacement implant designs (Fully-Congruent; Partially-Congruent; Non-Congruent-metal-backed; Non-Congruent-all-polyethylene) were inserted into a validated finite element model of a proximal tibia. The effect that bearing congruency, alignment and thickness had on the polyethylene stresses during a simulated step-up activity for each design was investigated. Additionally, contact pressures were compared to those calculated from Hertz elastic theory. Only the Fully-Congruent bearing experienced peak von Mises and contact stresses below the lower fatigue limit for polyethylene during the step-up activity. The highest polyethylene contact stresses were observed for the Partially-Congruent and Non-Congruent-metal-backed designs, which experienced approximately three times the polyethylene lower fatigue limit. Increasing the bearing thickness from 3.5mm to 8.5mm of the Non-Congruent design decreased the contact stresses in the bearing; however they did not fall below the lower fatigue limit for polyethylene. Good agreement between finite element and Hertz contact pressures was found. Fully congruent unicompartmental knee replacement bearings can be markedly thinner without approaching the material failure limit, have a greater potential to preserve bone stock and are less likely to fail mechanically.

  15. Effect of Carbon Doping on the Electronic Structure and Elastic Properties of Boron Suboxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    of Boron Suboxide by Amol B Rahane, Jennifer S Dunn, and Vijay Kumar Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...Laboratory Effect of Carbon Doping on the Electronic Structure and Elastic Properties of Boron Suboxide by Amol B Rahane and Vijay Kumar Dr...SUBTITLE Effect of Carbon Doping on the Electronic Structure and Elastic Properties of Boron Suboxide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  16. Effect of reinforcement volume fraction on the density & elastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unidirectional Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, Vit.1, Bulk metallic glass matrix composites, reinforced with glass E,. Fe, Mo, Ni, Cr, Mn, Nb, Cd, Pt, U, Cu or Zr fibers, has been investigated. It was found the elastic moduli of high volume fraction composites are improved with the introduction of certain materials reinforcement ...

  17. Effect of elasticity during viscoelastic polymer flooding : a possible mechanism of increasing the sweep efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbissinova, T.S.; Trivedi, J.J.; Kuru, E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-12-15

    This paper discussed a laboratory experiment undertaken to study how the elasticity of polymer-based fluids affects microscopic sweep efficiency, which has implications for enhanced oil recovery processes. In a series of experiments, polymer solutions with the same shear viscosity but notably different elastic characteristics were injected through a mineral-oil-saturated sandpack. The experiments involved a special core holder that was designed to simulate radial flow. The solution was injected via a perforated injection line located in the centre of the cell, and fluids were produced by way of 2 production lines located at the periphery. The shear rate used in the experiments was within the range of field applications. Using polymer solutions with similar shear viscosity behaviour and different elasticity allowed the effect of elasticity on sweep efficiency to be singled out. It was concluded that adjusting the molecular weight distribution of the solution at a constant shear viscosity and polymer concentration could improve the sweep efficiency of a polymeric fluid. The higher-elasticity polymer solution had a higher resistance to flow through porous media, resulting in better sweep efficiency and lower residual oil saturation. The objective of the study was to isolate elasticity from the other parameters that affect displacement efficiency to show the individual effect of elasticity on oil recovery. 20 refs., 5 tabs., 14 figs.

  18. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Kenza Qiraouani; Charrouf, Zoubida; Aguenaou, Hassan; Derouiche, Abdelfattah; Bensouda, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity. Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group of 30 participants received dietary argan oil, the control group of 30 participants received olive oil, and both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a 60-day period. Assessments of skin elasticity parameters, ie, the three R-parameters (R2 or gross-elasticity of the skin, R5 or net elasticity of the skin, and R7 or biological elasticity), and the resonance running time (RRT) at both volar forearms of the two groups were performed during three visits: before starting oils consumption and application, after 30 days of oils consumption and application, and after 60 days of oils consumption and application. The consumption of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (Pskin (R5) (Poil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (Pskin (R5) (Poil have an anti-aging effect on the skin demonstrated by the improvement of skin elasticity, characterized by an increase of R-parameters (R2, R5, and R7) and a decrease of RRT.

  19. The Acute Effect of Hemodialysis on Choroidal Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Çelikay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the effect of hemodialysis (HD on choroidal thickness (CT. Methods. The right eyes of 41 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD undergoing HD were included. All patients underwent an ophthalmic examination, including CT measurement via optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure (IOP, blood pressure, and body weight measurement immediately before and after a HD session. Results. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT after HD decreased significantly from 254.59 ± 84.66 µm to 229.34 ± 77.79 µm (p<0.001. CT at the temporal and nasal regions also decreased significantly after HD (both p<0.001. IOP changes after HD were insignificant (p=0.958. CT difference was insignificant in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and without DM before and after HD, respectively (p=0.285 and p=0.707. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that diastolic blood pressure was the best fitted factor to explain the changes in CT (r=0.327 and p=0.040.  Conclusion. CT was decreased in the patients with ESRD following a HD session. This study suggested that the changes in CT may be related to the changes in systemic blood pressure.

  20. The Effect of Interfacial Transition Zone Properties on the Elastic Properties of Cementitious Nanocomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala G. Abu Taqa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A parametric study was conducted to explore the effect of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ or interphase on the overall elastic modulus of the CNT-reinforced cement. The effect of the ITZ properties on the elastic modulus of the CNT-reinforced cement was investigated using a four-phase axisymmetric model consisting of a single CNT aligned at the center of composite unit cell, an interface, an ITZ (or interphase, and a cement matrix. The CNT and cement matrix were assumed fully elastic while the interface was modeled using a cohesive surface framework. The width and mechanical properties of the ITZ and the interface were found to affect significantly the elastic modulus and the behavior of the composite material.

  1. Free vibration of elastically supported thin cylinders including gyroscopic effects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    1998-10-29

    Full Text Available stream_source_info loveday_1998.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 30419 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name loveday_1998.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 D[R[ 747723*JSV 106...# or in_nite "rigid#[ 7 0887 Academic Press 0[ INTRODUCTION The vibration of thin elastic shells has been studied by many researchers[ The results of many of these studies have been summarised by Leissa 0 and Blevins 1 [ The literature contains numerous...

  2. Effect of diabetic macular edema on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Duck Jin; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sang Yoon; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon

    2014-05-15

    To investigate both the effect of diabetic macular edema (DME) on measured peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab injection on RNFL thickness using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients with diabetic retinopathy. We compared the SD-OCT RNFL thickness profiles between eyes with and without DME (DME [n = 42]; without DME [n = 53]) and conducted an interventional study for evaluating the effect of DME on RNFL thickness. Six sectorial and the global RNFL (gRNFL) thicknesses were compared between the two groups. To evaluate the intraindividual effect of DME on RNFL thickness, 1-month follow-up OCT data of 42 eyes that received an intravitreal bevacizumab injection were compared with preinjection data. The six sectorial and gRNFL thicknesses were greater in the DME group than the non-DME group (P thickness significantly correlated with the central foveal thickness (CFT) (R = 0.470, P thickness (P thickness and RNFL thickness were significantly correlated (R = 0.576, P thickness was generally increased in patients with DME, and the increment correlated with the degree of macular edema. While long-lasting DME resulted in RNFL thickening in all sectors, short-term DME resolution mainly influenced the temporal and nasal RNFL thicknesses. Cautious interpretation is recommended for evaluation of glaucoma using RNFL thickness in diabetic patients, especially patients with DME. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  3. Hydromagnetic free convection currents effects on boundary layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwanza, J.K., E-mail: kwanzakioko@yahoo.co [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya); Marigi, E.M.; Kinyanjui, M. [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2010-06-15

    In this study we discuss an unsteady free convection MHD flow past semi-infinite vertical porous plate. We have considered the flow in the presence of a strong magnetic field and therefore the electromagnetic force is very large. This brings in the phenomenon of Hall and Ion-slip currents. The effects of these two parameters together with that of viscous dissipation and radiation absorption among others on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are presented. The profiles are presented graphically. As the partial differential equations governing this problem are highly non-linear they are solved numerically by a finite difference method. It is found that in presence of heating of the plate by free convection current the velocity boundary layer thickness decreases.

  4. Stress effects on the elastic properties of amorphous polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caponi, S., E-mail: silvia.caponi@cnr.it, E-mail: silvia.corezzi@unipg.it [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR (CNR-IOM) - Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia I-06100 (Italy); Corezzi, S., E-mail: silvia.caponi@cnr.it, E-mail: silvia.corezzi@unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); CNR-ISC (Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi), c/o Università di Roma “LaSapienza,” Piazzale A. Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Mattarelli, M. [NiPS Laboratory, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Fioretto, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy)

    2014-12-07

    Brillouin light scattering measurements have been used to study the stress induced modification in the elastic properties of two glass forming polymers: polybutadiene and epoxy-amine resin, prototypes of linear and network polymers, respectively. Following the usual thermodynamic path to the glass transition, polybutadiene has been studied as a function of temperature from the liquid well into the glassy phase. In the epoxy resin, the experiments took advantage of the system ability to reach the glass both via the chemical vitrification route, i.e., by increasing the number of covalent bonds among the constituent molecules, as well as via the physical thermal route, i.e., by decreasing the temperature. Independently from the particular way chosen to reach the glassy phase, the measurements reveal the signature of long range tensile stresses development in the glass. The stress presence modifies both the value of the sound velocities and their mutual relationship, so as to break the generalized Cauchy-like relation. In particular, when long range stresses, by improvise sample cracking, are released, the frequency of longitudinal acoustic modes increases more than 10% in polybutadiene and ∼4% in the epoxy resin. The data analysis suggests the presence of at least two different mechanisms acting on different length scales which strongly affect the overall elastic behaviour of the systems: (i) the development of tensile stress acting as a negative pressure and (ii) the development of anisotropy which increases its importance deeper and deeper in the glassy state.

  5. Role of elastic deformation in determining the mixed alkaline earth effect of hardness in silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Potuzak, M.

    2015-01-01

    Glasses deform permanently as a result of indentation and the total resistance to deformation consists of three individual resistances, i.e., those to elastic deformation, densification, and plastic flow. The link between Vickers hardness and the resistances to densification and plastic flow has...... been investigated previously, but the link between the resistance to elastic deformation and hardness has not yet been studied. In this work, we investigate the link between elastic deformation during indentation and Vickers hardness in a series of mixed magnesium-barium boroaluminosilicate glasses. We...... show that the mixed alkaline earth effect manifests itself as deviations from linearity in shear modulus, Poisson’s ratio, glass transition temperature, liquid fragility index, hardness, volume of densification, and volume of plastic flow. We find no correlation between the elastic part...

  6. Surface stress, surface elasticity, and the size effect in surface segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, M.; Hofer, W.; Varga, P.

    1995-01-01

    Surface stress and surface elasticity of low-index fcc surfaces have been studied using effective-medium theory potentials. In addition to total-energy calculations giving stress components and elastic data for the surface as a whole, the use of artificial atoms with modified size allows us...... to probe the stress and elasticity of individual layers. This method of artificial atoms provides a direct way to study the contribution of atomic size to segregation in alloys as well as the driving force of reconstructions driven by surface stress. As an example, we give a qualitative explanation...... of the face-dependent segregation of Pt-Ni alloys. We also compare results of these atomic-scale calculations with continuum elasticity....

  7. Effect of LED light-curing time for the adhesive resin on the modulus of elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senawongse, Pisol; Harnirattisai, Choltacha; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the elastic modulus of successive layers where an adhesive resin was cured by different light-curing times. Eighty dentin discs which were 2 mm thick were prepared from 40 sound third molars. The dentin discs were further divided into four groups and bonded with 3M Single Bond 2 and cured with an LED for 5, 10, 15 and 20s. Bonded specimens were restored with a microhybrid resin composite. Specimens were cut perpendicular to the resin dentin interface, embedded in epoxy resin, and polished. Polished specimens were evaluated for the elastic modulus at the layer of dentin, hybrid layer, adhesive resin, and resin composite at 24 hours after preparation. Light-curing times influenced the elastic modulus of hybrid layer and adhesive resin. The significant differences of elastic modulus among successive layers were found. The results suggested that extension of light-curing times of adhesive resin from 5 to 20 seconds increased the mechanical properties of the resin dentin interface.

  8. The effect of a running task on muscle shear elastic modulus of posterior lower leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Shuhei; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Aoki, Takafumi; Suzuki, Daichi; Kikumoto, Takanori; Nakamura, Emi; Ito, Wataru; Hirabayashi, Ryo; Takabayashi, Tomoya; Edama, Mutsuaki

    2017-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common causes of exercise-related leg pain in runners. Because stopping training due to pain from MTSS could decrease the athlete's competitiveness, it is necessary to construct MTSS prevention and treatment programs. However, the effect of running, which is believed to cause MTSS, on shear elastic modulus of the posterior lower leg is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 30 min of running on shear elastic modulus of the posterior lower leg in healthy subjects. Twenty healthy males volunteered to participate in this study (age, 20.9 ± 0.6 y; height, 169.6 ± 4.5 cm; weight, 62.6 ± 5.2 kg). The shear elastic modulus of the posterior lower leg was measured using ultrasonic shear wave elastography before and immediately after a 30-min running task. Shear elastic moduli of the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior were significantly increased after 30 min running task. However, there were no significant changes in shear elastic moduli of the lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus and peroneus brevis. The results suggested that the increases in shear elastic moduli of flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior after running could be a risk factor for running-related MTSS development.

  9. Importance of elastic finite-size effects: Neutral defects in ionic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, P. A.; Cooper, M. W. D.

    2017-09-01

    Small system sizes are a well-known source of error in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, yet computational constraints frequently dictate the use of small supercells, often as small as 96 atoms in oxides and compound semiconductors. In ionic compounds, electrostatic finite-size effects have been well characterized, but self-interaction of charge-neutral defects is often discounted or assumed to follow an asymptotic behavior and thus easily corrected with linear elastic theory. Here we show that elastic effects are also important in the description of defects in ionic compounds and can lead to qualitatively incorrect conclusions if inadequately small supercells are used; moreover, the spurious self-interaction does not follow the behavior predicted by linear elastic theory. Considering the exemplar cases of metal oxides with fluorite structure, we show that numerous previous studies, employing 96-atom supercells, misidentify the ground-state structure of (charge-neutral) Schottky defects. We show that the error is eliminated by employing larger cells (324, 768, and 1500 atoms), and careful analysis determines that elastic, not electrostatic, effects are responsible. The spurious self-interaction was also observed in nonoxide ionic compounds irrespective of the computational method used, thereby resolving long-standing discrepancies between DFT and force-field methods, previously attributed to the level of theory. The surprising magnitude of the elastic effects is a cautionary tale for defect calculations in ionic materials, particularly when employing computationally expensive methods (e.g., hybrid functionals) or when modeling large defect clusters. We propose two computationally practicable methods to test the magnitude of the elastic self-interaction in any ionic system. In commonly studied oxides, where electrostatic effects would be expected to be dominant, it is the elastic effects that dictate the need for larger supercells: greater than 96 atoms.

  10. Effect of Varying Crustal Thickness on CHAMP Geopotential Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, P. T.; Kis, K. I.; vonFrese, R. R. B.; Korhonen, J. V.; Wittmann, G.; Kim, H. R.; Potts, L. V.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the effect of crustal thickness variation on satellite-altitude geopotential anomalies we compared two regions of Europe with vastly different values, Central/Southern Finland and the Pannonian Basin. Crustal thickness exceeds 62 km in Finland and is less than 26 km in the Pannonian Basin. Heat-flow maps indicate that the thinner and more active crust of the Pannonian Basin has a value nearly three times that of the Finnish Svecofennian Province. Ground based gravity mapping in Hungary shows that the free-air gravity anomalies across the Pannonian Basin are near 0 to +20 mGal with shorter wavelength anomalies from +40 to less than +60 mGal and some 0 to greater than -20 mGal. Larger anomalies are detected in the mountainous areas. The minor value anomalies can indicate the isostatic equilibrium for Hungary (the central part of the Pannonian Basin). Gravity data over Finland are complicated by de-glaciation. CHAMP gravity data (400 km) indicates a west-east positive gradient of greater than 4 mGal across Central/Southern Finland and an ovoid positive anomaly (approximately 4 mGal) quasi-coincidental with the magnetic anomaly traversing the Pannonian Basin. CHAMP magnetic data (425 km) reveal elongated semicircular negative anomalies for both regions with South-Central Finland having larger amplitude (less than -6 nT) than that over the Pannonian Basin, Hungary (less than -5 nT). In both regions subducted oceanic lithosphere has been proposed as the anomalous body.

  11. Neutron Angular Scatter Effects in 3DHZETRN: Quasi-Elastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Werneth, Charles M.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    The current 3DHZETRN code has a detailed three dimensional (3D) treatment of neutron transport based on a forward/isotropic assumption and has been compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulation codes in various geometries. In most cases, it has been found that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. However, a recent study of neutron leakage from finite geometries revealed that further improvements to the 3DHZETRN formalism are needed. In the present report, angular scattering corrections to the neutron fluence are provided in an attempt to improve fluence estimates from a uniform sphere. It is found that further developments in the nuclear production models are required to fully evaluate the impact of transport model updates. A model for the quasi-elastic neutron production spectra is therefore developed and implemented into 3DHZETRN.

  12. Including surface ligand effects in continuum elastic models of nanocrystal vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Mork, A. Jolene; Willard, Adam P.; Tisdale, William A.

    2017-07-01

    The measured low frequency vibrational energies of some quantum dots (QDs) deviate from the predictions of traditional elastic continuum models. Recent experiments have revealed that these deviations can be tuned by changing the ligands that passivate the QD surface. This observation has led to speculation that these deviations are due to a mass-loading effect of the surface ligands. In this article, we address this speculation by formulating a continuum elastic theory that includes the dynamical loading by elastic surface ligands. We demonstrate that this model is capable of accurately reproducing the l = 0 phonon energy across a variety of different QD samples, including cores with different ligand identities and epitaxially grown CdSe/CdS core/shell heterostructures. We highlight that our model performs well even in the small QD regime, where traditional elastic continuum models are especially prone to failure. Furthermore, we show that our model combined with Raman measurements can be used to infer the elastic properties of surface bound ligands, such as sound velocities and elastic moduli, that are otherwise challenging to measure.

  13. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX (Oxford Instruments and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM analysis (JEOL were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual information's (KVI POPOVAC. Results. Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Conclusion. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobaltchromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  14. EFFECTIVENESS IN DYNAMIC BALANCE: A COMPARISON BETWEEN FOOT MUSCLE STRENGTHENING USING ELASTIC BAND AND WITHOUT ELASTIC BAND IN CHILDREN AGED 8–12 WITH FLEXIBLE FLATFEET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indri Listyorini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the effects of foot muscle strengthening exercises with and without elastic band to the dynamic balance function in children aged 8–12 years with flexible flatfeet. Methods: Forty-one children (aged 8–12 years with flexible flatfeet and dynamic balance problem were randomly allocated into either the intervention or control group. Both groups received thrice weekly training for 6 weeks. The foot strengthening exercise regimens consisted of pronation, supination, short foot, and tiptoeing using elastic band for the intervention group and without elastic band for the control group. Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT was tested before and after 6 weeks of training. Results: A statistically significant difference of normalized SEBT scores was found for both groups in both legs (p=0.00, p<0.05. The intervention group was significantly better than the control group for both right and left legs (p=0.00, p<0.05. Conclusions: Foot muscle strengthening either with or without elastic band improves dynamic balance in children aged 8–12 years with flexible flatfeet. Exercise given with elastic band significantly shows better improvement in the dynamic balance compared to without elastic band.

  15. Effect of topical dorzolamide on rabbit central corneal thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jr. G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to study the effect of dorzolamide on corneal hydration in an 18-week controlled experiment using ultrasonic pachymetry. Twenty-eight male rabbits were divided randomly into four groups. The 7 rabbits in each group received eye drops containing either 2% (w/v dorzolamide or placebo in their right eye, or in their left eye. The 2% dorzolamide rabbits were treated every 8 h. Fellow eyes are defined as eyes which did not receive either dorzolamide or placebo. The study was blind for both the person who applied the drug and the one who performed the pachymetry. The effect of treatments is reported on the basis of the percentage of pachymetric variation compared to the measurement made before drug application. There was no significant difference (P = 0.061 in pachymetric variation between dorzolamide (-4.42 ± 11.71% and placebo (2.48 ± 9.63%. However, there was a significant difference (P = 0.0034 in pachymetric variation between the dorzolamide fellow eyes (-7.56 ± 10.50% and the placebo (-4.42 ± 11.71%. In conclusion, dorzolamide did not increase the corneal thickness in rabbits.

  16. Thickness effect on the fracture and delamination of titanium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordill, M.J., E-mail: megan.cordill@oeaw.ac.at [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Science and the Department of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, Jahnstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Taylor, A.A. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Mechanics and Nanostructures, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2015-08-31

    Titanium adhesion layers are a common component of many coated products; they play a particularly important role in promoting the adhesion of Cu and Au conduction lines to polymer substrates for flexible electronic circuitry. In this work a full microstructural and mechanical characterization is performed on Ti layers of three different thicknesses—8, 12 and 50 nm—deposited onto polyimide. Observed differences in the mechanical behavior of the coatings were found to relate to the changing chemistry and grain size of the coatings. In particular, the observation, using transmission electron microscopy, that the two thinner coatings were comprised of 50% or less metallic Ti illustrates the potential pitfalls of altering something so simple as the coating thickness. - Highlights: • Crack behavior changes with film thickness despite film adhesion staying constant. • Ti–PI interlayer and TiO{sub x} surface layer thicknesses do not change with film thickness. • Film and interface characterization provides understanding of mechanical properties.

  17. Thickness Effect of Micro Speaker Copper Coil Fabrication Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. L. AYAT

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the advantage of using electroplating for making the thick layer of copper over the sputtering. The purpose of this paper is to fabricate the copper coil for microspeaker. The design and simulation of this copper coil shows that the 15 um thickness is needed. In order to fabricate this coil, copper plating is used. The electro-deposition process is well suited to make films of metals such as copper, gold and nickel. The films can be made in any thickness from ~1 µm to >100 µm. The deposition is best controlled when used with an external electrical potentiostate. However, it requires electrical contact to the substrate when immersed in the liquid bath. In any process, the surface of the substrate must have an electrically conducting coating before the deposition can be done. The result of this experimental research shows the easy and cheap way to fabricate the thick layer of copper for microspeacker fabrication.

  18. Effect of myopia onset time for macula choroidal thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Ming Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect of onset time(Tfor macula choroidal thickness(CTin myopia patient. METHODS:A prospective cohort study was designed.One hundred and twenty-two myopia patients(244 eyes; 67 male and 55 female; aged 30~41 years, mean 35.1±4.6 years oldwho received preoperative examinations from March 2014 to April 2015 were recruited in this study. The patients were divided into three groups according to onset time(T:group A(T≤5a, group B(5aF=1.56,P>0.05,age(F=2.13,P>0.05,best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, F=1.41,P>0.05,corneal curvature(F=1.65,P>0.05and axial length(F=1.89,P>0.05among the three groups. The choroid in macular region was measured by enhanced depth imaging(EDIusing spectral-domain optical coherence tomography(SD-OCT. This study recorded the CT at subfoveal(SFCT, 1mm at temporal(T1mm, nasal(N1mm, superior(S1mmand inferior(I1mmto the fovea and 3mm temporal(T3mm, nasal(N3mm, superior(S3mmand inferior(I3mmto the fovea, respectively. The differences of CT at the same position among the three groups were analyzed.RESULTS:The mean SFCT for group A,B,C were 238.32±57.95μm, 230.58±67.21μm, 221.63±62.37μm respectively in this study. The CT was found no significant difference in different locations except N3mm(tA-B=4.34,P3mm(tB-C=7.61,P3mm(t=0.76,P>0.05between group A and C. Significant difference was found at N3mm(tA-B=4.31,t B-C=7.59,tA-C=12.18; PCONCLUSION:The choroidal thickness decreases as the myopia onset time is earlier, especially at nasal.

  19. The effect of substrate elasticity and actomyosin contractility on different forms of endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirlis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Substrate mechanical properties have emerged as potent determinants of cell functions and fate. We here tested the hypothesis that different forms of endocytosis are regulated by the elasticity of the synthetic hydrogels cells are cultured on. Towards this objective, we quantified cell-associated fluorescence of the established endocytosis markers transferrin (Tf) and cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) using a flow-cytometry based protocol, and imaged marker internalization using microscopy techniques. Our results demonstrated that clathrin-mediated endocytosis of Tf following a 10-minute incubation with a fibroblast cell line was lower on the softer substrates studied (5 kPa) compared to those with elasticities of 40 and 85 kPa. This effect was cancelled after 1-hour incubation revealing that intracellular accumulation of Tf at this time point did not depend on substrate elasticity. Lipid-raft mediated endocytosis of CTb, on the other hand, was not affected by substrate elasticity in the studied range of time and substrate elasticity. The use of pharmacologic contractility inhibitors revealed inhibition of endocytosis for both Tf and CTb after a 10-minute incubation and a dissimilar effect after 1 hour depending on the inhibitor type. Further, the internalization of fluorescent NPs, used as model drug delivery systems, showed a dependence on substrate elasticity, while transfection efficiency was unaffected by it. Finally, an independence on substrate elasticity of Tf and CTb association with HeLa cells indicated that there are cell-type differences in this respect. Overall, our results suggest that clathrin-mediated but not lipid-raft mediated endocytosis is potentially influenced by substrate mechanics at the cellular level, while intracellular trafficking and accumulation show a more complex dependence. Our findings are discussed in the context of previous work on how substrate mechanics affect the fundamental process of endocytosis and highlight important

  20. Effects of Body Elasticity on Stability of Underwater Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Fangxu

    2012-01-01

    We examine the stability of the "coast" motion of fish, that is to say, the motion of a neutrally buoyant fish at constant speed in a straight line. The forces and moments acting on the fish body are thus perfectly balanced. The fish motion is said to be unstable if a perturbation in the conditions surrounding the fish results in forces and moments that tend to increase the perturbation and it is stable if these emerging forces tend to reduce the perturbation and return the fish to its original state. Stability may be achieved actively or passively. Active stabilization requires neurological control that activates musculo-skeletal components to compensate for the external perturbations acting against stability. Passive stabilization on the other hand requires no energy input by the fish and is dependent upon the fish morphology, i.e. geometry and elastic properties. In this paper, we use a deformable body consisting of an articulated body equipped with torsional springs at its hinge joints and submerged in an...

  1. Effect of elasticity on stress distribution in CAD/CAM dental crowns: Glass ceramic vs. polymer-matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuanyuan; Griggs, Jason A

    2015-06-01

    Further investigations are required to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of newly developed polymer-matrix composite (PMC) blocks for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elasticity on the stress distribution in dental crowns made of glass-ceramic and PMC materials using finite element (FE) analysis. Elastic constants of two materials were determined by ultrasonic pulse velocity using an acoustic thickness gauge. Three-dimensional solid models of a full-coverage dental crown on a first mandibular molar were generated based on X-ray micro-CT scanning images. A variety of load case-material property combinations were simulated and conducted using FE analysis. The first principal stress distribution in the crown and luting agent was plotted and analyzed. The glass-ceramic crown had stress concentrations on the occlusal surface surrounding the area of loading and the cemented surface underneath the area of loading, while the PMC crown had only stress concentration on the occlusal surface. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown in all load cases, but this difference was not substantial when the loading had a lateral component. Eccentric loading did not substantially increase the maximum stress in the prosthesis. Both materials are resistant to fracture with physiological occlusal load. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown, but the effect of a lateral loading component was more pronounced for a PMC crown than for a glass-ceramic crown. Knowledge of the stress distribution in dental crowns with low modulus of elasticity will aid clinicians in planning treatments that include such restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation and parameterized treatment on the effect of nuclear elastic scattering in high-energy proton radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zheng, Na

    2015-07-01

    A version of Geant4 has been developed to treat high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the results of calculations simulating the effects of nuclear elastic scattering for various test step wedges. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. The traditional expressions of the transmission should be correct if the angle distribution of the scattering is Gaussian multiple Coulomb scattering. The mean free path (which depends on the collimator angle) and the radiation length are treated as empirical parameters, according to transmission as a function of thickness obtained by simulations. The results can be used in density reconstruction, which depends on the transmission expressions. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  3. An effective thickness proposal for strength evaluation of one-side pitted steel plates under uniaxial compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorareh Hadj Mohammad Esmaeil Nouri

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation into the post-buckling behaviour and ultimate strength of imperfect pitted steel plates used in ship and other marine-related structures. A series of elastic-plastic large deflection finite element analyses is performed on pitted steel plates. The effects of pitting corrosion on one side of the plates are introduced into the finite element models. The effects on plate compressive strength as a result of parametric variation of the pitting corrosion geometry are evaluated. A proposal on the effective thickness is concluded in order to estimate the ultimate strength and explore the post-buckling behaviour of pitted steel plates under uniaxial compression.

  4. Determination of effective elastic properties of metal matrix composites with damage particulates using homogenization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, S. Z.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Ibrahim, I.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Ridzuan, M. J. M.

    2017-10-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effect of micro-damage in particulates metal matrix composite on the elastic properties. The micro damage that perhaps could occurs during manufacturing process or due to environmental effects was modelled in three different types, namely shattered, debonded and breakage particulates with variation of volume fraction. The modelling and analysis were conducted based on homogenization theory by utilizing multiscale finite element software (Voxelxon). The results suggest that the elastic properties of metal matrix composite was sensitive to the geometrical defects of its particle.

  5. Magneto-Elastic Effects in Tb3Ga5O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Ute; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Araki, Koji; Akatsu, Mitsuhiro; Nemoto, Yuichi; Goto, Terutaka; Zeitler, Uli; Lüthi, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    We report new results for the elastic constants studied in Faraday and Cotton-Mouton geometry in Tb3Ga5O12 (TGG), a frustrated magnetic substance with strong spin-phonon interaction and remarkable crystal-electric-field (CEF) effects. We analyze the data in the framework of CEF theory taking into account the individual surroundings of the six inequivalent Tb3+-ion positions. This theory describes both, elastic constants in the magnetic field and as a function of temperature. Moreover we present sound-attenuation data for the acoustic Cotton-Mouton effect in TGG.

  6. Simulation of Elastic Properties of Polymer- Clay Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Dashtbayazi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, stiffness of polymer-clay nanocomposites was simulated by Mori-Tanaka and two and three dimensional finite element models. Nanoclays were dispersed into polymer matrix in two ways, namely parallel and random orientations toward loading direction. Effects of microstructural parameters including volume fraction of nanoclays, elastic modulus of nanoclays and interphase, thickness of interphase, aspect ratio of nanoclays and random orientation of nanoclays on elastic modulus of the nanocomposite were investigated by finite element model. Comparing the simulation with experimental results showed that the Mori-Tanak simulation results were closer to the experimental results. Analysis of results showed that the volume fraction of nanoclay, elastic modulus of nanoclay, deviation of nanoclay layers with respect to loading direction, nanoclays aspect ratio, thickness of interphase and the elastic modulus of interphase had respectively the most to the least effect on elastic modulus of nanocomposite.

  7. Elastic deflection and tilting effect in a multi-stage micro bulk former

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, R.; Hansen, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    the analysis focuses on quantifying the effect the forming force has on the elastic deflection of the machine and the tools by examining the displacement of the moving plate under loaded and unloaded conditions. The results of the measurements were used to describe the tilting effect due to the off...

  8. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective properties of discrete elastic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Thomsen, Jon Juel; Snaeland, Sveinn Orri

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate how highfrequency (HF) excitation, combined with strong nonlinear elastic material behavior, influences the effective material or structural properties for low-frequency excitation and wave propagation. The HF effects are demonstrated on discrete linear...

  9. Effects of section thickness on the optimum properties OF Al-8%Si ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to produce squeeze castings, determine the effects of section thickness on the optimum properties of squeeze cast products from Al-Si alloy. Squeeze castings with section thickness ranging from 8 to15mm and aspect ratio (height-to-section thickness ratio) not greater than 3.125:1 were made from ...

  10. Effect of thickness on silicon solar cell efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, C.-T.; Yamakawa, K. A.; Lutwack, R.

    1982-01-01

    A computer-aided-design study on the dependence of the efficiency peak of a back-surface field solar cell on the concentrations of the recombination and dopant impurities is presented. The illuminated current-voltage characteristics of more than 100 cell designs are obtained using the transmission line circuit model to numerically solve the Shockley equations. Using an AM 1 efficiency of 17% as a target value, it is shown that the efficiency versus thickness dependence has a broad maximum which varies by less than 1% over more than a three-to-one range of cell thicknesses from 30 to 100 microns. An optically reflecting back surface will give only a slight improvement of AM 1 efficiency, about 0.7%, in this thickness range. Attention is given to the dependence of the efficiency on patchiness across the back-surface field low-high junction in thin cells.

  11. Differential Effect of Bilayer Thickness on Sticholysin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ortega, Juan; García-Linares, Sara; Rivera-de-Torre, Esperanza; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2017-10-17

    In this study, we examined the influence of bilayer thickness on the activity of the actinoporin toxins sticholysin I and II (StnI and StnII) at 25 °C. Bilayer thickness was varied using dimonounsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) analogues (with 14:1, 16:1, 18:1, 20:1, and 22:1 acyl chains). In addition, N-14:0-sphingomyelin (SM) was always included because StnI and StnII are SM specific. Cholesterol was also incorporated as indicated. In cholesterol-free large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) the PC:SM molar ratio was 4:1, and when cholesterol was included, the complete molar ratio was 4:1:0.5 (PC:SM:cholesterol, respectively). Stn toxins promote bilayer leakage through pores formed by oligomerized toxin monomers. Initial calcein leakage was moderately dependent on bilayer PC acyl chain length (and thus bilayer thickness), with higher rates observed with di-16:1 and di-18:1 PC bilayers. In the presence of cholesterol, the maximum rates of calcein leakage were observed in di-14:1 and di-16:1 PC bilayers. Using isothermal titration calorimetry to study the Stn-LUV interaction, we observed that the bilayer affinity constant (Ka) peaked with LUVs containing di-18:1 PC, and was lower in shorter and longer PC acyl chain bilayers. The presence of cholesterol increased the binding affinity approximately 30-fold at the optimal bilayer thickness (di-18:1-PC). We conclude that bilayer thickness affects both functional and conformational aspects of Stn membrane binding and pore formation. Moreover, the length of the actinoporins' N-terminal α-helix, which penetrates the membrane to form a functional pore, appears to be optimal for the membrane thickness represented by di-18:1 PC.

  12. Effects of Host-rock Fracturing on Elastic-deformation Source Models of Volcano Deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holohan, Eoghan P; Sudhaus, Henriette; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Walsh, John J

    2017-09-08

    Volcanoes commonly inflate or deflate during episodes of unrest or eruption. Continuum mechanics models that assume linear elastic deformation of the Earth's crust are routinely used to invert the observed ground motions. The source(s) of deformation in such models are generally interpreted in terms of magma bodies or pathways, and thus form a basis for hazard assessment and mitigation. Using discontinuum mechanics models, we show how host-rock fracturing (i.e. non-elastic deformation) during drainage of a magma body can progressively change the shape and depth of an elastic-deformation source. We argue that this effect explains the marked spatio-temporal changes in source model attributes inferred for the March-April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Reunion. We find that pronounced deflation-related host-rock fracturing can: (1) yield inclined source model geometries for a horizontal magma body; (2) cause significant upward migration of an elastic-deformation source, leading to underestimation of the true magma body depth and potentially to a misinterpretation of ascending magma; and (3) at least partly explain underestimation by elastic-deformation sources of changes in sub-surface magma volume.

  13. The Effect of Fiber Geometry and Interfacial Properties on the Elastic Properties of Cementitious Nanocomposite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala G. Abu Taqa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the elastic (Young’s modulus of carbon Nanotube- (CNT- reinforced cement paste using 3D and axisymmetric models using Abaqus software. The behavior of the CNT and the cement matrix was assumed to be fully elastic while the cohesive surface framework was used to model the interface. To investigate the effect of fiber waviness on the value of the elastic modulus, 3D models were developed assuming different distributions of fibers. The results obtained using the 3D model were compared to those obtained using the simplified three-phase axisymmetric model which consists of one single CNT aligned in the center of composite unit cell, an interface, and cement matrix. A parametric study was then carried out using the axisymmetric model to study the role of the interface in the composite elastic modulus without accounting for the presence of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ or interphase. The results showed that the CNTs waviness significantly reduced their reinforcing capability in the cement paste. On the other hand, the results obtained using the axisymmetric model were found to be in good agreement with those obtained using the 3D model. Moreover, the results of the parametric study showed that the interface properties significantly affect the composite elastic modulus and alter its behavior.

  14. Effects of Kyunghee Facial Resistance Program (KFRP) on mechanical and elastic properties of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Jeon, Serim; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Facial skin aging is influenced by weakened mimetic muscles. Resistance training of facial mimetic muscles could be one of practical strategy to defend against age-related changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an exercise program (KFRP: Kyunghee Facial Resistance Program) designed for facial mimetic muscles on the mechanical properties and elasticity of facial skin. For this study, 16 healthy female volunteers aged 35-58 participated in KFRP for eight weeks. The mechanical and elastic properties of skin were measured using a Cutometer® on the face and neck. The parameters representing skin fatigue decreased and the parameters representing skin elasticity increased significantly compared to the baseline in all measured regions. The ability of re-deformation of skin increased significantly except the zygomaticus and platysma muscle regions. All measured regions of skin became firmer and the ability to return to the initial position was also significantly improved compared to the baseline. Visco-elasticiy of the skin was not significantly altered. The skin became more firm and elastic through KFRP. This method of resistive exercise had a significantly positive influence on the mechanical properties and elasticity of facial and neck skin.

  15. Effect of patellar thickness on early results of total knee replacement with patellar resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Qunn Jid; Yeung, Sze Tsun; Wong, Yiu Chung; Wai, Yuk Leung

    2014-12-01

    Patellar thickness is a concern in total knee replacement with patellar resurfacing because of the risk of patellar fracture or implant loosening. The aim of this study was to evaluate if patellar thickness is related to clinical outcome in the absence of patellar fracture or implant loosening. Early results of 169 patients who underwent total knee replacement with patellar resurfacing were reviewed to assess the effect of patellar thickness on clinical outcome. The mean follow-up was 13 months. The range of motion, Knee Society Score, Function Score and WOMAC Score were assessed preoperatively, at day 0, 6 months and 1 year. Radiographs were assessed for patellar fracture or implant loosening. Thirty-one percent of all patients had preoperative thickness thickness after patellar cut, all were female. Twenty-three percent had ≥1 mm increase of thickness after surgery. Radiographs did not show any patellar fracture or implant loosening. However, preoperative patellar thickness thickness. Residual thickness thickness ≥1 mm postoperatively was associated with lower gain in WOMAC score at 6 months. Early results of patellar resurfacing with preoperative thickness thickness thickness was also found to have inferior clinical results. II.

  16. A cell model for homogenization of fiber-reinforced composites: General theory and nonlinear elasticity effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-11-01

    The theoretical basis of the homogenization technique developed by Aboudi is presented and assessed. Given the constitutive relations of the constituents, this technique provides an equivalent, homogeneous, constitutive model of unidirectional, continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. The expressions that comprise the first-order version of the technique are given special attention as this treatment has considerable practical value. Nonlinear elasticity effects are added to it. This extension increases the accuracy of numerical simulations of high strain-rate loadings. It is particularly important for any dynamic loading in which shock waves might be produced, including crash safety, armor, and munitions applications. Examples illustrate that elastic nonlinearity can make substantial contributions at strains of only a few per cent. These contributions are greatest during post-yield inelastic deformation. The micromechanics-based homogenization technique is shown to facilitate use of an efficient approximate treatment of elastic nonlinearity in composites with isotropic matrix materials.

  17. Synergistic Effect of Elastic Stockings to Maintain Volume Losses after Mechanical Lymphatic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Pereira de Godoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to assess whether Venosan elastic stockings have a synergistic effect on the maintenance of results after Mechanical Lymphatic Therapy. Eleven patients with grade II lymphedema of the legs, regardless of cause, were evaluated in the Clinica Godoy between September and November 2012. The participants’ ages ranged from 53 to 83 years old with a mean of 65.1 years. Two groups were formed with Group I using Venosan elastic stockings and Group II not using any type of compression therapy. Evaluations of the lymphedematous legs were performed before and after each drainage session using bioimpedance. Patients who wore elastic stockings had a greater volume reduction than those who did not wear stockings (unpaired t-test: P value < 0.001.

  18. Strong coupling effects in near-barrier heavy-ion elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock (Poland); Kemper, K.W. [The Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, Florida (United States); University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Rusek, K. [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-09-15

    Accurate elastic scattering angular distribution data measured at bombarding energies just above the Coulomb barrier have shapes that can markedly differ from or be the same as the expected classical Fresnel scattering pattern depending on the structure of the projectile, the target or both. Examples are given such as {sup 18}O + {sup 184}W and {sup 16}O + {sup 148,} {sup 152}Sm, where the expected rise above Rutherford scattering due to Coulomb-nuclear interference is damped by coupling to the target excited states, and the extreme case of {sup 11}Li scattering, where coupling to the {sup 9}Li + n + n continuum leads to an elastic scattering shape that cannot be reproduced by any standard optical model parameter set. An early indication that the projectile structure can modify the elastic scattering angular distribution was the large vector analyzing powers observed in polarised {sup 6}Li scattering. The recent availability of high-quality {sup 6}He, {sup 11}Li and {sup 11}Be data provides further examples of the influence that coupling effects can have on elastic scattering. Conditions for strong projectile-target coupling effects are presented with special emphasis on the importance of the beam-target charge combination being large enough to bring about the strong coupling effects. Several measurements are proposed that can lead to further understanding of strong coupling effects by both inelastic excitation and nucleon transfer on near-barrier elastic scattering. A final note on the anomalous nature of {sup 8}B elastic scattering is presented as it possesses a more or less normal Fresnel scattering shape whereas one would a priori not expect this due to the very low breakup threshold of {sup 8}B. The special nature of {sup 11}Li is presented as it is predicted that no matter how far above the Coulomb barrier the elastic scattering is measured, its shape will not appear as Fresnel like whereas the elastic scattering of all other loosely bound nuclei studied to

  19. Effect of van der Waals interactions on the structural and elastic properties of black phosphorus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appalakondaiah, S.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Lebègue, S.

    2012-01-01

    (GGA), and with several dispersion corrections to include van der Waals interactions. It is found that the dispersion corrections improve the lattice parameters over LDA and GGA in comparison with experimental results. The calculations reproduce well the experimental trends under pressure and show...... that van der Waals interactions are most important for the crystallographic b axis in the sense that they have the largest effect on the bonding between the phosphorus layers. The elastic constants are calculated and are found to be in good agreement with experimental values. The calculated C22 elastic...

  20. Effect of thickness of bonded composite resin on compressive strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamburger, J.T.; Opdam, N.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, J.; Huysmans, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the compressive strength of composites with different physical properties bonded as a restoration to dentin in layers of varying thicknesses. METHODS: Four types of direct composite materials: a midway-filled (Tetric EvoCeram); a compact-filled

  1. Effects of Temperature Levels and Concrete Cover Thickness on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the knowledge of the temperature of the fire, thickness of concrete cover, residual strength of concrete and tensile strength of embedded reinforcement after fire exposure, we can predict the residual carrying capacity of the beams after fire. The experimental procedure involves some specimens of reinforcing steel bars ...

  2. Elastic wave induced by friction as a signature of human skin ageing and gender effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaghloul, M; Morizot, F; Zahouani, H

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose an innovative approach based on a rotary tribometer coupled with laser velocimetry for measuring the elastic wave propagation on the skin. The method is based on a dynamic contact with the control of the normal force (Fn ), the contact length and speed. During the test a quantification of the friction force is produced. The elastic wave generated by friction is measured at the surface of the skin 35 mm from the source of friction exciter. In order to quantify the spectral range and the energy property of the wave generated, we have used laser velocimetry whose spot laser diameter is 120 μm, which samples the elastic wave propagation at a frequency which may reach 100 kHz. In this configuration, the speaker is the friction exciter and the listener the laser velocimetry. In order to perform non-invasive friction tests, the normal stress has been set to 0.3 N and the rotary velocity to 3 revolutions per second, which involves a sliding velocity of 63 mm/s. This newly developed innovative tribometer has been used for the analysis of the elastic wave propagation induced by friction on human skin during chronological ageing and gender effect. Measurements in vivo have been made on 60 healthy men and women volunteers, aged from 25 to 70. The results concerning the energy of the elastic wave signature induced by friction show a clear difference between the younger and older groups in the range of a low band of frequencies (0-200 Hz). The gender effect was marked by a 20% decrease in the energy of elastic wave propagation in the female group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of size and defects on the elasticity of silicon nanocantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, H.; Yang, C.K.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Bossche, A.; Staufer, U.; French, P.J.; Van Keulen, F.

    2010-01-01

    The size-dependent elastic behavior of silicon nanocantilevers and nanowires, specifically the effective Young’s modulus, has been determined by experimental measurements and theoretical investigations. The size dependence becomes more significant as the devices scale down from micro- to

  4. Hall effect on MHD flow of visco-elastic micro-polar fluid layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0. (0,0, ). H. = H о is applied along z-axis. Fig. 1: Geometry of the problem. Here, we have taken Rivlin-Ericksen visco-elastic fluid in which when the fluid permeates a porous medium, the gross effect is represented by Darcy's law and the usual viscous term in the momentum equation is replaced by the resistance term. 1.

  5. Effect of fat loss on arterial elasticity in obese adolescents with clinical insulin resistance: RESIST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mandy; Gow, Megan; Baur, Louise A; Benitez-Aguirre, Paul Z; Tam, Charmaine S; Donaghue, Kim C; Craig, Maria E; Cowell, Chris T; Garnett, Sarah P

    2014-10-01

    Reduced arterial elasticity contributes to an obesity-related increase in cardiovascular risk in adults. To evaluate the effect of fat loss on arterial elasticity in obese adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes. A secondary data analysis of the RESIST study was performed in two hospitals in Sydney, Australia. The study included 56 subjects (ages, 10 to 17 y; 25 males) with prediabetes and/or clinical features of insulin resistance. A 12-month lifestyle plus metformin intervention. Arterial elasticity and systemic vascular resistance were measured using radial tonometry pulse contour analysis, percentage body fat (%BF) was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity index was derived from an oral glucose tolerance test and lipids. Adolescents (n = 31) with decreased %BF (mean change [range], -4.4% [-18.3 to -0.01%]) after the intervention had significant increases in the mean large arterial elasticity index (mean change [95%CI], 5.1 [1.9 to 8.2] mL/mm Hg * 10; P = .003) and insulin sensitivity index (0.5 [0.1 to 0.9]; P = .010) and a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (-82 [-129 to -35] dyne * s * cm(-5); P = .001). There were no significant changes in these parameters in adolescents who increased their %BF. Nor was there any significant change in the mean small arterial elasticity index in either group. Long-term follow-up of these adolescents is warranted to assess whether the observed changes in vascular elasticity will lead to a clinical benefit including reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  6. Effects of elastic therapeutic taping on motor function in children with motor impairments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Andréa Baraldi; Lima-Alvarez, Carolina Daniel de; Rocha, Ana Carolinne Portela; Tudella, Eloisa

    2017-03-22

    The elastic therapeutic taping has been considered a promising resource for disabled children. To systematically review the evidence of the effects of elastic therapeutic taping on motor function in children with motor impairments. Three independent evaluators conducted searches in electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, BIREME/BVS, Science Direct, SciELO, and PEDro). Clinical studies design, published until 2016, involving elastic therapeutic taping and children aged 0-12 years with motor impairments were included. The variables considered were the methodological aspects (study design, participants, outcome measurements, and experimental conditions); results presented in the studies, and also the methodological quality of studies. Final selection was composed by 12 manuscripts (five randomized controlled trials), published in the last 10 years. Among them, cerebral palsy (CP) was the most recurrent disorder (n = 7), followed by congenital muscular torticollis (n = 2) and brachial plexus palsy (n = 2). Positive results were associated with taping application: improvement in the upper limb function, gross motor skills, postural control, muscular balance, and performance in the dynamics functional and daily activities. Lower quality of the studies, clinical and population heterogeneity existed across studies. The elastic therapeutic taping has been shown to be a promising adjunct resource to the conventional rehabilitation in children with motor impairments. However, high methodological studies about its efficacy in this population are already scarce. Implications for Rehabilitation Elastic therapeutic taping has been shown to be a promising adjunct resource to the conventional rehabilitation in disabled children. Clinical trials have indicated improvement in the postural control and functional activities with both, upper and lower limbs, and increase in the functional independency resulting from the taping use. Randomized control trials and

  7. Effect of suction on macular thickness and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness during LASIK used femtosecond laser and Moria M2 microkeratome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yue-Hua

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effect of suction on the macular thickness and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) used Ziemer FEMTO LDV femtosecond laser (Ziemer group) and Moria M2 automated microkeratome (Moria group) for flap creation. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) was used to measure macular thickness, ganglion cell complex thickness and (RNFL) thickness of 204 eyes of 102 patients with the Ziemer femtosecond laser (102 eyes) and the Moria M2 microkeratome (102 eyes) before surgery and 30min; 1, 3d; 1wk; 1, 3mo; 1y after surgery. The average foveal thickness and parafoveal retinal thickness 30min after the surgery were statistically more than that before surgery (Ziemer Peffect was less in the Ziemer group than that in the Moria group (P allthickness was not significantly changed in both groups (P all>0.05). The RNFL thickness was statistically less 30min after surgery in both groups (P=0.014, Pthickness had recovered to the preoperative level only 1d after surgery. The suction of femtosecond laser and mechanical microkeratome led to the increase in macular central fovea thickness and the decrease in RNFL thickness values at the early stage after LASIK. The effect of suction on macular and the RNFL thicknesses in Ziemer group is smaller than that in Moria group.

