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Sample records for effective elastic constants

  1. Estimation of effective elastic constants for grid plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    1980-07-01

    This article contains a method of estimation for the effective elastic constants of a grid plate, which is a flat perforated plate with pipes for cooling. The elastic constants of the grid plate are formulated for two symmetric axes. In the case of using OFCu(E 0 = 12500 kg/mm 2 , ν 0 = 0.34) as the material of the grid, the results are given as follows. E sub(L) = 3180 kg/mm 2 , E sub(T) = 3860 kg/mm 2 upsilon sub(LT) = 0.12, upsilon sub(TL) = 0.15 (author)

  2. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  3. Modelling and simulation of multi-phase effects on X-ray elasticity constants

    CERN Document Server

    Freour, S; Guillen, R; François, M X

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the calculation of X-ray Elasticity Constants (XEC) of phases embedded in multi-phase polycrystals. A three scales (macroscopic, pseudo-macroscopic, mesoscopic) model based on the classical self-consistent formalism is developed in order to analyse multi-phase effects on XEC values. Simulations are performed for cubic or hexagonal crystallographic structure phases embedded in several two-phases materials. In fact, it is demonstrated that XEC vary with the macroscopic stiffness of the whole polycrystal. In consequence, the constants of one particular phase depend on the elastic behaviour and the volume fraction of all the phases constituting the material. Now, XEC play a leading role in pseudo-macroscopic stresses determination by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. In this work, a quantitative analysis of the multi-phase effects on stresses determination by XRD methods was performed. Numerical results will be compared and discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Effect of plastic deformation and strain history on X-ray elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iadicola, Mark A.; Foecke, Tim

    2005-01-01

    The use of X-ray diffraction to measure residual stress in a crystalline material is well known. This method is currently being reapplied to the surface measurement of in situ stresses during biaxial straining of sheet metal specimens. This leads to questions of precision and calibration of the method through plastic deformation. Little is known of the change, with plastic work, in the X-ray elastic constants (XECs) that are required by the technique for stress measurement. Experiments to determine the formability of various materials using this stress measurement technique in conjunction with a typical Marciniak test (with the Raghavan variation of specimen shapes) have been performed assuming a constant value for XECs. New results of calibration experiments are presented which admit the possibility of variation of the XECs with plastic strain history and initial texture of the material. Adjustment of the data from the previously performed formability experiments is shown. Additionally, various phenomena are captured including initial yielding, change of XECs with plastic strain level (both with uniaxial and biaxial strain histories), and some of the effects of texture on the technique. This technique has potential application in verification of the assumptions made during other standard testing methods (in-plane biaxial specimen geometries and bulge testing), verifying stress predictions from finite element analyses (i.e. benchmarking experiments such as BM3), analysis of stress states in localized deformation (yield point effects), and tracking of the effect of prestraining on material formability through the process of multistage forming

  5. Theory of the change of elastic constants by interstitials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, N.; Dederichs, P.H.; Lehmann, C.; Leibfried, G.; Scholz, A.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of the change of elastic constants by point-defects, in particular by interstitials, is briefly summarized. The typical effects of spring changes in a defect lattice on the elastic data are discussed qualitatively. Numerical results for the change of elastic constants by self-interstitials and vacancies are given and compared with experimental data for Cu and Al

  6. Effect of Microstructure Constraints on the Homogenized Elastic Constants of Elastomeric Sylgard/GMB Syntactic Foam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steck, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Previous numerical studies of Sylgard filled with glass microballoons (GMB) have relied on various microstructure idealizations to achieve a large range of volume fractions with high mesh quality. This study investigates how different microstructure idealizations and constraints affect the apparent homogenized elastic constants in the virgin state of the material, in which all GMBs are intact and perfectly bonded to the Sylgard matrix, and in the fully damaged state of the material in which all GMBs are destroyed. In the latter state, the material behaves as an elastomeric foam. Four microstructure idealizations are considered relating to how GMBs are packed into a representative volume element (RVE): (1) no boundary penetration nor GMB-GMB overlap, (2) GMB-GMB overlap, (3) boundary penetration, and (4) boundary penetration and GMB-GMB overlap. First order computational homogenization with kinematically uniform displacement boundary conditions (KUBCs) was employed to determine the homogenized (apparent) bulk and shear moduli for the four microstructure idealizations in the intact and fully broken GMB material states. It was found that boundary penetration has a significant effect on the shear modulus for microstructures with intact GMBs, but that neither boundary penetration nor GMB overlap have a significant effect on homogenized properties for microstructures with fully broken GMBs. The primary conclusion of the study is that future investigations into Sylgard/GMB micromechanics should either force GMBs to stay within the RVE fully and/or use periodic BCs (PBCs) to eliminate the boundary penetration issues. The implementation of PBCs requires the improvement of existing tools in Sandia’s Sierra/SM code.

  7. Effective X-ray elastic constant measurement for in situ stress measurement of biaxially strained AA5754-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iadicola, Mark A.; Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of stresses by X-ray diffraction requires accurate X-ray elastic constants. Calibration experiments are one method to determine these for a specific material in a specific condition. In this paper, uniaxial tension experiments are used to investigate the variation of these constants after uniaxial and equal-biaxial plastic deformation for an aluminum alloy (AA5754-O) of interest to the automotive industry. These data are critical for accurate measurement of the biaxial mechanical properties of the material using a recent experimental method combining specialized sheet metal forming equipment with portable X-ray diffraction equipment. The measured effective X-ray elastic constants show some minor variation with increased plastic deformation, and this behavior was found to be consistent for both uniaxially and equal-biaxially strained samples. The use of two average values for effective X-ray elastic constants, one in the rolling direction and one transverse to the rolling direction of the sheet material, is shown to be of sufficient accuracy for the combined tests of interest. Comparison of uniaxial data measured using X-ray diffraction and standard methods show good agreement, and biaxial stress–strain results show good repeatability. Additionally, the calibration data show some non-linear behavior, which is analyzed in regards to crystallographic texture and intergranular stress effects. The non-linear behavior is found to be the result of intergranular stresses based on comparison with additional measurements using other X-ray diffraction equipment and neutron diffraction.

  8. Elastic Constants of Plane Orthotropic Elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The four independent material parameters of plane orthotropic elasti city are introduced as the effective stiffness, the effective Poisson ratio, the stiffness ratio and the shear parameter. It is proved that stress boundary value problems with zero resulting force on internal contours lead...

  9. Effect of elastic constants of liquid crystals in their electro-optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, Z.; Ghaffary, T.; Gharahbeigi, M. M.

    Recently following the success of the density functional theory (DFT) in obtaining the structure and thermodynamics of homogeneous and inhomogeneous classical systems such as simple fluids, dipolar fluid and binary hard spheres, this theory was also applied to obtain the density profile of a molecular fluid in between hard planar walls by Kalpaxis and Rickayzen. In the theory of molecular fluids, the direct correlation function (DCF) can be used to calculate the equation of state, free energy, phase transition, elastic constants, etc. It is well known that the hard core molecular models play an important role in understanding complex liquids such as liquid crystals. In this paper, a classical fluid of nonspherical molecules is studied. The required homogeneous (DCF) is obtained by solving Orenstein-Zernike (OZ) integral equation numerically. Some of the molecules in the liquid crystals have a sphere shape and this kind of molecular fluid is considered here. The DCF sphere of the molecular fluid is calculated and it will be shown that the results are in good agreement with the pervious works and the results of computer simulation. Finally the electro-optical properties of ellipsoid liquid crystal using DCF of these molecules are calculated.

  10. Elastic constants from microscopic strain fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta; Nielaba; Rao; Binder

    2000-02-01

    Fluctuations of the instantaneous local Lagrangian strain epsilon(ij)(r,t), measured with respect to a static "reference" lattice, are used to obtain accurate estimates of the elastic constants of model solids from atomistic computer simulations. The measured strains are systematically coarse-grained by averaging them within subsystems (of size L(b)) of a system (of total size L) in the canonical ensemble. Using a simple finite size scaling theory we predict the behavior of the fluctuations as a function of L(b)/L and extract elastic constants of the system in the thermodynamic limit at nonzero temperature. Our method is simple to implement, efficient, and general enough to be able to handle a wide class of model systems, including those with singular potentials without any essential modification. We illustrate the technique by computing isothermal elastic constants of "hard" and "soft" disk triangular solids in two dimensions from Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. We compare our results with those from earlier simulations and theory.

  11. Effects of hydrogen on the single crystalline elastic constants of niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlader, Daniel Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1977-06-01

    A special hydriding system was designed and constructed to satisfy conditions for hydriding niobium. This system controlled the temperature and hydrogen atmosphere surrounding the niobium while ultrasonic measurements were recorded. Ultrasonic wave velocities were determined by measurement of the times for ultrasonic pulses to transit and then echo through known dimensions of test specimens. The method which was employed is commonly known as the pulse-echo-overlap method. This study confirmed the general trends of earlier investigations. In this study C' continued to decrease and C44 continued to increase up to 4.69 atomic percent hydrogen which is the maximum concentration which has yet been examined. In the case of the niobium-hydrogen system the Snoek effect may well be a contributory factor to the decrease of C' with increasing hydrogen concentration. However, crystallographic considerations preclude this effect from contributing a concentration dependence to C44 or B. The observation of the present work implies that other factors must also be contributing to the overall behavior.

  12. Effects of hydrogen on the single crystalline elastic constants of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlader, D.M.

    1977-06-01

    A special hydriding system was designed and constructed to satisfy conditions for hydriding niobium. This system controlled the temperature and hydrogen atmosphere surrounding the niobium while ultrasonic measurements were recorded. Ultrasonic wave velocities were determined by measurement of the times for ultrasonic pulses to transit and then echo through known dimensions of test specimens. The method which was employed is commonly known as the pulse-echo-overlap method. This study confirmed the general trends of earlier investigations. In this study C' continued to decrease and C 44 continued to increase up to 4.69 atomic percent hydrogen which is the maximum concentration which has yet been examined. In the case of the niobium-hydrogen system the Snoek effect may well be a contributory factor to the decrease of C' with increasing hydrogen concentration. However, crystallographic considerations preclude this effect from contributing a concentration dependence to C 44 or B. The observation of the present work implies that other factors must also be contributing to the overall behavior

  13. Effective medium approximation for elastic constants of porous solids with microscopic heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Formulas for the scattering from an inhomogeneous sphere in a fluid-saturated porous medium are used to construct a self-consistent effective medium approximation for the coefficients in Biot's equations of poroelasticity [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 28, 168 (1956)] when the material constituting the porous solid frame is not homogeneous on the microscopic scale. The discussion is restricted to porous materials exhibiting both macroscopic and microscopic isotropy. Brown and Korringa [Geophysics 40, 608 (1975)] have previously found the general form of these coefficients. The present results give explicit estimates of all the coefficients in terms of the moduli of the solid constituents. The results are also shown to be completely consistent with the well-known results of Gassmann and of Biot and Willis, as well as those of Brown and Korringa

  14. Experimental determination of third-order elastic constants of diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J M; Gupta, Y M

    2011-03-25

    To determine the nonlinear elastic response of diamond, single crystals were shock compressed along the [100], [110], and [111] orientations to 120 GPa peak elastic stresses. Particle velocity histories and elastic wave velocities were measured by using laser interferometry. The measured elastic wave profiles were used, in combination with published acoustic measurements, to determine the complete set of third-order elastic constants. These constants represent the first experimental determination, and several differ significantly from those calculated by using theoretical models.

  15. Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the third-order elastic constants and mechanical properties of NiAl

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaohua; Wu, Xiaozhi; Wang, Rui; Liu, Qing; Gan, Liyong

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite in Al sublattice, Cr in Al sublattice, Pt in Ni sublattice on the second-order elastic constants (SOECs) and third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of the B2 NiAl have been investigated using the first-principles methods. Lattice constant and the SOECs of NiAl are in good agreement with the previous results. The brittle/ductile transition map based on Pugh ratio G/B and Cauchy pressure Pc shows that Ni antisite, Cr, Pt and pressure can improve the ductility of NiAl, respectively. Ni vacancy and lower pressure can enhance the Vickers hardness Hv of NiAl. The density of states (DOS) and the charge density difference are also used to analysis the effects of vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the mechanical properties of NiAl, and the results are in consistent with the transition map. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the third-order elastic constants and mechanical properties of NiAl

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaohua

    2014-12-01

    Effects of Ni vacancy, Ni antisite in Al sublattice, Cr in Al sublattice, Pt in Ni sublattice on the second-order elastic constants (SOECs) and third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of the B2 NiAl have been investigated using the first-principles methods. Lattice constant and the SOECs of NiAl are in good agreement with the previous results. The brittle/ductile transition map based on Pugh ratio G/B and Cauchy pressure Pc shows that Ni antisite, Cr, Pt and pressure can improve the ductility of NiAl, respectively. Ni vacancy and lower pressure can enhance the Vickers hardness Hv of NiAl. The density of states (DOS) and the charge density difference are also used to analysis the effects of vacancy, Ni antisite, Cr and Pt on the mechanical properties of NiAl, and the results are in consistent with the transition map. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Elastic constants of diamond from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guangtu; Van Workum, Kevin; Schall, J David; Harrison, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    The elastic constants of diamond between 100 and 1100 K have been calculated for the first time using molecular dynamics and the second-generation, reactive empirical bond-order potential (REBO). This version of the REBO potential was used because it was redesigned to be able to model the elastic properties of diamond and graphite at 0 K while maintaining its original capabilities. The independent elastic constants of diamond, C 11 , C 12 , and C 44 , and the bulk modulus were all calculated as a function of temperature, and the results from the three different methods are in excellent agreement. By extrapolating the elastic constant data to 0 K, it is clear that the values obtained here agree with the previously calculated 0 K elastic constants. Because the second-generation REBO potential was fit to obtain better solid-state force constants for diamond and graphite, the agreement with the 0 K elastic constants is not surprising. In addition, the functional form of the second-generation REBO potential is able to qualitatively model the functional dependence of the elastic constants and bulk modulus of diamond at non-zero temperatures. In contrast, reactive potentials based on other functional forms do not reproduce the correct temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The second-generation REBO potential also correctly predicts that diamond has a negative Cauchy pressure in the temperature range examined

  18. Evaluating variability with atomistic simulations: the effect of potential and calculation methodology on the modeling of lattice and elastic constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Trautt, Zachary T.; Becker, Chandler A.

    2018-07-01

    Atomistic simulations using classical interatomic potentials are powerful investigative tools linking atomic structures to dynamic properties and behaviors. It is well known that different interatomic potentials produce different results, thus making it necessary to characterize potentials based on how they predict basic properties. Doing so makes it possible to compare existing interatomic models in order to select those best suited for specific use cases, and to identify any limitations of the models that may lead to unrealistic responses. While the methods for obtaining many of these properties are often thought of as simple calculations, there are many underlying aspects that can lead to variability in the reported property values. For instance, multiple methods may exist for computing the same property and values may be sensitive to certain simulation parameters. Here, we introduce a new high-throughput computational framework that encodes various simulation methodologies as Python calculation scripts. Three distinct methods for evaluating the lattice and elastic constants of bulk crystal structures are implemented and used to evaluate the properties across 120 interatomic potentials, 18 crystal prototypes, and all possible combinations of unique lattice site and elemental model pairings. Analysis of the results reveals which potentials and crystal prototypes are sensitive to the calculation methods and parameters, and it assists with the verification of potentials, methods, and molecular dynamics software. The results, calculation scripts, and computational infrastructure are self-contained and openly available to support researchers in performing meaningful simulations.

  19. Elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    We review recent experimental studies at NBS on the anisotropic elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites. Materials that were studied include: boron-aluminum, boron-epoxy, graphite-epoxy, glass-epoxy, and aramid-epoxy. In all cases, elastic-constant direction dependence could be described by relationships developed for single crystals of homogeneous materials. Elastic stiffness and internal friction were found to vary inversely

  20. Temperature dependence of grain boundary free energy and elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foiles, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the suggestion that the temperature dependence of the grain boundary free energy can be estimated from the temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The temperature-dependent elastic constants and free energy of a symmetric Σ79 tilt boundary are computed for an embedded atom method model of Ni. The grain boundary free energy scales with the product of the shear modulus times the lattice constant for temperatures up to about 0.75 the melting temperature.

  1. X-Ray Elastic Constants for Cubic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malen, K

    1974-10-15

    The stress-strain relation to be used in X-ray stress measurements in anisotropic texture-free media is studied. The method for evaluation of appropriate elastic constants for a cubic medium is described. Some illustrative numerical examples have been worked out including line broadening due to elastic anisotropy. The elastic stress and strain compatibility at grain boundaries is taken into account using Kroner's method. These elastic constants obviously only apply when no internal stresses due to plastic deformation are present. The case of reorientation of free interstitials in the stress field can be taken into account

  2. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-09

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni{sub 3}Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  3. X-Ray Elastic Constants for Cubic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malen, K.

    1974-10-15

    The stress-strain relation to be used in X-ray stress measurements in anisotropic texture-free media is studied. The method for evaluation of appropriate elastic constants for a cubic medium is described. Some illustrative numerical examples have been worked out including line broadening due to elastic anisotropy. The elastic stress and strain compatibility at grain boundaries is taken into account using Kroner's method. These elastic constants obviously only apply when no internal stresses due to plastic deformation are present. The case of reorientation of free interstitials in the stress field can be taken into account

  4. X-Ray Elastic Constants for Cubic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.

    1974-10-01

    The stress-strain relation to be used in X-ray stress measurements in anisotropic texture-free media is studied. The method for evaluation of appropriate elastic constants for a cubic medium is described. Some illustrative numerical examples have been worked out including line broadening due to elastic anisotropy. The elastic stress and strain compatibility at grain boundaries is taken into account using Kroner's method. These elastic constants obviously only apply when no internal stresses due to plastic deformation are present. The case of reorientation of free interstitials in the stress field can be taken into account

  5. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni 3 Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  6. Stresses and elastic constants of crystalline sodium, from molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiferl, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    The stresses and the elastic constants of bcc sodium are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) for temperatures to T = 340K. The total adiabatic potential of a system of sodium atoms is represented by pseudopotential model. The resulting expression has two terms: a large, strictly volume-dependent potential, plus a sum over ion pairs of a small, volume-dependent two-body potential. The stresses and the elastic constants are given as strain derivatives of the Helmholtz free energy. The resulting expressions involve canonical ensemble averages (and fluctuation averages) of the position and volume derivatives of the potential. An ensemble correction relates the results to MD equilibrium averages. Evaluation of the potential and its derivatives requires the calculation of integrals with infinite upper limits of integration, and integrand singularities. Methods for calculating these integrals and estimating the effects of integration errors are developed. A method is given for choosing initial conditions that relax quickly to a desired equilibrium state. Statistical methods developed earlier for MD data are extended to evaluate uncertainties in fluctuation averages, and to test for symmetry. 45 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Elastic constants of stressed and unstressed materials in the phase-field crystal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Le; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Liu, Zhirong

    2018-04-01

    A general procedure is developed to investigate the elastic response and calculate the elastic constants of stressed and unstressed materials through continuum field modeling, particularly the phase-field crystal (PFC) models. It is found that for a complete description of system response to elastic deformation, the variations of all the quantities of lattice wave vectors, their density amplitudes (including the corresponding anisotropic variation and degeneracy breaking), the average atomic density, and system volume should be incorporated. The quantitative and qualitative results of elastic constant calculations highly depend on the physical interpretation of the density field used in the model, and also importantly, on the intrinsic pressure that usually pre-exists in the model system. A formulation based on thermodynamics is constructed to account for the effects caused by constant pre-existing stress during the homogeneous elastic deformation, through the introducing of a generalized Gibbs free energy and an effective finite strain tensor used for determining the elastic constants. The elastic properties of both solid and liquid states can be well produced by this unified approach, as demonstrated by an analysis for the liquid state and numerical evaluations for the bcc solid phase. The numerical calculations of bcc elastic constants and Poisson's ratio through this method generate results that are consistent with experimental conditions, and better match the data of bcc Fe given by molecular dynamics simulations as compared to previous work. The general theory developed here is applicable to the study of different types of stressed or unstressed material systems under elastic deformation.

  8. Elasticity Constants of a Two-Phase Tungsten Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fares Slim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The IET was used to determine the macroscopic elasticity constants of the multiphase coating. In order to determine the macroscopic elasticity constants of the film firstly, a critical assessment of Young’s modulus determination was done by comparing all the models proposed in the literature. The best model was identified and a study was performed to identify and quantify the most influent factors on the global uncertainty. Secondly, an enhanced formulation to determine the shear modulus of coating by IET was developed. The methodology was applied on a tungsten thin film deposited by DC magnetron sputtering.

  9. Ab Initio Simulation Beryllium in Solid Molecular Hydrogen: Elastic Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Perlado, Jose M.

    2016-03-01

    In systems of inertial confinement fusion targets Deuterium-Tritium are manufactured with a solid layer, it must have specific properties to increase the efficiency of ignition. Currently there have been some proposals to model the phases of hydrogen isotopes and hence their high pressure, but these works do not allow explaining some of the structures present at the solid phase change effect of increased pressure. By means of simulation with first principles methods and Quantum Molecular Dynamics, we compare the structural difference of solid molecular hydrogen pure and solid molecular hydrogen with beryllium, watching beryllium inclusion in solid hydrogen matrix, we obtain several differences in mechanical properties, in particular elastic constants. For C11 the difference between hydrogen and hydrogen with beryllium is 37.56%. This may produce a non-uniform initial compression and decreased efficiency of ignition.

  10. Dynamic measurements of the elastic constants of glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    . But a new mechanical design, which reduces mechanical resonance, is described. The measurements were carried out in atmospheric air at normal pressure, and this causes an oscillatory airflow in the sample. To obtain the elastic constants, the influence of the airflow was subtracted from the data by a new...

  11. Mechanical Properties and Elastic Constants Due to Damage Accumulation and Amorphization in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Damage accumulation due to cascade overlap, which was simulated previously, has been used to study the changes of elastic constants, bulk and elastic moduli as a function of dose. These mechanical properties generally decrease with increasing dose, and the rapid decrease at low-dose level indicates that point defects and small clusters play an important role in the changes of elastic constants rather than topological disorder. The internal strain relaxation has no effect on the elastic constants, C11 and C12, in perfect SiC, but it has a significant influence on all elastic constants calculated in damaged SiC. The elastic constants in the cascade-amorphized (CA) SiC decrease about 19%, 29% and 46% for C11, C12 and C44, respectively. The bulk modulus decrease 23% and the elastic modulus decreases 29%, which is consistent with experimental measurements. The stability of both the perfect SiC and CA-SiC under hydrostatic tension has been also investigated. All mechanical properties in the CA-SiC exhibit behavior similar to that in perfect SiC, but the critical stress at which the CA-SiC becomes structurally unstable is one order of magnitude smaller than that for perfect SiC

  12. Single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite

    KAUST Repository

    Speziale, Sergio

    2008-07-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The six non-zero elastic constants of this trigonal mineral are: C11 = 35.1 ± 0.1 GPa, C12 = 21.9 ±0.1 GPa, C13 = 20.0 ± 0.5 GPa, C14 = 0.6 ± 0.2 GPa, C33 = 55 ± 1 GPa, C44 = 11.0 ± 0.2 GPa. The Hill average of the aggregate bulk, shear modulus and the polycrystal Young\\'s modulus and Poisson\\'s ratio are 27.3 ± 0.9 GPa, 9.5 ± 0.8 GPa, 25 ± 2 GPa and 0.34 ± 0.02 respectively. The longitudinal and shear elastic anisotropy are C33/C11 = 0.64 ± 0.01 and C66/C44 =0.60 ± 0.01. The elastic anisotropy in ettringite is connected to its crystallographic structure. Stiff chains of [Al(OH)6]3- octahedra alternating with triplets of Ca2+ in eight-fold coordination run parallel to the c-axis leading to higher stiffness along this direction. The determination of the elastic stiffness tensor can help in the prediction of the early age properties of cement paste when ettringite crystals precipitate and in the modeling of both internal and external sulfate attack when secondary ettringite formation leads to expansion of concrete. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite

    KAUST Repository

    Speziale, Sergio; Jiang, Fuming; Mao, Zhu; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Duffy, Thomas S.; Schilling, Frank R.

    2008-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The six non-zero elastic constants of this trigonal mineral are: C11 = 35.1 ± 0.1 GPa, C12 = 21.9 ±0.1 GPa, C13 = 20.0 ± 0.5 GPa, C14 = 0.6 ± 0.2 GPa, C33 = 55 ± 1 GPa, C44 = 11.0 ± 0.2 GPa. The Hill average of the aggregate bulk, shear modulus and the polycrystal Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are 27.3 ± 0.9 GPa, 9.5 ± 0.8 GPa, 25 ± 2 GPa and 0.34 ± 0.02 respectively. The longitudinal and shear elastic anisotropy are C33/C11 = 0.64 ± 0.01 and C66/C44 =0.60 ± 0.01. The elastic anisotropy in ettringite is connected to its crystallographic structure. Stiff chains of [Al(OH)6]3- octahedra alternating with triplets of Ca2+ in eight-fold coordination run parallel to the c-axis leading to higher stiffness along this direction. The determination of the elastic stiffness tensor can help in the prediction of the early age properties of cement paste when ettringite crystals precipitate and in the modeling of both internal and external sulfate attack when secondary ettringite formation leads to expansion of concrete. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants in piezoceramic disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Nicolas; Andrade, Marco A B; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2010-12-01

    Three-dimensional modeling of piezoelectric devices requires a precise knowledge of piezoelectric material parameters. The commonly used piezoelectric materials belong to the 6mm symmetry class, which have ten independent constants. In this work, a methodology to obtain precise material constants over a wide frequency band through finite element analysis of a piezoceramic disk is presented. Given an experimental electrical impedance curve and a first estimate for the piezoelectric material properties, the objective is to find the material properties that minimize the difference between the electrical impedance calculated by the finite element method and that obtained experimentally by an electrical impedance analyzer. The methodology consists of four basic steps: experimental measurement, identification of vibration modes and their sensitivity to material constants, a preliminary identification algorithm, and final refinement of the material constants using an optimization algorithm. The application of the methodology is exemplified using a hard lead zirconate titanate piezoceramic. The same methodology is applied to a soft piezoceramic. The errors in the identification of each parameter are statistically estimated in both cases, and are less than 0.6% for elastic constants, and less than 6.3% for dielectric and piezoelectric constants.

  15. Hydrostatic pressure dependence of elastic constants for lead fluoride crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Rao, C.N.

    1988-10-01

    The variations of the second order elastic constants (SOEC) and longitudinal and shear moduli with hydrostatic pressure for the lead fluoride have been investigated theoretically, for the first time, by means of a three-body force potential (TBP) model. The significance of three-body interactions (TBI) has been clearly demonstrated in these investigations. The present TBP model has reproduced the pressure derivatives of the SOEC of PbF more satisfactorily than the shell model and other model calculations. (author). 24 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Measurement of elastic constants by simultaneously sensing longitudinal and shear waves as an overlapped signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ho Geon; Song, Dong Gi; Jhang, Kyoung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Measurement of elastic constants is crucial for engineering aspects of predicting the behavior of materials under load as well as structural health monitoring of material degradation. Ultrasonic velocity measurement for material properties has been broadly used as a nondestructive evaluation method for material characterization. In particular, pulse-echo method has been extensively utilized as it is not only simple but also effective when only one side of the inspected objects is accessible. However, the conventional technique in this approach measures longitudinal and shear waves individually to obtain their velocities. This produces a set of two data for each measurement. This paper proposes a simultaneous sensing system of longitudinal waves and shear waves for elastic constant measurement. The proposed system senses both these waves simultaneously as a single overlapped signal, which is then analyzed to calculate both the ultrasonic velocities for obtaining elastic constants. Therefore, this system requires just half the number of data to obtain elastic constants compared to the conventional individual measurement. The results of the proposed simultaneous measurement had smaller standard deviations than those in the individual measurement. These results validate that the proposed approach improves the efficiency and reliability of ultrasonic elastic constant measurement by reducing the complexity of the measurement system, its operating procedures, and the number of data.

  17. Measurement of elastic constants by simultaneously sensing longitudinal and shear waves as an overlapped signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Ho Geon; Song, Dong Gi; Jhang, Kyoung Young

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of elastic constants is crucial for engineering aspects of predicting the behavior of materials under load as well as structural health monitoring of material degradation. Ultrasonic velocity measurement for material properties has been broadly used as a nondestructive evaluation method for material characterization. In particular, pulse-echo method has been extensively utilized as it is not only simple but also effective when only one side of the inspected objects is accessible. However, the conventional technique in this approach measures longitudinal and shear waves individually to obtain their velocities. This produces a set of two data for each measurement. This paper proposes a simultaneous sensing system of longitudinal waves and shear waves for elastic constant measurement. The proposed system senses both these waves simultaneously as a single overlapped signal, which is then analyzed to calculate both the ultrasonic velocities for obtaining elastic constants. Therefore, this system requires just half the number of data to obtain elastic constants compared to the conventional individual measurement. The results of the proposed simultaneous measurement had smaller standard deviations than those in the individual measurement. These results validate that the proposed approach improves the efficiency and reliability of ultrasonic elastic constant measurement by reducing the complexity of the measurement system, its operating procedures, and the number of data

  18. Effective elastic properties of damaged isotropic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, U Sik

    1998-01-01

    In continuum damage mechanics, damaged solids have been represented by the effective elastic stiffness into which local damage is smoothly smeared. Similarly, damaged solids may be represented in terms of effective elastic compliances. By virtue of the effective elastic compliance representation, it may become easier to derive the effective engineering constants of damaged solids from the effective elastic compliances, all in closed form. Thus, in this paper, by using a continuum modeling approach based on both the principle of strain energy equivalence and the equivalent elliptical micro-crack representation of local damage, the effective elastic compliance and effective engineering constants are derived in terms of the undamaged (virgin) elastic properties and a scalar damage variable for both damaged two-and three-dimensional isotropic solids

  19. Determination of the elastic constants of portlandite by Brillouin spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Speziale, S.; Reichmann, H.J.; Schilling, F.R.; Wenk, H.R.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The single crystal elastic constants Cij and the shear and adiabatic bulk modulus of a natural portlandite (Ca(OH)2) crystal were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The elastic constants, expressed in GPa, are: C11 = 102.0(± 2.0), C12 = 32.1(± 1.0), C13 = 8.4(± 0.4), C14 = 4.5(± 0.2), C33 = 33.6(± 0.7), C44 = 12.0(± 0.3), C66 = (C11-C12)/2 = 35.0(± 1.1), where the numbers in parentheses are 1σ standard deviations. The Reuss bounds of the adiabatic bulk and shear moduli are K0S = 26.0(± 0.3) GPa and G0 = 17.5(± 0.4) GPa, respectively, while the Voigt bounds of these moduli are K0S = 37.3(± 0.4) GPa and G0 = 24.4(± 0.3) GPa. The Reuss and Voigt bounds for the aggregate Young's modulus are 42.8(± 1.0) GPa and 60.0(± 0.8) GPa respectively, while the aggregate Poisson's ratio is equal to 0.23(± 0.01). Portlandite exhibits both large compressional elastic anisotropy with C11/C33 = 3.03(± 0.09) equivalent to that of the isostructural hydroxide brucite (Mg(OH)2), and large shear anisotropy with C66/C44 = 2.92(± 0.12) which is 11% larger than brucite. The comparison between the bulk modulus of portlandite and that of lime (CaO) confirms a systematic linear relationship between the bulk moduli of brucite-type simple hydroxides and the corresponding NaCl-type oxides. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of the elastic constants of portlandite by Brillouin spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Speziale, S.

    2008-10-01

    The single crystal elastic constants Cij and the shear and adiabatic bulk modulus of a natural portlandite (Ca(OH)2) crystal were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The elastic constants, expressed in GPa, are: C11 = 102.0(± 2.0), C12 = 32.1(± 1.0), C13 = 8.4(± 0.4), C14 = 4.5(± 0.2), C33 = 33.6(± 0.7), C44 = 12.0(± 0.3), C66 = (C11-C12)/2 = 35.0(± 1.1), where the numbers in parentheses are 1σ standard deviations. The Reuss bounds of the adiabatic bulk and shear moduli are K0S = 26.0(± 0.3) GPa and G0 = 17.5(± 0.4) GPa, respectively, while the Voigt bounds of these moduli are K0S = 37.3(± 0.4) GPa and G0 = 24.4(± 0.3) GPa. The Reuss and Voigt bounds for the aggregate Young\\'s modulus are 42.8(± 1.0) GPa and 60.0(± 0.8) GPa respectively, while the aggregate Poisson\\'s ratio is equal to 0.23(± 0.01). Portlandite exhibits both large compressional elastic anisotropy with C11/C33 = 3.03(± 0.09) equivalent to that of the isostructural hydroxide brucite (Mg(OH)2), and large shear anisotropy with C66/C44 = 2.92(± 0.12) which is 11% larger than brucite. The comparison between the bulk modulus of portlandite and that of lime (CaO) confirms a systematic linear relationship between the bulk moduli of brucite-type simple hydroxides and the corresponding NaCl-type oxides. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Is the Armington Elasticity Really Constant across Importers?

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmazkuday, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the Armington elasticity, which refers to both the elasticity of substitution across goods and the price elasticity of demand under the assumption of a large number of varieties, systematically changes from one importer country to another in an international trade context. Then a natural question to ask is "What determines the Armington elasticity?" The answer comes from the distinction between the elasticity of demand with respect to the destination price (i.e., the Arm...

  2. Ultrasonic Determination of the Elastic Constants of Epoxy-natural Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, C. A. Meza; Pazos-Ospina, J. F.; Franco, E. E.; Ealo, Joao L.; Collazos-Burbano, D. A.; Garcia, G. F. Casanova

    This paper shows the applications ultrasonic through-transmission technique to determine the elastic constants of two polymer-natural fiber composite materials with potential industrial application and economic and environmental advantages. The transversely isotropic coconut-epoxy and fique-epoxy samples were analyzed using an experimental setup which allows the sample to be rotated with respect to transducers faces and measures the time-of-flight at different angles of incidence. Then, the elastic properties of the material were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the Christoffel equation. Results show a good agreement between the measured elastic constants and the values predicted by an analytical model. The velocities as a function of the incidence angle are reported and the effect of the natural fiber on the stiffness of the composite is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of single crystal coefficients from mechanical and x-ray elastic constants of the polycrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauk, V.; Kockelmann, H.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of calculation are developed for determination of single crystal elastic compliance or stiffness constants of cubic and hexagonal materials from mechanical and X-ray elastic constants of polycrystals. The calculations are applied to pure, cubic iron and hexagonal WC. There are no single crystal constants in the literature for WC, because no single crystals suitable for measurement are available. (orig.) [de

  4. DFT calculation for elastic constants of orthorhombic structure within WIEN2K code: A new package (ortho-elastic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshak, Ali H.; Jamal, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new package for calculating elastic constants of orthorhombic structure is released. ► The package called ortho-elastic. ► It is compatible with [FP-(L)APW+lo] method implemented in WIEN2k code. ► Several orthorhombic structure compounds were used to test the new package. ► Elastic constants calculated using this package show good agreement with experiment. - Abstract: A new package for calculating the elastic constants of orthorhombic structure is released. The package called ortho-elastic. The formalism of calculating the ortho-elastic constants is described in details. The package is compatible with the highly accurate all-electron full-potential (linearized) augmented plane-wave plus local orbital [FP-(L)APW+lo] method implemented in WIEN2k code. Several orthorhombic structure compounds were used to test the new package. We found that the calculated elastic constants using the new package show better agreement with the available experimental data than the previous theoretical results used different methods. In this package the second-order derivative E ″ (ε) of polynomial fit E=E(ε) of energy vs strains at zero strain (ε=0), used to calculate the orthorhombic elastic constants.

  5. Evaluation of elastic constants of materials using the frequency spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, Ramiro J. da; Baroni, Douglas B.; Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q.

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of materials made with the support of non-destructive techniques has great importance in industrial applications. The ultrasonic techniques are distinguished by good resolution to measure small variations of wave velocities as a result of changes in the character suffered by a particular material. In general these ultrasonic techniques are studied in the time domain, which represents an experimental difficulties when thin materials are analyzed, as well as to attenuate the ultrasonic signal drastically. An ultrasonic technique that uses the frequency domain is used in this study aiming to provide good time measurements to calculate the elastic constants of the first order in an aluminum alloy 6351. With the aid of a statistical approach was possible to have good results of tests performed when compared by a time domain technique already well explored in Ultrasound works produced in the Nuclear Engineering Institute Laboratory (LABUS / IEN) and also presented in most of the package, in good agreement with the theoretical model established in literature and used to validate the experiment, which was found in the results with good approximation. The relevance of this work in the nuclear area is associated with the interest to know the mechanical properties of structural components of the nuclear industry, which is currently studied as a rule, resorting to the computer simulations or previously during the operation of the system. (author)

  6. Evaluation of elastic constants of materials using the frequency spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Neto, Ramiro J. da; Baroni, Douglas B.; Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q., E-mail: ramirobd@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Materiais Nucleares. Laboratorio de Ultrassom

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of materials made with the support of non-destructive techniques has great importance in industrial applications. The ultrasonic techniques are distinguished by good resolution to measure small variations of wave velocities as a result of changes in the character suffered by a particular material. In general these ultrasonic techniques are studied in the time domain, which represents an experimental difficulties when thin materials are analyzed, as well as to attenuate the ultrasonic signal drastically. An ultrasonic technique that uses the frequency domain is used in this study aiming to provide good time measurements to calculate the elastic constants of the first order in an aluminum alloy 6351. With the aid of a statistical approach was possible to have good results of tests performed when compared by a time domain technique already well explored in Ultrasound works produced in the Nuclear Engineering Institute Laboratory (LABUS / IEN) and also presented in most of the package, in good agreement with the theoretical model established in literature and used to validate the experiment, which was found in the results with good approximation. The relevance of this work in the nuclear area is associated with the interest to know the mechanical properties of structural components of the nuclear industry, which is currently studied as a rule, resorting to the computer simulations or previously during the operation of the system. (author)

  7. Three-body interactions and the elastic constants of hcp solid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ashleigh L.; Hinde, Robert J.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of three-body interactions on the elastic properties of hexagonal close packed solid 4He is investigated using variational path integral (VPI) Monte Carlo simulations. The solid's nonzero elastic constants are calculated, at T = 0 K and for a range of molar volumes from 7.88 cm3/mol to 20.78 cm3/mol, from the bulk modulus and the three pure shear constants C0, C66, and C44. Three-body interactions are accounted for using our recently reported perturbative treatment based on the nonadditive three-body potential of Cencek et al. Previous studies have attempted to account for the effect of three-body interactions on the elastic properties of solid 4He; however, these calculations have treated zero point motions using either the Einstein or Debye approximations, which are insufficient in the molar volume range where solid 4He is characterized as a quantum solid. Our VPI calculations allow for a more accurate treatment of the zero point motions which include atomic correlation. From these calculations, we find that agreement with the experimental bulk modulus is significantly improved when three-body interactions are considered. In addition, three-body interactions result in non-negligible differences in the calculated pure shear constants and nonzero elastic constants, particularly at higher densities, where differences of up to 26.5% are observed when three-body interactions are included. We compare to the available experimental data and find that our results are generally in as good or better agreement with experiment as previous theoretical investigations.

  8. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormeci, A.; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr 2 have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson's ratio and the direction dependence of Young's modulus

  9. Low-temperature monocrystal elastic constants of Fe-19Cr-10Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    By a pulse-echo-overlap ultrasonic method, we determined the monocrystal elastic constants (C 11 , C 12 , C 44 ) of an Fe-19Cr-10Ni alloy between 295 and 4 K. In composition this laboratory alloy approximates a technological austenitic stainless steel: AISI 304. Many previous studies on polycrystalline steels found a low-temperature magnetic phase transition that affects physical properties, including elastic constants. At the transition, anomalies occur in all polycrystal elastic constants: Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and Poisson's ratio. The present study found that the transition, near 50 K, does not affect one monocrystal elastic constant: C 44 , the resistance to shear on a (100) plane in a [100]-type direction. We interpret this new observation from the viewpoint of a Born-type lattice model. Also, we comment about the relationship between the elastic-constant changes and the low-temperature magnetic state

  10. The Elastic Constants Measurement of Metal Alloy by Using Ultrasonic Nondestructive Method at Different Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryi Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic nondestructive method is introduced into the elastic constants measurement of metal material. The extraction principle of Poisson’s ratio, elastic modulus, and shear modulus is deduced from the ultrasonic propagating equations with two kinds of vibration model of the elastic medium named ultrasonic longitudinal wave and transverse wave, respectively. The ultrasonic propagating velocity is measured by using the digital correlation technique between the ultrasonic original signal and the echo signal from the bottom surface, and then the elastic constants of the metal material are calculated. The feasibility of the correlation algorithm is verified by a simulation procedure. Finally, in order to obtain the stability of the elastic properties of different metal materials in a variable engineering application environment, the elastic constants of two kinds of metal materials in different temperature environment are measured by the proposed ultrasonic method.

  11. Calculation of elastic constants of BCC transition metals: tight-binding recursion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, K.; Hamada, N.; Terakura, K.

    1984-01-01

    The elastic constants of BCC transition metals (Fe, Nb, Mo and W) are calculated by using the tight-binding d band and the Born-Mayer repulsive potential. Introducing a small distortion characteristic to C 44 (or C') elastic deformation and calculating the energy change up to second order in the atomic displacement, the shear elastic constants C 44 and C' are determined. The elastic constants C 11 and C 12 are then calculated by using the relations B=1/3(C 11 + 2C 12 ) and C'=1/2(C 11 -C 12 ), where B is the bulk modulus. In general, the agreement between the present results and the experimental values is satisfactory. The characteristic elasticity behaviour, i.e. the strong Nsub(d) (number of d electrons) dependence of the observed anisotropy factor A=C 44 /C', will also be discussed. (author)

  12. Comparison between the basic least squares and the Bayesian approach for elastic constants identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogu, C.; Haftka, R.; LeRiche, R.; Molimard, J.; Vautrin, A.; Sankar, B.

    2008-11-01

    The basic formulation of the least squares method, based on the L2 norm of the misfit, is still widely used today for identifying elastic material properties from experimental data. An alternative statistical approach is the Bayesian method. We seek here situations with significant difference between the material properties found by the two methods. For a simple three bar truss example we illustrate three such situations in which the Bayesian approach leads to more accurate results: different magnitude of the measurements, different uncertainty in the measurements and correlation among measurements. When all three effects add up, the Bayesian approach can have a large advantage. We then compared the two methods for identification of elastic constants from plate vibration natural frequencies.

  13. X-ray elastic constants in textured Zr-base materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.; Pochettino, A.A.; Lebrun, J.L.; Maeder, G.

    1993-01-01

    A general method for the calculation of the X-ray elastic constants (XREC) for textured hexagonal close-packed (hcp) materials was developed by using the orientation distribution function (ODF) and the Reuss hypothesis. This method was applied to textured zirconium (Zr) sheets and zircaloy 4 (Zry 4) extruded tubes. For these samples, where the elastic anisotropy is not very strong, an 'isotropic approximation' method is proposed using the ODF data. In that case, the classical XREC 1/2S 2 and S, values are calculated and experimentally verified for (10 bar 14) diffracting planes. Theoretical XREC values are also given for different (hkil) that could be chosen according to the experimental conditions, considering texture effects on diffracting peak intensities

  14. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  15. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormeci, A. [Koc Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr{sub 2} have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson`s ratio and the direction dependence of Young`s modulus.

  16. Elastic constants of the C15 laves phase compound NbCr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, F.; He, Y.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1995-01-01

    Elastic properties of a solid are important because they relate to various fundamental solid-state phenomena such as interatomic potentials, equations of state, and phonon spectra. Elastic properties are also linked thermodynamically with specific heat, thermal expansion, Debye temperature, and Gruneisen parameter. Most important, knowledge of elastic constants is essential for many practical applications related to the mechanical properties of a solid as well: load-deflection, thermoelastic stress, internal strain (residual stress), sound velocities, dislocation core structure, and fracture toughness. In order to understand better the physical properties and deformation behavior of the C15 compound NbCr 2 , the authors have studied its elastic properties in this paper. In Section 2, the experimental methods are described, including the preparation of the sample and the measurement of the elastic constants. In Section 3, the experimental results are presented and the implications of these experimental results are discussed. Conclusions are drawn in Section 4

  17. Elastic-constant systematics in f.c.c. metals, including lanthanides-actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledbetter, Hassel [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory (E536), Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    For f.c.c. metals, using Blackman's diagram of dimensionless elastic-constant ratios, we consider the systematics of physical properties and interatomic bonding. We focus especially on the lanthanides-actinides La, Ce, Yb, Th, U, Pu, those for which we know some monocrystal elastic constants. Their behavior differs from the other f.c.c. metals, and all except La show a negative Cauchy pressure, contrary to most f.c.c. metals, which show a positive Cauchy pressure. Among the lanthanides-actinides, {delta}-Pu stands apart, consistent with its many odd physical properties. Based on elastic-constant correlations, we suggest that {delta}-Pu possesses a strong s-electron interatomic-bonding component together with a covalent component. Elastically, {delta}-Pu shows properties similar to Yb. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Surface acoustic waves and elastic constants of InN epilayers determined by Brillouin scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Cusco, R.; Domenech-Amador, N.; Artus, L. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s.n., Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The surface acoustic wave velocity in InN has been experimentally determined by means of Brillouin scattering experiments on c - and m -face epilayers. From simulations based on the Green's function formalism we determine the shear elastic constants c{sub 66} and c{sub 44} and propose a complete set of elastic constants for wurtzite InN. The analysis of the sagittal and azimuthal dependence of the surface acoustic wave velocity indicates a slightly different elastic behavior of the m -face sample that basically affects the c{sub 44} elastic constant. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Analysis of competitive power market with constant elasticity function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.H.M.; Wong, K.P.

    2003-01-01

    A solution method, for competitive power markets formulated as a Cournot game, that allows equilibrium to be determined without an explicit model of aggregated demand is presented. The method determines market equilibrium for all feasible demand conditions and thus provides a perspective on the market, independent of representative demand function, that reveals the inherent tendencies of producers in the market. Numerical solutions are determined by use of the new controlled genetic algorithm and constraint handling techniques. The solutions give production and demand elasticity distributions of the market at any feasible equilibrium price and volume. The solution distributions evaluated for the market with unspecified demand functions, were found to be consistent with previous results obtained from markets with specific demand functions. The ability of the new approach to all, and arbitrary, solutions allow specific markets to be examined, as well as very general observations to be made. Generally it was observed that: no inherent price constraint exists; price is more volatile for low volumes and high prices; market dominance and power are unaffected by price; and inelastic demand can give rise to equilibrium with lower price than responsive demand. (Author)

  20. Size effect of the elastic modulus of rectangular nanobeams: Surface elasticity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hai-Yan; Fan Wen-Liang; Yun Guo-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The size-dependent elastic property of rectangular nanobeams (nanowires or nanoplates) induced by the surface elasticity effect is investigated by using a developed modified core-shell model. The effect of surface elasticity on the elastic modulus of nanobeams can be characterized by two surface related parameters, i.e., inhomogeneous degree constant and surface layer thickness. The analytical results show that the elastic modulus of the rectangular nanobeam exhibits a distinct size effect when its characteristic size reduces below 100 nm. It is also found that the theoretical results calculated by a modified core-shell model have more obvious advantages than those by other models (core-shell model and core-surface model) by comparing them with relevant experimental measurements and computational results, especially when the dimensions of nanostructures reduce to a few tens of nanometers. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  1. The relationship between elastic constants and structure of shock waves in a zinc single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivosheina, M. N.; Kobenko, S. V.; Tuch, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper provides a 3D finite element simulation of shock-loaded anisotropic single crystals on the example of a Zn plate under impact using a mathematical model, which allows for anisotropy in hydrostatic stress and wave velocities in elastic and plastic ranges. The simulation results agree with experimental data, showing the absence of shock wave splitting into an elastic precursor and a plastic wave in Zn single crystals impacted in the [0001] direction. It is assumed that the absence of an elastic precursor under impact loading of a zinc single crystal along the [0001] direction is determined by the anomalously large ratio of the c/a-axes and close values of the propagation velocities of longitudinal and bulk elastic waves. It is shown that an increase in only one elastic constant along the [0001] direction results in shock wave splitting into an elastic precursor and a shock wave of "plastic" compression.