  8. Effects of the air sac thickness on ventilation by a 1D model of an avian respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushikubo, Akira; Nakamura, Masanori; Hirahara, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Airflow in an avian respiratory system was simulated to study why birds affected with airsacculitis have respiratory distress. The airflow in the avian lung was modeled with a 1D electrical circuit and simulated for investigating what effect an increase in wall thickness of air sacs caused by airsacculitis has on flow in lung. The results demonstrated that thickening of the air sac wall caused anti-synchronization between an elastic recoiling force of the air sac walls and an intra-pleural pressure, bringing difficulties in expansion of air sacs to draw in airs during an inspiration period and thereby decreasing air to be pumped out during an expiration period. This was reflected in a decrease in air flow volume in parabronchi where gas exchange takes place. Therefore, it was concluded that airsacculitis causes imbalance in air flow dynamics in the avian lung and thus impairs breathing ability of birds.

  9. Effect of deposition temperature on morphological, magnetic and elastic properties of ultrathin Co49Pt51 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si Abdallah, F.; Chérif, S. M.; Bouamama, Kh.; Roussigné, Y.; Hsu, J.-H.

    2018-03-01

    Morphological, magnetic and elastic properties of 5 nm-thick Co49Pt51 films, sputtered on glass substrates, with 20 nm-thick Ta (seed) and Pt (buffer) layers were studied as function of the deposition temperature Td ranging between room temperature and 350° C. Atomic and magnetic force microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and Brillouin light scattering techniques were used to investigate the root mean square (RMS) roughness, the magnetic domain configuration, the coercive field (Hc), the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), and the dynamic magnetic and elastic properties of the films with Td. The results show that surface uniformity was enhanced since the RMS roughness decreases with Td while magnetic domains typical of films with high PMA are observed. Hc and PMA are found to sensibly increase with Td. The dynamic magnetization behavior is characterized by magnetic modes related with the co-existence of hard and soft magnetic areas within the samples. The elastic properties of the stack were first analyzed by means of a model describing the main variation of the elastic wave frequencies within the frame of weighted average thickness, density, Young's modulus and Poisson coefficient of all the layers constituting the stacks. However, while Hc and PMA keep increasing with Td, a more precise experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior shows that the group velocity starts increasing and finally decreases with Td, suggesting that knowledge of the influence of Td on the mechanical properties of each individual layer composing the stack is required to obtain a more accurate analysis.

  10. Thickness and camber effects in slender wing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that the flow past thin slender wings with round leading edges can remain attached up to moderate values of angle of attack. In the low aspect ratio limit, the slender wing theory of Jones (1946) can therefore provide a simple analytical tool for studying this flow. First-order corrections to slender wing theory due to spanwise thickness and camber are developed. For wings of general planform, the validity and applicability of slender wing theory have recently been extended with the addition of chordwise and compressibility corrections by Levin and Seginer (1982). It is believed that similar corrections can be applied to the present results.

  11. Lonsdaleite Films with Nanometer Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvashnin, Alexander G; Sorokin, Pavel B

    2014-02-06

    We investigate the properties of potentially the stiffest quasi-2-D films with lonsdaleite structure. Using a combination of ab initio and empirical potential approaches, we analyze the elastic properties of lonsdaleite films in both elastic and inelastic regimes and compare them with graphene and diamond films. We review possible fabrication methods of lonsdaleite films using the pure nanoscale "bottom-up" paradigm: by connecting carbon layers in multilayered graphene. We propose the realization of this method in two ways: by applying direct pressure and by using the recently proposed chemically induced phase transition. For both cases, we construct the phase diagrams depending on temperature, pressure, and film thickness. Finally, we consider the electronic properties of lonsdaleite films and establish the nonlinear dependence of the band gap on the films' thicknesses and their lower effective masses in comparison with bulk crystal.

  12. Effect of temperature and geometric parameters on elastic properties of tungsten nanowire: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sourav, E-mail: ssaha09@me.buet.ac.bd; Mojumder, Satyajit; Mahboob, Monon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Islam, M. Zahabul [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Tungsten is a promising material and has potential use as battery anode. Tungsten nanowires are gaining attention from researchers all over the world for this wide field of application. In this paper, we investigated effect of temperature and geometric parameters (diameter and aspect ratio) on elastic properties of Tungsten nanowire. Aspect ratios (length to diameter ratio) considered are 8:1, 10:1, and 12:1 while diameter of the nanowire is varied from 1-4 nm. For 2 nm diameter sample (aspect ratio 10:1), temperature is varied (10 K ~ 1500 K) to observe elastic behavior of Tungsten nanowire under uniaxial tensile loading. EAM potential is used for molecular dynamic simulation. We applied constant strain rate of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} to deform the nanowire. Elastic behavior is expressed through stress vs. strain plot. We also investigated the fracture mechanism of tungsten nanowire and radial distribution function. Investigation suggests peculiar behavior of Tungsten nanowire in nano-scale with double peaks in stress vs. strain diagram. Necking before final fracture suggests that actual elastic behavior of the material is successfully captured through atomistic modeling.

  13. [Effect of polydimethylsiloxane matrix elasticity on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Y; Zhao, J Z; Yang, C; Zu, Y; Li, Q

    2017-08-09

    Objective: To investigate the effect of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix elasticity on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells (rBMSC). Methods: A series of PDMS composite substrates with different elastic modulus were constructed by adjusting the relative concentrations of cross-linking agent. The Young's modulus was used to describe the elasticity of PDMS after measurement by atomic force microscope (AFM). After surface modification, rBMSC was seeded on PDMS matrix, and 7 days after rBMSC was cultured on the five different Young's moduli matrix, the differences of osteogenic differentiation of rBMSC were observed by the method of real-time PCR, Western blotting, and alkaline phosphatase assay. Results: The PDMS was suitable for cell culture after surface modification, and by altering the concentration of cross-linking agent, PDMS could mimic the majority of the tissues' elasticity in vivo. The related osteogenic differentiation markers expression showed significant difference between the five matrixes (Pmatrix which could be used in the investigation of inducing rBMSCs into osteoblastic lineages. PDMS substrate stiffness has an obvious influence on rBMSC osteogenic differentiation.

  14. A systematic literature review of the effect of carotid atherosclerosis on local vessel stiffness and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, Mari E; Singh, Dilip; Menon, Bijoy K; Frayne, Richard

    2015-11-01

    This systematic literature review sought to determine the effects of carotid atherosclerotic plaque on local arterial stiffness. MedLine, EMBASE, and grey literature were searched with the following term: ("atherosclerosis" or "carotid atherosclerosis" or "carotid artery disease" or "carotid plaque") AND ("distensibility" or "elasticity" or "stiffness" or "compliance") NOT ("pulse wave velocity" or "PWV" or "carotid-ankle" or "ankle-brachial" or "augmentation index" or "cardio-ankle" or "CAVI" or "flow mediated dilation" or "FMD"). Results were restricted to English language articles reporting local arterial stiffness in human subjects with carotid atherosclerosis. Of the 1466 search results, 1085 abstracts were screened and 191 full-text articles were reviewed for relevance. The results of the 50 studies that assessed some measure of carotid arterial elasticity or stiffness in patients with carotid plaque were synthesized and reviewed. A number of different measures of carotid elasticity were found in the literature. Regardless of which metric was used, the majority of studies found increased carotid stiffness (or decreased distensibility) to be associated with carotid plaque presence, the degree of atherosclerosis, and incident stroke. Carotid artery mechanics are influenced by the presence of atherosclerotic plaque. The clinical applicability of carotid elasticity measures may be limited by the lack of reference values and standardized techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of non-elastic taping on muscle tone in stroke patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Chung, Jun Sub; Jang, Gwon Uk; Park, Seol; Park, Ji Won

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] Hemiplegia occurs when posturing with a dominant flexor tone is present in the upper limbs, thus preventing increased abnormal tone. We attempted to improve the side effects of this condition using elbow re-positioning with non-elastic tape; this method is used to modulate abnormal muscle tone in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen post-stroke patients were included in this study. Non-elastic tape was applied to the elbow joint in a spiral manner. Before and after the tape was applied, the degree of spasticity (hypertonia) was measured in the elbow flexor muscles using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Global synkinesis (GS) intensity using electromyography (EMG) was measured in the biceps brachii and triceps brachii during voluntary isometric elbow contractions of the contralateral upper limbs. [Results] Application of non-elastic tape at the elbow joint significantly changed the GS intensity, but no significant changes were found when compared with the MAS. [Conclusion] This study demonstrates that non-elastic tape can be used to decrease abnormal elbow flexor tone. The findings may be used to influence the choice of intervention regarding muscle tone and spastic elbow flexion.

  16. The effect of elastic therapeutic taping on lumbar extensor isokinetic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapman, Harry J; Fallon, Tom; O'Connor, Matthew; Titmus, Lee A; Choy, Sherrie T; Hornsby, Claire; Marsden, Jon F; Shum, Gary L

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of elastic therapeutic tape when applied overlaying the lumbar extensors on different measures of muscle performance, compared to a placebo taping technique and a no-tape control. A cross-sectional experimental study. A biomechanics laboratory. Twenty one participants received three taping conditions in a randomised order: elastic therapeutic tape, a placebo tape and a no-tape control. Peak torque, the time taken to reach peak torque and peak velocity were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Concentric lumbar extension peak torque at 60°/s, time taken to reach peak torque and peak velocity was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Friedman's test and post-hoc Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to determine the statistical differences between the three taping conditions. Level of signicance was set at 0.05.fi. A statistically significant improvement in peak lumbar extensor torque was observed when comparing elastic therapeutic tape with the no-tape control (p  0.05). Results demonstrate that the application of elastic therapeutic tape overlaying the primary lumbar extensors significantly improves the maximal lumbar extension peak torque in healthy, asymptomatic adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on global and regional cortical thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik A Govindarajan

    Full Text Available Global and regional cortical thicknesses based on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images acquired at 1.5 T and 3 T were measured on a relatively large cohort of 295 subjects using FreeSurfer software. Multivariate regression analysis was performed using Pillai's trace test to determine significant differences in cortical thicknesses measured at these two field strengths. Our results indicate that global cortical thickness is not affected by the field strength or gender. In contrast, the regional cortical thickness was observed to be field dependent. Specifically, the cortical thickness in regions such as parahippocampal, superior temporal, precentral and posterior cingulate is thicker at 3 T than at 1.5 T. In contrast regions such as cuneus and pericalcarine showed higher cortical thickness at 1.5 T than at 3 T. These differences appear to be age-dependent. The differences in regional cortical thickness between field strengths were similar in both genders. Further, male vs. female differences in regional cortical thickness were observed only at 1.5 T and not at 3 T. Our results indicate that magnetic field strength has a significant effect on the estimation of regional, but not global, cortical thickness. In addition, the pulse sequence, scanner type, and spatial resolution do not appear to have significant effect on the measured cortical thickness.

  18. Effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on global and regional cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Koushik A; Freeman, Leorah; Cai, Chunyan; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2014-01-01

    Global and regional cortical thicknesses based on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images acquired at 1.5 T and 3 T were measured on a relatively large cohort of 295 subjects using FreeSurfer software. Multivariate regression analysis was performed using Pillai's trace test to determine significant differences in cortical thicknesses measured at these two field strengths. Our results indicate that global cortical thickness is not affected by the field strength or gender. In contrast, the regional cortical thickness was observed to be field dependent. Specifically, the cortical thickness in regions such as parahippocampal, superior temporal, precentral and posterior cingulate is thicker at 3 T than at 1.5 T. In contrast regions such as cuneus and pericalcarine showed higher cortical thickness at 1.5 T than at 3 T. These differences appear to be age-dependent. The differences in regional cortical thickness between field strengths were similar in both genders. Further, male vs. female differences in regional cortical thickness were observed only at 1.5 T and not at 3 T. Our results indicate that magnetic field strength has a significant effect on the estimation of regional, but not global, cortical thickness. In addition, the pulse sequence, scanner type, and spatial resolution do not appear to have significant effect on the measured cortical thickness.

  19. Effect of supramolecular structure on polymer nanofibre elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinstein, Arkadii; Burman, Michael; Gendelman, Oleg; Zussman, Eyal

    2007-01-01

    Polymer materials of reduced size and dimensionality, such as thin films, polymer nanofibres and nanotubes, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties compared with those of their macroscopic counterparts. We discuss here the abrupt increase in Young's modulus in polymer nanofibres. Using scaling estimation we show that this effect occurs when, in the amorphous (non-crystalline) part of the nanofibres, the transversal size of regions consisting of orientation-correlated macromolecules is comparable to the nanofibre diameter, thereby resulting in confinement of the supramolecular structure. We suggest that in polymer nanofibres the resulting supramolecular microstructure plays a more dominant role in the deformation process than previously thought, challenging the commonly held view that surface effects are most significant. The concept we develop also provides a way to interpret the observed-but not yet understood-temperature dependence of Young's modulus in nanofibres of different diameters.

  20. Effect of finite phosphor thickness on detective quantum efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, R.M.; Yaffe, M.J.; Holmes, R.B. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1989-09-01

    In this paper we describe theoretically the relationship between the finite thickness of a phosphor screen and its spatial-frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency DQE(f-). The finite thickness of the screen causes a variation in both the total number of light quanta emitted from the screen in a burst from a given x-ray interaction and in the spatial distribution of the quanta within the light burst (i.e., shape or point spread function (PSF) of the light burst). The variation in magnitude of the burst gives rise to a spatial-frequency-independent reduction in DQE, characterized by the scintillation efficiency As. The variation in PSF causes a roll off in DQE with increasing spatial frequency which we have characterized by the function Rc(f). Both As and Rc(f) can be determined from the moments of the distribution of the spatial Fourier spectrum of light bursts emitted from the phosphor and thus they are related: As is a scaling factor for Rc(f). Our theory predicts that it is necessary for all light bursts which appear at the output to have the same magnitude to maximize As and the same shape to maximize Rc(f). These requirements can lead to the result that the fluorescent screen with the highest modulation transfer function will not necessarily have the highest DQE(f) even at high spatial frequencies.

  1. The Effect of Thickness of Aluminium Films on Optical Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lugolole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Uganda and Africa at large, up to 90% of the total energy used for food preparation and water pasteurization is from fossil fuels particularly firewood and kerosene which pollute the environment, yet there is abundant solar energy throughout the year, which could also be used. Uganda is abundantly rich in clay minerals such as ball clay, kaolin, feldspar, and quartz from which ceramic substrates were developed. Aluminium films of different thicknesses were deposited on different substrates in the diffusion pump microprocessor vacuum coater (Edwards AUTO 306. The optical reflectance of the aluminium films was obtained using a spectrophotometer (SolidSpec-3700/DUV-UV-VIS-NIR at various wave lengths. The analysis of the results of the study revealed that the optical reflectance of the aluminium films was above 50% and increased with increasing film thickness and wavelength. Thus, this method can be used to produce reflector systems in the technology of solar cooking and other appliances which use solar energy.

  2. Standard test method for determining the effective elastic parameter for X-ray diffraction measurements of residual stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for experimentally determining the effective elastic parameter, Eeff, for the evaluation of residual and applied stresses by X-ray diffraction techniques. The effective elastic parameter relates macroscopic stress to the strain measured in a particular crystallographic direction in polycrystalline samples. Eeff should not be confused with E, the modulus of elasticity. Rather, it is nominally equivalent to E/(1 + ν) for the particular crystallographic direction, where ν is Poisson's ratio. The effective elastic parameter is influenced by elastic anisotropy and preferred orientation of the sample material. 1.2 This test method is applicable to all X-ray diffraction instruments intended for measurements of macroscopic residual stress that use measurements of the positions of the diffraction peaks in the high back-reflection region to determine changes in lattice spacing. 1.3 This test method is applicable to all X-ray diffraction techniques for residual stress measurem...

  3. Coupling liquids acoustic velocity effects on elastic metallic bioglass properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metiri, W.; Hadjoub, F.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of surface acoustic wave, SAW, velocities of coupling liquids on acoustical properties of several bulk metallic glasses, BMG, has been investigated using simulation program based on acoustic microscopy. Thus, we determined variations of critical angles at which the excitation of longitudinal mode, θL and Rayleigh mode, θR occurs as a function of wave velocities in different coupling liquids, Vliq. Linear relations of the form θi =ai0 +βiVliq were deduced. The importance of such formula, used with Snell's law, lies in the direct determination of SAW velocities and consequently mechanical properties of BMGs.

  4. On rate-dependent dissipation effects in electro-elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Prashant; Steinmann, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical modelling of large strain electro-viscoelastic deformations in electro-active polymers. Energy dissipation is assumed to occur due to mechanical viscoelasticity of the polymer as well as due to time-dependent effective polarisation of the material. Additive decomposition of the electric field $\\mathbb{E} = \\mathbb{E}_e + \\mathbb{E}_v$ and multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient $\\mathbf{F} = \\mathbf{F}_e \\mathbf{F}_v$ are proposed to model the internal dissipation mechanisms. The theory is illustrated with some numerical examples in the end.

  5. Exchange nonlocal effects in the nuclear heavy-ion elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M.A.C.; Chamon, L.C.; Pereira, D. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Galetti, D. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-01-01

    An interesting feature of the presence of exchange nonlocal effects in the nucleus-nucleus collision description in the modification of the nuclear barrier. This results, on the one hand, in an enhancement of the nuclear fusion cross sections due to the modification introduced in the basic quantum mechanical tunnelling calculation and, on the other hand, leads one to the study of the consequences of those effects in the nuclear elastic scattering. In this paper, we discuss the manifestations of the presence of those effects through an approximated model Schroedinger equation describing a nuclear system colliding at energies around the barrier. An an application, the elastic channel and, concomitantly, the fusion processes are studied for the {sup 16} O + {sup 60} Ni system at energies close to the barrier. (author). 15 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Measurement of two-photon exchange effect by comparing elastic $e^\\pm p$ cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Rimal, D; Raue, B A; Weinstein, L B; Arrington, J; Brooks, W K; Ungaro, M; Adhikari, K P; Akbar, Z; Pereira, S Anefalos; Badui, R A; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bennett, R P; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Bültmann, S; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chetry, T; Ciullo, G; Clark, L; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Compton, N; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fersch, R; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Gleason, C; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Joosten, S; Keller, D; Khetarpal, P; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lanza, L; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Sharabian, Y G; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stankovic, Ivana; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Torayev, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2016-01-01

    [Background] The electromagnetic form factors of the proton measured by unpolarized and polarized electron scattering experiments show a significant disagreement that grows with the squared four momentum transfer ($Q^{2}$). Calculations have shown that the two measurements can be largely reconciled by accounting for the contributions of two-photon exchange (TPE). TPE effects are not typically included in the standard set of radiative corrections since theoretical calculations of the TPE effects are highly model dependent, and, until recently, no direct evidence of significant TPE effects has been observed. [Purpose] We measured the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic-scattering cross sections in order to determine the TPE contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering and thereby resolve the proton electric form factor discrepancy. [Methods] We produced a mixed simultaneous electron-positron beam in Jefferson Lab's Hall B by passing the 5.6 GeV primary electron beam through a radiator to p...

  7. Elastic α-{sup 12}C scattering at low energies in cluster effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Shung-Ichi [Sunmoon University, School of Mechanical and ICT Convergence Engineering, Asan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The elastic α-{sup 12}C scattering at low energies is studied employing an effective field theory in which the α and {sup 12}C states are treated as elementary-like fields. We discuss scales of the theory in the stellar energy region where the {sup 12}C(α, γ){sup 16}O process occurs, and then obtain an expression of the elastic scattering amplitudes in terms of effective-range parameters. Using experimental data of the phase shifts for l=0,1, 2 channels at low energies, for which the resonance regions are avoided, we fix values of the parameters and find that the phase shifts at the low energies are well reproduced by using three effective-range parameters for each channel. Furthermore, we discuss problems and uncertainties of the present approach when the amplitudes are extrapolated to the stellar energy region. (orig.)

  8. Effect of longitudinal vibration of fluid-filled pipe with elastic wall on sound transmission character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When one end of a fluid-filled pipe with an elastic wall is fixed and a harmonic force effect acts on the other end,a steady longitudinal vibration will be produced. Compared to the pipeline resonance mode,the amplitude of the steady longitudinal vibration of an elastic pipe is greater,and the effect on the sound is also greater. The study of the steady longitudinal vibration of pipes can better describe the effects of fluid-filled pipelines on the radiation sound field of the pipe opening. Through the contrast between the analysis calculation of the equivalent beam model and the experimental results,the accuracy of the equivalent beam model for the calculation of the steady longitudinal vibration of pipelines is verified,and a method of isolating the steady longitudinal vibration state is proposed and verified.

  9. Effect of layer thickness on the high temperature mechanical properties of Al/SiC nanolaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfian, S. [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Mayer, C.; Chawla, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106 (United States); Llorca, J. [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Department of Materials Science, Polytechnic University of Madrid, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Misra, A.; Baldwin, J.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Molina-Aldareguía, J.M., E-mail: jon.molina@imdea.org [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-28

    Composite laminates on the nanoscale have shown superior hardness and toughness, but little is known about their high temperature behavior. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) were measured as a function of temperature by means of nanoindentation in Al/SiC nanolaminates, a model metal–ceramic nanolaminate fabricated by physical vapor deposition. The influence of the Al and SiC volume fraction and layer thicknesses was determined between room temperature and 150 °C and, the deformation modes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, using a focused ion beam to prepare cross-sections through selected indents. It was found that ambient temperature deformation was controlled by the plastic flow of the Al layers, constrained by the SiC, and the elastic bending of the SiC layers. The reduction in hardness with temperature showed evidence of the development of interface-mediated deformation mechanisms, which led to a clear influence of layer thickness on the hardness. - Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of Al/SiC nanolaminates was measured between 28 °C and 150 °C. • Room temperature hardness was controlled by the volume fraction of the constituents. • The hardness of all the nanolaminates decreased rapidly with temperature. • Reduction of hardness with temperature increased as the interface density increased.

  10. Effect of elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory responses in Taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Gadruni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Elastic bands offer variable elastic resistance (ER throughout a range of motion and their incorporation with exercise movements has been used for variable strength training and rehabilitation purposes. Objective: Investigate the effect of acute bout of progressive elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory response in Taekwondo athletes (TKD compared with untrained ones.METHODS: Fourteen (TKD, n = 7 and untrained, n = 7 men performed 3 sets of progressive resistance elastic exercise. Blood samples were taken pre-exercise and also immediately and 24h post exercise. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, total leukocyte counts, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were analyzed.RESULTS: Only DOMS increased in untrained group, but elevation of DOMS was observed in both groups (TKD and untrained at 24h after exercise (p<0.05. CK and LDH activity increased in both groups significantly. Also TKD group only showed CK increasing 24h post exercise (p<0.05. Total circulating leukocyte counts increased immediately in post exercise experiments and decreased in 24h ones in both groups (p<0.05. Serum IL-6 immediately increased in both groups and 24h post exercises but there was no significant difference between immediate and 24h post exercise experiments in TKD group. Furthermore, CRP just increased 24h after exercise in both groups (p<0.05.CONCLUSION: Progressive resistance elastic exercise induced muscle damage and inflammation in TKD athletes, but also had smaller changes in comparison with untrained group and other forms of exercise.

  11. Immediate effects of an elastic knee sleeve on frontal plane gait biomechanics in knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Schween

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis of the knee affects millions of people. Elastic knee sleeves aim at relieving symptoms. While symptomatic improvements have been demonstrated as a consequence of elastic knee sleeves, evidence for biomechanical alterations only exists for the sagittal plane. We therefore asked what effect an elastic knee sleeve would have on frontal plane gait biomechanics.18 subjects (8 women, 10 men with osteoarthritis of the medial tibiofemoral joint walked over ground with and without an elastic knee sleeve. Kinematics and forces were recorded and joint moments were calculated using an inverse dynamics approach. Conditions with sleeve and without sleeve were compared with paired t-Tests.With the sleeve, knee adduction angle at ground contact was reduced by 1.9 ± 2.1° (P = 0.006. Peak knee adduction was reduced by 1.5 ± 1.6° (P = 0.004. The first peak knee adduction moment and positive knee adduction impulse were decreased by 10.1% (0.74 ± 0.9 Nm • kg-1; P = 0.002 and 12.9% (0.28 ± 0.3 Nm • s • kg-1; P < 0.004, respectively.Our study provides evidence that wearing an elastic knee sleeve during walking can reduce knee adduction angles, moments and impulse in subjects with knee osteoarthritis. As a higher knee adduction moment has previously been identified as a risk factor for disease progression in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, we speculate that wearing a knee sleeve may be beneficial for this specific subgroup.

  12. Effect of macular hole volume on postoperative central macular thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Ozturk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the association between macular hole volume (MHV and postoperative central macular thickness (CMT using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Methods: Thirty-three eyes of 30 patients with a large full-thickness idiopathic macular hole with or without vitreomacular traction who underwent surgical intervention were included in this cross-sectional study. Complete ophthalmological examination, including SD-OCT, was performed for all participants during the pre- and postoperative visits. MHV was preoperatively measured using SD-OCT, which captured the widest cross-sectional image of the hole. For normal distribution analysis of the data, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed, and for statistical analyses, chi-square, Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient test were performed. Results: Mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and MHV were found to be 0.99 ± 0.36 (range, 0.3-2.0 logMAR and 0.139 ± 0.076 (range, 0.004-0.318 mm3, respectively. Mean follow-up was 16.3 ± 14.3 (range, 3-50 months. No statistical correlations were found between MHV and postoperative BCVA (p=0.588 and between MHV and disease recurrence (p=0.544. A weak negative correlation existed between MHV and final CMT scores (p=0.04, r=-0.383. Conclusions: Greater MHV was found to be weakly associated with lower postoperative CMT scores.

  13. Effects of material thickness and processing method on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) degradation and mechanical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Reyhaneh Neghabat; Aldabbagh, Fawaz; Ronan, William; Erxleben, Andrea; Rochev, Yury; McHugh, Peter

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of material thickness and processing method on the degradation rate and the changes in the mechanical properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material during simulated physiological degradation were investigated. Two types of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) materials were considered: 0.12 mm solvent-cast films and 1 mm compression-moulded plates. The experimental results presented in this study were compared to the experimental results of Shirazi et al. (Acta Biomaterialia 10(11):4695-703, 2014) for 0.25 mm solvent-cast films. These experimental observations were used to validate the computational modelling predictions of Shirazi et al. (J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 54: 48-59, 2016) on critical diffusion length scale and also to refine the model parameters. The specific material processing methods considered here did not have a significant effect on the degradation rate and the changes in mechanical properties during degradation; however, they influenced the initial molecular weight and they determined the stiffness and hardness of the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material. The experimental observations strongly supported the computational modelling predictions that showed no significant difference in the degradation rate and the changes in the elastic modulus of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) films for thicknesses larger than 100 μm.

  14. Effect of Ru thickness on spin pumping in Ru/Py bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Nilamani; Singh, M. Sanjoy; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K., E-mail: dkpandya@physics.iitd.ac.in; Muduli, P. K. [Department of Physics, Thin Film Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-05-07

    We report the effect of Ru thickness (t{sub Ru}) on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line-width of Ru(t{sub Ru})/Py(23 nm) bilayer samples grown on Si(100)/SiO{sub 2} substrates at room temperature by magnetron sputtering. The FMR line-width is found to vary linearly with frequency for all thicknesses of Ru, indicating intrinsic origin of damping. For Ru thicknesses below 15 nm, Gilbert-damping parameter, α is almost constant. We ascribe this behavior to spin back flow that is operative for Ru thicknesses lower than the spin diffusion length in Ru, λ{sub sd}. For thicknesses >15 nm (>λ{sub sd}), the damping constant increases with Ru thickness, indicating spin pumping from Py into Ru.

  15. The Effect of Eggshell Thickness on the Hatchability of Guinea Fowl and Pheasants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    US Yamak

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Successful incubation affects the number of healthy chicks in all poultry species. This study examined the effect of eggshell thickness on the hatching rates of guinea fowl and pheasant eggs. In total, 964 guinea fowl and 1,728 pheasant eggs were used in the study. Eggshell thickness was measured directly with an ultrasound gauge. Thicknesses ranged between 0.27-0.47 mm in guinea fowl and 0.24-0.49 mm in pheasant eggs. Incubation periods were 28 days for guinea fowl and 25 days for pheasant eggs. At the end of the incubation period, unhatched eggs were broken to identify the causes of embryonic mortality. Eggs were classified as thin-, medium- and thick-shelled, and hatching rates were calculated as a function of eggshell thickness. Differences in hatching rates of guinea fowl and pheasant eggs with different shell thicknesses were not statistically significant (p>0.05.

  16. Large Scale FEM of the effective elastic properties of particle reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauhe, Jens Christian; Pyrz, Ryszard; Lund, Erik

    2004-01-01

    Over the years several methods have been proposed for the determination of the effective elastic properties of particle reinforced composites. The material microstructures used in the present analysis is a real microstructure and a numerically generated microstructure. X-ray microtomography is used...... three-dimensional finite element models of the microstructure. The models contain a large number of elements, up to 1 million, and are solved iteratively using an element-by-element formalism. Models containing 100 particles have been statistically generated and the material properties of each particle...... is assigned using a Gaussian distribution of the properties. Various distributions have been used to determine how the variation of particle properties influences the effective elastic properties. From this examination it was found that the larger the variation of the particle properties is the softer...

  17. Computation of antenna vibration mode elastic-rigid and effective-weight coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.

    1992-01-01

    A significant amount of both qualitative and quantitative information about structures can be derived from the elastic-rigid structural coupling matrices, and from the effective modal inertias and masses. Typical finite-element analysis programs do not provide this information as part of the regular output. This report presents an easy way to develop the necessary information from ordinary program output, and shows how to deal with alternative origins for the reference coordinate system.

  18. Effect of Fiber Crimp on the Elasticity of Random Fiber Networks With and Without Embedding Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ehsan; Barocas, Victor H; Shephard, Mark S; Picu, Catalin R

    2016-04-01

    Fiber networks are assemblies of one-dimensional elements representative of materials with fibrous microstructures such as collagen networks and synthetic nonwovens. The mechanics of random fiber networks has been the focus of numerous studies. However, fiber crimp has been explicitly represented only in few cases. In the present work, the mechanics of cross-linked networks with crimped athermal fibers, with and without an embedding elastic matrix, is studied. The dependence of the effective network stiffness on the fraction of nonstraight fibers and the relative crimp amplitude (or tortuosity) is studied using finite element simulations of networks with sinusoidally curved fibers. A semi-analytic model is developed to predict the dependence of network modulus on the crimp amplitude and the bounds of the stiffness reduction associated with the presence of crimp. The transition from the linear to the nonlinear elastic response of the network is rendered more gradual by the presence of crimp, and the effect of crimp on the network tangent stiffness decreases as strain increases. If the network is embedded in an elastic matrix, the effect of crimp becomes negligible even for very small, biologically relevant matrix stiffness values. However, the distribution of the maximum principal stress in the matrix becomes broader in the presence of crimp relative to the similar system with straight fibers, which indicates an increased probability of matrix failure.

  19. Thermal fluctuations and effective bending stiffness of elastic thin sheets and graphene: A nonlinear analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpoor, Fatemeh; Wang, Peng; Huang, Rui; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-10-01

    The study of statistical mechanics of thermal fluctuations of graphene-the prototypical two-dimensional material-is rendered rather complicated due to the necessity of accounting for geometric deformation nonlinearity. Unlike fluid membranes such as lipid bilayers, coupling of stretching and flexural modes in solid membranes like graphene leads to a highly anharmonic elastic Hamiltonian. Existing treatments draw heavily on analogies in the high-energy physics literature and are hard to extend or modify in the typical contexts that permeate materials, mechanics and some of the condensed matter physics literature. In this study, using a variational perturbation method, we present a ;mechanics-oriented; treatment of the thermal fluctuations of elastic sheets such as graphene and evaluate their effect on the effective bending stiffness at finite temperatures. In particular, we explore the size, pre-strain and temperature dependency of the out-of-plane fluctuations, and demonstrate how an elastic sheet becomes effectively stiffer at larger sizes. Our derivations provide a transparent approach that can be extended to include multi-field couplings and anisotropy for other 2D materials. To reconcile our analytical results with atomistic considerations, we also perform molecular dynamics simulations on graphene and contrast the obtained results and physical insights with those in the literature.

  20. Theories and experiments on the stiffening effect of high-frequency excitation for continuous elastic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2003-01-01

    , as was done in a few related studies¿¿unless the system has very low modal density or heavy damping; thus first-order consideration to resonance effects is included. Using the specific example with experimental support to put confidence on the proposed theory, expressions for predicting the stiffening effect...... for a more general class of continuous systems in differential operator form are also provided.......One effect of strong mechanical high-frequency excitation may be to apparently "stiffen" a structure, a well-described phenomenon for discrete systems. The present study provides theoretical and experimental results on this effect for continuous elastic structures. A laboratory experiment is set up...

  1. Corneal thickness, residual stromal thickness, and its effect on opaque bubble layer in small-incision lenticule extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiaonan; Wang, Yan; Li, Liuyang; Zhang, Jiamei

    2017-08-18

    To evaluate the effects of the central corneal thickness (CCT) and residual stromal thickness (RST) on the formation of opaque bubble layer (OBL) during small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE). A total of 345 eyes from Refractive Surgery Center database at Tianjin Eye Hospital that had been subjected to SMILE surgery and followed for 6 months were included in this study and divided into OBL and OBL-free groups. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data for all eyes were evaluated and analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. After adjustment for several confounding factors, potential associations of CCT and RST with OBL were elucidated by determining odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In total, 22 of the 345 eyes developed various degrees of OBL during the femtosecond laser scanning phase of SMILE surgery. After adjustment for age, sex, and refractive errors, significant relationships were detected between CCT and RST and OBL formation (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.02-1.06; OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.02-1.05, respectively, P < 0.001). Smooth curve fitting revealed an increased risk of OBL in the presence of an increased CCT or RST. However, visual outcomes were comparable between the two groups at both 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The results suggest that OBL formation during SMILE surgery is more likely in eyes with a thicker cornea. CCT and RST can be considered independent risk factors for OBL formation. Although this phenomenon may disturb the surgical procedure, it is unlikely to affect the postoperative visual outcome.

  2. Effect of layer thickness on the elution of bulk-fill composite components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmund, Lena; Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Hickel, Reinhard; Styllou, Panorea; Styllou, Marianthi; Kehe, Kai; Yang, Yang; Högg, Christof

    2017-01-01

    An increment layering technique in a thickness of 2mm or less has been the standard to sufficiently convert (co)monomers. Bulk fill resin composites were developed to accelerate the restoration process by enabling up to 4mm thick increments to be cured in a single step. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of layer thickness on the elution of components from bulk fill composites. The composites ELS Bulk fill, SDR Bulk fill and Venus Bulkfill were polymerized according to the instruction of the manufacturers. For each composite three groups with four samples each (n=4) were prepared: (1) samples with a layer thickness of 2mm; (2) samples with a layer thickness of 4mm and (3) samples with a layer thickness of 6mm. The samples were eluted in methanol and water for 24h and 7 d. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A total of 11 different elutable substances have been identified from the investigated composites. Following methacrylates showed an increase of elution at a higher layer thickness: TEGDMA (SDR Bulk fill, Venus Bulk fill), EGDMA (Venus Bulk fill). There was no significant difference in the elution of HEMA regarding the layer thickness. The highest concentration of TEGDMA was 146μg/mL for SDR Bulk fill at a layer thickness of 6mm after 7 d in water. The highest HEMA concentration measured at 108μg/mL was detected in the methanol eluate of Venus Bulk fill after 7 d with a layer thickness of 6mm. A layer thickness of 4mm or more can lead to an increased elution of some bulk fill components, compared to the elution at a layer thickness of 2mm. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of porosity and substrate on the piezoelectric behaviour of thick-film PZT elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwirc, S N [Instituto Nacional de TecnologIa Industrial, Electronica e Informatica, CC 157, B1650WAB San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Negreira, C A [Instituto de Fisica, Laboratorio de Acustica Ultrasonora, Facultad de Ciencias, Igua 4225, 11400 Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2006-10-07

    This work presents a method to establish the elastic and piezoelectric constants of a thick film screen printed PZT composite over an alumina substrate. The calculus procedure uses as input data the parameters from the bulk material because it is basically the same component of which the thick film paste is manufactured. We also need to know frequencies of resonance and anti-resonance as well as the permittivity and density of the film in a poled disc sample. This method takes into account three factors: the additional components such as the glass frit, porosity of the film caused by the low temperature sinter process and the film clamping to the substrate. Each one of these factors reduces the piezoelectric efficiency by a different amount and, consequently, the measured values of the constants. The results obtained in this way are compared with experimental measurements of the effective piezoelectric charge constant d{sub 33} and permittivity with good agreement. Small discrepancies could be explained mainly due to lack of homogeneity in glass as well as in pore distribution.

  4. Effect of Glass Thickness on Performance of Flat Plate Solar Collectors for Fruits Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhani Bakari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the effect of thickness of glazing material on the performance of flat plate solar collectors. Performance of solar collector is affected by glaze transmittance, absorptance, and reflectance which results into major heat losses in the system. Four solar collector models with different glass thicknesses were designed, constructed, and experimentally tested for their performances. Collectors were both oriented to northsouth direction and tilted to an angle of 10° with the ground toward north direction. The area of each collector model was 0.72 m2 with a depth of 0.15 m. Low iron (extra clear glass of thicknesses 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm was used as glazing materials. As a control, all collector performances were analysed and compared using a glass of 5 mm thickness and then with glass of different thickness. The results showed that change in glass thickness results into variation in collector efficiency. Collector with 4 mm glass thick gave the best efficiency of 35.4% compared to 27.8% for 6 mm glass thick. However, the use of glass of 4 mm thick needs precautions in handling and during placement to the collector to avoid extra costs due to breakage.

  5. Effect of alloying on elastic properties of ZrN based transition metal nitride alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of composition and metal sublattice substitutional element on the structural, elastic and electronic properties of ternary transition metal nitrides Zr1-xMxN with M=Al, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, W and Mo. The analysis of the elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young\\'s modulus, and Poisson\\'s ratio provides insights regarding the mechanical behavior of Zr1-xMxN. We predict that ternary alloys are more ductile compared to their parent binary compounds. The revealed trend in the mechanical behavior might help for experimentalists on the ability of tuning the mechanical properties during the alloying process by varying the concentration of the transition metal. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Simulation of Elastic Properties of Polymer- Clay Nanocomposite

    OpenAIRE

    M.R. Dashtbayazi; M. Mahmoudi Meymand

    2015-01-01

    In this research, stiffness of polymer-clay nanocomposites was simulated by Mori-Tanaka and two and three dimensional finite element models. Nanoclays were dispersed into polymer matrix in two ways, namely parallel and random orientations toward loading direction. Effects of microstructural parameters including volume fraction of nanoclays, elastic modulus of nanoclays and interphase, thickness of interphase, aspect ratio of nanoclays and random orientation of nanoclays on elastic modulus of ...

  7. Effects of target polarization in electron elastic scattering off endohedral A @C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatov, V. K.; Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an efficient approximation to describe the low-energy electron elastic scattering off an endohedral fullerene A @CN . It accounts for polarization of A @CN by incoming electrons without reference to complicated details of the electronic structure of CN itself. The developed approach has permitted us to unravel spectacular A @CN polarization effects in low-energy e-+A @CN elastic scattering, particularly the effects due to interelectron interaction between the electrons of both CN and A . We show that contribution of a single atom A remains unscreened by the multiatomic CN despite the fact that the projectile's wavelength is bigger than the size of the target. Inclusion of A and CN polarizability interference leads to violation of the previously predicted phase additivity rule. The partial scattering cross sections acquire prominent Ramsauer-type minima which, however, disappear in the total cross section. The study reveals notable trends in e-+A @CN elastic scattering versus the polarizability of an encapsulated atom. We also predict the existence of certain negative ions A @CN- . We chose Ne, Xe, and Ba as atoms A , and C60 as the endohedral CN, as the case study. The work focuses on a reasonable compromise between the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the problem in general rather than on carrying out detailed calculations for one particular system.

  8. Rheology Effects on Predicted Fiber Orientation and Elastic Properties in Large Scale Polymer Composite Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaogui Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Short fiber-reinforced polymers have recently been introduced to large-scale additive manufacturing to improve the mechanical performances of printed-parts. As the short fiber polymer composite is extruded and deposited on a moving platform, velocity gradients within the melt orientate the suspended fibers, and the final orientation directly affects material properties in the solidified extrudate. This paper numerically evaluates melt rheology effects on predicted fiber orientation and elastic properties of printed-composites in three steps. First, the steady-state isothermal axisymmetric nozzle melt flow is computed, which includes the prediction of die swell just outside the nozzle exit. Simulations are performed with ANSYS-Polyflow, where we consider the effect of various rheology models on the computed outcomes. Here, we include Newtonian, generalized Newtonian, and viscoelastic rheology models to represent the melt flow. Fiber orientation is computed using Advani–Tucker fiber orientation tensors. Finally, elastic properties in the extrudate are evaluated based from predicted fiber orientation distributions. Calculations show that the Phan–Thien–Tanner (PTT model yields the lowest fiber principal alignment among considered rheology models. Furthermore, the cross section averaged elastic properties indicate a strong transversely isotropic behavior in these composites, where generalized Newtonian models yield higher principal Young’s modulus, while the viscoelastic fluid models result in higher shear moduli.

  9. Organic field effect transistors - Study of performance parameters for different dielectric layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Anu; Shahul Hameed T., A.; Predeep, P.

    2017-06-01

    Mobility and current handling capabilities of Organic Field Effect Transistor (OFET) are vitally important parameters in the electrical performance where the material parameters and thickness of different layers play significant role. In this paper, we report the simulation of an OFET using multi physics tool, where the active layer is pentacene and Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) forms the dielectric. Electrical characterizations of the OFET on varying the thickness of the dielectric layer from 600nm to 400nm are simulated and drain current, transconductance and mobility are analyzed. In the study it is found that even though capacitance increases with reduction in dielectric layer thickness, the transconductance effect is reflected many more times in the mobility which in turn could be attributed to the variations in transverse electric field. The layer thickness below 300nm may result in gate leakage current points to the requirement of optimizing the thickness of different layers for better performance.

  10. The effect of intracameral anesthesia on macular thickness and ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness after uneventful phacoemulsification surgery: prospective and randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Esin Sogutlu; Ermis, Sitki Samet; Yazici, Alper; Koytak, Arif; Sahin, Gözde; Kilic, Adil

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of intracameral lidocaine anesthesia on macular thickness and macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) thickness following uneventful phacoemusification in healthy subjects. This is a prospective, randomized and double- masked study. One hundred eyes of 74 consecutive patients were randomized to receive intracameral preservative-free lidocaine 1 % (intracameral lidocaine group) or intracameral injection of balanced salt solution (sham injection group) at the time of the phacoemulsification surgery. Preoperative and postoperative macular thickness analyses with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-ODT) were performed and the results between the two groups were compared. Postoperatively, both the central foveal thickness (CFT) and the thickness of perifoveal macula were significantly improved in both groups (p thicknesses of the two groups at any follow-up time. In both groups, GC-IPL thickness was significantly increased at the first week and first month visits (p thickness measurements of the two groups at any follow-up time. The current study demonstrated that supplementary intracameral lidocaine 1 % did not cause more macular thickening than the intracameral sham injection during a follow-up period of 3 months. The present study also showed a tendency for a transient increase in high definition SD-OCT-based GC-IPL thickness measurements within a few months following cataract surgery under both intracameral lidocaine anesthesia and intracameral sham injection.

  11. Effective radiation attenuation calibration for breast density: compression thickness influences and correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jerry A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibrating mammograms to produce a standardized breast density measurement for breast cancer risk analysis requires an accurate spatial measure of the compressed breast thickness. Thickness inaccuracies due to the nominal system readout value and compression paddle orientation induce unacceptable errors in the calibration. Method A thickness correction was developed and evaluated using a fully specified two-component surrogate breast model. A previously developed calibration approach based on effective radiation attenuation coefficient measurements was used in the analysis. Water and oil were used to construct phantoms to replicate the deformable properties of the breast. Phantoms consisting of measured proportions of water and oil were used to estimate calibration errors without correction, evaluate the thickness correction, and investigate the reproducibility of the various calibration representations under compression thickness variations. Results The average thickness uncertainty due to compression paddle warp was characterized to within 0.5 mm. The relative calibration error was reduced to 7% from 48-68% with the correction. The normalized effective radiation attenuation coefficient (planar representation was reproducible under intra-sample compression thickness variations compared with calibrated volume measures. Conclusion Incorporating this thickness correction into the rigid breast tissue equivalent calibration method should improve the calibration accuracy of mammograms for risk assessments using the reproducible planar calibration measure.

  12. Effect of Amblyopia Treatment on Macular Thickness in Eyes With Myopic Anisometropic Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yi; Frantz, Kelly A; Block, Sandra; Goodfellow, Geoffrey W; Allison, Christine

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether abnormal macular thickness in myopic anisometropic amblyopia differed after amblyopia treatment. Furthermore, to investigate whether effect of treatment on macular thickness was associated with subject age or improvement in stereoacuity. Seventeen children (mean age: 9.0 [±3.0] years, ranging from 5.7-13.9 years) with myopic anisometropic amblyopia (visual acuity [VA] in amblyopic eyes: 20/80-20/400) were recruited and treated with 16-week refractive correction, followed by an additional 16-week refractive correction and patching. Macular thickness, best-corrected VA, and stereoacuity were measured both before and after amblyopia treatment. Factorial repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to determine whether macular thickness in amblyopic eyes changed after amblyopia treatment. Mean baseline VA in the amblyopic eye was 1.0 ± 0.3 logMAR and improved to 0.7 ± 0.3 after amblyopia treatment (P thickness (P = 0.040). There was no treatment effect on fellow eyes (P = 0.245); however, the average foveal thickness in the amblyopic eye was significantly reduced after amblyopia treatment (P = 0.049). No statistically significant interactions were found for the other macular thickness parameters (P > 0.05). Abnormal central macula associated with myopic anisometropic amblyopia tended to be thinner following amblyopia treatment with no significant changes in peripheral macular thickness.

  13. Evaluation of the effect of geometry for measuring section thickness in tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Ryohei; Ishii, Rie; Kishimoto, Junichi; Yamato, Shinichiro; Takahata, Akira; Kohama, Chiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the effect of geometry for measuring section thickness in tomosynthesis by using a metal bead device (bead method). Tomosynthesis images were obtained from two types of tomosynthesis equipment, Safire17 (ST, Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan) and XR650 (GT, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). After tomosynthesis radiography with each device, the bead tomosynthesis images were obtained by image reconstruction. The digital profile was obtained from the digital value of the bead central coordinate in the perpendicular direction, and we acquired the slice sensitivity profile (SSP). The section thickness was defined with the full width at half maximum obtained from the SSP. We investigated the change in section thickness under different evaluation conditions: the angular range, the height of the bead position, the source-image receptor distance (SID), and image processing. The section thickness decreased when the angular range and height of the bead position increased. Also, the section thickness varied with a change in the SID. The section thickness differed according to the geometry for measuring the section thickness. Thus, the effect of the geometry used for measurement should be considered when the section thickness in tomosynthesis is measured by the bead method.

  14. Effects of compositions of filler, binder and porosity on elastic and fracture properties of nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyaw, S.T., E-mail: si.kyaw@nottingham.ac.uk; Sun, W.; Becker, A.A.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Micromechanics based homogenisation method is used for graphite microstructures. • Elastic and fracture properties are estimated based on graphite microstructures. • Fracture behaviours are studied using compact tension simulation. • Fracture behaviours are studied using four point bending simulation. • Flexural strengths were obtained and compared to experimental results from literature. - Abstract: Physical mechanisms at different length scales have to be taken into account while predicting the overall failure of nuclear graphite structures of advanced gas cooled graphite reactors. In this paper, the effect of composition of meso graphite phases and porosity on the aggregate elastic properties is predicted using the Eshelby homogenisation method. Results indicate an overall decrease in elastic modulus with an increase in porosity. Subsequently, the moduli at different porosity levels are used to predict the critical strain energy release rates for crack propagation of graphite, and fracture behaviour is studied using compact tension and four point bending tests. Compared to flexural strength at zero porosity level, significant reduction in strength of up to 80% at 30% porosity level is observed. Evolution of flexural strength due to porosity is also compared against available experimental values of graphite from UK nuclear plants.

  15. Effects of alloying elements on elastic properties of Al by first-principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of alloying elements (Co, Cu, Fe, Ge, Hf, Mg, Mn, Ni, Si, Sr, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and Zr on elastic properties of Al have been investigated using first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation. A supercell consisting of 31 Al atoms and one solute atom is used. A good agreement is obtained between calculated and available experimental data. Lattice parameters of the studied Al alloys are found to be depended on atomic radii of solute atoms. The elastic properties of polycrystalline aggregates including bulk modulus (B, shear modulus (G, Young’s modulus (E, and the B/G ratio are also determined based on the calculated elastic constants (cij’s. It is found that the bulk modulus of Al alloys decreases with increasing volume due to the addition of alloying elements and the bulk modulus is also related to the total molar volume (Vm and electron density (nAl31x with the relationship of nAl31x=1.0594+0.0207√B/Vm. These results are of relevance to tailor the properties of Al alloys.

  16. Effect of strong elastic contrasts on the propagation of seismic wave in hard-rock environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, R.; Zheng, L.; Liu, Q.; Milkereit, B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the propagation of seismic waves in a presence of strong elastic contrasts, such as topography, tunnels and ore-bodies is still a challenge. Safety in mining is a major concern and seismic monitoring is the main tool here. For engineering purposes, amplitudes (peak particle velocity/acceleration) and travel times of seismic events (mostly blasts or microseismic events) are critical parameters that have to be determined at various locations in a mine. These parameters are useful in preparing risk maps or to better understand the process of spatial and temporal stress distributions in a mine. Simple constant velocity models used for monitoring studies in mining, cannot explain the observed complexities in scattered seismic waves. In hard-rock environments modeling of elastic seismic wavefield require detailed 3D petrophysical, infrastructure and topographical data to simulate the propagation of seismic wave with a frequencies up to few kilohertz. With the development of efficient numerical techniques, and parallel computation facilities, a solution for such a problem is achievable. In this study, the effects of strong elastic contrasts such as ore-bodies, rough topography and tunnels will be illustrated using 3D modeling method. The main tools here are finite difference code (SOFI3D)[1] that has been benchmarked for engineering studies, and spectral element code (SPECFEM) [2], which was, developed for global seismology problems. The modeling results show locally enhanced peak particle velocity due to presence of strong elastic contrast and topography in models. [1] Bohlen, T. Parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference seismic modeling. Computers & Geosciences 28 (2002) 887-899 [2] Komatitsch, D., and J. Tromp, Introduction to the spectral-element method for 3-D seismic wave propagation, Geophys. J. Int., 139, 806-822, 1999.

  17. CDCC calculations of elastic scattering for the systems 6Li+144Sm and 6Li+208Pb. Effect of resonances of 6Li on elastic scattering angular distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Camacho, A.

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of elastic scattering angular distributions for reactions of the weakly bound projectile 6Li with targets 144Sm and 208Pb at energies above the barrier, are performed with the Continuum Discretized Coupled-Channel method (CDCC). Ground, resonant and nonresonant continuum states of 6Li are included up to some maximum energy epsilonmax for which convergence is achieved. In the three-body system, global interactions are used for the α-target and d - target sub-systems. The effect of continuum resonant states of 6Li, i.e., l = 2, jπ = 3+, 2+ and 1+ on elastic scattering angular distributions is investigated by extracting these states from the continuum space. It is found that the calculated elastic scattering angular distributions are in good agreement with the measurements for most of the cases studied where consideration of couplings to continuum states is essential. It is also found that the resonance character of the continuum states is in some cases important to obtain agreement with the data.

  18. Effect of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy on choroidal thickness in diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Glenn; Manjunath, Varsha; Chiu, Stephanie J; Farsiu, Sina; Mahmoud, Tamer H

    2014-10-01

    To determine the effect of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy on choroidal thickness in eyes with diabetic macular edema (DME). A retrospective, cohort analysis of 59 eyes from 59 patients with DME without prior anti-VEGF therapy. Choroidal thickness was measured using semiautomated segmentation of enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography images at 0.5-mm intervals from 2.5 mm nasal to 2.5 mm temporal to the fovea. Changes in choroidal thickness with and without anti-VEGF treatment over 6 months were compared. Best-corrected visual acuity and central foveal thickness were analyzed to evaluate the association of choroidal thickness with functional and anatomic outcomes. Of the 59 eyes with DME, 26 eyes were observed without treatment, whereas 33 underwent intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy (mean number of injections, 2.73) over 6 months. In untreated eyes, there was no significant change in best-corrected visual acuity (P = .098), central foveal thickness (P = .472), or choroidal thickness at all measurements along the macula (P = .057 at the fovea). In eyes treated with anti-VEGF injections, choroidal thickness decreased significantly at the fovea (246.6 to 224.8 μm; P thickness after anti-VEGF treatment was not associated with the cumulative number of anti-VEGF injections (R(2) = 0.031; P = .327) or to changes in best-corrected visual acuity (R(2) = 0.017; P = .470) or central foveal thickness (R(2) = 0.040; P = .263). Central choroidal thickness decreases after anti-VEGF therapy for DME after 6 months, but may not be associated with functional or anatomic outcomes in eyes with DME. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Elastic ring deformation and pedestal contact status analysis of elastic ring squeeze film damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic parametric characteristic of the elastic ring squeeze film damper (ERSFD). Firstly, the coupled oil film Reynolds equations and dynamic equations of an ERSFD supported rotor system are established. The finite differential method and numerical simulation are used to analyze the oil film pressure distribution, bearing capacity of ERSFD, oil film stiffness and damping characteristics during a vibration period. Then, based on the oil film pressure results, the deformation of elastic ring is revealed by the finite element method. Finally, pedestal contact status is analyzed according to the change of oil film thickness during a vibration period. The results reveal that the oil film pressure is sectionally continuous, the deformation of elastic ring is complex under the compression of inner and outer oil film, and different pedestal contacts occur in a vibration period. The level of nonlinearity of the bearing capacity, oil film stiffness and damping can be effectively lightened by application of the elastic ring.

  20. Effects of relative thickness on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at a low Reynolds number

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ma Dongli Zhao Yanping Qiao Yuhang Li Guanxiong

    2015-01-01

    ... method.Then the effects of the relative thickness of airfoil on aerodynamic performance are explored, using the above numerical method, by simulating flows around airfoils of different relative thicknesses(12%, 14%, 16%, 18...

  1. Investigation of thickness effects on the dielectric constant barium strontium titanate thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Grattan, L J

    2002-01-01

    The collapse in dielectric constant at small thickness commonly observed in ferroelectric thin films was measured and investigated in barium strontium titanate (Ba sub 0 sub . sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 TiO sub 3). The possible mechanisms responsible for this effect are reviewed. Functional measurements were performed on BST thin films, of 7.5 to 950 nm, by incorporating them into capacitor structures with bottom electrodes of strontium ruthenate (SRO) and thermally- evaporated Au top electrodes. A discussion on thin film growth considerations, optimal PLD conditions and the measurement techniques employed in the project is presented. The experimentally determined dielectric constant - thickness profile was fitted using the series capacitor model assuming low dielectric constant interfacial layers in series with the bulk. Consideration of the case where the combined 'dead layer' thickness was close to the total BST thickness revealed that, for this system, the total 'dead layer' thickness had to be less than ...

  2. Effect of thickness on optoelectrical properties of Mo-doped indium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K. [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science, Missouri State University, 901 South National Avenue, Kemper Hall, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States)], E-mail: ramguptamsu@gmail.com; Ghosh, K. [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science, Missouri State University, 901 South National Avenue, Kemper Hall, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States); Patel, R. [Roy Blunt Jordan Valley Innovation Center, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO 65806 (United States); Kahol, P.K. [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science, Missouri State University, 901 South National Avenue, Kemper Hall, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States)

    2008-12-30

    Molybdenum-doped indium oxide films of various thicknesses were deposited on quartz substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique. The effect of thickness on structural, optical, and electrical properties was studied. X-ray diffraction studied revealed that all the films are highly oriented along (2 2 2) direction. It is observed that film crystallinity increases with thickness. These films are highly transparent (82-96%) in visible region. Atomic force microscopy analysis shows that the films are very smooth with root mean square surface roughness of 0.95 nm for 10 nm thick film. It is observed that resistivity of the films decreases from 1.05 x 10{sup -4} {omega} cm to 6.06 x 10{sup -5} {omega} cm, while mobility increases from 172 cm{sup 2}/Vs to 263 cm{sup 2}/Vs with increases in film thickness from 10 nm to 125 nm, respectively.

  3. Effects of long-term soft contact lens wear on the corneal thickness and corneal epithelial thickness of myopic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yulin; Zheng, Xiuyun; Hou, Jie; Xu, Baozeng; Mu, Guoying

    2015-03-01

    To perform safe and successful corneal refractive surgery on myopic patients, corneal thickness (CT) and corneal epithelial thickness (CET) must be accurately measured. Numerous individuals with myopia wear soft contact lenses (SCLs) for the correction of visual acuity but may subsequently undergo corneal refractive surgery. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the effects of long-term SCL wear on the CT and the CET of myopic subjects in order to guarantee the safety and accuracy of subsequent corneal refractive surgeries. Fifty-six subjects prepared to receive refractive surgery at Jinan Mingshui Eye Hospital (Zhangqiu, China) from April to July 2013 were included in the study. CT and CET were measured in subjects immediately following discontinued SCL wear (group I, 56 eyes), and subsequently following >two weeks of discontinued SCL wear (group II, 56 eyes). Ninety-four subjects with no history of corneal contact lens wear were enrolled as a control group. The CT and CET were measured at positions with a radius of 0.0‑1.0, 1.0-2.5 (divided into eight quadrants) and 2.5-3.0 mm (divided into eight quadrants) away from the corneal center using the RTVue-100 Fourier-domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography system. A significant decrease in the CT of the subjects in group II was observed, compared with that of group I and the control group (P<0.05). A significant decrease was observed in the CET of groups I and II compared with that of the control group (P<0.05). Following discontinuation of SCL wear, CET increased. However, the increased CET was unable to reach the normal range exhibited by the control group. Edema and thinning of the corneal stroma, as well as thinning of the corneal epithelium were observed in groups I and II. In conclusion, it was proposed that in clinical practice, for myopic patients following long-term SCL wear, CT and CET should be determined ≥ two weeks following discontinuation of SCL wear, once a stable

  4. Elastic deformation of soft coatings due to lubrication forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yumo; Tan, Matthew R; Frechette, Joelle

    2017-10-04

    Elastic deformation of rigid materials with soft coatings (stratified materials) due to lubrication forces can alter the interpretation of dynamic surface forces measurements and prevent contact formation between approaching surfaces. Understanding the role of elastic deformation on the process of fluid drainage is necessary, in particular for the case where one (or both) of the interacting materials consists of a rigid substrate with a soft coating. We combine lubrication theory and solid linear elasticity to describe the dynamic of fluid drainage past a compliant stratified boundary. The analysis presented covers the full range of coating thicknesses, from an elastic foundation to a half-space for an incompressible coating. We decouple the individual contributions of the coating thickness and material properties on the elastic deformation, hydrodynamic forces, and fluid film thickness. We obtain a simple expression for the shift in contact position during force measurements that is valid for many experimental conditions. We compare directly the effect of stratification on the out-of-contact deformation to the well-known effect of stratification on indentation. We show that corrections developed for stratification in contact mechanics are not applicable to elastohydrodynamic deformation. Finally, we provide generalized contour maps that can be employed directly to estimate the elastic deformation present in most dynamic surface force measurements.

  5. Effect of Film Thickness on Postharvest Ripening and Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upon transfer to normal atmosphere, fruits previously held in MAP ripened normally with the changes for fruits previously in 0.08mm bags being slower. These results indicate that when all other parameters are held constant, a thicker film is more effective in retarding ripening processes and extending fruit shelf life, thereby ...

  6. Growth characteristics and effect of thickness on optical properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    near infrared regions and exhibited poor transmittance in the ultraviolet regions, the thin films of FeS2CuS3 could be used for solar cell fabrication and as effective coatings for poultry houses. Journal of Applied Science and Technology Vol.

  7. Elastic emission polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  8. Maternal malnutrition during lactation in Wistar rats: effects on elastic fibers of the extracellular matrix in the trachea of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Filipe Moreira de; Judice, Luiz Felippe; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Cisne, Rafael; Ramos, Cristiane da Fonte; Babinski, Marcio Antonio

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of maternal protein malnutrition during lactation on the elastic fibers in the tracheas of Wistar rat pups. At delivery, 12 male pups of two Wistar rat dams were equally divided into two groups: control, in which the dam received water and standard rat chow ad libitum during lactation; and protein-restricted (PR), in which the dam received water ad libitum and an isoenergetic PR diet (8% protein). At 21 days of age, the pups were killed and their tracheas were excised. The elastic fibers were stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin (after oxidation) and evaluated under light microscopy. Morphometric determinations were performed by stereology, with the point-counting method, and expressed as volumetric densities. Elastic fibers, most having a longitudinal distribution, were identified beneath the tracheal mucosa. In addition, well-defined circular layers of elastic fibers were found around the inner and outer surfaces of the cartilaginous ring. There were no differences between the groups regarding the organization and distribution of the elastic fibers. The volumetric density of the elastic fibers of the pups in the control and PR groups was 2.46 ± 0.99% and 3.25 ± 1.13%, respectively (p < 0.01). The volumetric density of elastic fibers appears to be greater in rat pups breastfed by dams receiving a PR diet than in those breastfed by dams receiving a normal diet.

  9. The Effects of Mucopolysaccharide Polysulphate on Hydration and Elasticity of Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mucopolysaccharide polysulphate (MPS has been used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent for over 50 years. Its chemical structure permits considerable hydrogen bonding with adjacent water molecules, which effectively leads to hydration of the surrounding tissue. In addition, it stimulates endogenous hyaluronate synthesis, resulting in an increase in water-binding capacity and viscoelasticity of the skin. Objective. To study the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on hydration and elasticity of human skin. Methods. The first part of this study was a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study which included 60 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825. The volunteers were treated with either 0.1% MPS or vehicle control. All subjects were asked to apply 1 g of cream to their face twice daily for a total period of 4 weeks. Skin hydration and elasticity were measured at baseline and week 4 with Corneometer CM 825 and cutometer MPA 580, respectively, at forehead and both cheeks. The second part of this study focused on the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on skin hydration after single application. 20 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825, were recruited to the study. All subjects were asked to apply 2 g of 0.1% MPS cream on entirely randomly selected forearm. Skin hydration at the middle of both forearms was measured at baseline, immediately after application, and every 1 hour after application for a period of 10 hours. Results. 57 subjects (28 in vehicle control group, 29 in MPS completed treatment protocol. The baseline skin hydration of both groups was not significantly different (P=0.47. Hower, there was a statistically significant difference in skin hydration at 4 weeks between MPS and placebo group (P=0.01. Skin elasticity was significantly improved at week 4 in both groups (vehicle-control, P<0.01, and MPS, P<0.01. However, no

  10. The effect of allergic rhinitis with positive skin prick test on choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenigun, Alper; Elbay, Ahmet; Dogan, Remzi; Ozturan, Orhan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Hakan

    2017-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disease that develops through immunoglobulin E in the rhino-ocular mucosa due to allergy. The main symptoms are runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing and itchy nose. This study was designed to investigate the effect of allergic rhinitis on choroidal thickness. This study was planned as a case-control study. This study performed in a tertiary referral center. The study included 61 patients with allergic rhinitis and 35 healthy subjects. Patients in both groups underwent skin prick test. In allergic rhinitis patients and healthy persons; subfoveal, temporal and nasal choroidal thickness measurement was performed. The choroidal thicknesses were measured without pupil dilation using the Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography. In the subfoveal and temporal region, choroidal tissue was followed up significantly thicker in allergic rhinitis patients statistically compared to healthy persons (p = 0.031, p = 0.049). However, no significant difference was followed up between the nasal choroidal thickness measurements statistically (p = 0.54). Runny nose (67.2%), sneeze (65.5%), stuffiness (62.2%), itching of the nose (40.9%), and nasal discharge (21.3%) complaints were observed significantly higher in the group having allergic rhinitis. The effect of allergic rhinitis on choroidal thickness were assessed and compared with the control group. Our study revealed that there was significant association between increased choroidal thickness and allergic rhinitis. Allergic sensitivity may play an important role in increased choroidal thickness.

  11. Effect of porcelain and enamel thickness on porcelain veneer failure loads in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chunling; Green, Chad C; Sederstrom, Dalene; McLaren, Edward A; White, Shane N

    2014-05-01

    Bonded porcelain veneers are widely used esthetic restorations. Although high success and survival rates have been reported, failures occur. Fracture is the most common failure mode. Fractures range from incomplete cracks to the catastrophic. Minimally invasive or thin partial veneers have gained popularity. The aim of this study was to measure the influences of porcelain veneer thickness and enamel substrate thickness on the loads needed to cause the initial fracture and catastrophic failure of porcelain veneers. Model discoid porcelain veneer specimens of varying thickness were bonded to the flattened facial surfaces of incisors, artificially aged, and loaded to failure with a small sphere. Individual fracture events were identified and analyzed statistically and fractographically. Fracture events included initial Hertzian cracks, intermediate radial cracks, and catastrophic gross failure. Increased porcelain, enamel, and their combined thickness had like effects in substantially raising resistance to catastrophic failure but also slightly decreased resistance to initial Hertzian cracking. Fractographic and numerical data demonstrated that porcelain and tooth enamel behaved in a remarkably similar manner. As porcelain thickness, enamel thickness, and their combined thickness increased, the loads needed to produce initial fracture and catastrophic failure rose substantially. Porcelain veneers withstood considerable damage before catastrophic failure. Increased enamel thickness, increased porcelain thickness, and increased combined enamel and porcelain thickness all profoundly raised the failure loads necessary to cause catastrophic failure. Enamel and feldspathic porcelain behaved in a like manner. Surface contact damage occurred initially. Final catastrophic failure followed flexural radial cracking. Bonded porcelain veneers were highly damage tolerant. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Immediate effects of forearm elastic and nonelastic taping on wrist flexor muscle and grip strength of normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Shin, Young-Jun

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of forearm elastic taping on grip and wrist flexor muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] This was a single-blind, crossover study. This study selected 40 healthy subjects with no history of orthopedic disorders and was conducted after consent to participate was obtained. Grip and wrist flexor muscle strength of subjects were assessed by a handheld dynamometer and a Commander Muscle Tester, respectively, with forearm elastic taping or nonelastic taping. [Results] After application of forearm elastic taping, grip strength and wrist flexor muscle strength significantly increased compared with the nonelastic taping group. [Conclusion] Application of forearm elastic taping is considered to have positive effects on improving wrist and grip strength.

  13. The effects of the metal temperature and wall thickness on flake graphite layer in ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the effect of mold filling and wall thickness on the flake graphite layer in ductile iron. The research was conducted for castings with different wall thickness (3-8 mm and using molding sand with furan resin. A thermal analysis has been performed along the length of the castings to determine the initial temperature of the metal in the mold cavity and the contact time of the liquid metal with the mold. Results demonstrated the strong influence of the temperature decrease of the metal in the mold cavity on the occurrence and the thickness of the flake graphite in the surface layer in ductile iron.

  14. Effect of laminate thickness and specimen configuration on the fracture of laminated composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the effect of laminate thickness on graphite/epoxy laminates in the present measurements of fracture toughness in center cracked tension specimens, compact tension specimens, and three-point bend specimens. Crack tip damage development prior to fracture is also studied. The results obtained show fracture toughness to be a function of laminate thickness, being in all cases independent of crack size. The fracture surface of all thick laminates was uniform in the interior and self-similar with the starter notch. With only one exception, the fracture toughness of the thicker laminates was relatively independent of specimen configuration.

  15. Measurement of two-photon exchange effect by comparing elastic e±p cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimal, D.; Adikaram, D.; Raue, B. A.; Weinstein, L. B.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Ungaro, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Afanasev, A. V.; Akbar, Z.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, Ivana; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Background: The electromagnetic form factors of the proton measured by unpolarized and polarized electron scattering experiments show a significant disagreement that grows with the squared four-momentum transfer (Q2). Calculations have shown that the two measurements can be largely reconciled by accounting for the contributions of two-photon exchange (TPE). TPE effects are not typically included in the standard set of radiative corrections since theoretical calculations of the TPE effects are highly model dependent, and, until recently, no direct evidence of significant TPE effects has been observed. Purpose: We measured the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic-scattering cross sections in order to determine the TPE contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering and thereby resolve the proton electric form factor discrepancy. Methods: We produced a mixed simultaneous electron-positron beam in Jefferson Lab's Hall B by passing the 5.6-GeV primary electron beam through a radiator to produce a bremsstrahlung photon beam and then passing the photon beam through a convertor to produce electron-positron pairs. The mixed electron-positron (lepton) beam with useful energies from approximately 0.85 to 3.5 GeV then struck a 30-cm-long liquid hydrogen (LH2) target located within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). By detecting both the scattered leptons and the recoiling protons, we identified and reconstructed elastic scattering events and determined the incident lepton energy. A detailed description of the experiment is presented. Results: We present previously unpublished results for the quantity R2 γ, the TPE correction to the elastic-scattering cross section, at Q2≈0.85 and 1.45 GeV2 over a large range of virtual photon polarization ɛ . Conclusions: Our results, along with recently published results from VEPP-3, demonstrate a nonzero contribution from TPE effects and are in excellent agreement with the calculations that include TPE

  16. Shoulder horizontal abduction stretching effectively increases shear elastic modulus of pectoralis minor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujita, Kosuke; Kusano, Ken; Nishishita, Satoru; Araki, Kojiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yanase, Ko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-07-01

    Stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle, which involve shoulder horizontal abduction or scapular retraction, are performed in clinical and sports settings because the tightness of this muscle may contribute to scapular dyskinesis. The effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle is unclear in vivo. The purpose of this study was to verify the effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. Elongation of the pectoralis minor muscle was measured for 3 stretching maneuvers (shoulder flexion, shoulder horizontal abduction, and scapular retraction) at 3 shoulder elevation angles (30°, 90°, and 150°). The shear elastic modulus, used as the index of muscle elongation, was computed using ultrasonic shear wave elastography for the 9 aforementioned stretching maneuver-angle combinations. The shear elastic modulus was highest in horizontal abduction at 150°, followed by horizontal abduction at 90°, horizontal abduction at 30°, scapular retraction at 30°, scapular retraction at 90°, scapular retraction at 150°, flexion at 150°, flexion at 90°, and flexion at 30°. The shear elastic moduli of horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150° were significantly higher than those of other stretching maneuvers. There was no significant difference between horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150°. This study determined that shoulder horizontal abduction at an elevation of 90° and horizontal abduction at an elevation of 150° were the most effective stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced Acoustic Black Hole effect in beams with a modified thickness profile and extended platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of Acoustics Black Hole (ABH) benefits from the bending wave propagating properties inside a thin-walled structure with power-law thickness variation to achieve zero reflection when the structural thickness approaches zero in the ideal scenario. However, manufacturing an ideally tailored power-law profile of a structure with embedded ABH feature can hardly be achieved in practice. Past research showed that the inevitable truncation at the wedge tip of the structure can significantly weaken the expected ABH effect by creating wave reflections. On the premise of the minimum achievable truncation thickness by the current manufacturing technology, exploring ways to ensure and achieve better ABH effect becomes important. In this paper, we investigate this issue by using a previously developed wavelet-decomposed semi-analytical model on an Euler-Bernoulli beam with a modified power-law profile and an extended platform of constant thickness. Through comparisons with the conventional ABH profile in terms of system loss factor and energy distribution, numerical results show that the modified thickness profile brings about a systematic increase in the ABH effect at mid-to-high frequencies, especially when the truncation thickness is small and the profile parameter m is large. The use of an extended platform further increases the ABH effect to broader the frequency band whilst providing rooms for catering particular low frequency applications.

  18. Computation of vibration mode elastic-rigid and effective weight coefficients from finite-element computer program output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.

    1991-01-01

    Post-processing algorithms are given to compute the vibratory elastic-rigid coupling matrices and the modal contributions to the rigid-body mass matrices and to the effective modal inertias and masses. Recomputation of the elastic-rigid coupling matrices for a change in origin is also described. A computational example is included. The algorithms can all be executed by using standard finite-element program eigenvalue analysis output with no changes to existing code or source programs.

  19. Immediate effects of forearm elastic and nonelastic taping on wrist flexor muscle and grip strength of normal adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Shin, Young-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of forearm elastic taping on grip and wrist flexor muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] This was a single-blind, crossover study. This study selected 40 healthy subjects with no history of orthopedic disorders and was conducted after consent to participate was obtained. Grip and wrist flexor muscle strength of subjects were assessed by a handheld dynamometer and a Commander Muscle Tester, respectively, with forearm elastic tapi...

  20. Controlling silica coating thickness on TiO2 nanoparticles for effective photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Shaokun; Lou, Xia

    2013-07-01

    Photosensitive nanoparticles are useful in developing phototherapeutic agents for targeted cancer therapy. In this paper, core-shell structured titanium dioxide-silica (TiO2-SiO2) nanoparticles, with varying shell thickness, were synthesized. The influence of the silica shell thickness on the photoreactivity, cytotoxicity and photo-killing ability of the TiO2 nanoparticles was investigated. Silica coating reduced the photocatalytic reactivity but improved the cytocompatibility of the TiO2 nanoparticles. This effect was amplified with increasing silica shell thickness. When the silica thickness was about 5.5 nm, the coated TiO2 not only retained a high level photodynamic reactivity, comparable to the non-coated TiO2 nanoparticles, but also demonstrated an improved cell compatibility and effective photo-killing ability upon the mouse fibroblast cells (L929). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential effects of Losartan and Atorvastatin in partial and full thickness burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akershoek, Johanneke J; Brouwer, Katrien M; Vlig, Marcel; Boekema, Bouke K H L; Beelen, Rob H J; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M W

    2017-01-01

    Healing of burn wounds is often associated with scar formation due to excessive inflammation and delayed wound closure. To date, no effective treatment is available to prevent the fibrotic process. The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) was shown to be involved in fibrosis in various organs. Statins (e.g. Atorvastatin), Angiotensin receptor antagonists (e.g. Losartan) and the combination of these drugs are able to reduce the local RAS activation, and reduced fibrosis in other organs. We investigated whether inhibition of the RAS could improve healing of burn wounds by treatment with Atorvastatin, Losartan or the combination of both drugs. Therefore, full and partial thickness burn wounds were inflicted on both flanks of Yorkshire pigs. Oral administration of Atorvastatin, Losartan or the combination was started at post-burn day 1 and continued for 28 days. Full thickness wounds were excised and transplanted with an autologous meshed split-thickness skin graft at post-burn day 14. Partial thickness wounds received conservative treatment. Atorvastatin treatment resulted in enhanced graft take and wound closure of the full thickness wounds, faster resolution of neutrophils compared to all treatments and reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin positive cells compared to control treatment. Treatment with Losartan and to a lesser extent the combination therapy resulted in diminished graft take, increased wound contraction and poorer scar outcome. In contrast, Losartan treatment in partial thickness wounds decreased the alpha-smooth muscle actin+ fibroblasts and contraction. In conclusion, we showed differential effects of Losartan and Atorvastatin in full and partial thickness wounds. The extensive graft loss seen in Losartan treated wounds is most likely responsible for the poor clinical outcome of these full thickness burn wounds. Therefore, Losartan treatment should not be started before transplantation in order to prevent graft loss. Atorvastatin seems to accelerate the

  2. The Effect of Geometric Configurations on the Elastic Behavior of an Edge-Cracked Bonded Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interface cracks often initiate around the bonding free-edge corner due to the high-stress concentration. In this research, the elastic behavior of an edge-cracked dissimilar bonded strip subjected to remote tensile load is investigated using the proportional crack tip opening displacement method based on FE analysis for arbitrary material combinations. The stress intensity factor, energy release rate, and mode mixity are computed and compared systematically with varying geometrical configurations and material combinations. Then, the combined effects of the relative height of the bonded component and material combination are discussed for the typical engineering materials.

  3. Boundary effect on the elastic field of a semi-infinite solid containing inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y J; Song, G; Yin, H M

    2015-07-08

    The boundary effect of one inhomogeneity embedded in a semi-infinite solid at different depths has firstly been investigated using the fundamental solution for Mindlin's problem. Expanding the eigenstrain in a polynomial form and using the Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method, one can calculate the eigenstrain and thus obtain the elastic field. When the inhomogeneity is far from the boundary, the solution recovers Eshelby's solution. The method has been extended to a many-particle system in a semi-infinite solid, which is first demonstrated by the cases of two spheres. The comparison of the asymptotic form solution with the finite-element results shows the accuracy and capability of this method. The solution has been used to illustrate the boundary effects on its effective material behaviour of a semi-infinite simple cubic lattice particulate composite. The local field of a semi-infinite composite has been calculated at different volume fractions. A representative unit cell has been taken with different depths to the surface. The average stress and strain of the unit cell have been calculated under uniform loading conditions of normal or shear force on the surface, respectively. The effective elastic moduli of the unit cell not only depend on the material proportion, but also on its distance to the surface. The present model can be extended to other types of particle distribution and ellipsoidal particles.

  4. High fidelity numerical simulation of airfoil thickness and kinematics effects on flapping airfoil propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meilin; Wang, Z. J.; Hu, Hui

    2013-10-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations with the spectral difference (SD) method are carried out to investigate the unsteady flow over a series of oscillating NACA 4-digit airfoils. Airfoil thickness and kinematics effects on the flapping airfoil propulsion are highlighted. It is confirmed that the aerodynamic performance of airfoils with different thickness can be very different under the same kinematics. Distinct evolutionary patterns of vortical structures are analyzed to unveil the underlying flow physics behind the diverse flow phenomena associated with different airfoil thickness and kinematics and reveal the synthetic effects of airfoil thickness and kinematics on the propulsive performance. Thickness effects at various reduced frequencies and Strouhal numbers for the same chord length based Reynolds number (=1200) are then discussed in detail. It is found that at relatively small Strouhal number (=0.3), for all types of airfoils with the combined pitching and plunging motion (pitch angle 20°, the pitch axis located at one third of chord length from the leading edge, pitch leading plunge by 75°), low reduced frequency (=1) is conducive for both the thrust production and propulsive efficiency. Moreover, relatively thin airfoils (e.g. NACA0006) can generate larger thrust and maintain higher propulsive efficiency than thick airfoils (e.g. NACA0030). However, with the same kinematics but at relatively large Strouhal number (=0.45), it is found that airfoils with different thickness exhibit diverse trend on thrust production and propulsive efficiency, especially at large reduced frequency (=3.5). Results on effects of airfoil thickness based Reynolds numbers indicate that relative thin airfoils show superior propulsion performance in the tested Reynolds number range. The evolution of leading edge vortices and the interaction between the leading and trailing edge vortices play key roles in flapping airfoil propulsive performance.

  5. Effect of bond thickness on fracture and fatigue strength of adhesively bonded composite joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of composite to composite bonded joints was undertaken to study the effect of bond thickness on debond growth rate under cyclic loading and critical strain energy release rate under static loading. Double cantilever beam specimens of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 were tested under mode I loading. A different behavior of fracture and fatigue strength was observed with variation of bondline thickness.

  6. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  7. Effect of Temperature on Film Thickness of Two Types of Commonly used Luting Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Praveen; Priyadarshini, Reddy; Kumar, Yasangi M; Priya, K Shanthi; Chunchuvyshnavi, Chunchuvyshnavi; Yerrapragada, Harika

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of temperature change on film thickness of both types of cements. Totally, 60 samples were prepared with 10 in each subgroup, thus comprising 30 in each group. Materials tested were glass ionomer cement (GIC) type I and zinc phosphate type I. Samples were manipulated with manufacturer's instructions and tested according to American Dental Association (ADA) guidelines. The mean values of film thickness were recorded for both groups I and II. In intragroup comparison of group 1, subgroup III (26.560 ± 0.489 urn) was found to have the highest film thickness followed by subgroup II (24.182 ± 0.576 urn) and the lowest in subgroup I (20.209 ± 0.493 urn). In intragroup comparison of group II, the film thickness recorded in subgroup III (25.215 ± 0.661 urn) was the highest followed by subgroup II (21.471 ± 0.771 urn) and the least in subgroup I (17.951 ± 0.654 urn; p film thickness than group I (23.650 ± 0.271). The results were found to be statistically significant (p film thickness. Zinc phosphate has less film thickness than GIC. Zinc phosphate should be preferred over GIC in clinical practice, and more stress should be given in mechanical preparation of crowns for better retentive quality of prosthesis.

  8. Effects of core and veneer thicknesses on the color of CAD-CAM lithium disilicate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wol; Park, Jong-Kyoung; Kim, So-Ri; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2017-07-06

    The color of dental ceramics is important for achieving successful esthetic restorations. However, insufficient studies are available of the color of recently introduced computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) lithium disilicate ceramics as functions of the core and veneer thicknesses. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of the thickness of different core and veneer thicknesses on the color of CAD-CAM lithium disilicate ceramics. A total of 42 specimens from 2 groups of 7 ceramic cores at 3 thicknesses (0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 mm) were fabricated. The veneer was fabricated at 3 thicknesses (0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 mm). The group name was based on the name of the ceramic core (IPS e.max CAD; lithium disilicate [LD], IPS Empress CAD; leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic [LR]), and the associated number was determined by the combined thicknesses of the core and the veneer: 1=0.8+0.7; 2=1.0+0.5; and 3=1.2+0.3. The color coordinates and the color differences were calculated using a spectrophotometer. The color difference was analyzed using the CIEDE2000 chrominance and the acceptability threshold. Two-way ANOVA was used to identify the color difference based on the core/veneer thicknesses, and the Tukey honest significant differences and Games-Howell tests were conducted to verify the ΔE00 differences of the group (α=.05). In addition, regression analysis was carried out to estimate the causal relationship between the independent variables and the chrominance. At a certain thickness, the color differences of LD1, LR1, and LR2 were not clinically acceptable based on the thicknesses of the core and the veneer. Results of 2-way ANOVA demonstrated that the different thicknesses of core/veneer combination significantly affected the color difference (Pcore decreased by 0.2 mm. The color is influenced by the thicknesses of the core and the veneer. With a certain thickness, the color differences increased as the thickness of the core

  9. Evaluating the effect of biofilm thickness on nitrification in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piculell, Maria; Welander, Pia; Jönsson, Karin; Welander, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of biofilm thickness on the nitrifying activity in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) in a controlled environment. In-depth understanding of biofilm properties in MBBRs and their effect on the overall treatment efficiency is the key to optimizing process stability and efficiency. However, evaluating biofilm properties in continuously operated MBBRs can be extremely challenging. This study uses a carrier design which enables comparison of four different biofilm thicknesses, in otherwise equally operated lab-scale MBBRs. The results show that within the studied range (200-500 µm) and specific operation conditions, biofilm thickness alone had no significant effect on the overall ammonium removal. The nitrate production, however, decreased with a decreasing biofilm thickness, and the ratio between nitrite and ammonia-oxidizing activity decreased both with increasing load and decreasing oxygen concentration for all thicknesses. The suggestion that nitratation is disfavoured in thin biofilms is an interesting contribution to the current research being performed on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria inhibition for deammonification applications. By indicating that different groups of bacteria respond differently to biofilm thickness, this study accentuates the importance of further evaluation of these complex systems.

  10. Nonlinear Vibrational Analysis of Nanobeams Embedded in an Elastic Medium including Surface Stress Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Azizi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to size-dependent behavior of nanostructures, the classical continuum models are not applicable for the analyses at this submicron size. Surface stress effect is one of the most important matters which make the nanoscale structures have different properties compared to the conventional structures due to high surface to volume ratio. In the present study, nonlinear free vibrational characteristics of embedded nanobeams are investigated including surface stress effects. To this end, a thin surface layer is assumed on the upper and lower surfaces of the cross section to separate the surface and bulk of nanobeams with their own different material properties. Based on harmonic balance method, closed-form analytical solution is conducted for nonlinear vibrations to obtain natural frequencies of embedded nanobeams with and without considerations of surface elasticity and residual surface tension effects corresponding to the various values of nondimensional amplitude, elastic foundation modulus, and geometrical variables of the system. Selected numerical results are given to indicate the influence of each one in detail.

  11. Investigations of structural, elastic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of lutetium filled skutterudite LuFe4P12 under pressure effect: FP-LMTO method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudia Keltouma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural, elastic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of ternary cubic filled skutterudite compound were calculated. We have computed the elastic modulus and its pressure dependence. From the elastic parameter behavior, it is inferred that this compound is elastically stable and ductile in nature. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which phononic effects are considered, the effect of pressure P (0 to 50 GPa and temperature T (0 to 3000 °C on the lattice constant, elastic parameters, bulk modulus B, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient α, internal energy U, entropy S, Debye temperature θD, Helmholtz free energy A, and Gibbs free energy G are investigated.

  12. Effect of Resveratrol-Based Nutritional Supplement on Choroidal Thickness: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuaishuai; Moonasar, Nived; Xiao, Xiao; Yin, Tiemei; Weinreb, Robert N; Sun, Xufang

    2016-10-01

    The effect of an oral trans-resveratrol-based supplement (Longevinex(®)) on choroidal thickness, measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT) enhanced depth imaging, was investigated in a prospective study. 34 young, healthy participants were randomly divided into two age- and gender-matched groups. They were then assigned in a randomized fashion to treat with either a trans-resveratrol-based group (Longevinex(®), Las Vegas) or placebo. All participants underwent ocular imaging with spectral domain (SD)-OCT (Spectralis; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg) at the baseline and then again 1 h following treatment. The choroidal thickness was measured in a masked fashion at the fovea and at four additional points, located at 500 μm and 1000 μm nasal to the fovea and 500 μm and 1000 μm temporal to the fovea. In the resveratrol group, the foveal choroidal thickness at the baseline was 267.73 ± 84.19 μm (mean ± SD); it increased to 284.57 ± 92.39 μm 1 h after drug treatment (p = 0.033). The mean choroidal thickness was also significantly increased at each of the four extrafoveal points (all p thickness at the fovea was 269.73 ± 71.40 μm (mean ± SD) and it was 268.43 ± 70.15 μm (mean ± SD) 1 h after the placebo was administered (p = 0.183); there were also no significant differences in choroidal thickness at the four additional points (all p > 0.05) Conclusion: A significant increase in choroidal thickness following oral administration of a trans-resveratrol-based supplement was observed. There was no change in choroidal thickness in the placebo-treated control group. We speculate that the increased choroidal thickness is the result of choroidal vessel vasodilation.

  13. Effect of Thickness of Zirconia Ceramic on Its Masking Ability: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaian, Farhad; Dalirani, Sara; Namdari, Mahshid

    2017-04-28

    Color-masking ability of zirconia ceramics as coping materials has not been clearly understood in zirconia-based restorations. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of zirconia ceramic thickness on its masking ability, and to define a thickness cutoff for the tested ceramic. Ninety zirconia disc specimens, in nine thickness groups including 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2 mm were fabricated. A white substrate and a black substrate were prepared. The disc specimens were placed onto the substrates for spectrophotometric measurements. A spectrophotometer measured L(*) , a(*) , and b(*) color attributes for the specimens. ΔE value was calculated to determine the color difference of specimens on the white and black substrate. Then the ΔE values were compared with an acceptable clinical threshold (ΔE = 5.5) and an ideal threshold (ΔE = 2.6). Welch test, Games-Howell Post Hoc, one-sample t-test, and a regression analysis were performed (p thickness groups of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2 mm were 13.0, 11.9, 9.7, 5.0, 4.2, 3.9, 2.2, 1.9, and 1.5, respectively. A significant difference was found in the ΔE value among the groups (p thickness and the ΔE by the regression analysis (∆E = 25.68e(-1.45 (thickness)) ). The masking ability increased as the zirconia ceramic thickness increased. The tested zirconia ceramic had an acceptable clinical masking ability with a minimum thickness of 1 mm, and an ideal masking ability with a minimum thickness of 1.6 mm. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. The effect of topical adrenergic and anticholinergic agents on the choroidal thickness of young healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Beata P; Collins, Michael J; Read, Scott A

    2014-11-01

    The human choroid is capable of rapidly changing its thickness in response to a variety of stimuli. However little is known about the role of the autonomic nervous system in the regulation of the thickness of the choroid. Therefore, we investigated the effect of topical parasympatholytic and sympathomimetic agents upon the choroidal thickness and ocular biometrics of young healthy adult subjects. Fourteen subjects (mean age 27.9 ± 4 years) participated in this randomized, single-masked, placebo-controlled study. Each subject had measurements of choroidal thickness (ChT) and ocular biometrics of their right eye taken before, and then 30 and 60 min following the administration of topical pharmacological agents. Three different drugs: 2% homatropine hydrobromide, 2.5% phenylephrine hydrochloride and a placebo (0.3% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) were tested in all subjects; each on different days (at the same time of the day) in randomized order. Participants were masked to the pharmacological agent being used at each testing session. The instillation of 2% homatropine resulted in a small but significant increase in subfoveal ChT at 30 and 60 min after drug instillation (mean change 7 ± 3 μm and 14 ± 2 μm respectively; both p thickness with time after 2% homatropine (p thickness (LT) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) (p thickness, or ocular biometrics were found after 2.5% phenylephrine or placebo at any examination points (p > 0.05). In human subjects, significant increases in subfoveal and parafoveal choroidal thickness occurred after administration of 2% homatropine and this implies an involvement of the parasympathetic system in the control of choroidal thickness in humans. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of CD4+ CD28null T lymphocytes in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Relation to microvascular complications, aortic elastic properties, and carotid intima media thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Samahy, Mona H; Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Habeeb, Nevin M; Ismail, Eman A R; Hamed, Gehan M; Eladawy, Rasha

    2017-12-01

    Cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and altered immunity. CD4+ CD28null T-cells are a subset of long-lived cytotoxic CD4+ T-lymphocytes with proatherogenic and plaque-destabilizing properties. We hypothesized that the frequency of CD4+ CD28null T-cells may be altered in T1DM and related to vascular complications. To assess the percentage of CD4+ CD28null T-lymphocytes in children and adolescents with T1DM and their relation to vascular structure and glycemic control. Totally 100 patients with T1DM were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of microvascular complications and compared with 50 healthy controls. CD4+ CD28null T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry. Aortic elastic properties and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) were assessed. Aortic stiffness index and CIMT were significantly higher among patients compared with healthy controls while aortic strain and distensibility were decreased. The percentage of CD4+ CD28null T-cells was significantly higher in patients with and without microvascular complications compared with controls. High frequency of CD4+ CD28null T-cells was found among patients with microalbuminuria or peripheral neuropathy. Patients with CD4+ CD28null T-cells ≥10% had higher HbA1c, urinary albumin creatinine ratio, aortic stiffness, and CIMT. CD4+ CD28null T-cells were positively correlated to HbA1c, aortic stiffness index, and CIMT. Changes in aortic elastic properties and increased CIMT among young patients with T1DM may enable the recognition of preclinical cardiac impairment. The correlation between CD4+ CD28null T-cells and assessed parameters of vascular structure highlights the role of altered immune response in the occurrence of diabetic vascular complications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of Reduced Meal Frequency during Ramadan Fasting on Retinal and Choroidal Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersan, Ismail; Tufan, Hasan Ali; Arikan, Sedat; Kara, Selcuk; Gencer, Baran; Hondur, Ahmet Murat

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of Ramadan fasting on central foveal thickness (CFT) and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) in healthy individuals using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). The EDI-OCT scans of 42 healthy individuals obtained after about 12 hours of fasting on at least the twenty-first consecutive day of fasting were compared to scans of the same patients taken one month after the last day they had fasted. CFT values were similar for both time periods (p > 0.05). The SFCT was significantly higher after consecutive fasting days towards the end of Ramadan, compared to the SFCT after one month of no fasting (one month after Ramadan ended) (p fasting may lead to a significant increase in subfoveal choroidal thickness without affecting the central foveal thickness.

  17. The effects of dynamic exercise utilizing PNF patterns on abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wontae

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of dynamic exercise utilizing the PNF (proprioceptor neuromuscular facilitation) patterns accompanied by abdominal drawing-in exercises on abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults. [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 30;15 were randomly placed in the training group (TG), and the remaining 15 made up the control group (CG). [Methods] The subjects in the TG conducted 3-5 sets of dynamic exercises utilizing the PNF patterns each day, 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The thickness of the abdominal muscles was measured by ultrasonography. [Results] When the TG's abdominal muscle thickness pre-test and post-test were compared in this study, there was a statistical significance in all of the external obliquus abdominis (Eo), the internal obliquus abdominis (Io), and the transversus abdominis (Tra). [Conclusion] Dynamic exercise utilizing the PNF patterns increased the thickness of the abdominal muscles that are the basis of trunk stabilization.

  18. Effects of compaction delay on the performance of porous asphalt mixture compacted at different thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohd Rosli Mohd; Hamzah, Meor Othman; Razak, Rosmawati Abdul

    2017-09-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain the effects of specimen thickness and compaction delay on the properties of porous asphalt (PA) mixtures. The PA14 specimens were prepared at 4.5 % binder content. Crushed granite aggregate and conventional asphalt binder penetration grade 60/70 were used as the main ingredients for the preparation of the samples. The PA mixture was prepared using a bucket mixer and compacted using a Marshall hammer. Porous asphalt specimens were tested to evaluate the effects of compaction delay on mixtures at two different thicknesses, 40 mm and 60 mm. Four compaction process delay times were selected, namely 2 minutes, 5 minutes, 15 minutes and 30 minutes. The PA specimens were evaluated based on the temperature drop, permeability, resilient modulus and indirect tensile strength (ITS) tests. The temperature of each specimen was evaluated at every minute prior to the compaction of the PA mixture. From the test results, the temperature of the 40 mm thick specimens were lower compared to specimens compacted to 60 mm thickness. Additionally, the ITS of a PA mixture reduced as the compaction delay time increased. It was also found that the 40 mm thick specimen exhibited higher ITS compared to the ITS of 60 mm thick specimens. On the other hand, the mixture compacted with a 30 minute delay time exhibited the highest coefficient of permeability and air voids, which resulted in lower resilient modulus.