  2. The modified Black-Scholes model via constant elasticity of variance for stock options valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeki, S. O.; Owoloko, E. A.; Ugbebor, O. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the classical Black-Scholes option pricing model is visited. We present a modified version of the Black-Scholes model via the application of the constant elasticity of variance model (CEVM); in this case, the volatility of the stock price is shown to be a non-constant function unlike the assumption of the classical Black-Scholes model.

  3. Determination of mass density, dielectric, elastic, and piezoelectric constants of bulk GaN crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluch, Waldemar; Brzozowski, Ernest; Lysakowska, Magdalena; Sadura, Jolanta

    2011-11-01

    Mass density, dielectric, elastic, and piezoelectric constants of bulk GaN crystal were determined. Mass density was obtained from the measured ratio of mass to volume of a cuboid. The dielectric constants were determined from the measured capacitances of an interdigital transducer (IDT) deposited on a Z-cut plate and from a parallel plate capacitor fabricated from this plate. The elastic and piezoelectric constants were determined by comparing the measured and calculated SAW velocities and electromechanical coupling coefficients on the Z- and X-cut plates. The following new constants were obtained: mass density p = 5986 kg/m(3); relative dielectric constants (at constant strain S) ε(S)(11)/ε(0) = 8.6 and ε(S)(11)/ε(0) = 10.5, where ε(0) is a dielectric constant of free space; elastic constants (at constant electric field E) C(E)(11) = 349.7, C(E)(12) = 128.1, C(E)(13) = 129.4, C(E)(33) = 430.3, and C(E)(44) = 96.5 GPa; and piezoelectric constants e(33) = 0.84, e(31) = -0.47, and e(15) = -0.41 C/m(2).

  4. Line-focus acoustic microscopy of Ti-6242 α/β single colony: determination of elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.-Y.; Yakovlev, V.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    2002-01-01

    Time-resolved line-focus acoustic microscopy is performed for determining elastic constants of Ti-6242 α/β-single colony and Ti-6 α-phase single crystal. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocities are obtained as a function of the propagation angle from measured time-delays of SAW signals. The propagation of surface waves in a semi-infinite half space formed by anisotropic layers inclined arbitrarily to the sample surface is studied to model a quasi-random lamellar structure of the Ti-6242 α/β-single colony. Effective elastic constants of the multilayered structure are derived and verified through the comparison with exact ones, based on which SAW velocities in non-principal planes are calculated. Effective and constituent elastic constants of the α/β-single colony and the α-phase single crystal are inversely determined from the measured and calculated SAW velocities. The α- and β-phase elastic constants from the α/β-single colony so determined are compared with those from the α-single crystal and data in the literature

  5. Diffraction plane dependency of elastic constants in ferritic steel in neutron stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, M.; Ishiwata, M.; Minakawa, N.; Funahashi, S.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements have been made to investigate the elastic properties of the ferritic steel obtained from socket weld. The Kroner elastic model is found to account for the [hkl]-dependence of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material. Maps of residual stress are later to be made by measuring lattice strain from shifts in the (112) diffraction peak, for which the diffraction elastic constants the herein found to be E=243±5GPa and ν=0.28±0.01. (author)

  6. Change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hop crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, C.

    1979-10-01

    An approximate model is developed to calculate the change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hcp metals, supposed the defect configuration is known. General expressions relating the change of elastic moduli to the final atomic coordinates and to the defect force field are derived using the specific symmetry of the defect. Explicit calculations are done for Mg. The predicted change of elastic moduli turns out to be negative for vacancies and trigonal interstitials while for hexagonal interstitials a positive change is predicted. Compatibility with experimental data would suggest that the trigonal configuration is the stable one. (author)

  7. Estimation of Single-Crystal Elastic Constants of Polycrystalline Materials from Back-Scattered Grain Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldipur, P.; Margetan, F. J.; Thompson, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Single-crystal elastic stiffness constants are important input parameters for many calculations in material science. There are well established methods to measure these constants using single-crystal specimens, but such specimens are not always readily available. The ultrasonic properties of metal polycrystals, such as velocity, attenuation, and backscattered grain noise characteristics, depend in part on the single-crystal elastic constants. In this work we consider the estimation of elastic constants from UT measurements and grain-sizing data. We confine ourselves to a class of particularly simple polycrystalline microstructures, found in some jet-engine Nickel alloys, which are single-phase, cubic, equiaxed, and untextured. In past work we described a method to estimate the single-crystal elastic constants from measured ultrasonic velocity and attenuation data accompanied by metallographic analysis of grain size. However, that methodology assumes that all attenuation is due to grain scattering, and thus is not valid if appreciable absorption is present. In this work we describe an alternative approach which uses backscattered grain noise data in place of attenuation data. Efforts to validate the method using a pure copper specimen are discussed, and new results for two jet-engine Nickel alloys are presented

  8. Effective stress law for anisotropic elastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    An effective stress law is derived analytically to describe the effect of pore fluid pressure on the linearly elastic response of saturated porous rocks which exhibit anisotropy. For general anisotropy the difference between the effective stress and the applied stress is not hydrostatic. The effective stress law involves two constants for transversely isotropic response and three constants for orthotropic response; these constants can be expressed in terms of the moduli of the porous material and of the solid material. These expressions simplify considerably when the anisotropy is structural rather than intrinsic, i.e., in the case of an isotropic solid material with an anisotropic pore structure. In this case the effective stress law involves the solid or grain bulk modulus and two or three moduli of the porous material, for transverse isotropy and orthotropy, respectively. The law reduces, in the case of isotropic response, to that suggested by Geertsma (1957) and by Skempton (1961) and derived analytically by Nur and Byerlee

  9. Pressure derivatives of the second-order elastic constants of strontium, barium, and lead nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedi, S.S.; Verma, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    An interpretation is given of the measured results on the pressure derivatives of second-order elastic constants (SOEC) of strontium barium, and lead nitrate crystallizing in the fluorite type structure from the Lundquist potential. Potential parameters are determined from the experimental values of SOEC and the equilibrium condition

  10. Elastic constants and Debye temperature of wz-AlN and wz-GaN ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOI: 10.1007/s12043-014-0785-7; ePublication: 5 September 2014. Abstract. First-principles calculations .... For calculating elastic stiffness constants, C11, C12, C13, C33 and C44, we have taken ..... 89, 5815 (2001). [2] G Chris, Van de Walle ...

  11. Temperature variation of higher-order elastic constants of MgO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    series of strains using Taylor's series expansion. The coefficients of quadratic, cu- ... as thermal expansion, specific heat at higher temperature, temperature variation of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, .... such studies have an impression that linear variation of elastic constant is true. The experimental study shows that ...

  12. Proposal for Ultrasonic Technique for evaluation elastic constants in UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Alessandra Susanne Viana Ragone; Baroni, Douglas Brandao; Bittencourt, Marcelo de Siqueira Queiroz; Souza, Mauro Carlos Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Pellets of uranium dioxide are used as fuel in nuclear power reactors, in which are exposed to high thermal gradients. This high energy will initiate fusion in the central part of the pellet. The expansion of the uranium dioxide pellets, resulting from fission products, can cause fissures or cracks, therefore, the study of their behavior is important. This work aims to develop and propose an ultrasonic technique to evaluate the elastic constants of UO 2 pellets. However, because of the difficulties in handling nuclear material, we proposed an initial study of alumina specimens. Alumina pellets are also ceramic material and their porosity and dimensions are in the similar range of dioxide uranium pellets. They also are used as thermal insulation in the fuel rods, operating under the same conditions. They were fabricated and used in two different sets of 10 alumina pellets with densities of 92% and 96%. The developed ultrasonic technique evaluates the traveling time of ultrasonic waves, longitudinal and transverse, and correlates the observed time and the elastic constants of the materials. Equations relating the speed of the ultrasonic wave to the elastic modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio have led to these elastic constants, with graphics of correlation that showed excellent agreement with the literature available for Alumina. In view of the results and the ease of implementation of this technique, we believe that it may easily be used for dioxide uranium pellets, justifying further studies for that application. (author)

  13. The Pricing of European Options Under the Constant Elasticity of Variance with Stochastic Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Bounghun; Choi, Sun-Yong; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    This paper considers a hybrid risky asset price model given by a constant elasticity of variance multiplied by a stochastic volatility factor. A multiscale analysis leads to an asymptotic pricing formula for both European vanilla option and a Barrier option near the zero elasticity of variance. The accuracy of the approximation is provided in a rigorous manner. A numerical experiment for implied volatilities shows that the hybrid model improves some of the well-known models in view of fitting the data for different maturities.

  14. The elastic constants and anisotropy of superconducting MgCNi3 and CdCNi3 under different pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Huifang

    2013-11-23

    The second-order elastic constants (SOECs) and third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of MgCNi3 and CdCNi3 are presented by using first-principles methods combined with homogeneous deformation theory. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRH) approximation are used to calculate the bulk modulus B, shear modulus G, averaged Young\\'s modulus E and Poisson\\'s ratio ν for polycrystals and these effective modulus are consistent with the experiments. The SOECs under different pressure of MgCNi3 and CdCNi3 are also obtained based on the TOECs. Furthermore, the Zener anisotropy factor, Chung-Buessem anisotropy index, and the universal anisotropy index are used to describe the anisotropy of MgCNi3 and CdCNi3. The anisotropy of Young\\'s modulus of single-crystal under different pressure is also presented. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  15. A Unit-Cell Model for Predicting the Elastic Constants of 3D Four Directional Cylindrical Braided Composite Shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenfeng; Liu, Ye; Huang, Xinrong; Liu, Yinghua; Zhu, Jianguo

    2018-06-01

    In this work, the elastic constants of 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts were predicted using analytical and numerical methods. First, the motion rule of yarn carrier of 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts was analyzed, and the horizontal projection of yarn motion trajectory was obtained. Then, the geometry models of unit-cells with different braiding angles and fiber volume contents were built up, and the meso-scale models of 3D cylindrical braided composite shafts were obtained. Finally, the effects of braiding angles and fiber volume contents on the elastic constants of 3D braided composite shafts were analyzed theoretically and numerically. These results play a crucial role in investigating the mechanical properties of 3D 4-directional braided composites shafts.

  16. The elastic constants and anisotropy of superconducting MgCNi3 and CdCNi3 under different pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Huifang; Wu, Xiaozhi; Gan, Liyong; Wang, Rui; Wei, Qunyi

    2013-01-01

    The second-order elastic constants (SOECs) and third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of MgCNi3 and CdCNi3 are presented by using first-principles methods combined with homogeneous deformation theory. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRH) approximation are used

  17. Multiscale approach including microfibril scale to assess elastic constants of cortical bone based on neural network computation and homogenization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Chamekh, Abdessalem; Merzouki, Tarek; Hambli, Ridha; Mkaddem, Ali

    2014-03-01

    The complexity and heterogeneity of bone tissue require a multiscale modeling to understand its mechanical behavior and its remodeling mechanisms. In this paper, a novel multiscale hierarchical approach including microfibril scale based on hybrid neural network (NN) computation and homogenization equations was developed to link nanoscopic and macroscopic scales to estimate the elastic properties of human cortical bone. The multiscale model is divided into three main phases: (i) in step 0, the elastic constants of collagen-water and mineral-water composites are calculated by averaging the upper and lower Hill bounds; (ii) in step 1, the elastic properties of the collagen microfibril are computed using a trained NN simulation. Finite element calculation is performed at nanoscopic levels to provide a database to train an in-house NN program; and (iii) in steps 2-10 from fibril to continuum cortical bone tissue, homogenization equations are used to perform the computation at the higher scales. The NN outputs (elastic properties of the microfibril) are used as inputs for the homogenization computation to determine the properties of mineralized collagen fibril. The mechanical and geometrical properties of bone constituents (mineral, collagen, and cross-links) as well as the porosity were taken in consideration. This paper aims to predict analytically the effective elastic constants of cortical bone by modeling its elastic response at these different scales, ranging from the nanostructural to mesostructural levels. Our findings of the lowest scale's output were well integrated with the other higher levels and serve as inputs for the next higher scale modeling. Good agreement was obtained between our predicted results and literature data. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Phase-shift parametrization and extraction of asymptotic normalization constants from elastic-scattering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Suárez, O. L.; Sparenberg, J.-M.

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a simplified effective-range function for charged nuclei, related to the modified K matrix but differing from it in several respects. Negative-energy zeros of this function correspond to bound states. Positive-energy zeros correspond to resonances and "echo poles" appearing in elastic-scattering phase-shifts, while its poles correspond to multiple-of-π phase shifts. Padé expansions of this function allow one to parametrize phase shifts on large energy ranges and to calculate resonance and bound-state properties in a very simple way, independently of any potential model. The method is first tested on a d -wave 12C+α potential model. It is shown to lead to a correct estimate of the subthreshold-bound-state asymptotic normalization constant (ANC) starting from the elastic-scattering phase shifts only. Next, the 12C+α experimental p -wave and d -wave phase shifts are analyzed. For the d wave, the relatively large error bars on the phase shifts do not allow one to improve the ANC estimate with respect to existing methods. For the p wave, a value agreeing with the 12C(6Li,d )16O transfer-reaction measurement and with the recent remeasurement of the 16Nβ -delayed α decay is obtained, with improved accuracy. However, the method displays two difficulties: the results are sensitive to the Padé-expansion order and the simplest fits correspond to an imaginary ANC, i.e., to a negative-energy "echo pole," the physical meaning of which is still debatable.

  19. Optimal determination of the elastic constants of composite materials from ultrasonic wave-speed measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnède, Bernard; Jenkins, James T.; Sachse, Wolfgang; Baste, Stéphane

    1990-03-01

    A method is described to optimally determine the elastic constants of anisotropic solids from wave-speeds measurements in arbitrary nonprincipal planes. For such a problem, the characteristic equation is a degree-three polynomial which generally does not factorize. By developing and rearranging this polynomial, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained. The elastic constants are then recovered by minimizing a functional derived from this overdetermined system of equations. Calculations of the functional are given for two specific cases, i.e., the orthorhombic and the hexagonal symmetries. Some numerical results showing the efficiency of the algorithm are presented. A numerical method is also described for the recovery of the orientation of the principal acoustical axes. This problem is solved through a double-iterative numerical scheme. Numerical as well as experimental results are presented for a unidirectional composite material.

  20. First-principles elastic constants and phonons of delta-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderlind, P.; Landa, A.; Sadigh, B.

    2004-01-01

    Elastic constants and zone-boundary phonons of delta-plutonium have been calculated within the density-functional theory. The paramagnetic state of delta-Pu is modeled by disordered magnetism utilizing either the disordered local moment or the special quasirandom structure techniques. The anomalo......Elastic constants and zone-boundary phonons of delta-plutonium have been calculated within the density-functional theory. The paramagnetic state of delta-Pu is modeled by disordered magnetism utilizing either the disordered local moment or the special quasirandom structure techniques....... The anomalously soft C-' as well as a large anisotropy ratio (C-44/C-') of delta-Pu is reproduced by this theoretical model. Also the recently measured phonons for delta-Pu compare relatively well with their theoretical counterpart at the zone boundaries....

  1. High temperature elastic constant measurements: application to plutonium; Mesure des constantes elastiques a haute temperature application au plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    We present an apparatus with which we have measured the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of several compounds from the resonance frequency of cylinders in the temperature range 0 deg. C-700 deg. C. We especially studied the elastic constants of plutonium and measured for the first time to our knowledge the Young's modulus of Pu{sub {delta}} and Pu{sub {epsilon}}. E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Using our results, we have calculated the compressibility, the Debye temperature, the Grueneisen constant and the electronic specific heat of Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (author) [French] Nous decrivons un appareil qui permet de mesurer les constantes elastiques (module de Young et module de Poisson) jusqu'a 700 deg. C a partir des frequences de resonance de barreaux cylindriques. Nous avons plus specialement etudie le plutonium et determine pour la premiere fois a notre connaissance le module de Young des phases {delta} et {epsilon}: E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Nos mesures nous ont permis de calculer la compressibilite, la temperature de Debye, la constante de Gruneisen et la chaleur specifique electronique de Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (auteur)

  2. A fluctuation method to calculate the third order elastic constants in crystalline solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zimu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Qu, Jianmin, E-mail: j-qu@northwestern.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    This paper derives exact expressions of the isothermal third order elastic constants (TOE) in crystalline solids in terms of the kinetic and potential energies of the system. These expressions reveal that the TOE constants consist of a Born component and a relaxation component. The Born component is simply the third derivative of the system's potential energy with respect to the deformation, while the relaxation component is related to the non-uniform rearrangements of the atoms when the system is subject to a macroscopic deformation. Further, based on the general expressions derived here, a direct (fluctuation) method of computing the isothermal TOE constants is developed. Numerical examples of using this fluctuation method are given to compute the TOE constants of single crystal iron.

  3. Mining for elastic constants of intermetallics from the charge density landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Chang Sun; Broderick, Scott R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Jones, Travis E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Loyola, Claudia [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Eberhart, Mark E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    There is a significant challenge in designing new materials for targeted properties based on their electronic structure. While in principle this goal can be met using knowledge of the electron charge density, the relationships between the density and properties are largely unknown. To help overcome this problem we develop a quantitative structure–property relationship (QSPR) between the charge density and the elastic constants for B2 intermetallics. Using a combination of informatics techniques for screening all the potentially relevant charge density descriptors, we find that C{sub 11} and C{sub 44} are determined solely from the magnitude of the charge density at its critical points, while C{sub 12} is determined by the shape of the charge density at its critical points. From this reduced charge density selection space, we develop models for predicting the elastic constants of an expanded number of intermetallic systems, which we then use to predict the mechanical stability of new systems. Having reduced the descriptors necessary for modeling elastic constants, statistical learning approaches may then be used to predict the reduced knowledge-based required as a function of the constituent characteristics.

  4. Single-crystal elastic constants of a plutonium-gallium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moment, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of a plutonium-1 wt % gallium alloy were determined at room temperature by measuring ultrasonic sound-wave velocities. The three independent elastic constants of this face-centered cubic delta-phase alloy were determined from the longitudinal and the two shear-wave velocities, all along a direction. Their values are C 11 =3.628, C 12 =2.673 and C 44 =3.359 in units of 10 10 N/m 2 ; the respective errors are estimated to be 1%, 1%, and 0.3 %. The Zener anisotropy ratio is 7.03, almost twice that known for any other fcc metal, and falls among the ratios for the body centered cubic alkali metals, which are noted for their high elastic anisotropy. Polycrystalline elastic constants calculated from the single-crystal data are Young's modulus E=4.064, the shear modulus G=1.596 and the bulk modulus (reciprocal compressibility) B=2.991, all in units of 10 10 N/m 2 , and Poisson's ratio γ=0.27. These values of E and G are both lower than those obtained by Taylor, Linford and Dean from measurements on polycrystalline specimens. Within a single crystal, the longitudinal sound velocity varies with direction by a factor of 1.4 and the transverse velocity by a factor of 2.6. The maximum Young's modulus (along ) was 5.4 times larger than the minimum (along ). The Debye temperature was calculated to be 105.7 K at 293 K and estimated to be 114 K at 0.K. (Auth.)

  5. Effective constants for wave propagation through partially saturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.; Thigpen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The multipole scattering coefficients for elastic wave scattering from a spherical inhomogeneity in a fluid-saturated porous medium have been calculated. These coefficients may be used to obtain estimates of the effective macroscopic constants for long-wavelength propagation of elastic waves through partially saturated media. If the volume average of the single scattering from spherical bubbles of gas and liquid is required to vanish, the resulting equations determine the effective bulk modulus, density, and viscosity of the multiphase fluid filling the pores. The formula for the effective viscosity during compressional wave excitation is apparently new

  6. Temperature dependence of the elastic constant of Borassus Flabellifier 'BF' material by acoustic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phadke, Sushil; DShrivastava, B; Dagaonkar, N; Mishra, Ashutosh

    2012-01-01

    The homogeneous continuous materials are widely used for many structural applications. Migrations of atoms or molecules are the mechanism of mechanical and kinetic processes in materials for their synthesis processing as well as for their structural evolutions. The elastic constant of solids provides valuable information on their mechanical and dynamical properties. In particular, they provide information on the stability and stiffness of materials. In the present study author investigated relation between elastic constant and temperature in Borassus Flabellifier 'BF' wood part. Determination of elastic properties of material is based on the longitudinal wave's velocities via ultrasonic methods. The resonant frequencies of the specimens were measured by Ultrasonic Interferometer (for solids) dual frequency using longitudinal cubic piezoelectric crystal of quartz of frequency 123.62 KHz. The temperature variations from room temperature were done by PID control unit, Mittal Enterprises, New Delhi, India. Characterization of the samples was done by scanning electron microscope (SEM) Model JEOL JSM5400 at 5.0kvx750, 10 μm.

  7. Estimation of parameters of constant elasticity of substitution production functional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaboob, B.; Venkateswarlu, B.; Sankar, J. Ravi

    2017-11-01

    Nonlinear model building has become an increasing important powerful tool in mathematical economics. In recent years the popularity of applications of nonlinear models has dramatically been rising up. Several researchers in econometrics are very often interested in the inferential aspects of nonlinear regression models [6]. The present research study gives a distinct method of estimation of more complicated and highly nonlinear model viz Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) production functional model. Henningen et.al [5] proposed three solutions to avoid serious problems when estimating CES functions in 2012 and they are i) removing discontinuities by using the limits of the CES function and its derivative. ii) Circumventing large rounding errors by local linear approximations iii) Handling ill-behaved objective functions by a multi-dimensional grid search. Joel Chongeh et.al [7] discussed the estimation of the impact of capital and labour inputs to the gris output agri-food products using constant elasticity of substitution production function in Tanzanian context. Pol Antras [8] presented new estimates of the elasticity of substitution between capital and labour using data from the private sector of the U.S. economy for the period 1948-1998.

  8. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhuqing; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Ma, Dong; Beese, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  9. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhuqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Stoica, Alexandru D. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Ma, Dong, E-mail: dongma@ornl.gov [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Beese, Allison M., E-mail: amb961@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-09-30

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  10. Evaluating Bounds and Estimators for Constants of Random Polycrystals Composed of Orthotropic Elastic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J. G.

    2012-03-01

    While the well-known Voigt and Reuss (VR) bounds, and the Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRH) elastic constant estimators for random polycrystals are all straightforwardly calculated once the elastic constants of anisotropic crystals are known, the Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) bounds and related self-consistent (SC) estimators for the same constants are, by comparison, more difficult to compute. Recent work has shown how to simplify (to some extent) these harder to compute HS bounds and SC estimators. An overview and analysis of a subsampling of these results is presented here with the main point being to show whether or not this extra work (i.e., in calculating both the HS bounds and the SC estimates) does provide added value since, in particular, the VRH estimators often do not fall within the HS bounds, while the SC estimators (for good reasons) have always been found to do so. The quantitative differences between the SC and the VRH estimators in the eight cases considered are often quite small however, being on the order of ±1%. These quantitative results hold true even though these polycrystal Voigt-Reuss-Hill estimators more typically (but not always) fall outside the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds, while the self-consistent estimators always fall inside (or on the boundaries of) these same bounds.

  11. The elastic constants of V2O3 in the insulating phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelon, W.B.; Keem, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The initial slopes of the acoustic phonon dispersion curves in (Vsub(0.98)Crsub(0.02)) 2 O 3 have been measured at room temperature in several of the high symmetry directions by inelastic neutron scattering. From these data several sound velocities and four independent elastic constants have been determined. Although the Cr doped specimen is in the insulating phase and pure V 2 O 3 is metallic, these results are in good agreement with recent data obtained by ultrasonic measurements on pure V 2 O 3 . (author)

  12. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, G., E-mail: g-ghosh@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts (M{sub 3}C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr{sub 2}FeC and CrFe{sub 2}C) having the crystal structure of Fe{sub 3}C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, C{sub ij}, of above M{sub 3}Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio based on calculated C{sub ij}s, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio) of M{sub 3}Cs by homogenization of calculated C{sub ij}s; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θ{sub D}, of M{sub 3}Cs based on calculated C{sub ij}s. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  13. Pressure dependence of elastic constants in zinc-blende III-N and their influence on the light emission in nitride heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepkowski, S.P.; Majewski, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the nonlinear elasticity effects for the case of III-N compounds. Particularly, we determined the pressure dependences of elastic constants, in zinc-blende InN, GaN, and AlN by performing ab initio calculations in the framework of plane-wave pseudopotential implementation of the density-functional theory. We found significant and almost linear increase in C 11 , C 12 with pressure for considered nitrides compounds. Much weaker dependences on pressure was observed for C 44 . We also discussed pressure dependences of two-dimensional Poisson's ratio and elastic anisotropy coefficient. Finally, we showed that the pressure dependence of elastic constants results in significant reduction of the pressure coefficient of the energy emission in cubic InGaN/GaN quantum well and essentially improves the agreement between experimental and theoretical values. (author)

  14. Kelvin Notation for Stabilizing Elastic-Constant Inversion Notation Kelvin pour stabiliser l'inversion de constantes élastiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dellinger J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Inverting a set of core-sample traveltime measurements for a complete set of 21 elastic constants is a difficult problem. If the 21 elastic constants are directly used as the inversion parameters, a few bad measurements or an unfortunate starting guess may result in the inversion converging to a physically impossible solution . Even given perfect data, multiple solutions may exist that predict the observed traveltimes equally well. We desire the inversion algorithm to converge not just to a physically possible solution, but to the best(i. e. most physically likely solution of all those allowed. We present a new parameterization that attempts to solve these difficulties. The search space is limited to physically realizable media by making use of the Kelvin eigenstiffness-eigentensor representation of the 6 x 6 elastic stiffness matrix. Instead of 21 stiffnesses, there are 6 eigenstiffness parametersand 15 rotational parameters . The rotational parameters are defined using a Lie-algebra representation that avoids the artificial degeneracies and coordinate-system bias that can occur with standard polar representations. For any choice of these 21 real parameters, the corresponding stiffness matrix is guaranteed to be physically realizable. Furthermore, all physically realizable matrices can be represented in this way. This new parameterization still leaves considerable latitude as to which linear combinations of the Kelvin parameters to use, and how they should be ordered. We demonstrate that by careful choice and ordering of the parameters, the inversion can be relaxedfrom higher to lower symmetry simply by adding a few more parameters at a time. By starting from isotropy and relaxing to the general result in stages (isotropy, transverse isotropy, orthorhombic, general, we expect that the method should find the solution that is closest to isotropy of all those that fit the data. L'inversion d'un ensemble de mesures du temps de parcours d

  15. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses for reducers with constant-depth internal circumferential surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Szu-Ying; Tsai, Bor-Jiun; Chen, Jien-Jong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a 3-D automatic elastic-plastic finite element mesh generator is established to accurately predict the J-integral value of an arbitrary reducer with a constant-depth internal circumferential surface crack under bending and axial force. The contact pairs are used on the crack surfaces to simulate the actual contact behaviors of the crack model under loadings. In order to verify the accuracy of the proposed elastic-plastic finite element model for a reducer with a surface crack, the cracked straight pipe models are generated according to a special modeling procedure for a flawed reducer. The J-integral values along the crack front of surface crack are calculated and compared with the straight pipe models which have been verified in the previous published studies. Based on the comparison of computed results, good agreements are obtained to show the accuracy of present numerical models. More confidence on using the 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis for reducers with internal circumferential surface cracks can be thus established in this work

  16. Effective cosmological constant within the expanding axion universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierpoint, M.P., E-mail: M.Pierpoint@lboro.ac.uk; Kusmartsev, F.V., E-mail: F.Kusmartsev@lboro.ac.uk

    2014-09-12

    We show that the value of an effective cosmological constant, Λ{sub eff}, is influenced by the dimensionality of the space. Results were obtained in the framework of the axion model describing expansion of the inhomogeneous universe. Λ{sub eff} determines the tension of the space (i.e. elasticity), and is relaxed when extra dimensions are accessible. We demonstrate that the effective value of the cosmological constant may be tuned to be consistent with experimental observation. Inhomogeneities considered are representative of temperature fluctuations observed within the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  17. Optimal determination of the elastic constants of woven 2D SiC/SiC composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouchtachi, A; Guerjouma, R El; Baboux, J C; Rouby, D; Bouami, D

    2004-01-01

    For homogeneous materials, the ultrasonic immersion method, associated with a numerical optimization process mostly based on Newton's algorithm, allows the determination of elastic constants for various synthetic and natural composite materials. Nevertheless, a principal limitation of the existing optimization procedure occurs when the considered material is at the limit of the homogeneous hypothesis. Such is the case of the woven bidirectional SiC matrix and SiC fibre composite material. In this study, we have developed two numerical methods for the determination of the elastic constants of the 2D SiC/SiC composite material (2D SiC/SiC). The first one is based on Newton's algorithm: the elastic constants are obtained by minimizing the square deviation between experimental and calculated velocities. The second method is based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. We show that these algorithms give the same results in the case of homogeneous anisotropic composite materials. For the 2D SiC/SiC composite material, the two methods, using the same measured velocities, give different sets of elastic constants. We then note that the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm enables a better convergence towards a global set of elastic constants in good agreement with the elastic properties, which can be measured using classical quasi-static methods

  18. Effect of Pressure on Elastic Constants, Generalized Stacking Fault Energy, and Dislocation Properties in Antiperovskite-Type Ni-Rich Nitrides ZnNNi3 and CdNNi3

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lili

    2014-07-31

    The elastic properties and generalized stacking fault energy curves of antiperovskite-type Ni-rich nitrides MNNi3 (M = Zn, Cd) under different pressure have been obtained from the first-principles calculations. By using the variational method, the core width and Peierls stresses of (Formula presented.) edge dislocation and screw dislocation in ZnNNi3 and CdNNi3 within the improved Peierls-Nabarro (P-N) model in which the lattice discrete effect is taken into account have been investigated. Whatever the material or the pressure range, the Peierls stress of edge dislocation is smaller than that of screw dislocation. This also demonstrates that the edge dislocation is considered to be the dominant factor in determining the plastic behavior of MNNi3 (M = Zn, Cd) in the pressure range of 0–30 GPa.

  19. Non-linear optical measurement of the twist elastic constant in thermotropic and DNA lyotropic chiral nematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Liana; Fraccia, Tommaso P; Ciciulla, Fabrizio; Bellini, Tommaso

    2017-07-10

    Throughout the whole history of liquid crystals science, the balancing of intrinsic elasticity with coupling to external forces has been the key strategy for most application and investigation. While the coupling of the optical field to the nematic director is at the base of a wealth of thoroughly described optical effects, a significant variety of geometries and materials have not been considered yet. Here we show that by adopting a simple cell geometry and measuring the optically induced birefringence, we can readily extract the twist elastic coefficient K 22 of thermotropic and lyotropic chiral nematics (N*). The value of K 22 we obtain for chiral doped 5CB thermotropic N* well matches those reported in the literature. With this same strategy, we could determine for the first time K 22 of the N* phase of concentrated aqueous solutions of DNA oligomers, bypassing the limitations that so far prevented measuring the elastic constants of this class of liquid crystalline materials. The present study also enlightens the significant nonlinear optical response of DNA liquid crystals.

  20. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, A. J. G.; Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.; Neo, T. K.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  1. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunt, A. J. G., E-mail: alexander.lunt@eng.ox.ac.uk; Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Korsunsky, A. M. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J. [ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Neo, T. K. [Specialist Dental Group, Mount Elizabeth Orchard, 3 Mount Elizabeth, #08-03/08-08/08-10, Singapore 228510 (Singapore)

    2014-08-07

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  2. Bounds and self-consistent estimates for elastic constants of polycrystals composed of orthorhombics or crystals with higher symmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, James G

    2011-04-01

    Methods for computing Hashin-Shtrikman bounds and related self-consistent estimates of elastic constants for polycrystals composed of crystals having orthorhombic symmetry have been known for about three decades. However, these methods are underutilized, perhaps because of some perceived difficulties with implementing the necessary computational procedures. Several simplifications of these techniques are introduced, thereby reducing the overall computational burden, as well as the complications inherent in mapping out the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding curves. The self-consistent estimates of the effective elastic constants are very robust, involving a quickly converging iteration procedure. Once these self-consistent values are known, they may then be used to speed up the computations of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds themselves. It is shown furthermore that the resulting orthorhombic polycrystal code can be used as well to compute both bounds and self-consistent estimates for polycrystals of higher-symmetry tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic (but not trigonal) materials. The self-consistent results found this way are shown to be the same as those obtained using the earlier methods, specifically those methods designed specially for each individual symmetry type. But the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds found using the orthorhombic code are either the same or (more typically) tighter than those found previously for these special cases (i.e., tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic). The improvement in the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds is presumably due to the additional degrees of freedom introduced into the available search space.

  3. Bounds and self-consistent estimates for elastic constants of granular polycrystals composed of orthorhombics or crystal with higher symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J. G.

    2011-02-01

    Methods for computing Hashin-Shtrikman bounds and related self-consistent estimates of elastic constants for polycrystals composed of crystals having orthorhombic symmetry have been known for about three decades. However, these methods are underutilized, perhaps because of some perceived difficulties with implementing the necessary computational procedures. Several simplifications of these techniques are introduced, thereby reducing the overall computational burden, as well as the complications inherent in mapping out the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding curves. The self-consistent estimates of the effective elastic constants are very robust, involving a quickly converging iteration procedure. Once these self-consistent values are known, they may then be used to speed up the computations of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds themselves. It is shown furthermore that the resulting orthorhombic polycrystal code can be used as well to compute both bounds and self-consistent estimates for polycrystals of higher-symmetry tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic (but not trigonal) materials. The self-consistent results found this way are shown to be the same as those obtained using the earlier methods, specifically those methods designed specially for each individual symmetry type. But the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds found using the orthorhombic code are either the same or (more typically) tighter than those found previously for these special cases (i.e., tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic). The improvement in the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds is presumably due to the additional degrees of freedom introduced into the available search space.

  4. Calculated temperature dependence of elastic constants and phonon dispersion of hcp and bcc beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Steven; Arapan, Sergiu; Harmon, Bruce; Eriksson, Olle

    2011-03-01

    Conventional first principle methods for calculating lattice dynamics are unable to calculate high temperature thermophysical properties of materials containing modes that are entropically stabilized. In this presentation we use a relatively new approach called self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamics (SCAILD) to study the hcp to bcc transition (1530 K) in beryllium. The SCAILD method goes beyond the harmonic approximation to include phonon-phonon interactions and produces a temperature-dependent phonon dispersion. In the high temperature bcc structure, phonon-phonon interactions dynamically stabilize the N-point phonon. Fits to the calculated phonon dispersion were used to determine the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in the hcp and bcc phases. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy-Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  5. Temperature dependence of bulk modulus and second-order elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.P.; Kumar, Munish

    2004-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is developed to investigate the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus and second order elastic constants. The method is based on the two different approaches viz. (i) the theory of thermal expansivity formulated by Suzuki, based on the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state, (ii) the theory of high-pressure-high-temperature equation of state formulated by Kumar, based on thermodynamic analysis. The results obtained for a number of crystals viz. NaCl, KCl, MgO and (Mg, Fe) 2 SiO 4 are discussed and compared with the experimental data. It is concluded that the Kumar formulation is far better that the Suzuki theory of thermal expansivity

  6. Determination of elastic constants of fuels plates based on uranium by ultrasound testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira Castro, Martin Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Current nuclear reactors use as U-235 U-enriched compounds enriched with U-235, requiring U-alloys that increase the amount of atoms available for nuclear fission in a convenient way. This study was carried out on fuel plates manufactured in the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, whose cores are composed of a dispersed mixture Al-U_3Si_2 and Al-U_7Mo, with different densities of uranium, covered by a coating of Al6061. The objective was to characterize elastically and classify the fuel plates analyzed. Specifically, five Al-U_3Si_2 fuel plates with 1.7 gU/cm"3, eight A-U_3Si_2 with 3.4 gU/cm"3, five of A-l U_3Si_2 with 4.8 gU/cm"3 were successfully studied. The apparent elastic constants (Young and Shear modules, and Poisson coefficient) were determined in the area where the fuel is located (MEAT) by means of an ultrasound sampling technique, thus being able to characterize them and classify them according to their composition. The behavior of the elastic constants generally shows a tendency to decrease as the amount of U_3Si_2 particles dispersed in the MEAT zone of the fuel plates increases. In addition, the non-destructive test method used made it possible to detect several differences between the fuel plates analyzed, such as the amount of reduction in rolling, among others. Additionally, six experimental fuel miniplates were analyzed whose meat were formed by a dispersion of the Al-UMo type, specifically: two of Al-U_7Mo with 6.0 gU/cm"3, two of Al-U_7Mo with 7.0 gU/ cm"3 and two of Al-U_7Mo with 8.0 gU/cm"3. The response of the U-Mo fuel miniplates against this technique was not good, so several ideas were proposed to improve this situation

  7. Elastic Resistance Effectiveness on Increasing Strength of Shoulders and Hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picha, Kelsey J; Almaddah, Muataz R; Barker, Jordan; Ciochetty, Tavis; Black, W Scott; Uhl, Tim L

    2017-09-12

    Elastic resistance is a common training method used to gain strength. Currently, progression with elastic resistance is based on the perceived exertion of the exercise or completion of targeted repetitions; exact resistance is typically unknown. This study's objective is to determine if knowledge of load during elastic resistance exercise will increase strength gains during exercises. Participants were randomized into two strength training groups, elastic resistance only and elastic resistance using a load cell (LC) that displays force during exercise. The LC group used a Smart Handle (Patterson Medical Supply, Chicago, IL) to complete all exercises. Each participant completed the same exercises three times weekly for 8 weeks. The LC group was provided with a set load for exercises whereas the elastic resistance only group was not. Participant's strength was tested at baseline and program completion, measuring isometric strength for shoulder abduction (SAb), shoulder external rotation (SER), hip abduction (HAb), and hip extension (HEx). Independent t-tests were used to compare the normalized torques between groups. No significant differences were found between groups. Shoulder strength gains did not differ between groups (SAb p>0.05; SER p>0.05). Hip strength gains did not differ between groups (HAb p>0.05; HEx p>0.05). Both groups increased strength due to individual supervision, constantly evaluating degree of difficulty associated with exercise and providing feedback while using elastic resistance. Using a LC is as effective as supervised training and could provide value in a clinic setting when patients are working unsupervised.

  8. Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Riche R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their

  9. Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogu, C.; Yin, W.; Haftka, R.; Ifju, P.; Molimard, J.; Le Riche, R.; Vautrin, A.

    2010-06-01

    A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test) which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel) and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their dimensionality. POD is

  10. Thermal expansion and temperature variation of elastic constants of Li(H,D) and Na(H,D) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, A.K.M.A.; Hoque, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    An analysis of thermal expansion of Li(H,D) systems up to melting temperature has been performed using the theory of anharmonic lattice. The study has for the first time been extended to Na(H,D) systems where very little or no data are available. The calculated lattice constants of Li(H,D) systems show quite good agreement with experiment. The success of the present calculation with Li(H,D) and room temperature lattice constant data for Na(H,D) given an indication of the reliability of the computed lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients for Na(H,D) systems. The study also allows us to predict the hitherto unknown lattice constants of Na(H,D) crystal at 0K. The temperature dependence of elastic constants for Li(H,D) systems has also been evaluated. Comparison with measurements shows the reliability of the present calculations. (author). 45 refs, 4 figs

  11. Effects of quantum entropy on bag constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.E.; Tawfik, A.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of quantum entropy on the bag constant are studied at low temperatures and for small chemical potentials. The inclusion of the quantum entropy of the quarks in the equation of state provides the hadronic bag with an additional heat which causes a decrease in the effective latent heat inside the bag. We have considered two types of baryonic bags, Δ and Ω - . In both cases we have found that the bag constant without the quantum entropy almost does not change with temperature and quark chemical potential. The contribution from the quantum entropy to the equation of state clearly decreases the value of the bag constant. Furthermore, we construct states densities for quarks using the 'Thomas Fermi model' and take into consideration a thermal potential for the interaction. (author)

  12. Elastic constants of the hard disc system in the self-consistent free volume approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, K.W.

    1990-09-01

    Elastic moduli of the two dimensional hard disc crystal are determined exactly within the Kirkwood self-consistent free volume approximation and compared with the Monte Carlo simulation results. (author). 22 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Algebraic aspects of evolution partial differential equation arising in the study of constant elasticity of variance model from financial mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsepa, Tanki; Aziz, Taha; Fatima, Aeeman; Khalique, Chaudry Masood

    2018-03-01

    The optimal investment-consumption problem under the constant elasticity of variance (CEV) model is investigated from the perspective of Lie group analysis. The Lie symmetry group of the evolution partial differential equation describing the CEV model is derived. The Lie point symmetries are then used to obtain an exact solution of the governing model satisfying a standard terminal condition. Finally, we construct conservation laws of the underlying equation using the general theorem on conservation laws.

  14. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  15. Multigroup constants for charged particle elastic nuclear (plus interference) scattering of light isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.; Perkins, S.T.

    1977-01-01

    Multi-group averaged reaction rates and transfer matrices were calculated for charged particle induced elastic nuclear (plus interference) scattering. Results are presented using a ten group structure for all twenty-five permutations of projectile and target for the following charged particles: p, d, t, 3 He and alpha. Transfer matrices are presented in a simplified form for both incident projectile and the knock-ons; these matrices explicitly conserve energy

  16. Test of parameter-free local pseudopotential for the study of dynamical elastic constants - Cu as a prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, K. G.; Vyas, S. M.; Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2018-05-01

    Using parameter-free (first principles local) pseudopotential, in the present communication we have calculated dynamical elastic constants (C11, C12 and C44), bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (µp), Young's modulus (Y) and Poisson's ratio (σ) in long wavelength limit. Our computed results are well agreed for C44 and B with experiment and with other theoretical results obtained within framework of second order perturbation pseudopotential theory. From the present study we conclude that pseudopotential used contain s-p hybridization and no extra term is required to account core-core repulsion.

  17. Determination of the reduced matrix of the piezoelectric, dielectric, and elastic material constants for a piezoelectric material with C∞ symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Masys, Tony J; Wiederick, Harvey D; Mukherjee, Binu K

    2011-09-01

    We present a procedure for determining the reduced piezoelectric, dielectric, and elastic coefficients for a C(∞) material, including losses, from a single disk sample. Measurements have been made on a Navy III lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic sample and the reduced matrix of coefficients for this material is presented. In addition, we present the transform equations, in reduced matrix form, to other consistent material constant sets. We discuss the propagation of errors in going from one material data set to another and look at the limitations inherent in direct calculations of other useful coefficients from the data.

  18. Ultrasonic measurement of elastic constants at temperatures from 20 to 11000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, M.W.; Hammond, J.P.

    1976-09-01

    Measurements of the elastic moduli at temperatures from 20 to 1100 0 C of a number of materials of interest in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor and the High Temperature Gas Reactor were accomplished using acoustic techniques. A two-step process was required to complete the measurements. First, the acoustic velocities were measured accurately on bulk samples at room temperature, then a wire sample was used to make elevated-temperature measurements. A computer was used to calculate the moduli and plot the data. A detailed summary has been made of the sources of error and a calculation of the precision of the measurements is given

  19. Elastic constants and the structural phase transition in La2-xSrxCuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrao, J.L.; Lei, Ming; Stekel, A.; Bell, T.M.; Leisure, R.G.; Sham, L.J.; Visscher, W.M.; Migliori, A.; Bussmann-Holder, A.; Tanaka, I.; Kojima, H.

    1991-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is used to measure the temperature dependence of all six elastic moduli of La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 . A giant softening (> 50% reduction) in the in-plane shear modulus, c 66 , is observed and is attributed to the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural phase transition in this material. This phase transition and the corresponding softening is examined with a simple anharmonic mechanical model and a macroscopic Ginsburg-Landau formalism exploiting the full symmetry of the crystal. 16 refs., 5 figs

  20. Boron nitride elastic and thermal properties. Irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, Bernard.

    1977-01-01

    The anisotropy of boron nitride (BN) and especially thermal and elastic properties were studied. Specific heat and thermal conductivity between 1.2 and 300K, thermal conductivity between 4 and 350K and elastic constants C 33 and C 44 were measured. BN was irradiated with electrons at 77K and with neutrons at 27K to determine properties after irradiation [fr

  1. A Comparative Analysis of the Effective Elastic Constants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of various finite element and closed form models developed in the attempt to evaluate and establish accurate values of the Young's modulus, E; the shear modulus G; and the Poisson's ratio,< for laminated composite plates having soft matrix and high fibre volume fraction are discussed in this paper. Their merits and ...

  2. Elastic constants of non-modulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Bodnárová, Lucie; Heczko, Oleg; Landa, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 136, July (2017), s. 20-23 ISSN 1359-6462 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-00062S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic methods * elastic behavior * ferromagnetic shape memory alloys * martensitic phase transformation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 3.747, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1359646217301768/1-s2.0-S1359646217301768-main.pdf?_tid=9b99b306-4a83-11e7-8ec6-00000aacb35e&acdnat=1496731657_35d3b5f3132e926d5bc8c6043961bb6d

  3. Trinucleon asymptotic normalization constants including Coulomb effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.; Gibson, B.F.; Lehman, D.R.; Payne, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Exact theoretical expressions for calculating the trinucleon S- and D-wave asymptotic normalization constants, with and without Coulomb effects, are presented. Coordinate-space Faddeev-type equations are used to generate the trinucleon wave functions, and integral relations for the asymptotic norms are derived within this framework. The definition of the asymptotic norms in the presence of the Coulomb interaction is emphasized. Numerical calculations are carried out for the s-wave NN interaction models of Malfliet and Tjon and the tensor force model of Reid. Comparison with previously published results is made. The first estimate of Coulomb effects for the D-wave asymptotic norm is given. All theoretical values are carefully compared with experiment and suggestions are made for improving the experimental situation. We find that Coulomb effects increase the 3 He S-wave asymptotic norm by less than 1% relative to that of 3 H, that Coulomb effects decrease the 3 He D-wave asymptotic norm by approximately 8% relative to that of 3 H, and that the distorted-wave Born approximation D-state parameter, D 2 , is only 1% smaller in magnitude for 3 He than for 3 H due to compensating Coulomb effects

  4. Elastic and piezoelectric fields around a quantum wire of zincblende heterostructures with interface elasticity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Liu, Yifei

    2018-04-01

    This work formulates the solutions to the elastic and piezoelectric fields around a quantum wire (QWR) with interface elasticity effect. Closed-form solutions to the piezoelectric potential field of zincblende QWR/matrix heterostructures grown along [111] crystallographic orientation are found and numerical results of InAs/InP heterostructures are provided as an example. The piezoelectric potential in the matrix depends on the interface elasticity, the radius and stiffness of the QWR. Our results indicate that interface elasticity can significantly alter the elastic and piezoelectric fields near the interface. Additionally, when the elastic property of the QWR is considered to be anisotropic in contrary to the common isotropic assumption, piezoelectric potentials are found to be distinct near the interface, but the deviations are negligible at positions far away from the interface.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations to calculate glass transition temperature and elastic constants of novel polyethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Reddy, Sreekantha T; Sikder, Arun K

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations studies are carried out on hydroxyl terminated polyethers that are useful in energetic polymeric binder applications. Energetic polymers derived from oxetanes with heterocyclic side chains with different energetic substituents are designed and simulated under the ensembles of constant particle number, pressure, temperature (NPT) and constant particle number, volume, temperature (NVT). Specific volume of different amorphous polymeric models is predicted using NPT-MD simulations as a function of temperature. Plots of specific volume versus temperature exhibited a characteristic change in slope when amorphous systems change from glassy to rubbery state. Several material properties such as Young's, shear, and bulk modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc. are predicted from equilibrated structures and established the structure-property relations among designed polymers. Energetic performance parameters of these polymers are calculated and results reveal that the performance of the designed polymers is comparable to the benchmark energetic polymers like polyNIMMO, polyAMMO and polyBAMO. Overall, it is worthy remark that this molecular simulations study on novel energetic polyethers provides a good guidance on mastering the design principles and allows us to design novel polymers of tailored properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of price elasticity of demand in monopolies with gradient adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalli, Fausto; Naimzada, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •A monopoly with isoelastic demand function is studied. •Reduced rationality monopolist uses gradient adjustment. •If marginal cost is small, increasing elasticity leads to stable dynamics. •For large marginal cost, dynamic can be unstable for both small and large elasticity. -- Abstract: We study a monopolistic market characterized by a constant elasticity demand function, in which the firm technology is described by a linear total cost function. The firm is assumed to be boundedly rational and to follow a gradient rule to adjust the production level in order to optimize its profit. We focus on what happens on varying the price elasticity of demand, studying the effect on the equilibrium stability. We prove that, depending on the relation between the market size and the marginal cost, two different scenarios are possible, in which elasticity has either a stabilizing or a mixed stabilizing/destabilizing effect

  7. Non-linear optical measurement of the twist elastic constant in thermotropic and DNA lyotropic chiral nematics

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchetti, Liana; Fraccia, Tommaso P.; Ciciulla, Fabrizio; Bellini, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the whole history of liquid crystals science, the balancing of intrinsic elasticity with coupling to external forces has been the key strategy for most application and investigation. While the coupling of the optical field to the nematic director is at the base of a wealth of thoroughly described optical effects, a significant variety of geometries and materials have not been considered yet. Here we show that by adopting a simple cell geometry and measuring the optically induced bi...

  8. First-principles study of crystal structure, elastic stiffness constants, piezoelectric constants, and spontaneous polarization of orthorhombic Pna21-M2O3 (M = Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kazuhiro

    2018-03-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the crystal structure, elastic and piezoelectric properties, and spontaneous polarization of orthorhombic M2O3 (M = Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y) with Pna21 space group based on density functional theory. The lattice parameters, full elastic stiffness constants, piezoelectric stress and strain constants, and spontaneous polarization are successfully predicted. Comparison with available experimental and computational results indicates the validity of our computational results. Detailed analysis of the results clarifies the difference in the bonding character and the origin of the strong piezoelectric response and large spontaneous polarization.

  9. The effect of inclusions on macroscopic composite elasticity: A systematic finite-element analysis of constituent and bulk elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, A; Sohag, F H

    2010-01-01

    The bulk physical properties of composite systems are difficult to predict - even when the properties of the constituent materials in the system are well known. We conducted a finite-element method simulation to examine the inclusion effect by substituting an inclusion phase (second phase) into a host phase (first phase). We have organized the simulation results as a function of the elasticity of host and inclusion phases. In this procedure, special attention was paid to the initial change of elastic constants as the inclusion volume ratio was varied. To accomplish this, we introduced a new parameter D ij defined as the derivatives of the normalized stiffness elastic constant over the inclusion volume ratio. We succeeded in obtaining useful systematic formulations for D ij . These formulations are expected to be applicable to the study of composite systems in many disciplines, such as geophysics, mechanics, material engineering, and biology. The present results provide much more effective constraints on the physical properties of composite systems, like rocks, than traditional methods, such as the Voigt-Reuss bounds.

  10. First-principles calculations of the elastic constants of the cubic, orthorhombic and hexagonal phases of BaF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyawere, P.W.O., E-mail: otienop98@yahoo.ca [Computational Materials Science Group, Department of Physics, University of Eldoret, P.O. Box 1125-30100 Eldoret (Kenya); Department of Computing, Kabarak University, P.O. - Private Bag - 20157 Kabarak (Kenya); The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Makau, N.W., E-mail: wanimak@yahoo.com [Computational Materials Science Group, Department of Physics, University of Eldoret, P.O. Box 1125-30100 Eldoret (Kenya); Amolo, G.O., E-mail: georgeamolo862@gmail.com [Computational Materials Science Group, Department of Physics, University of Eldoret, P.O. Box 1125-30100 Eldoret (Kenya)

    2014-02-01

    All the elastic constants of cubic, orthorhombic and hexagonal phases of BaF{sub 2} have been calculated using first principles methods. We have employed density-functional theory within generalized gradient approximation (GGA) using a plane-wave pseudopotentials method and a plane-wave basis set. The calculated elastic constant values for a cubic phase compare well with recent theoretical and experimental calculations. The bulk modulus derived from the elastic constant calculations of orthorhombic phase of BaF{sub 2} is 94.5 GPa and those of hexagonal phase is 161 GPa. These values are in good agreement with experimental data available. Stability of these phases of BaF{sub 2} is also estimated in different crystallographic directions.

  11. Combined effect of structural softening and magneto-elastic coupling on elastic coefficients of Ni-Mn-Ga austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Heczko, Oleg; Sedlák, Petr; Bodnárová, Lucie; Novotný, Michal; Kopeček, Jaromír; Landa, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 577, November 2013 (2013), S131-S135 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/10/0824; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Ni2MnGa * elastic constants of Ni-Mn-Ga austenite * magnetic shape memory effect * martensitic transformation * elastic softening Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925838812000539

  12. Influence of quantum confinement on the carrier contribution to the elastic constants in quantum confined heavily doped non-linear optical and optoelectronic materials: simplified theory and the suggestion for experimental determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruah, D; Choudhury, S; Singh, K M; Ghatak, K P

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the carrier contribution to elastic constants in quantum confined heavily doped non-linear optical compounds on the basis of a newly formulated electron dispersion law taking into account the anisotropies of the effective electron masses and spin orbit splitting constants together with the proper inclusion of the crystal field splitting in the Hamiltonian within the framework of k.p formalism. All the results of heavily doped three, and two models of Kane for heavily doped III-V materials form special cases of our generalized analysis. It has been found, taking different heavily doped quantum confined materials that, the carrier contribution to the elastic constants increases with increase in electron statistics and decrease in film thickness in ladder like manners for all types of quantum confinements with different numerical values which are totally dependent on the energy band constants. The said contribution is greatest in quantum dots and least in quantum wells together with the fact the heavy doping enhances the said contributions for all types of quantum confined materials. We have suggested an experimental method of determining the carrier contribution to the elastic constants in nanostructured materials having arbitrary band structures

  13. Interface effects on effective elastic moduli of nanocrystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gangfeng; Feng Xiqiao; Yu Shouwen; Nan Cewen

    2003-01-01

    Interfaces often play a significant role in many physical properties and phenomena of nanocrystalline materials (NcMs). In the present paper, the interface effects on the effective elastic property of NcMs are investigated. First, an atomic potential method is suggested for estimating the effective elastic modulus of an interface phase. Then, the Mori-Tanaka effective field method is employed to determine the overall effective elastic moduli of a nanocrystalline material, which is regarded as a binary composite consisting of a crystal or inclusion phase with regular lattice connected by an amorphous-like interface or matrix phase. Finally, the stiffening effects of strain gradients are examined on the effective elastic property by using the strain gradient theory to analyze a representative unit cell. Our analysis shows two physical mechanisms of interfaces that influence the effective stiffness and other mechanical properties of materials. One is the softening effect due to the distorted atomic structures and the increased atomic spacings in interface regions, and another is the baffling effect due to the existence of boundary layers between the interface phase and the crystalline phase

  14. Actin filaments growing against an elastic membrane: Effect of membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2018-03-01

    We study the force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against an elastic membrane. The elastic membrane tries to stay flat and any deformation from this flat state, either caused by thermal fluctuations or due to protrusive polymerization force exerted by the filaments, costs energy. We study two lattice models to describe the membrane dynamics. In one case, the energy cost is assumed to be proportional to the absolute magnitude of the height gradient (gradient model) and in the other case it is proportional to the square of the height gradient (Gaussian model). For the gradient model we find that the membrane velocity is a nonmonotonic function of the elastic constant μ and reaches a peak at μ =μ* . For μ membrane energy keeps increasing with time. For the Gaussian model, the system always reaches a steady state and the membrane velocity decreases monotonically with the elastic constant ν for all nonzero values of ν . Multiple filaments give rise to protrusions at different regions of the membrane and the elasticity of the membrane induces an effective attraction between the two protrusions in the Gaussian model which causes the protrusions to merge and a single wide protrusion is present in the system. In both the models, the relative time scale between the membrane and filament dynamics plays an important role in deciding whether the shape of elasticity-velocity curve is concave or convex. Our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with our analytical calculations.

  15. Effect of elasticity during viscoelastic polymer flooding : a possible mechanism of increasing the sweep efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbissinova, T.S.; Trivedi, J.J.; Kuru, E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-12-15

    This paper discussed a laboratory experiment undertaken to study how the elasticity of polymer-based fluids affects microscopic sweep efficiency, which has implications for enhanced oil recovery processes. In a series of experiments, polymer solutions with the same shear viscosity but notably different elastic characteristics were injected through a mineral-oil-saturated sandpack. The experiments involved a special core holder that was designed to simulate radial flow. The solution was injected via a perforated injection line located in the centre of the cell, and fluids were produced by way of 2 production lines located at the periphery. The shear rate used in the experiments was within the range of field applications. Using polymer solutions with similar shear viscosity behaviour and different elasticity allowed the effect of elasticity on sweep efficiency to be singled out. It was concluded that adjusting the molecular weight distribution of the solution at a constant shear viscosity and polymer concentration could improve the sweep efficiency of a polymeric fluid. The higher-elasticity polymer solution had a higher resistance to flow through porous media, resulting in better sweep efficiency and lower residual oil saturation. The objective of the study was to isolate elasticity from the other parameters that affect displacement efficiency to show the individual effect of elasticity on oil recovery. 20 refs., 5 tabs., 14 figs.

  16. Vanadium and heat treatments effect on elastic characteristics of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Tret'yakov, V.I.; Prokoshkin, D.A.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of vanadium content and of heat treatment conditions on the elastic properties of niobium at temperatures of 20 to 800 deg C was studied. Nb-V alloys were produced by binary vacuum remelting. The Nb-V alloys have been then subjected to thermal treatment. The total degree of deformation amounts to about 95%. The specimens were tested with a view to determine their microhardness, specific electric resistance, elasticity limit and modulus of elasticity. The elastic limit of niobium rises when alloyed with vanadium. With the increase of vanadium content the elastic limit of the alloy becomes greater. Pre-crystallization annealing at 600 - 700 deg C considerably increases the elastic limit, which is explained by development of the thermally activated processes leading to a decrease of dislocation mobility and thereby to a strengthening of the alloy

  17. Mimicking the effect of gravity using an elastic membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yecun; Zhu, Changqing; Wang, Yijun; Shi, Qingfan

    2014-01-01

    Comparing astrospace with an elastic membrane is an interesting analogy but it lacks a theoretical basis and experimental support. We develop a theoretical model that brings to light the relationship between the conceptual model of a gravity well and an elastic deformation equation of a membrane supporting a heavy ball, and further derive the ‘gravitational constant’ for such a small ‘elastic space’. The experimental data obtained are consistent with the prediction of our model, in mimicking the revolution of a small planet. Teaching practice shows that using an elastic membrane is a simple, intuitive and reliable method to enhance the quality of learning about the effect of gravity. (paper)

  18. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO2 over-layer on LiNbO3 for a temperature stable SAW device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K

    2003-01-01

    The influence of sputtered SiO 2 over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO 2 over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO 2 . The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO 2 over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO 2 layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C 11 = 0.75x10 11 N m -2 and C 44 0.225x10 11 N m -2 ) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10 -4 deg C -1 and 2.0x10 -4 deg C -1 ) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters

  19. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO{sub 2} over-layer on LiNbO{sub 3} for a temperature stable SAW device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2003-08-07

    The influence of sputtered SiO{sub 2} over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO{sub 2} over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO{sub 2}. The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO{sub 2} over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO{sub 2} layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C{sub 11} = 0.75x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2} and C{sub 44} 0.225x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2}) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1} and 2.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1}) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters.

  20. Effect of elastic boundaries in hydrostatic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A. N.; Tolstonogov, A. P.

    2010-03-01

    The possibility and conditions of use of the Bernoulli equation for description of an elastic pipeline were considered. It is shown that this equation is identical in form to the Bernoulli equation used for description of a rigid pipeline. It has been established that the static pressure entering into the Bernoulli equation is not identical to the pressure entering into the impulse-momentum equation. The hydrostatic problem on the pressure distribution over the height of a beaker with a rigid bottom and elastic walls, filled with a liquid, was solved.

  1. A method for determination of X-ray elastic constants of materials showing non-linear sin2ψ diagrams and its application to Zn-Ni-alloy electroplate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Makoto; Yoshioka, Yasuo.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the method and the experiment for the determination of the x-ray elastic constants of Zn-Ni-alloy electroplate. For this material, the sin 2 ψ method is not adequate to use because this material shows severely curved sin 2 ψ diagrams. Therefore, a new method developed by the authors was explained first. This new method is effective for materials showing nonlinear sin 2 ψ diagrams. Secondly, the experiment was made on the application of this method to the Zn-Ni-alloy electroplate. And it was found out that the experimental data agreed well to the theory of this method. As a result, the following values were obtained as the x-ray elastic constants of the sample measured: (1+ν)/E=8.44 TPa -1 ν/E=2.02 TPa -1 (author)

  2. Investigations of structural, elastic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of lutetium filled skutterudite LuFe4P12 under pressure effect: FP-LMTO method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudia Keltouma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural, elastic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of ternary cubic filled skutterudite compound were calculated. We have computed the elastic modulus and its pressure dependence. From the elastic parameter behavior, it is inferred that this compound is elastically stable and ductile in nature. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which phononic effects are considered, the effect of pressure P (0 to 50 GPa and temperature T (0 to 3000 °C on the lattice constant, elastic parameters, bulk modulus B, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient α, internal energy U, entropy S, Debye temperature θD, Helmholtz free energy A, and Gibbs free energy G are investigated.

  3. Monte Carlo investigations on surface elastic energy of spin-crossover solids: Direct access to image pressure and the Eshelby constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2013-10-01

    We present theoretical investigations on surface elastic energy in spin-crossover (SC) solids studied in the frame of a microscopic elastic model, coupling spin, and lattice deformations. Although surface energy plays a crucial role in driving the SC transition, specific quantitative investigations on its effect have been neglected in most of the recent theoretical works based on atomistic descriptions of the SC transitions, resolved by Monte Carlo or by molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we perform a quantitative study of the surface energy resulting from an inserted high-spin (HS) domain in a low-spin (LS) lattice. This situation may be produced experimentally in SC solids, at low temperature, through a photoexcitation by a single pulse laser shot. We demonstrate that the surface energy depends on the ratio between the local molecular volume misfit (between the LS and HS sites) δυ and the lattice volume V, such as Esurf˜δυ2/V for the HS atom at the center of lattice, while it is Esurf˜δυ2/L (L is the length of the lattice) in the case of the HS atom located on the edge of the lattice. We then derived the image pressure (negative in the case of embedded dilatation centers) through the work of the free surface atoms and evaluated the Eshelby constant, which was found equal to γ˜1.90, in very good agreement with the available data of literature. Energetic configuration diagrams in the homogeneous (HS and LS) and heterogeneous (coexistence of HS and LS) are calculated, from which estimations of the macroscopic bulk modulus were deduced.

  4. Surface Brillouin scattering measurement of the elastic constants of single crystal InAs{sub 0.91}Sb{sub 0.09}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotane, L M; Comins, J D; Every, A G [Materials Physics Research Institute, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Botha, J R, E-mail: Lesias.Kotane@wits.ac.z [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2011-01-01

    Surface Brillouin scattering of light has been used to measure the angular dependence of the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW), pseudo surface acoustic wave (PSAW) and longitudinal lateral wave (LLW) speeds in a (100)-oriented single crystal of the ternary semiconductor alloy InAs{sub 0.91}Sb{sub 0.09}. The wave speed measurements have been used to determine the room temperature values of the elastic constants C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44} of the alloy. A simple and robust fitting procedure has been implemented for recovering the elastic constants, in which the merit function is constructed from explicit secular functions that determine the surface and lateral wave speeds in the [001] and [011] crystallographic directions. In the fitting, relatively larger weighting factors have been assigned to the SAW and PSAW data because of the greater precision with which the surface modes can be measured as compared with the lateral wave.

  5. Surface Brillouin scattering measurement of the elastic constants of single crystal InAs0.91Sb0.09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotane, L M; Comins, J D; Every, A G; Botha, J R

    2011-01-01

    Surface Brillouin scattering of light has been used to measure the angular dependence of the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW), pseudo surface acoustic wave (PSAW) and longitudinal lateral wave (LLW) speeds in a (100)-oriented single crystal of the ternary semiconductor alloy InAs 0.91 Sb 0.09 . The wave speed measurements have been used to determine the room temperature values of the elastic constants C 11 , C 12 and C 44 of the alloy. A simple and robust fitting procedure has been implemented for recovering the elastic constants, in which the merit function is constructed from explicit secular functions that determine the surface and lateral wave speeds in the [001] and [011] crystallographic directions. In the fitting, relatively larger weighting factors have been assigned to the SAW and PSAW data because of the greater precision with which the surface modes can be measured as compared with the lateral wave.

  6. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO 3 crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO 3 :MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  7. Coupled channels effects in heavy ion elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, P.D.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of inelastic excitation on the elastic scattering of heavy ions are considered within a coupled channels framework. Both Coulomb and nuclear excitation results are applied to 18 O + 184 W and other heavy ion reactions

  8. On the evaluation of temperature dependence of elastic constants of martensitic phases in shape memory alloys from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, Michal; Sedlak, Petr; Sittner, Petr; Seiner, Hanus; Heller, Ludek

    2008-01-01

    Elastic constants of austenite and martensite phases in shape memory alloys reflect fundamental thermodynamic properties of these materials-i.e. important physical information can be deduced not just from the values of the constants but, mainly from their temperature and stress dependencies. As regards to the parent austenite phase, such information is available in the literature for most of the known shape memory alloys. For the martensitic phases, however, only few reliable experimental data exist, due to the experimental difficulties with the preparation of martensite single crystals as well as due to the difficulties with the ultrasonic measurement of elastic properties of strongly anisotropic media with low symmetry. In this work, the temperature dependence of all elastic constants of cubic austenite and orthorhombic 2H martensite phases in Cu-Al-Ni alloy determined by resonance ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is reported. Experimental and theoretical improvements of the RUS method which had to be made to perform the successful measurements on strongly anisotropic and martensitic phases are discussed

  9. Elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates the following five aspects of engineering-material solid-state elastic constants: general properties, interrelationships, relationships to other physical properties, changes during cooling from ambient to near-zero temperature, and near-zero-temperature behavior. Topics considered include compressibility, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Hooke's law, elastic-constant measuring methods, thermodynamic potentials, higher-order energy terms, specific heat, thermal expansivity, magnetic materials, structural phase transitions, polymers, composites, textured aggregates, and other-phenomena correlations. Some of the conclusions concerning polycrystalline elastic properties and their temperature dependence are: elastic constants are physical, not mechanical, properties which relate thermodynamically to other physical properties such as specific heat and thermal expansivity; elastic constants at low temperatures are nearly temperature independent, as required by the third law of thermodynamics; and elastic constants can be used to study directional properties of materials, such as textured aggregates and composites

  10. Surface excess elasticity of gold: Ab initio coefficients and impact on the effective elastic response of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, B.A.M.; Müller, S.; Bargmann, S.; Weissmüller, J.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the influence of the surface on the effective elastic properties of nanoscale structures and nanomaterials remains a challenge, which we here address on both levels, continuum and atomic. Density Functional Theory (DFT) computation at the atomic level yields the first reliable surface excess elastic parameters for the (111) and (001) surfaces of gold. At the continuum level, we derive closed-form expressions for the effective elastic behavior that can be combined with the DFT-derived excess elastic parameters to obtain the effective axial, torsion, and bending stiffness of circular nanowires with surface excess elasticity. The two approaches use different reference frames, and we emphasize the need for consistent stress definitions and for conversion between the separate stress measures when transferring results between the approaches. We present excess elastic parameters separately for Cauchy and 2 nd Piola-Kirchhoff stresses, demonstrating that the conversion substantially modifies their numerical value and may even invert their sign. The results afford an assessment of the contribution of the surface excess elastic parameters to the effective elastic response of nanoscale beams or wires. This assessment sheds doubt on earlier suggestions relating experimental observations of an effective stiffening or softening at small size to the excess elasticity of clean surfaces.

  11. Temperature effect on elastic properties of yttrium ferrite garnet Y3Fe5O12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenkov, Yu.A.; Nikanorov, S.P.

    2002-01-01

    One studied temperature dependence of all independent elastic constants describing comprehensively elastic anisotropy of yttrium ferrite garnet within temperature wide range covering T c . One measured the Young modules for [100] and [110] crystallographic directions and the module of shift for [100] direction of specially pure single crystal of yttrium ferrite garnet within 20-600 deg C temperature range. One analyzed behavior of elastic modules and of elastic anisotropy factor near the critical temperature of magnetic phase transition [ru

  12. Evidence for anisotropic polar nanoregions in relaxor Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3: A neutron study of the elastic constants and anomalous TA phonon damping in PMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, C.; Gehring, P. M.; Hiraka, H.; Swainson, I.; Xu, Guangyong; Ye, Z.-G.; Luo, H.; Li, J.-F.; Viehland, D.

    2012-09-01

    We use neutron inelastic scattering to characterize the acoustic phonons in the relaxor Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) and demonstrate the presence of a highly anisotropic damping mechanism that is directly related to short-range polar correlations. For a large range of temperatures above Tc˜210 K, where dynamic, short-range polar correlations are present, acoustic phonons propagating along [11¯0] and polarized along [110] (TA2 phonons) are overdamped and softened across most of the Brillouin zone. By contrast, acoustic phonons propagating along [100] and polarized along [001] (TA1 phonons) are overdamped and softened for a more limited range of wave vectors q. The anisotropy and temperature dependence of the acoustic phonon energy linewidth Γ are directly correlated with neutron diffuse scattering cross section, indicating that polar nanoregions are the cause of the anomalous behavior. The damping and softening vanish for q→0, i.e., for long-wavelength acoustic phonons near the zone center, which supports the notion that the anomalous damping is a result of the coupling between the relaxational component of the diffuse scattering and the harmonic TA phonons. Therefore, these effects are not due to large changes in the elastic constants with temperature because the elastic constants correspond to the long-wavelength limit. We compare the elastic constants we measure to those from Brillouin scattering experiments and to values reported for pure PbTiO3. We show that while the values of C44 are quite similar, those for C11 and C12 are significantly less in PMN and result in a softening of (C11-C12) over PbTiO3. The elastic constants also show an increased elastic anisotropy [2C44/(C11-C12)] in PMN versus that in PbTiO3. These results are suggestive of an instability to TA2 acoustic fluctuations in PMN and other relaxor ferroelectrics. We discuss our results in the context of the current debate over the “waterfall” effect and show that they are inconsistent with

  13. Effects of constant voltage and constant current stress in PCBM:P3HT solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cester, Andrea; Rizzo, Aldo; Bazzega, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aimof this work is the investigation of forward and reverse bias stress effects, cell self-heating and annealing in roll coated organic solar cells with PCBM:P3HT active layer. In reverse bias stress cells show a constant degradation over time. In forward current stress cells alternate...... mechanisms: the decrease of the net generation rate (due to formation of exciton quenching centres or the reduction of exciton separation rate); the formation of small leaky paths between anode and cathode, which reduces the total current extracted from the cell. The stress-induced damage can be recovered...... degradation and annealing phases, which are explained through the high power dissipation during the current stress, and the consequent self-heating. The high temperature is able to recover the cell performances at least until a critical temperature is reached. The degradation can be explained by the following...

  14. Elastic layer under axisymmetric indentation and surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarit, Pong-in; Senjuntichai, Teerapong; Rungamornrat, Jaroon

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a continuum-based approach is adopted to investigate the contact problem of an elastic layer with finite thickness and rigid base subjected to axisymmetric indentation with the consideration of surface energy effects. A complete Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is employed to consider the influence of surface stresses. The indentation problem of a rigid frictionless punch with arbitrary axisymmetric profiles is formulated by employing the displacement Green's functions, derived with the aid of Hankel integral transform technique. The problem is solved by assuming the contact pressure distribution in terms of a linear combination of admissible functions and undetermined coefficients. Those coefficients are then obtained by employing a collocation technique and an efficient numerical quadrature scheme. The accuracy of proposed solution technique is verified by comparing with existing solutions for rigid indentation on an elastic half-space. Selected numerical results for the indenters with flat-ended cylindrical and paraboloidal punch profiles are presented to portray the influence of surface energy effects on elastic fields of the finite layer. It is found that the presence of surface stresses renders the layer stiffer, and the size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is observed in the present solutions. In addition, the surface energy effects become more pronounced with smaller contact area; thus, the influence of surface energy cannot be ignored in the analysis of indentation problem especially when the indenter size is very small such as in the case of nanoindentation.

  15. Generalized uncertainty principles, effective Newton constant and regular black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiang; Ling, Yi; Shen, You-Gen; Liu, Cheng-Zhou; He, Hong-Sheng; Xu, Lan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the quantum spacetimes that are potentially connected with the generalized uncertainty principles. By analyzing the gravity-induced quantum interference pattern and the Gedanken for weighting photon, we find that the generalized uncertainty principles inspire the effective Newton constant as same as our previous proposal. A characteristic momentum associated with the tidal effect is suggested, which incorporates the quantum effect with the geometric nature of gravity...

  16. Rayleigh wave effects in an elastic half-space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of Rayleigh wave effects in a homogeneous isotropic linearly elastic half-space subject to an impulsive uniform disk pressure loading. An approximate formula is obtained for the Rayleigh wave effects. It is shown that the Rayleigh waves near the center of loading arise from the portion of the dilatational and shear waves moving toward the axis, after they originate at the edge of the load disk. A study is made of the vertical displacement due to Rayleigh waves at points on the axis near the surface of the elastic half-space.

  17. The effective Schroedinger equation of the optical model of composite nuclei elastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, A.; Hernandez, E.

    1980-01-01

    An effective hamiltonian for elastic collisions between composite nuclei is obtained from the Schroedinger equation of the complete many-body system and its fully antisymmetric wave functions by means of a projection operator technique. This effective hamiltonian, defined in such a way that it has to reproduce the scattering amplitude in full detail, including exchange effects, is explicitly Galilean invariant. The effective interaction operator is a function of the relative distance between the centers of mass of the colliding nuclei and the constants of the motion of the whole system. The interaction operator of the optical model is obtained next, requiring as usual, that it reproduces the average over the energy of the scattering amplitude and keeping the Galilean invariance. The resulting optical potential operator has some terms identical to those obtained in the Resonating Group Method, and others coming from the elimination of all non elastic channels and the delayed elastic scattering. This result makes the relation existing among the projection operator method to the Feshbach and the cluster model equations of motion for positive energies (RGM) explicit. The additional interaction terms due to the flux loss in the elastic channel are non-local, and non-hermitean operators expressed in terms of the transition amplitudes and the density of states of the compound nucleus in such a way that an approximate evaluation, in a systematic fashion, seems possible. Theangular momentum dependence of the optical potential operator is discussed in some detail. (author)

  18. Flavour breaking effects in the pseudoscalar meson decay constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornyakov, V.G. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation). School of Biomedicine; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Hyogo (Japan); Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Pleiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Juelich Supercomputing Centre; Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division; Schierholz, G. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Stueben, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Regionales Rechenzentrum; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ. (Australia). CSSM, Dept. of Physics; Collaboration: QCDSF-UKQCD Collaborations

    2016-12-14

    The SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in up, down and strange quark masses is extended from hadron masses to meson decay constants. This allows a determination of the ratio of kaon to pion decay constants in QCD. Furthermore when using partially quenched valence quarks the expansion is such that SU(2) isospin breaking effects can also be determined. It is found that the lowest order SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion (or Gell-Mann-Okubo expansion) works very well. Simulations are performed for 2+1 flavours of clover fermions at four lattice spacings.

  19. Surface displacements and energy release rates for constant stress drop slip zones in joined elastic quarter spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Michael J.; Wen, Shengmin; Keer, Leon M.

    2000-08-01

    A three-dimensional quasi-static model of faulting in an elastic half-space with a horizontal change of material properties (i.e., joined elastic quarter spaces) is considered. A boundary element method is used with a stress drop slip zone approach so that the fault surface relative displacements as well as the free surface displacements are approximated in elements over their respective domains. Stress intensity factors and free surface displacements are calculated for a variety of cases to show the phenomenological behavior of faulting in such a medium. These calculations showed that the behavior could be distinguished from a uniform half-space. Slip in a stiffer material increases, while slip in a softer material decreases the energy release rate and the free surface displacements. Also, the 1989 Kalapana earthquake was located on the basis of a series of forward searches using this method and leveling data. The located depth is 8 km, which is the closer to the seismically inferred depth than that determined from other models. Finally, the energy release rate, which can be used as a fracture criterion for fracture at this depth, is calculated to be 11.1×106 J m-2.

  20. The elastic constants of MgSiO3 perovskite at pressures and temperatures of the Earth's mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganov, A R; Brodholt, J P; Price, G D

    2001-06-21

    The temperature anomalies in the Earth's mantle associated with thermal convection can be inferred from seismic tomography, provided that the elastic properties of mantle minerals are known as a function of temperature at mantle pressures. At present, however, such information is difficult to obtain directly through laboratory experiments. We have therefore taken advantage of recent advances in computer technology, and have performed finite-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the elastic properties of MgSiO3 perovskite, the major mineral of the lower mantle, at relevant thermodynamic conditions. When combined with the results from tomographic images of the mantle, our results indicate that the lower mantle is either significantly anelastic or compositionally heterogeneous on large scales. We found the temperature contrast between the coldest and hottest regions of the mantle, at a given depth, to be about 800 K at 1,000 km, 1,500 K at 2,000 km, and possibly over 2,000 K at the core-mantle boundary.

  1. Effective Elastic Modulus of Structured Adhesives: From Biology to Biomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nano-hierarchical structures (lamellae, setae, branches, and spatulae on the toe pads of many animals play key roles for generating strong but reversible adhesion for locomotion. The hierarchical structure possesses significantly reduced, effective elastic modulus (Eeff, as compared to the inherent elastic modulus (Einh of the corresponding biological material (and therefore contributes to a better compliance with the counterpart surface. Learning from nature, three types of hierarchical structures (namely self-similar pillar structure, lamella–pillar hybrid structure, and porous structure have been developed and investigated.

  2. The Effect of Annealing on the Elastic Modulus of Orthodontic Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, Kyle

    Introduction: Nickel Titanium orthodontic wires are currently used in orthodontic treatment due to their heat activated properties and their delivery of constant force. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of annealing on the elastic modulus of Nickel Titanium, Stainless Steel and Beta-titanium (TMA) wires. Different points along the wire were tested in order to determine how far from the annealed ends the elastic modulus of the wires was affected. Methods: Eighty (80) orthodontic wires consisting of 4 equal groups (SS/TMA/Classic NitinolRTM/Super Elastic NitinolRTM) were used as the specimens for this study. All wires were measured and marked at 5mm measurements, and cut into 33.00mm sections. The wires were heated with a butane torch until the first 13.00mm of the wires were red hot. Load deflection tests using an InstronRTM universal testing machine were run at 5mm distances from the end of the wire that had been annealed. The change in elastic modulus was then determined. Results: There was a significant difference (F = 533.001, p = 0.0005) in the change in elastic modulus for the four distances. There was also a significant difference (F = 57.571, p = 0.0005) in the change in elastic modulus for the four wire types. There was a significant interaction (F = 19.601, p = 0.005) between wire type and distance, however this interaction negated the differences between the wires. Conclusion: 1) There are significant differences in the changes in elastic modulus between the areas of the wires within the annealed section and those areas 5mm and 10mm away from the annealed section. The change in elastic modulus within the annealed section was significantly greater at 8 mm than it was at 13mm, and this was significantly greater than 18mm and 23mm (5mm and 10mm beyond the annealed section). However, there was no statistical difference in the change in elastic modulus between 5mm and 10mm away from the annealed section (18mm and 23mm respectively). 2

  3. Algorithm of constructing hybrid effective modules for elastic isotropic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Miciński, J.; Kupriyanov, N. A.; Barashkov, V. N.; Lushnikov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The algorithm of constructing of new effective elastic characteristics of two-component composites based on the superposition of the models of Reiss and Voigt, Hashin and Strikman, as well as models of the geometric average for effective modules. These effective characteristics are inside forks Voigt and Reiss. Additionally, the calculations of the stress-strain state of composite structures with new effective characteristics give more accurate prediction than classical models do.

  4. Effect of reinforcement volume fraction on the density & elastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of reinforcement volume fraction on the density & elastic parameters of BMG's matrix composites. Wahiba Metiri 1, Fatiha Hadjoub1, 2 and Leila Touati Tliba 1. 1 Laboratoire des Semi-Conducteurs, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Badji-. Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba -23000, Algeria.

  5. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M.K.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2013-01-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young

  6. Effect of T-stress on crack growth along an interface between ductile and elastic solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2003-01-01

    For crack growth along an interface joining an elastic-plastic solid to an elastic substrate the effect of a non-singular stress component in the crack growth direction in the elastic-plastic solid is investigated. Conditions of small scale yielding are assumed, and due to the mismatch of elastic...

  7. Effect of reorientation of anisotropic point defects on relaxation of crystal elastic coefficients of high order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topchyan, I.I.; Dokhner, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of reorientation of anisotropic point defects in uniform fields of elastic stresses on the relaxation of the elastic coefficients of a crystal was investigated in the nonlinear elasticity theory approximation. In calculating the interaction of point defects with elastic-stress fields was taken into consideration. The expression for the relaxations of the elasticity coefficients are obtained in an analytical form. The relaxation of the second-order elasticity coefficients is due to the dimentional interaction of a point defect with an applied-stress field, whereas the relaxation of the higher-order elasticity coefficients is determined both by dimentional and module effects

  8. Estimation of the effective distribution coefficient from the solubility constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An updated version of RESRAD has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy to derive site-specific soil guidelines for residual radioactive material. In this updated version, many new features have been added to the, RESRAD code. One of the options is that a user can input a solubility constant to limit the leaching of contaminants. The leaching model used in the code requires the input of an empirical distribution coefficient, K d , which represents the ratio of the solute concentration in soil to that in solution under equilibrium conditions. This paper describes the methodology developed to estimate an effective distribution coefficient, Kd, from the user-input solubility constant and the use of the effective K d for predicting the leaching of contaminants

  9. Directional effects in transitional resonance spectra and group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Oh, K.O.; Rhodes, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical exploratory investigations indicate that transition effects such as streaming cause a considerable spatial variation in the neutron spectra across resonances; streaming leads to opposite effects in the forward and backward directions. The neglect of this coupled spatial/angular variations of the transitory resonance spectra is an approximation that is common to all current group constant generation methodologies. This paper presents a description of the spatial/angular coupling of the neutron flux across isolated resonances. It appears to be necessary to differentiate between forward-and backward-directed neutron flux components or even to consider components in narrower angular cones. The effects are illustrated for an isolated actinide resonance in a simplified fast reactor blanket problem. The resonance spectra of the directional flux components φ + and φ - , and even more so the 90-deg cone components, are shown to deviate significantly from the infinite medium approximation, and the differences increase with penetration. The charges in φ + lead to a decreasing scattering group constant that enhances neutron transmission; the changes in φ - lead to an increasing group constant inhibiting backward scattering. Therefore, the changes in the forward-and backward-directed spectra both lead to increased neutron transmission. Conversely, the flux (φ = φ + +φ - ) is shown to agree closely with the infinite medium approximation both in the analytical formulas and in the numerical solution. The directional effect cancel in the summation. The forward-and backward-directed flux components are used as weighting spectra to illustrate the group constant changes for a single resonance

  10. Two-dimensional linear elasticity theory of magneto-electro-elastic plates considering surface and nonlocal effects for nanoscale device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Li, Peng; Jin, Feng

    2016-09-01

    A novel two-dimensional linear elastic theory of magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) plates, considering both surface and nonlocal effects, is established for the first time based on Hamilton’s principle and the Lee plate theory. The equations derived are more general, suitable for static and dynamic analyses, and can also be reduced to the piezoelectric, piezomagnetic, and elastic cases. As a specific application example, the influences of the surface and nonlocal effects, poling directions, piezoelectric phase materials, volume fraction, damping, and applied magnetic field (i.e., constant applied magnetic field and time-harmonic applied magnetic field) on the magnetoelectric (ME) coupling effects are first investigated based on the established two-dimensional plate theory. The results show that the ME coupling coefficient has an obvious size-dependent characteristic owing to the surface effects, and the surface effects increase the ME coupling effects significantly when the plate thickness decreases to its critical thickness. Below this critical thickness, the size-dependent effect is obvious and must be considered. In addition, the output power density of a magnetic energy nanoharvester is also evaluated using the two-dimensional plate theory obtained, with the results showing that a relatively larger output power density can be achieved at the nanoscale. This study provides a mathematical tool which can be used to analyze the mechanical properties of nanostructures theoretically and numerically, as well as evaluating the size effect qualitatively and quantitatively.

  11. Empirical correlation among the dynamic elastic constants and the waves P and S velocities in rocks; Correlaciones empiricas entre las constantes elasticas dinamicas y las velocidades de las ondas P y S de las rocas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras Lopez, Enrique [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    Departing from the analysis of a data base on the velocities of the compression waves (V{sub p}) and the transverse waves (V{sub s}) in a group of 97 specimens of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks, the existence of four types of empirical correlation very well entailed between the dynamic elastic constants and the velocities V{sub p} and V{sub s}. These correlation allow the estimation with a very close approximation the elastic dynamic constants without the need of having available of the complete set of data (V{sub p}, V{sub s} and total density) that is normally required for its determination. The identified correlation is mathematically expressed by means of adjustment equations that reproduce in all of the cases the experimental values with a standard error of estimation within 10%, for the universe of rocks studied and with much less error for different specific lithological groups. The application methodologies of the correlation found for different cases of practical interest, are described. [Espanol] A partir del analisis de una base de datos experimentales sobre la velocidad de las ondas compresionales (V{sub p}) y de las ondas transversales (V{sub s}) de un conjunto de 97 especimenes de rocas sedimentarias, igneas y metamorficas, se identifica la existencia de cuatro tipos de correlaciones empiricas muy bien comportadas entre las constantes elasticas dinamicas y las velocidades V{sub p} y V{sub s}. Estas correlaciones permiten estimar con muy buena aproximacion las constantes elasticas dinamicas de las rocas sin tener que disponer del conjunto completo de datos (V{sub p}, V{sub s} y densidad total) que normalmente se requieren para su determinacion. Las correlaciones identificadas se expresan matematicamente mediante ecuaciones de ajuste que reproducen en todos los casos los valores experimentales con un error estandar de estimacion dentro de 10% para el universo de las rocas estudiadas, y con mucho menor error para diferentes grupos litologicos

  12. Empirical correlation among the dynamic elastic constants and the waves P and S velocities in rocks; Correlaciones empiricas entre las constantes elasticas dinamicas y las velocidades de las ondas P y S de las rocas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras Lopez, Enrique [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    Departing from the analysis of a data base on the velocities of the compression waves (V{sub p}) and the transverse waves (V{sub s}) in a group of 97 specimens of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks, the existence of four types of empirical correlation very well entailed between the dynamic elastic constants and the velocities V{sub p} and V{sub s}. These correlation allow the estimation with a very close approximation the elastic dynamic constants without the need of having available of the complete set of data (V{sub p}, V{sub s} and total density) that is normally required for its determination. The identified correlation is mathematically expressed by means of adjustment equations that reproduce in all of the cases the experimental values with a standard error of estimation within 10%, for the universe of rocks studied and with much less error for different specific lithological groups. The application methodologies of the correlation found for different cases of practical interest, are described. [Espanol] A partir del analisis de una base de datos experimentales sobre la velocidad de las ondas compresionales (V{sub p}) y de las ondas transversales (V{sub s}) de un conjunto de 97 especimenes de rocas sedimentarias, igneas y metamorficas, se identifica la existencia de cuatro tipos de correlaciones empiricas muy bien comportadas entre las constantes elasticas dinamicas y las velocidades V{sub p} y V{sub s}. Estas correlaciones permiten estimar con muy buena aproximacion las constantes elasticas dinamicas de las rocas sin tener que disponer del conjunto completo de datos (V{sub p}, V{sub s} y densidad total) que normalmente se requieren para su determinacion. Las correlaciones identificadas se expresan matematicamente mediante ecuaciones de ajuste que reproducen en todos los casos los valores experimentales con un error estandar de estimacion dentro de 10% para el universo de las rocas estudiadas, y con mucho menor error para diferentes grupos litologicos

  13. Effect of temperature and geometric parameters on elastic properties of tungsten nanowire: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sourav, E-mail: ssaha09@me.buet.ac.bd; Mojumder, Satyajit; Mahboob, Monon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Islam, M. Zahabul [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Tungsten is a promising material and has potential use as battery anode. Tungsten nanowires are gaining attention from researchers all over the world for this wide field of application. In this paper, we investigated effect of temperature and geometric parameters (diameter and aspect ratio) on elastic properties of Tungsten nanowire. Aspect ratios (length to diameter ratio) considered are 8:1, 10:1, and 12:1 while diameter of the nanowire is varied from 1-4 nm. For 2 nm diameter sample (aspect ratio 10:1), temperature is varied (10 K ~ 1500 K) to observe elastic behavior of Tungsten nanowire under uniaxial tensile loading. EAM potential is used for molecular dynamic simulation. We applied constant strain rate of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} to deform the nanowire. Elastic behavior is expressed through stress vs. strain plot. We also investigated the fracture mechanism of tungsten nanowire and radial distribution function. Investigation suggests peculiar behavior of Tungsten nanowire in nano-scale with double peaks in stress vs. strain diagram. Necking before final fracture suggests that actual elastic behavior of the material is successfully captured through atomistic modeling.

  14. Effect of alloying on elastic properties of ZrN based transition metal nitride alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2014-01-01

    We report the effect of composition and metal sublattice substitutional element on the structural, elastic and electronic properties of ternary transition metal nitrides Zr1-xMxN with M=Al, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, W and Mo. The analysis of the elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio provides insights regarding the mechanical behavior of Zr1-xMxN. We predict that ternary alloys are more ductile compared to their parent binary compounds. The revealed trend in the mechanical behavior might help for experimentalists on the ability of tuning the mechanical properties during the alloying process by varying the concentration of the transition metal. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Effect of alloying on elastic properties of ZrN based transition metal nitride alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of composition and metal sublattice substitutional element on the structural, elastic and electronic properties of ternary transition metal nitrides Zr1-xMxN with M=Al, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, W and Mo. The analysis of the elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young\\'s modulus, and Poisson\\'s ratio provides insights regarding the mechanical behavior of Zr1-xMxN. We predict that ternary alloys are more ductile compared to their parent binary compounds. The revealed trend in the mechanical behavior might help for experimentalists on the ability of tuning the mechanical properties during the alloying process by varying the concentration of the transition metal. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Surface effects on static bending of nanowires based on non-local elasticity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface elasticity and non-local elasticity effects on the elastic behavior of statically bent nanowires are investigated in the present investigation. Explicit solutions are presented to evaluate the surface stress and non-local elasticity effects with various boundary conditions. Compared with the classical Euler beam, a nanowire with surface stress and/or non-local elasticity can be either stiffer or less stiff, depending on the boundary conditions. The concept of surface non-local elasticity was proposed and its physical interpretation discussed to explain the combined effect of surface elasticity and non-local elasticity. The effect of the nanowire size on its elastic bending behavior was investigated. The results obtained herein are helpful to characterize mechanical properties of nanowires and aid nanowire-based devices design.

  17. Effective action, massive gravitons and the Cosmological Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garattini, Remo [Universita degli Studi di Bergamo, Facolta di Ingegneria, Viale Marconi 5, 24044 Dalmine (Bergamo) (Italy); INFN - sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, Milan (Italy)

    2006-03-01

    The one loop effective action in a Schwarzschild background is here used to compute the cosmological constant in presence of massive gravitons. It is shown that the expression of the Zero Point Energy (ZPE) is equivalent to the one computed by means of a variational approach. To handle with ZPE divergences, we use the zeta function regularization. The regularization is closely related to the subtraction procedure appearing in the computation of Casimir energy in a curved background. A renormalization procedure is introduced to remove the infinities together with a renormalization group equation.

  18. Effective action, massive gravitons and the Cosmological Constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garattini, Remo

    2006-01-01

    The one loop effective action in a Schwarzschild background is here used to compute the cosmological constant in presence of massive gravitons. It is shown that the expression of the Zero Point Energy (ZPE) is equivalent to the one computed by means of a variational approach. To handle with ZPE divergences, we use the zeta function regularization. The regularization is closely related to the subtraction procedure appearing in the computation of Casimir energy in a curved background. A renormalization procedure is introduced to remove the infinities together with a renormalization group equation

  19. Shape memory effect and super elasticity. Its dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotian, R

    2001-01-01

    The shape memory alloys are quite fascinating materials characterized by a shape memory effect and super elasticity which ordinary metals do not have. This unique behaviour was first found in a Au-47.5 at % Cd alloy in 1951, and was published in 1963 by the discovery of Ti-Ni alloy. Shape memory alloys now being practically used as new functional alloys for various dental and medical applications.

  20. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Magdala Tesauro; Mikhail Kaban; S. A. P. L. Cloetingh

    2013-01-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member ‘hard’ (HRM) and a ‘soft’ (SR...

  1. Sub-Micrometer Zeolite Films on Gold-Coated Silicon Wafers with Single-Crystal-Like Dielectric Constant and Elastic Modulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiriolo, Raffaele [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro Italy; Rangnekar, Neel [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Zhang, Han [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Shete, Meera [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Bai, Peng [Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Theory Center, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Nelson, John [Characterization Facility, University of Minnesota, 12 Shepherd Labs, 100 Union St. S.E. Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Karapetrova, Evguenia [Surface Scattering and Microdiffraction, X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Building 438-D002 Argonne IL 60439 USA; Macosko, Christopher W. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Siepmann, Joern Ilja [Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Theory Center, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Lamanna, Ernesto [Department of Health Sciences, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro Italy; Lavano, Angelo [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro Italy; Tsapatsis, Michael [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA

    2017-05-08

    A low-temperature synthesis coupled with mild activation produces zeolite films exhibiting low dielectric constant (low-k) matching the theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for single crystals. This synthesis and activation method allows for the fabrication of a device consisting of a b-oriented film of the pure-silica zeolite MFI (silicalite-1) supported on a gold-coated silicon wafer. The zeolite seeds are assembled by a manual assembly process and subjected to optimized secondary growth conditions that do not cause corrosion of the gold underlayer, while strongly promoting in-plane growth. The traditional calcination process is replaced with a non-thermal photochemical activation to ensure preservation of an intact gold layer. The dielectric constant (k), obtained through measurement of electrical capacitance in a metal-insulator-metal configuration, highlights the ultralow k approximate to 1.7 of the synthetized films, which is among the lowest values reported for an MFI film. There is large improvement in elastic modulus of the film (E approximate to 54 GPa) over previous reports, potentially allowing for integration into silicon wafer processing technology.