  19. Effect of thermal shrinkage during thermoforming on the thickness of fabricated mouthguards: Part 2 pressure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Satoh, Yoshihide; Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of thermal shrinkage, which occurs during thermoforming of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) sheets on the thickness of mouthguards fabricated by pressure formation. Mouthguards were fabricated from 4.0-mm-thick EVA sheets by utilizing a pressure-forming machine. Two molding conditions were compared: The sheets were placed in the thermoforming machine with the sheet extrusion direction either vertical or parallel to the model's center line. The working model was trimmed to the height of 20 mm at the cutting edge of the maxillary central incisor and 15 mm at the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. The sheet was pressed against the working model for 2 min where the center of the softened sheet sagged 15 mm lower than the clamp. After fabrication, the thickness of mouthguard sheets was determined for the incisal (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar (cusp and buccal surface) portions, and dimensional measurements were made. Differences in molded mouthguard thickness with the sheet orientation of extruded sheets were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U-test. In comparison with the parallel axis orientation, the sheets in vertical orientation with the model's centerline yielded significantly higher thickness measurements at the incisal edge, labial surface, and the cusp (P effectively reduce loss of thickness in mouthguards after pressure formation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect of Neodymium Nanoparticles on Elastic Properties of Zinc-Tellurite Glass System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbaset A. Abdulla Awshah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to determine the effect of neodymium nanoparticles concentration on the elastic properties of zinc-tellurite glass. A series of neodymium nanoparticles doped zinc-tellurite glass systems (NdNPsZT of composition [(TeO20.70(ZnO0.30]1-x(Nd2O3 NPs(x, x=0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04, and 0.05, were synthesized by using conventional melt-quenching method. The amorphous nature of the glass system was confirmed by using XRD analysis. The density of the glass system was determined by Archimedes method. The elastic properties were calculated from the measured density and ultrasonic velocity at 5 MHz frequency. The experimental results showed that the elastic properties rely upon the composition of the glass systems and the impact of neodymium nanoparticles (Nd2O3 NPs within the glass network. The increase in ultrasonic velocities is due to the increase in rigidity and change in structural units of the glass system. The softening temperature and the microhardness increased with the increase in Nd3+ ions concentration from 0.1 to 0.2 mol and decreased when the Nd3+ ions concentration increased from 0.2 to 0.5 mol. Poisson’s ratio and Debye’s temperature decreased with the increase in the Nd3+ ions concentration from 0.1 to 0.2 mol and increased when the Nd3+ ions concentration was increased from 0.2 to 0.5 mol.

  1. Effect of vitreomacular separation on macular thickness determined by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Uemura, Akinori; Hangai, Masanori; Suetsugu, Tetsuyuki; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effects of vitreomacular separation on macular thickness. This was a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Average foveal and central minimum thicknesses were measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in 308 eyes of 308 healthy subjects (healthy group) and 298 normal fellow eyes of 298 patients with a unilateral macular hole (MH group). Multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the effects of various factors on the macular thickness. The mean age of the healthy group was 67.3 ± 9.6 years (range 40-88 years) and that of the MH group was 67.8 ± 7.0 years (range 43-91). SD-OCT images showed that 149 eyes (48.4 %) in the healthy group and 174 eyes (58.4 %) in the MH group had a vitreomacular separation. In the healthy group, the central minimum thickness of eyes with a vitreomacular separation (196 µm) was significantly thinner than those without a vitreomacular separation (205 µm; P thickness (234 µm) and the central minimum thickness (177 µm) in eyes with a vitreomacular separation were thinner than those without it (247 and 199 µm, respectively; both P thicknesses in both groups (P thickness in the MH group (P < 0.001). A vitreomacular separation caused thinning of the central fovea in both the healthy eyes and the normal fellow eyes of unilateral MH patients; the extent of foveal thinning is greater in the MH group.

  2. [Effect of slice thickness on drying process of Polygonum multiflorum root tuber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Zhou, Li-Qing; Qi, Mei-Na; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Hu-Juan

    2013-08-01

    To study the effect of slice thickness on drying process of Polygonum multiflorum root tuber. The root tuber of Polygonum multiflorum was sliced with thickness of 2, 5 and 8 mm. Drying experiments were conducted at temperatures of 45, 55, 65 and 75 degrees C. The experimental data were fitted to ten thin-layer drying models to select a suitable model for describing the drying characteristic of Polygonum multiflorum root tuber. Based on thin-layer drying theory, the kinetics parameters of drying process were calculated. The drying processes of Polygonum multiflorum root tuber were consisted of two regions, 1st and 2nd falling rate periods when the slice thickness was thick or the drying temperature was high. Aghbashlo model was the best one to describe its drying behavior. The variation of thickness had significant effect on effective moisture diffusivity (D), but had little effect on activation energy E(a). Thin-layer drying theory can be an effective tool for the study of drying behavior of Polygonum multiflorum root tuber. The result provides experimental basis for the quality control of Polygonum multiflorum root tuber drying process.

  3. Long term fuel price elasticity: effects on mobility tool ownership and residential location choice - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erath, A.; Axhausen, K. W.

    2010-04-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the long-term effects of fuel price elasticity. The study analyses how mobility tool usage and ownership as well as residence location choice are affected by rising fuel costs. Based on econometric models, long-term fuel price elasticity is derived. The authors quote that the demand reactions to higher fuel prices mainly observed are the reduction of mileage and the consideration of smaller-engined and diesel-driven cars. As cars with natural gas powered engines and electric drives were hardly considered in the survey, the results of the natural gas model can, according to the authors, only serve as a trend. No stable model could be estimated for the demand and usage of electric cars. A literature overview is presented and the design of the survey is discussed, whereby socio-demographical variables and the effects of price and residence changes are discussed. Modelling of mobility tool factors and results obtained are looked at. Finally, residence choice factors are modelled and discussed. Several appendices complete the report.

  4. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm.

  5. Novel ultrasonic bone densitometry based on two longitudinal waves: significant correlation with pQCT measurement values and age-related changes in trabecular bone density, cortical thickness, and elastic modulus of trabecular bone in a normal Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, H; Iguchi, G; Tobimatsu, T; Takahashi, K; Otani, T; Horii, K; Mano, I; Nagai, I; Iio, H; Fujita, T; Yoh, K; Baba, H

    2010-10-01

    A reference database for trabecular bone density, cortical thickness, and elastic modulus of trabecular bone for a novel ultrasonic bone densitometry system (LD-100) based on two longitudinal waves (fast and slow) was determined over a wide age range in a normal Japanese population. A novel ultrasonic bone densitometry system (LD-100 system) was applied to create a reference database for trabecular bone density (TBD), cortical thickness (CoTh), and elastic modulus of trabecular bone (EMTb) for this device over a wide age range in a normal Japanese population. In a comparative study between LD-100 and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) systems, 52 individuals were examined by both systems at the same radius simultaneously. To create a reference database, a total of 2,380 healthy subjects (1,179 men, 1,201 women), ages 18-99 years, were examined using the LD-100 system. Highly significant correlations between the LD-100 and pQCT systems were found in TBD (r = 0.877, p < 0.001) and CoTh (r = 0.723, p < 0.001). For the reference database, peak values of TBD, CoTh, and EMTb were observed at 30-34 years (255.09 mg/cm(3)), 20-24 years (5.23 mm), and 20-24 years (4.09 GPa) in men, and at 25-29 years (209.24 mg/cm(3)), 25-29 years (3.98 mm), and 20-24 years (3.33 GPa) in women, respectively. The TBD fell significantly (p < 0.05) beginning at 55-59 years in both sexes, with a relatively rapid decrease in women. The CoTh showed a significant decrease beginning at 40-44 years in men and 50-54 years in women. The EMTb showed a significant decrease beginning at 40-44 years in men and 55-59 years in women. The LD-100 system is a useful bone densitometry device and the database of age-related changes in TBD, CoTh, and EMTb established in this study will provide fundamental data for future studies related to bone status.

  6. Effect of surface chemistry and metallic layer thickness on the clustering of metallodielectric Janus spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemi, Onajite; Solomon, Michael J

    2014-12-30

    The noncovalent binding of the gold hemispheres of polystyrene/gold colloidal Janus spheres in aqueous solution was found to depend more significantly on the deposition thickness of the particle's gold layer than the chemistry of a covalently affixed self-assembled monolayer on the gold. By means of two-channel confocal laser scanning microscopy, salt-induced clustering was observed and quantified for Janus particles with gold hemispheres functionalized with a thiol self-assembled monolayer that varied in hydrophobicity and chain length. The thickness of the gold layer on the Janus particles was also varied from 10 to 40 nm. The measured cluster distributions were strongly salt dependent, with clustering absent at 1 mM salt but present at salt concentrations in the range of 2-3 mM. For Janus spheres with a 40 nm thick gold hemisphere, the effects of both thiol monolayer hydrophobicity and chain length were modest. Varying the gold layer thickness from 10 to 40 nm, however, had a significant effect on the cluster distribution; the most abundant cluster size shifted from one to seven particles as the gold layer thickness increased from 10 to 40 nm. Thus, the gold layer thickness had an effect stronger than that of either self-assembled monolayer hydrophobicity or chain length on the self-assembly of metallodielectric Janus particles into clusters. The dominant effect of the metallic layer thickness suggests that van der Waals forces between metallic surfaces are more important than hydrophobic interactions in determining the pair potential interactions of metallodielectric Janus particles.

  7. The effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation in 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiuto, R. A.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1984-01-01

    Tests were conducted on three thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet to investigate the effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation under constant amplitude loading conditions and on retardation following a single peak overload. Constant amplitude loading tests were performed at stress ratios of 0.05 and 0.75 to obtain data for conditions with crack closure and without crack closure, respectively. At both stress ratios a thickness effect was clearly evident, with thicker specimens exhibiting higher growth rates in the transition from plane strain to plane stress region. The effect of thickness for a stress ratio of 0.05 corresponded well with the fracturing mode transitions observed on the specimens. A model based on the strain energy release rate which accounted for the fracture mode transition was found to correlate the thickness effects well. The specimens tested at the stress ratio of 0.75 did not make the transition from tensile mode to shear mode, indicating that another mechanism besides crack closure or fracture mode transition was active.

  8. Effect of in-painting on cortical thickness measurements in multiple sclerosis: A large cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Koushik A; Datta, Sushmita; Hasan, Khader M; Choi, Sangbum; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Cofield, Stacey S; Cutter, Gary R; Lublin, Fred D; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2015-10-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the effect of lesion in-painting on the estimation of cortical thickness using magnetic resonance imaging was performed on a large cohort of 918 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients who participated in a phase III multicenter clinical trial. An automatic lesion in-painting algorithm was developed and implemented. Cortical thickness was measured using the FreeSurfer pipeline with and without in-painting. The effect of in-painting was evaluated using FreeSurfer's paired analysis pipeline. Multivariate regression analysis was also performed with field strength and lesion load as additional factors. Overall, the estimated cortical thickness was different with in-painting than without. The effect of in-painting was observed to be region dependent, more significant in the left hemisphere compared to the right, was more prominent at 1.5 T relative to 3 T, and was greater at higher lesion volumes. Our results show that even for data acquired at 1.5 T in patients with high lesion load, the mean cortical thickness difference with and without in-painting is ∼2%. Based on these results, it appears that in-painting has only a small effect on the estimated regional and global cortical thickness. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3749-3760, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Coupling the Leidenfrost effect and elastic deformations to power sustained bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitukaitis, Scott R.; Zuiderwijk, Antal; Souslov, Anton; Coulais, Corentin; van Hecke, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The Leidenfrost effect occurs when an object near a hot surface vaporizes rapidly enough to lift itself up and hover. Although well understood for liquids and stiff sublimable solids, nothing is known about the effect with materials whose stiffness lies between these extremes. Here we introduce a new phenomenon that occurs with vaporizable soft solids--the elastic Leidenfrost effect. By dropping hydrogel spheres onto hot surfaces we find that, rather than hovering, they energetically bounce several times their diameter for minutes at a time. With high-speed video during a single impact, we uncover high-frequency microscopic gap dynamics at the sphere/substrate interface. We show how these otherwise-hidden agitations constitute work cycles that harvest mechanical energy from the vapour and sustain the bouncing. Our findings suggest a new strategy for injecting mechanical energy into a widely used class of soft materials, with potential relevance to fields such as active matter, soft robotics and microfluidics.

  10. Effect of resin thickness on the microhardness and optical properties of bulk-fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ha; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Kil

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the resin thickness on the microhardness and optical properties of bulk-fill resin composites. Four bulk-fill (Venus Bulk Fill, Heraeus Kulzer; SDR, Dentsply Caulk; Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar vivadent; SonicFill, Kerr) and two regular resin composites (Charisma flow, Heraeus Kulzer; Tetric N-Ceram, Ivoclar vivadent) were used. Sixty acrylic cylindrical molds were prepared for each thickness (2, 3 and 4 mm). The molds were divided into six groups for resin composites. The microhardness was measured on the top and bottom surfaces, and the colors were measured using Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) L (*) a (*) b (*) system. Color differences according to the thickness and translucency parameters and the correlations between the microhardness and translucency parameter were analyzed. The microhardness and color differences were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc test, and a student t-test, respectively. The level of significance was set to α = 0.05. The microhardness decreased with increasing resin thickness. The bulk-fill resin composites showed a bottom/top hardness ratio of almost 80% or more in 4 mm thick specimens. The highest translucency parameter was observed in Venus Bulk Fill. All resin composites used in this study except for Venus Bulk Fill showed linear correlations between the microhardness and translucency parameter according to the thickness. Within the limitations of this study, the bulk-fill resin composites used in this study can be placed and cured properly in the 4 mm bulk.

  11. The effect of resistance exercise direction for hip joint stabilization on lateral abdominal muscle thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of resistance direction in hip joint stabilization exercise on change in lateral abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults. Twenty-six healthy adults were randomly allocated to either a hip stabilization exercise by hip straight resistance group (n=12) or a hip diagonal resistance group (n=14). The outcome measures included contraction thickness ratio in transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique, and TrA lateral slide were assessed during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver by b-mode ultrasound. The researcher measured the abdominal muscle thickness of each participant before the therapist began the intervention and at the moment intervention was applied. There was a significant difference in lateral abdominal muscle thickness between the straight resistance exercise of hip joint group and the diagonal resistance exercise of hip joint group. Significant differences were found between the two groups in the percentage of change of muscle thickness of the TrA (P=0.018) and in the thickness ratio of the TrA (P=0.018). Stability exercise accompanied by diagonal resistance on the hip joint that was applied in this study can induce automatic contraction of the IO and TrA, which provides stability to the lumbar spine.

  12. Sediment deposit thickness and its effect on critical velocity for incipient motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, C H J; Lau, T L; Ab Ghani, A; Chan, N W

    2016-10-01

    The understanding of how the sediment deposit thickness influences the incipient motion characteristic is still lacking in the literature. Hence, the current study aims to determine the effect of sediment deposition thickness on the critical velocity for incipient motion. An incipient motion experiment was conducted in a rigid boundary rectangular flume of 0.6 m width with varying sediment deposition thickness. Findings from the experiment revealed that the densimetric Froude number has a logarithmic relationship with both the thickness ratios ts/d and ts/y0 (ts: sediment deposit thickness; d: grain size; y0: normal flow depth). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed using the data from the current study to develop a new critical velocity equation by incorporating thickness ratios into the equation. The new equation can be used to predict critical velocity for incipient motion for both loose and rigid boundary conditions. The new critical velocity equation is an attempt toward unifying the equations for both rigid and loose boundary conditions.

  13. Porcelain thickness and cement shade effects on the colour and translucency of porcelain veneering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürklü, Duygu; Azer, Shereen S; Yilmaz, Burak; Johnston, William M

    2013-11-01

    Purposes of this in vitro study include evaluating colour changes in combinations of feldspathic porcelain and cement resulting from different thicknesses of porcelain and different shades of composite luting agent, and evaluating relative translucency parameter (RTP) values. Porcelain discs of shade A1 at nominal thicknesses of 0.5 and 1.0mm were bonded to cements of three shades in a factorial design. Colours were calculated for CIE D65 Illuminant and Standard Human Observer on black, grey and white backings. A colour difference (CD) was calculated of each possible pair of different porcelain thickness values for the same cement shade and each possible pair of different cement shades for the same porcelain thickness. RTP was analyzed by ANOVA and selected pairwise comparisons. All mean CDs studied were perceptible and most were at or greater than the clinical acceptability threshold, with the notable exception that the mean CDs and their confidence limits were below the clinical acceptability threshold for a change in porcelain thickness when utilizing the Clear cement shade. Variation in the shade of the resin luting cement will result in CDs which are near or beyond clinical acceptability. A decrease in porcelain thickness did significantly increase RTP when bonded to the resin cement shades studied. Changes in porcelain thickness or cement shade may adversely affect basic aesthetic properties of these materials. Development of methods for analyzing aesthetic effects over greater ranges of thickness for these materials would improve the prognosis for using these materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of age and sex on retinal layer thickness and volume in normal eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jae Yon; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Young-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of sex and age on the thickness of the retinal layer in normal eyes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT).Fifty healthy subjects between the ages of 20 and 80 had their retinal layers measured using SD-OCT at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. Mean thickness and volume were measured for 9 retinal layers in the fovea, the pericentral ring, and the peripheral ring. The differences of sex- and age-related thickness and volume in each retinal layer were analyzed.The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), ganglion cell layer (GCL), inner plexiform layer (IPL), inner nuclear layer (INL), and outer plexiform layer (OPL) were thinnest in the fovea area, whereas the outer nuclear layer (ONL), photoreceptor layer (PHL), and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were thickest at similar locations. Mean thickness of the RNFL, GCL, IPL, and OPL was significantly greater in men than women. However, mean thickness of the ONL was greater in women than in men. When compared between patients 60 years of age, the thickness and volume of peripheral RNFL, GCL, and pericentral and peripheral IPL were significantly larger in the younger group than the older group. Conversely, the thickness and volume of foveal INL and IR were larger in the older group than in the younger group.The thickness and volume of the retinal layer in normal eyes significantly vary depending on age and sex. These results should be considered when evaluating layer analysis in retinal disease.

  15. Effect of nanostructuring on the elastic properties of aluminum alloy AMg6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokhorov, V., E-mail: pvm@tisnum.ru; Perfilov, S. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials. Centralnaya 7a, Moscow, Troitsk, 142190 (Russian Federation); Korobov, A., E-mail: aikor42@mail.ru; Kokshaiskii, A.; Volkov, A. [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University. Leninskie gory 1, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    We experimentally investigated the nanostructuring effect on the elastic properties of aluminum alloy AMg6 (Al–Mg–Mn system). The n-AMg6 nanostuctured specimens were prepared from a commercial polycrystalline alloy by refining and homogenizing a mixture of small chips of the alloy in a planetary mill. The resulting product consists of 200-500-micron agglomerates of nanoparticles with average nanoparticle size ∼ 40–60 nanometer according to the X-ray analysis. The compacted nanopowder was extruded at a temperature of 300°C with a reduction of cross-sectional area at least 4 times to 90 mm diameter. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies confirmed the presence of the nanostructure with a grain size of ∼60 nanometers. For the experiments, nine parallelepiped shape specimens of 20×20×40 mm{sup 3} size were cut from the central and peripheral parts of the n-AMg6 rod. We measured of the second-order and third-order elastic coefficients of the obtained samples by ultrasonic method. The same measurements were made on specimens of the primary AMg6 alloy for comparison.

  16. The Effect of Nuclear Elastic Scattering on Temperature Equilibration Rate of Ions in Fusion Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahdavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A plasma with two different particle types and at different temperatures has been considered, so that each type of ion with Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function is in temperature equilibrium with itself. Using the extracted nuclear elastic scattering differential cross-section from experimental data, solving the Boltzmann equation, and also taking into account the mobility of the background particles, temperature equilibration rate between two different ions in a fusion plasma is calculated. The results show that, at higher temperature differences, effect of nuclear elastic scattering is more important in calculating the temperature equilibration rate. The obtained expressions have general form so that they are applicable to each type of particle for background (b and each type for projectile (p. In this paper, for example, an equimolar Deuterium-Hydrogen plasma with density n=5×1025 cm−3 is chosen in which the deuteron is the background particle with temperature (also electron temperature Tb=1 keV (usual conditions for a fusion plasma at the ignition instant and the proton is the projectile with temperature Tp>Tb. These calculations, particularly, are very important for ion fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion concept.

  17. Stabilizing effect of elasticity on the inertial instability of submerged viscoelastic liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; McKinley, Gareth

    2017-11-01

    The stability of submerged Newtonian and viscoelastic liquid jets is studied experimentally using flow visualization. Precise control of the amplitude and frequency of the imposed linear perturbations is achieved through a piezoelectric actuator attached to the nozzle. By illuminating the jet with a strobe light driven at a frequency slightly less than the frequency of the perturbation we slow down the apparent motion by large factors ( 100 , 000) and capture the phenomena with high temporal and spatial resolution. Newtonian liquid jets become unstable at moderate Reynolds numbers (Rej 150) and sinuous or varicose patterns emerge and grow in amplitude. As the jet moves downstream, the varicose waves gradually pile up in the sinuous ones due to the difference in their corresponding wave speeds, leading to a unique chevron-like morphology. Experiments with model viscoelastic polymer solutions show that this inertial instability is fully stabilized sufficiently large levels of elasticity. We compare our experimental results with the theoretical predictions of an elastic Rayleigh equation for an axisymmetric jet and show that the presence of streamline tension is indeed the stabilizing effect for inertioelastic jets.

  18. Size Effects on Surface Elastic Waves in a Semi-Infinite Medium with Atomic Defect Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates small-scale effects on the Rayleigh-type surface wave propagation in an isotopic elastic half-space upon laser irradiation. Based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics, the basic equations of wave motion and laser-induced atomic defect dynamics are derived. Dispersion equation that governs the Rayleigh surface waves in the considered medium is derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients which characterize surface waves are obtained. It is shown that if the generation rate is above the critical value, due to concentration-elastic instability, nanometer sized ordered concentration-strain structures on the surface or volume of solids arise. The spatial scale of these structures is proportional to the characteristic length of defect-atom interaction and increases with the increase of the temperature of the medium. The critical value of the pump parameter is directly proportional to recombination rate and inversely proportional to deformational potentials of defects.

  19. Effect of Kayak Ergometer Elastic Tension on Upper Limb EMG Activity and 3D Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Neil; Donne, Bernard; Fletcher, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of shoulder injury in kayakers, limited published research examining associated upper limb kinematics and recruitment patterns exists. Altered muscle recruitment patterns on-ergometer vs. on-water kayaking were recently reported, however, mechanisms underlying changes remain to be elucidated. The current study assessed the effect of ergometer recoil tension on upper limb recruitment and kinematics during the kayak stroke. Male kayakers (n = 10) performed 4 by 1 min on-ergometer exercise bouts at 85%VO2max at varying elastic recoil tension; EMG, stroke force and three-dimensional 3D kinematic data were recorded. While stationary recoil forces significantly increased across investigated tensions (125% increase, p kayakers maintained normal upper limb kinematics via additional AD recruitment despite ergometer induced recoil forces. Key pointsKayak ergometer elastic tension significantly alters Anterior Deltoid recruitment patterns.Kayakers maintain optimal arm kinematics despite changing external forces via altered shoulder muscle recruitment.Overhead arm movements account for a high proportion of the kayak stroke cycle.

  20. Effect of radiotheraphy on impaired aortic elasticity and stiffness in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicaslan, Baris; Piskin, Gonul Demir; Susam, Ibrahim; Dursun, Huseyin; Ozdogan, Oner

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the elastic properties of the aorta using echocardiography in patients with breast cancer (BC). A total of 105 women with left-sided epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (erb-2) BC were divided into 2 groups, group 1 with patients who did not receive RT and group 2 with patients who received RT. In all patients, echocardiographic examination and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were determined. A significant decrease in aortic distensibility (AD) and increase in hs-CRP were seen from group 1 to group 2. The AD was inversely correlated with left ventricle diastolic diameter, systolic blood pressure (SBP), left atrial diameter, age, and RT dose. The AD was significantly related to age, SBP, and RT dose. Increased RT dose is significantly correlated with impaired elastic properties that may contribute to the relation of RT and increased rate of cardiovascular events among patients with BC who received RT. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Effect of annealing, thickness ratio and bend angle on springback of AA6061-T6 with non-uniform thickness section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan M.F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-uniform thickness section section is considered one of the most effective approaches to reduce automotive part weight. Reduction in term of mass and size result in less fuel consumption and greenhouse gases. Thickness is the most significant parameter to formability, therefore forming a section with non-uniform thickness becomes a great challenge. Improper process and incorrect decision may lead to severe defect and one of the main concerns is the springback. This study will focus on springback behaviour of non-uniform thickness AA6061 strip with complex profile using Taguchi Method. Profile projector (PC 3000 is used to measure the spring back and two-line technique is applied to measure angles (after loading between two lines. Three parameters (i.e. annealing temperature, thickness ratio and bend angle are studied, and results determine that the most significant parameter is bend angle, followed by thickness ratio, and then by the annealing temperature of the specimen during bending process.

  2. Effect of ceramic thickness, grinding, and aging on the mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diniz PRADO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monolithic restorations of Y-TZP have been recommended as a restorative alternative on prosthetic dentistry as it allows a substantial reduction of ceramic thickness, which means a greater preservation of tooth structure. However, the influence of grinding and aging when using a thinner layer of the material is unclear. This investigation aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of ceramic thickness (0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, grinding and aging (low-temperature degradation on the mechanical behavior and surface characteristics of a full-contour Y-TZP ceramic. Y-TZP disc-shaped specimens (15 mm diameter were manufactured with both thicknesses and randomly assigned into 4 groups considering the factors ‘grinding with diamond bur’ and ‘aging in autoclave’. Surface topography (roughness, 3D profilometry and SEM, phase transformation, flexural strength and structural reliability (Weibull analyses were executed. Grinding affected the surface topography, while aging did not promote any effect. An increase in m-phase content was observed after grinding and aging, although different susceptibilities were observed. Regardless of zirconia’s thickness, no deleterious effect of grinding or aging on the mechanical properties was observed. Thus, in our testing assembly, reducing the thickness of the Y-TZP ceramic did not alter its response to grinding and low temperature degradation and did not impair its mechanical performance.

  3. Effect of ceramic thickness, grinding, and aging on the mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Rodrigo Diniz; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Melo, Renata Marques de; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2017-11-06

    Monolithic restorations of Y-TZP have been recommended as a restorative alternative on prosthetic dentistry as it allows a substantial reduction of ceramic thickness, which means a greater preservation of tooth structure. However, the influence of grinding and aging when using a thinner layer of the material is unclear. This investigation aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of ceramic thickness (0.5 mm and 1.0 mm), grinding and aging (low-temperature degradation) on the mechanical behavior and surface characteristics of a full-contour Y-TZP ceramic. Y-TZP disc-shaped specimens (15 mm diameter) were manufactured with both thicknesses and randomly assigned into 4 groups considering the factors 'grinding with diamond bur' and 'aging in autoclave'. Surface topography (roughness, 3D profilometry and SEM), phase transformation, flexural strength and structural reliability (Weibull) analyses were executed. Grinding affected the surface topography, while aging did not promote any effect. An increase in m-phase content was observed after grinding and aging, although different susceptibilities were observed. Regardless of zirconia's thickness, no deleterious effect of grinding or aging on the mechanical properties was observed. Thus, in our testing assembly, reducing the thickness of the Y-TZP ceramic did not alter its response to grinding and low temperature degradation and did not impair its mechanical performance.

  4. Effect of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burns in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Elif; Dincel, Gungor C

    2016-08-01

    The potential of several drugs for full-thickness skin burns has been investigated, but the treatment of such burns remains a challenge in plastic surgery. The present study was designed to determine the effect of systemic and topical administration of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burn wound healing. A total of 36 New Zealand male rabbits were divided into six groups. Full-thickness skin burns were produced in all the groups, except the control group. Piracetam was administered systemically (piracetam-IV) and topically (piracetam-C) for 14 days, and nimodipine was administered systemically (nimodipine-IV) and topically (nimodipine-C) over the burn wounds for 14 days. The sham group underwent burn injury but was not administered any drug. After 21 days, gross examination and histopathological analysis were performed and the results were compared statistically. Nimodipine-C and nimodipine-IV had no effect on burn wound healing. However, both piracetam-IV and piracetam-C significantly enhanced the healing of the full-thickness skin burn wounds, although the latter was more effective, useful and practical in burn wound healing. The histopathological features of the wounds in the piracetam-C group were closer to those of the control group than those of the other groups. Piracetam-C rather than piracetam-IV may promote full-thickness burn wound healing in rabbits. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Axial-torsional fatigue: A study of tubular specimen thickness effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature experimental program was conducted on AISI type 316 stainless steel to determine the effect of wall thickness on the cyclic deformation behavior and fatigue life of thin-wall, tubular, axial-torsional fatigue specimens. The following experimental variables were examined in this study: the depth of the surface work-hardened layer produced in specimen machining, and the effects of strain range and axial-torsional strain phasing. Tubular fatigue specimens were fabricated with wall thicknesses of 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mm. One as-fabricated specimen from each wall thickness was sectioned for microstructural examination and microhardness measurement. A specimen of each wall thickness was tested at each of three conditions - high strain range in-phase, low strain range in-phase, and low strain range out-of-phase - for a total of nine axial-torsional fatigue experiments. The machining-induced work-hardened zone, as a percentage of the gage section material, was found to have a minimal effect on both deformation behavior and fatigue life. Also, little or no variation in fatigue life or deformation behavior as a function of wall thickness was observed. Out-of-phase fatigue tests displayed shorter fatigue lives and more cyclic hardening than in-phase tests.

  6. The Effect of Thickness of Resorbable Bacterial Cellulose Membrane on Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, You-Jin; An, Sung-Jun; Bae, Eun-Bin; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Park, Jong-Seok; Jeong, Sung In; Jeon, Young-Chan; Lee, So-Hyoun; Lim, Youn-Mook; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-03-21

    This study introduces the effect of the thickness of a bacterial cellulose membrane by comparing the bone regeneration effect on rat skulls when using a collagen membrane and different thicknesses of resorbable bacterial cellulose membranes for guided bone regeneration. Barrier membranes of 0.10 mm, 0.15 mm, and 0.20 mm in thickness were made using bacterial cellulose produced as microbial fermentation metabolites. Mechanical strength was investigated, and new bone formation was evaluated through animal experimental studies. Experimental animals were sacrificed after having 2 weeks and 8 weeks of recovery, and specimens were processed for histologic and histomorphometric analyses measuring the area of bone regeneration (%) using an image analysis program. In 2 weeks, bone-like materials and fibrous connective tissues were observed in histologic analysis. In 8 weeks, all experimental groups showed the arrangement of osteoblasts surrounding the supporting body on the margin and center of the bone defect region. However, the amount of new bone formation was significantly higher (p thickness compared to the other experimental groups. Within the limitations of this study, a bacterial cellulose membrane with 0.10 mm thickness induced the most effective bone regeneration.

  7. Boundary layer thickness effect on boattail drag. [wind tunnel tests for drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Chamberlin, R.; Bober, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program has been conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, to investigate the effects of boundary layer changes on the flow over high angle boattail nozzles. The tests were run on an isolated axisymmetric sting mounted model. Various boattail geometries were investigated at high subsonic speeds over a range of boundary layer thicknesses. In general, boundary layer effects were small at speeds up to Mach 0.8. However, at higher speeds significant regions of separated flow were present on the boattail. When separation was present large reductions in boattail drag resulted with increasing boundary layer thickness. The analysis predicts both of these trends.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Effects of Vibration upon Elastic and Cohesive Properties of Beds of Wet Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alsop

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of sinusoidal vibrations through beds of cohesive particulate solids was measured. Results were interpreted in terms of a critical state model to predict the elastic swelling constant k, and the cohesive stress C. Factorial experimental design was used to identify significant parameters. Factors that affect k include percent moisture, bulk density, sample size, sample shape, the presence of a supporting membrane, and loading order. Factors that affect C include percent moisture and particle size distribution. Factors affecting k were interpreted in terms of their effects upon bed structure and factors affecting C in terms of an equivalent pore water pressure due to capillary and liquid bridge effects. The critical state model was modified to incorporate general relationships between axial and radial strains.

  9. Effect of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide injection on central macular thickness in diabetic patients having phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadabadi, Hooshang Faghihi; Mohammadi, Massood; Beheshtnejad, Hooshang; Mirshahi, Ahmad

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effect of intraoperative intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide on the central macular thickness, visual outcomes, and development of cystoid macular edema (CME) after phacoemulsification in diabetic patients. Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, Iran. In this prospective randomized controlled study, patients with diabetes were randomly assigned to a treatment group, which received an intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide at the end of phacoemulsification, and a control group, which had routine phacoemulsification. Visual acuity, center-point thickness, central 1.0 mm subfield mean thickness, CME development, and diabetic retinopathy progression were compared between the 2 groups 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The treatment group comprised 20 eyes and the control group, 21 eyes. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean corrected distance visual acuity at any follow-up examination (P>.05). The mean change in center-point thickness and central 1.0 mm subfield mean thickness was statistically significantly lower in the treatment group than in the control group at all follow-up visits (P<.05). Four eyes in the control group and no eye in the treatment group developed CME (P = .059). Three eyes (15%) in the treatment group developed an intraocular pressure rise that was managed by topical medication. Intravitreal injection of triamcinolone reduced the amount of increase in center-point thickness and central 1.0 mm subfield mean thickness after phacoemulsification in eyes of diabetic patients. Although it also reduced the incidence of CME, it had no effect on visual acuity gain. (c) 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Axial Length on the Thickness of Intraretinal Layers of the Macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigeti, Andrea; Tátrai, Erika; Varga, Boglárka Enikő; Szamosi, Anna; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera; Nagy, Zoltán Zsolt; Németh, János; Somfai, Gábor Márk

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of axial length (AL) on the thickness of intraretinal layers in the macula using optical coherence tomography (OCT) image analysis. Fifty three randomly selected eyes of 53 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. The median age of the participants was 29 years (range: 6 to 67 years). AL was measured for each eye using a Lenstar LS 900 device. OCT imaging of the macula was also performed by Stratus OCT. OCTRIMA software was used to process the raw OCT scans and to determine the weighted mean thickness of 6 intraretinal layers and the total retina. Partial correlation test was performed to assess the correlation between the AL and the thickness values. Total retinal thickness showed moderate negative correlation with AL (r = -0.378, p = 0.0007), while no correlation was observed between the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), ganglion cell layer (GCC), retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and AL. Moderate negative correlation was observed also between the thickness of the ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer complex (GCL+IPL), inner nuclear layer (INL), outer plexiform layer (OPL), outer nuclear layer (ONL) and AL which were more pronounced in the peripheral ring (r = -0.402, p = 0.004; r = -0.429, p = 0.002; r = -0.360, p = 0.01; r = -0.448, p = 0.001). Our results have shown that the thickness of the nuclear layers and the total retina is correlated with AL. The reason underlying this could be the lateral stretching capability of these layers; however, further research is warranted to prove this theory. Our results suggest that the effect of AL on retinal layers should be taken into account in future studies.

  11. Effect of thickness ratio on load-bearing capacity of bilayered dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to reveal the mechanism of failure of bilayered beams and to assess the thickness ratio effect on the load-bearing capacity of the bilayered beams. Both analytical and finite element analysis methods were used to analyze the stress distributions of bilayered beams subjected to three-point bending test and the residual thermal stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch. Then, the ideal load-bearing capacity of the beams as a function of core thickness was evaluated based on the mechanical models. Finally, three-point bending tests were performed on Cercon Zirconia /IPS e.max Ceram beams to verify the mechanical models. The failure load as a function of core thickness was obtained. For the materials employed in this study, the thickness ratio did not significantly affect the load-bearing capacity of bilayered beams when the thickness ratio changed from 1:2 to 2:1. The residual thermal stresses in the core layer have slightly beneficial effects on the strength of the beams. The first strength theory can be used to explain the mechanism of failure, which can be described as the failure is interpreted by tensile stress and ultimate strength of the material. Based on the relationship between the thickness ratio and load-bearing capacity, the core/veneer thickness ratio of the connector of a fixed partial denture could be relatively small to about 1:2 to obtain a good appearance. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Effects of corrugation shape on frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic elastic layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns determining frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic waveguide. The waveguide may be considered either as an elastic layer with variable thickness or as a rod with variable cross section. As a result, widths and locations of all frequency band......, harmonic in the corrugation series. The revealed insights into the mechanism of band-gap formation can be used to predict locations and widths of all frequency band-gaps featured by any corrugation shape. These insights are general and can be valid also for other types of wave motion in periodic structures...

  13. Improvements in low contrast detectability with iterative reconstruction and the effect of slice thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2017-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction has become a popular route for dose reduction in CT scans. One method for assessing the dose reduction of iterative reconstruction is to use a low contrast detectability phantom. The apparent improvement in detectability can be very large on these phantoms, with many studies showing dose reduction in excess of 50%. In this work, we show that much of the advantage of iterative reconstruction in this context can be explained by differences in slice thickness. After adjusting the effective reconstruction kernel by blurring filtered backprojection images to match the shape of the noise power spectrum of iterative reconstruction, we produce thick slices and compare the two reconstruction algorithms. The remaining improvement from iterative reconstruction, at least in scans with relatively uniform statistics in the raw data, is significantly reduced. Hence, the effective slice thickness in iterative reconstruction may be larger than that of filtered backprojection, explaining some of the improvement in image quality.

  14. Effect of 17β-estradiol on the elasticity of MCF-7 cells by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen

    2016-10-01

    Estrogen plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer, and it promotes proliferation, invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. In this paper, we investigated the effect of estrogen on the elasticity of breast cancer cells. 17β-estradiol, one of the most active estrogens in the human body was applied to MCF-7 living cells and the elasticity of breast cancer cells was measured by atomic force microscopy. The force spectroscopy was performed on the center of the cell and the Hertz model was used to calculate the elasticity modulus. Furthermore, the confocal fluorescence imaging was taken to observe the effect of 17β-estradiol on the actin distribution in the cells. The results show that the elasticity of the cells decreases rapidly after the addition of 17β-estradiol, which indicates that the cells appear softer for 17β-estradiol's treatment. From the confocal imaging, it can be observed that the actin filament rearranged for 17β-estradiol's treatment, which may lead to the alteration of the cell elasticity. Our findings may deepen our understanding on the rapid effect of 17β-estradiol to MCF-7 cells.

  15. The effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Park, Seol; Jang, Gwon-Uk

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven chronic low back pain patients participated in this study. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of three exercise groups, namely, a prone bridge exercise group, supine bridge exercise on a Swiss ball group, and supine bridge exercise group. The thicknesses of the transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) were measured using ultrasound. [Results] After eight weeks of training, the three groups showed significant increases in the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO. Among the groups, TrA and IO showed significantly different muscle thicknesses. [Conclusion] The prone bridge exercise significantly affected the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO unlike the supine bridge exercises. Based on the results of this study, the prone bridge exercise is a more effective method to improve trunk stability than conventional supine bridge exercises.

  16. Web thickness determines the therapeutic effect of endoscopic keel placement on anterior glottic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Shi, Fang; Chen, Min; Yang, Yue; Cheng, Lei; Wu, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    This work is a retrospective analysis to investigate the critical risk factor for the therapeutic effect of endoscopic keel placement on anterior glottic web. Altogether, 36 patients with anterior glottic web undergoing endoscopic lysis and silicone keel placement were enrolled. Their voice qualities were evaluated using the voice handicap index-10 (VHI-10) questionnaire, and improved significantly 3 months after surgery (21.53 ± 3.89 vs 9.81 ± 6.68, P thickness, and the recurrence rates were compared. The distribution of recurrence rates for Cohen type 1 ~ 4 were 28.6, 16.7, 33.3, and 40%, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.461). When classified by web thickness, only 2 of 27 (7.41%) thin type cases relapsed whereas 8 of 9 (88.9%) cases in the thick group reformed webs (P thickness rather than the Cohen grades. Endoscopic lysis and keel placement is only effective for cases with thin glottic webs. Patients with thick webs should be treated by other means.

  17. Effect of Specimen Thickness on Mechanical Behavior of SiC/SiC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Freedman, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Potential composite applications in aerospace and transportation application systems have different thickness requirements. For example, space applications such as nozzle ramps or heat exchangers use very thin (less than 1 mm) structures whereas turbine blades need very thick parts greater than or equal to cm). There has been little investigation into the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-NicalonTM fibers, a carbon interphase, and CVI Sic matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies to provide variable thickness. The composites ranged from a single ply (approximately 0.4 mm) to thirty-six plies (approximately 1 cm). Tensile tests were performed at room temperature with acoustic emission used to monitor matrix crack behavior. Elevated temperature tensile stress-rupture tests were performed in air. Considerably different room and elevated temperature tensile behavior was observed that will be discussed with respect to the effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and oxidation diffusion kinetics.

  18. Effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secilmis, Asli; Bulbul, Mehmet; Sari, Tugrul; Usumez, Aslihan

    2013-01-01

    The neodymium/yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd/YAG) laser has been suggested to repair broken prostheses in the mouth. This study investigated the effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding. Three intact human maxillary molars were prepared for full-veneer crown. For each tooth, dentin thicknesses in mesiobuccal cusp was 2, 3, or 4 mm. Twenty dies were duplicated from each of the prepared teeth. For metal copings with 0.5-mm thickness, wax patterns were prepared with dip wax technique directly onto each of dies. All patterns were sprued and invested. The castings were made using a nickel-chromium alloy (Nicromed Premium, Neodontics). A hole with 0.5-mm diameter was prepared on the mesiobuccal cusp of each crown. The Nd/YAG laser (9.85 W; 1 Hz repetition rate; fluence, 1.230 J/cm(2); Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona) was used for welding with or without air cooling (n = 10). The temperature rise was measured in pulpal chamber with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Differences between start and highest temperature reading were taken, and temperature rise values were compared using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference tests (α = .05). Pulpal temperature rise varied significantly depending on the dentin thickness and air cooling (p temperature increases. There were no significant differences between 2- and 3-mm dentin thicknesses groups (p > 0.05); however, pulpal temperature rise was the lowest for 4-mm dentin thickness group (p temperature rises known to adversely affect pulpal health when dentin thickness is 2 or 3 mm.

  19. Effects of Gestational Housing on Reproductive Performance and Behavior of Sows with Different Backfat Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of back-fat thickness at d 107 of gestation and housing types during gestation on reproductive performance and behavior of sows. A total of 64 crossbred sows (Landrace×Yorkshire in their 3 to 4 parities were allotted to one of four treatments (n = 16 over two consecutive parities. During each parity, sows were assigned to two gestational housing types (stall or group housing and two level of back-fat thickness (<20 or ≥20 at d 107 of gestation. Gestating sows were transferred from gestational crates to stalls or pens (group housing 5 weeks before farrowing. All sows were moved to farrowing crates on d 109 of gestation. At weaning, back-fat thickness changes were lesser (p<0.05 in sows having back-fat thickness <20 mm than that of sows with ≥20 mm back-fat thickness at 107 d of gestation. Group housed sows had greater (p<0.05 feed intake and shorter (p<0.05 weaning-to-estrus interval than that of sows in stalls. At weaning, back-fat thickness changes were lesser (p<0.05 in group housed sows than that of sows in stalls. The number of piglets at weaning, growth rate and average daily gain were greater (p<0.05 in group housed sows than that of sows in stalls. During gestation, walking duration was more (p<0.05 in group housed sows. Group housed sows had lesser (p<0.05 farrowing duration and greater (p<0.05 eating time than that of sows in stalls. Result obtained in present study indicated that sows with ≥20 mm back-fat thickness at 107 days had better reproductive performance. Additionally, group housing of sows during last five week of gestation improved the performance and behavior and reproductive efficiency of sows.

  20. The effect of consumption of ethanol on subfoveal choroidal thickness in acute phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hae Min; Woo, Young Jae; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Lee, Christopher Seungkyu; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the acute effect of ethanol consumption on subfoveal choroidal thickness. This prospective interventional study included the right eyes of 30 healthy subjects (30 eyes). Ethanol (1.0 g/kg) was administered orally on the first visit. A matching volume of water was administered orally on the second visit. Oral administration of ethanol and water was performed at 14:00, and choroidal thickness was measured every 30 min until 16:00. Change of choroidal thickness after oral administration of ethanol and water was the main outcome measure. At baseline, choroidal mean subfoveal thickness was 299.0±73.4 µm (range, 186.5-472.5 µm) before ethanol consumption and 297.1±71.1 µm (range, 187.0-470.5 µm) before water consumption. After consumption of ethanol, mean subfoveal choroidal thickness increased during the first 60 min and then decreased during the next 60 min, which was a significant change over time (pthickness over time (p=0.310). Comparison of changes in the mean subfoveal choroidal thickness during 120 min showed significant difference between ethanol and water consumption (pthickness. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness increased during the first 60 min and then decreased during the next 120 min after ethanol consumption. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Seismology of adolescent neutron stars: Accounting for thermal effects and crust elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, C J; Andersson, N

    2014-01-01

    We study the oscillations of relativistic stars, incorporating key physics associated with internal composition, thermal gradients and crust elasticity. Our aim is to develop a formalism which is able to account for the state-of-the-art understanding of the complex physics associated with these systems. As a first step, we build models using a modern equation of state including composition gradients and density discontinuities associated with internal phase-transitions (like the crust-core transition and the point where muons first appear in the core). In order to understand the nature of the oscillation spectrum, we carry out cooling simulations to provide realistic snapshots of the temperature distribution in the interior as the star evolves through adolescence. The associated thermal pressure is incorporated in the perturbation analysis, and we discuss the presence of $g$-modes arising as a result of thermal effects. We also consider interface modes due to phase-transitions and the gradual formation of the...

  2. Pressure effects on the elastic and lattice dynamics properties of AlP from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakel, S.; Okbi, F.; Ibrir, M.; Almi, K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed first-principles calculations to investigate the behavior under hydrostatic pressure of the structural, elastic and lattice dynamics properties of aluminum phosphide crystal (AlP), in both zinc-blende (B3) and nickel arsenide (B8) phases. Our calculated structural and electronic properties are in good agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. The elastic constants, bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (G), and Young's modulus (E), Born effective charge and static dielectric constant ɛ0, were calculated with the generalized gradient approximations and the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT). Our results in the pressure behavior of the elastic and dielectric properties of both phases are compared and contrasted with the common III-V materials. The Born effective charge ZB decreases linearly with pressure increasing, while the static dielectric constant decreases quadratically with the increase of pressure.

  3. Thickness and local field effects on energy transfer rate in coupled quantum wells system: Linear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazifehshenas, T.; Bahrami, B. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-fard, T., E-mail: taha@udel.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the dependence of energy transfer rate in Double-Quantum-Well system on the well thickness by using the balance equation formalism. Also, by including the local field correction in our calculations through the zero- and finite-temperature Hubbard approximations, we study the effect of the short-range interactions on the energy transfer phenomenon. Calculations consider both the static and dynamic screening approximations. Our numerical results predict that the energy transfer rate increases considerably by increasing the layers' thicknesses and by taking into account the short-range interactions, as well.

  4. Effect of Ceramic Thickness and Luting Agent Shade on the Color Masking Ability of Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Zubeda; Chheda, Pratik; Shruthi, C. S.; Sonika, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to recognize the effect of ceramic thickness and luting agent on the extent to which the restoration masks color variations that may be present in the underlying dental structure. Two pressable ceramics were used: Lithium disilicate reinforced (IPS e.max- Ivoclar Vivadent) and Leucite reinforced (Cergo- Dentsply). Fifteen ceramic discs were manufactured from each ceramic and divided into three groups, according to the thickness (0.5, 1, 1.5 mm). To simulate...