  2. Field Dependence of Elastic Constants in the Bilayer Manganite: (La1-z Prz )1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 for z=0.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Matasukawa, M.; Yoshizawa, M.; Apost, M.; Suryanarayanan, R.; Revcolevischi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Elastic properties of the Pr-doped bilayer manganite: (La 1-z Pr z ) 1.2 Sr 1.8 Mn 2 O 7 for z=0.6 was investigated by means of the ultrasonic measurement. No remarkable anomaly was observed around the transition temperature in the temperature dependence of C 33 in zero field. A pronounced elastic anomaly, however, has been observed around the magnetic phase transition field Ht in the longitudinal elastic constants C 11 , indicating the phase can be induced in magnetic fields. The transition accompanies a large hysteresis, implying the ordered state to be so-called ''orbital-glass state''. The origin of observed elastic anomalies are discussed in terms of the coupling between elastic strains and magnetic moments of Mn ions, and a change of carrier numbers. (author)

  3. Approximated treatment of the Pauli principle effects in elastic collisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, H.

    1984-08-01

    Exact microscopic methods like the RGM (Resonanting Group Method) and the GCM (Generator Coordinate Method) and approximate methods like the OCM (Orthogonality Condition Model) are used to study the effects of Pauli Principle in α- 16 O elastic scattering. Using V2 and BL nucleon-nucleon interactions, nucleus-nucleus effective potentials are obtained from RGM 'exact' wave functions and also from an approximate method developed previoulsy. Using these potentials in the OCM Saito Equation phase-shifts are calculated for partial waves Λ = 0, 1, ... 11, in the energy range 0 [pt

  4. Effect of van der Waals interactions on the structural and elastic properties of black phosphorus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appalakondaiah, S.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Lebègue, S.

    2012-01-01

    constant is significantly larger than the C11 and C33 parameters, implying that black phosphorus is stiffer against strain along the a axis than along the b and c axes. From the calculated elastic constants, the mechanical properties, such as bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson...

  5. On crack interaction effects of in-plane surface cracks using elastic and elastic-plastic finite element analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Min; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The crack-tip stress fields and fracture mechanics assessment parameters for a surface crack, such as the elastic stress intensity factor or the elastic-plastic J-integral, can be affected significantly by the adjacent cracks. Such a crack interaction effect due to multiple cracks can alter the fracture mechanics assessment parameters significantly. There are many factors to be considered, for instance the relative distance between adjacent cracks, the crack shape, and the loading condition, to quantify the crack interaction effect on the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. Thus, the current assessment codes on crack interaction effects (crack combination rules), including ASME Sec. XI, BS7910, British Energy R6 and API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, provide different rules for combining multiple surface cracks into a single surface crack. The present paper investigates crack interaction effects by evaluating the elastic stress intensity factor and the elastic-plastic J-integral of adjacent in-plane surface cracks in a plate through detailed 3-dimensional elastic and elastic-plastic finite element analyses. The effects on the fracture mechanics assessment parameters of the geometric parameters, the relative distance between two cracks, and the crack shape are investigated systematically. As for the loading condition, an axial tension is considered. Based on the finite element results, the acceptability of the crack combination rules provided in the existing guidance was investigated, and the relevant recommendations on a crack interaction for in-plane surface cracks are discussed. The present results can be used to develop more concrete guidance on crack interaction effects for crack shape characterization to evaluate the integrity of defective components

  6. Bounds and self-consistent estimates for elastic constants of polycrystals of hcp solid He 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, James G.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in methods for computing both Hashin-Shtrikman bounds and related selfconsistent (or CPA) estimates of elastic constants for polycrystals composed of randomly oriented crystals can be applied successfully to hexagonal close packed solid He{sup 4}. In particular, since the shear modulus C{sub 44} of hexagonal close-packed solid He is known to undergo large temperature variations when 20 mK {<=} T {<=} 200 mK, bounds and estimates computed with this class of effective medium methods, while using C{sub 44} {r_arrow} 0 as a proxy for melting, are found to be both qualitatively and quantitatively very similar to prior results obtained using Monte Carlo methods. Hashin- Shtrikman bounds provide significantly tighter constraints on the polycrystal behavior than do the traditional Voigt and Reuss bounds.

  7. Elastic interaction of a crack with a microcrack array. I - Formulation of the problem and general form of the solution. II - Elastic solution for two crack configurations (piecewise constant and linear approximations)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Dolgopolsky, A.; Kachanov, M.

    1987-01-01

    The elastic interactions of a two-dimensional configuration consisting of a crack with an array of microcracks located near the tip are studied. The general form of the solution is based on the potential representations and approximations of tractions on the microcracks by polynomials. In the second part, the technique is applied to two simple two-dimensional configurations involving one and two microcracks. The problems of stress shielding and stress amplification (the reduction or increase of the effective stress intensity factor due to the presence of microcracks) are discussed, and the refinements introduced by higher order polynomial approximations are illustrated.

  8. Probing the Effect of Hydrogen on Elastic Properties and Plastic Deformation in Nickel Using Nanoindentation and Ultrasonic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, S. K.; Somerday, B. P.; Ingraham, M. D.; Bahr, D. F.

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen effects on small-volume plasticity and elastic stiffness constants are investigated with nanoindentation of Ni-201 and sonic velocity measurements of bulk Ni single crystals. Elastic modulus of Ni-201, calculated from indentation data, decreases 22% after hydrogen charging. This substantial decrease is independently confirmed by sonic velocity measurements of Ni single crystals; c 44 decreases 20% after hydrogen exposure. Furthermore, clear hydrogen-deformation interactions are observed. The maximum shear stress required to nucleate dislocations in hydrogen-charged Ni-201 is markedly lower than in as-annealed material, driven by hydrogen-reduced shear modulus. Additionally, a larger number of depth excursions are detected prior to general yielding in hydrogen-charged material, suggesting cross-slip restriction. Together, these data reveal a direct correlation between hydrogen-affected elastic properties and plastic deformation in Ni alloys.

  9. Mesonic effects in the elastic electron deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, G.

    1981-01-01

    The present thesis was concerned with the study of the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron in the framework of the OBE model using elastic electron-deuteron scattering with high momentum transfer. In the framework of the S-matrix formalism the differential cross sections was derived in first Born approximation. The calculation of the invariant amplitude led to the introduction of the electric and magnetic structure functions. From these structure functions the electromagnetic form factor was calculated. Furthermore the effective OBE-potential was derived in the framework of a projection procedure on the base of unitary transformations. (orig./HSI). [de

  10. Effect of Rotation in an Orthotropic Elastic Slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santra S.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental equations of the two dimensional generalized thermoelasticity (L-S model with one relaxation time parameter in orthotropic elastic slab has been considered under effect of rotation. The normal mode analysis is used to the basic equations of motion and heat conduction equation. Finally, the resulting equations are written in the form of a vector-matrix differential equation which is then solved by the eigenvalue approach. The field variables in the space time domain are obtained numerically. The results corresponding to the cases of conventional thermoelasticity CTE, extended thermoelasticity (ETE and temperature rate dependent thermoelasticity (TRDTE are compared by means of graphs.

  11. Characterization for elastic constants of fused deposition modelling-fabricated materials based on the virtual fields method and digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Quankun; Xie, Huimin

    2017-12-01

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM), a widely used rapid prototyping process, is a promising technique in manufacturing engineering. In this work, a method for characterizing elastic constants of FDM-fabricated materials is proposed. First of all, according to the manufacturing process of FDM, orthotropic constitutive model is used to describe the mechanical behavior. Then the virtual fields method (VFM) is applied to characterize all the mechanical parameters (Q_{11}, Q_{22}, Q_{12}, Q_{66}) using the full-field strain, which is measured by digital image correlation (DIC). Since the principal axis of the FDM-fabricated structure is sometimes unknown due to the complexity of the manufacturing process, a disk in diametrical compression is used as the load configuration so that the loading angle can be changed conveniently. To verify the feasibility of the proposed method, finite element method (FEM) simulation is conducted to obtain the strain field of the disk. The simulation results show that higher accuracy can be achieved when the loading angle is close to 30°. Finally, a disk fabricated by FDM was used for the experiment. By rotating the disk, several tests with different loading angles were conducted. To determine the position of the principal axis in each test, two groups of parameters (Q_{11}, Q_{22}, Q_{12}, Q_{66}) are calculated by two different groups of virtual fields. Then the corresponding loading angle can be determined by minimizing the deviation between two groups of the parameters. After that, the four constants (Q_{11}, Q_{22}, Q_{12}, Q_{66}) were determined from the test with an angle of 27°.

  12. Effect of the Pauli principle in elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picklesimer, A.; Thaler, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of imposition of the Pauli principle for two-fragment elastic nuclear scattering is examined. It is shown that the antisymmetrized problem can be cast into the Lippmann-Schwinger form with an effective interaction in which the effect of the Pauli principle is entirely absorbed into the effective interaction potential operator. This result enables the formalism to be developed in analogy with the unsymmetrized formulation. Central to the approach is the choice of the off-shell extension of the transition operator. Comparison is made with a previously proposed treatment based on a different off-shell extension. It is shown that both the antisymmetrized transition operator and the associated optical potential proposed herein are readily expressed as spectator expansions in which the effect of the Pauli principle among the active fermions is incorporated in a physically appealing fashion at each stage of the expansion

  13. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene.

  14. Numerical calculations of effective elastic properties of two cellular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2005-01-01

    Young's moduli of regular two-dimensional truss-like and eye-shaped structures are simulated using the finite element method. The structures are idealizations of soft polymeric materials used in ferro-electret applications. In the simulations, the length scales of the smallest representative units are varied, which changes the dimensions of the cell walls in the structures. A power-law expression with a quadratic as the exponent term is proposed for the effective Young's moduli of the systems as a function of the solid volume fraction. The data are divided into three regions with respect to the volume fraction: low, intermediate and high. The parameters of the proposed power-law expression in each region are later represented as a function of the structural parameters, the unit-cell dimensions. The expression presented can be used to predict a structure/property relationship in materials with similar cellular structures. The contribution of the cell-wall thickness to the elastic properties becomes significant at concentrations >0.15. The cell-wall thickness is the most significant factor in predicting the effective Young's modulus of regular cellular structures at high volume fractions of solid. At lower concentrations of solid, the eye-shaped structure yields a lower Young's modulus than a truss-like structure with similar anisotropy. Comparison of the numerical results with those of experimental data for poly(propylene) show good agreement regarding the influence of cell-wall thickness on elastic properties of thin cellular films

  15. Multiple scattering effects in depth resolution of elastic recoil detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Harding, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) is used to profile hydrogen and other low mass elements in thin films at surface and interfaces in a similar way that Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) is used to detect and profile heavy elements. It is often assumed that the depth resolutions of these two techniques are similar. However, in contrast to typical RBS, the depth resolution of ERD is limited substantially by multiple scattering. In experimental data analysis and/or spectra simulations of a typical RBS measurement multiple scattering effects are often ignored. Computer programs used in IBA, such as RUMP, HYPRA or RBX do not include multiple scattering effects at all. In this paper, using practical thin metal structures with films containing intentionally introduced hydrogen, we demonstrate experimental ERD depth resolution and sensitivity limitations. The effects of sample material and scattering angle are also discussed. (authors)

  16. Multiple scattering effects in depth resolution of elastic recoil detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Harding, G.L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Telecommunications and Industrial Physics; Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, (Hungary)

    1998-06-01

    Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) is used to profile hydrogen and other low mass elements in thin films at surface and interfaces in a similar way that Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) is used to detect and profile heavy elements. It is often assumed that the depth resolutions of these two techniques are similar. However, in contrast to typical RBS, the depth resolution of ERD is limited substantially by multiple scattering. In experimental data analysis and/or spectra simulations of a typical RBS measurement multiple scattering effects are often ignored. Computer programs used in IBA, such as RUMP, HYPRA or RBX do not include multiple scattering effects at all. In this paper, using practical thin metal structures with films containing intentionally introduced hydrogen, we demonstrate experimental ERD depth resolution and sensitivity limitations. The effects of sample material and scattering angle are also discussed. (authors). 19 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Elasticity and hardness of nano-polycrystalline boron nitrides: The apparent Hall-Petch effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakubo, A.; Ogi, H.; Hirao, M.; Sumiya, H.

    2014-01-01

    Nano-polycrystalline boron nitride (BN) is expected to replace diamond as a superhard and superstiff material. Although its hardening was reported, its elasticity remains unclear and the as-measured hardness could be significantly different from the true value due to the elastic recovery. In this study, we measured the longitudinal-wave elastic constant of nano-polycrystalline BNs using picosecond ultrasound spectroscopy and confirmed the elastic softening for small-grain BNs. We also measured Vickers and Knoop hardness for the same specimens and clarified the relationship between hardness and stiffness. The Vickers hardness significantly increased as the grain size decreased, while the Knoop hardness remained nearly unchanged. We attribute the apparent increase in Vickers hardness to the elastic recovery and propose a model to support this insight.

  18. Magnetic effects in the paraxial regime of elastic electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Alexander; Lubk, Axel; Rusz, Ján

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by a recent claim [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 127203 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.127203] that electron vortex beams can be used to image magnetism at the nanoscale in elastic scattering experiments, using transmission electron microscopy, a comprehensive computational study is performed to study magnetic effects in the paraxial regime of elastic electron scattering in magnetic solids. Magnetic interactions from electron vortex beams, spin polarized electron beams, and beams with phase aberrations are considered, as they pass through ferromagnetic FePt or antiferromagnetic LaMnAsO. The magnetic signals are obtained by comparing the intensity over a disk in the diffraction plane for beams with opposite angular momentum or aberrations. The strongest magnetic signals are obtained from vortex beams with large orbital angular momentum, where relative magnetic signals above 10-3 are indicated for 10 ℏ orbital angular momentum, meaning that relative signals of one percent could be expected with the even larger orbital angular momenta, which have been produced in experimental setups. All results indicate that beams with low acceleration voltage and small convergence angles yield stronger magnetic signals, which is unfortunately problematic for the possibility of high spatial resolution imaging. Nevertheless, under atomic resolution conditions, relative magnetic signals in the order of 10-4 are demonstrated, corresponding to an increase with one order of magnitude compared to previous work.

  19. Effects of elastic anisotropy on mechanical behavior of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of the deformation and fracture behavior of ordered intermetallic compounds are examined within the framework of linear anisotropic elasticity theory of dislocations and cracks. The orientation dependence and the tension/compression asymmetry of yield stress are explained in terms of the anisotropic coupling effect of non-glide stresses to the glide strain. The anomalous yield behavior is related to the disparity (edge/screw) of dislocation mobility and the critical stress required for the dislocation multiplication mechanism of Frank-Read type. The slip-twin conjugate relationship, extensive faulting, and pseudo-twinning (martensitic transformation) at a crack tip can be enhanced also by the anisotropic coupling effect, which may lead to transformation toughening of shear type

  20. Experimental Investigation of Effects of Vibration upon Elastic and Cohesive Properties of Beds of Wet Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alsop

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of sinusoidal vibrations through beds of cohesive particulate solids was measured. Results were interpreted in terms of a critical state model to predict the elastic swelling constant k, and the cohesive stress C. Factorial experimental design was used to identify significant parameters. Factors that affect k include percent moisture, bulk density, sample size, sample shape, the presence of a supporting membrane, and loading order. Factors that affect C include percent moisture and particle size distribution. Factors affecting k were interpreted in terms of their effects upon bed structure and factors affecting C in terms of an equivalent pore water pressure due to capillary and liquid bridge effects. The critical state model was modified to incorporate general relationships between axial and radial strains.

  1. Relativistic effects in elastic scattering of electrons in TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rother, Axel; Scheerschmidt, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy typically works with highly accelerated thus relativistic electrons. Consequently the scattering process is described within a relativistic formalism. In the following, we will examine three different relativistic formalisms for elastic electron scattering: Dirac, Klein-Gordon and approximated Klein-Gordon, the standard approach. This corresponds to a different consideration of spin effects and a different coupling to electromagnetic potentials. A detailed comparison is conducted by means of explicit numerical calculations. For this purpose two different formalisms have been applied to the approaches above: a numerical integration with predefined boundary conditions and the multislice algorithm, a standard procedure for such simulations. The results show a negligibly small difference between the different relativistic equations in the vicinity of electromagnetic potentials, prevailing in the electron microscope. The differences between the two numeric approaches are found to be small for small-angle scattering but eventually grow large for large-angle scattering, recorded for instance in high-angle annular dark field.

  2. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jon J; Linte, Cristian A; Rettmann, Maryam E; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L; Robb, Richard A; Holmes, David R

    2015-02-21

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrode-tissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel [1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  3. Elastic Bands in Combination With Free Weights in Strength Training: Neuromuscular Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Vidar; Fimland, Marius S; Kolnes, Maria K; Saeterbakken, Atle H

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the effects of a variable vs. a constant lower limb resistance training program on muscle strength, muscle activation, and ballistic muscle performance at different knee angles. Thirty-two females were randomized to a constant resistance training free-weight group (FWG) or a variable resistance training group using free weights in combination with elastic bands (EBG). Two variations of the squat exercise (back squat and split) were performed 2 days per week for 10 weeks. Knee extensor maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) and countermovement jump were assessed at knee angles of 60, 90, and 120° before and after the intervention. During the MVCs, muscle activation of the superficial knee extensor muscles was measured using surface electromyography. The FWG increased their MVCs at 60 and 90° (24 and 15%, respectively), whereas the EBG only increased significantly at 60° (15%). The FWG increased their jump height significantly at all angles (12-16%), whereas the EBG only improved significantly at 60 and 90° (15 and 10%, respectively). Both groups improved their 6-repetition maximum free-weight squat performance (EBG: 25% and FWG: 23%). There were no significant changes in muscle activation. In conclusion, constant and variable resistance training provided similar increases in dynamic and isometric strength, and ballistic muscle performance, albeit most consistently for the group training only with free weights.

  4. Fluid-like elasticity induced by anisotropic effective mass density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guancong; Fu, Caixing; Wang, Guanghao

    We present a three-dimensional anisotropic elastic metamaterial, which can generate dipolar resonances. Repeating these subwavelength units can lead to one-dimensional arrays, which are essentially elastic rods that can withstand both longitudinal, and flexural vibrations. Band structure analysis...

  5. A flexoelectric theory with rotation gradient effects for elastic dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anqing, Li; Shenjie, Zhou; Lu, Qi; Xi, Chen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a general flexoelectric theory in the framework of couple stress theory is proposed for isotropic dielectrics, in which the rotation gradient and the polarization gradient are involved to represent the nonlocal mechanical and electrical effects, respectively. The present flexoelectric theory shows only the anti-symmetric part of rotation gradient can induce polarization, while the symmetric part of rotation gradient cannot induce polarization in isotropic dielectrics. The electrostatic stress is obtained naturally in the governing equations and boundary conditions in terms of the variational principle, which is composed of two parts: the Maxwell stress corresponding to the polarization and the remainder relating to the polarization gradient. The current theory is able to account for the effects of size, direct and inverse flexoelectricities, and electrostatic force. To illustrate this theory, a simple application of Bernoulli–Euler cantilever beam is discussed. The numerical results demonstrate neither the higher-order constant l 1 nor the higher-order constant l 2 associated with the symmetric and anti-symmetric parts of rotation gradient, respectively, can be ignored in the flexoelectric theory. In addition, the induced deflection increases as the increase of the flexoelectric coefficient. The polarization is no longer constant and the potential is no longer linear along the thickness direction of beam because of the influence of polarization gradient. (paper)

  6. Thermodynamic effect of elastic stress on grain boundary segregation of phosphorus in a low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Lei; Lejček, Pavel; Song, Shenhua; Schmitz, Guido; Meng, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Grain boundary (GB) segregation of P in 2.25Cr1Mo steel induced by elastic stress shows that the P equilibrium concentration, after reaching the non-equilibrium concentration maximum at critical time, returns to its initial thermal equilibrium level. This finding confirms the interesting phenomenon that the effect of elastic stress on GB segregation of P is significant in kinetics while slight in thermodynamics. Through extending the “pressure” in classical theory of chemical potential to the “elastic stress”, the thermodynamic effect of elastic stress on GB segregation is studied, and the relationship between elastic stress and segregation Gibbs energy is formulated. The formulas reveal that the difference in the segregation Gibbs energy between the elastically-stressed and non-stressed states depends on the excess molar volume of GB segregation and the magnitude of elastic stress. Model calculations in segregation Gibbs energy confirm that the effect of elastic stress on the thermodynamics of equilibrium GB segregation is slight, and the theoretical analyses considerably agree with the experimental results. The confirmation indicates that the nature of the thermodynamic effect is well captured. - Highlights: • GB segregation of P after stress aging returns to its initial thermal equilibrium level. • Relationship between elastic stress and segregation energy is formulated. • Thermodynamic effect relies on excess molar volume and magnitude of elastic stress. • Effect of elastic stress on Gibbs energy of GB segregation is estimated to be slight. • Complete theory of the effect of elastic stress on grain boundary segregation is setup

  7. Double dividend effectiveness of energy tax policies and the elasticity of substitution: A CGE appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancho, Ferran

    2010-01-01

    There is a considerable body of literature that has studied whether or not an adequately designed tax swap, whereby an ecotax is levied and some other tax is reduced while keeping government income constant, may achieve a so-called double dividend, that is, an increase in environmental quality and an increase in overall efficiency. Arguments in favor and against are abundant. Our position is that the issue should be empirically studied starting from an actual, non-optimal tax system structure and by way of checking the responsiveness of equilibria to revenue neutral tax regimes under alternate scenarios regarding technological substitution. With the use of a CGE model, we find that the most critical elasticity for achieving a double dividend is the substitution elasticity between labor and capital whereas the elasticity that would generate the highest reduction in carbon dioxide emissions is the substitution elasticity among energy goods.

  8. Double dividend effectiveness of energy tax policies and the elasticity of substitution. A CGE appraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancho, Ferran [Departament d' Economia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193-Bellaterra (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    There is a considerable body of literature that has studied whether or not an adequately designed tax swap, whereby an ecotax is levied and some other tax is reduced while keeping government income constant, may achieve a so-called double dividend, that is, an increase in environmental quality and an increase in overall efficiency. Arguments in favor and against are abundant. Our position is that the issue should be empirically studied starting from an actual, non-optimal tax system structure and by way of checking the responsiveness of equilibria to revenue neutral tax regimes under alternate scenarios regarding technological substitution. With the use of a CGE model, we find that the most critical elasticity for achieving a double dividend is the substitution elasticity between labor and capital whereas the elasticity that would generate the highest reduction in carbon dioxide emissions is the substitution elasticity among energy goods. (author)

  9. Effective elastic modulus of isolated gecko setal arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, K; Majidi, C; Groff, R E; Dittmore, A; Fearing, R

    2006-09-01

    Conventional pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are fabricated from soft viscoelastic materials that satisfy Dahlquist's criterion for tack with a Young's modulus (E) of 100 kPa or less at room temperature and 1 Hz. In contrast, the adhesive on the toes of geckos is made of beta-keratin, a stiff material with E at least four orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of Dahlquist's criterion. Therefore, one would not expect a beta-keratin structure to function as a PSA by deforming readily to make intimate molecular contact with a variety of surface profiles. However, since the gecko adhesive is a microstructure in the form of an array of millions of high aspect ratio shafts (setae), the effective elastic modulus (E(eff)) is much lower than E of bulk beta-keratin. In the first test of the E(eff) of a gecko setal adhesive, we measured the forces resulting from deformation of isolated arrays of tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) setae during vertical compression, and during tangential compression at angles of +45 degrees and -45 degrees . We tested the hypothesis that E(eff) of gecko setae falls within Dahlquist's criterion for tack, and evaluated the validity of a model of setae as cantilever beams. Highly linear forces of deformation under all compression conditions support the cantilever model. E(eff) of setal arrays during vertical and +45 degrees compression (along the natural path of drag of the setae) were 83+/-4.0 kPa and 86+/-4.4 kPa (means +/- s.e.m.), respectively. Consistent with the predictions of the cantilever model, setae became significantly stiffer when compressed against the natural path of drag: E(eff) during -45 degrees compression was 110+/-4.7 kPa. Unlike synthetic PSAs, setal arrays act as Hookean elastic solids; setal arrays function as a bed of springs with a directional stiffness, assisting alignment of the adhesive spatular tips with the contact surface during shear loading.

  10. Pressure effect on the structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of the Zintl phase KAsSn, first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guechi, A., E-mail: ab_guechi@yahoo.fr [Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Setif-1 University, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Laboratory of Optoelectronics and Components, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Setif-1 University, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Merabet, A. [Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Setif-1 University, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Laboratory of Physics and Mechanics of Metallic Materials, Setif-1 University, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Chegaar, M. [Laboratory of Optoelectronics and Components, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Setif-1 University, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Bouhemadou, A. [Laboratory for Developing New Materials and their Characterization, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Setif-1 University, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Guechi, N. [Laboratory for Developing New Materials and their Characterization, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Setif-1 University, 19000 Setif (Algeria)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • KAsSn is interesting in the materials community due to its complex structure and narrow gap. • Physical properties of KAsSn have not taken much attention in previous studies. • The KAsSn structure is shown to be mechanically stable. • KAsSn is predicted to be brittleness and characterized by a weak elastic anisotropy. • Its high absorption in the U.V. energy range shows its use in the optoelectronic devices. - Abstract: In this work, a first-principles study of ternary Zintl phase KAsSn compound using density-functional theory (DFT) method within the generalized gradient approximation developed by Wu–Cohen (GGA-Wc) has been performed. Based on the optimized structural parameter, the electronic structure, elastic and optical properties have been investigated. The calculated lattice constants agree reasonably with the previous results. The effect of high pressure on the structural parameters has been shown. The elastic constants were calculated and satisfy the stability conditions for hexagonal crystal. These indicate that this compound is stable in the studied pressure regime. The single crystal elastic constants (C{sub ij}) and related properties are calculated using the static finite strain technique, moreover the polycrystalline elastic moduli such as bulk modulus, shear modulus, micro-hardness parameter H{sub ν}, Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio were estimated using Voigt, Reuss and Hill’s (VRH) approximations. The elastic anisotropy of the KAsSn was also analyzed. On another hand the Debye temperature was obtained from the average sound velocity. Electronic properties have been studied throughout the calculation of band structure, density of states and charge densities. It is shown that this crystal belongs to the semiconductors with a pseudo gap of about 0.34 eV. Furthermore, in order to clarify the optical transitions of this compound, linear optical functions including the complex dielectric function, refractive index

  11. Surface effects on anti-plane shear waves propagating in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Chunli; Chen, Weiqiu; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    Material surfaces may have a remarkable effect on the mechanical behavior of magneto-electro-elastic (or multiferroic) structures at nanoscale. In this paper, a surface magneto-electro-elasticity theory (or effective boundary condition formulation), which governs the motion of the material surface of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, is established by employing the state-space formalism. The properties of anti-plane shear (SH) waves propagating in a transversely isotropic magneto-electro-elastic plate with nanothickness are investigated by taking surface effects into account. The size-dependent dispersion relations of both antisymmetric and symmetric SH waves are presented. The thickness-shear frequencies and the asymptotic characteristics of the dispersion relations considering surface effects are determined analytically as well. Numerical results show that surface effects play a very pronounced role in elastic wave propagation in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, and the dispersion properties depend strongly on the chosen surface material parameters of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates. As a consequence, it is possible to modulate the waves in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates through surface engineering. (paper)

  12. The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Shen, Y P; Du, J K

    2008-01-01

    The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures is investigated in this paper. The coupled magneto-electro-elastic field equations are solved by adopting the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) approximate approach. Then the phase velocity can be calculated by applying boundary and continuity conditions. A specific example of a structure consisting of a CoFe 2 O 4 layer and a BaTiO 3 substrate is used to illustrate the influence of inhomogeneous initial stress on the phase velocity, corresponding coupled magneto-electric factor and stress fields. The different influence between constant initial stress and inhomogeneous initial stress is discussed and the results are expected to be helpful for the preparation and application of Love wave sensors

  13. Correction for Poisson's effect in an elastic analysis of low cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.; Moulin, D.

    1984-05-01

    Fatigue behaviour is essentially dependent on the real strain range, but the current practice is the use of elastic analysis. In low cycle fatigue conditions where inelastic strains predominate, elastic analysis never gives the real value of the strain range. In order to use these results some corrections are necessary. One of these corrections is due to the Poisson's effect (the Poisson ratio in inelastic behaviour is higher than in elastic behaviour). In this paper a method of correction of this effect is proposed. It consists in multiplying the results of the elastic analysis by a coefficient called Kν. A method to draw curves giving this coefficient Kν as a function of results of elastic analysis is developped. Only simple analytical computations using the unixial cyclic curve are needed to draw these curves. Examples are given. The proposed method is very convenient and low cost effective [fr

  14. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.

    2013-08-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member 'hard' (HRM) and a 'soft' (SRM) rheology models of the continental crust. Temperature within the lithosphere has been estimated using a recent tomography model of Ritsema et al. (2011), which has much higher horizontal resolution than previous global models. Most of the strength is localized in the crust for the HRM and in the mantle for the SRM. These results contribute to the long debates on applicability of the "crème brulée" or "jelly-sandwich" model for the lithosphere structure. Changing from the SRM to HRM turns most of the continental areas from the totally decoupled mode to the fully coupled mode of the lithospheric layers. However, in the areas characterized by a high thermal regime and thick crust, the layers remain decoupled even for the HRM. At the same time, for the inner part of the cratons the lithospheric layers are coupled in both models. Therefore, rheological variations lead to large changes in the integrated strength and Te distribution in the regions characterized by intermediate thermal conditions. In these areas temperature uncertainties have a greater effect, since this parameter principally determines rheological behavior. Comparison of the Te estimates for both models with those determined from the flexural loading and spectral analysis shows that the 'hard' rheology is likely applicable for cratonic areas, whereas the 'soft' rheology is more representative for young orogens.

  15. ELASTICITY of SHORT FIBRE REINFORCED POLYAMIDE: MORPHOLOGICAL AND NUMERICAl ANALYSIS OF FIBRE ORIENTATION EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cosmi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behaviour of injection moulded short fibre reinforced polymers depends upon fibre orientation, as shown in experiments conducted with notched specimens injected through different injection gates. The different fatigue behaviour is mainly related to the different local elastic properties, as determined by the different fibre orientation patterns, resulting into different strain distributions. In order to quantify the relationship between fibre orientation and elastic constants, the Cell Method was applied to volumes extracted from the specimens, reconstructed by micro-tomography.

  16. Effects of configuration mixing in heavy-ion elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Bondi, M.; Nicoloso, D.; Tropea, S.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Chamon, L.C.; Gasques, L.R.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; De Napoli, M.; Nunes Garcia, V.; Paes, B.; Foti, A.

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical study of the influence of configuration mixing on elastic scattering cross section is performed for the system 16 O + 27 Al at 100 MeV. A simple two-state model space, including the 27 Al 5/2 + ground and 5/2 + excited state at 2.73 MeV, is used in the coupled channel equations. The results indicate that even a weak degree of mixing is able to sizeably affect the elastic cross section, determining mainly a damping of Fraunhofer oscillations, as observed in the experiments. (authors)

  17. Effective material parameter retrieval of anisotropic elastic metamaterials with inherent nonlocality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung Jin; Lee, Heung Son; Ma, Pyung Sik; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the scattering (S-) parameter retrieval method is presented specifically for anisotropic elastic metamaterials; so far, no retrieval has been accomplished when elastic metamaterials exhibit fully anisotropic behavior. Complex constitutive property and intrinsic scattering behavior of elastic metamaterials make their characterization far more complicated than that for acoustic and electromagnetic metamaterials. In particular, elastic metamaterials generally exhibit anisotropic scattering behavior due to higher scattering modes associated with shear deformation. They also exhibit nonlocal responses to some degrees, which originate from strong multiple scattering interactions even in the long wavelength limit. Accordingly, the conventional S-parameter retrieval methods cannot be directly used for elastic metamaterials, because they determine only the diagonal components in effective tensor property. Also, the conventional methods simply use the analytic inversion formulae for the material characterization so that inherent nonlocality cannot be taken into account. To establish a retrieval method applicable to anisotropic elastic metamaterials, we propose an alternative S-parameter method to deal with full anisotropy of elastic metamaterials. To retrieve the whole effective anisotropic parameter, we utilize not only normal but also oblique wave incidences. For the retrieval, we first retrieve the ratio of the effective stiffness tensor to effective density and then determine the effective density. The proposed retrieval method is validated by characterizing the effective material parameters of various types of non-resonant anisotropic metamaterials. It is found that the whole effective parameters are retrieved consistently regardless of used retrieval conditions in spite of inherent nonlocality.

  18. On the evaluation of temperature dependence of elastic constants of martensitic phases in shape memory alloys from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, Michal; Sedlák, Petr; Šittner, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Heller, Luděk

    481-482, - (2008), s. 567-573 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/0768 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : modal resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * elastic properties * shape memory alloy s Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  19. Elasticity theory of ultrathin nanofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiangang; Yun, Guohong; Narsu, B; Yao, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    A self-consistent theoretical scheme for describing the elastic behavior of ultrathin nanofilms (UTNFs) was proposed. Taking into account the lower symmetry of an UTNF compared to its bulk counterpart, additional elastic and magnetoelastic parameters were introduced to model the elasticity rigorously. The applications of current theory to several elastic and magnetoelastic systems gave excellent agreement with experiments. More importantly, the surface elastic and magnetoelastic parameters used to fit the experimental results are physically reasonable and in close agreement with those obtained from experiment and simulation. This fact suggests that the additional elastic (magnetoelastic) constants due to symmetry breaking are of great importance in theoretical description of the mechanical properties of UTNFs. And we proved that the elasticity of UTNFs should be described by a three-dimensional model just including the intrinsic surface and bulk parameters, but not the effective surface parameters. It is believed that the theory reported here is a universal strategy for elasticity and magnetoelasticity of ultrathin films. (paper)

  20. Muscle activity during leg strengthening exercise using free weights and elastic resistance: effects of ballistic vs controlled contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2013-02-01

    The present study's aim was to evaluate muscle activity during leg exercises using elastic vs. isoinertial resistance at different exertion and loading levels, respectively. Twenty-four women and eighteen men aged 26-67 years volunteered to participate in the experiment. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in nine muscles during a standardized forward lunge movement performed with dumbbells and elastic bands during (1) ballistic vs. controlled exertion, and (2) at low, medium and high loads (33%, 66% and 100% of 10 RM, respectively). The recorded EMG signals were normalized to MVC EMG. Knee joint angle was measured using electronic inclinometers. The following results were obtained. Loading intensity affected EMG amplitude in the order: lowBallistic contractions always produced greater EMG activity than slow controlled contractions, and for most muscles ballistic contractions with medium load showed similar EMG amplitude as controlled contractions with high load. At flexed knee joint positions with elastic resistance, quadriceps and gluteus EMG amplitude during medium-load ballistic contractions exceeded that recorded during high-load controlled contractions. Quadriceps and gluteus EMG amplitude increased at flexed knee positions. In contrast, hamstrings EMG amplitude remained constant throughout ROM during dumbbell lunge, but increased at more extended knee joint positions during lunges using elastic resistance. Based on these results, it can be concluded that lunges performed using medium-load ballistic muscle contractions may induce similar or even higher leg muscle activity than lunges using high-load slow-speed contractions. Consequently, lunges using elastic resistance appear to be equally effective in inducing high leg muscle activity as traditional lunges using isoinertial resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of elastic anisotropy of crystal grain on stress intensity factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2002-01-01

    The stress intensity factor (SIF) is used widely for evaluating integrity of cracked components. Usually, the SIF obtained under isotropic elastic conditions is used for the evaluations. Although, macroscopic elastic behaviors of polycrystal materials can be considered isotropic, each crystal has anisotropic elastic properties. This implies that if the crack size is small and the influence of anisotropic elastic properties on the stress around cracks is significant, the SIF evaluated under anisotropic elastic conditions may differ from the SIF obtained under isotropic elastic conditions. In the present study, the effect of anisotropic elasticity on the SIF was evaluated by using the finite element analysis (FEA). First, the SIF of semi-circular cracks located in a single crystal was evaluated. It was found that the SIF is affected crystal orientation. Secondly, FEA using a polycrystal model was performed. It was found that the change in the SIF was caused by crack tip crystal orientation as well as the deformation constraint from neighboring crystals. Finally, the statistical tendency of change in the SIF caused by the anisotropic elastic properties and the relationship with crack size were examined. The influence of the local SIF on crack growth behavior is also discussed. (author)

  2. Effect of elastic anisotropy of crystal grain on stress intensity factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamaya, Masayuki [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    The stress intensity factor (SIF) is used widely for evaluating integrity of cracked components. Usually, the SIF obtained under isotropic elastic conditions is used for the evaluations. Although, macroscopic elastic behaviors of polycrystal materials can be considered isotropic, each crystal has anisotropic elastic properties. This implies that if the crack size is small and the influence of anisotropic elastic properties on the stress around cracks is significant, the SIF evaluated under anisotropic elastic conditions may differ from the SIF obtained under isotropic elastic conditions. In the present study, the effect of anisotropic elasticity on the SIF was evaluated by using the finite element analysis (FEA). First, the SIF of semi-circular cracks located in a single crystal was evaluated. It was found that the SIF is affected crystal orientation. Secondly, FEA using a polycrystal model was performed. It was found that the change in the SIF was caused by crack tip crystal orientation as well as the deformation constraint from neighboring crystals. Finally, the statistical tendency of change in the SIF caused by the anisotropic elastic properties and the relationship with crack size were examined. The influence of the local SIF on crack growth behavior is also discussed. (author)

  3. Pressure effect on structural, elastic, and thermodynamic properties of tetragonal B4C4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baobing Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The compressibility, elastic anisotropy, and thermodynamic properties of the recently proposed tetragonal B4C4 (t-B4C4 are investigated under high temperature and high pressure by using of first-principles calculations method. The elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Vickers hardness, Pugh’s modulus ratio, and Poisson’s ratio for t-B4C4 under various pressures are systematically explored, the obtained results indicate that t-B4C4 is a stiffer material. The elastic anisotropies of t-B4C4 are discussed in detail under pressure from 0 GPa to 100 GPa. The thermodynamic properties of t-B4C4, such as Debye temperature, heat capacity, and thermal expansion coefficient are investigated by the quasi-harmonic Debye model.

  4. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiraouani Boucetta K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenza Qiraouani Boucetta,1 Zoubida Charrouf,2 Hassan Aguenaou,3 Abdelfattah Derouiche,4 Yahya Bensouda1 1Research Team on Formulation and Biopharmacy, Research Center for Drug, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco; 2Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco; 3Mixed Unit of Research in Nutrition, ITU / CNESTEN, Ibn Tofail University, Kenitra, Morocco; 4Faculty of Sciences, Hassan II University, Casablanca, Morocco Background: During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity.Materials and methods: Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group of 30 participants received dietary argan oil, the control group of 30 participants received olive oil, and both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a 60-day period. Assessments of skin elasticity parameters, ie, the three R-parameters (R2 or gross-elasticity of the skin, R5 or net elasticity of the skin, and R7 or biological elasticity, and the resonance running time (RRT at both volar forearms of the two groups were performed during three visits: before starting oils consumption and application, after 30 days of oils consumption and application, and after 60 days of oils consumption and application.Results: The consumption of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2 (P<0.001, net elasticity of the skin (R5 (P<0.001, biological elasticity (R7 (P<0.001, and a significant decrease of RRT (P=0.002. The application of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2 (P<0.001, net

  5. The effective dielectric constant of plasmas - A mean field theory built from the electromagnetic ionic T-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niez, Jean-Jacques

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to obtain the effective dielectric constant tensor of a warm plasma in the spirit of the derivation of a mixing law. The medium is made of non point-like ions immersed in an electron gas with usual conditions relating the various lengths which define the problem. In this paper the ion dielectric constants are taken from their RPA responses as developed in a previous paper [1]. Furthermore the treatment of the screening effects is made through a mathematical redefinition of the initial problem as proposed in Ref. [1]. Here the complete calculation of the T-matrix describing the scattering of an electromagnetic wave on an isolated ion immersed in an 'effective medium' is given. It is used for building , in the spirit of a mixing law, a self-consistent effective medium theory for the plasma dielectric tensor. We then extend the results obtained in Ref. [1] to higher orders in ion or dielectric inclusion densities. The techniques presented are generic and can be used in areas such as elasticity, thermoelasticity, and piezoelectricity.

  6. Bilateral Trade Elasticity of Serbia: Is There a J-Curve Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safet Kurtovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the bilateral elasticity effect of real exchange rate depreciation on the export and import demand functions of Serbia and its nine leading trade partners. Analysing quarterly data for the 2004-2015 period, we find the presence of a J-curve effect in the cases of Germany, Austria and Croatia. In contrast, we find that the Marshall-Lerner conditions are fulfilled in the case of bilateral trade with Austria. Finally, in our estimates the elasticity to income has a greater impact on the export and import demand functions than the elasticity to the exchange rate. JEL Classification: F14, F31, F32

  7. Effect of elastic and plastic tensile mechanical loading on the magnetic properties of NGO electrical steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuning, N., E-mail: nora.leuning@iem.rwth-aachen.de [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Steentjes, S. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Schulte, M.; Bleck, W. [Steel Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Hameyer, K. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic properties of non-grain-oriented (NGO) electrical steels are highly susceptible to mechanical stresses, i.e., residual, external or thermal ones. For rotating electrical machines, mechanical stresses are inevitable and originate from different sources, e.g., material processing, machine manufacturing and operating conditions. The efficiency and specific losses are largely altered by different mechanical stress states. In this paper the effect of tensile stresses and plastic deformations on the magnetic properties of a 2.9 wt% Si electrical steel are studied. Particular attention is paid to the effect of magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the influence of the direction of applied mechanical stress with respect to the rolling direction. Due to mechanical stress, the induced anisotropy has to be evaluated as it is related to the stress-dependent magnetostriction constant and the grain alignment. - Highlights: • A detailed look at magnetic anisotropy of FeSi NGO electrical steel. • Study of magnetic behavior under elastic as well as plastic tensile stresses. • Correlation of magnetic behavior with microscopic deformation mechanisms. • Discussion of detrimental and beneficial effects of external stresses. • Loss separation at different polarizations and frequencies under increasing stress.

  8. Effect of elastic and plastic tensile mechanical loading on the magnetic properties of NGO electrical steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuning, N.; Steentjes, S.; Schulte, M.; Bleck, W.; Hameyer, K.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties of non-grain-oriented (NGO) electrical steels are highly susceptible to mechanical stresses, i.e., residual, external or thermal ones. For rotating electrical machines, mechanical stresses are inevitable and originate from different sources, e.g., material processing, machine manufacturing and operating conditions. The efficiency and specific losses are largely altered by different mechanical stress states. In this paper the effect of tensile stresses and plastic deformations on the magnetic properties of a 2.9 wt% Si electrical steel are studied. Particular attention is paid to the effect of magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the influence of the direction of applied mechanical stress with respect to the rolling direction. Due to mechanical stress, the induced anisotropy has to be evaluated as it is related to the stress-dependent magnetostriction constant and the grain alignment. - Highlights: • A detailed look at magnetic anisotropy of FeSi NGO electrical steel. • Study of magnetic behavior under elastic as well as plastic tensile stresses. • Correlation of magnetic behavior with microscopic deformation mechanisms. • Discussion of detrimental and beneficial effects of external stresses. • Loss separation at different polarizations and frequencies under increasing stress.

  9. Effect of pressure variation on structural, elastic, mechanical, optoelectronic and thermodynamic properties of SrNaF3 fluoroperovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erum, Nazia; Azhar Iqbal, Muhammad

    2017-12-01

    The effect of pressure variation on structural, electronic, elastic, mechanical, optical and thermodynamic characteristics of cubic SrNaF3 fluoroperovskite have been investigated by employing first-principles method within the framework of gradient approximation (GGA). For the total energy calculations, we have used the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. Thermodynamic properties are computed in terms of quasi-harmonic Debye model. The pressure effects are determined in the range of 0-25 GPa, in which mechanical stability of SrNaF3 fluoroperovskite remains valid. A prominent decrease in lattice constant and bonds length is observed with the increase in pressure from 0 to 25 GPa. The effect of increase in pressure on band structure calculations with GGA and GGA plus Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential reveals a predominant characteristic associated with widening of bandgap. The influence of pressure on set of isotropic elastic parameters and their related properties are numerically estimated for SrNaF3 polycrystalline aggregate. Apart of linear dependence of elastic coefficients, transition from brittle to ductile behavior is observed as pressure is increased from 0 to 25 GPa. We have successfully obtained variation of lattice constant, volume expansion, bulk modulus, Debye temperature and specific heat capacities with pressure and temperature in the range of 0-25 GPa and 0-600 K. All the calculated optical properties such as the complex dielectric function ɛ(ω), optical conductivity σ(ω), energy loss function L(ω), absorption coefficient α(w), refractive index n(ω), reflectivity R(ω), and effective number of electrons n eff, via sum rules shift towards the higher energies under the application of pressure.

  10. A new dimension to relative age effects: constant year effects in German youth handball.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schorer

    Full Text Available In this manuscript we argue for a broader use of the term 'relative age effect' due to the influence of varying development policies on the development of sport expertise. Two studies are presented on basis of data from Schorer, et al. [1]. The first showed clear 'constant year effects' in the German handball talent development system. A shift in year groupings for the female athletes resulted in a clear shift of birth year patterns. In the second study we investigated whether the constant year effect in the national talent development system carried over to professional handball. No patterns were observable. Together both studies show that a differentiation of varying effects that often happen simultaneously is necessary to understand the secondary mechanisms behind the development of sport expertise.

  11. Effective optical constants and effective optical properties of ultrathin trilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haija, A.J.; Larry Freeman, W.; Umbel, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    This work presents an extension of the characteristic effective medium approximation (CEMA) to ultrathin trilayer systems. The extension has been carried out analytically and is supported by corresponding calculations of the effective optical constants of Cu-Au-Cu and Ag-SiO-Ag trilayer systems using the CEMA approximation. This work is in essence a generalization of the characteristic effective medium approximation introduced earlier for ultrathin bilayer structures. This method is used to derive the effective optical constants of a trilayer system, consisting of three thin layers with each constituent layer of thickness much less than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Within this regime a trilayer system is viewed as one effective layer referred to as an effective stack (ES) with well defined effective optical constants, which can be used to calculate the optical properties of the trilayer stack within a specified wavelength range. The CEMA based calculations of the effective optical constants are applied to two trilayer systems with a total of five stacks. Three are Cu-Au-Cu and two are Ag-SiO-Ag stacks. The thicknesses of the parent layers in the Cu-Au-Cu stack range from 3 to 30 nm for Cu and 4 to 40 nm for Au; in the Ag-SiO-Ag stack the constituent layers are 6 nm for Ag, but range from 5 to 10 nm for SiO. This study is for normal or near normal incidence spectroscopy in a wavelength range that extends from visible to near infrared. The agreement between CEMA based ES stack results and those of the standard CMT technique is very satisfactory.