  5. Quantification of the effect of oil layer thickness on entrainment of surface oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marieke Zeinstra-Helfrich; Wierd Koops; Klaas Dijkstra; Albertinka J. Murk

    2015-01-01

    This study quantifies the effect of oil layer thickness on entrainment and dispersion of oil into seawater, using a plunging jet with a camera system. In contrast to what is generally assumed, we revealed that for the low viscosity “surrogate MC252 oil” we used, entrainment rate is directly

  6. Effects of fosinopril and pravastatin on carotid intima-media thickness in subjects with increased albuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselbergs, FW; van Roon, AM; Hillege, HL; de Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; Smit, AJ; van Gilst, WH

    Background and Purpose-Elevated urinary albumin excretion (UAE) is associated with an increased carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT). Because angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as well as statins have been shown to lower UAE and the progression of IMT, we assessed the effects of fosinopril and

  7. Wood chip mulch thickness effects on soil water, soil temperature, weed growth, and landscape plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood chip mulches are used in landscapes to reduce soil water evaporation and competition from weeds. A study was conducted over a three-year period to determine soil water content at various depths under four wood chip mulch treatments and to evaluate the effects of wood chip thickness on growth of...

  8. Effects of Age and Symptomatology on Cortical Thickness in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Thomas, Krissy A. R.; Duerden, Emma G.; Taylor, Margot J.; Lerch, Jason P.; Soorya, Latha V.; Wang, A. Ting; Fan, Jin; Hollander, Eric; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2013-01-01

    Several brain regions show structural and functional abnormalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but the developmental trajectory of abnormalities in these structures and how they may relate to social and communicative impairments are still unclear. We assessed the effects of age on cortical thickness in individuals with…

  9. The effect of component thickness on the flattening of surface asperities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a deformable flat rough surface being in contact with a hard smooth ball indenter was presented to evaluate the effect of thickness on the flattening of surface asperities. A novel method to determine the asperities flattening was deployed. The method uses a matching

  10. Effect of Ceramic Thickness and Luting Agent Shade on the Color Masking Ability of Laminate Veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Zubeda; Chheda, Pratik; Shruthi, C S; Sonika, Radhika

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of the study was to recognize the effect of ceramic thickness and luting agent on the extent to which the restoration masks color variations that may be present in the underlying dental structure. Two pressable ceramics were used: Lithium disilicate reinforced (IPS e.max- Ivoclar Vivadent) and Leucite reinforced (Cergo- Dentsply). Fifteen ceramic discs were manufactured from each ceramic and divided into three groups, according to the thickness (0.5, 1, 1.5 mm). To simulate the color of a dark underlying dental structure, background discs, color C3, with 20 mm diameter, were made using resin composite. The ceramic discs with varying thicknesses were seated on the dark background of the resin composite with either resinous opaque cement or resinous cement. The color parameters were determined by the CIE Lab system of colors using a spectrophotometer and color differences (ΔE) were calculated. The results were then statistically analyzed, using ANOVA test and Tukey HSD test. The ΔE values of both ceramic systems were affected by both the luting agent and the ceramic thickness (P veneers, higher values in the color parameters were obtained for both ceramic materials. The color masking ability of ceramics used for laminate veneers is significantly affected by the thickness of the ceramic and the shade of the luting agent used.

  11. EFFECT OF THICKNESS AND SPAN IN BENDING DEFORMATION OF WOOD PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Maria de Figueiredo Pazetto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between the physical and mechanical properties of MDF (Medium Density Fiberboard and MDP (Medium Density Particleboard used in furniture manufacturing. The physical properties density and moisture content and the mechanical properties static bending (MOE and MOR were determined. The experiment was made with three panel thicknesses (15 mm, 18 mm and 25 mm and three different spans with relationship L/h (span divided by thickness of 30, 35 and 40 totaling nine treatments for each type of panel with three replications. These samples were subjected to nondestructive bending test, with loads equivalent to 25 g.cm-² uniformly distributed in conditioned environment (temperature 20º C ±1, humidity 65% ±1. The final deformation load was recorded after a week, and the residual deformation, after removal of the load, was also registered. Statistical analysis of the results evaluated the effect of treatments relative to the span and thickness. The analysis showed significant differences between the results for each thickness, however, the span demonstrated greater influence than the thickness. Among the sample sizes evaluated the best value found was L/h = 30.

  12. Effect of midsole thickness of dance shoes on dynamic postural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, Matthew A; Cloak, Ross; Lucas, Josephine; Clarke, Frances

    2013-12-01

    Landing from jumps is one of the main causes of injury within dance. A number of studies have reported a negative effect of shoe midsole thickness on lower limb kinematics during running due to the reduction in afferent sensory outputs from the foot's epithelium. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of varying midsole thicknesses in dance shoes on dynamic postural stability during a single-leg landing. Twenty-eight female undergraduate dance participants volunteered for the study. They carried out three trials under four conditions: barefoot and in ballet flats (2 mm midsole thickness), jazz shoes (7 mm), and dance sneakers (30 mm). The task consisted of a single-leg forward jump over a hurdle at 50% of their maximal vertical jump height, landing on a force platform, and balancing for 3 seconds. The stability indices for vertical stability (VSI), anterior-posterior stability (APSI), medial-lateral stability (MLSI), and dynamic postural stability (DPSI) were calculated using Wikstrom's revised method. Significant differences were reported between the midsole thicknesses for both DPSI and VSI (p<0.01). No statistical differences were noted for the indices SPSI or MLSI. The present data agree with the running studies in that increased midsole thickness has a negative influence on landing stability.

  13. Structural, transport and microwave properties of 123/sapphire films: Thickness effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predtechensky, MR.; Smal, A.N.; Varlamov, Y.D. [Institute of Thermophysics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The effect of thickness and growth conditions on the structure and microwave properties has been investigated for the 123/sapphire films. It has been shown that in the conditions of epitaxial growth and Al atoms do not diffuse from substrate into the film and the films with thickness up to 100nm exhibit the excellent DC properties. The increase of thickness of GdBaCuO films causes the formation of extended line-mesh defects and the increase of the surface resistance (R{sub S}). The low value of surface resistance R{sub S}(75GHz,77K)=20 mOhm has been obtained for the two layer YBaCuO/CdBaCuO/sapphire films.

  14. Effect of Chromium Interlayer Thickness on Optical Properties of Au-Ag Nanoparticle Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chromium interlayer thickness on optical properties of array of hybrid Au-Ag triangular nanoparticles is systematically investigated. The optical spectrum simulated by discrete dipole approximation (DDA numerical method shows that with increase of the chromium interlayer thickness both refractive index sensitivity (RIS and figure of merit (FOM of localized surface plasmon resonance from the hybrid nanostructures experience remarkable change and the intensity of the extinction efficiency decreases. The nanosphere lithography (NSL is used to fabricate the hybrid nanostructure arrays with different chromium interlayer thicknesses. The experiment demonstrates that the spectrum as measured from the as-fabricated hybrid nanostructure arrays is essentially in agreement with the simulated results.

  15. Effects on measurement of photon-atom scattering of applied pressures on sample at different thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icelli, Orhan [Department of Physics Education, Education Faculty of Erzincan, Atatuerk University, Erzincan (Turkey)]. E-mail: orhan_icelli@hotmail.com; Erzeneoglu, Salih [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2006-01-15

    N{sub coh}/N{sub Comp} and NK{sub {beta}}/NK{sub {alpha}} intensity ratios of scattered photons by Zn in the linear region and the infinite mass thickness region are measured as functions of the pressure used for compressing the pellets with a Si(Li) detector using Am-241 and Fe-55 annular source. Besides, the effect on the experimental intensity ratio of relation between two different thicknesses of sample with applied different pressures on the sample is investigated in this study. Harmony between the linear and infinitive (critical) thickness region and the applied pressure on the sample has directly affected the experimental intensity ratios. Experimental results were not compared with various theoretical values in the literature, for present results constitute the first experimental measurements.

  16. Effect of electrolyte temperature on the thickness of anodic aluminium oxide (AAO layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Michal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effect of electrolyte temperature on the thickness of resulting oxide layer has been studied. Unlike previous published studies this article was aimed to monitor the relationship between electrolyte temperature and resulting AAO layer thickness in interaction with other input factors affecting during anodizing process under special process condition, i.e. lower concentration of sulphuric acid, oxalic acid, boric acid and sodium chloride. According to Design of Experiments (DOE 80 individual test runs of experiment were carried out. Using statistical analysis and artificial intelligence for evaluation, the computational model predicting the thickness of oxide layer in the range from 5 / μm to 15 / μm with tolerance ± 0,5 / μm was developed.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Temperature Effect on Thickness Distribution in Warm Hydroforming of Aluminum Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Moslemi Naeini, Hassan; Liaghat, Gholamhosein; Azizi Tafti, Roohollah; Rahmani, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of weight and increase of corrosion resistance are among the advantageous applications of aluminum alloys in automotive industry. Producing complicated components with several parts as a uniform part not only increases their strength but also decreases the production sequences and costs. However, achieving this purpose requires sufficient formability of the material. Tube hydroforming is an alternative process to produce complex products. In this process, the higher the material formability the more uniform will be the thickness distribution. In this research, tube hydroforming of aluminum alloy (AA1050) at various temperatures has been investigated numerically to study temperature effect on thickness distribution of final product. Also a warm hydroforming set-up has been designed and manufactured to evaluate numerical results. According to numerical and experimental results in the case of free bulging, unlike the constrained bulging, increase of the process temperature causes more uniform thickness distribution and therefore increases the material formability.

  18. Effect of Temperature, Time, and Material Thickness on the Dehydration Process of Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. K. Correia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of temperature, time, and thickness of tomatoes fruits during adiabatic drying process. Dehydration, a simple and inexpensive process compared to other conservation methods, is widely used in the food industry in order to ensure a long shelf life for the product due to the low water activity. This study aimed to obtain the best processing conditions to avoid losses and keep product quality. Factorial design and surface response methodology were applied to fit predictive mathematical models. In the dehydration of tomatoes through the adiabatic process, temperature, time, and sample thickness, which greatly contribute to the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of the final product, were evaluated. The optimum drying conditions were 60°C with the lowest thickness level and shorter time.

  19. Structural, transport and microwave properties of 123/sapphire films: Thickness effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predtechensky, M. R.; Smal, A. N.; Varlamov, Yu. D.; Vatnik, S. M.; Tukhto, O. M.; Vasileva, I. G.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of thickness and growth conditions on the structure and microwave properties has been investigated for the 123/sapphire films. It has been shown that in the conditions of epitaxial growth the Al atoms do not diffuse from substrate into the film and the films with thickness up to 100 nm exhibit the excellent direct current (DC) properties. The increase of thickness of GdBaCuO films causes the formation of extended line-mesh defects and the increase of the surface resistance (R(sub S)). The low value of surface resistance R(sub S)(75 GHz, 77K) = 20 mOhm has been obtained for the two layer YBaCuO/CdBaCuO/sapphire films.

  20. The effect of caffeine on choroidal thickness in young healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Mehmet Ozgur; Cinar, Esat; Karahan, Eyyup; Tuncer, Ibrahim; Kucukerdonmez, Cem

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of oral caffeine intake on choroidal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Eighteen otherwise healthy caffeine users and 18 controls were enrolled. All participants underwent OCT scanning with high-speed and resolution spectral-domain OCT device (3D OCT 2000, Topcon, Japan) at baseline, and 1 and 3 h following 200-mg oral caffeine intake in the study and after oral placebo in the control group. The measurements were taken in the morning (10-12 am) to avoid diurnal fluctuation. The median choroidal thickness at the fovea prior to oral caffeine intake was 337.00 (IQR 83.75) μm, which decreased to 311.00 (IQR 79.25) μm at 1 h and 311.00 (IQR 75.00) μm at 3 h following oral caffeine intake (p = 0.001, 0.002, respectively). The median choroidal thickness was also significantly decreased following oral caffeine intake at other five extrafoveal points (p thickness was not statistically significant between 1 and 3 h of caffeine intake at all six points. In the control group, the median baseline choroidal thickness at the fovea was 330.00 (IQR 88.75) μm, which was 330.50 (IQR 80.75) μm at 1 h and 330.50 (IQR 90.75) μm at 3 h (p = 0.552, 0.704, respectively). Caffeine causes a significant decrease in choroidal thickness following oral intake. This decrease might be a result of reduced ocular blood flow due to its vasoconstrictive effect.

  1. Effects of air resistance on AT-cut quartz thickness-shear resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jiashi

    2013-02-01

    We study theoretically the effects of air resistance on an AT-cut quartz plate thickness-shear mode resonator. Mindlin's two-dimensional equations for coupled thickness-shear and flexural motions of piezoelectric plates are employed for the crystal resonator. The equations of a Newtonian fluid and the equations of linear acoustics are used for the shear and compressive waves in the air surrounding the resonator, respectively. Solutions for free and electrically forced vibrations are obtained. The impedance of the resonator is calculated. The effects of air resistance are examined. It is found that air viscosity causes a relative frequency shift of the order of ppm. When the material quality factor of quartz Q = 10(5), the air viscosity and compressibility both have significant effects on resonator impedance. For resonators with larger aspect ratios the effects of air resistance are weaker, and the effect of air compressibility is weaker than air viscosity.

  2. Axial-torsional fatigue - A study of tubular specimen thickness effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were carried out at room temperature on AISI type 316 stainless steel to determine the effect of wall thickness on the cyclic deformation behavior and fatigue life of thin-wall tubular axial-torsional fatigue specimens. The experimental variables examined included the depth of the surface work-hardened layer produced in specimen machining, and the effects of strain range and axial-torsional strain phasing. Tubular fatigue specimens had wall thicknesses of 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mm. One as-fabricated specimen from each wall thickness was sectioned for microstructural examination and microhardness measurement. A specimen of each wall thickness was tested in axial-torsional fatigue experiments for each of the three conditions: high strain range in-phase, low strain range in-phase, and low strain range out-of-phase. The machining-induced work-hardened zone, as a percentage of the gage section material, was found to have a minimal effect on both deformation behavior and fatigue life. Out-of-phase fatigue tests displayed shorter fatigue lives and more cyclic hardening than in-phase tests.

  3. Effects of skeletally anchored Class II elastics: A pilot study and new approach for treating Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbilek, Selin; Gungor, Ahmet Yalcin; Celik, Salih

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue effects of skeletally anchored Class II elastics and compare them with a matched control group treated by a monobloc appliance for the correction of skeletal Class II malocclusion due to mandibular retrusion. Twelve patients (6 girls, 6 boys) were randomly divided into two groups. In the elastics group, six patients (12.9 ± 1.5 years of age; 3 boys, 3 girls) were treated with skeletally anchored Class II elastics. Two miniplates were placed bilaterally at the ramus of the mandible and the other two miniplates were placed at the aperture piriformis area of the maxilla. In the monobloc group (3 boys and 3 girls; mean age, 12.3 ± 1.6 years), patients used the monobloc appliance. The changes observed in each phase of treatment were evaluated using the Wilcoxon matched-pair sign test. Intergroup comparisons at the initial phase of treatment were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test. There were statistically significant group differences in Co-Gn, B-VRL, U1-PP, U1-VRL, Ls-VRL, with significant increases in these parameters in the elastics group (P mandibular incisors were protruded in the monobloc group (5.45 ± 1.23°), whereas they were retruded in the elastics group (-3.01 ± 1.66°; P anchorage. Favorable skeletal outcomes can be achieved by skeletal anchorage therapies which could be an alternative to treat skeletal Class II patients with mandibular deficiency.

  4. Acute Effects of Elastic Bands on Kinetic Characteristics During the Deadlift at Moderate and Heavy Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Andrew J; Malyszek, Kylie K; Davis, Kyle A; Record, Shaina M; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Harmon, RoQue A; Steele, Jeff M; Manolovitz, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    Loading a barbell with variable resistance positively alters kinetic characteristics during the back squat and bench press but has never been studied during the deadlift. The purpose of this project was to examine the acute effects of combining elastic bands and free weights during the deadlift at moderate and heavy loads. Twelve trained men (age: 24.08 ± 2.35 years, height: 175.94 ± 5.38 cm, mass: 85.58 ± 12.49 kg, deadlift 1 repetition maximum (RM): 188.64 ± 16.13 kg) completed 2 variable resistance (B1 and B2) and 1 traditional free-weight (NB) condition at both 60 and 85% 1RM on a force plate. B1 had 15% resistance from bands, with the remaining 85% from free weights. B2 had 35% bands and 65% free weights. NB used free weights only. Average resistance was equated for all conditions. Power and velocity generally increased, whereas force decreased with the addition of bands. The amount of band tension (B1 or B2) had little impact on power when lifting at 60% 1RM. However, greater resistance from bands resulted in greater peak and relative power when lifting at 85% 1RM. Adding elastic bands decreased time to peak force (PF), time between PF and peak power (PP), and time between PF and peak velocity (PV) when compared with NB at 60% 1RM (NB > B1 > B2). These differences only reached significance for NB > B2 when lifting at 85% 1RM. These same differences existed for time between PP and PV. Thus, the amount of tension from bands has less impact on interpeak variables at heavier absolute loads. Practitioners should consider using heavy bands when prescribing the deadlift for speed or power, but not maximal force.

  5. Effects of microcurrent therapy on excisional elastic cartilage defects in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerino Filho, Edson Pereira; Fachi, José Luis; Vasconcelos, Israel Costa; Dos Santos, Glaucia Maria Tech; Mendonça, Fernanda Aparecida Sampaio; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2016-06-01

    The effects of microcurrent application on the elastic cartilage defects in the outer ear of young animals were analyzed. Sixty male Wistar rats were divided into a control (CG) and a treated group (TG). An excisional lesion was created in the right outer ear of each animal. Daily treatment was started after 24h and consisted of the application of a low-intensity (20μA) continuous electrical current to the site of injury for 5min. The animals were euthanized after 7, 14 and 28 days of injury and the samples were submitted to analyses. In CG, areas of newly formed cartilage and intense basophilia were seen at 28 days, while in TG the same observations were made already at 14 days. The percentage of birefringent collagen fibers was higher in CG at 28 days. The number of connective tissue cells and granulocytes was significantly higher in TG. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the presence of chondrocytes in TG at 14 days, while these cells were observed in CG only at 28 days. Cuprolinic blue staining and the amount of glycosaminoglycans were significantly higher in TG at 14 days and 28 days. The amount of hydroxyproline was significantly higher in TG at all time points studied. The active isoform of MMP-2 was higher activity in TG at 14 days. Immunoblotting for type II collagen and decorin was positive in both groups and at all time points. The treatment stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of connective tissue cells, the deposition of glycosaminoglycans and collagen, and the structural reorganization of these elements during elastic cartilage repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On Elasticity Measurement in Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Ai; Kenli Li; Shenglin Lan; Fan Zhang; Jing Mei; Keqin Li; Rajkumar Buyya

    2016-01-01

    Elasticity is the foundation of cloud performance and can be considered as a great advantage and a key benefit of cloud computing. However, there is no clear, concise, and formal definition of elasticity measurement, and thus no effective approach to elasticity quantification has been developed so far. Existing work on elasticity lack of solid and technical way of defining elasticity measurement and definitions of elasticity metrics have not been accurate enough to capture the essence of elas...

  7. Boundary layer model to account for thick mask effects in photolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Burchard, Paul; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2003-06-01

    The lack of transparent optical components at short wavelengths limits the available wavelengths in Deep Ultraviolet lithography, while the required minimum feature on wafer continues to shrink towards deeper sub-wavelength scales. This places a serious limitation on Kirchhoff boundary conditions that replace the field on the mask openings by the incident field, since this approximation fails to account for the increasingly important topographical effects (thick mask effects) in the computation of the lithographic image. In this paper we present a sophisticated various on Kirchhoff approximation capable of modeling rigorous near field effects while retaining the simplicity of the scalar model. Our model is based on a comparison of the fields produced by both the thick and ideal thin masks on the wafer. Polarization and edge diffraction effects as well as phase and transmission errors, are included in our model.

  8. Serotonin Signaling Modulates the Effects of Familial Risk for Depression on Cortical Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gingrich, Jay; Hao, Xuejun; Odgerel, Zagaa; Warner, Virginia; Wickramaratne, Priya J.; Talati, Ardesheer; Ansorge, Mark; Brown, Alan S.; Sourander, Andre; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a highly familial and a heritable illness that is more prevalent in the biological offspring of the depressed individuals than in the general population. In a 3-generation, 30-year, longitudinal study of individuals at either a high(HR) or a low(LR) familial risk for depression, we previously showed cortical thinning in the right hemisphere was an endophenotype for the familial risk. In this study, we assessed whether the effects of familial risk were modulated by the serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR). We measured cortical thickness using MRI of the brain and associated it with 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in 76 HR and 53 LR individuals. We studied the effects of genotype and gene-by-risk interaction on cortical thickness while controlling for the confounding effects of age and gender, and for the familial relatedness by applying a variance component model with random effects for genotype. The results showed significant effects of gene-by-risk interaction on thickness: The “s” allele was associated with thinner cortex in the LR individuals whereas with thicker cortex in the HR individuals. The opposing gene effects across the two risk groups were likely due to either epistatic effects and/or differing modulation of the neural plasticity by the altered 5-HT signaling in utero. PMID:26774425

  9. Effects of tanalith-e impregnation substance on bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending of some wood types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Keskin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of impregnation with Tanalith-E on the bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending of some wood types. The test samples prepared from beech, oak, walnut, poplar, ash and pine wood materials - that are of common use in the forest products industry of TURKEY - according to TS 345, were treated with according to ASTM D 1413-76 substantially. Un-impregnated samples according to impregnated wood materials, the bending strengths in beech to 6.83%, 5.12% in ash, 5.93% in pine, the elasticity module values to 7.15% in oak and ash, at a rate of 6.58% in the higher were found. The highest values of bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending were obtained in beech and ash woods impregnated with Tanalith-E, whereas the lowest values were obtained in the poplar wood.

  10. Properties of electrodeposited CoFe/Cu multilayers: The effect of Cu layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Turgut, E-mail: stsahin4@hotmail.com [Deparment of Physics, Science and Literature Faculty, Balikesir University, 10100 Balikesir (Turkey); Kockar, Hakan, E-mail: hkockar@balikesir.edu.tr [Deparment of Physics, Science and Literature Faculty, Balikesir University, 10100 Balikesir (Turkey); Alper, Mursel, E-mail: malper@uludag.edu.tr [Deparment of Physics, Science and Literature Faculty, Uludag University, 16059 Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2015-01-01

    CoFe/Cu multilayers were potentiostatically electrodeposited on Ti substrates as a function of different non-magnetic (Cu) layer thicknesses, and their characterizations were investigated. The compositional analysis performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy disclosed that the Cu content in the multilayers increased and the Co content decreased as non-magnetic layer was increased. However, the Fe content was almost stable. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the surface morphology of the films is strongly affected by the non-magnetic layer thickness, and X-ray diffraction was used to analyse the structural properties of the multilayers and revealed that the multilayers have face-centred cubic (fcc) structure and their preferred orientations change depending on the Cu layer thickness. In the case of magnetoresistance measurements of the multilayers performed at room temperature, the highest giant magnetoresistance (GMR) values exhibited for the films with the Cu layer thickness (6.0 nm) whereas the lowest GMR magnitudes were observed for the films without Cu layer. Therefore, the variations of the Cu layer thicknesses were observed to have a significant effect on the GMR of multilayers. The differences observed in the magnetotransport properties were attributed to the microstructural changes caused by the Cu layer thickness. - Highlights: • CoFe/Cu multilayers were potentiostatically electrodeposited on Ti substrates. • Microstructural and magnetoresistance properties of CoFe/Cu multilayers were investigated. • All films had a face-centred cubic structure irrespective of the multilayer content. • All samples exhibited GMR and the maximum GMR value was 11%.

  11. Ceramic materials for porcelain veneers: part II. Effect of material, shade, and thickness on translucency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barizon, Karine T L; Bergeron, Cathia; Vargas, Marcos A; Qian, Fang; Cobb, Deborah S; Gratton, David G; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2014-10-01

    Information regarding the differences in translucency among new ceramic systems is lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative translucency of the different types of ceramic systems indicated for porcelain veneers and to evaluate the effect of shade and thickness on translucency. Disk specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.7-mm thick were fabricated for the following 9 materials (n=5): VITA VM9, IPS Empress Esthetic, VITA PM9, Vitablocks Mark II, Kavo Everest G-Blank, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.maxPress, and Lava Zirconia. VITA VM9 served as the positive control and Lava as the negative control. The disks were fabricated with the shade that corresponds to A1. For IPS e.maxPress, additional disks were made with different shades (BL2, BL4, A1, B1, O1, O2, V1, V2, V3), thickness (0.3 mm), and translucencies (high translucency, low translucency). Color coordinates (CIE L∗ a∗ b∗) were measured with a tristimulus colorimeter. The translucency parameter was calculated from the color difference of the material on a black versus a white background. One-way ANOVA, the post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference, and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range tests were used to analyze the data (α=.05). Statistically significant differences in the translucency parameter were found among porcelains (PPM9, Empress Esthetic>Empress CAD>Mark II, Everest, e.max CAD>e.max Press>Lava. Significant differences also were noted when different shades and thickness were compared (Pveneers present varying degrees of translucency. The thickness and shade of lithium disilicate ceramic affect its translucency. Shade affects translucency parameter less than thickness. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reliability of the Effect of Artificial Anterior Chamber Pressure and Corneal Drying on Corneal Graft Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Vito; Steger, Bernhard; Chen, Jern Y; Hassaan, Sherif; Batterbury, Mark; Willoughby, Colin E; Ahmad, Sajjad; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Kaye, Stephen B

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of artificial anterior chamber (AAC) pressure and corneal drying on the graft thickness in preparation for Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty. Twenty-seven corneoscleral discs were placed in an AAC. The AAC pressure (15, 45, 92, 109, and 198 mm Hg) was controlled using the height of an infusion bottle and a roller clamp. The endothelium was removed in 1 subgroup. Corneas were exposed to room air or repeatedly dried using cellulose spears. Central corneal thickness was measured every 90 seconds for the first 15 minutes and again at 20 minutes using an ultrasound pachymeter (SP-100, Tomey). There was a significant linear relationship between the corneal thickness and both AAC pressure and corneal drying. Very high coefficients of determination and narrow 95% confidence intervals were present, in particular for high pressures and drying. The rate of thinning increased with increasing pressure and drying to 1.6% per minute. At the maximum rate of thinning, a 10% reduction in corneal thickness occurred in 6 minutes or 100 μm in 8.8 minutes. Removal of the corneal endothelium reduced the rate of thinning to 0.3% per minute (R = 0.72). Increasing AAC pressure and corneal drying reduced the graft thickness at a very predictable rate. Adequate corneal thinning can be achieved by increasing the pressure in the AAC by closing the clamp followed by removal of the residual corneal epithelium and repeated drying with a cellulose spear for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on the initial corneal thickness. This method is simple and is both suitable for use in the eye bank and by the surgeon.

  13. Regulation of sodium channel function by bilayer elasticity: the importance of hydrophobic coupling. Effects of Micelle-forming amphiphiles and cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J

    2004-01-01

    and kinetics of the protein conformational changes therefore will be regulated by the bilayer elasticity, which is determined by the lipid composition. This hydrophobic coupling mechanism has been studied extensively in gramicidin channels, where the channel-bilayer hydrophobic interactions link...... a "conformational" change (the monomerdimer transition) to an elastic bilayer deformation. Gramicidin channels thus are regulated by the lipid bilayer elastic properties (thickness, monolayer equilibrium curvature, and compression and bending moduli). To investigate whether this hydrophobic coupling mechanism could...... be a general mechanism regulating membrane protein function, we examined whether voltage-dependent skeletal-muscle sodium channels, expressed in HEK293 cells, are regulated by bilayer elasticity, as monitored using gramicidin A (gA) channels. Nonphysiological amphiphiles (beta-octyl-glucoside, Genapol X-100...

  14. Effect of geometric nonlinearity on the free flexural vibrations of moderately thick rectangular plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, K. K.; Rao, G. V.; Raju, I. S.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of geometric nonlinearity on the free flexural vibrations of moderately thick rectangular plates is studied in this paper. Finite element formulation is employed to obtain the non-linear to linear period ratios for some rectangular plates. A conforming finite element of rectangular shape wherein the effects of shear deformation and rotatory inertia are included, is developed and used for the analysis. Results are presented for both simply supported and clamped boundary conditions.

  15. CFD-DEM study of effect of bed thickness for bubbling fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingwen, Li; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Garg, Rahul; Shahnam, Mehrdad

    2011-10-01

    The effect of bed thickness in rectangular fluidized beds is investigated through the CFD–DEM simulations of small-scale systems. Numerical results are compared for bubbling fluidized beds of various bed thicknesses with respect to particle packing, bed expansion, bubble behavior, solids velocities, and particle kinetic energy. Good two-dimensional (2D) flow behavior is observed in the bed having a thickness of up to 20 particle diameters. However, a strong three-dimensional (3D) flow behavior is observed in beds with a thickness of 40 particle diameters, indicating the transition from 2D flow to 3D flow within the range of 20–40 particle diameters. Comparison of velocity profiles near the walls and at the center of the bed shows significant impact of the front and back walls on the flow hydrodynamics of pseudo-2D fluidized beds. Hence, for quantitative comparison with experiments in pseudo-2D columns, the effect of walls has to be accounted for in numerical simulations.

  16. Effect of thickness on the maximum potential drop of current collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo-Robles, Jose Miguel; Artetxe, Xabier; del Teso Sánchez, Karmele

    2017-08-01

    The basic principle for achieving high-power capability on an electrochemical energy storage cell is minimizing the overall resistance. The resistance due to current collecting systems has not received sufficient attention in the past, presumably because it was not considered of significance for low-power batteries and supercapacitors. However, the necessity of high-power cells has reduced other sources of the inner resistance, and the current collector potential drop has become more important. Moreover, the miniaturization of energy storage devices could increase the ohmic loses in current collectors. In this work, we have developed an electrical model to assess the effect of the current collector thickness on the maximum potential drop. We have found that the thickness of current collectors is a critical parameter that can increase the maximum potential drop drastically. Indeed, the maximum potential drop of current collectors remains almost constant for thicknesses greater than 500 μm, but below this value, there is an inverse relationship between the maximum potential drop and the thickness. We have also analyzed the effect of the material and tab position in the maximum potential drop.

  17. Size and thickness effect on magnetic structures of maghemite hollow magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed, Fatima; Labaye, Yvan, E-mail: yvan.labaye@univ-lemans.fr [Université du Maine, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans CNRS UMR-6283 (France); Sayed Hassan, Rodaina; El Haj Hassan, Fouad [Université Libanaise, Faculté des Sciences Section I, MPLAB (Lebanon); Yaacoub, Nader, E-mail: nader.yaacoub@univ-lemans.fr; Greneche, Jean-Marc [Université du Maine, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans CNRS UMR-6283 (France)

    2016-09-15

    The effect of surface anisotropy on the magnetic ground state of hollow maghemite nanoparticles is investigated using atomistic Monte Carlo simulation. The computer modeling is carried on hollow nanostructures as a function of size and shell thickness. It is found that the large contribution of the surface anisotropy imposes a “throttled” spin structure where the moments located at the outer surface tend to orient normal to the surface while those located at the inner surface appear to be more aligned. For increasing values of surface anisotropy in the frame of a radial model, the magnetic moments become radially oriented either inward or outward giving rise to a “hedgehog” configuration with nearly zero net magnetization. We also show the effect of the size of hollow nanoparticle on the spin behavior where the spin non-collinearity increases (for fixed value of surface anisotropy) as the diameter of the hollow nanoparticle increases due to the significant increase in surface-to-volume ratio, the thickness being constant. Moreover, the thickness of the hollow nanoparticle shell influences the spin configuration and thus the relation between surface anisotropy and the size or the thickness of the hollow nanoparticle is established.

  18. The effect of knee joint loading and immobilization on the femoral cartilage thickness in paraplegics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, B; Demir, Y; Özyörük, E; Kesikburun, S; Güzelküçük, Ü

    2016-04-01

    Femoral cartilage thickness has been used as an indicator for immobilization and unloading in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, conflicting results have been reported on this subject. (i) To determine femoral cartilage thickness alterations after prolonged immobilization, (ii) to demonstrate the effect of the daily standing or ambulation time on the cartilage and (iii) to analyze the predictors of the femoral cartilage in patients with SCI. A total of 50 patients with SCI and 50 healthy age and sex-matched volunteers were enrolled in the study. A physician scanned both knees of all participants and measurements were taken at three locations: trochlear notch, midpoints of the medial and lateral condyle. The trochlear notch, medial and lateral condyle femoral cartilage thickness of both sides were significantly thicker in the control group (Pthickness measurements in all sub parameters than patients with >1 h daily standing/walking time (Pthickness. SCI patients had thinner knee cartilage compared with healthy individuals in ultrasonographic assessment. More than 1 h daily standing/walking time may have a negative effect on the femoral cartilage thickness. Thus, ultrasonographic evaluation of the femoral cartilage should be considered in clinical practice to detect early cartilage thinning in patients with SCI.

  19. Effects of alloying elements and temperature on the elastic properties of W-based alloys by first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yong-Jie, E-mail: yoh5120@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Shang, Shun-Li; Wang, Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Darling, Kristopher A.; Butler, Brady G.; Kecskes, Laszlo J. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Liu, Zi-Kui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-06-25

    The influence of various transition alloying elements (X's) on the elastic properties of W-based alloys has been studied via first-principles calculations on the basis of density functional theory. Here, nineteen transition metal alloying elements (X) are considered: Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Hf, Ta, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. It is found that (i) the bulk modulus of the dilute W-X alloy decreases with increasing its equilibrium volume, particularly, for the alloying elements in the same period; (ii) all of the alloying elements decrease the shear modulus of BCC W; and (iii) the largest decrease of elastic properties of W is due to alloying element Y. In addition, it is shown that the changes of elastic properties of W caused by the alloying elements are traceable from the electron charge density distribution, resulting in a bonding distortion between W and the alloying atoms. Using the quasi-static approach based on the Debye model, the elastic properties of these W-X alloys at finite temperatures are predicted. Calculated properties of BCC W and the W-X alloys are in favorable agreement with available experimental measurements. - Highlights: • The effects of nineteen metal elements on the elastic properties of W are studied. • The elastic properties at finite temperatures are predicted by the Debye model. • The alloying effects can be traceable from the changes of electronic structure. • The possibly promising alloying elements to soften BCC W are suggested.

  20. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, M.; Pellicciotti, F.; Mabillard, J.; Reid, T.; Brock, B. W.

    2016-08-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are increasingly studied because it is assumed that debris cover extent and thickness could increase in a warming climate, with more regular rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and more englacial melt-out material. Debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancement/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya, and can be difficult to extrapolate. Due to their lower data requirements, empirical models have been used extensively in clean glacier melt modelling. For debris-covered glaciers, however, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of varying debris thickness on melt and prescribe a constant reduction for the entire melt across a glacier. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model that accounts for debris thickness in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The model empirical parameters are optimized at the point scale for varying debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter is validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. We develop the model on Miage Glacier, Italy, and then test its transferability on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. The performance of the new debris temperature-index (DETI) model in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale is comparable to the one of the physically based approach, and the definition of model parameters as a function of debris thickness allows the simulation of the nonlinear relationship of melt rate to debris thickness, summarised by the

  1. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, M; Pellicciotti, F; Mabillard, J; Reid, T; Brock, B W

    2016-08-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are increasingly studied because it is assumed that debris cover extent and thickness could increase in a warming climate, with more regular rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and more englacial melt-out material. Debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancement/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya, and can be difficult to extrapolate. Due to their lower data requirements, empirical models have been used extensively in clean glacier melt modelling. For debris-covered glaciers, however, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of varying debris thickness on melt and prescribe a constant reduction for the entire melt across a glacier. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model that accounts for debris thickness in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The model empirical parameters are optimized at the point scale for varying debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter is validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. We develop the model on Miage Glacier, Italy, and then test its transferability on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. The performance of the new debris temperature-index (DETI) model in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale is comparable to the one of the physically based approach, and the definition of model parameters as a function of debris thickness allows the simulation of the nonlinear relationship of melt rate to debris thickness, summarised by the

  2. Effect of elastic and plastic tensile mechanical loading on the magnetic properties of NGO electrical steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuning, N., E-mail: nora.leuning@iem.rwth-aachen.de [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Steentjes, S. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Schulte, M.; Bleck, W. [Steel Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Hameyer, K. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic properties of non-grain-oriented (NGO) electrical steels are highly susceptible to mechanical stresses, i.e., residual, external or thermal ones. For rotating electrical machines, mechanical stresses are inevitable and originate from different sources, e.g., material processing, machine manufacturing and operating conditions. The efficiency and specific losses are largely altered by different mechanical stress states. In this paper the effect of tensile stresses and plastic deformations on the magnetic properties of a 2.9 wt% Si electrical steel are studied. Particular attention is paid to the effect of magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the influence of the direction of applied mechanical stress with respect to the rolling direction. Due to mechanical stress, the induced anisotropy has to be evaluated as it is related to the stress-dependent magnetostriction constant and the grain alignment. - Highlights: • A detailed look at magnetic anisotropy of FeSi NGO electrical steel. • Study of magnetic behavior under elastic as well as plastic tensile stresses. • Correlation of magnetic behavior with microscopic deformation mechanisms. • Discussion of detrimental and beneficial effects of external stresses. • Loss separation at different polarizations and frequencies under increasing stress.

  3. Effects of elastic bed on hydrodynamic forces for a submerged sphere in an ocean of finite depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Smrutiranjan

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we consider a hydroelastic model to examine the radiation of waves by a submerged sphere for both heave and sway motions in a single-layer fluid flowing over an infinitely extended elastic bottom surface in an ocean of finite depth. The elastic bottom is modeled as a thin elastic plate and is based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation. The effect of the presence of surface tension at the free-surface is neglected. In such situation, there exist two modes of time-harmonic waves: the one with a lower wavenumber (surface mode) propagates along the free-surface and the other with higher wavenumber (flexural mode) propagates along the elastic bottom surface. Based on the small amplitude wave theory and by using the multipole expansion method, we find the particular solution for the problem of wave radiation by a submerged sphere of finite depth. Furthermore, this method eliminates the need to use large and cumbersome numerical packages for the solution of such problem and leads to an infinite system of linear algebraic equations which are easily solved numerically by any standard technique. The added-mass and damping coefficients for both heave and sway motions are derived and plotted for different submersion depths of the sphere and flexural rigidity of the elastic bottom surface. It is observed that, whenever the sphere nearer to the elastic bed, the added-mass move toward to a constant value of 1, which is approximately twice of the value of added-mass of a moving sphere in a single-layer fluid flowing over a rigid and flat bottom surface.

  4. On the Effect of Unit-Cell Parameters in Predicting the Elastic Response of Wood-Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Alavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effect of unit-cell geometrical parameters in predicting elastic properties of a typical wood plastic composite (WPC. The ultimate goal was obtaining the optimal values of representative volume element (RVE parameters to accurately predict the mechanical behavior of the WPC. For each unit cell, defined by a given combination of the above geometrical parameters, finite element simulation in ABAQUS was carried out, and the corresponding stress-strain curve was obtained. A uniaxial test according to ASTM D638-02a type V was performed on the composite specimen. Modulus of elasticity was determined using hyperbolic tangent function, and the results were compared to the sets of finite element analyses. Main effects of RVE parameters and their interactions were demonstrated and discussed, specially regarding the inclusion of two adjacent wood particles within one unit cell of the material. Regression analysis was performed to mathematically model the RVE parameter effects and their interactions over the modulus of elasticity response. The model was finally employed in an optimization analysis to arrive at an optimal set of RVE parameters that minimizes the difference between the predicted and experimental moduli of elasticity.

  5. Effect of Zirconia Thickness on the Tensile Stress of Zirconia Based All-Ceramic Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Shiezadeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of the presented study was to evaluate the effect of zirconia thickness on the tensile stress of zirconia based all-ceramic restorations. Methods: Twenty zirconia disks with 10mm diameter were prepared in two groups using CAD/CAM system. The thickness of zirconia was 0.5mm in first group and 0.3mm in second group. After sintering, 0.4mm glass ceramic porcelain was applied to each disk. Then, sintering and glazing of porcelain carried out. Instron testing machine with 1mm/min crosshead speed used to evaluate the failure load of the samples. Biaxial Flexural strength standard formula employed to calculate tensile stress of specimens. Statistical analysis performed using SPSS software. Results: Although data analysis showed more maximum tensile stress in 1st group, no significant differences were found between two groups. Conclusion: Zirconia with 0.5mm and 0.3mm thicknesses cause similar tensile stress in all-ceramic restorations and thickness of these laminates could be reduced to 0.7mm.

  6. Effect of Catalytic Layer Thickness on Diameter of Vertically Aligned Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of catalytic thin film thickness on the diameter control of individual carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Individual carbon nanotubes were grown on catalytic nanodot arrays, which were fabricated by e-beam lithography and e-beam evaporation. During e-beam evaporation of the nanodot pattern, more catalytic metal was deposited at the edge of the nanodots than the desired catalyst thickness. Because of this phenomenon, carbon atoms diffused faster near the center of the dots than at the edge of the dots. The carbon atoms, which were gathered at the interface between the catalytic nanodot and the diffusion barrier, accumulated near the center of the dot and lifted the catalyst off. From the experiments, an individual carbon nanotube with the same diameter as that of the catalytic nanodot was obtained from a 5 nm thick catalytic nanodot; however, an individual carbon nanotube with a smaller diameter (~40% reduction was obtained from a 50 nm thick nanodot. We found that the thicker the catalytic layer, the greater the reduction in diameter of the carbon nanotubes. The diameter-controlled carbon nanotubes could have applications in bio- and nanomaterial scanning and as a contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Effects of Coil Diameter in Thickness Measurement Using Pulsed Eddy Current Non-destructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa Azaman, Khairun; Sophian, Ali; Nafiah, Faris

    2017-11-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques are used in industry to evaluate the properties of a material, component or structure without causing any permanent damage. Among the techniques, pulsed eddy current (PEC) NDT is regarded as a new technique where a broadband pulse excitation is used, as opposed to single frequencies employed in conventional eddy current NDT. In this study, a 2D axisymmetric electromagnetic model of a PEC probe has been developed and it has been used to study the effects of the excitation coil diameter on the performance of PEC probes in sample thickness measurement. A PEC system has also been built to validate the model. Aluminium plates are used as the sample and they can be stacked up to replicate thickness from 1 mm to 10 mm. The results show that there is a very good correlation between the simulation and experimental results, with an average error of less than 10%. The results also suggest that the larger the diameter of the excitation coil, the deeper the penetration and therefore the larger the thickness measurement range. It has also been shown that although the larger diameters have deeper penetration, the smallest diameter has the highest sensitivity if normalization is not used. These conclusions indicate that coil diameter is an important parameter in a PEC probe design for thickness measurement applications.

  8. The effect of zinc thickness on corrosion film breakdown of Colombian galvanized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Amador, A.; E Torres Ramirez, J.; Cabrales-Villamizar, P. A.; Laverde Cataño, D.; Y Peña-Ballesteros, D.

    2017-12-01

    This work studies the corrosion behaviour of Colombian galvanized steel in solutions of chloride and sulphate ions. The effect of the thickness and exposure time on the film’s breakdown susceptibility and protectiveness of the corrosion products were studied using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion products were analysed using SEM-EDS and XRD. The samples with a higher thickness level in the zinc film (Z180) have the lowest corrosion rate. In this case, one of the products that was formed by the chemical reactions that occurred was Zinc hydroxide, which exhibits a passive behaviour as observed in the Pourbaix curves of the obtained potentials and in how the different Ph levels of the solutions worked. The sheets with the highest thickness (Z180) had the best performance, since at the end of the study they showed the least amount of damage on the surface of the zinc layer. This is because the thickness of the zinc layer favours the formation of simonkolleite, which is the corrosion product that protects the material under the conditions of the study.

  9. Effect of age at onset on cortical thickness and cognition in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Aida; Lehmann, Manja; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio; Roldán-Lora, Florinda; Schott, Jonathan M; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2016-08-01

    Age at onset (AAO) has been shown to influence the phenotype of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but how it affects atypical presentations of AD remains unknown. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is the most common form of atypical AD. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of AAO on cortical thickness and cognitive function in 98 PCA patients. We used Freesurfer (v5.3.0) to compare cortical thickness with AAO both as a continuous variable, and by dichotomizing the groups based on median age (58 years). In both the continuous and dichotomized analyses, we found a pattern suggestive of thinner cortex in precuneus and parietal areas in earlier-onset PCA, and lower cortical thickness in anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex in later-onset PCA. These cortical thickness differences between PCA subgroups were consistent with earlier-onset PCA patients performing worse on cognitive tests involving parietal functions. Our results provide a suggestion that AAO may not only affect the clinico-anatomical characteristics in AD but may also affect atrophy patterns and cognition within atypical AD phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Elasticity of Flowing Soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2016-11-01

    The robustness of soap films and bubbles manifests their mechanical stability. The single most important factor underlying the mechanical stability of soap films is its elasticity. Non-destructive measurement of the elasticity in these films has been cumbersome, because of its flowing nature. Here we provide a convenient, reproducible, and non-destructive method for measuring the elasticity by generating and inspecting Marangoni waves. Our method is based on generating an oblique shock by inserting a thin cylindrical obstacle in the flowing film, and converting the measured the shock angle to elasticity. Using this method, we find a constant value for the elasticity of 22 dyne/cm in the commonly used range of film widths, thicknesses or flow rates, implying that the surface of the film is chemically saturated with soap molecules.

  11. Effect of oral isotretinoin treatment on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucak, Haydar; Aykut, Veysel; Ozturk, Savas; Cicek, Demet; Erden, Ilker; Demir, Betul

    2014-01-01

    Oral isotretinoin treatment can cause ocular side effects. This study was performed to detect possible toxic effects of oral isotretinoin treatment on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL). The study population consisted of 54 eyes of 27 patients with nodulocystic acne who used oral isotretinoin (Roaccutane) treatment. Macular GCL and peripapillary RNFL thickness measurements were performed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) before and after therapy. Before and after treatment, a complete ophthalmologic examination was normal in all eyes. However, posttreatment lower temporal (TL) values were significantly lower (76.80 ± 16.31) than pretreatment TL values (84.96 ± 24.83) (p  =  .02). There was no statistically significant difference in the other OCT values, upper temporal, superotemporal, superonasal, upper nasal, lower nasal, inferonasal, and inferotemporal (p  =  .35, p  =  .40, p  =  .56, p  =  .95, p  =  .94, p  =  .93, p  =  .61, respectively). Also, there was no statistically significant difference between the right and left eyes and between genders for all parameters (p > .05). The use of oral isotretinoin treatment has increased in recent years. In addition, oral isotretinoin treatment has a broad adverse effect potential on the ocular system. The measurement of RNFL thickness, especially TL thickness, by OCT may be useful for detecting the possible toxic effect of oral isotretinoin therapy on RNFL.

  12. The effect of non-elastic taping on balance and gait function in patients with stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nam, Chan-Woo; Lee, Jung-Ho; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the influence of exercise on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients after applying non-elastic tape, which can stabilize muscles and joints, to the lower...

  13. An aerodynamic study of scramjet fuel injectors. [effect of injector thickness ratio on aerodynamic drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag and fuel distribution patterns of injectors designed for a supersonic combustion ramjet were measured at Mach numbers of 2, 2.5, and 3. The most significant parameter effecting the drag was found to be the injector thickness ratio. A two-fold reduction in the thickness ratio caused a 65 percent decrease in drag. Changing the injector sweep angle a factor of 2 resulted in only a small change in drag. A reversal of injector sweep, from sweepback to sweepforward, did not change the measured drag. Helium gas was injected through the struts to simulate the penetration and spreading patterns of hydrogen. Sampling measurements were made at approximately 2 duct heights downstream of the combustor. The spacing required between fuel injectors was found to be about 10 jet diameters. The effect of gas injection on the measured drag was found to be minor.

  14. Long term fuel price elasticity: Effect of price changes on mobility tool ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Erath, Alexander; Axhausen, Kay W.

    2013-01-01

    The study analyzes how mobility tool usage and ownership as well as residence location choice are affected by rising fuel costs. Based on econometric models, long-term fuel price elasticities are derived. Based on data collected in stated choice and stated adaptation experiments that were conducted as computer-based face-to-face surveys, a structural equation model was estimated. The resulting fuel price elasticities are primarily dependent on fuel type and fuel price level, but sociodemograp...

  15. Elastic effects of dilute polymer solution on bubble generation in a microfluidic flow-focusing channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Young; Shim, Tae Soup; Kim, Ju Min

    2017-05-01

    Recently, two-phase flow in microfluidics has attracted much attention because of its importance in generating droplets or bubbles that can be used as building blocks for material synthesis and biological applications. However, there are many unresolved issues in understanding droplet and bubble generation processes, especially when complex fluids are involved. In this study, we investigated elastic effects on bubble generation processes in a flow-focusing geometry and the shapes of the produced bubbles flowing through a microchannel. We used dilute polymer solutions with nearly constant shear viscosities so that the shear-thinning effects on bubble generation could be precluded. We observed that a very small amount of polymer (poly(ethylene oxide) at O(10) ppm) significantly affects bubble generation. When the polymer was added to a Newtonian fluid, the fluctuation in bubble size increased notably, which was attributed to the chaotic flow dynamics in the flow-focusing region. In addition, it was demonstrated that the bubbles were thinner along the minor axis in the viscoelastic fluid than they were in the Newtonian fluid. We expect that the current results will contribute to understanding the dynamics of two-phase flow in microchannels and the design and operation of the microfluidic devices to generate microbubbles.

  16. Effect of gasket of varying thickness on spark ignition engines | Ajayi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the study of Toyota, In-line, 4 cylinders, spark ignition engine using gaskets of varying thicknesses (1.75mm, 3.5mm, 5.25mm, 7mm and 8.75mm) between the cylinder head and the engine block, the performance characteristics of the engine was investigated via the effect of engine speed on brake power, brake thermal ...

  17. Effect of long-term combined oral contraceptive pill use on endometrial thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Nayana; Bentov, Yaakov; Chang, Paul T; Esfandiari, Navid; Nazemian, Zohreh; Casper, Robert F

    2012-08-01

    To estimate whether there is any association of long-term use of combined oral contraceptive pills (OCP) with adverse endometrial growth. We reviewed the charts of 137 patients with history of OCP use undergoing endometrial preparation with estrogen for frozen embryo transfer. Endometrial thickness was measured by transvaginal ultrasonography on day 10 after menses and patients were divided into two groups (less than 7 mm and 7 mm or more). Thirty patients had endometrial thickness less than 7 mm and 107 had thickness of 7 mm or more. Mean years of combined OCP use in each group were 9.8±4.54 and 5.8±4.52, respectively (Pday 10 in patients using combined OCP for less than 10 years and 10 years or more were 9.54±1.88 mm and 8.48±2.33 mm, respectively, with P=.007. The mean endometrial thickness was 9.72±1.69 mm in less than 5 years and 8.81±2.23 mm in 5 or more years of use, respectively (P=.008). Cycle cancellation rates in the less than 7 mm group and 7 mm or greater endometrial thickness group were 23% and 4%, respectively (P=.002), but there was no difference in the clinical pregnancy rates between the two groups (13% compared with 27%, respectively; P=.15). Long-term combined OCP use (5 years or more) can potentially affect optimal endometrial growth, leading to a higher cancellation rate and longer stimulation in frozen embryo transfer cycles. These findings suggest a previously unidentified adverse effect of long-term combined OCP use in women who are anticipating future fertility. II.

  18. Atomic force microscopy study of the effects of water-soluble fullerenes on the elasticity of living plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejie; Liu, Qiaoling; Xia, Tie; Li, Nan; He, Kangmin; Wang, Chunru; Tan, Weihong; Fang, Xiaohong

    2013-10-01

    In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to characterize the elastic properties of a living suspension of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow (BY-2) cells and to investigate the changes in plant-cell elasticity that were induced by water-soluble C70 fullerene derivatives. The results revealed different effects of the three fullerene derivatives that had different numbers of carboxylic groups on the cell elasticity. BY-2 cells that were repressed by dimalonic-acid-modified C70 fullerenes (DiF70) and trimalonic-acid-modified C70 fullerenes (TriF70) showed a clear decrease in their Young's modulus. However, the Young's modulus of cells that were treated with tetramalonic-acid-modified C70 fullerenes (TetraF70) increased. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton arrangement was observed following treatment with DiF70 and TriF70, but not with TetraF70. Moreover, the fullerene-induced cell-elasticity change was consistent with the change in cell-proliferation rate. This work provides a new approach and valuable information for the study of the biological effect of nanomaterials on plant cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. An Atomistic-Based Continuum Modeling for Evaluation of Effective Elastic Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. M. Al-Kharusi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior of SWCNTs is characterized using an atomistic-based continuum method. At nanoscale, interatomic energy among carbon atoms and the corresponding force constants are defined. Subsequently, we used an atomistic finite element analysis to calculate the energy stored in the SWCNT model, which forms a basis for calculating effective elastic moduli. In the finite element model, the force interaction among carbon atoms in a SWCNT is modeled using load-carrying structural beams. At macroscale, the SWCNT is taken as cylindrical continuum solid with transversely isotropic mechanical properties. Equivalence of energies of both models establishes a framework to calculate effective elastic moduli of armchair and zigzag nanotubes. This is achieved by solving five boundary value problems under distinct essential-controlled boundary conditions, which generates a prescribed uniform strain field in both models. Elastic constants are extracted from the calculated elastic moduli. While results of Young’s modulus obtained in this study generally concur with the published theoretical and numerical predictions, values of Poisson’s ratio are on the high side.

  20. Effect of CAD-CAM porcelain veneers thickness on their cemented color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hanan; Atta, Osama; El-Mowafy, Omar; Khan, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    To determine the effect of thickness of porcelain veneers constructed from CAD-CAM on their final color when two resin cements were used. Buccal surfaces of extracted sound human molars with shade 3M2 [verified using digital spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade-Vident)] were reduced to expose flat enamel surfaces. CAD-CAM blocks (Vitablokcs Mark II) of the same shade were sectioned into three groups of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7mm thickness. Each group was subdivided into two subgroups; one subgroup was cemented to enamel using an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Calibra/Prime and bond-NT, Dentsply) and the other was cemented to enamel using a self-etching resin cement (Panavia-F, Kuraray). The shade of the two resin cements was "light". Change in color (ΔE) between the selected shade (3M2) and the resulted shade was measured for each specimen using a digital spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade-Vident). Means and SDs were calculated and data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc tukey's. Change in color (ΔE) between the selected and the produced shade for the Calibra subgroups was 2.8 (0.3) for the 0.3mm, 1.67 (0.2) for the 0.5mm thick specimens and 1.26 (0.3) for the 0.7mm. Panavia F subgroups showed ΔE of 2 (0.4) for the 0.3mm, 1.13 (0.23) for the 0.5mm thick specimens and 1.21 (0.31) for the 0.7mm. The 0.7mm subgroups showed no significant difference in color change among the two cements (P>.05), however, Calibra resulted in significantly higher change in color values for the 0.5mm thick specimens (Pveneer thickness from 0.5 to 0.7mm did not significantly affect the final color of cemented veneers. Whilst the color was significantly affected at the thickness of 0.3mm. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of adding roughness and thickness to a transonic axial compressor rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Chima, Rodrick V.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Roberts, William B.

    1995-01-01

    The performance deterioration of a high speed axial compressor rotor due to surface roughness and airfoil thickness variations is reported. A 0.025 mm (0.001 in.) thick rough coating with a surface finish of 2.54-3.18 RMS microns (100-125 RMS microinches) is applied to the pressure and suction surface of the rotor blades. Coating both surfaces increases the leading edge thickness by 10% at the hub and 20% at the tip. Application of this coating results in a loss in efficiency of 6 points and a 9% reduction in the pressure ratio across the rotor at an operating condition near the design point. To separate the effect of thickness and roughness, a smooth coating of equal thickness is also applied to the blade. The smooth coating surface finish is 0.254-0.508 RMS microns (10-20 RMS microinches), compared to the bare metal blade surface finish of 0.508 RMS microns (20 RMS microinches). The smooth coating results in approximately half of the performance deterioration found from the rough coating. Both coatings are then applied to different portions of the blade surface to determine which portions of the airfoil are most sensitive to thickness/roughness variations. Aerodynamic performance measurements are presented for a number of coating configurations at 60%, 80%, and 100% of design speed. The results indicate that thickness/roughness over the first 10% of blade chord accounts for virtually all of the observed performance degradation for the smooth coating, compared to about 70% of the observed performance degradation for the rough coating. The performance deterioration is investigated in more detail at design speed using laser anemometer measurements as well as predictions generated by a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes flow solver which includes a surface roughness model. Measurements and analysis are performed on the baseline blade and the full-coverage smooth and rough coatings. The results indicate that coating the blade causes a thickening of the blade boundary layers. The

  2. Elastic constant measurement in supported W/Cu multilayer thin films by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villain, P.; Goudeau, P.; Renault, P.O.; Badawi, K.F. [LMP-UMR, CNRS, Univ. de Poitiers, Futuroscope (France)

    2002-07-01

    Elasticity of reduced dimension materials remains misunderstood since both experimental and theoretical studies on this subject are difficult to perform. Numerous experiments realised in the early 90's evidenced ''elastic anomalies'' in small period multilayer systems: ''supermodulus'', breakdown of the Poisson's effect. The polemic raised by these observations lead us to develop a method to study the elastic constants in thin films on substrates; it combines X-ray diffraction and in situ tensile testing. The results presented in this paper deal with the size effect on the elastic properties in tungsten layers with a thickness of a few nanometers. For that purpose, W/Cu multilayers with various thickness periods {lambda} ranging from 3 to 24 nm have been analysed. (orig.)

  3. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2017-02-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  4. Healing effect of sea buckthorn, olive oil, and their mixture on full-thickness burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edraki, Mitra; Akbarzadeh, Armin; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Tanideh, Nader; Salehi, Alireza; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the healing effect of silver sulfadiazine (SSD), sea buckthorn, olive oil, and 5% sea buckthorn and olive oil mixture on full-thickness burn wounds with respect to both gross and histopathologic features. Full-thickness burns were induced on 60 rats; the rats were then were divided into 5 groups and treated with sea buckthorn, olive oil, a 5% sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture, SSD, and normal saline (control). They were observed for 28 days, and the wounds' healing process was evaluated. Wound contraction occurred faster in sea buckthorn, olive oil, and the sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture groups compared with the SSD and control groups. The volume of the exudates was controlled more effectively in wounds treated with the sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture. Purulent exudates were observed in the control group, but the others did not show infection. The group treated with sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture revealed more developed re-epithelialization with continuous basement membrane with a mature granulation tissue, whereas the SSD-treated group showed ulceration, necrosis, and immature granulation. The results show that sea buckthorn and olive oil individually are proper dressing for burn wounds and that they also show a synergetic effect when they are used together. A sea buckthorn and olive oil mixture could be considered as an alternative dressing for full-thickness burns because of improved wound healing characteristics and antibacterial property.

  5. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2017-02-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  6. Effect of Heat Flux on Creep Stresses of Thick-Walled Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosayeb Davoudi Kashkoli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that the thermo-creep response of the material is governed by Norton’s law, an analytical solution is presented for the calculation of time-dependent creep stresses and displacements of homogeneous thick-walled cylindrical pressure vessels. For the stress analysis in a homogeneous pressure vessel, having material creep behavior, the solutions of the stresses at a time equal to zero (i.e. the initial stress state are needed. This corresponds to the solution of materials with linear elastic behavior. Therefore, using equations of equilibrium, stress-strain and strain-displacement, a differential equation for displacement is obtained and then the stresses at a time equal to zero are calculated. Using Norton’s law in the multi-axial form in conjunction with the above-mentioned equations in the rate form, the radial displacement rate is obtained and then the radial, circumferential and axial creep stress rates are calculated. When the stress rates are known, the stresses at any time are calculated iteratively. The analytical solution is obtained for the conditions of plane strain and plane stress. The thermal loading is as follows: inner surface is exposed to a uniform heat flux, and the outer surface is exposed to an airstream. The heat conduction equation for the one-dimensional problem in polar coordinates is used to obtain temperature distribution in the cylinder. The pressure, inner radius and outer radius are considered constant. Material properties are considered as constant. Following this, profiles are plotted for the radial displacements, radial stress, circumferential stress and axial stress as a function of radial direction and time.

  7. Thickness scaling effect on interfacial barrier and electrical contact to two-dimensional MoS2 layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song-Lin; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Nakaharai, Shu; Lin, Yen-Fu; Yamamoto, Mahito; Duan, Xiangfeng; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-12-23

    Understanding the interfacial electrical properties between metallic electrodes and low-dimensional semiconductors is essential for both fundamental science and practical applications. Here we report the observation of thickness reduction induced crossover of electrical contact at Au/MoS2 interfaces. For MoS2 thicker than 5 layers, the contact resistivity slightly decreases with reducing MoS2 thickness. By contrast, the contact resistivity sharply increases with reducing MoS2 thickness below 5 layers, mainly governed by the quantum confinement effect. We find that the interfacial potential barrier can be finely tailored from 0.3 to 0.6 eV by merely varying MoS2 thickness. A full evolution diagram of energy level alignment is also drawn to elucidate the thickness scaling effect. The finding of tailoring interfacial properties with channel thickness represents a useful approach controlling the metal/semiconductor interfaces which may result in conceptually innovative functionalities.

  8. Effects of phosphatidic acid supplementation on muscle thickness and strength in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Sell, Katie M; Ghigiarelli, Jamie J; Kelly, Christopher F; Shone, Edward W; Accetta, Matthew R; Baum, Jamie B; Mangine, Gerald T

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of phosphatidic acid (PA) supplementation on muscle thickness and strength following an 8 week supervised resistance-training program. Fifteen resistance trained men (22.8 ± 3.5 years; 80.6 ± 8.7 kg; 178.1 ± 5.6 cm; 14.6% ± 8.8% body fat) were randomly assigned to a group that either consumed 750 mg of PA or a placebo (PL). Testing was carried out before (PRE) and after (POST) training/supplementation for muscle thickness and strength. Muscle thickness of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), biceps brachii (BB), and triceps brachii (TB) muscles were measured via ultrasonography, along with 1 repetition maximum (1RM) of squat, deadlift, and bench press. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using PRE values as the covariate, did not reveal any group differences for measures of muscle thickness in the RF (PA: 3.6% ± 5.2%; PL: 3.2% ± 4.2%, p = 0.97), VL (PA: 23.4% ± 18.1%, PL: 12.5% ± 15.4%, p = 0.37), BB (PA: 3.7% ± 6.4%, PL: 9.6% ± 12.4%, p = 0.86), or TB (PA: 15.1% ± 17.9%, PL: 10.7% ± 19.3%, p = 0.79). Likewise, no group differences were observed in changes in squat (PA: 8.4% ± 4.1%, PL: 8.1% ± 4.2%, p = 0.79), deadlift (PA: 10.1% ± 10.1%, PL: 8.9% ± 9.5%, p = 0.66), or bench press (PA: 5.7% ± 5.5%, PL: 5.1% ± 3.0%, p = 0.76) exercises. Collectively, however, all participants experienced significant (p muscle thickness and strength. Results of this study suggest that PA supplementation, in combination with a 3 days·week -1 resistance-training program for 8 weeks, did not have a differential effect compared with PL on changes in muscle thickness or 1RM strength.

  9. Seismology of adolescent neutron stars: Accounting for thermal effects and crust elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, C. J.; Ho, W. C. G.; Andersson, N.

    2015-09-01

    We study the oscillations of relativistic stars, incorporating key physics associated with internal composition, thermal gradients and crust elasticity. Our aim is to develop a formalism which is able to account for the state-of-the-art understanding of the complex physics associated with these systems. As a first step, we build models using a modern equation of state including composition gradients and density discontinuities associated with internal phase transitions (like the crust-core transition and the point where muons first appear in the core). In order to understand the nature of the oscillation spectrum, we carry out cooling simulations to provide realistic snapshots of the temperature distribution in the interior as the star evolves through adolescence. The associated thermal pressure is incorporated in the perturbation analysis, and we discuss the presence of g -modes arising as a result of thermal effects. We also consider interface modes due to phase-transitions and the gradual formation of the star's crust and the emergence of a set of shear modes.

  10. Elastic Cherenkov effects in transversely isotropic soft materials-I: Theoretical analysis, simulations and inverse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Yang; Zheng, Yang; Liu, Yanlin; Destrade, Michel; Cao, Yanping

    2016-11-01

    A body force concentrated at a point and moving at a high speed can induce shear-wave Mach cones in dusty-plasma crystals or soft materials, as observed experimentally and named the elastic Cherenkov effect (ECE). The ECE in soft materials forms the basis of the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique, an ultrasound-based dynamic elastography method applied in clinics in recent years. Previous studies on the ECE in soft materials have focused on isotropic material models. In this paper, we investigate the existence and key features of the ECE in anisotropic soft media, by using both theoretical analysis and finite element (FE) simulations, and we apply the results to the non-invasive and non-destructive characterization of biological soft tissues. We also theoretically study the characteristics of the shear waves induced in a deformed hyperelastic anisotropic soft material by a source moving with high speed, considering that contact between the ultrasound probe and the soft tissue may lead to finite deformation. On the basis of our theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, we propose an inverse approach to infer both the anisotropic and hyperelastic parameters of incompressible transversely isotropic (TI) soft materials. Finally, we investigate the properties of the solutions to the inverse problem by deriving the condition numbers in analytical form and performing numerical experiments. In Part II of the paper, both ex vivo and in vivo experiments are conducted to demonstrate the applicability of the inverse method in practical use.

  11. The Effect of Thickness and Chemical Reduction of Graphene Oxide on Nanoscale Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangku; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Hyunsoo; Koh, Sang Joon; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk; Park, Jeong Young

    2018-01-18

    The tribological properties of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are quite different from three-dimensional continuum materials because of the unique mechanical responses of 2D layers. It is known that friction on graphene shows a remarkable decreasing behavior as the number of layers increases, which is caused by the puckering effect. On other graphene derivatives, such as graphene oxide (GO) or reduced graphene oxide (rGO), the thickness dependence of friction is important because of the possibilities for technical applications. In this report, we demonstrate unexpected layer-dependent friction behavior on GO and rGO layers. Friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on GO does not depend on the number of layers; however, after reduction, friction on rGO shows an inverse thickness dependence compared with pristine graphene. We show that the friction on rGO is higher than that on SiO2 at low load, and that an interesting crossover behavior at higher load occurs because of the lower friction coefficient and higher adhesion of the rGO. We provide a relevant interpretation that explains the effect of thickness and chemical reduction on nanoscale friction.

  12. Transverse resistive wall impedances and shielding effectiveness for beam pipes of arbitrary wall thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Al-Khateeb

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Using field matching techniques, closed form analytic expressions for the transverse impedance and for the shielding effectiveness of a smooth cylindrical beam pipe of arbitrary thickness are presented. In the limit of thick and thin beam pipes the well-known expressions are reproduced. The transverse transmission coefficient is compared with the longitudinal one that has been obtained in our previous work [A. M. Al-Khateeb, O. Boine-Frankenheim, R. W. Hasse, and I. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. E 71, 026501 (2005.PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.71.026501]. The results are applied to the heavy ion synchrotron SIS 18 and to the planned SIS 100 at GSI. In both machines the stainless steel beam pipe in the dipole sections is much thinner than the skin depths at the revolution frequency and, therefore, the impedance value and the transmission are of concern.

  13. Effect of initial conditions, boundary conditions and thickness on the moisture buffering capacity of spruce plywood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osanyintola, O. F.; Talukdar, P.; Simonson, C. J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (China)

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, the moisture buffering capacity of spruce plywood is measured by recording the change in mass of a test specimen when the air relative humidity (RH) is changed between 33% RH and 75% RH. The aim is to represent diurnal cycles in indoor humidity with 33% RH maintained for 16 h and 75% RH maintained for 8 h. Measurements are taken using two different apparatuses, which provide different convective transfer coefficients between the air and the plywood, and the results are compared to a numerical model for validation. The validated numerical model is then used to investigate the effect of initial conditions, boundary conditions and thickness on the moisture buffering capacity of plywood. The results show that the buffering capacity of plywood depends on the initial conditions and thickness of the plywood as well as the surface film coefficient and humidity cycle. (author)

  14. Effect of substrate on the results of measuring coating thickness according to radiation scattered by substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedavnij, O.I.; Khripunov, L.Z. (Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Introskopii)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a substrate on the results of measuring tantalum coating thickness in two-layer compositions according to gamma radiation scattered by the substrate is studied. It is shown that by means of an albedo-radiometer realizing the physical model absorber-scatterer one can determine the thickness (application uniformity) of tantalum coatings up to 150-300 ..mu..m depending on the substrate material (plexiglas, aluminium, iron, copper). In case of testing coatings on substrates of alloys and high-alloy steels in order to ensure high accuracy of measurement it is expedient with the above albedo-radiometer to determine the value of the backscattered radiation flux for the substrate before coating application.

  15. Focused electron beam induced processing and the effect of substrate thickness revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, W. F.; Beyer, A.; Mainka, M.

    2013-01-01

    thinner than the SE escape depth, confirm this hypothesis. We used membranes of 1.4 and 4.3 nm amorphous carbon as supports. At the very early stage, the growth is support-dominated and the growth rate on a 4.3 nm thick membrane is three times higher than on a 1.4 nm thick membrane. This is consistent...... at a precursor pressure 20 times lower than previously. Then, despite using membranes thinner than the SE escape depth, we did not see an effect on the experimental growth rate. We explain our current results by the fact that very early in the process, the growth becomes dominated by the growing deposit itself....

  16. Effects of an elastic mass on frequency response characteristics of an ultra-thin piezoelectric micro-acoustic actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Woo Seok; No, Kwangsoo

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an optimized method to improve the sound quality of ultra-thin piezoelectric micro-acoustic actuators. To achieve flat and smooth frequency response characteristics of the piezoelectric acoustic actuators, we have proposed an elastic mass attached to the acoustic diaphragm. The effects of the elastic mass on frequency response characteristics of the piezoelectric acoustic actuator were investigated by finite element analysis simulation and laser scanning vibrometer measurement. Based on the modal and vibrational characteristics, it was found that the fabricated piezoelectric acoustic actuator has a significant dip of 1.32 kHz and peak of 2.24 kHz, which correspond respectively to the (1,3) and (3,1) resonant modes of the acoustic diaphragm. However, by attaching an elastic mass to the acoustic diaphragm with a shape similar to the (3,1) mode, the resonant frequencies corresponding to the (1,3) and (3,1) modes shifted to higher frequencies and the vibrational displacements at each mode were dramatically reduced by about 40%. As a result, the dip at (1,3) mode was greatly improved by 13 dB and total harmonic distortion was dramatically reduced from 80.83% to 8.71%. This paper shows that the optimized elastic mass can allow flat and smooth frequency response characteristics by improving the significant peak and dip.

  17. Effects of Loading Frequency and Film Thickness on the Mechanical Behavior of Nanoscale TiN Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-na; Xu, Bin-shi; Wang, Hai-dou; Cui, Xiu-fang; Jin, Guo; Xing, Zhi-guo

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a nanoscale-thickness film material determine its reliability and service life. To achieve quantitative detection of film material mechanical performance based on nanoscale mechanical testing methods and to explore the influence of loading frequency of the cycle load on the fatigue test, a TiN film was prepared on monocrystalline silicon by magnetron sputtering. The microstructure of the nanoscale-thickness film material was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The residual stress distribution of the thin film was obtained by using an electronic film stress tester. The hardness values and the fatigue behavior were measured by using a nanomechanical tester. Combined with finite element simulation, the paper analyzed the influence of the film thickness and loading frequency on the deformation, as well as the equivalent stress and strain. The results showed that the TiN film was a typical face-centered cubic structure with a large amount of amorphous. The residual compressive stress decreased gradually with increasing thin film thickness, and the influence of the substrate on the elastic modulus and hardness was also reduced. A greater load frequency would accelerate the dynamic fatigue damage that occurs in TiN films.

  18. Effect of gender, age and anthropometric variables on plantar fascia thickness at different locations in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual Huerta, Javier [Department of Podiatry, Universidad Europea de Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: javier.pascual@uem.es; Alarcon Garcia, Juan Maria [Ultrasound Unit, Hospital Nuestra Senora de America, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: The study was aimed to investigate plantar fascia thickness at different locations in healthy asymptomatic subjects and its relationship to the following variables: weight, height, sex and age. Material and methods: The study evaluates 96 feet of healthy asymptomatic volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured at four different locations: 1 cm proximal to the insertion of the plantar fascia, at the insertion of the plantar fascia on the calcaneus and separate out 1 cm + 2 cm distal to the insertion. A 10 MHz linear-array transducer was used. Results: There were statistically significant differences in plantar fascia thickness at the four different locations (p < 0.001) although no differences in PF thickness were found between the two distal from insertion locations (1 and 2 cm). Multiple regression analysis showed sex as independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion. At origin and 1 cm distal to insertion weight was an independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness. Conclusions: There are differences of thickness at different locations of plantar fascia measured by ultrasonography. Thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion is influenced by sex and thickness at origin and at 1 cm distal to the insertion has a direct relationship with body weight. This could be attributed to the overloading effect that weight has on plantar fascia in healthy symptomatic subjects at these two locations. Height and age did not seem to influence as independent variables in plantar fascia thickness among non-painful subjects.

  19. Effects of dietary protein on glomerular mesangial area and basement membrane thickness in aged uninephrectomized dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, R A; Steffens, W L; Brown, C A; Brown, S A; Ard, M; Finco, D R

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of diets containing 18% or 34% protein on glomerular mesangial area (GMA) and basement membrane thickness (GBMT) in uninephrectomized aged dogs. A secondary objective was to determine the combined effects of aging and uninephrectomy on GMA and GBMT in dogs. Ten clinically healthy, pure-bred dogs were unilaterally nephrectomized at about 8 y of age. After 2 mo, 5 dogs were fed an 18% protein diet and 5 dogs were fed a 34% protein...

  20. Effects of elastic support on the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuaishuai; Zhu, Caichao; Song, Chaosheng; Han, Huali

    2017-09-01

    The reliability and service life of wind turbines are influenced by the complex loading applied on the hub, especially amidst a poor external wind environment. A three-point elastic support, which includes the main bearing and two torque arms, was considered in this study. Based on the flexibilities of the planet carrier and the housing, a coupled dynamic model was developed for a wind turbine drive train. Then, the dynamic behaviors of the drive train for different elastic support parameters were computed and analyzed. Frequency response functions were used to examine how different elastic support parameters influence the dynamic behaviors of the drive train. Results showed that the elastic support parameters considerably influenced the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train. A large support stiffness of the torque arms decreased the dynamic response of the planet carrier and the main bearing, whereas a large support stiffness of the main bearing decreased the dynamic response of planet carrier while increasing that of the main bearing. The findings of this study provide the foundation for optimizing the elastic support stiffness of the wind turbine drive train.

  1. Effect of Cortical Bone Thickness on Detection of Intraosseous Lesions by Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Adibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Usefulness of ultrasound (US in detection of intrabony lesions has been showed. A cortical bone perforation or a very thin and intact cortical bone is prerequisite for this purpose. Objective. The current in vitro study was aimed at measuring the cut-off thickness of the overlying cortical bone which allows ultrasonic assessment of bony defects. Materials and Methods. 20 bovine scapula blocks were obtained. Samples were numbered from 1 to 20. In each sample, 5 artificial lesions were made. The lesions were made in order to increase the overlying bone thickness, from 0.1 mm in the first sample to 2 mm in the last one (with 0.1 mm interval. After that, the samples underwent ultrasound examinations by two practicing radiologists. Results. All five lesions in samples numbered 1 to 11 were detected as hypoechoic area. Cortical bone thickness more than 1.1 mm resulted in a failure in the detection of central lesions. Conclusion. We can conclude that neither bony perforation nor very thin cortical bones are needed to consider US to be an effective imaging technique in the evaluation of bony lesion.

  2. The Effect of Selected Conditions in a Thermoforming Process on Wall Thickness Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Sasimowski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports the results of a study on the effect of selected conditions in a thermoforming process for thin polystyrene sheet by vacuum assisted drape forming on the wall thickness non-uniformity of finished parts. The investigation was performed using Statistica’s DOE module for three variables: temperatures in the external and internal zones of the heater as well as heating time of the plastic sheet. The results demonstrate that the wall thickness in the finished parts at the measuring points is primarily affected by the heating time and the temperature in the internal zone of the heater, while the temperature in the external zone only affects some regions of the finished part. The results demonstrate that a short heating time and hence a lower temperature of the plastic sheet lead to a more uniform deformation of both the bottom and the side walls of the finished part, and as a consequence, to smaller variations in the wall thickness. The shortening of the heating time is however limited by the necessity of accurate reproduction of the shape of the finished part.

  3. Thickness-Dependent Strain Effect on the Deformation of the Graphene-Encapsulated Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangli Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strain effect on graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles is investigated. A finite-element calculation is performed to simulate the strain distribution and morphology of the monolayer and multilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, respectively. It can be found that the inhomogeneous strain and deformation are enhanced with the increasing shrinkage of the graphene shell. Moreover, the strain distribution and deformation are very sensitive to the layer number of the graphene shell. Especially, the inhomogeneous strain at the interface between the graphene shell and encapsulated Au nanoparticles is strongly tuned by the graphene thickness. For the mono- and bilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, the dramatic shape transformation can be observed. However, with increasing the graphene thickness further, there is hardly deformation for the encapsulated Au nanoparticles. These simulated results indicate that the strain and deformation can be designed by the graphene layer thickness, which provides an opportunity to engineer the structure and morphology of the graphene-encapsulated nanoparticles.

  4. Defect concentration in nitrogen-doped graphene grown on Cu substrate: A thickness effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dhananjay K.; Fateixa, Sara; Hortigüela, María J.; Vidyasagar, Reddithota; Otero-Irurueta, Gonzalo; Nogueira, Helena I. S.; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Kholkin, Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Tuning the band-gap of graphene is a current need for real device applications. Copper (Cu) as a substrate plays a crucial role in graphene deposition. Here we report the fabrication of in-situ nitrogen (N) doped graphene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and the effect of Cu substrate thickness on the growth mechanism. The ratio of intensities of G and D peaks was used to evaluate the defect concentration based on local activation model associated with the distortion of the crystal lattice due to incorporation of nitrogen atoms into graphene lattice. The results suggest that Cu substrate of 20 μm in thickness exhibits higher defect density (1.86×1012 cm-2) as compared to both 10 and 25 μm thick substrates (1.23×1012 cm-2 and 3.09×1011 cm-2, respectively). Furthermore, High Resolution -X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS) precisely affirms 0.4 at% of nitrogen intercalations in graphene. Our results show that the substitutional type of nitrogen doping dominates over the pyridinic configuration. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows all the XRD peaks associated with carbon. However, the peak at 24° is suppressed by the substrate peaks (Cu). These results suggest that nitrogen atoms can be efficiently incorporated into the graphene using thinner copper substrates, rather than the standard 25 μm ones. This is important for tailoring the properties by graphene required for microelectronic applications.

  5. Modeling ozone removal to indoor materials, including the effects of porosity, pore diameter, and thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Elliott T; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Corsi, Richard L

    2015-04-07

    We develop an ozone transport and reaction model to determine reaction probabilities and assess the importance of physical properties such as porosity, pore diameter, and material thickness on reactive uptake of ozone to five materials. The one-dimensional model accounts for molecular diffusion from bulk air to the air-material interface, reaction at the interface, and diffusive transport and reaction through material pore volumes. Material-ozone reaction probabilities that account for internal transport and internal pore area, γ(ipa), are determined by a minimization of residuals between predicted and experimentally derived ozone concentrations. Values of γ(ipa) are generally less than effective reaction probabilities (γ(eff)) determined previously, likely because of the inclusion of diffusion into substrates and reaction with internal surface area (rather than the use of the horizontally projected external material areas). Estimates of γ(ipa) average 1 × 10(-7), 2 × 10(-7), 4 × 10(-5), 2 × 10(-5), and 4 × 10(-7) for two types of cellulose paper, pervious pavement, Portland cement concrete, and an activated carbon cloth, respectively. The transport and reaction model developed here accounts for observed differences in ozone removal to varying thicknesses of the cellulose paper, and estimates a near constant γ(ipa) as material thickness increases from 0.02 to 0.16 cm.

  6. The Effects of Accretion Disk Thickness on the Black Hole Reflection Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Corbin; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2018-01-01

    Despite being the gravitational engines that power galactic-scale winds and mega parsec-scale jets in active galaxies, black holes are remarkably simple objects, typically being fully described by their angular momenta (spin) and masses. The modelling of AGN X-ray reflection spectra has proven fruitful in estimating the spin of AGN, as well as giving insight into their accretion histories and into the properties of plasmas in the strong gravity regime. However, current models make simplifying assumptions about the geometry of the reflecting material in the accretion disk and the irradiating X-ray corona, approximating the disk as an optically thick, infinitely thin disk of material in the orbital plane. We present results from the new relativistic raytracing suite, Fenrir, that explore the effects that disk thickness may have on the reflection spectrum and the accompanying reverberation signatures. Approximating the accretion disk as an optically thick, geometrically thin, radiation pressure dominated disk (Shakura & Sunyaev 1973), one finds that the disk geometry is non-negligible in many cases, with significant changes in the broad Fe K line profile. Finally, we explore the systematic errors inherent in other contemporary models that approximate that disk as having negligible vertical extent.

  7. The effect of spatial resolution upon cloud optical property retrievals. I - Optical thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feind, Rand E.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1992-01-01

    High spectral and spatial resolution Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imagery is used to study the effects of spatial resolution upon fair weather cumulus cloud optical thickness retrievals. As a preprocessing step, a variation of the Gao and Goetz three-band ratio technique is used to discriminate clouds from the background. The combination of the elimination of cloud shadow pixels and using the first derivative of the histogram allows for accurate cloud edge discrimination. The data are progressively degraded from 20 m to 960 m spatial resolution. The results show that retrieved cloud area increases with decreasing spatial resolution. The results also show that there is a monotonic decrease in retrieved cloud optical thickness with decreasing spatial resolution. It is also demonstrated that the use of a single, monospectral reflectance threshold is inadequate for identifying cloud pixels in fair weather cumulus scenes and presumably in any inhomogeneous cloud field. Cloud edges have a distribution of reflectance thresholds. The incorrect identification of cloud edges significantly impacts the accurate retrieval of cloud optical thickness values.

  8. Effect of adherend thickness and mixed mode loading on debond growth in adhesively bonded composite joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Symmetric and unsymmetric double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were tested and analyzed to assess the effect of: (1) adherend thickness, and (2) a predominantly mode I mixed mode loading on cyclic debond growth and static fracture toughness. The specimens were made of unidirectional composite (T300/5208) adherends bonded together with EC3445 structural adhesive. The thickness was 8, 16, or 24 plies. The experimental results indicated that the static fracture toughness increases and the cyclic debond growth rate decreases with increasing adherend thickness. This behavior was related to the length of the plastic zone ahead of the debond tip. For the symmetric DCB specimens, it was further found that displacement control tests resulted in higher debond growth rates than did load control tests. While the symmetric DCB tests always resulted in cohesive failures in the bondline, the unsymmetric DCB tests resulted in the debond growing into the thinner adherend and the damage progressing as delamination in that adherend. This behavior resulted in much lower fracture toughness and damage growth rates than found in the symmetric DCB tests.

  9. Medial Femoral Condyle Cartilage Defect Biomechanics: Effect of Obesity, Defect Size, and Cartilage Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Kyle W; Cracchiolo, Allison; Yu, Stephen; Goitz, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Medial femoral condyle (MFC) chondral defects cause knee pain. Clinical studies have shown worse functional outcomes and cartilage defect fill rates after microfracture in obese patients (BMI ≥30) and for defects with size ≥2 cm(2). To determine the effect of obesity, defect size, and cartilage thickness on the force sustained at the base of full-thickness MFC cartilage defects during weightbearing. Controlled laboratory study. Eight human cadaveric knees were loaded in 15° of flexion. A sensor measured force across the medial compartment. The area at the base of the defect protected from load, termed the "area of containment," was quantified, and loads simulating weightbearing for BMIs of 20, 30, and 40 were applied. A full-thickness cartilage defect was created on the MFC. Cycles of loads were applied for defect sizes with diameters of 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 mm. A second sensor recorded force at the base of the defect for defects with diameters of 14, 16, 18, and 20 mm. Loads simulating BMI ≥30 led to a decrease in the area of containment for all defects ≥14 mm in diameter (P ≤ .038). Base of defect force increased for defects ≥16 mm in diameter (area, ≥2 cm(2)) between loaded and unloaded states (P ≤ .042) and for loads simulating BMI ≥30 (P ≤ .045). Cartilage rim thickness biomechanically unfavorable environment after microfracture in these patient subsets. These biomechanical findings corroborate clinical studies that have noted worse outcomes after microfracture in patients with BMI ≥30 and cartilage defects of size ≥2 cm(2). Further clinical studies are needed to compare microfracture with other cartilage restoration procedures in these patient subsets. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Effect of fingolimod (FTY720) on choroidal thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, Ali; Oğuz Ulusoy, Mahmut; Horasanlı, Bahriye; Cezairlioğlu, Şefik; Kal, Öznur

    2017-05-01

    Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), to compare the choroidal thickness in a healthy population (group 1), with newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) patients (group 2), with MS patients who underwent β-interferon monotherapy (group 3) and MS patients who underwent fingolimod therapy for 1 year (group 4) METHODS: Twenty-five control subjects (25 eyes), 24 newly diagnosed (24 eyes) MS patients, 22 MS patients who underwent fingolimod monotherapy for 1 year (22 eyes), and 24 MS patients who underwent β-interferon monotherapy for 1 year (24 eyes) were included in this study. The control group consisted of age- and gender-matched healthy individuals. The choroidal thickness measurements were performed using a high-speed and high-resolution SD-OCT device. The choroidal thickness measurements were compared using a One Way Anova and Post-Hoc Tukey test. Ninety-five eyes of 95 participants were included in this study. The mean age of the control group was 27.83±4.60, and it was 26.83±6.79, 27.87±6. 46 and 27.58±6.65 in the newly diagnosed MS group, fingolimod group and β-interferon group, respectively. In fingolimod group N-1000, N-1500 and T-1500 was significantly lower than control group. (p=0.026, p=0.06 p=0.13) CONCLUSION: Choroidal thickness values at N-1000, N-1500 and T-1500 levels in fingolimod group were found lower than in control but higher than in newly diagnosed MS group. This result can be explained with the therapeutic effect of the fingolimod on MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of coping thickness and background type on the masking ability of a zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaian, Farhad; Taghizade, Fateme; Namdari, Mahshid

    2017-05-05

    The masking ability of zirconia ceramics as copings is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of coping thickness and background type on the masking ability of a zirconia ceramic and to determine zirconia coping thickness cut offs for masking the backgrounds investigated. Thirty zirconia disks in 3 thickness groups of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mm were placed on 9 backgrounds to measure CIELab color attributes using a spectrophotometer. The backgrounds included A1, A2, and A3.5 shade composite resin, A3 shade zirconia, nickel-chromium alloy, nonprecious gold-colored alloy, amalgam, black, and white. ΔE values were measured to determine color differences between the specimens on the A2 shade composite resin background and the same specimens on the other backgrounds. The color change (ΔE) values were compared with threshold values for acceptability (ΔE=5.5) and perceptibility (ΔE=2.6). Repeated measures ANOVA, the Bonferroni test, and 1-sample t tests were used to analyze data (α=.05). Mean ΔE values ranged between 1.44 and 7.88. The zirconia coping thickness, the background type, and their interaction affected the CIELab and ΔE values (Pthickness of a zirconia coping should be 0.4 mm for A1 and A3.5 shade composite resin, A3 shade zirconia, and nonprecious gold-colored alloy, 0.6 mm for amalgam, and 0.8 mm for nickel-chromium alloy. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Elastic Beanstalk

    CERN Document Server

    Vliet, Jurg; Wel, Steven; Dowd, Dara

    2011-01-01

    While it's always been possible to run Java applications on Amazon EC2, Amazon's Elastic Beanstalk makes the process easier-especially if you understand how it works beneath the surface. This concise, hands-on book not only walks you through Beanstalk for deploying and managing web applications in the cloud, you'll also learn how to use this AWS tool in other phases of development. Ideal if you're a developer familiar with Java applications or AWS, Elastic Beanstalk provides step-by-step instructions and numerous code samples for building cloud applications on Beanstalk that can handle lots

  13. Effectiveness of Hamstring Knee Rehabilitation Exercise Performed in Training Machine vs. Elastic Resistance Electromyography Evaluation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M. D.; Sundstrup, E.; Andersen, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate muscle activity during hamstring rehabilitation exercises performed in training machine compared with elastic resistance. Design Six women and 13 men aged 28-67 yrs participated in a crossover study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in ...... extended knee angles and with higher perceived loading as hamstring curls using training machines.......Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate muscle activity during hamstring rehabilitation exercises performed in training machine compared with elastic resistance. Design Six women and 13 men aged 28-67 yrs participated in a crossover study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded...... in the biceps femoris and the semitendinosus during the concentric and the eccentric phase of hamstring curls performed with TheraBand elastic tubing and Technogym training machines and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction-EMG (normalized EMG). Knee joint angle was measured using electronic...

  14. To the theory of elastic properties of isotropic magnetic gels. Effect of interparticle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lopez, M. T.; Iskakova, L. Yu; Zubarev, A. Yu; Borin, D. Yu

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with theoretical study of elastic shear properties of a magnetic gel, consisting of spherical magnetizable particles, randomly (gas-like) distributed in an elastic matrix. We suppose that the composite is placed in a magnetic field, perpendicular to the direction of the sample shear. In order to get mathematically rigorous results, we have restricted ourselves by the analysis of the system with a low concentration of the particles. Magnetic and elastic (through the matrix deformation) interactions between them are considered in the framework of the regular pair approximation. Analysis shows that external magnetic field decreases the macroscopic shear modulus of the composite with a low concentration of the particles. The decreasing dependence of the modulus on the macroscopic shear is estimated. We believe that the suggested rigorous approach can be a robust background for the study of the systems with a high concentration of the particles.

  15. Effect of Microstructure Constraints on the Homogenized Elastic Constants of Elastomeric Sylgard/GMB Syntactic Foam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steck, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Previous numerical studies of Sylgard filled with glass microballoons (GMB) have relied on various microstructure idealizations to achieve a large range of volume fractions with high mesh quality. This study investigates how different microstructure idealizations and constraints affect the apparent homogenized elastic constants in the virgin state of the material, in which all GMBs are intact and perfectly bonded to the Sylgard matrix, and in the fully damaged state of the material in which all GMBs are destroyed. In the latter state, the material behaves as an elastomeric foam. Four microstructure idealizations are considered relating to how GMBs are packed into a representative volume element (RVE): (1) no boundary penetration nor GMB-GMB overlap, (2) GMB-GMB overlap, (3) boundary penetration, and (4) boundary penetration and GMB-GMB overlap. First order computational homogenization with kinematically uniform displacement boundary conditions (KUBCs) was employed to determine the homogenized (apparent) bulk and shear moduli for the four microstructure idealizations in the intact and fully broken GMB material states. It was found that boundary penetration has a significant effect on the shear modulus for microstructures with intact GMBs, but that neither boundary penetration nor GMB overlap have a significant effect on homogenized properties for microstructures with fully broken GMBs. The primary conclusion of the study is that future investigations into Sylgard/GMB micromechanics should either force GMBs to stay within the RVE fully and/or use periodic BCs (PBCs) to eliminate the boundary penetration issues. The implementation of PBCs requires the improvement of existing tools in Sandia’s Sierra/SM code.

  16. Control of propagation characteristics of spin wave pulses via elastic and thermal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Arista, Ivan [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O., E-mail: oleg.kolokoltsev@ccadet.unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Acevedo, A.; Qureshi, N. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Ordóñez-Romero, César L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico)

    2017-05-01

    A study of the magnetoelastic (ME) and thermal effects governing the phase (φ) and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides is presented. The ME effects were studied in a flexural configuration, under punctual mechanical force (F). Thermally induced ME and demagnetization phenomena were controlled by optically injected thermal power P{sub th}. It was determined that in an unclamped Ga:YIG waveguide, the force F that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the P{sub th} at which Δφ=π decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. For nano-volume waveguides the ME control energy (E{sub me}) can be of order of aJ, and the thermal control energy (ΔE{sub th}) can be as small as 50 fJ. The response time of these effects lies in the ns time scale. Both the mechanical and the thermo-magnetic forces provide an effective control of MSSW pulse amplitude, in addition to its phase shift. The thermo-magnetic effect allows one to realize variable delays of a MSSW pulse. - Highlights: • The Magneto-elastic (ME) and optically induced thermal effects governing the phase and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides are presented. • A mechanical force that causes phase shift Δφ=π for spin waves in the waveguides decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the optical power that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. • The response time of these effects can lie in the ns time scale.

  17. The effect of hip rotation on shear elastic modulus of the medial and lateral hamstrings during stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umegaki, Hiroki; Ikezoe, Tome; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nishishita, Satoru; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-02-01

    Regarding hamstring stretching methods, many studies have investigated the effect of stretching duration or frequency on muscle stiffness. However, the most effective stretching positions for hamstrings are unclear because it is impossible to quantify muscle elongation directly and noninvasively in vivo. Recently, a new ultrasound technology, ultrasonic shear wave elastography, has permitted noninvasive and reliable measurement of muscle shear elastic modulus, which has a strong linear relationship to the amount of muscle elongation. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hip internal and external rotation on shear elastic modulus of the lateral and medial hamstrings, respectively, during stretching in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Twenty-three healthy men (age, 23.0 ± 2.1 years) were recruited for this study. To investigate the effect of hip rotation on the elongation of the medial and lateral hamstrings, shear elastic modulus of the biceps femoris (BF) and semitendinosus (ST) was measured at rest (a supine position with 90° knee flexion, 90° hip flexion, and hip neutral rotation) and in seven stretching positions (with 45° knee flexion and hip internal, external, and neutral rotation) using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. In both BF and ST, the shear elastic modulus in the rest position was significantly lower than that in all stretching positions. However, no significant differences were seen among stretching positions. Our results suggest that adding hip rotation at a stretching position for the hamstrings may not have a significant effect on muscle elongation of the medial and lateral hamstrings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of sildenafil citrate on secondary healing in full thickness skin defects in experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, E; Karasoy Yesilada, A; Sevim, K Z; Sumer, O; Tatlidede, H S; Sakiz, D

    2014-01-01

    An acceleration of the wound healing process expedites chronic wound patient's return to normal social environments significantly. Sildenafil, a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent phosphodiesterase- 5 inhibitor has been shown to be a potent stimulator of angiogenesis through upregulation of cGMP. In our study, sildenafil was administered orally as a cost-effective supplement in the treatment of full thickness defects and chronic wounds in that manner with low incidence of side effects and morbidity. Randomly selected 72 Wistar-Albino rats were divided into the two groups, 36 rats in each group. Control group (n =36) was divided further into a secondary healing group consisting of 9 rats and a pathology group consisting of 27 rats (pathology group 1: 9 rats, 4th and 7th day of wound healing, pathology group 2: 9 rats, 10th and 14th day of wound healing, pathology group 3: 9 rats, 21st and 28th day of wound healing. Experimental group consisted of 36 rats which received sildenafil citrate (Viagra® Pfizer, Germany) for secondary wound healing to proceed. The average wound healing period in the control group was 17.89 days and in the sildenafil citrate administered group 14.56 days. The difference of the epithelialisation on full thickness defects were more prominent on days 5 and 11 postoperatively. In the sildenafil citrate applied group, on the 7th day, the defect was 25% smaller and on the 13th day, the defect contracted by 38%. In conclusion, we believe that sildenafil citrate administered orally is a cost- effective supplement in the treatment of full thickness defects and chronic wounds in that manner with low incidence of side effects and morbidity (Tab. 4, Fig. 7, Ref. 34).