  12. Effective elasticity coefficients of native rocks and consolidated granular matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Beatrix M.; Schulz, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The elastic coefficients of binary heterogeneous materials, such as several native rock materials or consolidated granular matter will be determined in terms of a perturbation expansion. Furthermore, in order to check the validity of the obtained results, these are compared with numerical investigations using Boole's model of randomly distributed spheres. Finally, we apply the results on several classes of native rocks and consolidated granular materials

  13. Effects of Constant Flow vs. Constant Pressure Perfusion on Fluid Filtration in Severe Hypothermic Isolated Blood-Perfused Rat Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsøy, Kathrine; Kondratiev, Timofey; Tveita, Torkjel; Bjertnaes, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Victims of severe accidental hypothermia are prone to fluid extravasation but rarely develop lung edema. We hypothesize that combined hypothermia-induced increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and a concomitant fall in cardiac output protect the lungs against edema development. Our aim was to explore in hypothermic-isolated blood-perfused rat lungs whether perfusion at constant pressure influences fluid filtration differently from perfusion at constant flow. Isolated blood-perfused rat lungs were hanging freely in a weight transducer for measuring weight changes (ΔW). Fluid filtration coefficient (Kfc), was determined by transiently elevating left atrial pressure (Pla) by 5.8 mmHg two times each during normothermia (37°C) and during hypothermia (15°C). The lung preparations were randomized to two groups. One group was perfused with constant flow (Constant flow group) and the other group with constant pulmonary artery pressure (Constant PPA group). Microvascular pressure (Pmv) was determined before and during elevation of Pla (ΔPmv) by means of the double occlusion technique. Kfc was calculated with the formula Kfc = ΔW/ΔPmv/min. All Kfc values were normalized to predicted lung weight (P LW ), which was based on body weight (BW) according to the formula: P LW  = 0.0053 BW - 0.48 and presented as Kfc PLW in mg/min/mmHg/g. At cessation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid/perfusate protein concentration (B/P) ratio was determined photometrically. Data were analyzed with parametric or non-parametric tests as appropriate. p  Kfc PLW and B/P ratio increased significantly by more than 10-fold during hypothermia concerted by visible signs of edema in the trachea. Hemoglobin and hematocrit increased within the Constant flow group and between the groups at cessation of the experiments. In hypothermic rat lungs perfused at constant flow, fluid filtration coefficient per gram P LW and B/P ratio increased more than 10-fold concerted by increased

  14. Investigation of the effects of constant darkness and light on blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of constant darkness and light on changes of serum cholesterol, insulin and glucose levels in healthy male rats. In this study, healthy male rats (n = 30) were divided into 3 groups of tens and kept at various light/dark conditions: Control 12:12 light/dark (LD); constant ...

  15. Effects of Density-Dependent Bag Constant and Strange Star Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiao-Er; GUO Hua

    2003-01-01

    With the emphasis on the effects of the density-dependent bag constant and the rotation of strange star the limiting mass of strange star is calculated. The obtained results show that the limiting mass and the corresponding radius of strange star increase as the rotation frequency increases, and tend to be lowered when the density-dependent bag constant is considered.

  16. Simple theory of the inverse Faraday effect with relationship to optical constants N and K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    The inverse Faraday effect in general materials is theoretically investigated based on the classical motion of an electron. It is shown that the inverse Faraday effect is simply and explicitly expressed in terms of optical constants N and K, i.e., the real and imaginary parts of complex refractive index of materials. The derived new formula provides a good physical perspective for the inverse Faraday effect and enables its easy quantitative evaluation from familiar optical constants. - Highlights: → The theory of the inverse Faraday effect in general materials is presented based on the classical motion model of electron. → The simple relationship between optical constants of materials and the inverse Faraday effect is given. → The given new formula enables easy quantitative evaluation of the inverse Faraday effect from known optical constants.

  17. A New Dimension to Relative Age Effects: Constant Year Effects in German Youth Handball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorer, Jörg; Wattie, Nick; Baker, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript we argue for a broader use of the term ‘relative age effect’ due to the influence of varying development policies on the development of sport expertise. Two studies are presented on basis of data from Schorer, et al. [1]. The first showed clear ‘constant year effects’ in the German handball talent development system. A shift in year groupings for the female athletes resulted in a clear shift of birth year patterns. In the second study we investigated whether the constant year effect in the national talent development system carried over to professional handball. No patterns were observable. Together both studies show that a differentiation of varying effects that often happen simultaneously is necessary to understand the secondary mechanisms behind the development of sport expertise. PMID:23637745

  18. Finite-thickness effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in accelerated elastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, S. A.; Piriz, A. R.; Tahir, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    A physical model has been developed for the linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a finite-thickness elastic slab laying on top of a semi-infinite ideal fluid. The model includes the nonideal effects of elasticity as boundary conditions at the top and bottom interfaces of the slab and also takes into account the finite transit time of the elastic waves across the slab thickness. For Atwood number AT=1 , the asymptotic growth rate is found to be in excellent agreement with the exact solution [Plohr and Sharp, Z. Angew. Math. Mech. 49, 786 (1998), 10.1007/s000330050121], and a physical explanation is given for the reduction of the stabilizing effectiveness of the elasticity for the thinner slabs. The feedthrough factor is also calculated.

  19. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry’s constants – separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Comber, Mike

    Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relative to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Water phase biodegradation rate constants, kwater, were up to 72 times higher than test system...

  20. Nonlinear Elasticity of Borocarbide Superconductor YNi2B2C: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available First-principles calculations combined with homogeneous deformation methods are used to investigate the second- and third-order elastic constants of YNi2B2C with tetragonal structure. The predicted lattice constants and second-order elastic constants of YNi2B2C agree well with the available data. The effective second-order elastic constants are obtained from the second- and third-order elastic constants for YNi2B2C. Based on the effective second-order elastic constants, Pugh’s modulus ratio, Poisson’s ratio, and Vickers hardness of YNi2B2C under high pressure are further investigated. It is shown that the ductility of YNi2B2C increases with increasing pressure.

  1. First-principles calculation of the elastic constants, the electronic density of states and the ductility mechanism of the intermetallic compounds: YAg, YCu and YRh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yurong [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiantang 411201 (China); Hu Wangyu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: wangyuhu2001cn@yahoo.com.cn; Han Shaochang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2008-10-01

    First-principles calculations have been used to study the elastic and electronic properties of ductility rare-earth alloy YM (M=Ag, Cu, Rh) systems. The ductility mechanism for these alloys is studied from microscopic aspect, via electronic density of states (DOS). The Fermi energy lies near a local minimum, and the hybridization is stronger than that of the common NiAl alloy, demonstrating that the ductility of these alloys is much better than that of NiAl alloy. Elastic modulus, namely, shear modulus C'=(C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, bulk modulus B and C{sub 44} are calculated by volume-conserving orthorhombic, hydrostatic pressure and tri-axial shear strain, respectively. Moreover, lattice parameters, antiphase boundary (APB) energies and unstable stacking fault energies of these alloys are also studied. The APB energies are greater than the unstable stacking fault energies for these alloy systems, and this is a characteristic of the ductility rare-earth alloy. The APB energies of YRh are the highest ones in these three YM alloys, which make dislocation dissociation difficult. The DOS and APB energy results show that the ductility of YRh may be worst in these three YM systems.

  2. First-principles calculation of the elastic constants, the electronic density of states and the ductility mechanism of the intermetallic compounds: YAg, YCu and YRh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yurong; Hu Wangyu; Han Shaochang

    2008-01-01

    First-principles calculations have been used to study the elastic and electronic properties of ductility rare-earth alloy YM (M=Ag, Cu, Rh) systems. The ductility mechanism for these alloys is studied from microscopic aspect, via electronic density of states (DOS). The Fermi energy lies near a local minimum, and the hybridization is stronger than that of the common NiAl alloy, demonstrating that the ductility of these alloys is much better than that of NiAl alloy. Elastic modulus, namely, shear modulus C'=(C 11 -C 12 )/2, bulk modulus B and C 44 are calculated by volume-conserving orthorhombic, hydrostatic pressure and tri-axial shear strain, respectively. Moreover, lattice parameters, antiphase boundary (APB) energies and unstable stacking fault energies of these alloys are also studied. The APB energies are greater than the unstable stacking fault energies for these alloy systems, and this is a characteristic of the ductility rare-earth alloy. The APB energies of YRh are the highest ones in these three YM alloys, which make dislocation dissociation difficult. The DOS and APB energy results show that the ductility of YRh may be worst in these three YM systems

  3. Atomistic calculation of size effects on elastic coefficients in nanometre-sized tungsten layers and wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, P.; Beauchamp, P.; Badawi, K.F.; Goudeau, P.; Renault, P.-O.

    2004-01-01

    Equilibrium state and elastic coefficients of nanometre-sized single crystal tungsten layers and wires are investigated by atomistic simulations. The variations of the equilibrium distances as a function of the layer thickness or wire cross-section are mainly due to elastic effects of surface tension forces. A strong decrease of the Young's modulus is observed when the transverse dimensions are reduced below 2-3 nm

  4. Stress effects on the elastic properties of amorphous polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caponi, S., E-mail: silvia.caponi@cnr.it, E-mail: silvia.corezzi@unipg.it [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR (CNR-IOM) - Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia I-06100 (Italy); Corezzi, S., E-mail: silvia.caponi@cnr.it, E-mail: silvia.corezzi@unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); CNR-ISC (Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi), c/o Università di Roma “LaSapienza,” Piazzale A. Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Mattarelli, M. [NiPS Laboratory, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Fioretto, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06100 Perugia (Italy)

    2014-12-07

    Brillouin light scattering measurements have been used to study the stress induced modification in the elastic properties of two glass forming polymers: polybutadiene and epoxy-amine resin, prototypes of linear and network polymers, respectively. Following the usual thermodynamic path to the glass transition, polybutadiene has been studied as a function of temperature from the liquid well into the glassy phase. In the epoxy resin, the experiments took advantage of the system ability to reach the glass both via the chemical vitrification route, i.e., by increasing the number of covalent bonds among the constituent molecules, as well as via the physical thermal route, i.e., by decreasing the temperature. Independently from the particular way chosen to reach the glassy phase, the measurements reveal the signature of long range tensile stresses development in the glass. The stress presence modifies both the value of the sound velocities and their mutual relationship, so as to break the generalized Cauchy-like relation. In particular, when long range stresses, by improvise sample cracking, are released, the frequency of longitudinal acoustic modes increases more than 10% in polybutadiene and ∼4% in the epoxy resin. The data analysis suggests the presence of at least two different mechanisms acting on different length scales which strongly affect the overall elastic behaviour of the systems: (i) the development of tensile stress acting as a negative pressure and (ii) the development of anisotropy which increases its importance deeper and deeper in the glassy state.

  5. Testing for constant nonparametric effects in general semiparametric regression models with interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Jiawei; Carroll, Raymond J.; Maity, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work

  6. An Effective Way to Control Numerical Instability of a Nonordinary State-Based Peridynamic Elastic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The constitutive modeling and numerical implementation of a nonordinary state-based peridynamic (NOSB-PD model corresponding to the classical elastic model are presented. Besides, the numerical instability problem of the NOSB-PD model is analyzed, and a penalty method involving the hourglass force is proposed to control the instabilities. Further, two benchmark problems, the static elastic deformation of a simple supported beam and the elastic wave propagation in a two-dimensional rod, are discussed with the present method. It proves that the penalty instability control method is effective in suppressing the displacement oscillations and improving the accuracy of calculated stress fields with a proper hourglass force coefficient, and the NOSB-PD approach with instability control can analyze the problems of structure deformation and elastic wave propagation well.

  7. Importance of elastic finite-size effects: Neutral defects in ionic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, P. A.; Cooper, M. W. D.

    2017-09-01

    Small system sizes are a well-known source of error in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, yet computational constraints frequently dictate the use of small supercells, often as small as 96 atoms in oxides and compound semiconductors. In ionic compounds, electrostatic finite-size effects have been well characterized, but self-interaction of charge-neutral defects is often discounted or assumed to follow an asymptotic behavior and thus easily corrected with linear elastic theory. Here we show that elastic effects are also important in the description of defects in ionic compounds and can lead to qualitatively incorrect conclusions if inadequately small supercells are used; moreover, the spurious self-interaction does not follow the behavior predicted by linear elastic theory. Considering the exemplar cases of metal oxides with fluorite structure, we show that numerous previous studies, employing 96-atom supercells, misidentify the ground-state structure of (charge-neutral) Schottky defects. We show that the error is eliminated by employing larger cells (324, 768, and 1500 atoms), and careful analysis determines that elastic, not electrostatic, effects are responsible. The spurious self-interaction was also observed in nonoxide ionic compounds irrespective of the computational method used, thereby resolving long-standing discrepancies between DFT and force-field methods, previously attributed to the level of theory. The surprising magnitude of the elastic effects is a cautionary tale for defect calculations in ionic materials, particularly when employing computationally expensive methods (e.g., hybrid functionals) or when modeling large defect clusters. We propose two computationally practicable methods to test the magnitude of the elastic self-interaction in any ionic system. In commonly studied oxides, where electrostatic effects would be expected to be dominant, it is the elastic effects that dictate the need for larger supercells: greater than 96 atoms.

  8. Evaluation of crack interaction effect for in-plane surface cracks using elastic finite element analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Nam Su; Choi, Suhn; Park, Keun Bae; Kim, Jong Min; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    The crack-tip stress fields and fracture mechanics assessment parameters, such as the elastic stress intensity factor and the elastic-plastic J-integral, for a surface crack can be significantly affected by adjacent cracks. Such a crack interaction effect due to multiple cracks can magnify the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. There are many factors to be considered, for instance the relative distance between adjacent cracks, crack shape and loading condition, to quantify a crack interaction effect on the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. Thus, the current guidance on a crack interaction effect (crack combination rule), including ASME Sec. XI, BS7910, British Energy R6 and API RP579, provide different rules for combining multiple surface cracks into a single surface crack. The present paper investigates a crack interaction effect by evaluating the elastic stress intensity factor of adjacent surface cracks in a plate along the crack front through detailed 3-dimensional elastic finite element analyses. The effects of the geometric parameters, the relative distance between cracks and the crack shape, on the stress intensity factor are systematically investigated. As for the loading condition, only axial tension is considered. Based on the elastic finite element results, the acceptability of the crack combination rules provided in the existing guidance was investigated, and the relevant recommendations on a crack interaction for in-plane surface cracks in a plate were discussed

  9. [Mediating effect of mental elasticity on occupational stress and depression in female nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Liu, G Z; Zhou, X T; Sheng, P J; Cui, F F; Shi, T

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To investigate the interaction between mental elasticityand occupational stress and depressionin female nurses and the mediating effect of mental elasticity, as well as the functioning way of mental elasticity in occupational stress-depression. Methods: From August to October, 2015, cluster sampling was used to select 122 female nurses in a county-level medical institution as study subjects. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) , Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised Edition (OSI-R) , and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used to collect the data on mental elasticity, occupational stress, and depression and analyze their correlation and mediating effect. Results: The 122 female nurses had a mean mental elasticity score of 62.4±15.1, which was significantly lower than the Chinese norm (65.4±13.9) ( P occupational stress and depression ( r =-0.559 and -0.559, both P Occupational stress and the two subscales mental stress reaction and physical stress reaction were positively correlated with depression ( r =0.774, 0.734, and 0.725, all P occupational stress had a positive predictive effect on depression ( β =0.744, P occupational stress on depression and a significant mediating effect of mental elasticity ( a =-0.527, b =-0.227, c =0.744, c '=0.627; all P occupational stress and depression and can alleviate the adverse effect of occupational stress and reduce the development of depression.

  10. Pricing perpetual American options under multiscale stochastic elasticity of variance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the effects of the stochastic elasticity of variance on perpetual American option. • Our SEV model consists of a fast mean-reverting factor and a slow mean-revering factor. • A slow scale factor has a very significant impact on the option price. • We analyze option price structures through the market prices of elasticity risk. - Abstract: This paper studies pricing the perpetual American options under a constant elasticity of variance type of underlying asset price model where the constant elasticity is replaced by a fast mean-reverting Ornstein–Ulenbeck process and a slowly varying diffusion process. By using a multiscale asymptotic analysis, we find the impact of the stochastic elasticity of variance on the option prices and the optimal exercise prices with respect to model parameters. Our results enhance the existing option price structures in view of flexibility and applicability through the market prices of elasticity risk

  11. Effect of interface/surface stress on the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Jiwei; Liu, Yongquan; Su, Xianyue

    2012-01-01

    In the present Letter, the multiple scattering theory (MST) for calculating the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) is extended to include the interface/surface stress effect at the nanoscale. The interface/surface elasticity theory is employed to describe the nonclassical boundary conditions at the interface/surface and the elastic Mie scattering matrix embodying the interface/surface stress effect is derived. Using this extended MST, the authors investigate the interface/surface stress effect on the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional PCs, which is demonstrated to be significant when the characteristic size reduces to nanometers. -- Highlights: ► Multiple scattering theory including the interface/surface stress effect. ► Interface/surface elasticity theory to describe the nonclassical boundary conditions. ► Elastic Mie scattering matrix embodying the interface/surface stress effect. ► Interface/surface stress effect would be significant at the nanoscale.

  12. Elastic stockings effect on leg volume variability in healthy workers under prolonged gravitational gradient exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Tessari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the elastic stockings effect on healthy workers (HW who are exposed to a prolonged hydrostatic pressure overload for professional reasons. The cohort was composed by 20 HW who voluntarily underwent a water plethysmography test before and after eight hour of standing up in an operating room, wearing elastic stockings. After 8 h of gravity exposure, we demonstrated the absence of leg volume increase in case of elastic stockings use. In the morning measurement we found that the lower limb volume was 1967.5 mL±224, while in the evening it was 1962.5 mL±227 (P<0.0828. The decreased volume is significantly correlated with the time that was spent under gravity forces for working purpose wearing elastic stockings (R2=0.99, P<0.0001. Our experiment demonstrates that elastic stockings may effectively counteract the increased leg volume over time in workers who are exposed to prolonged gravitational gradient. Further longitudinal studies are needed to determine if the above effect could correct one of the major risk factors for the development of chronic venous insufficiency.

  13. Effects of replacing free weights with elastic band resistance in squats on trunk muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeterbakken, Atle H; Andersen, Vidar; Kolnes, Maria K; Fimland, Marius S

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of adding elastic bands to free-weight squats on the neuromuscular activation of core muscles. Twenty-five resistance trained women with 4.6 ± 2.1 years of resistance training experience participated in the study. In randomized order, the participants performed 6 repetition maximum in free-weight squats, with and without elastic bands (i.e., matched relative intensity between exercises). During free-weight squats with elastic bands, some of the free weights were replaced with 2 elastic bands attached to the lowest part of the squat rack. Surface electromyography (EMG) activity was measured from the erector spinae, external oblique, and rectus abdominis, whereas a linear encoder measured the vertical displacement. The EMG activities were compared between the 2 lifting modalities for the whole repetition and separately for the eccentric, concentric, and upper and lower eccentric and concentric phases. In the upper (greatest stretch of the elastic band), middle, and lower positions in squats with elastic bands, the resistance values were approximately 117, 105, and 93% of the free weight-only trial. Similar EMG activities were observed for the 2 lifting modalities for the erector spinae (p = 0.112-0.782), external oblique (p = 0.225-0.977), and rectus abdominis (p = 0.315-0.729) in all analyzed phases. In conclusion, there were no effects on the muscle activity of trunk muscles of substituting some resistance from free weights with elastic bands in the free-weight squat.

  14. The Effect of Substrate Elasticity and Actomyosin Contractility on Different Forms of Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirlis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Substrate mechanical properties have emerged as potent determinants of cell functions and fate. We here tested the hypothesis that different forms of endocytosis are regulated by the elasticity of the synthetic hydrogels cells are cultured on. Towards this objective, we quantified cell-associated fluorescence of the established endocytosis markers transferrin (Tf) and cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) using a flow-cytometry based protocol, and imaged marker internalization using microscopy techniques. Our results demonstrated that clathrin-mediated endocytosis of Tf following a 10-minute incubation with a fibroblast cell line was lower on the softer substrates studied (5 kPa) compared to those with elasticities of 40 and 85 kPa. This effect was cancelled after 1-hour incubation revealing that intracellular accumulation of Tf at this time point did not depend on substrate elasticity. Lipid-raft mediated endocytosis of CTb, on the other hand, was not affected by substrate elasticity in the studied range of time and substrate elasticity. The use of pharmacologic contractility inhibitors revealed inhibition of endocytosis for both Tf and CTb after a 10-minute incubation and a dissimilar effect after 1 hour depending on the inhibitor type. Further, the internalization of fluorescent NPs, used as model drug delivery systems, showed a dependence on substrate elasticity, while transfection efficiency was unaffected by it. Finally, an independence on substrate elasticity of Tf and CTb association with HeLa cells indicated that there are cell-type differences in this respect. Overall, our results suggest that clathrin-mediated but not lipid-raft mediated endocytosis is potentially influenced by substrate mechanics at the cellular level, while intracellular trafficking and accumulation show a more complex dependence. Our findings are discussed in the context of previous work on how substrate mechanics affect the fundamental process of endocytosis and highlight important

  15. Development of ACROSS (Accurately Controlled, Routinely Operated, Signal System) to realize constant monitoring the invisible earth's interiors by means of stationary coherent elastic and electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, Mineo; Kunitomo, Takahiro; Nakajima, Takahiro; Fujii, Naoyuki; Shigeta, Naotaka; Tsuruga, Kayoko; Hasada, Yoko; Nagao, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Junzo

    2007-03-01

    The developmental study made at Tono Geoscience Center under the Earthquake Frontier Research Project since 1996 is reported for a brand new technology system called ACROSS (Accurately Controlled, Routinely Operated, Signal System invented at Kagoya University in 1994). Various technology elements have been combined together under a specific theoretical framework for the underground exploration and monitoring of structures and physical states. The ACROSS is essentially a spectroscopy of the underground space consisted of complex media subjected to environmental noise. The robustness against noise is devised by utilizing coherent elastic and electromagnetic waves with phase controlled very accurately. Demanded hardware technology has been developed successfully and know how has been accumulated for practical applications. Accurate synchronization of transmission and observation systems has provided us with reliable data on the tensor transfer function between the source and receiver, which is equivalent to Green function within a limited frequency range. Several examples of the field application are demonstrated by the test experiments at Tono Mine site. After the developmental works of 10 years, the ACROSS is brought to be a practical method applied to the remote monitoring of temporal variation of underground states at the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory and also it is being applied to the expected focal region of the coming Tokai earthquake near Hamaoka in Shizuoka prefecture. Whereas ACROSS technology is not mature enough yet, it is shown to be a potential and versatile methodology applied even for the health monitoring of the construction such as building strongly coupled with the ground in addition to the underground study. (author)

  16. The behaviour of effective coupling constants in 'finite' grand unification theories in curved spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchbinder, I.L.; Odintsov, S.D.; Lichtzier, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    The question of the behaviour of effective coupling constants in one-loop 'finite' grand unification theories in curved spacetime is investigated. It is shown that in strong gravitational fields the effective coupling constant, corresponding to the parameter of non-minimal interaction of scalar and gravitational fields, tends to the conformal value or increases in an exponential fashion. The one-loop effective potential is obtained with accuracy to linear curvature terms. It is shown that, in external supergravity, supersymmetric finite theories admit asymptotic conformal invariance. (Author)

  17. Nuclear elastic scattering effects on fusion product transport in the FRM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.C.; Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Large energy transfer (LET) events such as nuclear elastic scatterng (NES) are shown to have significant effects on fusion product transport in the field-reversed mirror. The method used and preliminary results obtained from the study on NES effects on f/sub p/ orbits are described

  18. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective properties of discrete elastic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Thomsen, Jon Juel; Snaeland, Sveinn Orri

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate how highfrequency (HF) excitation, combined with strong nonlinear elastic material behavior, influences the effective material or structural properties for low-frequency excitation and wave propagation. The HF effects are demonstrated on discrete linear s...

  19. Obtaining the general forms of the effective coefficients of laminate magneto-electro - elastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabañas, J. H.; Otero, A.; Castillero, B.; Rodríguez, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this work using the asymptotic homogenization method obtained general expressions for the calculation of the effective characteristics of magnetoelectro-elastic laminates with layers of any symmetry. You will reach an array of auxiliary functions for determining the effective coefficients for a serial connection and displays a result similar to the case of parallel connection.

  20. Influence of temperature on elastic properties of caesium cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Preeti; Gaur, N.K.; Singh, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    An extended three body force shell model (ETSM), which incorporates the effects of translational-rotational (TR) coupling, three body interactions (TBI) and anharmonicity, has been applied to investigate the temperature dependence of the second order elastic constants (c ij , i,j=1,2) of CsCN. The elastic constant c 44 obtained by us shows an anomalous behaviour with the variation of temperature. The variations of elastic constants (c 11 , c 12 , c 44 ) with temperature are almost in excellent agreement with Brillouin scattering measured data. We have also evaluated the temperature variations of the third order elastic constants (c ijk ) and the pressure derivatives of the c ij in the CsCN material. However, their values could not be compared due to lack of experimental data. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Micromechanics-based determination of effective elastic properties of polymer bonded explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Biswajit; Adams, D.O.

    2003-01-01

    Polymer bonded explosives are particulate composites containing a high volume fraction of stiff elastic explosive particles in a compliant viscoelastic binder. Since the volume fraction of particles can be greater than 0.9 and the modulus contrast greater than 20 000, rigorous bounds on the elastic moduli of the composite are an order of magnitude different from experimentally determined values. Analytical solutions are also observed to provide inaccurate estimates of effective elastic properties. Direct finite element approximations of effective properties require large computational resources because of the complexity of the microstructure of these composites. An alternative approach, the recursive cells method (RCM) is also explored in this work. Results show that the degree of discretization and the microstructures used in finite element models of PBXs can significantly affect the estimated Young's moduli

  2. Pseudo-elasticity and shape memory effect on the TiNiCoV alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.E.; Yeh, M.T.; Hsu, I.C.; Chang, S.K.; Dai, Y.C.; Wang, J.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Unlike most of the structural intermetallic compound, TiNi is an exceptional case of inherent ductility. Besides its amusing behavior of high damping capacity due to martensitic transformation, the duel properties of shape memory and pseudo-elasticity co-exhibited in the same V and Co-modified TiNi-SMA at various temperature will attract another attention in modern manufacturing technology. The objective of this paper is to investigate the pseudo-elasticity and strain rate effect on TiNiCoV-SMA. The presence of dual behavior of super-elasticity and shape memory effect is technological significant for application of advanced materials on the structural component. An illustration of application of TiNiCoV shape memory alloy on the face of golf club head will be presented in this paper. (orig.)

  3. Effect of elasticity on stress distribution in CAD/CAM dental crowns: Glass ceramic vs. polymer-matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuanyuan; Griggs, Jason A

    2015-06-01

    Further investigations are required to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of newly developed polymer-matrix composite (PMC) blocks for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elasticity on the stress distribution in dental crowns made of glass-ceramic and PMC materials using finite element (FE) analysis. Elastic constants of two materials were determined by ultrasonic pulse velocity using an acoustic thickness gauge. Three-dimensional solid models of a full-coverage dental crown on a first mandibular molar were generated based on X-ray micro-CT scanning images. A variety of load case-material property combinations were simulated and conducted using FE analysis. The first principal stress distribution in the crown and luting agent was plotted and analyzed. The glass-ceramic crown had stress concentrations on the occlusal surface surrounding the area of loading and the cemented surface underneath the area of loading, while the PMC crown had only stress concentration on the occlusal surface. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown in all load cases, but this difference was not substantial when the loading had a lateral component. Eccentric loading did not substantially increase the maximum stress in the prosthesis. Both materials are resistant to fracture with physiological occlusal load. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown, but the effect of a lateral loading component was more pronounced for a PMC crown than for a glass-ceramic crown. Knowledge of the stress distribution in dental crowns with low modulus of elasticity will aid clinicians in planning treatments that include such restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effective diffusion constant in a two-dimensional medium of charged point scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, D S; Drummond, I T; Horgan, R R

    2004-01-01

    We obtain exact results for the effective diffusion constant of a two-dimensional Langevin tracer particle in the force field generated by charged point scatterers with quenched positions. We show that if the point scatterers have a screened Coulomb (Yukawa) potential and are uniformly and independently distributed then the effective diffusion constant obeys the Volgel-Fulcher-Tammann law where it vanishes. Exact results are also obtained for pure Coulomb scatterers frozen in an equilibrium configuration of the same temperature as that of the tracer

  5. Effect of different electron elastic-scattering cross sections on inelastic mean free paths obtained from elastic-backscattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonskiz, A.; Salvatz, F.; Powellz, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) of electrons with energies between 100 eV and 5,000 eV have been frequently obtained from measurements of elastic-backscattering probabilities for different specimen materials. A calculation of these probabilities is also required to determine IMFPs. We report calculations of elastic-backscattering probabilities for gold at energies of 100 eV and 500 eV with differential elastic-scattering cross sections obtained from the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential and the more reliable Dirac-Hartree-Fock potential. For two representative experimental configurations, the average deviation between IMFPs obtained with cross sections from the two potentials was 11.4 %. (author)

  6. Effects of Host-rock Fracturing on Elastic-deformation Source Models of Volcano Deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holohan, Eoghan P; Sudhaus, Henriette; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Walsh, John J

    2017-09-08

    Volcanoes commonly inflate or deflate during episodes of unrest or eruption. Continuum mechanics models that assume linear elastic deformation of the Earth's crust are routinely used to invert the observed ground motions. The source(s) of deformation in such models are generally interpreted in terms of magma bodies or pathways, and thus form a basis for hazard assessment and mitigation. Using discontinuum mechanics models, we show how host-rock fracturing (i.e. non-elastic deformation) during drainage of a magma body can progressively change the shape and depth of an elastic-deformation source. We argue that this effect explains the marked spatio-temporal changes in source model attributes inferred for the March-April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Reunion. We find that pronounced deflation-related host-rock fracturing can: (1) yield inclined source model geometries for a horizontal magma body; (2) cause significant upward migration of an elastic-deformation source, leading to underestimation of the true magma body depth and potentially to a misinterpretation of ascending magma; and (3) at least partly explain underestimation by elastic-deformation sources of changes in sub-surface magma volume.

  7. Scalar potential from de Sitter brane in 5D and effective cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masato

    2004-01-01

    We derive the scalar potential in zero mode effective action arising from a de Sitter brane embedded in five dimensions with bulk cosmological constant Λ. The scalar potential for a scalar field canonically normalized is given by the sum of exponential potentials. In the case of Λ = 0 and Λ > 0, we point out that the scalar potential has an unstable maximum at the origin and exponentially vanishes for large positive scalar field. In the case of Λ < 0, the scalar potential has an unstable maximum at the origin and a local minimum. It is shown that the positive cosmological constant in dS brane is reduced by negative potential energy of scalar at minimum and that effective cosmological constant depends on a dimensionless quantity. Furthermore, we discuss the fate of our universe including the potential energy of the scalar. (author)

  8. Gradient effects in a new class of electro-elastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitakis, Antonios

    2018-06-01

    Continuum theories for electro-elastic solids suggest the development of electric field or polarization-based models. Advanced versions of these models are the so-called gradient models, i.e., polarization gradient and electric field gradient models, which prove to be more than capable of explaining the behavior of a continuum in a wider range of length scales. In this work, implicit constitutive relations for electro-elastic bodies are considered with the introduction of polarization and electric field gradient effects. In this sense, the new class of electro-elastic bodies extends even further to account for nonlocality in constitutive equations, besides strain-limiting behavior and polarization saturation for large values of stresses and electric field, respectively. Nonlocality in constitutive equations is essential in modeling various phenomena.

  9. The effect of disorder geometry on the critical force in disordered elastic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Démery, Vincent; Lecomte, Vivien; Rosso, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We address the effect of disorder geometry on the critical force in disordered elastic systems. We focus on the model system of a long-range elastic line driven in a random landscape. In the collective pinning regime, we compute the critical force perturbatively. Not only does our expression for the critical force confirm previous results on its scaling with respect to the microscopic disorder parameters, but it also provides its precise dependence on the disorder geometry (represented by the disorder two-point correlation function). Our results are successfully compared with the results of numerical simulations for random field and random bond disorders. (paper)

  10. Effects of size and defects on the elasticity of silicon nanocantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, H.; Yang, C.K.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Bossche, A.; Staufer, U.; French, P.J.; Van Keulen, F.

    2010-01-01

    The size-dependent elastic behavior of silicon nanocantilevers and nanowires, specifically the effective Young’s modulus, has been determined by experimental measurements and theoretical investigations. The size dependence becomes more significant as the devices scale down from micro- to

  11. Elastic proton-deuteron backward scattering: relativistic effects and polarization observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaptari, L.P.; Semikh, S.S.

    1997-10-01

    The elastic proton-deuteron backward reaction is analyzed within a covariant approach based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation with 000. Lorentz boost and other relativistic effects in the cross section and spin correlation observables, like tensor analyzing power and polarization transfer etc., are investigated in explicit form. Results of numerical calculations for a complete set of polarization observables are presented. (orig.)

  12. Pb nanoprecipitates in Al: Magic-shape effects due to elastic strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, J.C.; Leoard, F.; Johnson, Erik

    2007-01-01

    We present a theory for size-dependent shapes of Pb nanoprecipitates in Al, introducing the concept of "magic shapes," i.e., shapes having near-zero homogeneous elastic strains. Our quantitative atomistic calculations of edge energies show their effect on precipitate shape to be negligible, thus...

  13. Nuclear re-interaction effects in quasi-elastic neutrino nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Co, G.; Bleve, C.; De Mitri, I.; Martello, D

    2002-11-01

    The quasi-elastic {nu}-nucleus cross section has been calculated by using a Fermi gas model corrected to consider the re-scattering between the emitted nucleon and the rest nucleus. As an example of the relevance of this effect we show results for the muon production cross section on {sup 16}O target.

  14. Examination of Effective Dielectric Constants Derived from Non-Spherical Melting Hydrometeor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Meneghini, R.

    2009-04-01

    The bright band, a layer of enhanced radar echo associated with melting hydrometeors, is often observed in stratiform rain. Understanding the microphysical properties of melting hydrometeors and their scattering and propagation effects is of great importance in accurately estimating parameters of the precipitation from spaceborne radar and radiometers. However, one of the impediments in the study of the radar signature of the melting layer is the determination of effective dielectric constants of melting hydrometeors. Although a number of mixing formulas are available to compute the effective dielectric constants, their results vary to a great extent when water is a component of the mixture, such as in the case of melting snow. It is also physically unclear as to how to select among these various formulas. Furthermore, the question remains as to whether these mixing formulas can be applied to computations of radar polarimetric parameters from non-spherical melting particles. Recently, several approaches using numerical methods have been developed to derive the effective dielectric constants of melting hydrometeors, i.e., mixtures consisting of air, ice and water, based on more realistic melting models of particles, in which the composition of the melting hydrometeor is divided into a number of identical cells. Each of these cells is then assigned in a probabilistic way to be water, ice or air according to the distribution of fractional water contents for a particular particle. While the derived effective dielectric constants have been extensively tested at various wavelengths over a range of particle sizes, these numerical experiments have been restricted to the co-polarized scattering parameters from spherical particles. As polarimetric radar has been increasingly used in the study of microphysical properties of hydrometeors, an extension of the theory to polarimetric variables should provide additional information on melting processes. To account for polarimetric

  15. The effective baryon-lepton coupling constant and the parity of leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Stremnitzer, H.

    1981-01-01

    Using a phenomenological ansatz for the Lagrangian of baryon- and lepton-number violating interactions the effective baryon-lepton coupling constant is calculated within the framework of a relativistic quark model. Apart from a calculation of B-number violating cross-sections and decays this ansatz allows for a definition of the parity of leptons relative to baryons. (Auth.)

  16. The Effects of Constant versus Varied Reinforcers on Preference and Resistance to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Jessie-Sue; Mace, F. Charles; Nevin, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that factors such as reinforcer frequency, amount, and delay have similar effects on resistance to change and preference. In the present study, 4 boys with autism made choices between a constant reinforcer (one that was the same food item every trial) and a varied food reinforcer (one that varied randomly between…

  17. Hall effects on hydromagnetic flow of an Oldroyd 6-constant fluid between concentric cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, M.A.; Siddiqui, A.M.; Qamar, Rashid

    2009-01-01

    The hydromagnetic flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible Oldroyd 6-constant fluid between two concentric cylinders is investigated. The flow is generated by moving inner cylinder and/or application of the constant pressure gradient. Two non-linear boundary value problems are solved numerically. The effects of material parameters, pressure gradient, magnetic field and Hall parameter on the velocity are studied. The graphical representation of velocity reveals that characteristics for shear thinning/shear thickening behaviour of a fluid is dependent upon the rheological properties

  18. Hall effects on hydromagnetic flow of an Oldroyd 6-constant fluid between concentric cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, M.A. [Management Information System, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mafzalrana@yahoo.com; Siddiqui, A.M. [Department of Mathematics, Pennsylvania State University, York Campus, York, PA 17403 (United States); Qamar, Rashid [Management Information System, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2009-01-15

    The hydromagnetic flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible Oldroyd 6-constant fluid between two concentric cylinders is investigated. The flow is generated by moving inner cylinder and/or application of the constant pressure gradient. Two non-linear boundary value problems are solved numerically. The effects of material parameters, pressure gradient, magnetic field and Hall parameter on the velocity are studied. The graphical representation of velocity reveals that characteristics for shear thinning/shear thickening behaviour of a fluid is dependent upon the rheological properties.

  19. Change of MIT bag constant in nuclear medium and implication for the EMC effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, X.; Jennings, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    The modified quark-meson coupling model, which features a density-dependent bag constant and bag radius in nuclear matter, is checked against the EMC effect within the framework of dynamical rescaling. Our emphasis is on the change in the average bag radius in nuclei, as evaluated in a local density approximation, and its implication for the rescaling parameter. We find that when the bag constant in nuclear matter is significantly reduced from its free-space value, the resulting rescaling parameter is in good agreement with that required to explain the observed depletion of the structure functions in the medium Bjorken x region. Such a large reduction of the bag constant also implies large and canceling Lorentz scalar and vector potentials for the nucleon in nuclear matter which are comparable to those suggested by the relativistic nuclear phenomenology and finite-density QCD sum rules. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Effects of geometry and fluid elasticity during polymeric droplet pinch-off in microfluidic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Ben; Shen, Amy; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the effects of fluid elasticity and channel geometry on polymeric droplet pinch-off by performing systematic experiments using viscoelastic polymer solutions which possess practically shear rate-independent viscosity (Boger fluids). Four different geometric sizes (width and depth are scaled up proportionally at the ratio of 0.5, 1, 2, 20) are used to study the effect of the length scale, which in turn influences the ratio of elastic to viscous forces as well as the Rayleigh time scale associated with the interfacial instability of a cylindrical column of liquid. We observe a power law relationship between the dimensionless (scaled with respect to the Rayleigh time scale) capillary pinch-off time, T, and the elasticity number, E, defined as the ratio of the fluid relaxation time to the time scale of viscous diffusion. In general, T increases dramatically with increasing E. The inhibition of ``bead-on-a-string'' formation is observed for flows with effective Deborah number, De, defined as the ratio of the fluid relaxation time to the Rayleigh time scale becomes greater than 10. For sufficiently large values of De, the Rayleigh instability may be modified substantially by fluid elasticity.

  1. Study of Coulomb effects using the comparison of positrons and electrons elastic scattering on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, Vincent

    1990-01-01

    We have studied Coulomb effects in the electron-nucleus interaction by measuring electron and positron elastic scattering. The Coulomb field of the nucleus acts differently on theses particles because of their opposite charges. The experiment took place at the Accelerateur Lineaire de Saclay, with 450 MeV electrons and positrons. We measured the emittance of the positron and electron beams. We compared electron and positron beams having the same energy, the same emittance and the same intensity. This way, we measured positron scattering cross sections with 2 % systematic error. By comparing positron and electron elastic scattering cross sections for momentum transfers between 1 and 2 fm -1 , on a Lead 208 target, we showed that the calculations of Coulomb effects in elastic scattering are in perfect agreement with experimental results. The comparison of positron and electron elastic scattering cross sections on Carbon showed that dispersive effects are smaller than 2 % outside the diffraction minima. These two results demonstrate in a definitive way that electron scattering allows to measure charge densities in the center of nuclei with an accuracy of the order of 1 %. (author) [fr

  2. Evaluation of the effects of the radial constant-head boundary in slug tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunfeng; Zhou, Zhifang; Zhao, Yanrong; Cui, Ziteng

    2015-03-01

    A semianalytical model of slug tests, conducted in a completely penetrating well within a radial constant-head boundary, was derived. The model, based on the Cooper et al. (1967) model, estimates the hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient through the matching of type curves. Type curves of the semianalytical solution were plotted, and the effect of the distance of the radial constant-head boundary is discussed. For different storage coefficients, the critical distances of the effect of the constant-head boundary were determined. The effect of the storage coefficient on the response of the water head in slug tests with a radial constant-head boundary of a certain distance is also shown. To verify the model, laboratory slug-test experiments were carried out using a cylindrical test platform, in which an artificial confined coarse-sand aquifer was built. Pumping tests were also executed using the test platform. The Cooper et al. (1967) model and new semianalytical model were used to analyze measurements; the hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient determined using the two methods were compared to demonstrate the importance of the radial constant-head boundary. A model considering the inertial effect was also used to analyze the slug-test measurements, and although the water head response did not oscillate greatly, the inertial effect affected the slug-test calculation result. The laboratory experiments indicate that the proposed semianalytical model is reasonable and reliable. Cooper HH, Bredehoeft JD, Papadopulos IS (1967) Response of a finite-diameter well to an instantaneous charge of water, Water Resour Res 3(1):263-269.

  3. Elastic effects behind cooperative bonding inβ-sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2004-01-01

    We present extensive density functional theory calculations of the bonding between strands in â-sheets. We identify a significant cooperative effect whereby the interaction increases in strength with the number of strands. We show that the effect is related to a coupling between interstrand bonding...

  4. Nuclear effects on elastic reactions induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, M.; Bonneaud, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two nuclear effects are studied on the reactions νn→μ - p and mean number of neutrons νp→μ + n: inhibition effect (due to Pauli principle) and kinematical effects due to the Fermi motion of the target nucleon inside a nucleus. By comparison with shell-model calculations it is shown that the Fermi-gas model is sufficiently accurate to describe the low-Q 2 inhibition effects. The incertitude on Esub(mean number of neutrons) and Q 2 , due to Fermi motion, is studied with a set of curves which give the error on Esub(mean number of neutrons) and Q 2 once Psub(μ) is given [fr

  5. Competition between elastic and chemical effects in the intermixing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. We have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the forma- tion energy and the effects of low dimensionality and reduced coordination on the magnetic properties of pseudomorphically grown monolayers of Co–Ag surface alloys on a Rh(111) substrate. We find that if such an alloy ...

  6. Effects of external field on elastic electron-ion collision in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Sang-Chul; Jung, Young-Dae

    2008-01-01

    The field effects on elastic electron-ion collision are investigated in a plasma with the presence of the external field. The eikonal method and effective interaction potential including the far-field term caused by the external field is employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the field strength, external frequency, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy and Debye length. The result shows that the effect of the external field on the eikonal cross section is given by the second-order eikonal phase. In addition, the external field effects suppress the eikonal cross section as well as eikonal phase for the elastic electron-ion collision. The eikonal phase and cross section are found to be increased with an increase of the frequency of the external field. It is also shown that the eikonal cross section increases with an increase of the thermal energy and Debye length.

  7. Most Probable Failures in LHC Magnets and Time Constants of their Effects on the Beam.

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez Alonso, Andres

    2006-01-01

    During the LHC operation, energies up to 360 MJ will be stored in each proton beam and over 10 GJ in the main electrical circuits. With such high energies, beam losses can quickly lead to important equipment damage. The Machine Protection Systems have been designed to provide reliable protection of the LHC through detection of the failures leading to beam losses and fast dumping of the beams. In order to determine the protection strategies, it is important to know the time constants of the failure effects on the beam. In this report, we give an estimation of the time constants of quenches and powering failures in LHC magnets. The most critical failures are powering failures in certain normal conducting circuits, leading to relevant effects on the beam in ~1 ms. The failures on super conducting magnets leading to fastest losses are quenches. In this case, the effects on the beam can be signficant ~10 ms after the quench occurs.

  8. Nuclear elastic scattering effects on fusion product transport in compact tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.; Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper seeks to advance previous work including the effects of nuclear elastic scattering (NES) on fusion-product transport. We have found that NES may dominate the slowing-down process for high-temperature, advance-fuel plasmas which burn Cat.D or D- 3 He. A modified version of the Monte Carlo fusion product transport code, MCFRM, was used to evaluate the effects of NES on discrete fusion-product orbits in the FRM

  9. Structure effects in the elastic scattering for the 16O + 46,50Ti systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, J.C.; Leal, L.A.S.; Munhoz, M.G.; Carlin, N.; Chamon, L.C.; Added, N.; Brage, J.A.P.; Liguori Neto, R.; Coimbra, M.M.; Moura, M.M. de; Souza, F.A.; Suaide, A.A.P.; Szanto, E.M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear structure effects observed in the sub-Coulomb fusion of heavy-ions demand a careful investigation of the reaction cross section and optical potentials near the Coulomb barrier. The elastic scattering for the 16 O + 46,50 Ti systems was investigated in the bombarding energy range 30= lab = 46 Ti and the neutron magic 50 Ti targets. This result is in agreement with the observation of no significant structure effects in the fusion cross section study for the same systems

  10. The effect of dissipation on the resistive admittance of an elastic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photiadis, Douglas M

    2012-03-01

    The effect of dissipation on the real part of the admittance of an elastic half-space is typically thought to be unimportant if the loss factor ζ of the elastic medium is small. However, dissipation induces losses in the near field of the source and, provided the size of the source is small enough, this phenomenon can be more important than elastic wave radiation. Such losses give rise to a fundamental limit in the quality factor of an oscillator attached to a substrate. Near field losses associated with strains in the elastic substrate can actually be larger than intrinsic losses in the oscillator itself if the internal friction of the substrate is larger than the internal friction of the oscillator. For a uniform stress applied to a disk of radius a, a monopole source, such phenomena become significant for k(L)a<ζ, while for higher order multipole sources of order l, near field losses are important for (k(L)a)(l+1)<ζ, a far less restrictive constraint. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  11. Standard test method for determining the effective elastic parameter for X-ray diffraction measurements of residual stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for experimentally determining the effective elastic parameter, Eeff, for the evaluation of residual and applied stresses by X-ray diffraction techniques. The effective elastic parameter relates macroscopic stress to the strain measured in a particular crystallographic direction in polycrystalline samples. Eeff should not be confused with E, the modulus of elasticity. Rather, it is nominally equivalent to E/(1 + ν) for the particular crystallographic direction, where ν is Poisson's ratio. The effective elastic parameter is influenced by elastic anisotropy and preferred orientation of the sample material. 1.2 This test method is applicable to all X-ray diffraction instruments intended for measurements of macroscopic residual stress that use measurements of the positions of the diffraction peaks in the high back-reflection region to determine changes in lattice spacing. 1.3 This test method is applicable to all X-ray diffraction techniques for residual stress measurem...