  19. Investigation of Effects of Material Architecture on the Elastic Response of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2012-01-01

    To develop methods for quantifying the effects of the microstructural variations of woven ceramic matrix composites on the effective properties and response of the material, a research program has been undertaken which is described in this paper. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, CVI SiC/SiC, composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents and collect relevant statistics such as within ply tow spacing. This information was then used to build two dimensional finite element models that approximated the observed section geometry. With the aid of geometrical models generated by the microstructural characterization process, finite element models were generated and analyses were performed to quantify the effects of the microstructure and its variation on the effective stiffness and areas of stress concentration of the material. The results indicated that the geometry and distribution of the porosity appear to have significant effects on the through-thickness modulus. Similarly, stress concentrations on the outer surface of the composite appear to correlate to regions where the transverse tows are separated by a critical amount.

  20. ELASTICITY of SHORT FIBRE REINFORCED POLYAMIDE: MORPHOLOGICAL AND NUMERICAl ANALYSIS OF FIBRE ORIENTATION EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cosmi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behaviour of injection moulded short fibre reinforced polymers depends upon fibre orientation, as shown in experiments conducted with notched specimens injected through different injection gates. The different fatigue behaviour is mainly related to the different local elastic properties, as determined by the different fibre orientation patterns, resulting into different strain distributions. In order to quantify the relationship between fibre orientation and elastic constants, the Cell Method was applied to volumes extracted from the specimens, reconstructed by micro-tomography.

  1. Dissipation Effect in the Hunting Motion Stability of Wheel Set with Elastic Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Baldovin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The axle hunting is a coupled lateral and yaw self oscillatory motion which is largely determined by wheel–rail contact geometry. The stability of this motion is an important dynamic problem that determines the maximum operating speed of railway vehicle. To improve the stability performances, without increasing the rail-wheel interaction forces above safety limits, elastic joints and dissipative devices are used to connect the wheelset to the bogy frame. In this paper is studied the influence of passive linear and non-linear dissipative horizontal forces on the hunting motion stability of a wheelset with elastic joints.

  2. Nanoindentation of orthodontic archwires: The effect of decontamination and clinical use on hardness, elastic modulus and surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Joseph P; Barbour, Michele E; Sandy, Jonathan R; Ireland, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of decontamination and clinical exposure on the elastic moduli, hardness and surface roughness of two frequently used orthodontic archwires, namely 0.020in.x0.020in. heat activated (martensitic active) nickel titanium archwires and 0.019in.x0.025in. austenitic stainless steel archwires. This study was a prospective clinical trial in which 20 consecutive patients requiring an archwire change as part of their course of orthodontic fixed appliance therapy, had either a nickel titanium or stainless steel archwire fitted as deemed clinically necessary. The effect of clinical use was determined by comparing distal end cuts of the "as received" archwires before and after decontamination, with the same retrieved archwires following clinical use and decontamination. Hardness, elastic modulus and surface roughness were determined using an atomic force microscope (AFM) coupled with a nanoindenter. The results showed that the decontamination regimen and clinical use had no statistically significant effect on the nickel titanium archwires, but did have a statistically significant effect on the steel archwires. Decontamination of the steel wires significantly increased the observed surface hardness (p=0.01) and reduced the surface roughness (p=0.02). Clinical use demonstrated a statistically significant increase in the observed elastic modulus (p<0.001) and a decrease in surface roughness (p=0.001). At present it is difficult to predict the clinical significance of these statistically significant changes in archwire properties on orthodontic tooth movement.

  3. Clarification of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on the effective elastic moduli of polycrystals with hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, J.P.; Peselnick, L.

    1980-01-01

    Bounds on the effective elastic moduli of randomly oriented aggregates of hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal crystals are derived using the variational principles of Hashin and Shtrikman. The bounds are considerably narrower than the widely used Voigt and Reuss bounds. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average lies within the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds in nearly all cases. Previous bounds of Peselnick and Meister are shown to be special cases of the present results.

  4. Pair collisions of fluid-filled elastic capsules in shear flow: Effects of membrane properties and polymer additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranay, Pratik; Anekal, Samartha G.; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; Graham, Michael D.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics and pair collisions of fluid-filled elastic capsules during Couette flow in Newtonian fluids and dilute solutions of high-molecular weight (drag-reducing) polymers are investigated via direct simulation. Capsule membranes are modeled using either a neo-Hookean constitutive model or a model introduced by Skalak et al. ["Strain energy function of red blood-cell membranes," Biophys. J. 13, 245 (1973)], which includes an energy penalty for area changes. This model was developed to capture the elastic properties of red blood cells. Polymer molecules are modeled as bead-spring trimers with finitely extensible nonlinearly elastic springs; parameters were chosen to loosely approximate 4000 kDa poly(ethylene oxide). Simulations are performed with a novel Stokes flow formulation of the immersed boundary method for the capsules, combined with Brownian dynamics for the polymer molecules. The results for isolated capsules in shear indicate that at the very low concentrations considered here, polymers have a little effect on the capsule shape. In the case of pair collisions, the effect of polymer is strongly dependent on the elastic properties of the capsules' membranes. For neo-Hookean capsules or for Skalak capsules with only a small penalty for area change, the net displacement in the gradient direction after collision is virtually unaffected by the polymer. For Skalak capsules with a large penalty for area change, polymers substantially decrease the net displacement when compared to the Newtonian case and the effect is enhanced upon increasing the polymer concentration. The differences between the polymer effects in the various cases are associated with the extensional flow generated in the region between the capsules as they leave the collision. The extension rate is highest when there is a strong resistance to a change in the membrane area and is substantially decreased in the presence of polymer.

  5. EFFECT OF KAYAK ERGOMETER ELASTIC TENSION ON UPPER LIMB EMG ACTIVITY AND 3D KINEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Fleming

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the prevalence of shoulder injury in kayakers, limited published research examining associated upper limb kinematics and recruitment patterns exists. Altered muscle recruitment patterns on-ergometer vs. on-water kayaking were recently reported, however, mechanisms underlying changes remain to be elucidated. The current study assessed the effect of ergometer recoil tension on upper limb recruitment and kinematics during the kayak stroke. Male kayakers (n = 10 performed 4 by 1 min on-ergometer exercise bouts at 85%VO2max at varying elastic recoil tension; EMG, stroke force and three-dimensional 3D kinematic data were recorded. While stationary recoil forces significantly increased across investigated tensions (125% increase, p < 0.001, no significant differences were detected in assessed force variables during the stroke cycle. In contrast, increasing tension induced significantly higher Anterior Deltoid (AD activity in the latter stages (70 to 90% of the cycle (p < 0.05. No significant differences were observed across tension levels for Triceps Brachii or Latissimus Dorsi. Kinematic analysis revealed that overhead arm movements accounted for 39 ± 16% of the cycle. Elbow angle at stroke cycle onset was 144 ± 10°; maximal elbow angle (151 ± 7° occurred at 78 ± 10% into the cycle. All kinematic markers moved to a more anterior position as tension increased. No significant change in wrist marker elevation was observed, while elbow and shoulder marker elevations significantly increased across tension levels (p < 0.05. In conclusion, data suggested that kayakers maintained normal upper limb kinematics via additional AD recruitment despite ergometer induced recoil forces

  6. The effects of elastic supports on the transient vibroacoustic response of a window caused by sonic booms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Dayi; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2011-08-01

    The transient vibration and sound radiation (TVSR) of plate-like structures with general elastic boundary conditions was investigated using the time-domain finite element method (TDFEM) and time-domain boundary element method (TDBEM). In this model, the structure can have arbitrary elastic boundary conditions and hence the effects of the boundary conditions on the TVSR can be effectively studied. The predicted results agreed well with existing experimental data using two classical boundary conditions: simply supported at all edges and clamped-free-free-free. The TVSR of a single panel with a more general boundary condition in two connected chambers was also measured. The predicted results agreed well with these experimental results. The prediction method was subsequently applied to evaluate the effects of elastic boundary supports on the TVSR of a window caused by a sonic boom. Loudness, non-audible acoustic perception, and tactile vibration thresholds were analyzed for different boundary conditions (varying between clamped and simply supported). The possibility of improving the transient vibration and noise isolation performance by selecting an appropriate boundary condition was thereby demonstrated.

  7. Optimization of custom cementless stem using finite element analysis and elastic modulus distribution for reducing stress-shielding effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravana Kumar, Gurunathan; George, Subin Philip

    2017-02-01

    This work proposes a methodology involving stiffness optimization for subject-specific cementless hip implant design based on finite element analysis for reducing stress-shielding effect. To assess the change in the stress-strain state of the femur and the resulting stress-shielding effect due to insertion of the implant, a finite element analysis of the resected femur with implant assembly is carried out for a clinically relevant loading condition. Selecting the von Mises stress as the criterion for discriminating regions for elastic modulus difference, a stiffness minimization method was employed by varying the elastic modulus distribution in custom implant stem. The stiffness minimization problem is formulated as material distribution problem without explicitly penalizing partial volume elements. This formulation enables designs that could be fabricated using additive manufacturing to make porous implant with varying levels of porosity. Stress-shielding effect, measured as difference between the von Mises stress in the intact and implanted femur, decreased as the elastic modulus distribution is optimized.

  8. Effect of cross-sectional design on the modulus of elasticity and toughness of fiber-reinforced composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Scott R; Lassila, Lippo V J; Jokinen, Mikko; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2005-09-01

    Many current fabrication protocols for dental fiber-reinforced composites use hand lay-up techniques and technician design input. Little information exists regarding how the manipulation of the cross-sectional design of a prosthesis might affect the modulus of elasticity and toughness. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of simple and complex cross-sectional designs on the modulus of elasticity and toughness of fiber-reinforced composite used for dental prostheses. Two particulate composites (BelleGlass HP and Targis) were reinforced with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene fiber ribbon (Connect), woven E-glass fibers (Vectris Frame), or unidirectional R-glass fibers (Vectris Pontic). A range of fiber positions, orientations, or geometries were incorporated into the rhombic specimens (2 x 2 x 25 mm(3)) to achieve simple and complex experimental cross-sectional designs. The control specimen did not contain fiber reinforcement. Specimens (n=6) were stored 1 week in distilled water at 37 degrees C prior to 3-point load testing to determine the modulus of elasticity (GPa) and toughness (MPa). The data within each main fiber group were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and a Tukey post hoc test (alpha=.05). Cross-sections of randomly selected test specimens (n=2) were made for scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the fiber distribution. The mean modulus of elasticity varied from 8.7 +/- 2.0 GPa (Targis control) to 21.6 +/- 1.4 GPa (2 unidirectional glass fiber reinforcements, 1 each at the tension side and the compression side). Mean toughness varied from 0.07 +/- 0.02 MPa (unidirectional glass fiber positioned at the compression side) as the lowest mean, to 4.53 +/- 0.89 MPa (unidirectional glass fiber positioned at the tension side) as the highest. Significant differences were identified between specimen groups in each main category (all groups Pmodulus of elasticity of the woven E-glass groups, where P=.003). SEM micrographs showed

  9. Rotational elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  10. Evaluation the Effects of Some Relevant Parameters on Elastic Modulus of Pumpkin Seed and Its Kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour-Fard, Mohammad Hossein; Khodabakhshian, Rasool; Emadi, Bagher; Sadrnia, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    The elastic modulus of two varieties of Iranian pumpkin seed and its kernel (namely, Zaria and Gaboor) were evaluated as a function of size (large, medium, and small), loading rate (2, 5, 8, and 10 mm/min), and moisture content (4, 7.8, 14, and 20% d.b) under quasistatic compression loading. The results showed that elastic modulus of pumpkin seed and its kernel decreased with increasing moisture content and also increasing loading rate, for the varieties under study. The average modulus of elasticity of pumpkin seed from 68.86 to 46.65 Mpa and from 97.14 to 74.93 Mpa was obtained for moisture levels ranging from 4 to 20%, for Zaria and Gaboor varieties, respectively. The elastic modulus of pumpkin seed decreased from 73.55 to 43.04 Mpa and from 101.83 to 71.32 Mpa with increasing loading rate from 2 to 10 mm/min for Zaria and Gaboor varieties, respectively. PMID:22481937

  11. Self-affine roughness effects on the contact area between elastic bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the real contact area between elastic bodies with self-affine rough surfaces, which are described in terms of analytical correlation models in Fourier space. It is found that the roughness has a strong influence on the real contact area A(lambda) at lateral length scales lambda

  12. Diameter effect on stress-wave evaluation of modulus of elasticity of logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Brian K. Brashaw; John Punches; John R. Erickson; John W. Forsman; Roy E. Pellerin

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of logs have shown that a longitudinal stress-wave method can be used to nondestructively evaluate the modulus of elasticity (MOE) of logs. A strong relationship has been found between stress-wave MOE and static MOE of logs, but a significant deviation was observed between stress-wave and static values. The objective of...

  13. The effect of different pH levels on conventional vs. super-force chain elastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of pH levels on force decay and cytotoxicity of elastic chains submersed in artificial saliva. The samples were divided into two groups: Group SF (Polyurethane elastic, super force and Group C (Polyurethane elastic, conventional, which were stretched to 100% of their initial length. They were kept in artificial saliva solutions at pH levels of 5.0, 6.0 and 7.5 for time intervals of 10 seconds, 1, 14 and 28 days. Cytotoxicity assay was performed in cells (L929-fibroblast, subjected to "dye-uptake" test. ANOVA, Sidak method and Tukey’s test were used. The pH did not interfere directly in force decay results of tested elastics. Cytotoxicity test showed that Group SF presented similar cell viability when compared with Group C. There was gradual reduction in cell viability from beginning to 28th day. The pH had no significant influence on force decay and cytotoxicity. Time had more influence and contributed to variability in results.

  14. The effect of cocontraction of the masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on thickness of the neck flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun-Ju; Goo, Bong-Oh; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the cocontraction of masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on changes in the thickness of the neck flexors. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects performed neck stabilization only exercise and neck stabilization exercise with simultaneous contraction of the masticatory muscles. Changes in the thickness of the longus colli and sternocleidomastoid were then measured by ultrasound. [Results] The thickness of the longus colli increased significantly fallowing cocontraction of the masticatory muscles and neck stabilization exercise, whereas the exercise method used had no significant effect on the thickness of the sternocleidomastoid. [Conclusion] Cocontraction of the masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercise is helpful in increasing the thickness of longus colli muscle.

  15. The Effect of Thermal Fluctuation on the Receptor-Mediated Adhesion of a Cell Membrane to an Elastic Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Marzban

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanics of the bilayer membrane play an important role in many biological and bioengineering problems such as cell–substrate and cell–nanomaterial interactions. In this work, we study the effect of thermal fluctuation and the substrate elasticity on the cell membrane–substrate adhesion. We model the adhesion of a fluctuating membrane on an elastic substrate as a two-step reaction comprised of the out-of-plane membrane fluctuation and the receptor–ligand binding. The equilibrium closed bond ratio as a function of substrate rigidity was computed by developing a coupled Fourier space Brownian dynamics and Monte Carlo method. The simulation results show that there exists a crossover value of the substrate rigidity at which the closed bond ratio is maximal.

  16. Effect of water content on the structural reorganization and elastic properties of biopolymer films: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimets, Iryna; Paes, Sabrina S; Wellner, Nikolaus; Smith, Andrew C; Wilson, Reginald H; Mitchell, John R

    2007-05-01

    In this work, the effect of water uptake on the structural reorganization and elastic properties of three types of biopolymer films was studied. The water-biopolymer interaction for hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), gelatin, and cassava starch films prepared from aqueous solutions was studied and compared using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis with humidity generator and controller (DMTA) techniques. The FTIR spectral variations due to the water sorption were generalized into two-dimensional (2D) correlation graphs for each biopolymer, and the effect of water on the molecular conformation was compared. The water sorption isotherms were fitted with Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer (GAB) and D'Arcy and Watt models. The water content in the mono- and multilayers predicted by both models for each biopolymer was discussed and compared. The correlation of the fitted data obtained from the sorption isotherms to the DMTA data allowed us to conclude that the elastic properties of the HPC films depended on the total water content in contrast to the elastic properties of the gelatin and cassava starch films, which decrease only with the appearance of multilayer water.

  17. Optical pendulum effect in one-dimensional diffraction-thick porous silicon based photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, V. B., E-mail: vb.novikov@physics.msu.ru; Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.; Murzina, T. V.; Mantsyzov, B. I. [Department of Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-21

    We present the realization of the multiperiodic optical pendulum effect in 1D porous silicon photonic crystals (PhCs) under dynamical Bragg diffraction in the Laue scheme. The diffraction-thick PhC contained 360 spatial periods with a large variation of the refractive index of adjacent layers of 0.4. The experiments reveal switching of the light leaving the PhC between the two spatial directions, which correspond to Laue diffraction maxima, as the fundamental wavelength or polarization of the incident light is varied. A similar effect can be achieved when the temperature of the sample or the intensity of the additional laser beam illuminating the crystal are changed. We show that in our PhC structures, the spectral period of the pendulum effect is down to 5 nm, while the thermal period is about 10 °C.

  18. Spin Seebeck effect in nanometer-thick YIG micro-fabricated strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Collet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the spin Seebeck effect (SSE generated by current induced-heating in ultra-thin yttrium iron garnet film (20 nm covered by an 8 nm thick Pt layer. By passing current in the Pt layer, an out-of-plane temperature gradient is established that, in turn, generates an out-of-equilibrium magnons population. The resulting pure spin current is detected using the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE measured in the Pt electrode. A lock-in detection scheme is used to separate the SSE signal from other magneto-galvanic effect. Indeed, the SSE signal is obtained as the second harmonic voltage response, while spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR is measured as the first harmonic response to the ac excitation current. Interestingly, the amplitude of the SSE in such thin YIG film is comparable to what has been reported for much thicker films.

  19. Effect of aggregate type, casting, thickness and curing condition on restrained strain of mass concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsak Choktaweekarn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element analysis is used for computing temperature and restrained strain inmass concrete. The model takes into account time, material properties, and mix proportion dependent behavior of concrete.The hydration heat and thermal properties used in the finite element analysis are obtained from our previously proposedadiabatic temperature rise model and are used as the input in the analysis. The analysis was done by varying size of massconcrete (especially thickness and the casting method in order to explain their effect on temperature and restrained strain inmass concrete. The casting methods used in the analysis are continuous and discontinuous casting. The discontinuouscasting consists of layer casting and block casting. Different types of aggregate were used in the analysis for studying theeffect of thermal properties of aggregate on temperature and restrained strain in mass concrete. Different conditions of curing(insulation and normal curing were also studied and compared. It was found from the analytical results that the maximumtemperature increases with the increase of the thickness of structure. The use of layer casting is more effective for thermalcracking control of mass concrete. The insulation curing method is preferable for mass concrete. Aggregate with low coefficientof thermal expansion is beneficial to reduce the restrained strain.

  20. Effect of pre-treatment and nickel layer thickness on nickel silicide/silicon carbide contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Nyborg, Lars; Jelvestam, Urban; Yi, Danqing

    2005-03-01

    This investigation deals with the impact of pre-treatment and Ni thickness on the reactions of Ni-silicide/SiC contact fabrication. The specimens have been prepared by sputter depositing 3-100 nm Ni layer on 4H-SiC wafer followed by annealing at 800 °C in vacuum for 20 min. The results by means of XPS show as follows: among the chemical cleaning procedures which have been tested, the recipe NH4OH:H2O2:H2O = 1:1:5, 85 °C, 5 min; HF 10%, 80 °C, 2 min; boiling water 10 min is the most effective for SiC substrates. However, due to short time exposure in the air before experiment, certain contamination re-occurs. After annealing, the dominant silicide formed is Ni2Si, whereas C on the surface is graphite. Argon ion etching before the Ni deposition helps the formation of multi-layer structure. For the samples without pre-treatment or with chemical cleaning procedure, there is more C agglomerated at the surface and no multi-layer structure formed. Under the action of Ar ion etching, SiC decomposes more quickly and Ni diffuses faster. This effect together with limited C diffusivity in the formed silicide is a probable reason for the formation of the multi-layer structure. The silicides formed at the interface are dependent on the Ni layer thickness and substrate surface condition.

  1. Electronic discrimination of the effective thickness of proportional counters. [Gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1976-01-01

    A new method of electronic discrimination of the effective thickness of proportional counters was developed and tested and applied in a proportional counter camera to adjust its effective aperture, i.e., the combination of counter efficiency and spatial resolution, without changing the pinhole aperture, the collimator, or the distance between the subject and camera. The discriminator virtually divides the thickness of the electronic drift volume of the camera into two regions and separates the photons detected in each region. Thus, two sets of data are acquired and displayed simultaneously during an exposure: one with good spatial resolution (less than 2 mm fwhm) using photons detected in the drift volume close to the entrance window, and one with high detection efficiency (greater than 50 percent for 60-keV photons) but poorer resolution (approximately 5 mm fwhm) using all detected photons. Simultaneous acquisition of two sets of data with different apertures reduces the exposure time in applications, such as nuclear medicine, where a sequence of images often is required to select the optimum aperture for different portions of radioisotope distribution images.

  2. Effects of dietary protein on glomerular mesangial area and basement membrane thickness in aged uninephrectomized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, R A; Steffens, W L; Brown, C A; Brown, S A; Ard, M; Finco, D R

    2001-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of diets containing 18% or 34% protein on glomerular mesangial area (GMA) and basement membrane thickness (GBMT) in uninephrectomized aged dogs. A secondary objective was to determine the combined effects of aging and uninephrectomy on GMA and GBMT in dogs. Ten clinically healthy, pure-bred dogs were unilaterally nephrectomized at about 8 y of age. After 2 mo, 5 dogs were fed an 18% protein diet and 5 dogs were fed a 34% protein diet for 48 mo. At month 48, the dogs were euthanized and the remaining kidney was collected. Samples of kidney from both times of collection were used to measure GMA and GBMT using electron microscopy. The effects of diet on GMA and GBMT were analyzed (student's t-test) using necropsy/nephrectomy score ratios. The effects of time-nephrectomy were determined by comparing nephrectomy values for GMA and GBMT with necropsy values (paired t-test). Dogs fed 34% dietary protein did not have a significant increase in GMA and GBM thickness when compared to dogs fed the 18% protein diet. A significant increase in GMA and GBMT occurred with time-nephrectomy (P = 0.011 and 0.018, respectively). Although dietary protein intake was not a significant factor in causing structural changes to glomeruli in uninephrectomized aged dogs, the power to detect a difference was low. However, significant effects of aging and nephrectomy were detected despite the low power of the study. These results suggest that the increases in GMA and GBMT that occur over time are not markedly influenced by dietary protein intake. However, subtle protein effects cannot be eliminated as a possibility based on this study.

  3. Effect of grazing flow on structural-acoustic response of an elastic plate with sound in a duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchakattil Sucheendran, Mahesh

    The design of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles involves the challenging task of designing thin panels that can withstand severe unsteady pressure and thermal loads. A good understanding and accurate prediction of the coupled structural-acoustic response of thin panels subjected to sound waves are key elements of this design process. Due to the cost of in-flight testing, the experimental assessment of the structural-acoustic response of skin panels is usually conducted in ground-based facilities consisting of a duct in which acoustic waves propagate at grazing incidence with skin panels mounted along the duct walls. A key limitation of such facility is the absence of flow, the impact of which on the structural-acoustic response of the skin panel is still poorly understood. To shed some insight on this key contribution, this analytical and numerical study focuses on the structural-acoustic interaction of sound with a thin elastic plate mounted flush on a wall in a rectangular duct in the presence of a uniform mean subsonic and supersonic flow. A linear, time-harmonic theory based on modal descriptions of the plate velocity and duct acoustic fields is first developed. The theory includes the effect of uniform mean flow in the duct and clamped and simply-supported boundary conditions for the plate. The sound radiated by the plate is calculated using Doak's theory [22], extended in this work to account for subsonic and supersonic uniform mean flow in the duct, and verified using the numerical solver. The theoretical model provides important insight on the effect of flow in the duct on the coupled response of the plate. Four metrics characterizing the coupled response are considered: the deviation of the peak response frequency from the in vacuo natural frequency of plate, the amplitude of the peak response, the effective acoustic damping of the plate, and the plate modal coupling through the duct acoustic field. The theory is extended to estimate the onset of

  4. Effect of preheating on the film thickness of contemporary composite restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The film thickness of the composites tested is material dependent. The thickness of the preheated conventional composites is significantly lower than those at room temperature. The conventional composites provide film thickness values greater than those of the flowable composites regardless of preheating temperature.

  5. Defect concentration in nitrogen-doped graphene grown on Cu substrate: A thickness effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Dhananjay K., E-mail: dhananjay@ua.pt [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Fateixa, Sara [Department of Chemistry & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Hortigüela, María J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vidyasagar, Reddithota [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Otero-Irurueta, Gonzalo [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Nogueira, Helena I.S. [Department of Chemistry & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Singh, Manoj Kumar [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Kholkin, Andrei, E-mail: kholkin@ua.pt [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Tuning the band-gap of graphene is a current need for real device applications. Copper (Cu) as a substrate plays a crucial role in graphene deposition. Here we report the fabrication of in-situ nitrogen (N) doped graphene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and the effect of Cu substrate thickness on the growth mechanism. The ratio of intensities of G and D peaks was used to evaluate the defect concentration based on local activation model associated with the distortion of the crystal lattice due to incorporation of nitrogen atoms into graphene lattice. The results suggest that Cu substrate of 20 µm in thickness exhibits higher defect density (1.86×10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) as compared to both 10 and 25 µm thick substrates (1.23×10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} and 3.09×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, respectively). Furthermore, High Resolution -X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS) precisely affirms ~0.4 at% of nitrogen intercalations in graphene. Our results show that the substitutional type of nitrogen doping dominates over the pyridinic configuration. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows all the XRD peaks associated with carbon. However, the peak at ~24° is suppressed by the substrate peaks (Cu). These results suggest that nitrogen atoms can be efficiently incorporated into the graphene using thinner copper substrates, rather than the standard 25 µm ones. This is important for tailoring the properties by graphene required for microelectronic applications.

  6. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Woo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice.MethodsSixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test.Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-β1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA.ConclusionsRose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing.

  7. Effect of visco-elastic silk-chitosan microcomposite scaffolds on matrix deposition and biomechanical functionality for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameettachal, Shibu; Murab, Sumit; Vaid, Radhika; Midha, Swati; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2017-04-01

    Commonly used polymer-based scaffolds often lack visco-elastic properties to serve as a replacement for cartilage tissue. This study explores the effect of reinforcement of silk matrix with chitosan microparticles to create a visco-elastic matrix that could support the redifferentiation of expanded chondrocytes. Goat chondrocytes produced collagen type II and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-enriched matrix on all the scaffolds (silk:chitosan 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1). The control group of silk-only constructs suffered from leaching out of GAG molecules into the medium. Chitosan-reinforced scaffolds retained a statistically significant (p < 0.02) higher amount of GAG, which in turn significantly increased (p < 0.005) the aggregate modulus (as compared to silk-only controls) of the construct akin to that of native tissue. Furthermore, the microcomposite constructs demonstrated highly pronounced hysteresis at 4% strain up to 400 cycles, mimicking the visco-elastic properties of native cartilage tissue. These results demonstrated a step towards optimizing the design of biomaterial scaffolds used for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Bubbles effect on sound dispersion in thin-walled tube with polymeric liquid and elastic central rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, S. P.; Bergman, R. M.; Haddad, J.

    2011-06-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of fine air bubbles effect on sound propagation in thin-walled elastic tube with compressible polymeric liquid and cylindrical elastic rod in the central part of the tube. The problem formulation and solution method follow the previous paper of the authors (S.P. Levitsky, R.M. Bergman, J. Haddad, Sound dispersion in deformable tube with polymeric liquid and elastic central rod, Journal of Sound and Vibration 275 (1-2) (2004) 267-281). In order to account for the bubbles' influence on sound dispersion and attenuation, dynamic equation of state of the mixture, formulated within homogeneous approximation, is used. It is assumed that the volume gas concentration is small. The resulting dispersion equation for the waveguide with viscoelastic liquid-gas mixture is studied in a long-wave range. Results of simulations illustrate the influence of free gas concentration, bubble radius and rheological properties of the liquid on sound dispersion and attenuation in the system.

  9. Effect of carbon and glass fiber posts on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; de Oliveira, Jonas Alves; do Valle, Accacio Lins; Zogheib, Lucas Villaca; Ferreira, Paulo Martins; Bastos, Luiz Gustavo Cavalcanti

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prefabricated fiber posts on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of a composite resin. Thirty bar-shaped specimens measuring 25 x 2.0 x 2.0 mm were made, containing posts that were 1.3 mm in diameter and 20 mm long. Each group contained 10 specimens: Group 1, resin without post; Group 2, resin with carbon fiber post; Group 3, resin with glass fiber post. The samples were immersed in water at 37 degrees C until the three-point loading test was performed at a speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = 0.05). Both fiber posts were similar in strength and both were stronger than the control. Group 3 obtained a higher mean modulus of elasticity than Groups 1 and 2, which were similar. The results of this study demonstrated that the presence of a fiber post significantly raised flexural strength values and the glass fiber post significantly increased the modulus of elasticity of the evaluated composite resin.

  10. Acute effects of caffeine on choroidal thickness and ocular pulse amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervişoğulları, Mehmet Serdar; Totan, Yüksel; Yüce, Aslıhan; Kulak, Ali Ender

    2016-12-01

    To explore ocular changes in healthy people after caffeine consumption. This prospective observational study was carried out with students of the Turgut Özal University Medical Faculty from May 15 to 15 December 2014. Enrolled in the study were 17 healthy subjects (n = 17 eyes), with a median age of 24 (IQR 1), ranging between 21 and 26 years. The control group (6 females, 11 males) aged between 23 and 28 (median 25 years [IQR 4.75]). For study, one eye from each participant was randomly selected. To obviate the effect of diurnal variations, tests were performed at the same time of the day (10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.). Each subject was given an ophthalmologic examination before the study to exclude those with undiagnosed ocular disease. Version 6.0 Cirrus high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) was used to measure CT at the fovea, and 1500 μm nasal and 1500 μm temporal to the fovea. After baseline OCT measurements, participants were asked to have 200 mg oral caffeine intake or a placebo capsule (200 mg lactose powder). Two further OCT measurements were applied at the first and fourth hours of caffeine intake. All participants also had intraocular pressure (IOP) and ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) measurements recorded before, first and fourth hours of caffeine intake. IOP and OPA were measured using the dynamic contour tonometry (DCT) (Swiss Micro Technology AG, Port, Switzerland). The groups showed no significant difference by means of age, gender, spherical refraction and axial length (p > 0.05). Baseline choroidal thickness measurements of the study and control group showed no significant difference. Oral caffeine intake caused a significant reduction in choroidal thickness compared with baseline, at all three measurement points, (p  0.05). The choroidal thickness still continued to decrease for at least 4 h following caffeine intake; whereas, the difference between 1 and 4 h was not

  11. Effect of Aging on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Normal Asian Indian Eyes: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoori, Tarannum; Balakrishna, Nagalla

    2017-02-01

    To determine longitudinal retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement change with aging, after a period of 3 years using spectral optical coherence tomography/scanning laser ophthalmoscope (OCT/SLO). A total of 50 eyes of 25 normal subjects underwent RNFL thickness measurement in 2008 and again in 2011 by a single operator, using spectral OCT/SLO. Measurements were compared at baseline and at follow-up. Linear mixed model analysis was used to measure the effect of age on RNFL thickness measurements over the 3 years. Mean RNFL thickness was 107.92 ± 11.1 µm in 2008 and 106.56 ± 10.8 µm in 2011. For every year increase in age, mean RNFL thickness showed a statistically significant decrease by -0.54 µm (95% confidence interval, -0.76 to -0.31; p thickness in most RNFL regions, except for the temporal quadrant (p = 0.37) and corresponding 7, 8, 9, and 10 o'clock hour sectors (p = 0.72, 0.75, 0.17, 0.14, respectively). RNFL thickness as measured by spectral OCT/SLO decreased significantly with advancing age over a period of 3 years, and was not uniform across the four quadrants. This age-related variation should be taken into account in RNFL thickness measurements when evaluating patients for diagnosis and follow-up of glaucoma.

  12. [Effect of soft tissue thickness of upper lip on lip retraction in orthodontical-treated Class II, Division 1 females].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lanyi; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Henglang; Na, Bi; He, Jinlong; Fan, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    To establish the Chinese Han national criteria for the thickness of upper lip in Chongqing and to investigate the effect of lip thickness on lip retraction in orthodontic treatment.
 A total of 240 adult patients (male=120, female=120) of Chinese Han nationality aged 18-35 years in Chongqing were treated with cephalograms and measured the thickness of upper lip. We established the Chinese Han national criteria for the thickness of upper lip in Chongqing according to the results. Sixty-eight female patients with Angle II 1 from Department of Orthodontics Stomatological Hospital of Chongqing Medical University were treated with maxillary premolars extraction, and pre- and post-treated with lateral cephalograms, then divided into 3 groups according to our criteria: a thin lips group, a normal lips group and a thick lips group. The ratio of the incisors retraction and the upper lip retraction were measured and calculated. The correlation between incisors retraction and the upper lip retraction was analyzed by the Pearson correlation method.
 There was statistical significance in the thickness of upper lip between males and females (Pthick lips group, respectively.
 Gender differences exist in the thickness of upper lip. Upper lip retraction with the incisors was negatively correlated with the soft tissue thickness of the upper lip in females with Angle II 1.

  13. Effects of thickness and external refractive index in coated tilted fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladino, D.; Pilla, P.; Cutolo, A.; Campopiano, S.; Giordano, M.; Cusano, A.; Caucheteur, C.; Mégret, P.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, an experimental analysis on the spectral effects induced by depositing a uniform high refractive index (HRI) thin coating on weakly tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) is carried out. First, two weakly TFBGs presenting different tilt angles were fabricated. Successively, by using dip-coating technique, two different coating thicknesses were deposited on each of them. The transmission spectra of the obtained structures were collected as the surrounding refractive index (SRI) changed in the range 1÷1.47. The coated gratings present some differences in their spectral evolution, that can be opportunely exploited. The coated configuration could improve some aspects of previous demodulation techniques exploited in the case of bare TFBGs. Moreover, an important effect of HRI coatings is to enhance the SRI sensitivity of the spectral position of the dips corresponding to cladding modes coupling, leading to a different interrogation method for sensing applications.

  14. Surface treatment systems for concrete in marine environment: Effect of concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Farias de Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract There are some ways to extend the service life of a reinforced concrete structure. This paper focuses on the extension of the service life by treating the surface of reinforced concrete, specifically on the effect of the concrete cover thickness on the surface treatment system efficacy. Thus, chloride migration tests were performed and diffusion chloride coefficients were calculated. The service life of each case (treated or non-treated concrete was estimated using these data and Fick's second law of diffusion. Results indicated that the thicker the concrete cover is, the greater the efficacy of the concrete surface treatment system will be. The dissemination of this information is important, since it is almost intuitive to think that the effect of a surface treatment system depends only on itself and this study shows the opposite.

  15. Coupling effects in bilayer thick metal films perforated with rectangular nanohole arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupling effects in bilayer thick metal (silver films perforated with rectangular nanohole arrays are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain technique. Many interesting light phenomena are observed as the distance between the metal rectangular nanohole arrays varies. Coupling effects are found to play very important roles on the optical and electronic properties of bilayer metal rectangular nanohole arrays: antisymmetric coupling between surface plasmon polaritons near the top and bottom film plane, and antisymmetric coupling between localized surface plasmon resonances near the two long sides of the rectangular hole, are probably excited in each layer of bilayer metal rectangular nanohole arrays; antisymmetric and symmetric magnetic coupling probably occur between the metal rectangular nanohole arrays.

  16. Optimal coating thickness for enhancement of optical effects in optical multilayer-based metrologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Chu Manh; Iida, Takuya; Dat, Le Tri; Huy, Ho Thanh; Vy, Nguyen Duy

    2017-11-01

    We theoretically determine an optimal configuration for a planar optical multilayer that is used to enhance the radiation pressure (RP) and the thermal heating in fiber-based metrology systems such as fiber-top cantilevers. The RP exerting on the metallic layer of the cantilever and the thermal heating due to optical absorption are enhanced. This enhancement can be employed to control the deflection and the vibration amplitude of the cantilever. The thicknesses of the cantilever and the coating layer for maximal RP are shown to be 50-60 nm and 20-40 nm, respectively, when a laser with an optical wavelength λ > 500 nm is used. The RP amplification due to the cavity effect is most effective at λ ≃ 1200 nm and reaches a maximum value of 30. The heat absorption of the corresponding films is discussed. These results would be useful for optimizing the configurations of optical multilayer-based devices.

  17. Eccentric strengthening effect of hip-adductor training with elastic bands in soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Hölmich, Per; Bandholm, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    programme, including one hip-adduction exercise, on eccentric and isometric hip-adduction strength, using elastic bands as external load. METHODS: Thirty-four healthy, sub-elite soccer players, mean (±SD) age of 22.1 (±3.3) years, were randomised to either training or control. During the mid-season break......, the training group performed 8 weeks of supervised, progressive hip-adduction strength training using elastic bands. The participants performed two training sessions per week (weeks 1-2) with 3×15 repetition maximum loading (RM), three training sessions per week (weeks 3-6) with 3×10 RM and three training......: In the training group, EHAD strength increased by 30% (ptraining group compared with the control group (p=0.044). No other significant between-group strength-differences in IHAD, IHAB...

  18. A frictional contact problem with wear involving elastic-viscoplastic materials with damage and thermal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoumene Djabi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical problem for quasistatic contact between a thermo-elastic-viscoplastic body with damage and an obstacle. The contact is frictional and bilateral with a moving rigid foundation which results in the wear of the contacting surface. We employ the thermo-elasticviscoplastic with damage constitutive law for the material. The damage of the material caused by elastic deformations. The evolution of the damage is described by an inclusion of parabolic type. The problem is formulated as a coupled system of an elliptic variational inequality for the displacement, a parabolic variational inequality for the damage and the heat equation for the temperature. We establish a variational formulation for the model and we prove the existence of a unique weak solution to the problem. The proof is based on a classical existence and uniqueness result on parabolic inequalities, differential equations and fixed point arguments.

  19. Effect of recasting on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems determines their flexural strength and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Recycling of basic alloys is often a clinical practice, despite the possible effects on the quality of the future metal-ceramic dentures. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the elastic modulus of metalceramic systems in making fixed partial dentures. Methods. The research was perform...

  20. Perceived thickness and creaminess modulates the short-term satiating effects of high-protein drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertenshaw, Emma J; Lluch, Anne; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-08-28

    Previous research suggests that increasing beverage protein content enhances subsequent satiety, but whether this effect is entirely attributable to post-ingestive effects of protein or is partly caused by the distinct sensory characteristics imparted by the presence of protein remains unclear. To try and discriminate nutritive from sensory effects of added protein, we contrasted effects of three higher-energy (about 1·2 MJ) and one lower-energy (LE: 0·35 MJ) drink preloads on subsequent appetite and lunch intake. Two higher-energy drinks had 44% of energy from protein, one with the sensory characteristics of a juice drink (HP2, low-sensory protein) and the second a thicker and creamier (HPþ, high-sensory protein) drink. The high-carbohydrate preload (HCþ, high-sensory carbohydrate) was matched for thickness and creaminess to the HPþ drink. Participants (healthy male volunteers, n 26) consumed significantly less at lunch after the HPþ(566 g) and HCþ(572 g) than after HP2 (623 g) and LE (668 g) drinks, although the compensation for drink energy accounted for only 50% of extra energy at best. Appetite ratings indicated that participants felt significantly less hungry and more full immediately before lunch in HPþ and HCþ groups compared with LE, with HP2 being intermediate. The finding that protein generated stronger satiety in the context of a thicker creamier drink (HPþ but not HP2) and that an isoenergetic carbohydrate drink (HCþ), matched in thickness and creaminess to the HPþ drink, generated the same pattern of satiety as HPþ, both suggest an important role for these sensory cues in the development of protein-based satiety.

  1. Effect of dynamic visco-elasticity on vertical and torsional vibrations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    In this case the equation of motion for vertical vibrations of mass m with a circular contact area of radius a is given by m. (. ∂2w/∂t2). + R(t) = P0eiωt . (12). R(t) is the response of visco-elastic half-space. Here w is used as average vertical dynamic deflection. Following Erguven (1988) and using (10), w is obtained in the ...

  2. Swiss ball abdominal crunch with added elastic resistance is an effective alternative to training machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Christoffer H; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Lars L

    2012-08-01

    Swiss ball training is recommended as a low intensity modality to improve joint position, posture, balance, and neural feedback. However, proper training intensity is difficult to obtain during Swiss ball exercises whereas strengthening exercises on machines usually are performed to induce high level of muscle activation. To compare muscle activation as measured by electromyography (EMG) of global core and thigh muscles during abdominal crunches performed on Swiss ball with elastic resistance or on an isotonic training machine when normalized for training intensity. 42 untrained individuals (18 men and 24 women) aged 28-67 years participated in the study. EMG activity was measured in 13 muscles during 3 repetitions with a 10 RM load during both abdominal crunches on training ball with elastic resistance and in the same movement utilizing a training machine (seated crunch, Technogym, Cesena, Italy). The order of performance of the exercises was randomized, and EMG amplitude was normalized to maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) EMG. When comparing between muscles, normalized EMG was highest in the rectus abdominis (PSwiss ball with elastic resistance showed higher activity of the rectus abdominis than crunches performed on the machine (104±3.8 vs 84±3.8% nEMG respectively, PSwiss ball induced lower activity of the rectus femoris than crunches in training machine (27±3.7 vs 65±3.8% nEMG respectively, PSwiss ball with added elastic resistance induces high rectus abdominis activity accompanied by low hip flexor activity which could be beneficial for individuals with low back pain. In opposition, the lower rectus abdominis activity and higher rectus femoris activity observed in machine warrant caution for individuals with lumbar pain. Importantly, both men and women, younger and elderly, and individuals with and without pain benefitted equally from the exercises.

  3. Studying effect of MoO3 on elastic and crystallization behavior of lithium diborate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, KH. S.; Abo-naf, S. M.; Abd Elnaeim, A. M.; Hassouna, M. E. M.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of MoO3 addition on the crystallization characteristics of 2Al2O3-23Li2O-(75 - x) B2O3 glass (where x MoO3 = 0, 10, 20, and 40 mol %) has been investigated. The compositional dependence of the glass transition ( T g), and crystallization ( T c) temperatures was determined by the differential thermal analysis (DTA). It was found that both the T g and T c decrease with increasing MoO3 content. The amorphous nature of the as-quenched glass and crystallinity of the produced glass-ceramics were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis. Glass-ceramics embedded with diomignite (lithium diborate, Li2B4O7) were produced from all investigated glasses by heat-treating the as-quenched glasses at the appropriate temperatures obtained from the DTA traces. Addition of MoO3 to the glass composition at 10% MoO3, causes the formation of lithium molybdenum oxide (Li4MoO5) crystalline phase in addition to the diomignite phase. Increasing MoO3 content to 20% causes a phase transformation of lithium molybdenum oxide from the (Li4MoO5) to the (Li2MoO4) phase and the formation of another lithium borate (Li4B2O5) phase in addition to the diomignite. Further increase of MoO3 content to 40% results in another phase transformation to the lithium aluminum molybdenum oxide [LiAl(MoO4)2], and, in this case, the molybdenum content was excess enough to crystallize the molybdate (MoO3) itself. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the morphology and microstructure of the formed solid solution phases. The values of the T g decrease with increasing the MoO3 content. The ultrasonic wave velocities and elastic moduli were determined using the pulse-echo method. Both velocities ( v L and v T) were increased as the MoO3 content, this increase can be attributed to the higher bond strength of Mo-O (607 kJ mol-1) than that of B-O (392 kJ mol-1).

  4. The effect of pressure on open-framework silicates: elastic behaviour and crystal-fluid interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, G. D.; Lotti, P.; Tabacchi, G.

    2017-08-01

    The elastic behaviour and the structural evolution of microporous materials compressed hydrostatically in a pressure-transmitting fluid are drastically affected by the potential crystal-fluid interaction, with a penetration of new molecules through the zeolitic cavities in response to applied pressure. In this manuscript, the principal mechanisms that govern the P-behaviour of zeolites with and without crystal-fluid interaction are described, on the basis of previous experimental findings and computational modelling studies. When no crystal-fluid interaction occurs, the effects of pressure are mainly accommodated by tilting of (quasi-rigid) tetrahedra around O atoms that behave as hinges. Tilting of tetrahedra is the dominant mechanism at low-mid P-regime, whereas distortion and compression of tetrahedra represent the mechanisms which usually dominate the mid-high P regime. One of the most common deformation mechanisms in zeolitic framework is the increase of channels ellipticity. The deformation mechanisms are dictated by the topological configuration of the tetrahedral framework; however, the compressibility of the cavities is controlled by the nature and bonding configuration of the ionic and molecular content, resulting in different unit-cell volume compressibility in isotypic structures. The experimental results pertaining to compression in "penetrating" fluids, and thus with crystal-fluid interaction, showed that not all the zeolites experience a P-induced intrusion of new monoatomic species or molecules from the P-transmitting fluids. For example, zeolites with well-stuffed channels at room conditions (e.g. natural zeolites) tend to hinder the penetration of new species through the zeolitic cavities. Several variables govern the sorption phenomena at high pressure, among those: the "free diameters" of the framework cavities, the chemical nature and the configuration of the extra-framework population, the partial pressure of the penetrating molecule in the

  5. Marangoni elasticity of flowing soap films

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2016-01-01

    We measure the Marangoni elasticity of a flowing soap film to be 22 dyne/cm irrespective of its width, thickness, flow speed, or the bulk soap concentration. We perform this measurement by generating an oblique shock in the soap film and measuring the shock angle, flow speed and thickness. We postulate that the elasticity is constant because the film surface is crowded with soap molecules. Our method allows non-destructive measurement of flowing soap film elasticity, and the value 22 dyne/cm ...

  6. Marangoni elasticity of flowing soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2017-08-01

    We measure the Marangoni elasticity of a flowing soap film to be 22 mN/m irrespective of its width, thickness, flow speed, or the bulk soap concentration. We perform this measurement by generating an oblique shock in the soap film and measuring the shock angle, flow speed, and thickness. We postulate that the elasticity is constant because the film surface is crowded with soap molecules. Our method allows nondestructive measurement of flowing soap film elasticity and the value 22 mN/m is likely applicable to other similarly constructed flowing soap films.

  7. Effect of cathode thickness on the performance of planar Na-NiCl2 battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Chang, Hee Jung; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Jung, Keeyoung; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Guosheng

    2017-10-01

    Na-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy storage and grid applications. Commercial NBBs are typically constructed in tubular designs, primarily because of their ease of sealing. However, planar designs are considered superior to tubular counterparts in terms of power output, cell packing, ease of assembly, and thermal management. In this paper, the performance of planar NBBs has been evaluated at an intermediate temperature. In particular, planar Na-NiCl2 cells with different cathode loadings and thicknesses have been studied at 190 °C. The effects of the cathode thickness, charging current, and discharging power output on the cell capacity and resistance have been investigated. More than 60% of theoretical cell capacity was retained with constant discharging power levels of 200, 175, and 100 mW/cm2 for 1x, 2x, and 3x cathode loadings, respectively. The cell resistance with 1x and 2x cathode loadings was dominated by ohmic resistance with discharging currents up to 105 mA/cm2, while for 3x cathode loading, it was primarily dominated by ohmic resistance with currents less than 66.67 mA/cm2 and by polarization resistance above 66.67 mA/cm2.