  12. Effect of longitudinal vibration of fluid-filled pipe with elastic wall on sound transmission character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When one end of a fluid-filled pipe with an elastic wall is fixed and a harmonic force effect acts on the other end,a steady longitudinal vibration will be produced. Compared to the pipeline resonance mode,the amplitude of the steady longitudinal vibration of an elastic pipe is greater,and the effect on the sound is also greater. The study of the steady longitudinal vibration of pipes can better describe the effects of fluid-filled pipelines on the radiation sound field of the pipe opening. Through the contrast between the analysis calculation of the equivalent beam model and the experimental results,the accuracy of the equivalent beam model for the calculation of the steady longitudinal vibration of pipelines is verified,and a method of isolating the steady longitudinal vibration state is proposed and verified.

  13. Chemical exchange effects during refocusing pulses in constant-time CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myint, Wazo; Ishima, Rieko

    2009-01-01

    In the analysis of the constant-time Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CT-CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiment, chemical exchange parameters, such as rate of exchange and population of the exchanging species, are typically optimized using equations that predict experimental relaxation rates recorded as a function of effective field strength. In this process, the effect of chemical exchange during the CPMG pulses is typically assumed to be the same as during the free-precession. This approximation may introduce systematic errors into the analysis of data because the number of CPMG pulses is incremented during the constant-time relaxation period, and the total pulse duration therefore varies as a function of the effective field strength. In order to estimate the size of such errors, we simulate the time-dependence of magnetization during the entire constant time period, explicitly taking into account the effect of the CPMG pulses on the spin relaxation rate. We show that in general the difference in the relaxation dispersion profile calculated using a practical pulse width from that calculated using an extremely short pulse width is small, but under certain circumstances can exceed 1 s -1 . The difference increases significantly when CPMG pulses are miscalibrated

  14. Theory of solvent effects on the hyperfine splitting constants in ESR spectra of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.; Tero-Kubota, S.; Ikegami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    An expression for the effects of solvation and hydrogen bonding on the hyperfine splitting constants of a free radical has been derived by obtaining π-electron spin densities of the radical in solution by perturbation theory. When no hydrogen bonding occurs between the radical and a solvent molecule, the splitting constant is approximately proportional to the Block and Walker parameter of theta(epsilon/sub r/) identical with 3 epsilon/sub r/ (ln epsilon/sub r/)/(epsilon/sub r/ ln epsilon/sub r/ - epsilon/sub r/ + 1) - 6/(ln epsilon/sub r/) - 2, where epsilon/sub r/ is the relative permittivity of the solvent. The expression is successfully applied to the di-tert-butyl nitroxide radical, the 1-methyl-4-(methoxycarbonyl)pyridinyl radical, and other free radicals. The effects of hydrogen bonding are discussed

  15. Effects of constant immigration on the dynamics and persistence of stable and unstable Drosophila populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Snigdhadip; Joshi, Amitabh

    2013-01-01

    Constant immigration can stabilize population size fluctuations but its effects on extinction remain unexplored. We show that constant immigration significantly reduced extinction in fruitfly populations with relatively stable or unstable dynamics. In unstable populations with oscillations of amplitude around 1.5 times the mean population size, persistence and constancy were unrelated. Low immigration enhanced persistence without affecting constancy whereas high immigration increased constancy without enhancing persistence. In relatively stable populations with erratic fluctuations of amplitude close to the mean population size, both low and high immigration enhanced persistence. In these populations, the amplitude of fluctuations relative to mean population size went down due to immigration, and their dynamics were altered to low-period cycles. The effects of immigration on the population size distribution and intrinsic dynamics of stable versus unstable populations differed considerably, suggesting that the mechanisms by which immigration reduced extinction risk depended on underlying dynamics in complex ways. PMID:23470546

  16. Effect of difference between group constants processed by codes TIMS and ETOX on integral quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki; Ishiguro, Yukio; Matsui, Yasushi.

    1978-06-01

    Group constants of 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, 240 Pu and 241 Pu have been produced with the processing code TIMS using the evaluated nuclear data of JENDL-1. The temperature and composition dependent self-shielding factors have been calculated for the two cases with and without considering mutual interference resonant nuclei. By using the group constants set produced by the TIMS code, the integral quantities, i.e. multiplication factor, Na-void reactivity effect and Doppler reactivity effect, are calculated and compared with those calculated with the use of the cross sections set produced by the ETOX code to evaluate accuracy of the approximate calculation method in ETOX. There is much difference in self-shielding factor in each energy group between the two codes. For the fast reactor assemblies under study, however, the integral quantities calculated with these two sets are in good agreement with each other, because of eventual cancelation of errors. (auth.)

  17. Effect of elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory responses in Taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Gadruni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Elastic bands offer variable elastic resistance (ER throughout a range of motion and their incorporation with exercise movements has been used for variable strength training and rehabilitation purposes. Objective: Investigate the effect of acute bout of progressive elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory response in Taekwondo athletes (TKD compared with untrained ones.METHODS: Fourteen (TKD, n = 7 and untrained, n = 7 men performed 3 sets of progressive resistance elastic exercise. Blood samples were taken pre-exercise and also immediately and 24h post exercise. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, total leukocyte counts, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were analyzed.RESULTS: Only DOMS increased in untrained group, but elevation of DOMS was observed in both groups (TKD and untrained at 24h after exercise (p<0.05. CK and LDH activity increased in both groups significantly. Also TKD group only showed CK increasing 24h post exercise (p<0.05. Total circulating leukocyte counts increased immediately in post exercise experiments and decreased in 24h ones in both groups (p<0.05. Serum IL-6 immediately increased in both groups and 24h post exercises but there was no significant difference between immediate and 24h post exercise experiments in TKD group. Furthermore, CRP just increased 24h after exercise in both groups (p<0.05.CONCLUSION: Progressive resistance elastic exercise induced muscle damage and inflammation in TKD athletes, but also had smaller changes in comparison with untrained group and other forms of exercise.

  18. Leptonic decay constants of heavy quarkonia in effective QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The QCD sum rule scheme, which allows one effectively to take into account the heavy quarkonium peculiarities such as nonrelativistic motion and large mass values of the quarks is considered. The phenomenological scaling law is derived for the leptonic constants with the use of the heavy quarkonium mass spectra. The law describes the data on the values of f φ , f ψ and fγ rather good and predicts f B C . 12 refs.; 2 tabs

  19. Effect of hydrostatic pressure in the ground state on the perturbed elastic deformable bodies in first post-Newtonian approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Guoxuan

    2009-01-01

    Based on the dynamical equations for a nonrotating elastic deformable astronomical body in the first post-Newtonian approximation of Einstein's theory of gravity, we re-examined the boundary(junction) conditions and have proven that a term, which is missing in the customary boundary(junction) conditions, is found. This term is induced by the existence of initial equilibrium hydrostatic pressure. A physical explanation of this term is given in the Newtonian approximation as well. By using the correcting boundary conditions the relation of the free spherically symmetrical radial oscillation frequency of a nonrotating homogeneously and isotropically elastic sphere with constant density is derived.

  20. Lactate dehydrogenase activity of rat epididymis and spermatozoa: Effect of constant light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Ponce

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available During its passage through the epididymis, the gamete undergoes a process of “maturation” leading to the acquisition of its fertilizing ability. The epididymis displays regional variations in the morphology and metabolic properties of its epithelium which are relevant for the progressive development of mature sperm characteristics. The epididymis has spontaneous peristaltic contractions and receives sympathetic innervation that is modulated by melatonin, a hormone synthesized and released by the pineal gland. Constant lighting disrupts melatonin synthesis and secretion. We have studied the effect of constant light on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27 and its isozyme C4 activities and protein content in whole epididymis, epididymal tissue and in spermatozoa from caput and cauda segments. Animals were exposed from birth to an illumination schedule of 14 h light: 10 h dark (group L:D. At 60 days of age one group of animals was submitted to constant light over 50 days (group L:L. In order to test the fertilizing ability, the rats of each group were mated with soliciting estrous females. The percentage of pregnancies in females mated with males maintained in L:L was remarkably lower than those in females mated with males maintained in the L:D photoperiod (44% and 88% respectively. Constant light increased protein concentration and LDH activity in caput as well as in cauda of total epididymis. On the contrary, in epididymal tissue, the protein content decreased in both epididymal sections compared with controls. When enzymatic activity was expressed in Units per spermatozoa, constant light induced a significant reduction of total LDH and LDHC4 in caput and cauda spermatozoa while LDH activity of epididymal tissue was not affected. In spite of the decrease in LDH per sperm cell when rats were exposed to constant light, in total epididymis (epididymis tissue plus sperm cells content and in spermatozoa, values of enzyme activities expressed per

  1. Directional anisotropy, finite size effect and elastic properties of hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Siby; Ajith, K M; Valsakumar, M C

    2016-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to analyze the elastic and mechanical properties of two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) using a Tersoff-type interatomic empirical potential. We present a systematic study of h-BN for various system sizes. Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio are found to be anisotropic for finite sheets whereas they are isotropic for the infinite sheet. Both of them increase with system size in accordance with a power law. It is concluded from the computed values of elastic constants that h-BN sheets, finite or infinite, satisfy Born’s criterion for mechanical stability. Due to the the strong in-plane sp 2 bonds and the small mass of boron and nitrogen atoms, h-BN possesses high longitudinal and shear velocities. The variation of bending rigidity with system size is calculated using the Foppl–von Karman approach by coupling the in-plane bending and out-of-plane stretching modes of the 2D h-BN. (paper)

  2. Quantification the Effect of the Thickness of Thin Films on their Elastic Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacem, A.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the characteristics and properties of thin films deposited on substrates is necessary in any device application in various fields. Adequate mechanical properties are highly required for the majority of surface waves and semiconductor devices. In this context, modelling the ultrasonic-material interaction, we present results of simulation curves of acoustic signatures for multiple thin film/substrate combinations. The results obtained on several structures (Al, SiO 2 , ZnO, Cu, AlN, SiC and Cr)/(Al 2 O 3 , Si, Cu or Quartz) showed a velocity dispersion of the Rayleigh wave as a function of layer thickness. The development of a theoretical calculation model based on the acoustic behaviour of these structures has enabled us to quantify the dispersive evolution (positive and negative) density. Thus, we have established a universal relationship describing the density-thickness variation. In addition, networks of dispersion curves, representing the evolution of elasticity modulus (Young and shear), were determined. These charts can be used to extract the influence of thickness of layers on the variation of elastic constants.(author)

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on visco-elastic properties of polymethyl-methacrylate and poly-4-methylpentene-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perepechko, I.I.; Mar'yasin, B.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of γ radiation on visco-elastic properties of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and poly-4-methylpentene-1 (P4MPI) has been investigated by the method of the forced resonance oscillations of a cantilevered specimen. It has been shown, that the variation of the dynamic elasticity modulus of amorphous polymer when the irradiation dose increases, considerable depends on the polymer physical state during the measurement. The irradiated polymer is a binary mixture of radiolysis low-molecular products and polymer itself. The value of elasticity modulus in such a mixture is defined by the modules of different components. More complex than in PMMA in the effect of γ-radiation upon the P4MPI visco-elastic behaviour. During the P4MPI irradiation, the rebuilding of polymer supermolecular structure takes place, which results in the variation of the dynamic elasticity modulus values and in the intensity of peaks of mechanical losses

  4. Determination of hoop direction effective elastic moduli of non-circular profile, fiber reinforced polymer composite sewer liner pipes from lateral ring compression tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czél, Gergely; Takács, Dénes

    2015-01-01

    A new material property determination method is presented for the calculation of effective elastic moduli of non-circular ring specimens cut from filament wound oval profile polymer composite sewer liner pipes. The hoop direction elastic moduli was determined using the test results obtained from ring compression tests, which is a very basic setup, and requires no special equipment. Calculations were executed for many different oval profiles, and diagrams were constructed, from which the cross section dependent C_e_f_f constants can be taken. The new method was validated by the comparison of tests and finite element analysis results. The calculation method and the diagrams are essential design tools for engineers, and a big step forward in sizing non-circular profile liner pipes. - Highlights: • A simple modulus measurement method is presented for non-circular ring specimens. • The evaluation method is validated against a finite element model. • Profile shape dependent constants are presented for a wide range of cross-sections. • A set of charts with the constants are provided to aid design engineers.

  5. Temperature dependence of elastic properties of paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrova, I.M.; Pisarevskii, Y.V.; Senyushenkov, P.A.; Krupny, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    New data are presented on the temperature dependence of the elastic wave velocities, elastic stiffness constants, and thermal expansion of paratellurite. It is shown that the external pressure appreciably influences the elastic properties of TeO 2 , especially the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus connected with the crystal soft mode. (author)

  6. Construction of exact constants of motion and effective models for many-body localized systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goihl, M.; Gluza, M.; Krumnow, C.; Eisert, J.

    2018-04-01

    One of the defining features of many-body localization is the presence of many quasilocal conserved quantities. These constants of motion constitute a cornerstone to an intuitive understanding of much of the phenomenology of many-body localized systems arising from effective Hamiltonians. They may be seen as local magnetization operators smeared out by a quasilocal unitary. However, accurately identifying such constants of motion remains a challenging problem. Current numerical constructions often capture the conserved operators only approximately, thus restricting a conclusive understanding of many-body localization. In this work, we use methods from the theory of quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium to establish an alternative approach for finding a complete set of exact constants of motion which are in addition guaranteed to represent Pauli-z operators. By this we are able to construct and investigate the proposed effective Hamiltonian using exact diagonalization. Hence, our work provides an important tool expected to further boost inquiries into the breakdown of transport due to quenched disorder.

  7. Study on effects of development of reactor constant in fast reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Gou

    2002-12-01

    Evaluation was carried out about an effect of development of the new generation reactor constant system that substitutes for the JFS library in fast reactor analysis. Analyzed cores were ZPPR in JUPITER critical experiment and several power reactor cores that were designed in the feasibility study. In the JUPITER analysis, large effects, over 10%, were observed in sodium void reactivity and sample Doppler reactivity. The former resulted from several factors, while the latter was due to an accurate of a resonance interaction effect between Doppler sample and core fuel. In the previous study, the effect had been evaluated in power reactor cores. The effect included an effect of corrosion of weighting spectrum because JFS-3-J3.2, which had been made with the incorrect weighting spectrum, was used in the evaluation. In the present study, JFS-3-J3.2R, which had been made with the correct weighting spectrum, was used. It was confirmed that the effect of development of reactor constant in power reactor was not as large as that in critical assembly. (author)

  8. Effect of Chlorides on Conductivity and Dielectric Constant in Hardened Cement Mortar: NDT for Durability Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunkook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric constant and conductivity, the so-called EM properties (electromagnetic, are widely adopted for NDT (Nondestructive Technique in order to detect damage or evaluate performance of concrete without damage to existing RC (reinforced concrete. Among deteriorating agents, chloride ion is considered as one of the most critical threats due to rapid penetration and direct effect on steel corrosion. In the work, cement mortar samples with 3 w/c (water-to-cement ratios and 4 levels of chloride addition are considered. Conductivity and dielectric constant are measured in the normal frequency range. They increase with strength of mortar and more chloride ions due to denser pore formation. Furthermore, the behaviors of measured EM property are investigated with carbonation velocity and strength, which shows an attempt of application to durability evaluation through EM measurement.

  9. Oxidative kinetics of amino acids by peroxydisulfate: Effect of dielectric constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Mohammad A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of alanine, asparagines, cysteine, glutamic acid, lysine, phenylalanine and serine by peroxydisulfate ion have been studied in aqueous acidic (sulfuric acid) medium at the temperature range 60-80C. The rate shows first order dependence on peroxydisulfate concentration and zero order dependence on amino acid concentration. The rate law observed is: -d [S2O82-] /dt = Kobs [S2O82-] [amino acid]0. An autocatalytic effect has been observed in amino acids oxidation due to formation of Schiff's base between the formed aldehyde and parent amino acid. A decrease in the dielectric constant of the medium-adding acetic acid (5-15% v/v) results in a decrease in the rate in all cases studied. Reactions were carried out at different temperature (60-80C) and the thermodynamics parameters have been calculated. The logarithm of the rate constant is linearly interrelated to the square root of the ionic strength. (author)

  10. Effect of the cosmological constant on the deflection angle by a rotating cosmic string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusufi, Kimet; Övgün, Ali

    2018-03-01

    We report the effect of the cosmological constant and the internal energy density of a cosmic string on the deflection angle of light in the spacetime of a rotating cosmic string with internal structure. We first revisit the deflection angle by a rotating cosmic string and then provide a generalization using the geodesic equations and the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We show there is an agreement between the two methods when employing higher-order terms of the linear mass density of the cosmic string. By modifying the integration domain for the global conical topology, we resolve the inconsistency between these two methods previously reported in the literature. We show that the deflection angle is not affected by the rotation of the cosmic string; however, the cosmological constant Λ strongly affects the deflection angle, which generalizes the well-known result.

  11. Analysis of dispersed frequency response for ionic glasses: influence of electrode and nearly constant loss effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, J Ross

    2005-01-01

    Analysis by D L Sidebottom of the dispersive frequency response of the real-part of the conductivity, σ'(ω), for many alkali phosphate and metaphosphate glasses, using a fitting model involving a 'universal dynamic response' power law with an exponent n and a constant-loss term, led to anomalous n behaviour that he explained as arising from variable constriction of the local cation conduction space. In order to obtain adequate fits, he eliminated from the data all low-frequency decreases of σ'(ω) below the dc plateau, ones actually associated with electrode effects. Such a cut-off does not, however, eliminate electrode effects possibly present in the high-frequency part of the data range. The results of the present detailed analysis and fitting of both synthetic data and several of his experimental data sets show unequivocally that his anomalous n behaviour arose from neglecting electrode effects. Their inclusion, with or without data cut-off in the fitting model, leads to the expected high-frequency slope value of n = 2/3 associated with bulk conduction, as required by recently published topological effective-dimension considerations for dielectric relaxation in conductive systems. Further, the effects of the inclusion in a full fitting model of series and possibly parallel complex constant-phase-element contributions, representing electrode and nearly constant loss effects, respectively, have been investigated in detail. Such composite models usually lead to best fitting of either the full or cut-off complex data when they include the semi-universal, topologically based K1 bulk model, one indirectly derived from the assumption of stretched-exponential temporal behaviour

  12. Study of pressure variation effect on structural, opto-electronic, elastic, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of SrLiF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erum, Nazia; Iqbal, Muhammad Azhar

    2017-11-01

    The structural, electronic, elastic, optical and thermodynamic properties of cubic fluoroperovskite SrLiF3 at ambient and high-pressure are investigated by using first-principles total energy calculations within the framework of Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), combined with Quasi-harmonic Debye model in which the phonon effects are considered. The pressure effects are determined in the range of 0-50 GPa, in which cubic stability of SrLiF3 fluoroperovskite remains valid. The computed lattice parameters agree well with experimental and previous theoretical results. Decrease in lattice constant and bonds length is observed with the increase in pressure from 0 to 50 GPa. The effect of increase in pressure on electronic band structure calculations with GGA and GGA plus Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential reveals a predominant characteristic associated with widening of bandgap. The influence of pressure on elastic constants and their related mechanical parameters have been discussed in detail. All the calculated optical properties such as the complex dielectric function Ԑ(ω), optical conductivity σ(ω), energy loss function L(ω), absorption coefficient α(w), refractive index n (ω), reflectivity R (ω), and effective number of electrons neff, via sum rules shift towards the higher energies under the application of pressure. Moreover, important thermodynamic properties heat capacities (Cp and Cv), volume expansion coefficient (α), and Debye temperature (θD) are predicted successfully in the wide temperature and pressure ranges.

  13. The porosity effect on properties of sintered materials as their conductivity and Youngs modulus of elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondracek, G.; Thuemmler, F.

    1979-01-01

    A set of equations derived demonstrates quantitatively the influence of closed pores on the conductivity as well as on Youngsmodulus of elasticity of sintered materials. There are three microstructural parameters following from the theoretical derivation controlling the porosity effect on the properties, which are the total porosity, the form factor and the orientation factor of the pores. By quantitative microstructure analysis these factors become available providing together with the equations the tool - to calculate the conductivity and Youngs modulus of elasticity from microstructural quantities of sintered materials thus substituting direct property measurements by quantitative microstructure analysis if desired - to endeaver technologically optimum microstructures to obtain theoretically predicted special property values and to precalculate property alterations by microstructure variations ('taylor-made-materials') - to supplement the conventional microstructural quality control by calculated property data. (orig.) [de

  14. The effect of interacting dark energy on local measurements of the Hubble constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odderskov, Io; Baldi, Marco; Amendola, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In the current state of cosmology, where cosmological parameters are being measured to percent accuracy, it is essential to understand all sources of error to high precision. In this paper we present the results of a study of the local variations in the Hubble constant measured at the distance scale of the Coma Cluster, and test the validity of correcting for the peculiar velocities predicted by gravitational instability theory. The study is based on N-body simulations, and includes models featuring a coupling between dark energy and dark matter, as well as two ΛCDM simulations with different values of σ 8 . It is found that the variance in the local flows is significantly larger in the coupled models, which increases the uncertainty in the local measurements of the Hubble constant in these scenarios. By comparing the results from the different simulations, it is found that most of the effect is caused by the higher value of σ 8 in the coupled cosmologies, though this cannot account for all of the additional variance. Given the discrepancy between different estimates of the Hubble constant in the universe today, cosmological models causing a greater cosmic variance is something that we should be aware of.

  15. The effect of interacting dark energy on local measurements of the Hubble constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odderskov, Io [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade 120, Aarhus C (Denmark); Baldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Amendola, Luca, E-mail: isho07@phys.au.dk, E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it, E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    In the current state of cosmology, where cosmological parameters are being measured to percent accuracy, it is essential to understand all sources of error to high precision. In this paper we present the results of a study of the local variations in the Hubble constant measured at the distance scale of the Coma Cluster, and test the validity of correcting for the peculiar velocities predicted by gravitational instability theory. The study is based on N-body simulations, and includes models featuring a coupling between dark energy and dark matter, as well as two ΛCDM simulations with different values of σ{sub 8}. It is found that the variance in the local flows is significantly larger in the coupled models, which increases the uncertainty in the local measurements of the Hubble constant in these scenarios. By comparing the results from the different simulations, it is found that most of the effect is caused by the higher value of σ{sub 8} in the coupled cosmologies, though this cannot account for all of the additional variance. Given the discrepancy between different estimates of the Hubble constant in the universe today, cosmological models causing a greater cosmic variance is something that we should be aware of.

  16. Effects of the anion salt nature on the rate constants of the aqueous proton exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Jose M; Garzon, Andres; Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Lopez, Sergio G; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2012-04-28

    The proton-transfer ground-state rate constants of the xanthenic dye 9-[1-(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (TG-II), recovered by Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), have proven to be useful to quantitatively reflect specific cation effects in aqueous solutions (J. M. Paredes, L. Crovetto, A. Orte, J. M. Alvarez-Pez and E. M. Talavera, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 1685-1694). Since these phenomena are more sensitive to anions than to cations, in this paper we have accounted for the influence of salts with the sodium cation in common, and the anion classified according to the empirical Hofmeister series, on the proton transfer rate constants of TG-II. We demonstrate that the presence of ions accelerates the rate of the ground-state proton-exchange reaction in the same order than ions that affect ion solvation in water. The combination of FLCS with a fluorophore undergoing proton transfer reactions in the ground state, along with the desirable feature of a pseudo-dark state when the dye is protonated, allows one unique direct determination of kinetic rate constants of the proton exchange chemical reaction. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  17. Connection between effective-range expansion and nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmukhamedov, R.; Baye, D.

    2011-01-01

    Explicit relations between the effective-range expansion and the nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay B→A+a are derived for an arbitrary orbital momentum together with the corresponding location condition for the (A+a) bound-state energy. They are valid both for the charged case and for the neutral case. Combining these relations with the standard effective-range function up to order six makes it possible to reduce to two the number of free effective-range parameters if an ANC value is known from experiment. Values for the scattering length, effective range, and form parameter are determined in this way for the 16 O+p, α+t, and α+ 3 He collisions in partial waves where a bound state exists by using available ANCs deduced from experiments. The resulting effective-range expansions for these collisions are valid up to energies larger than 5 MeV.

  18. More is not always better: modeling the effects of elastic exoskeleton compliance on underlying ankle muscle–tendon dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Farris, Dominic J; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    Development of robotic exoskeletons to assist/enhance human locomotor performance involves lengthy prototyping, testing, and analysis. This process is further convoluted by variability in limb/body morphology and preferred gait patterns between individuals. In an attempt to expedite this process, and establish a physiological basis for actuator prescription, we developed a simple, predictive model of human neuromechanical adaptation to a passive elastic exoskeleton applied at the ankle joint during a functional task. We modeled the human triceps surae–Achilles tendon muscle tendon unit (MTU) as a single Hill-type muscle, or contractile element (CE), and series tendon, or series elastic element (SEE). This modeled system was placed under gravitational load and underwent cyclic stimulation at a regular frequency (i.e. hopping) with and without exoskeleton (Exo) assistance. We explored the effect that both Exo stiffness (k Exo ) and muscle activation (A stim ) had on combined MTU and Exo (MTU + Exo), MTU, and CE/SEE mechanics and energetics. Model accuracy was verified via qualitative and quantitative comparisons between modeled and prior experimental outcomes. We demonstrated that reduced A stim can be traded for increased k Exo to maintain consistent MTU + Exo mechanics (i.e. average positive power ( P-bar mech + ) output) from an unassisted condition (i.e. k Exo =0 kN⋅m −1 ). For these regions of parameter space, our model predicted a reduction in MTU force, SEE energy cycling, and metabolic rate ( P-bar met ), as well as constant CE P-bar mech + output compared to unassisted conditions. This agreed with previous experimental observations, demonstrating our model’s predictive ability. Model predictions also provided insight into mechanisms of metabolic cost minimization, and/or enhanced mechanical performance, and we concluded that both of these outcomes cannot be achieved simultaneously, and that one must come at the detriment of the other in a spring

  19. More is not always better: modeling the effects of elastic exoskeleton compliance on underlying ankle muscle-tendon dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Farris, Dominic J; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-11-24

    Development of robotic exoskeletons to assist/enhance human locomotor performance involves lengthy prototyping, testing, and analysis. This process is further convoluted by variability in limb/body morphology and preferred gait patterns between individuals. In an attempt to expedite this process, and establish a physiological basis for actuator prescription, we developed a simple, predictive model of human neuromechanical adaptation to a passive elastic exoskeleton applied at the ankle joint during a functional task. We modeled the human triceps surae-Achilles tendon muscle tendon unit (MTU) as a single Hill-type muscle, or contractile element (CE), and series tendon, or series elastic element (SEE). This modeled system was placed under gravitational load and underwent cyclic stimulation at a regular frequency (i.e. hopping) with and without exoskeleton (Exo) assistance. We explored the effect that both Exo stiffness (kExo) and muscle activation (Astim) had on combined MTU and Exo (MTU + Exo), MTU, and CE/SEE mechanics and energetics. Model accuracy was verified via qualitative and quantitative comparisons between modeled and prior experimental outcomes. We demonstrated that reduced Astim can be traded for increased kExo to maintain consistent MTU + Exo mechanics (i.e. average positive power (P⁺mech) output) from an unassisted condition (i.e. kExo = 0 kN · m⁻¹). For these regions of parameter space, our model predicted a reduction in MTU force, SEE energy cycling, and metabolic rate (Pmet), as well as constant CE P⁺mech output compared to unassisted conditions. This agreed with previous experimental observations, demonstrating our model's predictive ability. Model predictions also provided insight into mechanisms of metabolic cost minimization, and/or enhanced mechanical performance, and we concluded that both of these outcomes cannot be achieved simultaneously, and that one must come at the detriment of the other in a spring-assisted compliant MTU.

  20. Collusion and the elasticity of demand

    OpenAIRE

    David Collie

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of collusion in infinitely repeated Cournot oligopoly games has generally assumed that demand is linear, but this note uses constant-elasticity demand functions to investigate how the elasticity of demand affects the sustainability of collusion.

  1. Isotopic effects in elastic and inelastic 12,13C + 16,18O scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Rudchik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available New angular-distribution data of 13С + 18О elastic and inelastic scattering at the energy Elab(18O = 105 MeV were obtained for the transitions to the ground and excited states 3.088 MeV(1/2+, 3.555 MeV (1/2-, 3.854 MeV (5/2+ of 13С and 1.982 MeV (2+, 3.555 MeV (4+, 3.921 MeV (2+, 4.456 MeV (1-, 5.098 MeV (3-, 5.260 MeV (2+ of 18O. These and the 13С + 18О elastic scattering data taken from the literature at the energies Elab(18O = 15, 20, 24, 31 MeV and Elab(13С = 24 MeV were analysed within the optical model and coupled-reaction-channels methods. Sets of 13С + 18О optical potential parameters and their energy dependence were obtained. Contributions of potential scattering and transfer reactions to the elastic and inelastic channels of 13С + 18О scattering were studied. Isotopic differences (effects in 12, 13С + 16, 18О optical potential parameters were investigated.

  2. Modeling of demand response in electricity markets : effects of price elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banda, E.C.; Tuan, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    A design mechanism for the optimal participation of customer load in electricity markets was presented. In particular, this paper presented a modified market model for the optimal procurement of interruptible loads participating in day-ahead electricity markets. The proposed model considers the effect of price elasticity and demand-response functions. The objective was to determine the role that price elasticity plays in electricity markets. The simulation model can help the Independent System Operator (ISO) identify customers offering the lowest price of interruptible loads and load flow patterns that avoid problems associated with transmission congestion and transmission losses. Various issues associated with procurement of demand-response offerings such as advance notification, locational aspect of load, and power factor of the loads, were considered. It was shown that demand response can mitigate price volatility by allowing the ISO to maintain operating reserves during peak load periods. It was noted that the potential benefits of the demand response program would be reduced when price elasticity of demand is taken into account. This would most likely occur in actual developed open electricity markets, such as Nordpool. This study was based on the CIGRE 32-bus system, which represents the Swedish high voltage power system. It was modified for this study to include a broad range of customer characteristics. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs

  3. Newton law corrections and instabilities in f(R) gravity with the effective cosmological constant epoch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2007-01-01

    We consider class of modified f(R) gravities with the effective cosmological constant epoch at the early and late universe. Such models pass most of solar system tests as well they satisfy to cosmological bounds. Despite their very attractive properties, it is shown that one realistic class of such models may lead to significant Newton law corrections at large cosmological scales. Nevertheless, these corrections are small at solar system as well as at the future universe. Another realistic model with acceptable Newton law regime shows the matter instability

  4. A Brillouin scattering study of the effect of chemical passivation on the elastic properties of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H. J.; Kuok, M. H.; Ng, S. C.; Boukherroub, R.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2002-07-01

    Brillouin scattering has been performed to probe acoustic waves in porous silicon films that have been chemically modified with either 1-decene, decyl aldehyde, undecylenic acid, or ethyl undecylenate. The shift in the frequencies of acoustic modes in the passivated porous silicon samples, relative to those in freshly prepared porous silicon, is different for different chemical modifiers. The magnitude of the frequency shift is qualitatively correlated with the change, caused by the passivation, in the average densities and elastic constants of the samples.

  5. Anisotropic failure and size effects in periodic honeycomb materials: A gradient-elasticity approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réthoré, Julien; Dang, Thi Bach Tuyet; Kaltenbrunner, Christine

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a fracture mechanics model for the analysis of crack propagation in periodic honeycomb materials. The model is based on gradient-elasticity which enables us to account for the effect of the material structure at the macroscopic scale. For simulating the propagation of cracks along an arbitrary path, the numerical implementation is elaborated based on an extended finite element method with the required level of continuity. The two main features captured by the model are directionality and size effect. The numerical predictions are consistent with experimental results on honeycomb materials but also with results reported in the literature for microstructurally short cracks in metals.

  6. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  7. Effects of hydrostatic pressure and biaxial strains on the elastic and electronic properties of t-C8B2N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyan; Shi, Liwei; Li, Shuaiqi; Duan, Yifeng; Zhang, Shaobo; Xia, Wangsuo

    2018-04-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure and biaxial strains on the elastic and electronic properties of a superhard material t-C8B2N2 have been studied using first-principles calculations. The structure is proven to be mechanically and dynamically stable under the applied external forces. All the elastic constants (except C66) and elastic modulus increase (decrease) with increasing pressure and compressive (tensile) biaxial strain ɛxx. A microscopic model is used to calculate the Vicker's hardness of every single bond as well as the crystal. The hardness of t-C8B2N2 (64.7 GPa) exceeds that of c-BN (62 GPa) and increases obviously by employing pressure and compressive ɛxx. Furthermore, the Debye temperature and anisotropy of sound velocities for t-C8B2N2 have been discussed. t-C8B2N2 undergoes an indirect to direct bandgap transition when ɛxx > 2%; however, the indirect bandgap character of the material remains under pressure.

  8. The effects of mucopolysaccharide polysulphate on hydration and elasticity of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Eimpunth, Sasima; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2011-01-01

    Background. Mucopolysaccharide polysulphate (MPS) has been used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent for over 50 years. Its chemical structure permits considerable hydrogen bonding with adjacent water molecules, which effectively leads to hydration of the surrounding tissue. In addition, it stimulates endogenous hyaluronate synthesis, resulting in an increase in water-binding capacity and viscoelasticity of the skin. Objective. To study the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on hydration and elasticity of human skin. Methods. The first part of this study was a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study which included 60 female volunteers aged 30-45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825. The volunteers were treated with either 0.1% MPS or vehicle control. All subjects were asked to apply 1 g of cream to their face twice daily for a total period of 4 weeks. Skin hydration and elasticity were measured at baseline and week 4 with Corneometer CM 825 and cutometer MPA 580, respectively, at forehead and both cheeks. The second part of this study focused on the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on skin hydration after single application. 20 female volunteers aged 30-45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825, were recruited to the study. All subjects were asked to apply 2 g of 0.1% MPS cream on entirely randomly selected forearm. Skin hydration at the middle of both forearms was measured at baseline, immediately after application, and every 1 hour after application for a period of 10 hours. Results. 57 subjects (28 in vehicle control group, 29 in MPS) completed treatment protocol. The baseline skin hydration of both groups was not significantly different (P = 0.47). Hower, there was a statistically significant difference in skin hydration at 4 weeks between MPS and placebo group (P = 0.01). Skin elasticity was significantly improved at week 4 in both groups (vehicle-control, P skin elasticity between MPS and vehicle-control group

  9. Environmental Effects on Long Term Displacement Data of Woven Fabric Webbings Under Constant Load for Inflatable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, WInfred S.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Duncan, Quinton; Plant, James

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of environmental temperature and humidity conditions on long-term creep displacement data of high strength Kevlar and VectranTM woven fabric webbings under constant load for inflatable structures is presented. The restraint layer of an inflatable structure for long-duration space exploration missions is designed to bear load and consists of an assembly of high strength webbings. Long-term creep displacement data of webbings can be utilized by designers to validate service life parameters of restraint layers of inflatable structures. Five groups of high-strength webbings were researched over a two year period. Each group had a unique webbing length, load rating, applied load, and test period. The five groups consisted of 1.) 6K Vectran webbings loaded to 49% ultimate tensile strength (UTS), 2.) 6K Vectran webbings loaded to 55% UTS, 3.) 12.5K Vectran webbings loaded to 22% UTS, 4.) 6K Kevlar webbings loaded to 40% and 43% UTS, and 5.) 6K Kevlar webbings loaded to 48% UTS. Results show that all webbing groups exhibit the initial two stages of three of a typical creep curve of an elastic material. Results also show that webbings exhibit unique local wave patterns over the duration of the test period. Data indicate that the local pattern is primarily generated by daily variations in relative humidity values within the test facility. Data indicate that after a three to six month period, where webbings reach a steady-state creep condition, an annual sinusoidal displacement pattern is exhibited, primarily due to variations in annual mean temperature values. Data indicates that variations in daily temperature values and annual mean humidity values have limited secondary effects on creep displacement behavior. Results show that webbings in groups 2 and 5 do not exhibit well defined annual displacement patterns because the magnitude of the applied loads cause large deformations, and data indicate that material yielding within a webbing

  10. Chiral symmetry effect on the pion-nucleon coupling constant; O efeito da simetria quiral na constante de acoplamento pion-nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Vanilse da Silva

    1997-12-31

    In this work we study the effects of chiral symmetry in the pion-nucleon coupling constant in the context of the linear {sigma}- model. First, we introduce the linear {sigma}-model and we discuss the phenomenological hypothesis of CVC and PCAC. Next, we calculate the coupling constant g+{pi}{sub NN}(q{sup 2}) and the nucleon pionic mean square radius considering the contribution of all the diagrams up to one-loop in the framework of the linear {sigma}-model for different values of the mass of the sigma meson and we compare them with the phenomenological form factors. Finally we make an extension of the linear {sigma}-model that consists of taking into account the mass differences of ions and nucleons into the Lagrangian of the model, to study the change dependence of g{sub {pi}nn} (q{sup 2}) and of the mean square radius. (author) 21 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Effect of hydrogel elasticity and ephrinB2-immobilized manner on Runx2 expression of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Masaya; Uyama, Hiroshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to design the manner of ephrinB2 immobilized onto polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels with varied elasticity and evaluate the effect of hydrogels elasticity and the immobilized manner of ephrinB2 on the Runx2 expression of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). The PAAm hydrogels were prepared by the radical polymerization of acrylamide (AAm), and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS). By changing the BIS concentration, the elasticity of PAAm hydrogels changed from 1 to 70kPa. For the bio-specific immobilization of ephrinB2, a chimeric protein of ephrinB2 and Fc domain was immobilized onto protein A-conjugated PAAm hydrogels by making use of the bio-specific interaction between the Fc domain and protein A. When hMSC were cultured on the ephrinB2-immobilized PAAm hydrogels with varied elasticity, the morphology of hMSC was of cuboidal shape on the PAAm hydrogels immobilized with ephrinB2 compared with non-conjugated ones, irrespective of the hydrogels elasticity. The bio-specific immobilization of ephrinB2 enhanced the level of Runx2 expression. The expression level was significantly high for the hydrogels of 3.6 and 5.9kPa elasticity with bio-specific immobilization of ephrinB2 compared with other hydrogels with the same elasticity. The hydrogels showed a significantly down-regulated RhoA activity. It is concluded that the Runx2 expression of hMSC is synergistically influenced by the hydrogels elasticity and their immobilized manner of ephrinB2 immobilized. Differentiation fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is modified by biochemical and biophysical factors, such as elasticity and signal proteins. However, there are few experiments about combinations of them. In this study, to evaluate the synergistic effect of them on cell properties of MSC, we established to design the manner of Eph signal ligand, ephrinB2, immobilized onto polyacrylamide hydrogels with varied elasticity. The gene expression level of an osteogenic maker, Runx2, was enhanced

  12. Energy and target dependence of projectile breakup effect in the elastic scattering of 6Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuragi, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Over the wide range of incident energy (E lab = 40 ∼ 170 MeV) and target mass number (A = 12 ∼ 208), projectile breakup effects in the elastic scattering of 6 Li have been investigated with a microscopic coupled-channel method. The coupling to the 6 Li → α + d breakup process is treated with the method of coupled discretized continuum channels (CDCC). 6 Li-target interactions are provided by the folding of the M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon potential with nucleon densities of colliding nuclei. The calculation well reproduces the observed elastic scattering for all the targets and incident energies without any renormalization in the real folding potentials. The breakup effect is found to depend little on the energy and target, which is confirmed by calculating the dynamical polarization potentials induced by the coupling to the breakup process. Almost irrespectively of energy and target, the potential has a repulsive real part with strength of about 40 % of the folding potential in addition to a negligible imaginary part, which explains well the empirical reduction factor of the double-folding model. Discussions are made on the origin of repulsive nature of the breakup effect. (author)

  13. Separating the effect of respiration from the heart rate variability for cases of constant harmonic breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kircher Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart Rate Variability studies are a known measure for the autonomous control of the heart rate. In special situations, its interpretation can be ambiguous, since the respiration has a major influence on the heart rate variability. For this reason it has often been proposed to measure Heart Rate Variability, while the subjects are breathing at a constant respiration rate. That way the spectral influence of the respiration is known. In this work we propose to remove this constant respiratory influence from the heart rate and the Heart Rate Variability parameters to gain respiration free autonomous controlled heart rate signal. The spectral respiratory component in the heart rate signal is detected and characterized. Subsequently the respiratory effect on Heart Rate Variability is removed using spectral filtering approaches, such as the Notch filter or the Raised Cosine filter. As a result new decoupled Heart Variability parameters are gained, which could lead to new additional interpretations of the autonomous control of the heart rate.

  14. Effect of Hartree-Fock exact exchange on intramolecular magnetic coupling constants of organic diradicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Daeheum; Ko, Kyoung Chul; Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Wakayama, Kazufumi; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi; Lee, Jin Yong

    2015-01-01

    The intramolecular magnetic coupling constant (J) of diradical systems linked with five- or six-membered aromatic rings was calculated to obtain the scaling factor (experimental J/calculated J ratio) for various density functional theory (DFT) functionals. Scaling factors of group A (PBE, TPSSh, B3LYP, B97-1, X3LYP, PBE0, and BH&HLYP) and B (M06-L, M06, M06-2X, and M06-HF) were shown to decrease as the amount of Hartree-Fock exact exchange (HFx) increases, in other words, overestimation of calculated J becomes more severe as the HFx increases. We further investigated the effect of HFx fraction of DFT functional on J value, spin contamination, and spin density distributions by comparing the B3LYP analogues containing different amount of HFx. It was revealed that spin contamination and spin densities at each atom increases as the HFx increases. Above all, newly developed BLYP-5 functional, which has 5% of HFx, was found to have the scaling factor of 1.029, indicating that calculated J values are very close to that of experimental values without scaling. BLYP-5 has potential to be utilized for accurate evaluation of intramolecular magnetic coupling constant (J) of diradicals linked by five- or six-membered aromatic ring couplers.

  15. Revisiting the decoupling effects in the running of the Cosmological Constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipin, Oleg; Melic, Blazenka

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the decoupling effects associated with heavy particles in the renormalization group running of the vacuum energy in a mass-dependent renormalization scheme. We find the running of the vacuum energy stemming from the Higgs condensate in the entire energy range and show that it behaves as expected from the simple dimensional arguments meaning that it exhibits the quadratic sensitivity to the mass of the heavy particles in the infrared regime. The consequence of such a running to the fine-tuning problem with the measured value of the Cosmological Constant is analyzed and the constraint on the mass spectrum of a given model is derived. We show that in the Standard Model (SM) this fine-tuning constraint is not satisfied while in the massless theories this constraint formally coincides with the well known Veltman condition. We also provide a remarkably simple extension of the SM where saturation of this constraint enables us to predict the radiative Higgs mass correctly. Generalization to constant curvature spaces is also given. (orig.)

  16. Effect of Hartree-Fock exact exchange on intramolecular magnetic coupling constants of organic diradicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Daeheum; Ko, Kyoung Chul; Lee, Jin Yong, E-mail: jinylee@skku.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Wakayama, Kazufumi; Yoshikawa, Takeshi [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nakai, Hiromi, E-mail: nakai@waseda.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-01-14

    The intramolecular magnetic coupling constant (J) of diradical systems linked with five- or six-membered aromatic rings was calculated to obtain the scaling factor (experimental J/calculated J ratio) for various density functional theory (DFT) functionals. Scaling factors of group A (PBE, TPSSh, B3LYP, B97-1, X3LYP, PBE0, and BH and HLYP) and B (M06-L, M06, M06-2X, and M06-HF) were shown to decrease as the amount of Hartree-Fock exact exchange (HFx) increases, in other words, overestimation of calculated J becomes more severe as the HFx increases. We further investigated the effect of HFx fraction of DFT functional on J value, spin contamination, and spin density distributions by comparing the B3LYP analogues containing different amount of HFx. It was revealed that spin contamination and spin densities at each atom increases as the HFx increases. Above all, newly developed BLYP-5 functional, which has 5% of HFx, was found to have the scaling factor of 1.029, indicating that calculated J values are very close to that of experimental values without scaling. BLYP-5 has potential to be utilized for accurate evaluation of intramolecular magnetic coupling constant (J) of diradicals linked by five- or six-membered aromatic ring couplers.

  17. Revisiting the decoupling effects in the running of the Cosmological Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipin, Oleg; Melic, Blazenka [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Division of Theoretical Physics, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2017-09-15

    We revisit the decoupling effects associated with heavy particles in the renormalization group running of the vacuum energy in a mass-dependent renormalization scheme. We find the running of the vacuum energy stemming from the Higgs condensate in the entire energy range and show that it behaves as expected from the simple dimensional arguments meaning that it exhibits the quadratic sensitivity to the mass of the heavy particles in the infrared regime. The consequence of such a running to the fine-tuning problem with the measured value of the Cosmological Constant is analyzed and the constraint on the mass spectrum of a given model is derived. We show that in the Standard Model (SM) this fine-tuning constraint is not satisfied while in the massless theories this constraint formally coincides with the well known Veltman condition. We also provide a remarkably simple extension of the SM where saturation of this constraint enables us to predict the radiative Higgs mass correctly. Generalization to constant curvature spaces is also given. (orig.)

  18. Effect of bending stiffness on the peeling behavior of an elastic thin film on a rigid substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhilong; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the experimental observation that the maximum peeling force of elastic films on rigid substrates does not always emerge at the steady-state peeling stage, but sometimes at the initial one, a theoretical model is established in this paper, in which not only the effect of the film's bending stiffness on the peeling force is considered, but also the whole peeling process, from the initiation of debonding to the steady-state stage, is characterized. Typical peeling force-displacement curves and deformed profiles of the film reappear for the whole peeling process. For the case of a film with relatively large bending stiffness, the maximum peeling force is found arising at the initial peeling stage and the larger the stiffness of the film, the larger the maximum peeling force is. With the peeling distance increasing, the peeling force is reduced from the maximum to a constant at the steady-state stage. For the case of a film with relatively small stiffness, the peeling force increases monotonically at the initial stage and then achieves a constant as the maximum at the steady-state stage. Furthermore, the peeling forces in the steady-state stage are compared with those of the classical Kendall model. All the theoretical predictions agree well with the existing experimental and numerical observations, from which the maximum peeling force can be predicted precisely no matter what the stiffness of the film is. The results in this paper should be very helpful in the design and assessment of the film-substrate interface.

  19. Effects of size and defects on the elasticity of silicon nanocantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghian, Hamed; Goosen, Johannes F L; Van Keulen, Fred; Yang, Chung-Kai; Bossche, Andre; French, Paddy J; Staufer, Urs

    2010-01-01

    The size-dependent elastic behavior of silicon nanocantilevers and nanowires, specifically the effective Young's modulus, has been determined by experimental measurements and theoretical investigations. The size dependence becomes more significant as the devices scale down from micro- to nano-dimensions, which has mainly been attributed to surface effects. However, discrepancies between experimental measurements and computational investigations show that there could be other influences besides surface effects. In this paper, we try to determine to what extent the surface effects, such as surface stress, surface elasticity, surface contamination and native oxide layers, influence the effective Young's modulus of silicon nanocantilevers. For this purpose, silicon cantilevers were fabricated in the top device layer of silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers, which were thinned down to 14 nm. The effective Young's modulus was extracted with the electrostatic pull-in instability method, recently developed by the authors (H Sadeghian et al 2009 Appl. Phys. Lett. 94 221903). In this work, the drop in the effective Young's modulus was measured to be significant at around 150 nm thick cantilevers. The comparison between theoretical models and experimental measurements demonstrates that, although the surface effects influence the effective Young's modulus of silicon to some extent, they alone are insufficient to explain why the effective Young's modulus decreases prematurely. It was observed that the fabrication-induced defects abruptly increased when the device layer was thinned to below 100 nm. These defects became visible as pinholes during HF-etching. It is speculated that they could be the origin of the reduced effective Young's modulus experimentally observed in ultra-thin silicon cantilevers.