  8. Effect of rib fat thickness on the quality of aged meat from Nellore young bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Escobar Dallantonia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This trial aimed to evaluate the quality of aged beef from Nellore young bulls under two yield grade (YG. Fourteen animals with approximately 450 ± 30 kg body weight were evaluated for backfat thickness (BFT at the beginning of the experimental period. Seven animals had BFT of 0-3 mm and seven animals, 3.1-6 mm. Two groups were formed at the end of the experiment: animals finished with 3-6 mm BFT (seven animals and animals finished with 6.1 to 10 mm BFT (seven animals. Every 28 days, we evaluated by ultrasound the BFT between the 12nd 13rd ribs. There was no interaction between YG and aging for beef color, pH, cooking losses and shear force (p > 0.05. There was no effect of YG on sarcomere length (p = 0.11. However, there was interaction between YG and aging on water holding capacity (p < 0.01. The yield grades evaluated did not interfere with meat quality, but carcasses with 6.1 - 10 mm of backfat thickness showed highest water holding capacity. The aging of the longissimus muscle for up to 14 days improves beef tenderness.

  9. An analytical design procedure for the determination of effective leading edge extensions on thick delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, F.; Chaturvedi, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical design procedure for leading edge extensions (LEE) was developed for thick delta wings. This LEE device is designed to be mounted to a wing along the pseudo-stagnation stream surface associated with the attached flow design lift coefficient of greater than zero. The intended purpose of this device is to improve the aerodynamic performance of high subsonic and low supersonic aircraft at incidences above that of attached flow design lift coefficient, by using a vortex system emanating along the leading edges of the device. The low pressure associated with these vortices would act on the LEE upper surface and the forward facing area at the wing leading edges, providing an additional lift and effective leading edge thrust recovery. The first application of this technique was to a thick, round edged, twisted and cambered wing of approximately triangular planform having a sweep of 58 deg and aspect ratio of 2.30. The panel aerodynamics and vortex lattice method with suction analogy computer codes were employed to determine the pseudo-stagnation stream surface and an optimized LEE planform shape.

  10. Effect of cathode thickness on the performance of planar Na-NiCl 2 battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Chang, Hee Jung; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Jung, Keeyoung; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Guosheng

    2017-10-01

    Na-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy storage and grid applications. Commercial NBBs are typically constructed in tubular designs, primarily because of their ease of sealing. However, planar designs are considered superior to tubular designs in terms of power output, cell packing, ease of assembly, and thermal management. In this paper, the performance of planar NBBs has been evaluated at an intermediate temperature. In particular, planar Na-NiCl2 cells with different cathode loadings and thicknesses have been studied at 190oC. The effects of the cathode thickness, charging current, and discharging power output on the cell capacity and resistance have been investigated. More than 60% of theoretical cell capacity could be retained with constant discharging power levels of 600, 525, and 300 mW for 1x, 2x, and 3x cathode loadings, respectively. The cell resistance with 1x and 2x cathode loadings was dominated by ohmic resistance with discharging currents up to 105 mA/cm2, while for 3x cathode loading, it was primarily dominated by ohmic resistance with currents less than 66.7 mA/cm2 and by polarization resistance above 66.7 mA/cm2.

  11. Effect of TiO 2 particle size and layer thickness on mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Geon; Kim, Min-cheol; Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Lee, Sang Myeong; Choi, Mansoo; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2017-11-01

    Mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers are commonly used as electron transport layers in perovskite solar cells, which help to extract electrons from the perovskite light-absorbing layer and transport them to the electrodes. We investigated the effects of the layer thickness of mp-TiO2 and particle size of TiO2 on photovoltaic properties, in terms of the surface area of the mp-layer and the interfacial areas of the TiO2 nanoparticles in the mp-layer. Various mp-TiO2 layers with thicknesses of 150, 250, and 400 nm and particle sizes of 25 nm and 41 nm were prepared to compare the photovoltaic properties of such layer-containing perovskite solar cells. Time-resolved photoluminescence decay and impedance studies showed that interfacial resistance as well as perovskite-to-TiO2 charge injection are important factors affecting photovoltaic performance. The deterioration of the photovoltaic parameters with increasing TiO2/TiO2 interfacial area also confirms that the interfacial series resistance that arises from these connections should be reduced to enhance the performance of mesoscopic perovskite solar cells.

  12. Correction of non-linear thickness effects in HAADF STEM electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Broek, W., E-mail: wouter.vandenbroek@uni-ulm.de [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Rosenauer, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik (IFP), Universitaet Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Goris, B.; Martinez, G.T.; Bals, S.; Van Aert, S.; Van Dyck, D. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2012-05-15

    In materials science, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy is often used for tomography at the nanometer scale. In this work, it is shown that a thickness dependent, non-linear damping of the recorded intensities occurs. This results in an underestimated intensity in the interior of reconstructions of homogeneous particles, which is known as the cupping artifact. In this paper, this non-linear effect is demonstrated in experimental images taken under common conditions and is reproduced with a numerical simulation. Furthermore, an analytical derivation shows that these non-linearities can be inverted if the imaging is done quantitatively, thus preventing cupping in the reconstruction. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In HAADF STEM, a thickness dependent, non-linear damping of the projected intensities occurs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In tomography, this leads to underestimated intensities in the interior of homogeneous particles, the cupping artifact. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The non-linear damping is demonstrated in experimental images and reproduced with numerical simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The non-linear damping can be undone if the imaging is done quantitatively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental proof is provided showing that cupping can be prevented.

  13. Effect of cabergoline on insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and carotid intima media thickness in patients with prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inancli, Serap Soytac; Usluogullari, Alper; Ustu, Yusuf; Caner, Sedat; Tam, Abbas Ali; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cabergoline on insulin sensitivity, inflammatory markers, and carotid intima media thickness in prolactinoma patients. Twenty-one female, newly diagnosed patients with prolactinoma were included in the study. None of the patients were treated previously. Cabergoline was given as treatment, starting with 0.5 mg/day and tapered necessarily. Blood samples were taken for prolactin, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, homocysteine, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) score was calculated, prior to and 6 months after starting treatment. The body mass index (BMI) was measured and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) was evaluated for each patient prior to and 6 months after the treatment. The prolactin levels and LDL decreased significantly after cabergoline treatment. Insulin sensitivity improved independently from the decrease in prolactin levels and BMI. The significant decrease in homocysteine and hs-CRP was not related with the decrease in prolactin levels. The significant decrease in CIMT was independent from the decrease in prolactin levels, HOMA score, and BMI. Our data suggest that cabergoline treatment causes an improvement in insulin sensitivity and inflammatory markers and causes a decrease in CIMT independent from the decrease in prolactin, LDL cholesterol, and BMI. We conclude that short term cabergoline treatment can improve endothelial function independently from the changes in metabolic disturbances and inflammatory markers.

  14. Effect of substrate elasticity on macroscopic parameters of fish keratocyte migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziob, Daniel; Kołodziej, Tomasz; Nowak, Justyna; Cyzio, Piotr; Raczkowska, Joanna; Laska, Jadwiga; Rajfur, Zenon

    2016-10-01

    Cell migration is an important biological phenomenon which depends on a number of internal and external factors. One of such factors can be the mechanical properties of the environment which can have an impact on the cell’s regulatory pathways through so-called mechanotransduction. Ultimately, these properties can also influence the process of cell migration. The goal of this work is to investigate how substrate stiffness (elasticity) changes basic migration parameters of migrating cells. Fish keratocytes migrating on polyacrylamide hydrogels have been used as a model of fast migrating cells. Cell migration have been tracked with optical microscopy, employing a time-lapse technique. Migration parameters have been determined from image analysis. This study has shown a systematic decrease of some of the key migration parameters—average cell speed and angular persistence—with a simultaneous increase of substrate elasticity. The results demonstrate that the elasticity of the substrate is the key factor in cell migration. It determines speed and angular persistence, which proves that mechanical parameters of the environment can affect cellular processes. A detailed knowledge of mechanotransduction processes can have major implications for tissue engineering and for the understanding of metastasis.

  15. A simplified approach to determining "effective" elastic mechanical properties of fiber-polymer composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggett, Susan Small

    The main objective of the research described herein was to find a method to improve the estimates of mechanical properties-especially elastic properties-in order to reduce the amount of point design testing needed to characterize laminated fiber composites. The specific approach evaluated was "reverse calculation" of the lamina properties from laminate properties for pairs of laminates. Tensile test data with biaxial strain gages were obtained for six to twelve replications for each of seven different laminate configurations of AS4/APC-2 graphite/PEEK. All laminates except the pure 90-deg laminate had between 0 and 25-percent 90-degree plies. The research showed that, for certain pairs of laminates, lamina elastic properties determined from reverse calculation improve the prediction of laminate elastic properties, compared to traditional approaches for obtaining lamina properties (ASTM D3039 and D3518 methods). This is particularly true for the laminate major Poisson's ratio, nusb{xy}, and for the laminate axial modulus, Esb{xy}, at high strains for ductile laminates, which may be very important in such areas of study as fracture mechanics where strains at the edge of a flaw can be very high. The pairs which provided the best correlation had one highly directional laminate with more than forty percent 0-degree plies, and one ductile laminate with 75-percent ±45-degree plies.

  16. The effect of non-elastic taping on balance and gait function in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Chan-Woo; Lee, Jung-Ho; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the influence of exercise on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients after applying non-elastic tape, which can stabilize muscles and joints, to the lower extremities of the affected side. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 patients diagnosed with stroke. They were divided into an experimental group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 15). The experimental group performed mat and treadmill exercises three times a week for six weeks with non-elastic tape applied to the lower extremities of the affected side. The control group performed the same exercises but without taping. [Results] The intervention significantly improved Berg balance scale scores and timed up and go (TUG) test scores as well as reduced stance duration and stride duration in the experimental group. In the control group, statistically significant improvements were observed in TUG test scores. [Conclusion] Although some differences did not reach the level of statistical significance, the application of non-elastic tape stabilized the joints of the lower extremities, thereby increasing balance and reducing stance duration and one step duration, which resulted in a reduction of overall gait duration.

  17. Medical Ultrasonic Elasticity Imaging Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Mok Keun [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Daejin University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Breast and prostate tumors or cancers tend to be stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue. However, the difference in echogenicity between cancerous and normal tissues is not clearly distinguishable in ultrasound B-mode imaging. Thus, imaging the stiffness contrast between the two different tissue types helps to diagnose lesions quantitatively, and such a method of imaging the elasticity of human tissue is termed ultrasound elasticity imaging. Recently, elasticity imaging has become an effective complementary diagnostic modality along with ultrasound B-mode imaging. This paper presents various elasticity imaging methods that have been reported up to now and describes their characteristics and principles of operation.

  18. Percolating macropore networks in tilled topsoil: effects of sample size, minimum pore thickness and soil type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Larsbo, Mats; Koestel, John; Keck, Hannes

    2017-04-01

    The long-range connectivity of macropore networks may exert a strong control on near-saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity and the occurrence of preferential flow through soil. It has been suggested that percolation concepts may provide a suitable theoretical framework to characterize and quantify macropore connectivity, although this idea has not yet been thoroughly investigated. We tested the applicability of percolation concepts to describe macropore networks quantified by X-ray scanning at a resolution of 0.24 mm in eighteen cylinders (20 cm diameter and height) sampled from the ploughed layer of four soils of contrasting texture in east-central Sweden. The analyses were performed for sample sizes ("regions of interest", ROI) varying between 3 and 12 cm in cube side-length and for minimum pore thicknesses ranging between image resolution and 1 mm. Finite sample size effects were clearly found for ROI's of cube side-length smaller than ca. 6 cm. For larger sample sizes, the results showed the relevance of percolation concepts to soil macropore networks, with a close relationship found between imaged porosity and the fraction of the pore space which percolated (i.e. was connected from top to bottom of the ROI). The percolating fraction increased rapidly as a function of porosity above a small percolation threshold (1-4%). This reflects the ordered nature of the pore networks. The percolation relationships were similar for all four soils. Although pores larger than 1 mm appeared to be somewhat better connected, only small effects of minimum pore thickness were noted across the range of tested pore sizes. The utility of percolation concepts to describe the connectivity of more anisotropic macropore networks (e.g. in subsoil horizons) should also be tested, although with current X-ray scanning equipment it may prove difficult in many cases to analyze sufficiently large samples that would avoid finite size effects.

  19. Effect of age on individual retinal layer thickness in normal eyes as measured with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkaya, Nazli; van Dijk, Hille W; van Schuppen, Sanne M; Abràmoff, Michael D; Garvin, Mona K; Sonka, Milan; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Verbraak, Frank D

    2013-07-22

    To determine the effect of age on the thickness of individual retinal layers, measured with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), in a population of healthy Caucasians. One hundred and twenty subjects with an age ranging between 18 and 81 years were examined with SD-OCT. Mean layer thickness was calculated for seven retinal layers, in the fovea (region 1 of the 9 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] regions); in the pericentral ring (ETDRS regions 2 to 5); and the peripheral ring (ETDRS regions 6 to 9) following automated segmentation using the Iowa Reference Algorithm. In addition, mean peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was measured. The partial correlation test was performed on each layer to determine the effect of age on layer thickness, while correcting for spherical equivalent, sex, and Topcon image quality factor as confounders, followed by Bonferroni corrections to adjust for multiple testing. The thickness of the peripapillary RNFL (R = -0.332; P thickness (R = 0.467, P thickness showed significant changes correlated with age. This should be taken into consideration when analyzing macular layers and the peripapillary RNFL in SD-OCT studies of retinal diseases and glaucoma.

  20. The effect of epicardial adipose tissue thickness on left ventricular diastolic functions in patients with normal coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuz, Mustafa; Dogan, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness on left ventricular diastolic functions in patients with normal coronary arteries (NCA) proven by angiography. We selected study patients who were referred to coronary angiography due to typical chest pain or atypical chest pain with a positive pre-test result for coronary artery disease (CAD). After coronary angiography, 85 patients with significant coronary lesion (≥ 50% stenosis) served as the CAD group, 82 patients with non-significant coronary lesion (thickness and left ventricular diastolic properties. Gensini score, total cholesterol, and C-reactive protein were significantly higher in the CAD group compared to the non-significant CAD group and the NCA group. The average of EAT thickness was 7.3 ± 2.4 mm in all groups. It was 5.8 ± 2.3 mm in the NCA group, 6.4 ± 2.4 mm in the non-significant CAD group, and 7.8 ± 2.2 mm in the CAD group (p thickness was significantly correlated with E/e' ratio in the NCA group. In multivariate analysis, average of EAT thickness was significantly associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in subjects with NCA (OR 1.019, 95% CI 1.012-1.027, p thickness may have an effect on left ventricular diastolic functions. This independent relationship showed us the clinical importance of measuring of EAT thickness.

  1. The effect of center point shift on the measurement of macular thickness: a spectral domain-optical coherence tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Nam; Shin, Il Hwan; Sung, Jae Yun; Kwak, Baek Soo; Lim, Hyung Bin; Jo, Young Joon; Kim, Jung Yeul

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) measurement center shift on the measurement of macular thickness. This was a prospective observational case series. A total of 60 normal eyes of 60 subjects included in the study. SD-OCT macular scanning (macular cube 512 × 128 scan) was performed twice by an experienced examiner. The average retinal thicknesses of the nine macular sectors as defined by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) were recorded. Each coefficient of repeatability was calculated for the macular thickness measurements of the ETDRS subfields. Thereafter, the measurement center was manually decentered to a seven scan point, each from the central fovea in steps of 58.7 μm horizontally and 47.2 μm vertically. At each shift point, the change in the macular thickness was compared. When the displacement distance between the measurement center point and the foveal center was within 117.4 μm horizontally and 141.6 μm vertically, the macular thickness measurements did not show any significant differences. However, if the offset of the EDTRS grid center from the anatomic fovea exceeded, we noted that the thickness at the fovea increased and the opposite-direction region at the inner circle was significantly thinner than the displaced point. The effect of measurement center shift needs to be considered when analyzing the macular thickness measurements in various ophthalmologic diseases.

  2. The effect of amorphous selenium detector thickness on dual-energy digital breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yue-Houng, E-mail: yuehoung.hu@gmail.com; Zhao, Wei [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, L-4 120 Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8460 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhanced (CE) imaging techniques for both planar digital mammography (DM) and three-dimensional (3D) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) applications requires x-ray photon energies higher than the k-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). As a result, x-ray tube potentials much higher (>40 kVp) than those typical for screening mammography must be utilized. Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based direct conversion flat-panel imagers (FPI) have been widely used in DM and DBT imaging systems. The a-Se layer is typically 200 μm thick with quantum detective efficiency (QDE) >87% for x-ray energies below 26 keV. However, QDE decreases substantially above this energy. To improve the object detectability of either CE-DM or CE-DBT, it may be advantageous to increase the thickness (d{sub Se}) of the a-Se layer. Increasing the d{sub Se} will improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at the higher energies used in CE imaging. However, because most DBT systems are designed with partially isocentric geometries, where the gantry moves about a stationary detector, the oblique entry of x-rays will introduce additional blur to the system. The present investigation quantifies the effect of a-Se thickness on imaging performance for both CE-DM and CE-DBT, discussing the effects of improving photon absorption and blurring from oblique entry of x-rays. Methods: In this paper, a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) was used to investigate the effect of d{sub Se} on the imaging performance (i.e., MTF, NPS, and DQE) of FPI in CE-DM and CE-DBT. The results from the model are used to calculate the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio, d′, which is used as a figure-of-merit to determine the total effect of increasing d{sub Se} for CE-DM and CE-DBT. Results: The results of the CLSM show that increasing d{sub Se} causes a substantial increase in QDE at the high energies used in CE-DM. However, at the oblique projection angles used in DBT, the increased length of penetration through a

  3. Effect of pressure variation on structural, elastic, mechanical, optoelectronic and thermodynamic properties of SrNaF3 fluoroperovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erum, Nazia; Azhar Iqbal, Muhammad

    2017-12-01

    The effect of pressure variation on structural, electronic, elastic, mechanical, optical and thermodynamic characteristics of cubic SrNaF3 fluoroperovskite have been investigated by employing first-principles method within the framework of gradient approximation (GGA). For the total energy calculations, we have used the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. Thermodynamic properties are computed in terms of quasi-harmonic Debye model. The pressure effects are determined in the range of 0–25 GPa, in which mechanical stability of SrNaF3 fluoroperovskite remains valid. A prominent decrease in lattice constant and bonds length is observed with the increase in pressure from 0 to 25 GPa. The effect of increase in pressure on band structure calculations with GGA and GGA plus Tran–Blaha modified Becke–Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential reveals a predominant characteristic associated with widening of bandgap. The influence of pressure on set of isotropic elastic parameters and their related properties are numerically estimated for SrNaF3 polycrystalline aggregate. Apart of linear dependence of elastic coefficients, transition from brittle to ductile behavior is observed as pressure is increased from 0 to 25 GPa. We have successfully obtained variation of lattice constant, volume expansion, bulk modulus, Debye temperature and specific heat capacities with pressure and temperature in the range of 0–25 GPa and 0–600 K. All the calculated optical properties such as the complex dielectric function ε(ω), optical conductivity σ(ω), energy loss function L(ω), absorption coefficient α(w), refractive index n(ω), reflectivity R(ω), and effective number of electrons n eff, via sum rules shift towards the higher energies under the application of pressure.

  4. Electrochemically active thickness of solid oxide fuel cell electrodes: Effectiveness model prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jin Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Daegu University, Gyungsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The three-phase boundaries (TPBs) in the electrodes of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have different activity because of the distributed nature of the electrochemical reactions. The electrochemically active thickness (EAT) is a good measure to evaluate the extension of the active reaction zone into the electrode and the effective utilization of TPBs. In this study, an electrochemical reaction/charge conduction problem is formulated based on the Butler–Volmer reaction kinetics and then numerically solved to determine the EATs for the active electrode layers of SOFCs with various microstructural, dimensional, and property parameters. Thus, the EAT data and correlations presented in this study are expected to provide useful information for designing efficient electrodes of SOFCs.

  5. Effect of Robusta coffee beans ointment on full thickness wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorinta Putri Kenisa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic lesions, whether chemical, physical, or thermal in nature, are among the most common lesion in the mouth. Wound healing is essential for the maintenance of normal structure, function, and survival of organisms. Experiments of Robusta coffee powder on rat-induced alloxan incision wound, clinically demonstrated similar healing rate with the povidone iodine 10%. No studies that look directly the effect of coffee extract in ointment form when viewed in terms of histopathology. Robusta coffee bean (Coffea canephora consists of chlorogenic acid (CGA and caffeic acid which are belived to act as antioxidant and take part in wound healing process. Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the enhancement of healing process of full-thickness skin wound after Robusta coffee beans extract ointment application. Methods: Sample consisted of 20 Cavia cabaya treated with full-thickness with wounds and was given Robusta coffee beans extract ointment concentration range of 22.5%, 45%, and 90% except the control group which was given ointment base material. Animals were then harvested on the fourth day and made for histopathological preparations. Data were calculated and compared by one-way ANOVA test and LSD test. Results: The study showed that Robusta coffee bean extract ointment can increase the number of lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, and blood vessels by the presence of chlorogenic acid (CGA and Caffeic acid. Conclusion: In conclusion Robusta coffee bean extract ointment enhance the healing process of fullthickness skin wound of Cavia cabaya.Latar belakang: Lesi traumatik, baik akibat rangsang kimia, fisik, atau termal, merupakan lesi yang paling umum terjadi di dalam rongga mulut. Penyembuhan luka yang terjadi ini penting untuk pemeliharaan struktur normal, fungsi, dan kelangsungan hidup organisme. Percobaan pemberian bubuk kopi Robusta terhadap luka sayatan pada tikus yang diinduksi aloksan, secara klinis

  6. A proof of the cancellation of the redistribution tidal potential effects on the rotation of an elastic Earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenas, Tomás; Escapa, Alberto; Ferrándiz, Jose Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The gravitational action of the Moon and the Sun on the elastic Earth originates a redistribution of its mass. In turn, this redistribution is responsible of an additional term in the gravitational potential energy of the system, commonly referred to as tidal potential of redistribution. Its effects on the Earth rotation were previously discussed in Escapa et al. (2004) and Lambert & Mathews (2006). A numerical approach was followed in those works to show that for an elastic Earth model, assumed to be spherical and non-rotating in the undeformed state, there is no net contribution to the motion of the figure axis. This result is consistent with the corresponding one deduced from the torque approach, where one can derive analytically that the redistribution torque for that elastic Earth model vanishes (e.g., Krasinsky 1999). However, it is far from being a trivial question to recover the same result when working directly with the tidal potential of redistribution, as in Escapa et al. (2004) or Lambert & Mathews (2006). In this investigation we revisit the issue, enhancing and completing former results by Escapa et al. (2004). In particular, we aim at proving, by analytical means, that the redistribution tidal potential of the former elastic Earth model does not affect its rotational motion. To this end we expand that potential in terms of an Andoyer-like set of canonical variables, and then compute the torque associated to it. This choice was motivated by the suitability of this set of variables to extend our calculations to the nutations of other different elastic or anelastic Earth models, through the Hamiltonian framework (e.g., Ferrándiz et al. 2012). We show the exact cancellation of the derived expressions as a consequence of certain properties fulfilled by the expansions of the orbital motion of the perturbing bodies. Acknowledgement. - This work has been partially supported by the Spanish government trhough the MINECO projects I+D+I AYA201022039-C02-01, AYA

  7. Effects of magnetic treated water on serum concentration parameters and fat thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Balieiro Neto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of magnetic water on blood cells counts, biochemical profile, blood gas level and subcutaneous fat thickness of Jersey cows. This research was carried out at Agência Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegócios - APTA, SP. Twenty six Jersey cows from the APTA were allotted into two groups: control (n=13, drinking regular water and the group consuming magnetic water (n=13. The animals were lactating around 150 days and pregnant around 60 days. Blood samples were collected from caudal auricular artery and jugular vein. The water treatment had no effect on hemogram (p>0.05. Higher pH (7.448 vs 7.407 mmHg, p<0.05 and lower PaCO2 (37.97 vs 42.47 mmHg, p<0.05 levels were detected in arterial blood of the group drinking magnetic water. The concentration of Na ion (138.8 vs 145.5 mmol/l, p<0.05 and serum triglycerides (10.4 vs 22.6 mg/dL, p<0.05 were significantly lower, resulting in smaller osmolality (273.30 vs 280.99 mOsm/kg, p<0.05 and subcutaneous fat thickness (0.2 vs 1.3 mm, p<0.05. In summary, the water treatment, evaluated in this study, may have decreased the risk of some metabolic disorders, such as acidosis and high serum concentration of Na and carbon dioxide.

  8. Effects of hippotherapy on the thickness of deep abdominal muscles and activity of daily living in children with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JiHyun; Yun, Chang-Kyo

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of hippotherapy exercise on the thickness of deep abdominal muscles and daily activities of children with intellectual disabilities. [Subjects and Methods] Seven children with intellectual disabilities were treated with hippotherapy for 30 minutes twice a week for 6 weeks. The thickness of deep abdominal muscles and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) of the subjects were measured by ultrasonography before and after the experiment. [Results] There was no significant change in the thickness of the External Oblique and Internal Oblique muscles, but there was a statistically significant change in Transverse Adbominis thickness and FIM score after treatment compared to before treatment. [Conclusion] Hippotherapy exercise has a positive effect on the improvement of Transverse Abdominis (TrA) and activity of daily livings of children with intellectual disabilities.

  9. Effect of Filtration and Thickness of Cross-Sections of Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images on Detection of Proximal Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdinian, Mehrdad; Nazeri, Rahman; Ghaiour, Marzieh

    2017-07-01

    When a patient has cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images based on the treatment plan, it is possible to use these images for evaluation of caries, and there is no need for new radiographs, according to the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) principle. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of filtration and thickness of CBCT cross-sections on detection of proximal caries. In this in-vitro study, 100 teeth were placed in the dental sockets of a dry skull, and were fixed in normal proximal contacts. CBCT images were taken and were evaluated by two observers on the panoramic view at 1-, 3- and 5-mm-thick cross-sections, with the use of filtrations 0, 1 and 2. Afterwards, the samples were sectioned and underwent a histological evaluation. McNemar's test was used to compare the findings on CBCT images and histological evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and logistic regression were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different cross-sections. The maximum AZ-value was achieved at 3-mm thickness/filtration 2. However, the differences between 1-mm thickness/filtration 2 and 1-mm thickness/filtration 1 were not significant (P=0.728 and 0.868, respectively). The minimum AZ-value was achieved at 5-mm thickness/filtration 0. Although CBCT is not sufficiently effective in detecting caries, the best cross-sections for detection of proximal caries were achieved at 3-mm thickness/filtration 2, 1-mm thickness/filtration 2 and 1-mm thickness/filtration 1.

  10. Effect of Filtration and Thickness of Cross-Sections of Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images on Detection of Proximal Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Abdinian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: When a patient has cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images based on the treatment plan, it is possible to use these images for evaluation of caries, and there is no need for new radiographs, according to the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA principle. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of filtration and thickness of CBCT cross-sections on detection of proximal caries.Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 100 teeth were placed in the dental sockets of a dry skull, and were fixed in normal proximal contacts. CBCT images were taken and were evaluated by two observers on the panoramic view at 1-, 3- and 5-mm-thick cross-sections, with the use of filtrations 0, 1 and 2. Afterwards, the samples were sectioned and underwent a histological evaluation. McNemar’s test was used to compare the findings on CBCT images and histological evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and logistic regression were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different cross-sections.Results: The maximum AZ-value was achieved at 3-mm thickness/filtration 2. However, the differences between 1-mm thickness/filtration 2 and 1-mm thickness/filtration 1 were not significant (P=0.728 and 0.868, respectively. The minimum AZ-value was achieved at 5-mm thickness/filtration 0.Conclusions: Although CBCT is not sufficiently effective in detecting caries, the best cross-sections for detection of proximal caries were achieved at 3-mm thickness/filtration 2, 1-mm thickness/filtration 2 and 1-mm thickness/filtration 1.

  11. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun

    2011-06-26

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Thickener Particle Geometry and Concentration on the Grease EHL Film Thickness at Medium Speeds

    OpenAIRE

    Cyriac, F.; Lugt, Pieter Martin; Bosman, Rob; Padberg, Clemens J.; Venner, Cornelis H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to understand the parameters influencing the grease film thickness in a rolling elastohydrodynamically lubricated contact under fully flooded conditions at medium speeds. Film thickness measurements were taken under pure rolling for six commercial greases and their bled oils. The grease film thickness was found to be higher than corresponding bled oil, suggesting the presence of thickener in the contact. No rheological properties (characterized by steady and dynamic ...

  13. Effect of kinesiotaping, non-elastic taping and bracing on segmental foot kinematics during drop landing in healthy subjects and subjects with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuni, B; Mussler, J; Kalkum, E; Schmitt, H; Wolf, S I

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of kinesiotape, non-elastic tape, and soft brace on segmental foot kinematics during drop landing in subjects with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects. Controlled study with repeated measurements. Three-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. Twenty participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 healthy subjects. The subjects performed drop landings with 17 retroreflective markers on the foot and lower leg in four conditions: barefoot, with kinesiotape, with non-elastic tape and with a soft brace. Ranges of motion of foot segments using a foot measurement method. In participants with chronic ankle instability, midfoot movement in the frontal plane (inclination of the medial arch) was reduced significantly by non-elastic taping, but kinesiotaping and bracing had no effect. In healthy subjects, both non-elastic taping and bracing reduced that movement. In both groups, non-elastic taping and bracing reduced rearfoot excursion in inversion/eversion significantly, which indicates a stabilisation effect. No such effect was found with kinesiotaping. All three methods reduced maximum plantar flexion significantly. Non-elastic taping stabilised the midfoot best in patients with chronic ankle instability, while kinesiotaping did not influence foot kinematics other than to stabilise the rearfoot in the sagittal plane. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01810471. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Elastic buckling strength of corroded steel plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elastic buckling assessment of a corroded plate with irregular surfaces is evaluated only on the basis of numerical analysis with FEM. A computer code in Fortran 90 is developed to generate irregular surfaces based on the mean and standard deviation of thickness diminution. By using shell elements with variable thickness ...

  15. Ultrahigh resolution focused electron beam induced processing: the effect of substrate thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F; Lazic, Ivan; Beyer, André

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations show that the SE yield changes strongly with substrate thickness for thicknesses below the SE escape depth. However, our experimental results show that the growth rate is independent of the substrate thickness. Deposits with an average size of about 3 nm were written on 1 and 9...... nm thick carbon substrates. The apparent contradiction between simulation and experiment is explained by simulating the SE emission from a carbon substrate with platinum deposits on the surface. It appears that the SE emission is dominated by the deposits rather than the carbon substrate, even...

  16. Effects of accelerating voltage and specimen thickness on the spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction in Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Jhih-Wun; Kuo, Ka-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Jui-Chao, E-mail: jckuo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Tsung-Yuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Technology, Tainan 71005, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A quantitative approach is proposed to measure spatial resolutions of t-EBSD. • Increasing accelerating voltage enhances the lateral and longitudinal resolutions. • Decreasing thickness improves the lateral and longitudinal resolutions. • The depth resolution is 34.4 nm for a 100 nm sample thickness at 25 kV. - Abstract: A quantitative approach was proposed to determine the spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) and to understand the limits of spatial resolution of t-EBSD. In this approach, Cu bicrystals and digital image correlation were employed. The effects of accelerating voltage and specimen thickness on the spatial resolution of t-EBSD were also investigated. t-EBSD specimens with 8 μm × 10 μm dimensions and different thicknesses were prepared using focused ion beam milling. The optimized quality of Kikuchi pattern was achieved at a working distance of 12 mm and a tilting angle of 20°. The optimum depth resolution of 34.4 nm was observed in the lower surface of a 100 nm thick sample at 25 kV. Thus, the penetration depth from the upper surface is 65.6 nm. The optimum lateral and longitudinal resolutions obtained from a 100 nm thick sample at 30 kV are 25.2 and 43.4 nm, respectively. The spatial resolution of t-EBSD can be enhanced by increasing the accelerating voltage and decreasing the sample thickness.

  17. Analytical applications and effective properties of a second gradient isotropic elastic material model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enakoutsa, Koffi

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the works by Toupin, Mindlin, Sokolowski and Germain have been developed following two research streams. In the first one, higher-order gradient continuum models were developed based on the Cauchy tetrahedron argument (see, e.g., dell'Isola and Seppecher in Comptes Rendus de l Academie de Sciences 17 Serie IIb: Mecanique, Physique, Chimie, Astronomie 321:303-308, 1995, Meccanica 32:33-52 1997, Zeitschrift fr Angewandte Mathematik und Physik 63(6):1119-1141, 2012). In the second one, the structure of higher-order gradient models is developed with a view to the applications. In particular in the model of linear isotropic solids proposed by Dell'Isola, Sciarra and Vidoli (DSV), the main constitutive equation is obtained for the case of second gradient models. This model introduces in addition to the two well-known Lame's elastic constants five constitutive constants. The practical applications of this model remain in its infancy since the issue of determining the new moduli it introduces is not yet completely addressed. Also, analytical solutions of simple boundary value problems that can be helpful to grasp some of the physical foundations of this model are missing. This paper aims to address these two issues by providing the analytical solutions for two model problems, a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions and the circular bending of a beam in plane strain, both the beam and the shell obeying the DSV second gradient isotropic elastic model. The solution of the circular bending of a beam has served to grasp some of the physical soundness of the model. A framework based on homogenization under inhomogeneous boundary conditions is also suggested to determine the unknown constitutive constants, which are provided in the particular case of elastic porous heterogeneous materials.

  18. Analysis of local deformation effects in resistive strain sensing of a submicron-thickness AFM cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Schwalb, Christian H.; Winhold, Marcel; Šńukić, Maja; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.

    2013-05-01

    Incorporating resistive strain-sensing elements into MEMS devices is a long-standing approach for electronic detection of the device deformation. As the need for more sensitivity trends the device dimensions downwards, the size of the strain-sensor may become comparable to the device size, which can have significant impact on the mechanical behaviour of the device. To study this effect, we modelled a submicron-thickness silicon nitride AFM cantilever with strain-sensing element. Using finite element analysis, we calculated the strain in the sensor elements for a deflected cantilever. The sensor element contributes to a local stiffening effect in the device structure which lowers the strain in the sensor. By varying the sensor geometry, we investigated the degree to which this effect impacts the strain. Minimizing the sensor size increases the strain, but the reduction in sensor cross-sectional area increases the resistance and expected sensor noise. The optimal sensor geometry must therefore account for this effect. We used our analysis to optimize geometric variations of nanogranular tunnelling resistor (NTR) strain sensors arranged in a Wheatstone bridge on a silicon nitride AFM cantilever. We varied the dimensions of each sensor element to maintain a constant cross-sectional area but maximize the strain in the sensor element. Through this approach, we expect a 45% increase in strain in the sensor and corresponding 20% increase in the Wheatstone bridge signal. Our results provide an important consideration in the design geometry of resistive strainsensing elements in MEMS devices.

  19. Evidence for an endogenous rebound effect impacting long-run car use elasticity to fuel price

    OpenAIRE

    Kemel, E.; Collet, R.; HIVERT, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a structural equation model of household fleet fuel efficiency and car use. It allows to weigh the contribution of car equipment changes and car use adjustments to the price elasticity of household demand for fuel. This model is implemented using a panel dataset of 322 households that were present in each annual wave of the French Car Fleet survey from 1999 to 2007. The longitudinal dimension of this dataset enables to assess the short and long-run adjustments at the house...

  20. Elastic Metamaterials with Simultaneously Negative Effective Shear Modulus and Mass Density

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2011-09-02

    We propose a type of elastic metamaterial comprising fluid-solid composite inclusions which can possess a negative shear modulus and negative mass density over a large frequency region. Such a material has the unique property that only transverse waves can propagate with a negative dispersion while longitudinal waves are forbidden. This leads to many interesting phenomena such as negative refraction, which is demonstrated by using a wedge sample and a significant amount of mode conversion from transverse waves to longitudinal waves that cannot occur on the interface of two natural solids.

  1. Effect of focusing flow on stationary spot machining properties in elastic emission machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoshinori; Mimura, Hidekazu

    2013-05-16

    Ultraprecise optical elements are applied in advanced optical apparatus. Elastic emission machining (EEM) is one of the ultraprecision machining methods used to fabricate shapes with 0.1-nm accuracy. In this study, we proposed and experimentally tested the control of the shape of a stationary spot profile by introducing a focusing-flow state between the nozzle outlet and the workpiece surface in EEM. The simulation results indicate that the focusing-flow nozzle sharpens the distribution of the velocity on the workpiece surface. The results of machining experiments verified those of the simulation. The obtained stationary spot conditions will be useful for surface processing with a high spatial resolution.

  2. Effect of porous titanium coating thickness on in vitro osteoblast phenotype expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Canabarro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed at determining the effect of different thickness of porous titanium (Ti coating, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm thick (PC-0.5, PC-1.0 and PC-1.5, on osteoblast phenotype expression. Materials and methods: Dense Ti discs coated with 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm of porous Ti (PC-0.5, PC-1.0 and PC-1.5, respectively were fabricated by powder metallurgy process with pore size typically between 50 and 400 μm and porosity of 60%. Osteoblastic cells obtained from human alveolar bone were cultured on dense Ti (D-Ti and PC-Ti discs for periods of up to 17 days. Results: Cultures grown on PC-Ti exhibited higher cell proliferation rate than on D-Ti. By comparing PC-Ti groups, it was observed statistical differences on culture grown only at day 10 (PC-0.5

  3. Effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on cortical thickness in transsexual individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Junque, Carme; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Guillamon, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Untreated transsexuals have a brain cortical phenotype. Cross-sex hormone treatments are used to masculinize or feminize the bodies of female-to-male (FtMs) or male-to-female (MtFs) transsexuals, respectively. A longitudinal design was conducted to investigate the effects of treatments on brain cortical thickness (CTh) of FtMs and MtFs. This study investigated 15 female-to-male (FtMs) and 14 male-to-female (MtFs) transsexuals prior and during at least six months of cross-sex hormone therapy treatment. Brain MRI imaging was performed in a 3-Tesla TIM-TRIO Siemens scanner. T1-weighted images were analyzed with FreeSurfer software to obtain CTh as well as subcortical volumetric values. Changes in brain CTh thickness and volumetry associated to changes in hormonal levels due to cross-sex hormone therapy. After testosterone treatment, FtMs showed increases of CTh bilaterally in the postcentral gyrus and unilaterally in the inferior parietal, lingual, pericalcarine, and supramarginal areas of the left hemisphere and the rostral middle frontal and the cuneus region of the right hemisphere. There was a significant positive correlation between the serum testosterone and free testosterone index changes and CTh changes in parieto-temporo-occipital regions. In contrast, MtFs, after estrogens and antiandrogens treatment, showed a general decrease in CTh and subcortical volumetric measures and an increase in the volume of the ventricles. Testosterone therapy increases CTh in FtMs. Thickening in cortical regions is associated to changes in testosterone levels. Estrogens and antiandrogens therapy in MtFs is associated to a decrease in the CTh that consequently induces an enlargement of the ventricular system. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. Thickness and Fuel Preheating Effects on Material Flammability in Microgravity from the BASS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra L.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Makoto; Johnson, Michael C.; T'ien, James S.

    2013-01-01

    The Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment was performed on the International Space Station. Microgravity combustion tests burning thin and thick flat samples, acrylic spheres, and candles were conducted. The samples were mounted inside a small wind tunnel which could impose air flow speeds up to 40 cms. The wind tunnel was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox which supplied power, imaging, and a level of containment. The effects of air flow speed, fuel thickness, fuel preheating, and nitrogen dilution on flame appearance, flame growth, and spread rates were determined in both the opposed and concurrent flow configuration. In some cases, a jet of nitrogen was introduced to attempt to extinguish the flame. Microgravity flames were found to be especially sensitive to air flow speed in the range 0 to 5 cms. The gas phase response is much faster compared to the solid and so as the flow speed is changed, the flame responds with almost no delay. At the lowest speeds examined (less than 1 cms) all the flames tended to become dim blue and very stable. However, heat loss at these very low convective rates is small so the flames can burn for a long time. At moderate flow speeds (between about 1 and 5 cms) the flame continually heats the solid fuel resulting in an increasing fuel temperature, higher rate of fuel vaporization, and a stronger, more luminous flame as time progresses. Only the smallest flames burning acrylic slabs appeared to be adversely influenced by solid conductive heat loss, but even these burned for over 5 minutes before self-extinguishing. This has implications for spacecraft fire safety since a tiny flame might be undetected for a long time. While the small flame is not particularly hazardous if it remains small, the danger is that it might flare up if the air convection is suddenly increased or if the flame spreads into another fuel source.

  5. Effect of lightweight aggregate intrinsic Strength on lightweight concrete compressive strength and modulus of elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla, C.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of Structural Lightweight Concrete (SLC, which is a material generally composed of cement, water and lightweight aggregate, has been mainly focused on developing particular cases. Then, the main objective of this research was to generalise the knowledge of this type of material. Particularly, the effect of replacing conventional coarse aggregate by lightweight aggregate on mechanical properties of concrete was studied. SLC may be conceived as a two -phase material. The first phase, composed of cement, water and siliceous natural sand, is called the "resistant phase", and contributes to the structural strength. The second phase is the lightweight phase, comprised of coarse lightweight aggregate, and it is meant to decrease the concrete density. In this way it would be possible to describe the mechanical behaviour of concrete, based on lightweight aggregate and the cement mortar parameters. The obtained results allow for the proposition of relationships between mechanical properties of SLC (such as compressive strength and modulus of elasticity and the constituent materials properties and amount. At the same time, an easily measured index representing the structural capability of lightweight aggregate is also proposed, this index allows to estimate the potential mechanical properties of concrete which could be obtained by using a particular aggregate.

    El estudio del Hormigón Ligero Estructural (HLE, material compuesto generalmente por cemento, agua y árido ligero, ha estado enfocado principalmente al desarrollo de casos particulares. Por lo anterior, el objetivo principal de esta investigación fue generalizar el conocimiento sobre este material. En particular, la meta de este trabajo fue estudiar el efecto que tiene el reemplazo de árido convencional por un árido ligero, en las propiedades mecánicas del hormigón. El modelo aplicado conceptualiza al HLE como un material de dos fases, una denominada "soportante", constituida

  6. Determination of the optical thickness and effective particle radius of clouds from reflected solar radiation measurements. I - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Teruyuki; King, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the optical thickness and effective particle radius of stratiform cloud layers from reflected solar radiation measurements. A detailed study is presented which shows that the cloud optical thickness (tau c) and effective particle radius (r/e/) of water clouds can be determined solely from reflection function measurements at 0.75 micron and 2.16 microns, provided tau c is not less than 4 and r(e) is not less than 6 microns. For optically thin clouds, the retrieval becomes ambiguous, resulting in two possible solutions for the effective radius and optical thickness. Adding a third channel near 1.65 micron does not improve the situation noticeably, whereas the addition of a channel near 3.70 microns reduces the ambiguity in deriving the effective radius. The effective radius determined by the above procedure corresponds to the droplet radius at some optical depth within the cloud layer.

  7. [Effect of recasting on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, Nemanja

    2007-07-01

    Elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems determines their flexural strenght and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Recycling of basic alloys is often a clinical practice, despite the possible effects on the quality of the future metal-ceramic dentures. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems in making fixed partial dentures. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99) and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C) were made. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Three- point bending test was used to determine elastic modulus, recommended by the standard ISO 9693:1999. Fracture load for damaging ceramic layer was recorded on the universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464), with the speed of 0,05 mm/min. The results of this research revealed significant differences between elasticity modules of metal-ceramic samples in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on the elastic modulus of the examined alloys. This research showed the slight linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 6th generation of recycling. After the 6th recycling there was a sudden fall of elastic modulus. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of the reduced elastic modulus of these alloys. Instead of reusing previously recasted alloys, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturer.

  8. Effect of recasting on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems determines their flexural strength and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Recycling of basic alloys is often a clinical practice, despite the possible effects on the quality of the future metal-ceramic dentures. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the elastic modulus of metalceramic systems in making fixed partial dentures. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Three- point bending test was used to determine elastic modulus, recommended by the standard ISO 9693:1999. Fracture load for damaging ceramic layer was recorded on the universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0,05 mm/min. Results. The results of this research revealed significant differences between elasticity modules of metal-ceramic samples in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on the elastic modulus of the examined alloys. This research showed the slight linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 6th generation of recycling. After the 6th recycling there was a sudden fall of elastic modulus. Conclusion. Recasting of nickelchromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of the reduced elastic modulus of these alloys. Instead of reusing previously recasted alloys, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturer. .

  9. Review of thickness swell in hardboard siding : effect of processing variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles G. Carll

    1997-01-01

    Medium-density hardboard is used extensively as siding on residential structures. One hardboard behavior that can be measured in the laboratory is thickness swell after exposure to water. This report reviews the literature on processing variables that are known to or likely to influence thickness swell. Where the literature on hardboard is sparse, research on other...

  10. Thick root of cucumber: other susceptible plants and the effect of pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, van der D.J.; Paternotte, P.; Hamelink, R.

    2002-01-01

    Thick root is a relatively new disorder of cucumber grown in artificial substrates. Plants of cucumber, tomato, sweet pepper, lupin, anthurium, Cucurbita ficifolia, C. maxima and two lines from crosses between C. maxima and C. moschata were grown in thick root disease (TRD)-infested nutrient

  11. THE EFFECT OF THE BACKFAT THICKNESS LOSS ON REPRODUCTION IN LACTATING SOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Brzobohatý

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The work discusses the influence of the backfat thickness change, during sow´s lactation, on their subsequent litter characteristics. The reproduction potential of 478 sows of two genotypes was assessed. The genotypes were 50 Large White (LWD sows and 428 crossbreeds Large White x Landrace (LWD x L sows. The backfat thickness decline was examined in accordance to P2, backfat thickness in sows during lactation namely 1 day before planned parturition as well as weaning. From the obtained results it can be stated that the backfat thickness decline level during lactation has a small influence on the number of total born piglets. In contrast, the number of piglets born alive increased when backfat thickness rate increased. With a moderate backfat thickness decline, the average birthweight piglets gradually increased. However, the opposite trend was shown for the average weight at weaning. The backfat thickness decline level during sow´s lactation influences their farrowing interval. Animals with a lower increase of the backfat thickness subsequently showed a shorter farrowing interval (148.99, respectively 151.86 days, as well as a shorter weaning – estrus interval.

  12. Effect of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene thickness on contact mechanics in total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deen, M; García-Fiñana, M; Jin, Z M

    2006-10-01

    One of the important design parameters in current knee joint replacements is the thickness of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) tibial insert, yet there is no clear definition of the upper limit of the 'thick' polyethylene insert. Using one design knee implant and subjecting it to the physiological loads encountered throughout the gait cycle, measurements of the lengths of contact imprints generated were compared with the corresponding theoretical predictions for different insert thicknesses under the same applied load. Multiple regression analysis was applied to test whether the dimensions of contact imprints are influenced by UHMWPE thickness. Good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental measurements of the dimensions of contact imprints when the knee was at 60 degrees flexion. Therefore, it was possible to estimate the contact pressure at the articulating surface using the theoretical model. Contact imprint dimensions increased with increasing applied load. Statistical analysis of the experimental data revealed that, at 0 degree flexion, the overall imprint dimensions increased as the UHMWPE thickness increased from 8 to 20 mm. However, the increment was not significant when the thickness subinterval 10-15 mm was considered. Furthermore, at 60 degrees flexion, thickness was not a significant factor for the overall imprint dimensions. No evidence was found from the data to suggest that an increment in polyethylene thickness over 10 mm would significantly reduce the contact imprint dimensions. These findings suggest that thicker inserts can be avoided, as they require unnecessary bone resection.