  20. Effects of elastic band exercises on physical ability and muscular topography of elderlyfemales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Suk Bum; Kim, Seong Wook

    2018-02-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of band exercise types on the physical ability and muscular topography for elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six females older than 65 years were divided into the dynamic band exercise (DBE; n=13) group and the Static band exercise (SBE; n=13) group. Each participant performed 12 weeks of elastic band exercises. Physical abilities were measured by leg extension power, sitting trunk flexion, closed eyes foot balance, and time to get up. Changes in muscle topography were evaluated with Moire measurement equipment for the chest, abdomen, and lumbar region. All results were compared before and after 12 weeks of exercise. [Results] Changes in physical ability were significantly increased in both groups. The scores for the muscular topography of the chest, abdomen, lumbar region, and all body parts was significantly improved in both groups for closed eyes foot balance. There were more improvements in the DBE group. [Conclusion] Two types of static and dynamic elastic band exercises effectively changed the physical fitness and muscle topography of elderly females. Therefore, to increase the effects of exercise, dynamic band exercises are considered useful. Because band exercises are simple, they can be used to maintain the health of elderly people.

  1. Studies on Effective Elastic Properties of CNT/Nano-Clay Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a computational approach to predict elastic propertiesof hybrid nanocomposite material prepared by adding nano-clayplatelets to conventional CNT-reinforced epoxy system. In comparison to polymers alone/single-fiber reinforced polymers, if an additional fiber is added to the composite structure, it was found a drastic improvement in resultant properties. In this regard, effective elastic moduli of a hybrid nano composite are determined by using finite element (FE) model with square representative volume element (RVE). Continuum mechanics based homogenization of the nano-filler reinforced composite is considered for evaluating the volumetric average of the stresses and the strains under different periodic boundary conditions.A three phase Halpin-Tsai approach is selected to obtain the analytical result based on micromechanical modeling. The effect of the volume fractions of CNTs and nano-clay platelets on the mechanical behavior is studied. Two different RVEs of nano-clay platelets were used to investigate the influence of nano-filler geometry on composite properties. The combination of high aspect ratio of CNTs and larger surface area of clay platelets contribute to the stiffening effect of the hybrid samples. Results of analysis are validated with Halpin-Tsai empirical formulae.

  2. Testing for constant nonparametric effects in general semiparametric regression models with interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Jiawei

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work was originally motivated by a unique testing problem in genetic epidemiology (Chatterjee, et al., 2006) that involved a typical generalized linear model but with an additional term reminiscent of the Tukey one-degree-of-freedom formulation, and their interest was in testing for main effects of the genetic variables, while gaining statistical power by allowing for a possible interaction between genes and the environment. Later work (Maity, et al., 2009) involved the possibility of modeling the environmental variable nonparametrically, but they focused on whether there was a parametric main effect for the genetic variables. In this paper, we consider the complementary problem, where the interest is in testing for the main effect of the nonparametrically modeled environmental variable. We derive a generalized likelihood ratio test for this hypothesis, show how to implement it, and provide evidence that our method can improve statistical power when compared to standard partially linear models with main effects only. We use the method for the primary purpose of analyzing data from a case-control study of colorectal adenoma.

  3. Towards a physical interpretation of substituent effect: Quantum chemical interpretation of Hammett substituent constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaksin, Konstantin S.; Szatylowicz, Halina; Krygowski, Tadeusz M.

    2017-06-01

    Quantitative description of substituent effects is of a great importance especially in organic chemistry and QSAR-type treatments. The proposed approaches: substituent effect stabilization energy (SESE) and charge of the substituent active region (cSAR) provide substituent effect characteristics, physically independent of the Hammett's substituent constants, σ. To document abilities of these descriptors the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method is employed to examine changes in properties of a reaction center Y (Y = COOH or COO- groups) and a transmitting moiety (benzene ring) due to substituent effects in a series of meta- and para-X-substituted benzoic acid and benzoate anion derivatives (X = NMe2, NH2, OH, OMe, CH3, H, F, Cl, CF3, CN, CHO, COMe, CONH2, COOH, NO2, NO). The transmitting moiety is described by aromaticity indices HOMA and NICS(1). Furthermore, an advantage of the cSAR characteristic is the ability to use it to describe both electron donating/accepting properties of a substituent as well as a reaction center. It allows demonstration of the reverse substituent effects of COOH and COO- groups on substituent X.

  4. Calculating Effective Elastic Properties of Berea Sandstone Using Segmentation-less Method without Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, K.; Goldfarb, E. J.; Tisato, N.

    2017-12-01

    Digital rock physics (DRP) allows performing common laboratory experiments on numerical models to estimate, for example, rock hydraulic permeability. The standard procedure of DRP involves turning a rock sample into a numerical array using X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT). Each element of the array bears a value proportional to the X-ray attenuation of the rock at the element (voxel). However, the traditional DRP methodology, which includes segmentation, over-predicts rock moduli by significant amounts (e.g., 100%). Recently, a new methodology - the segmentation-less approach - has been proposed leading to more accurate DRP estimate of elastic moduli. This new method is based on homogenization theory. Typically, segmentation-less approach requires calibration points from known density objects, known as targets. Not all micro-CT datasets have these reference points. Here, we describe how we perform segmentation- and target-less DRP to estimate elastic properties of rocks (i.e., elastic moduli), which are crucial parameters to perform subsurface modeling. We calculate the elastic properties of a Berea sandstone sample that was scanned at a resolution of 40 microns per voxel. We transformed the CT images into density matrices using polynomial fitting curve with four calibration points: the whole rock, the center of quartz grains, the center of iron oxide grains, and the center of air-filled volumes. The first calibration point is obtained by assigning the density of the whole rock to the average of all CT-numbers in the dataset. Then, we locate the center of each phase by finding local extrema point in the dataset. The average CT-numbers of these center points are assigned the density equal to either pristine minerals (quartz and iron oxide) or air. Next, density matrices are transformed to porosity and moduli matrices by means of an effective medium theory. Finally, effective static bulk and shear modulus are numerically calculated by using a Matlab code

  5. Piezoelectric excitation of elastic waves in centrosymmetrical potassium tantalate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, G.A.; Lemanov, V.V.; Sotnikov, A.V.; Syrnikov, P.P.; Yushin, N.K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiment results on excitation of elastic oscillations in potassium tantalate crystals are considered. The experiment has been conducted by usual for supersonic measurements technique: an impulse of the variable electric field has been applied to one of plane-parallel sample end-faces, at the same end-face signals corresponding to elastic pulses propagating in the crystal have been detected. Basic radiopulses parameters: basic frequency 30 MHz, duration 1-2 μs, pulse recurrence frequency 500 Hz, power 10 W. The investigation carried out has shown that the application to the sample at T=80 K temperature of constant external electrical field parallel to direction of elastic wave propagation leads to hysteresis dependence of elastic waves amplitude on the external voltage value. With temperature increase the hysteresis loop is deformed. It has been found when investigating temperature dependence of elastic wave amplitude that in the absence of external constant electrical field in short-circuited by constant current samples the oxillation excitation effect disappears at T approximately equal to 200 K. An essential influence on the elastic wave amplitude value is exerted by illumination of the crystal surface by light with 360-630 nm wave length. At T 130 K bacaee of photovoltaic effect in illuminated samples [ru

  6. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  7. Effect of collisional elasticity on the Bagnold rheology of sheared frictionless two-dimensional disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vâgberg, Daniel; Olsson, Peter; Teitel, S.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out constant volume simulations of steady-state, shear-driven flow in a simple model of athermal, bidisperse, soft-core, frictionless disks in two dimensions, using a dissipation law that gives rise to Bagnoldian rheology. Focusing on the small strain rate limit, we map out the rheological behavior as a function of particle packing fraction ϕ and a parameter Q that measures the elasticity of binary particle collisions. We find a Q*(ϕ ) that marks the clear crossover from a region characteristic of strongly inelastic collisions, Q Q* , and give evidence that Q*(ϕ ) diverges as ϕ →ϕJ , the shear-driven jamming transition. We thus conclude that the jamming transition at any value of Q behaves the same as the strongly inelastic case, provided one is sufficiently close to ϕJ. We further characterize the differing nature of collisions in the strongly inelastic vs weakly inelastic regions, and recast our results into the constitutive equation form commonly used in discussions of hard granular matter.

  8. Effects of breakup couplings on 8B + 58 Ni elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubian, J.; Correa, T.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Canto, L.F.; Aguilera, E.F.; Gomez-Camacho, A.; Quiroz, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear reactions involving weakly bound nuclei have been extensively investigated over the last years. Because of the low breakup threshold, collisions of weakly bound systems have large breakup cross sections. Nuclear reactions induced by 8 B projectiles have attracted particular interest, because the Coulomb dissociation of this nucleus leads to important information for understanding solar neutrino emission. Because the breakup process involves unbound states of the projectile's fragments is necessary to approximate the continuum by a finite number of channels. This is achieved by continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) method. Recently, new data have become available for the 8 B + 58 Ni system. Aguilera et al measured elastic angular distributions at several collisions energies, in the barrier region. In the present work, we perform a theoretical study of the effect of the breakup channel on the elastic angular distributions for the 8 B + 58 Ni system, using the CDCC method. The result of our calculations were in excellent agreement with the experimental results. We have also investigated the effects of inelastic excitations and of continuum-continuum couplings on the angular distributions. We found that inelastic excitations do not have an appreciable influence while continuum- continuum couplings are of utmost importance. We have shown that the multipole expansion of the coupling interaction is dominated by monopole, dipole, and quadrupole terms. Higher multipoles can be neglected. (author)

  9. Interface effects on elastic behavior of a screw dislocation around double nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen

    2014-01-01

    The elastic behavior of a screw dislocation around double nanowires (NWs) is addressed with taking into account the interface stress effect in controlling mechanical response of nanoscale structures. The stress boundary conditions at the interface of the NWs are modified by incorporating surface/interface stress. The analytic solution of complex functions of the right NW, the infinite matrix and the left NW are obtained by applying the complex variable method. The equilibrium positions and the image force acting on the dislocation of a screw dislocation near one of the NWs are discussed in detail and compared with those obtained within the classical theory of elasticity. It is shown that the NWs possess a significant local softening or hardening at the interface, which can change the nature of the equilibrium positions for the dislocation. The radius ratio between NWs has profound effects on the equilibrium position. Additionally, the soft NW with the positive interface stress inhibits the dislocation motion to enhance its own structural stability.

  10. Long term fuel price elasticity: effects on mobility tool ownership and residential location choice - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erath, A.; Axhausen, K. W.

    2010-04-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the long-term effects of fuel price elasticity. The study analyses how mobility tool usage and ownership as well as residence location choice are affected by rising fuel costs. Based on econometric models, long-term fuel price elasticity is derived. The authors quote that the demand reactions to higher fuel prices mainly observed are the reduction of mileage and the consideration of smaller-engined and diesel-driven cars. As cars with natural gas powered engines and electric drives were hardly considered in the survey, the results of the natural gas model can, according to the authors, only serve as a trend. No stable model could be estimated for the demand and usage of electric cars. A literature overview is presented and the design of the survey is discussed, whereby socio-demographical variables and the effects of price and residence changes are discussed. Modelling of mobility tool factors and results obtained are looked at. Finally, residence choice factors are modelled and discussed. Several appendices complete the report.

  11. Effect of the dielectric constant of mesoscopic particle on the exciton binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Zuyou; Gu Shiwei

    1991-09-01

    For materials with big exciton reduced mass and big dielectric constant, such as TiO 2 , the variation of dielectric constant with the radius of an ultrafine particle (UFP) is important for determining the exciton binding energy. For the first time a phenomenological formula of the dielectric constant of a UFP with its radius in mesoscopic range is put forward in order to explain the optical properties of TiO 2 UFP. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  12. Effect of complexing reagents on the ionization constant of boric acid and its relation to isotopic exchange separation factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of change in concentration of complexing reagents having two or more hydroxyl groups, viz., ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dextrose and mannitol on the ionization constant of boric acid has been studied by pH-metric titration method. The effect of increase in ionization constant of boric acid on isotopic exchange separation factor for the separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography has been studied by the batch method. (author). 9 refs

  13. Structural, elastic and thermodynamic properties under pressure and temperature effects of MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhemadou, A., E-mail: a_bouhemadou@yahoo.fr [Laboratory for Developing New Materials and their Characterization, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Haddadi, K. [Laboratory for Developing New Materials and their Characterization, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique (LPQ3M), Departement de Technologie, Universite de Mascara, 29000 Mascara (Algeria); Rached, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Sidi-Bel-Abbes, 22000 (Algeria); Bin-Omran, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-06-15

    A density functional-based method is used to investigate the structural, elastic and thermodynamic properties of the cubic spinel semiconductors MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} at different pressures and temperatures. Computed ground structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Single-crystal elastic parameters are calculated for pressure up to 10 GPa and temperature up to 1200 K. The obtained elastic constants values satisfy the requirement of mechanical stability, indicating that MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} compounds could be stable in the investigated pressure range. Isotropic elastic parameters for ideal polycrystalline MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} aggregates are computed in the framework of the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation. Pressure and thermal effects on some macroscopic properties such as lattice constant, volume expansion coefficient and heat capacities are predicted using the quasi-harmonic Debye model in which the lattice vibrations are taken into account.

  14. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  15. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  16. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  17. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  18. Size Effects on Surface Elastic Waves in a Semi-Infinite Medium with Atomic Defect Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates small-scale effects on the Rayleigh-type surface wave propagation in an isotopic elastic half-space upon laser irradiation. Based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics, the basic equations of wave motion and laser-induced atomic defect dynamics are derived. Dispersion equation that governs the Rayleigh surface waves in the considered medium is derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients which characterize surface waves are obtained. It is shown that if the generation rate is above the critical value, due to concentration-elastic instability, nanometer sized ordered concentration-strain structures on the surface or volume of solids arise. The spatial scale of these structures is proportional to the characteristic length of defect-atom interaction and increases with the increase of the temperature of the medium. The critical value of the pump parameter is directly proportional to recombination rate and inversely proportional to deformational potentials of defects.

  19. Effects of matrix elasticity and cell density on human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ruyue; Li, Julie Yi-Shuan; Yeh, Yiting; Yang, Li; Chien, Shu

    2013-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can differentiate into various cell types, including osteogenic and chondrogenic cells. The matrix elasticity and cell seeding density are important factors in hMSCs differentiation. We cultured hMSCs at different seeding densities on polyacrylamide hydrogels with different stiffness corresponding to Young's moduli of 1.6 ± 0.3 and 40 ± 3.6 kPa. The promotion of osteogenic marker expression by hard gel is overridden by a high seeding density. Cell seeding density, however, did not influence the chondrogenic marker expressions induced by soft gel. These findings suggest that interplays between cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions contribute to hMSCs differentiation. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation on hard matrix was shown to be mediated through the Ras pathway. Inhibition of Ras (RasN17) significantly decreased ERK, Smad1/5/8 and AKT activation, and osteogenic markers expression. However, constitutively active Ras (RasV12) had little effect on osteogenic marker expression, suggesting that the Ras pathways are necessary but not sufficient for osteogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that matrix elasticity and cell density are important microenvironmental cues driving hMSCs proliferation and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  20. On the Dielectric Constant for Acetanilide: Experimental Measurements and Effect on Energy Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careri, G.; Compatangelo, E.; Christiansen, P. L.; Halding, J.; Skovgaard, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the dielectric constant for crystalline acetanilide powder for temperatures ranging from - 140°C to 20°C and for different hydration levels are presented. A Davydov-soliton computer model predicts dramatic changes in the energy transport and storage for typically increased values of the dielectric constant.

  1. Corrosion in low dielectric constant Si-O based thin films: Buffer concentration effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, F. W.; Lane, M. W.; Gates, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Organosilicate glass (OSG) is often used as an interlayer dielectric (ILD) in high performance integrated circuits. OSG is a brittle material and prone to stress-corrosion cracking reminiscent of that observed in bulk glasses. Of particular concern are chemical-mechanical planarization techniques and wet cleans involving solvents commonly encountered in microelectronics fabrication where the organosilicate film is exposed to aqueous environments. Previous work has focused on the effect of pH, surfactant, and peroxide concentration on the subcritical crack growth of these films. However, little or no attention has focused on the effect of the conjugate acid/base concentration in a buffer. Accordingly, this work examines the “strength” of the buffer solution in both acidic and basic environments. The concentration of the buffer components is varied keeping the ratio of acid/base and therefore pH constant. In addition, the pH was varied by altering the acid/base ratio to ascertain any additional effect of pH. Corrosion tests were conducted with double-cantilever beam fracture mechanics specimens and fracture paths were verified with ATR-FTIR. Shifts in the threshold fracture energy, the lowest energy required for bond rupture in the given environment, G TH , were found to shift to lower values as the concentration of the base in the buffer increased. This effect was found to be much larger than the effect of the hydroxide ion concentration in unbuffered solutions. The results are rationalized in terms of the salient chemical bond breaking process occurring at the crack tip and modeled in terms of the chemical potential of the reactive species

  2. Effects of Pauli's principle in the. cap alpha. - /sup 16/O elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schechter, H; Canto, L F; Breitschaft, A M

    1986-03-01

    'Exact' microscopic methods like the RGM (Resonating Group Method) and the GCM (Generator Coordinate Method) and approximate methods like the OCM (Orthogonality Condition Model) are used to study the effects of Pauli's Principle in the ..cap alpha..-/sup 16/O elastic scattering. A method to derive 'exact' effective potentials for the OCM is introduced. These potentials, derived from RGM wave functions, make the OCM identical to the RGM and they have the advantage of being free from poles associated to the forbidden states. Numerical calculations are made with V2 and B1 nucleon-nucleon forces at energies in the range 0-30 MeV. The potentials and the resulting phase-shifts are compared to those obtained from the approximate method suggested by Friedrich and Canto. The problem of searching for local, state independent, potentials for the OCM is discussed.

  3. Low dielectric constant-based organic field-effect transistors and metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukah, Ndubuisi Benjamin

    This thesis describes a study of PFB and pentacene-based organic field-effect transistors (OFET) and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitors with low dielectric constant (k) poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) and cross-linked PVP (c-PVP) gate dielectrics. A physical method -- matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) -- of fabricating all-polymer field-effect transistors and MIS capacitors that circumvents inherent polymer dissolution and solvent-selectivity problems, is demonstrated. Pentacene-based OFETs incorporating PMMA and PVP gate dielectrics usually have high operating voltages related to the thickness of the dielectric layer. Reduced PMMA layer thickness (≤ 70 nm) was obtained by dissolving the PMMA in propylene carbonate (PC). The resulting pentacene-based transistors exhibited very low operating voltage (below -3 V), minimal hysteresis in their transfer characteristics, and decent electrical performance. Also low voltage (within -2 V) operation using thin (≤ 80 nm) low-k and hydrophilic PVP and c-PVP dielectric layers obtained via dissolution in high dipole moment and high-k solvents -- PC and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), is demonstrated to be a robust means of achieving improved electrical characteristics and high operational stability in OFETs incorporating PVP and c-PVP dielectrics.

  4. Effects of nonequilibrated topological charge distributions on pseudoscalar meson masses and decay constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C.; Toussaint, D.

    2018-04-01

    We study the effects of failure to equilibrate the squared topological charge Q2 on lattice calculations of pseudoscalar masses and decay constants. The analysis is based on chiral perturbation theory calculations of the dependence of these quantities on the QCD vacuum angle θ . For the light-light partially quenched case, we rederive the known chiral perturbation theory results of Aoki and Fukaya, but using the nonperturbatively valid chiral theory worked out by Golterman, Sharpe and Singleton, and by Sharpe and Shoresh. We then extend these calculations to heavy-light mesons. Results when staggered taste violations are important are also presented. The derived Q2 dependence is compared to that of simulations using the MILC Collaboration's ensembles of lattices with four flavors of dynamical highly improved staggered quarks. We find agreement, albeit with large statistical errors. These results can be used to correct for the leading effects of unequilibrated Q2, or to make estimates of the systematic error coming from the failure to equilibrate Q2. In an appendix, we show that the partially quenched chiral theory may be extended beyond a lower bound on valence masses discovered by Sharpe and Shoresh. Subtleties occurring when a sea-quark mass vanishes are discussed in another appendix.

  5. Electrical Field Effect Dependence of Hall Constant in Bi-films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butenko, A. V.; Sandomirsky, V.; Schlesinger, Y.; Shvarts, Dm.

    1998-01-01

    The Electrical Field Effect (EFE) was investigated on the capacitive structure Aumica (ns 10 μm ) - Bi films (L ∼ 350≥≥500 angstrem) in the temperature region 15 - 100 K. The thicknesses of Bi films lay in the region of the Quantum Size Effect (QSE). The transverse electric fields reach the value of 106 V/cm. The corresponding surface carrier concentrations are ns ∼ 10 13 [e]/cm 2 , i.e. the average change of carrier concentration in the 500 angstrem film is n s /L ∼ 10 17 cm -3 . The latter value is comparable with the original carrier concentration in Bi film, 3 f 1017 cm-3. However, EEE, the film resistance change Δ R is 0.5 %. On the other hand EFE change of Hall constant (2ΔR H ), that was observed for the first time in this work, is 5 - 30 % (depending on the film thickness). These results point to a small carrier mobility and to an essential change of carrier concentration in the EEE influence region (of the order of the screening length). The interpretation takes into account both classical and quantum versions of Bi film behavior under EFE conditions. A procedure to determine the surface charge carrier mobilities and concentrations from EFE-data (both ΔR and ORE) is propose

  6. Elastic properties of some transition metal arsenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Vikas; Verma, U. P.; Bisht, P. S.

    2018-05-01

    The elastic properties of transition metal arsenides (TMAs) have been studied by employing Wien2K package based on density functional theory in the zinc blende (ZB) and rock salt (RS) phase treating valance electron scalar relativistically. Further, we have also treated them non-relativistically to find out the relativistic effect. We have calculated the elastic properties by computing the volume conservative stress tensor for small strains, using the method developed by Charpin. The obtained results are discussed in paper. From the obtained results, it is clear that the values of C11 > C12 and C44 for all the compounds. The values of shear moduli of these compounds are also calculated. The internal parameter for these compounds shows that ZB structures of these compounds have high resistance against bond order. We find that the estimated elastic constants are in good agreement with the available data.

  7. Gravity-driven groundwater flow and slope failure potential: 1. Elastic effective-stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Reid, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Hilly or mountainous topography influences gravity-driven groundwater flow and the consequent distribution of effective stress in shallow subsurface environments. Effective stress, in turn, influences the potential for slope failure. To evaluate these influences, we formulate a two-dimensional, steady state, poroelastic model. The governing equations incorporate groundwater effects as body forces, and they demonstrate that spatially uniform pore pressure changes do not influence effective stresses. We implement the model using two finite element codes. As an illustrative case, we calculate the groundwater flow field, total body force field, and effective stress field in a straight, homogeneous hillslope. The total body force and effective stress fields show that groundwater flow can influence shear stresses as well as effective normal stresses. In most parts of the hillslope, groundwater flow significantly increases the Coulomb failure potential Φ, which we define as the ratio of maximum shear stress to mean effective normal stress. Groundwater flow also shifts the locus of greatest failure potential toward the slope toe. However, the effects of groundwater flow on failure potential are less pronounced than might be anticipated on the basis of a simpler, one-dimensional, limit equilibrium analysis. This is a consequence of continuity, compatibility, and boundary constraints on the two-dimensional flow and stress fields, and it points to important differences between our elastic continuum model and limit equilibrium models commonly used to assess slope stability.

  8. Are fundamental constants really constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Reasons for suspecting that fundamental constants might change with time are reviewed. Possible consequences of such variations are examined. The present status of experimental tests of these ideas is discussed

  9. Study of supersonic flow in a constant rate of momentum change (CRMC) ejector with frictional effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Virendra; Singhal, Gaurav; Subbarao, P.M.V.

    2013-01-01

    The constant rate of momentum change (CRMC) is a new approach towards design of supersonic ejectors. CRMC methodology was first proposed by Eames [1] in a study which was primarily based on isentropic flow inside the diffusing region of a supersonic ejector. The prime benefit that accrues from employing a CRMC ejector is that it can effectively eliminate the irreversibility associated with occurrence of thermodynamic shock process. The present study examines the supersonic flow in a CRMC ejector from the perspective of an adiabatic flow with frictional effects inside the variable cross-section of supersonic ejector, which is apparently more realistic. An analytical model has been discussed for the prediction of flow parameter variation in a space marching formulation taking into account change in localized frictional coefficient due to corresponding changes at each step. The analytical results have been validated by conducting a computational study based on 2-D axi-symmetric viscous compressible flow formulation with turbulence in FLUENT. The results are in good agreement at on-design conditions. The predictions especially for the recovered pressure made through the analytical formulation incorporating friction are found to be in significantly better agreement than the isentropic approach. The experimental validation for the approach has also been presented with the results being in close agreement with analytically predicted values. -- Highlights: • CRMC ejector eliminates the irreversibility due to occurrence of thermodynamic shock. • Frictional effect based apparently present more realistic solution for ejector. • Static pressure variation between proposed model and numerical study is nearly 2.29%. • Static pressure variation between analytical and experimental values is nearly 4%. • Experimentally observed entrainment ratio shows 3% variation w.r.t. design point value

  10. Flow Regime Destabilizing Effect on Fluid elastic Instability of Tube Array Preferentially Flexible to the Flow Direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kanghee; Shin, Changhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Olala, Stephen; Mureithi, Njuki [BWC/AECL/NSERC Chair of Fluid-Structure Interaction, Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    U bend region of operating SG is excited by the inclined cross flow due to the gradual change of hydraulic resistance force. The effect of tube array's flexibility direction on FEI is investigated by Khalvatti for rotated triangular tube in single phase (air) cross flow. He showed that FEI strongly depend on the flexibility angle. Reducing bundle flexibility to the flow direction ranging from 90 (out-of-flow direction) to 0 (in-flow direction) degree has a nonlinearly-varying stabilizing effect. Joly studies the same problem under high void fraction in two phase cross flow over 70 % to 90 %. With the Joly's experimental work, there is oddly low-valued Conner's constant in case of higher degree of angle of attack. This gives the motivation to our experimental study for fluid elastic instability of tube array in two phase cross flow. As the flow rate goes up, tube response was measured for each steady state flow condition by the strain gauge. Damping, peak frequency, and the critical velocity were estimated from the response spectrum. It seems that the flow regime for high void fraction can destabilize tube array with preferential flexibility over 60 degree. Because an intermittent flow is inherently unstable compared to the uniform bubbly flow, thus out-of-flow motion of tubes can be more fragile to the unstably rising intermittent flow. From the visual inspection, lateral tube motion seems to block the flow path periodically. Enlarged bubble in an intermittent flow regime can be squeezed-up at the flow gap between tubes.

  11. Effect of hydration repulsion on nanoparticle agglomeration evaluated via a constant number Monte–Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven; Lanphere, Jacob; Walker, Sharon; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydration repulsion on the agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions was investigated via the description of agglomeration by the Smoluchowski coagulation equation using constant number Monte–Carlo simulation making use of the classical DLVO theory extended to include the hydration repulsion energy. Evaluation of experimental DLS measurements for TiO 2 , CeO 2 , SiO 2 , and α-Fe 2 O 3 (hematite) at high IS (up to 900 mM) or low |ζ-potential| (≥1.35 mV) demonstrated that hydration repulsion energy can be above electrostatic repulsion energy such that the increased overall repulsion energy can significantly lower the agglomerate diameter relative to the classical DLVO prediction. While the classical DLVO theory, which is reasonably applicable for agglomeration of NPs of high |ζ-potential| (∼>35 mV) in suspensions of low IS (∼<1 mM), it can overpredict agglomerate sizes by up to a factor of 5 at high IS or low |ζ-potential|. Given the potential important role of hydration repulsion over a range of relevant conditions, there is merit in quantifying this repulsion energy over a wide range of conditions as part of overall characterization of NP suspensions. Such information would be of relevance to improved understanding of NP agglomeration in aqueous suspensions and its correlation with NP physicochemical and solution properties. (paper)

  12. Effect of a physical activity programme in the aquatic environment on haemodynamic constants in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Lara, Juana María; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos; Rodríguez-Díaz, Luciano; Ramírez-Rodrigo, Jesús; Villaverde-Gutiérrez, Carmen; Torres-Luque, Gema

    2017-09-20

    To evaluate the effect of a physical activity programme in the aquatic environment with immersion up to the neck, of six weeks duration, on haemodynamic constants in pregnant women. A six-week physical activity programme in the aquatic environment was carried out with a total of 46 pregnant women, who were distributed into an experimental group (n = 18), which participated in the programme, and a control group (n = 28), which followed routine care. In both groups different haemodynamic measurements were evaluated before and after the program. At the beginning of the programme the mean systolic blood pressure was similar between groups, but diastolic blood pressure was slightly higher in the experimental group. When the measurements at the last session were compared, arterial pressures (systolic, diastolic and mean) were significantly higher in the control group (p <.050). Similarly, the initial plasma volume values did not differ between groups, but after the intervention, the control group women showed a higher mean (p <.010). The fraction of sodium excretion (FENa) increased significantly in the experimental group, after the programme, with a mean three times higher (p <.050). Aldosterone plasma levels did not show significant differences between the groups in the different measurements. A programme of swimming and immersion exercises in pregnant women contributes to hydrosaline balance, preventing an excessive increase in usual plasma volume during pregnancy and in the activity of the renin-aldosterone axis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of athermal and isothermal omega phase particles on elasticity of beta-Ti single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejezchlebová, J.; Janovská, Michaela; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Landa, Michal; Šmilauerová, J.; Stráský, J.; Harcuba, P.; Janeček, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, May (2016), s. 185-191 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : titanium alloys * omega phase * elastic constants * single crystals * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1359645416301860/1-s2.0-S1359645416301860-main.pdf?_tid=dca8c8e6-017d-11e6-8121-00000aab0f27&acdnat=1460555256_4439abe9d4826c07f29d02804351d7be

  14. Effect of material constants on power output in piezoelectric vibration-based generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Mihara, Kensuke; Yoshimura, Tomohiro; Hoshina, Takuya; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2011-09-01

    A possible power output estimation based on material constants in piezoelectric vibration-based generators is proposed. A modified equivalent circuit model of the generator was built and was validated by the measurement results in the generator fabricated using potassium sodium niobate-based and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. Subsequently, generators with the same structure using other PZT-based and bismuth-layered structure ferroelectrics ceramics were fabricated and tested. The power outputs of these generators were expressed as a linear functions of the term composed of electromechanical coupling coefficients k(sys)(2) and mechanical quality factors Q*(m) of the generator. The relationship between device constants (k(sys)(2) and Q*(m)) and material constants (k(31)(2) and Q(m)) was clarified. Estimation of the power output using material constants is demonstrated and the appropriate piezoelectric material for the generator is suggested.

  15. Modelling of photodegradation effect on elastic-viscoplastic behaviour of amorphous polylactic acid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbachir, S.; Zaïri, F.; Ayoub, G.; Maschke, U.; Naït-Abdelaziz, M.; Gloaguen, J. M.; Benguediab, M.; Lefebvre, J. M.

    2010-02-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) films were subjected to accelerated ultra-violet (UV) ageing. The UV irradiation leads to the alteration of the chemical structure which influences directly the mechanical response of the polymer. The chemical modification of the polymer was followed by gel permeation chromatography. Uniaxial tension tests were conducted at 50 °C and for different strain rates in order to characterize the large deformation response of PLA. The influence of UV irradiation on the alteration of the large deformation response of PLA was examined. A physically based elastic-viscoplastic model was used to describe the mechanical response of virgin PLA. The photodegradation effect was incorporated into the constitutive model to capture the stress-strain behaviour up to failure of aged PLA. To that end, the measured molecular weight was used as a direct input into the model. The model is shown to be in good agreement with experimental results over a wide range of UV irradiation doses.

  16. Effects of an elastic membrane on tube waves in permeable formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H; Johnson, D

    1996-10-01

    In this paper, the modified properties were calculated for tube wave propagation in a fluid-filled borehole penetrating a permeable rock due to the presence of a mudcake which forms on the borehole wall. The mudcake was characterized by an impermeable elastic layer. The mudcake partial sealing mechanism was simulated using a finite membrane stiffness. Consequently, it was shown that the mudcake can reduce, but not eliminate, the permeability effects on the tube wave slowness and attenuation. Moreover, this paper discusses a variety of values for the relevant parameters especially the mudcake thickness and membrane stiffness. The important combinations of mudcake parameters were clarified by using an analytic expression for the low-frequency limit.

  17. Eccentric strengthening effect of hip-adductor training with elastic bands in soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Hölmich, Per; Bandholm, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    programme, including one hip-adduction exercise, on eccentric and isometric hip-adduction strength, using elastic bands as external load. METHODS: Thirty-four healthy, sub-elite soccer players, mean (±SD) age of 22.1 (±3.3) years, were randomised to either training or control. During the mid-season break......BACKGROUND: Soccer players with weak hip-adductor muscles are at increased risk of sustaining groin injuries. Therefore, a simple hip-adductor strengthening programme for prevention of groin injuries is needed. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the effect of an 8-week hip-adductor strengthening...... sessions per week (weeks 7-8) with 3×8 RM. Eccentric hip-adduction (EHAD), isometric hip-adduction (IHAD) and isometric hip-abduction (IHAB) strength, and the IHAD/IHAB ratio were measured assessor-blinded preintervention and postintervention, using reliable hand-held dynamometry procedures. RESULTS...

  18. Thermal elastic shock and its effect on TOPEX spacecraft attitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, Darrell F.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal elastic shock (TES) is a twice per orbit impulsive disturbance torque experienced by low-Earth orbiting spacecraft. The fundamental equations used to model the TES disturbance torque for typical spacecraft appendages (e.g., solar arrays and antenna booms) are derived in detail. In particular, the attitude-pointing performance of the TOPEX spacecraft, when subjected to the TES disturbance, is analyzed using a three-axis nonlinear time-domain simulation. Results indicate that the TOPEX spacecraft could exceed its roll-axis attitude-control requirement during penumbral transitions, and remain in violation for approximately 150 sec each orbit until the umbra collapses. A localized active-control system is proposed as a solution to minimize and/or eliminate the degrading effects of the TES disturbance.

  19. Combined effects of PEG hydrogel elasticity and cell-adhesive coating on fibroblast adhesion and persistent migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirlis, Dimitris; Spatz, Joachim P

    2014-01-13

    The development and use of synthetic, cross-linked, macromolecular substrates with tunable elasticity has been instrumental in revealing the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to their mechanical microenvironment. We here describe a hydrogel based on radical-free, cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) to study the effects of both substrate elasticity and type of adhesive coating on fibroblast adhesion and migration. Hydrogel elasticity was controlled through the structure and concentration of branched precursors, which efficiently react via Michael-type addition to produce the polymer network. We found that cell spreading and focal adhesion characteristics are dependent on elasticity for all types of coatings (RGD peptide, fibronectin, vitronectin), albeit with significant differences in magnitude. Importantly, fibroblasts migrated slower but more persistently on stiffer hydrogels, with the effects being more pronounced on fibronectin-coated substrates. Therefore, our results validate the hydrogels presented in this study as suitable for future mechanosensing studies and indicate that cell adhesion, polarity, and associated migration persistence are tuned by substrate elasticity and biochemical properties.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of Curie-point depths and lithospheric effective elastic thickness at Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Li, C. F.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic Ocean remains at the forefront of geological exploration. Here we investigate its deep geological structures and geodynamics on the basis of gravity, magnetic and bathymetric data. We estimate Curie-point depth and lithospheric effective elastic thickness to understand deep geothermal structures and Arctic lithospheric evolution. A fractal exponent of 3.0 for the 3D magnetization model is used in the Curie-point depth inversion. The result shows that Curie-point depths are between 5 and 50 km. Curie depths are mostly small near the active mid-ocean ridges, corresponding well to high heat flow and active shallow volcanism. Large curie depths are distributed mainly at continental marginal seas around the Arctic Ocean. We present a map of effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere using a multitaper coherence technique, and Te are between 5 and 110 km. Te primarily depends on geothermal gradient and composition, as well as structures in the lithosphere. We find that Te and Curie-point depths are often correlated. Large Te are distributed mainly at continental region and small Te are distributed at oceanic region. The Alpha-Mendeleyev Ridge (AMR) and The Svalbard Archipelago (SA) are symmetrical with the mid-ocean ridge. AMR and SA were formed before an early stage of Eurasian basin spreading, and they are considered as conjugate large igneous provinces, which show small Te and Curie-point depths. Novaya Zemlya region has large Curie-point depths and small Te. We consider that fault and fracture near the Novaya Zemlya orogenic belt cause small Te. A series of transform faults connect Arctic mid-ocean ridge with North Atlantic mid-ocean ridge. We can see large Te near transform faults, but small Curie-point depths. We consider that although temperature near transform faults is high, but mechanically the lithosphere near transform faults are strengthened.

  1. The role of an effective isotropic tissue modulus in the elastic properties of cancellous bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabel, J.; Rietbergen, van B.; Dalstra, M.; Odgaard, A.; Huiskes, H.W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Conceptually, the elastic characteristics of cancellous bone could be predicted directly from the trabecular morphology-or architecture-and by the elastic properties of the tissue itself. Although hardly any experimental evidence exists, it is often implicitly assumed that tissue anisotropy has a

  2. Role of elastic deformation in determining the mixed alkaline earth effect of hardness in silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Potuzak, M.

    2015-01-01

    been investigated previously, but the link between the resistance to elastic deformation and hardness has not yet been studied. In this work, we investigate the link between elastic deformation during indentation and Vickers hardness in a series of mixed magnesium-barium boroaluminosilicate glasses. We...

  3. Acute Effects of Elastic Bands on Kinetic Characteristics During the Deadlift at Moderate and Heavy Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Andrew J; Malyszek, Kylie K; Davis, Kyle A; Record, Shaina M; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Harmon, RoQue A; Steele, Jeff M; Manolovitz, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    Loading a barbell with variable resistance positively alters kinetic characteristics during the back squat and bench press but has never been studied during the deadlift. The purpose of this project was to examine the acute effects of combining elastic bands and free weights during the deadlift at moderate and heavy loads. Twelve trained men (age: 24.08 ± 2.35 years, height: 175.94 ± 5.38 cm, mass: 85.58 ± 12.49 kg, deadlift 1 repetition maximum (RM): 188.64 ± 16.13 kg) completed 2 variable resistance (B1 and B2) and 1 traditional free-weight (NB) condition at both 60 and 85% 1RM on a force plate. B1 had 15% resistance from bands, with the remaining 85% from free weights. B2 had 35% bands and 65% free weights. NB used free weights only. Average resistance was equated for all conditions. Power and velocity generally increased, whereas force decreased with the addition of bands. The amount of band tension (B1 or B2) had little impact on power when lifting at 60% 1RM. However, greater resistance from bands resulted in greater peak and relative power when lifting at 85% 1RM. Adding elastic bands decreased time to peak force (PF), time between PF and peak power (PP), and time between PF and peak velocity (PV) when compared with NB at 60% 1RM (NB > B1 > B2). These differences only reached significance for NB > B2 when lifting at 85% 1RM. These same differences existed for time between PP and PV. Thus, the amount of tension from bands has less impact on interpeak variables at heavier absolute loads. Practitioners should consider using heavy bands when prescribing the deadlift for speed or power, but not maximal force.

  4. Resonance effects in elastic cross sections for electron scattering on pyrimidine: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for elastic (rotationally integrated) electron scattering on pyrimidine, both as a function of angle up to 180(∘) at electron energies of 1, 5, 10, and 20 eV and as a function of electron energy in the range 0.1-14 eV. The experimental results are compared to the results of the fixed-nuclei Schwinger variational and R-matrix theoretical methods, which reproduce satisfactorily the magnitudes and shapes of the experimental cross sections. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. Resonant structures are observed at 0.2, 0.7, and 4.35 eV and calculations for different symmetries confirm their assignment as the X̃(2)A2, Ã(2)B1, and B̃(2)B1 shape resonances. As a consequence of superposition of coherent resonant amplitudes with background scattering the B̃(2)B1 shape resonance appears as a peak, a dip, or a step function in the cross sections recorded as a function of energy at different scattering angles and this effect is satisfactorily reproduced by theory. The dip and peak contributions at different scattering angles partially compensate, making the resonance nearly invisible in the integral cross section. Vibrationally integrated cross sections were also measured at 1, 5, 10 and 20 eV and the question of whether the fixed-nuclei cross sections should be compared to vibrationally elastic or vibrationally integrated cross section is discussed.

  5. Experimental Study on the Vibration Control Effect of Long Elastic Sleeper Track in Subways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopei Cai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibration effect of urban rail transit has gained attention from both academia and the industry sector. Long Elastic Sleeper Track (LEST is a new structure for vibration reduction which has recently been designed and applied to Chinese subways. However, little research has been devoted to its vibration reduction effect. In this study, field tests were conducted during peak transit hours on Beijing Subway Line 15 to examine the vibration reduction effects of the common ballastless track and LEST on both straight and curved sections. The results demonstrate that although LEST increases the wheel-rail vertical forces, rail vertical displacements, and rail accelerations to some extent, these effects do not threaten subway operational safety, and vibrations of track bed and tunnel wall are positively mitigated. LEST has an obvious vibration reduction effect at frequencies above 40 Hz. In straight track, the vibration of bottom of the tunnel wall measured in one-third octave bands is reduced by 10.52 dB, while the vibration at point on the tunnel wall at 1.5 m height is reduced by 9.60 dB. For the curved track, the vibrations at those two points are reduced by 9.35 dB and 8.44 dB, respectively. This indicates that LEST reduces vibrations slightly more for the straight track than for the curved track.

  6. Application of the variational method for calculation of neutron spectra and group constants - Master thesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    1979-01-01

    One-dimensional variational method for cylindrical configuration was applied for calculating group constants, together with effects of elastic slowing down, anisotropic elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, heterogeneous resonance absorption with the aim to include the presence of a number of different isotopes and effects of neutron leakage from the reactor core. Neutron flux shape P 3 and adjoint function are proposed in order to enable calculation of smaller size reactors and inclusion of heterogeneity effects by cell calculations. Microscopic multigroup constants were prepared based on the UKNDL data library. Analytical-numerical approach was applied for solving the equations of the P 3 approximation to obtain neutron flux moments and adjoint functions

  7. Effects of adrenalectomy and constant light on the rat estrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, J C

    1978-01-01

    Adult female ARS/Sprague-Dawley rats were allowed to acclimatize to a a lighting schedule of 12L:12D (LD) for 5 weeks. At that time, half the animals were adrenalectomized, and all rats remained in LD for an additional 4 to 5 weeks. Subsequently, half of the control and half of the adrenalectomized rats were exposed to constant light (LL) for an additional 8 weeks, at which time all animals were sacificed. Operated rats with regenerated adrenal tissue, determined either by macroscopic examination or serum corticosterone assay (about 50% of the rats), were excluded from all data calculations. Acute disturbances of estrous cycle length were minor. The long-term effects revealed a significant increase in 5-day cycles among the adrenalectomized rats, although the majority of cycles recorded (80%) were still 4 days in length. None of the rats in LD showed spontaneous persistent estrus. Adrenalectomy did not affect the number of ova shed. When placed in LL, the adrenalectomized rats continued to cycle longer than the unoperated controls, but all rats showed persistent estrus (5 or more consecutive days of vaginal cornification) within 7--8 weeks. Adrenalectomized rats had significantly higher body weights than controls. Relative uterine weight was decreased in these animals in both lighting regimens but only reached statistical significance in LD. Ovarian weight, by contrast, was significantly increased among adrenalectomized rats in LD but was identical in both groups in LL. Adrenal weight of intact rats was not altered by LL. Since estrous cycles can continue for at least 6 months in the absence of the adrenal gland, the persistent estrus that occurs in LL is not merely due to the loss of a diurnal rhythm of corticosteroids. Indeed, when adrenalectomized rats are placed in LL, they continue to show estrous cycles longer than do intact rats. Adrenalectomy does appear to increase the length of the cycle in some animals, and the hormonal basis for this warrants further

  8. Sedative and cardiorespiratory effects of detomidine constant rate infusion in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Rauane Sousa; Bittar, Isabela Plazza; da Silva, Luiz Henrique; Villela, Ana Carolina Vasquez; Dos Santos Júnior, Marcelo Borges; Borges, Naida Cristina; Franco, Leandro Guimarães

    2018-02-01

    The use of sheep in experiments is widespread and is increasing worldwide, and so is the need to develop species-specific anaesthetic techniques to ensure animal safety. Previous studies have mentioned several protocols involving the administration of alpha-2 adrenergic agonists in sheep; however, assessment of the efficacy and safety of these infusion techniques is still relatively new. Thus, the aim of the present study is to assess the effectiveness of detomidine constant rate infusion (CRI) in sheep by measuring the cardiovascular and respiratory parameters, blood gas variables and sedation scores. Eight adult female Santa Inês sheep received 20 µg/kg of detomidine hydrochloride intravenously as a bolus loading dose, followed by an infusion rate of 60 µg/kg/h. The heart rates and respiratory rates changed continuously during the CRI period. No arrhythmias were observed. The reduction in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO 2 ) was not significant, but one animal showed signs of hypoxaemia (minimum PaO 2 of 66.9 mmHg). The arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ) increased, but the animals did not become hypercapnic. The bicarbonate (HCO 3- ), pH and base excess (BE) tended towards metabolic alkalosis. The cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), cardiac index (CI) and ejection fraction (EF%) showed no significant changes. The fractional shortening (FS%) decreased slightly, starting at T 45min . Sedation scores varied between 3 (0/10) after sedation and during recovery and 7 (0/10) during CRI. We concluded that administering detomidine at an infusion rate of 60 µg/kg/h in Santa Inês sheep is a simple technique that produces satisfactory sedation for minimally invasive procedures.

  9. Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma: effects of electron temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiongping; Qin Zhen; Xu Bin; Cai Zebin

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma are investigated, using the wave and dielectric function equations, for their dependence on the electron temperature. Simulation results show that, due to the influence of the ponderomotive force there is a nonlinear variation of electron temperature in an underdense collisional plasma, and this leads to a complicated and interesting nonlinear variation of dielectric constant; this nonlinear variation of dielectric constant directly affects the beam propagation and gives rise to laser beam self-focusing in some spatial-temporal regions; in particular, the beam width and the beam intensity present an oscillatory variation in the self-focusing region. The influence of several parameters on the dielectric function and beam self-focusing is discussed.

  10. Effects of tanalith-e impregnation substance on bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending of some wood types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Keskin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of impregnation with Tanalith-E on the bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending of some wood types. The test samples prepared from beech, oak, walnut, poplar, ash and pine wood materials - that are of common use in the forest products industry of TURKEY - according to TS 345, were treated with according to ASTM D 1413-76 substantially. Un-impregnated samples according to impregnated wood materials, the bending strengths in beech to 6.83%, 5.12% in ash, 5.93% in pine, the elasticity module values to 7.15% in oak and ash, at a rate of 6.58% in the higher were found. The highest values of bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending were obtained in beech and ash woods impregnated with Tanalith-E, whereas the lowest values were obtained in the poplar wood.

  11. Effects of microstructure on the elastic properties of selected Ta2O5--Eu2O3 compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malarkey, C.J.

    1977-06-01

    Elastic properties and internal friction of selected compositions of tantala-doped monoclinic europia were studied at temperatures up to 1500 0 C using the sonic resonance technique. Unit cell parameters between 25C and 1000 0 C for monoclinic Eu 2 O 3 were calculated from high temperature x-ray diffractometer data. Large-grained monoclinic specimens having less than 6.0 Ta cation percent substitution exhibited anomalous elastic behavior when thermally cycled. Compositions above this addition level exhibited linear elastic behavior. Internal friction values also varied abnormally with grain size, composition, and temperature. The anomalous behavior was attributed to microcracking caused by thermal expansion anisotropies. The critical grain size was found to be approximately 14 μm. The high temperature diffractometry measurements supported the postulate that the grain coarsening effect associated with sintered monoclinic Eu 2 O 3 is the controlling factor for microcracking

  12. Finite plate thickness effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Rinosh; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-11-01

    The majority of theoretical studies have tackled the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) problem in solids using an infinitely thick plate. Recent theoretical studies by Piriz et al. (PRE 95, 053108, 2017) have explored finite thickness effects. We seek to validate this recent theoretical estimate experimentally using our rotating wheel RTI experiment in an accelerated elastic-plastic material. The test section consists of a container filled with air and mayonnaise (a non-Newtonian emulsion) with an initial perturbation between two materials. The plate thickness effects are studied by varying the depth of the soft-solid. A set of experiments is run by employing different initial conditions with different container dimensions. Additionally, the effect of acceleration rate (driving pressure rise time) on the instability threshold with reference to the finite thickness will also be inspected. Furthermore, the experimental results are compared to the analytical strength models related to finite thickness effects on RTI. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA Grant # DE-NA0003195 and LANL subcontract #370333.

  13. Analysis of neutron leakage effect in the determination of macrogroup constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.S.; Vieira, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    A method to include the neutron leakage in the macrogroup constants calculation is presented. The method leads to independent equations for neutron flux and neutron current density. The results that have been gotten with the present method are very precise despite its simplicity. (Author) [pt

  14. Effect of constant heat flux at outer cylinder on stability of viscous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the stability of the Couette flow of a viscous incompressible fluid between two concentric rotating cylinders is studied in the presence of a radial temperature gradient, when the outer cylinder is maintained at a constant heat flux. The analytical solution of the eigen-value problem is obtained by using the ...

  15. A comparative approach to predicting effective dielectric, piezoelectric and elastic properties of PZT/PVDF composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Zeeshan; Prasad, Ashutosh; Prasad, K.

    2009-01-01

    The present study addresses the problem of quantitative prediction of effective relative permittivity, dielectric loss factor, piezoelectric charge coefficient, and Young's modulus of PZT/PVDF diphasic ceramic-polymer composite as a function of volume fraction of PZT in the different compositions. Theoretical results for effective relative permittivity derived from several dielectric mixture equations like those of Knott, Rother-Lichtenecker, Bruggeman, Maxwell-Wagner-Webmann-Skipetrov or Dias-Dasgupta, Furukawa, Lewin, Wiener, Jayasundere-Smith, Modified Cule-Torquato, Taylor, Poon-Shin and Rao et al. were fitted to the experimental data taken from previous works of Yamada et al. Similarly, the results for effective piezoelectric coefficient and Young's modulus, derived from different appropriate equations were fitted to the corresponding experimental data taken from the literature. The study revealed that only a few equations like modified Rother-Lichtenecker equation, Dias-Dasgupta equation and Rao equation for dielectric and piezoelectric properties while the four new equations developed in the present study of elastic property (Young's modulus) well fitted the corresponding experimental results. Further, the acceptable data put to various regression analyses showed that in most of the cases the third order polynomial regression analysis provided more acceptable fits.

  16. Small Effect of Hydration on Elastic Wave Velocities of Ringwoodite in Earth's Transition Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, K.; Marquardt, H.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Kurnosov, A.; Kawazoe, T.; Koch-Müller, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ringwoodite can incorporate significant amounts of hydrogen as OH-defects into its crystal structure. The measurement of 1.4 wt.% H20 in a natural ringwoodite diamond inclusion (Pearson et al. 2014) showed that hydrous ringwoodite can exist in the Earth's mantle. Since ringwoodite is considered to be the major phase in the mantle between 520 and 660 km depth it likely plays an important role for Earth's deep water cycle and the mantle water budget. Previous experimental work has shown that hydration reduces seismic wave velocities in ringwoodite, motivating attempts to map the hydration state of the mantle using seismic wave speed variations as depicted by seismic tomography. However, large uncertainties on the actual effects at transition zone pressures and temperatures remain. A major difficulty is the comparability of studies with different experimental setups and pressure- and temperature conditions. Here, we present results from a comparative elasticity study designed to quantify the effects of hydration on the seismic wave velocities of ringwoodite in Earth's transition zone. Focused ion beam cut single-crystals of four samples of either Fo90 or Fo100 ringwoodite with hydration states between 0.21 - 1.71 wt.% H2O were loaded in the pressure chamber of one diamond-anvil cell to ensure identical experimental conditions. Single-crystal Brillouin Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at room temperature to a pressure of 22 GPa. Additional experiments at high pressure and temperatures up to 500 K were performed. Our data collected at low pressures show a significant reduction of elastic wave velocities with hydration, consistent with previous work. However, in contrast to previous inferences, our results indicate that pressure significantly reduces the effect of hydration. Based on the outcome of our work, the redution in aggregate velocities caused by 1 wt.% H2O becomes smaller than 1% in ringwoodite at pressures equivalent to the Earth

  17. On the Effect of Unit-Cell Parameters in Predicting the Elastic Response of Wood-Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Alavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effect of unit-cell geometrical parameters in predicting elastic properties of a typical wood plastic composite (WPC. The ultimate goal was obtaining the optimal values of representative volume element (RVE parameters to accurately predict the mechanical behavior of the WPC. For each unit cell, defined by a given combination of the above geometrical parameters, finite element simulation in ABAQUS was carried out, and the corresponding stress-strain curve was obtained. A uniaxial test according to ASTM D638-02a type V was performed on the composite specimen. Modulus of elasticity was determined using hyperbolic tangent function, and the results were compared to the sets of finite element analyses. Main effects of RVE parameters and their interactions were demonstrated and discussed, specially regarding the inclusion of two adjacent wood particles within one unit cell of the material. Regression analysis was performed to mathematically model the RVE parameter effects and their interactions over the modulus of elasticity response. The model was finally employed in an optimization analysis to arrive at an optimal set of RVE parameters that minimizes the difference between the predicted and experimental moduli of elasticity.

  18. Effectiveness of Hamstring Knee Rehabilitation Exercise Performed in Training Machine vs. Elastic Resistance Electromyography Evaluation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M. D.; Sundstrup, E.; Andersen, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate muscle activity during hamstring rehabilitation exercises performed in training machine compared with elastic resistance. Design Six women and 13 men aged 28-67 yrs participated in a crossover study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded...... inclinometers. Results Training machines and elastic resistance showed similar high levels of muscle activity (biceps femoris and semitendinosus peak normalized EMG >80%). EMG during the concentric phase was higher than during the eccentric phase regardless of exercise and muscle. However, compared with machine.......001) during hamstring curl performed with elastic resistance (7.58 +/- 0.08) compared with hamstring curl performed in a machine (5.92 +/- 0.03). Conclusions Hamstring rehabilitation exercise performed with elastic resistance induces similar peak hamstring muscle activity but slightly lower EMG values at more...

  19. Elastic Metamaterials with Simultaneously Negative Effective Shear Modulus and Mass Density

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying; Lai, Yun; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    2011-01-01

    We propose a type of elastic metamaterial comprising fluid-solid composite inclusions which can possess a negative shear modulus and negative mass density over a large frequency region. Such a material has the unique property that only transverse

  20. Curvature Effects on the Vibration Characteristics of Doubly Curved Shallow Shells with General Elastic Edge Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of curvature upon the vibration characteristics of doubly curved shallow shells are assessed in this paper. Boundary conditions of the shell are generally specified in terms of distributed elastic restraints along the edges. The classical homogeneous boundary supports can be easily simulated by setting the stiffnesses of restraining springs to either zero or infinite. Vibration problems of the shell are solved by a modified Fourier series method that each of the displacements is invariably expressed as a simple trigonometric series which converges uniformly and acceleratedly over the solution domain. All the unknown expansion coefficients are treated equally as a set of independent generalized coordinates and solved using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The current method provides a unified solution to the vibration problems of curved shallow shells involving different geometric properties and boundary conditions with no need of modifying the formulations and solution procedures. Extensive tabular and graphical results are presented to show the curvature effects on the natural frequencies of the shell with various boundary conditions.

  1. An evaluation of diverse methods of obtaining effective Schroedinger interaction potentials for elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.; Steward, C.; Hodgson, P.E.; Sofianos, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct solution of the Schroedinger equation and inversion methods of analysis of elastic scattering data are considered to evaluate the information that they can provide about the physical interaction between colliding nuclear particles. It was found that both optical model and inversion methods based upon inverse scattering theories are subject to ambiguities. Therefore, it is essential that elastic scattering data analyses are consistent with microscopic calculations of the potential. 25 refs

  2. An evaluation of diverse methods of obtaining effective Schroedinger interaction potentials for elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.; Steward, C. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Hodgson, P.E. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Sofianos, S.A. [University of South Africa (UNISA), Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Physics

    1995-10-01

    Direct solution of the Schroedinger equation and inversion methods of analysis of elastic scattering data are considered to evaluate the information that they can provide about the physical interaction between colliding nuclear particles. It was found that both optical model and inversion methods based upon inverse scattering theories are subject to ambiguities. Therefore, it is essential that elastic scattering data analyses are consistent with microscopic calculations of the potential. 25 refs.

  3. Effect of general anesthesia and major versus minor surgery on late postoperative episodic and constant hypoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Oturai, P; Erichsen, C J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relative contribution of general anesthesia alone and in combination with the surgical procedure to the pathogenesis of late postoperative hypoxemia. DESIGN: Open, controlled study. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: 60 patients undergoing major abdominal...... surgery and 16 patients undergoing middle ear surgery, both with comparable general anesthesia. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients were monitored with continuous pulse oximetry on one preoperative night and the second postoperative night. Significant episodic or constant hypoxemia did not occur...... on the second postoperative night following middle ear surgery and general anesthesia, but severe episodic and constant hypoxemia did occur on the second postoperative after major abdominal surgery and general anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS: General anesthesia in itself is not an important factor in the development...

  4. Effect of the ion force on the hydrolysis constants and of the solubility product of Europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez R, M.; Ramirez G, J.J.; Solache R, M.; Rojas H, A.

    2003-01-01

    A study on the behavior of the first hydrolysis constant β Eu,H l-0 and the constant of the solubility product Kps of the europium in front of the changes of the ion force: 0. 02 M, 0.1 M, 0.7M, 2M, 3M and 4M of sodium perchlorate, at 303 K. Experimentally the potentiometry and also radioactivity measures its were used. The specific interaction of ions theory (SIT) of Bronsted-Guggenheim-Scatchard allows the extrapolation of the values to infinite dilution and the results were: log β Eu,H l-0 = -7 36 and log K sp l-0 = -24. 68. A discussion of the group of results with the data of the literature is presented. (Author)

  5. Constant and alternating temperature effects on germination and early growth of scorzonera

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, A.S.; Dias, L.S.; Pereira, I.P.

    2013-01-01

    Scorzonera is a threatened species in Portugal. Given the role of temperature in germination and seedling recruitment, the performance of total germination, lag of germination, duration of germination, shape of germination, root and hypocotyl length, and relative root growth of scorzonera was investigated under constant and alternating temperatures between 10 and 25ºC. Because of scorzonera’s rarity and threatened status, seeds of cultivated scorzonera were used, providing the framework for h...

  6. Elastic wave excitation in centrosymmetric strontium titanate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yushin, N.K.; Sotnikov, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    The main experimental dependencies are measured and the excitation mechanism of elastic waves in centrosymmetric crystals is established. The surface generation of three-dimensional elastic waves of the 30 MHz frequency in strontium titanate crystals is observed and studied. Elastic wave excitation is observed in the 4 350 K temperature range. The efficiency of hysteresis excitation depends on the external electric field. The effect of light irradiation on the amplitude of excited elastic waves is observed. It is shown that escitation is connected with linearization of electrostriction by the constant electric field appearing in a near-surface crystal layer due to phenomena in the Schottky barrier and appearance of electretic near-electrode layers

  7. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Gutierrez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture systems have strong influence on the overall mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses due to their relatively lower stiffness and shear strength than those of the rock matrix. Understanding the effects of fracture geometrical distribution, such as length, spacing, persistence and orientation, is important for quantifying the mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses. The relation between fracture geometry and the mechanical characteristics of the fractured rock mass is complicated due to the fact that the fracture geometry and mechanical behaviors of fractured rock mass are strongly dependent on the length scale. In this paper, a comprehensive study was conducted to determine the effects of fracture distribution on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses over a wide range of fracture lengths. To account for the stochastic nature of fracture distributions, three different simulation techniques involving Oda's elastic compliance tensor, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS, and suitable probability density functions (PDFs were employed to represent the elastic compliance of fractured rock masses. To yield geologically realistic results, parameters for defining fracture distributions were obtained from different geological fields. The influence of the key fracture parameters and their relations to the overall elastic behavior of the fractured rock mass were studied and discussed. A detailed study was also carried out to investigate the validity of the use of a representative element volume (REV in the equivalent continuum representation of fractured rock masses. A criterion was also proposed to determine the appropriate REV given the fracture distribution of the rock mass.

  8. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of Ti{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}N alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulumba, Nina [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Functional Materials, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hellman, Olle [Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Rogström, Lina; Raza, Zamaan; Tasnádi, Ferenc; Odén, Magnus [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Abrikosov, Igor A. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Materials Modeling and Development Laboratory, NUST “MISIS,” 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); LACOMAS Laboratory, Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    Ti{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}N is a technologically important alloy that undergoes a process of high temperature age-hardening that is strongly influenced by its elastic properties. We have performed first principles calculations of the elastic constants and anisotropy using the symmetry imposed force constant temperature dependent effective potential method, which include lattice vibrations and therefore the effects of temperature, including thermal expansion and intrinsic anharmonicity. These are compared with in situ high temperature x-ray diffraction measurements of the lattice parameter. We show that anharmonic effects are crucial to the recovery of finite temperature elasticity. The effects of thermal expansion and intrinsic anharmonicity on the elastic constants are of the same order, and cannot be considered separately. Furthermore, the effect of thermal expansion on elastic constants is such that the volume change induced by zero point motion has a significant effect. For TiAlN, the elastic constants soften non-uniformly with temperature: C{sub 11} decreases substantially when the temperature increases for all compositions, resulting in an increased anisotropy. These findings suggest that an increased Al content and annealing at higher temperatures will result in a harder alloy.

  9. HYPOXIC EFFECT ON GROWTH OF PALEOMENETES VULGARIS LARVAE AND OTHER SPECIES: USING CONSTANT EXPOSURE DATA TO PREDICT CYCLIC EXPOSURE RESPONSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    First stage larval marsh grass shrimp, Palaemonetes vulgaris, were exposed to patterns of diurnal, semidiurnal, and constant hypoxia to evaluate effects on growth and to determine if there was a consistent relationship between exposures. A comparison of growth with cyclic exposur...

  10. Constant versus variable response signal delays in speed--accuracy trade-offs: effects of advance preparation for processing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff; Sproesser, Gudrun; Ulrich, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    In two experiments, we used response signals (RSs) to control processing time and trace out speed--accuracy trade-off(SAT) functions in a difficult perceptual discrimination task. Each experiment compared performance in blocks of trials with constant and, hence, temporally predictable RS lags against performance in blocks with variable, unpredictable RS lags. In both experiments, essentially equivalent SAT functions were observed with constant and variable RS lags. We conclude that there is little effect of advance preparation for a given processing time, suggesting that the discrimination mechanisms underlying SAT functions are driven solely by bottom-up information processing in perceptual discrimination tasks.

  11. Spatial variations of effective elastic thickness of the Lithosphere in the Southeast Asia regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaobin; Kirby, Jon; Yu, Chuanhai; Swain, Chris; Zhao, Junfeng

    2016-04-01

    The effective elastic thickness Te corresponds to the thickness of an idealized elastic beam that would bend similarly to the actual lithosphere under the same applied loads, and could provide important insight into rheology and state of stress. Thus, it is helpful to improve our understanding of the relationship between tectonic styles, distribution of earthquakes and lithospheric rheology in various tectonic settings. The Southeast Asia, located in the southeastern part of the Eurasian Plate, comprises a complex collage of continental fragments, volcanic arcs, and suture zones and marginal oceanic basins, and is surrounded by tectonically active margins which exhibit intense seismicity and volcanism. The Cenozoic southeastward extrusion of the rigid Indochina Block due to the Indo-Asian collision resulted in the drastic surface deformation in the western area. Therefore, a high resolution spatial variation map of Te might be a useful tool for the complex Southeast Asia area to examine the relationships between surface deformation, earthquakes, lithospheric structure and mantle dynamics. In this study, we present a high-resolution map of spatial variations of Te in the Southeast Asia area using the wavelet method, which convolves a range of scaled wavelets with the two data sets of Bouguer gravity anomaly and topography. The topography and bathymetry grid data was extracted from the GEBCO_08 Grid of GEBCO digital atlas. The pattern of Te variations agrees well with the tectonic provinces in the study area. On the whole, low lithosphere strength characterizes the oceanic basins, such as the South China Sea, the Banda sea area, the Celebes Sea, the Sulu Sea and the Andaman Sea. Unlike the oceanic basins, the continental fragments show a complex pattern of Te variations. The Khorat plateau and its adjacent area show strong lithosphere characteristics with a Te range of 20-50 km, suggesting that the Khorat plateau is the strong core of the Indochina Block. The West

  12. Lithospheric flexural strength and effective elastic thicknesses of the Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) and surrounding region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruç, Bülent; Gomez-Ortiz, David; Petit, Carole

    2017-12-01

    The Lithospheric structure of Eastern Anatolia and the surrounding region, including the northern part of the Arabian platform is investigated via the analysis and modeling of Bouguer anomalies from the Earth Gravitational Model EGM08. The effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere (EET) that corresponds to the mechanical cores of the crust and lithospheric mantle is determined from the spectral coherence between Bouguer anomalies and surface elevation data. Its average value is 18.7 km. From the logarithmic amplitude spectra of Bouguer anomalies, average depths of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), Moho, Conrad and basement in the study area are constrained at 84 km, 39 km, 16 km and 7 km, respectively. The geometries of the LAB and Moho are then estimated using the Parker-Oldenburg inversion algorithm. We also present a lithospheric strength map obtained from the spatial variations of EET determined by Yield Stress Envelopes (YSE). The EET varies in the range of 12-23 km, which is in good agreement with the average value obtained from spectral analysis. Low EET values are interpreted as resulting from thermal and flexural lithospheric weakening. According to the lithospheric strength of the Eastern Anatolian region, the rheology model consists of a strong but brittle upper crust, a weak and ductile lower crust, and a weak lower part of the lithosphere. On the other hand, lithosphere strength corresponds to weak and ductile lower crust, a strong upper crust and a strong uppermost lithospheric mantle for the northern part of the Arabian platform.

  13. Seismology of adolescent neutron stars: Accounting for thermal effects and crust elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, C. J.; Ho, W. C. G.; Andersson, N.

    2015-09-01

    We study the oscillations of relativistic stars, incorporating key physics associated with internal composition, thermal gradients and crust elasticity. Our aim is to develop a formalism which is able to account for the state-of-the-art understanding of the complex physics associated with these systems. As a first step, we build models using a modern equation of state including composition gradients and density discontinuities associated with internal phase transitions (like the crust-core transition and the point where muons first appear in the core). In order to understand the nature of the oscillation spectrum, we carry out cooling simulations to provide realistic snapshots of the temperature distribution in the interior as the star evolves through adolescence. The associated thermal pressure is incorporated in the perturbation analysis, and we discuss the presence of g -modes arising as a result of thermal effects. We also consider interface modes due to phase-transitions and the gradual formation of the star's crust and the emergence of a set of shear modes.

  14. Effect of Δ-isobar excitation on spin-dependent observables of elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, S.; Oryu, S.; Chmielewski, K.; Sauer, P.U.

    2000-01-01

    Δ-isobar excitation in the nuclear medium yields an effective three-nucleon force. A coupled-channel formulation with Δ-isobar excitation developed previously is used. The three-particle scattering equations are solved by a separable expansion of the two-baryon transition matrix for elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering. The effect of Δ-isobar excitation on the spin-dependent observables is studied at energies above 50 MeV nucleon lab energy. (author)

  15. Numerical investigation of shape domain effect to its elasticity and surface energy using adaptive finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfat, Sayahdin; Kimura, Masato; Firihu, Muhammad Zamrun; Rahmat

    2018-05-01

    In engineering area, investigation of shape effect in elastic materials was very important. It can lead changing elasticity and surface energy, and also increase of crack propagation in the material. A two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to investigation of elasticity and surface energy in elastic material by Adaptive Finite Element Method. Besides that, behavior of crack propagation has observed for every those materials. The government equations were based on a phase field approach in crack propagation model that developed by Takaishi-Kimura. This research has varied four shape domains where physical properties of materials were same (Young's modulus E = 70 GPa and Poisson's ratio ν = 0.334). Investigation assumptions were; (1) homogeneous and isotropic material, (2) there was not initial cracking at t = 0, (3) initial displacement was zero [u1, u2] = 0) at initial condition (t = 0), and (4) length of time simulation t = 5 with interval Δt = 0.005. Mode I/II or mixed mode crack propagation has been used for the numerical investigation. Results of this studies were very good and accurate to show changing energy and behavior of crack propagation. In the future time, this research can be developed to complex phenomena and domain. Furthermore, shape optimization can be investigation by the model.

  16. The effect of antiphase boundaries on the elastic properties of Ni–Mn–Ga austenite and premartensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Bodnárová, Lucie; Landa, Michal; Drahokoupil, Jan; Kopecký, Vít; Kopeček, Jaromír; Heczko, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of elastic properties with temperature and magnetic field was studied in two differently heat-treated single crystals of the Ni–Mn–Ga magnetic shape memory alloy using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. Quenching and slow furnace cooling were used to obtain different densities of antiphase boundaries. We found that the crystals exhibited pronounced differences in the c′ elastic coefficient and related shear damping in high-temperature ferromagnetic phases (austenite and premartensite). The difference can be ascribed to the formation of fine magnetic domain patterns and pinning of the magnetic domain walls on antiphase boundaries in the material with a high density of antiphase boundaries due to quenching. The fine domain pattern arising from mutual interactions between antiphase boundaries and ferromagnetic domain walls effectively reduces the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and amplifies the contribution of magnetostriction to the elastic response of the material. As a result, the anomalous elastic softening prior to martensite transformation is significantly enhanced in the quenched sample. Thus, for any comparison of experimental data and theoretical calculations the microstructural changes induced by specific heat treatment must be taken into account. (paper)

  17. Quantum size effects in Pb layers with absorbed Kondo adatoms: Determination of the exchange coupling constant

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Shelykh, I. A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the magnetic interaction of manganese phtalocyanine (MnPc) absorbed on Pb layers that were grown on a Si substrate. We perform an ab initio calculation of the density of states and Kondo temperature as a function of the number of Pb monolayers. Comparison to experimental data [Y.-S. Fu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 256601 (2007)] then allows us to determine the exchange coupling constant J between the spins of the adsorbed molecules and those of the Pb host. This approach gives rise to a general and reliable method for obtaining J by combining experimental and numerical results.

  18. Quantum size effects in Pb layers with absorbed Kondo adatoms: Determination of the exchange coupling constant

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-07-01

    We consider the magnetic interaction of manganese phtalocyanine (MnPc) absorbed on Pb layers that were grown on a Si substrate. We perform an ab initio calculation of the density of states and Kondo temperature as a function of the number of Pb monolayers. Comparison to experimental data [Y.-S. Fu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 256601 (2007)] then allows us to determine the exchange coupling constant J between the spins of the adsorbed molecules and those of the Pb host. This approach gives rise to a general and reliable method for obtaining J by combining experimental and numerical results.

  19. Elastic properties of icosahedral and decagonal quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, Mikhail A

    2005-01-01

    Problems associated with determining the symmetry properties of the elastic constant tensor of icosahedral and decagonal quasicrystals are reviewed. Notions of elastic isotropy and anisotropy are considered, and their relation to the components of the elastic constant tensor is discussed. The question is addressed of how to determine experimentally whether a system under study is elastically isotropic. Experimental results produced by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy of icosahedral Al-Li-Cu and decagonal Al-Ni-Co single quasicrystals are discussed in detail. (methodological notes)

  20. Effects of elastic support on the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuaishuai WANG; Caichao ZHU; Chaosheng SONG; Huali HAN

    2017-01-01

    The reliability and service life of wind turbines are influenced by the complex loading applied on the hub,especially amidst a poor external wind environment.A three-point elastic support,which includes the main bearing and two torque arms,was considered in this study.Based on the flexibilities of the planet carrier and the housing,a coupled dynamic model was developed for a wind turbine drive train.Then,the dynamic behaviors of the drive train for different elastic support parameters were computed and analyzed.Frequency response functions were used to examine how different elastic support parameters influence the dynamic behaviors of the drive train.Results showed that the elastic support parameters considerably influenced the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train.A large support stiffness of the torque arms decreased the dynamic response of the planet carrier and the main bearing,whereas a large support stiffness of the main bearing decreased the dynamic response of planet carrier while increasing that of the main bearing.The findings of this study provide the foundation for optimizing the elastic support stiffness of the wind turbine drive train.

  1. The effect of solvent relaxation time constants on free energy gap law for ultrafast charge recombination following photoinduced charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, Valentina A; Malykhin, Roman E; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2018-05-16

    To elucidate the regularities inherent in the kinetics of ultrafast charge recombination following photoinduced charge separation in donor-acceptor dyads in solutions, the simulations of the kinetics have been performed within the stochastic multichannel point-transition model. Increasing the solvent relaxation time scales has been shown to strongly vary the dependence of the charge recombination rate constant on the free energy gap. In slow relaxing solvents the non-equilibrium charge recombination occurring in parallel with solvent relaxation is very effective so that the charge recombination terminates at the non-equilibrium stage. This results in a crucial difference between the free energy gap laws for the ultrafast charge recombination and the thermal charge transfer. For the thermal reactions the well-known Marcus bell-shaped dependence of the rate constant on the free energy gap is realized while for the ultrafast charge recombination only a descending branch is predicted in the whole area of the free energy gap exceeding 0.2 eV. From the available experimental data on the population kinetics of the second and first excited states for a series of Zn-porphyrin-imide dyads in toluene and tetrahydrofuran solutions, an effective rate constant of the charge recombination into the first excited state has been calculated. The obtained rate constant being very high is nearly invariable in the area of the charge recombination free energy gap from 0.2 to 0.6 eV that supports the theoretical prediction.

  2. Buoyancy effects laminar slot jet impinging on a surface with constant heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokouhmand, H.; Esfahanian, V.; Masoodi, R.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional laminar air jet issuing from a nozzle of half which terminates at height above a flat plate normal to the jet is numerically on the flow and thermal structure of the region near impingement. The impinging surface is maintained at a constant heat flux condition. The full Navier-Stocks and energy equations are solved by a finite difference method to evaluate the velocity profiles and temperature distribution. The governing parameters and their ranges are: Reynolds number Re, 10-50, Grashof number Gr, 0-50, Richardson number Ri=Gr/ Re 2 , Non dimensional nozzle height H,2-3. Results of the free streamline, local friction factor and heat transfer coefficient are graphically presented. It is found that enhancement of the heat transfer rate is substantial for high Richardson number conditions. Although the laminar jet impingement for isothermal condition has been already studied, however the constant heat flux has not been studied enough. the present paper will analyze a low velocity air jet, Which can be used for cooling of a simulated electronics package

  3. Effect of temperature dependence of the Langmuir constant molecular pair potentials on gas hydrates formation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, B.; Enayati, M. [Iranian Offshore Oil Co., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidaryan, E. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Masjidosolayman Branch

    2008-07-01

    Theoretical methods show that crystalline hydrates can form from single-phase systems consisting of both vapor water with gaseous hydrate former and liquid water with dissolved hydrate former. Two phase systems consist of both liquid water with gaseous hydrate former and with liquid hydrate former on the surface. This paper presented a Langmuir constant related model for the prediction of equilibrium pressures and cage occupancies of pure component hydrates. Intermolecular potentials were fit to quantum mechanical energies to obtain the Langmuir constants, which differed from the procedure utilized with the vdWP model. The paper described the experimental method and model calculations. This included the Fugacity model and Van der Waals and Platteeuw model. The paper also discussed pair potential of non-spherical molecules, including the multicentre (site-site) potential; Gaussian overlap potential; Lennard-Jones potential; and Kihara generalized pair potential. It was concluded that fraction of occupied cavities is a function of pair potentials between hard core and empty hydrate lattice. These pair potentials could be calculated from some model as Kihara cell potential, Gaussian potential, Lennard-Jones potential and multicentre pair potential. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Control of propagation characteristics of spin wave pulses via elastic and thermal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Arista, Ivan [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O., E-mail: oleg.kolokoltsev@ccadet.unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Acevedo, A.; Qureshi, N. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Ordóñez-Romero, César L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico)

    2017-05-01

    A study of the magnetoelastic (ME) and thermal effects governing the phase (φ) and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides is presented. The ME effects were studied in a flexural configuration, under punctual mechanical force (F). Thermally induced ME and demagnetization phenomena were controlled by optically injected thermal power P{sub th}. It was determined that in an unclamped Ga:YIG waveguide, the force F that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the P{sub th} at which Δφ=π decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. For nano-volume waveguides the ME control energy (E{sub me}) can be of order of aJ, and the thermal control energy (ΔE{sub th}) can be as small as 50 fJ. The response time of these effects lies in the ns time scale. Both the mechanical and the thermo-magnetic forces provide an effective control of MSSW pulse amplitude, in addition to its phase shift. The thermo-magnetic effect allows one to realize variable delays of a MSSW pulse. - Highlights: • The Magneto-elastic (ME) and optically induced thermal effects governing the phase and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides are presented. • A mechanical force that causes phase shift Δφ=π for spin waves in the waveguides decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the optical power that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. • The response time of these effects can lie in the ns time scale.

  5. Low energy 16O+208Pb elastic scattering: an attempt to analyze the microscopic effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.; Ferrero, J.L.; Pacheco, J.C.; Bilwes, B.

    1991-03-01

    Elastic scattering of 16 O on 208 Pb is studied at 96, 104, 129.5, 192, 216.6 and 312.6 MeV. The 16 O+ 208 Pb potential is calculated first in the closure approximation model and compared to semi-phenomenological potentials. Then detailed contributions to the polarization real potential and to the imaginary potential due to the coupling of the elastic channels to the inelastic channels are calculated. The results are compared to the authors' model potential and used to test the main assumptions of the model. From that comparison a qualitative interpretation of the success of the model is proposed. At last the elastic scattering cross sections are calculated and compared to the data. (author) 41 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  7. Numerical simulation of shear and the Poynting effects by the finite element method: An application of the generalised empirical inequalities in non-linear elasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Angela Mihai, L.; Goriely, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Finite element simulations of different shear deformations in non-linear elasticity are presented. We pay particular attention to the Poynting effects in hyperelastic materials, complementing recent theoretical findings by showing these effects

  8. Orientation dependence of shape memory and super elastic effects in Ti-30% Ni-20% Cu single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumlyakov, Yu.I.; Kireeva, I.V.

    1999-01-01

    Single crystals of Ti-30% Ni-20% Cu (at.%) alloy experiencing B2-B19 martensitic transformation are used to study the dependence of deforming stress σ cr , shape memory effect and super elasticity on test temperature, crystal orientation and the sign of tension/compression stresses. It is shown that experimental values of shape memory effect and super elasticity as well as their dependences on orientation and loading regime are described within the frameworks of the model taking into account lattice distortions only. The orientation dependence and axial stress asymmetry in the temperature range of stress-induced martensite formation are determined by the dependence of lattice distortion during B2-B19 martensitic transformations on the orientation and the sign of applied stresses [ru

  9. Effect of rotation and magnetic field on free vibrations in a spherical non-homogeneous embedded in an elastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayones, F. S.; Abd-Alla, A. M.

    2018-06-01

    The prime objective of the present paper is to analyze the effect of magnetic field and rotation on the free vibrations of an elastic hollow sphere. The one-dimensional equation of motion is solved in terms of radial displacement. The frequency equation is obtained when the boundaries are free and fixed boundary conditions. The determination is concerned with the eigenvalues of the natural frequency of the free vibrations in the case of harmonic vibrations. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes are calculated numericall and the effects of rotation and magnetic field are discussed. It was shown that the dispersion curves of waves were significantly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation of the elastic sphere.

  10. Modeling Pseudo-elastic Behavior of Springback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-01-01

    constant. In the context of this investigation we refer psuedoelastic behavior in the most general sense as any deviation from linearity in the unloading curve. The non-linearity leads to a hysteresis loop upon reloading. The approach is based on the non-conventional theory with a vanishing elastic region as advanced by Dafalias and Popov. The treatment is purely phenomenological where we don't distinguish between macroscopic plasticity and micro-plasticity. The macroscopic uniaxial stress-strain curve is used to define effective plastic response in the same manner as classical plasticity theory except that the nonlinearity during unloading and reloading are incorporated into plasticity. It is shown that such models can be easily formulated within the context of elastoplasticity without violating any physical mechanisms of deformation. Springback for a plane strain bending model is used to demonstrate the potential effect if such a model is applied

  11. Synthetic Analysis of the Effective Elastic Thickness of the Lithosphere in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Li, C.

    2017-12-01

    Effective elastic thickness (Te) represents the response of the lithosphere to a long-term (larger than 105 years) geological loading and reflects the deformation mechanism of plate and its thermodynamic state. Temperature and composition of the lithosphere, coupling between crust and lithospheric mantle, and lithospheric structures affect Te. Regional geology in China is quite complex, influenced by the subduction of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates in the east and the collision of the Eurasia plate with the India-Australia plate in the southwest. Te can help understand the evolution and strength of the lithospheres in different areas and tectonic units. Here we apply the multitaper coherence method to estimate Te in China using the topography (ETOPO1) and Bouguer gravity anomalies (WGM2012) , at different window sizes (600km*600km, 800km*800km, 1000km*1000km) and moving steps. The lateral variation of Te in China coincides well with the geology. The old stable cratons or basins always correspond to larger Te, whereas the oceanic lithosphere or active orogen blocks tend to get smaller Te. We further correlate Te to curie-point depths (Zb) and heat flow to understand how temperature influences the strength of the lithosphere. Despite of a complex correlation between Te and Zb, good positive correlations are found in the North China Block, Tarim Basin, and Lower Yangtze, showing strong influence of temperature on lithospheric strength. Conversely, the Tibetan Plateau, Upper and Middle Yangtze, and East China Sea Basin even show negative correlation, suggesting that lithospheric structures and compositions play more important roles than temperature in these blocks. We also find that earthquakes tend to occur preferably in a certain range of Te. Deeper earthquakes are more likely to occur where the lithosphere is stronger with larger Te. Crust with a larger Te may also have a deeper ductile-brittle boundary, along which deep large earthquakes tend to cluster.

  12. Design and evaluation of noise suppression sheet for GHz band utilizing magneto-elastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Koichi; Yoshida, Shigeyoshi

    2017-12-01

    Feasibility of realizing a noise suppression sheet (NSS) coping with the low SHF band such as the 5 GHz band was investigated, which was composed of soft magnetic metal flakes dispersed in a polymer. For suppressing noises, the higher frequency one of the bimodal frequency dispersion (lower frequency one: Dispersion DII, higher frequency one: Dispersion DIII) seen in the imaginary permeability (μ″; magnetic loss component) spectrum of the NSS was aimed to utilize. Referring to the previous finding that Dispersion DIII is originated from a magneto-elastic effect, several magnetic composite sheets were prepared using various alloy flakes with different saturation magnetostriction (λs), and their frequency (fr(DIII)) and magnitude (μ″(DIII)) of Dispersion DIII were investigated. It was found that the NSS containing flakes with higher λs exhibited higher fr(DIII) and higher μ″(DIII)/μ″(DII), which was ratio of μ″(DIII) to the magnitude of Dispersion DII (μ″(DII)). The fr(DIII) for the NSS having the highest λs containing Fe-Co alloy flake reached 7.45 GHz and μ″ in the 5 GHz band was approximately twice as high as the conventional NSS containing Fe-Si-Al alloy flake. For transmission attenuation power ratio (Rtp) when an NSS was placed on a microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, NSS with larger fr(DIII)2 · μ″(DIII) ∝ Ms2 (Ms: saturation magnetization), which theoretically gave the frequency limit of imaginary permeability for a thin film, exhibited larger Rtp in the low SHF band. These results suggested that an NSS containing a magnetic flake material with both large λs and Ms was suitable for suppressing low SHF band noises.

  13. Elastic Beanstalk

    CERN Document Server

    Vliet, Jurg; Wel, Steven; Dowd, Dara

    2011-01-01

    While it's always been possible to run Java applications on Amazon EC2, Amazon's Elastic Beanstalk makes the process easier-especially if you understand how it works beneath the surface. This concise, hands-on book not only walks you through Beanstalk for deploying and managing web applications in the cloud, you'll also learn how to use this AWS tool in other phases of development. Ideal if you're a developer familiar with Java applications or AWS, Elastic Beanstalk provides step-by-step instructions and numerous code samples for building cloud applications on Beanstalk that can handle lots

  14. Elastic Anisotropy of Basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Shapiro, S.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Kaselow, A.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2005-12-01

    Elastic properties of rocks are sensitive to changes of the in-situ stress and damage state. In particular, seismic velocities are strongly affected by stress-induced formation and deformation of cracks or shear-enhanced pore collapse. The effect of stress on seismic velocities as a result of pore space deformation in isotropic rock at isostatic compression may be expressed by the equation: A+K*P-B*exp (-D*P) (1), where P=Pc-Pp is the effective pressure, the pure difference between confining pressure and pore pressure. The parameter A, K, B and D describe material constants determined using experimental data. The physical meaning of the parameters is given by Shapiro (2003, in Geophysics Vol.68(Nr.2)). Parameter D is related to the stress sensitivity of the rock. A similar relation was derived by Shapiro and Kaselow (2005, in Geophysics in press) for weak anisotropic rocks under arbitrary load. They describe the stress dependent anisotropy in terms of Thomson's (1986, in Geophysics, Vol. 51(Nr.10)) anisotropy parameters ɛ and γ as a function of stress in the case of an initially isotropic rock: ɛ ∝ E2-E3, γ ∝ E3-E2 (2) with Ei=exp (D*Pi). The exponential terms Ei are controlled by the effective stress components Pi. To test this relation, we have conducted a series of triaxial compression tests on dry samples of initially isotropic Etnean Basalt in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame equipped with a pressure cell. Confining pressure was 60, 40 and 20 MPa. Samples were 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. Elastic anisotropy was induced by axial compression of the samples through opening and growth of microcracks predominantly oriented parallel to the sample axis. Ultrasonic P- and S- wave velocities were monitored parallel and normal to the sample axis by an array of 20 piezoceramic transducers glued to the surface. Preamplified full waveform signals were stored in two 12 channel transient recorders. According to equation 2 the anisotropy parameters are

  15. Effects of a high mean stress on the high cycle fatigue life of PWA 1480 and correlation of data by linear elastic fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S.; Kwasny, R.

    1985-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests using 5-mm-diameter smooth specimens were performed on the single crystal alloy PWA 1480 (001 axis) at 70F (room temperature) in air and at 100F (538C) in vacuum (10 to the -6 power torr). Tests were conducted at zero mean stress as well as at high tensile mean stress. The results indicate that, although a tensile mean stress, in general, reduces life, the reduction in fatigue strength, for a given mean stress at a life of one million cycles, is much less than what is predicted by the usual linear Goodman plot. Further, the material appears to be significantly more resistant to mean stress effects at 1000F than at 70F. Metallographic examinations of failed specimens indicate that failures in all cases are initiated from micropores of sizes of the order of 30 to 40 microns. Since the macroscopic stress-strain response in all cases was observed to be linear elastic, linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analyses were carried out to determine the crack growth curves of the material assuming that crack initiation from a micropore (a sub o = 40 microns) occurs very early in life. The results indicate that the calculated crack growth rates at an R (defined as the ratio between minimum stress to maximum stress) value of zero are approximately the same at 70F as at 1000F. However, the calculated crack growth rates at other R ratios, both positive and negative, tend to be higher at 70F than at 1000F. Calculated threshold effects at large R values tend to be independent of temperature in the temperature regime studied. They are relatively constant with increasing R ratio up to a value of about 0.6, beyond which the calculated threshold stress intensity factor range decreases rapidly with increasing R ratios.

  16. Elasticity in Elastics-An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisetty, Supradeep Kumar; Nimagadda, Chakrapani; Begam, Madhoom Ponnachi; Nalamotu, Raghuveer; Srivastav, Trilok; Gs, Shwetha

    2014-04-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement results from application of forces to teeth. Elastics in orthodontics have been used both intra-orally and extra- orally to a great effect. Their use, combined with good patient co-operation provides the clinician with the ability to correct both anteroposterior and vertical discrepancies. Force decay over a period of time is a major problem in the clinical usage of latex elastics and synthetic elastomers. This loss of force makes it difficult for the clinician to determine the actual force transmitted to the dentition. It's the intent of the clinician to maintain optimal force values over desired period of time. The majority of the orthodontic elastics on the market are latex elastics. Since the early 1990s, synthetic products have been offered in the market for latex-sensitive patients and are sold as nonlatex elastics. There is limited information on the risk that latex elastics may pose to patients. Some have estimated that 0.12-6% of the general population and 6.2% of dental professionals have hypersensitivity to latex protein. There are some reported cases of adverse reactions to latex in the orthodontic population but these are very limited to date. Although the risk is not yet clear, it would still be inadvisable to prescribe latex elastics to a patient with a known latex allergy. To compare the in-vitro performance of latex and non latex elastics. Samples of 0.25 inch, latex and non latex elastics (light, medium, heavy elastics) were obtained from three manufacturers (Forestadent, GAC, Glenroe) and a sample size of ten elastics per group was tested. The properties tested included cross sectional area, internal diameter, initial force generated by the elastics, breaking force and the force relaxation for the different types of elastics. Force relaxation testing involved stretching the elastics to three times marketed internal diameter (19.05 mm) and measuring force level at intervals over a period of 48 hours. The data were

  17. Self-affine roughness effects on the contact area between elastic bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the real contact area between elastic bodies with self-affine rough surfaces, which are described in terms of analytical correlation models in Fourier space. It is found that the roughness has a strong influence on the real contact area A(lambda) at lateral length scales lambda

  18. Thermodynamic effect of elastic stress on grain boundary segregation of phosphorus in a low alloy steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zheng, L.; Lejček, Pavel; Song, S.; Schmitz, G.; Meng, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 647, Oct (2015), s. 172-178 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0144 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : grain boundaries * segregation * elastic stress * thermodynamics * chemical potential * molar volume Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  19. Diameter effect on stress-wave evaluation of modulus of elasticity of logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Brian K. Brashaw; John Punches; John R. Erickson; John W. Forsman; Roy E. Pellerin

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of logs have shown that a longitudinal stress-wave method can be used to nondestructively evaluate the modulus of elasticity (MOE) of logs. A strong relationship has been found between stress-wave MOE and static MOE of logs, but a significant deviation was observed between stress-wave and static values. The objective of...

  20. Swiss ball abdominal crunch with added elastic resistance is an effective alternative to training machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2012-01-01

    crunches in training machine (27±3.7 vs 65±3.8% nEMG respectively, Pinfluence the findings. CONCLUSION: Crunches on a Swiss ball with added elastic resistance induces high rectus abdominis activity accompanied by low hip flexor...

  1. Effect of a growth hormone treatment on bone orthotropic elasticity in dwarf rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohles, S. S.; Martinez, D. A.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1997-01-01

    A refinement of the current ultrasonic elasticity technique was used to measure the orthotropic elastic properties of rat cortical bone as well as to quantify changes in elastic properties, density, and porosity of the dwarf rat cortex after a treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). The ultrasonic elasticity technique was refined via optimized signal management of high-frequency wave propagation through cubic cortical specimens. Twenty dwarf rats (37 days old) were randomly assigned to two groups (10 rats each). The dwarf rat model (5-10% of normal GH) was given subcutaneous injections of either rhGH or saline over a 14-day treatment period. Density was measured using Archimedes technique. Porosity and other microstructural characteristics were also explored via scanning electron microscopy and image analysis. Statistical tests verified significant decreases in cortical orthotropic Young's (-26.7%) and shear (-16.7%) moduli and density (-2.42%) concomitant with an increase in porosity (+125%) after rhGH treatments to the dwarf model (p bone properties at this time interval. Structural implications of these changes throughout physiological loading regimens should be explored.

  2. Pressure dependence of the elastic constants and vibrational anharmonicity of Pd sub 3 sub 9 Ni sub 1 sub 0 Cu sub 3 sub 0 P sub 2 sub 1 bulk metallic glass

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Li; Sun, L L; Wang, W H; Wang, W K

    2003-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the acoustic velocities of a Pd sub 3 sub 9 Ni sub 1 sub 0 Cu sub 3 sub 0 P sub 2 sub 1 bulk metallic glass have been investigated up to 0.5 GPa at room temperature with the pulse echo overlap method. Two independent second-order elastic coefficients C sub 1 sub 1 and C sub 4 sub 4 and their pressure derivatives are yielded. The vibrational anharmonicity is shown by calculating both the acoustic mode Grueneisen parameters in the long-wavelength limit and the thermal Grueneisen parameter, and this result is compared with that for the Pd sub 4 sub 0 Ni sub 4 sub 0 P sub 2 sub 0 bulk glass.

  3. Effects of Constant and Doublet Frequency Electrical Stimulation Patterns on Force Production of Knee Extensor Muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Cometti

    Full Text Available This study compared knee extensors' neuromuscular fatigue in response to two 30-minute stimulation patterns: constant frequency train (CFT and doublet frequency train (DFT. Fifteen men underwent two separate sessions corresponding to each pattern. Measurements included torque evoked by each contraction and maximal voluntary contractions (MVC measured before and immediately after the stimulation sessions. In addition, activation level and torque evoked during doublets (Pd and tetanic contractions at 80-Hz (P80 and 20-Hz (P20 were determined in six subjects. Results indicated greater mean torque during the DFT stimulation session as compared with CFT. But, no difference was obtained between the two stimulation patterns for MVC and evoked torque decreases. Measurements conducted in the subgroup depicted a significant reduction of Pd, P20 and P80. Statistical analyses also revealed bigger P20 immediate reductions after CFT than after DFT. We concluded that DFT could be a useful stimulation pattern to produce and maintain greater force with quite similar fatigue than CFT.

  4. First-Principles and Thermodynamic Simulation of Elastic Stress Effect on Energy of Hydrogen Dissolution in Alpha Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitin, M. S.; Mirzoev, A. A.; Mirzaev, D. A.

    2018-04-01

    Mobile hydrogen, when dissolving in metals, redistributes due to the density gradients and elastic stresses, and enables destruction processes or phase transformations in local volumes of a solvent metal. It is rather important in solid state physics to investigate these interactions. The first-principle calculations performed in terms of the density functional theory, are used for thermodynamic simulation of the elastic stress effect on the energy of hydrogen dissolution in α-Fe crystal lattice. The paper presents investigations of the total energy of Fe-H system depending on the lattice parameter. As a result, the relation is obtained between the hydrogen dissolution energy and stress. A good agreement is shown between the existing data and simulation results. The extended equation is suggested for the chemical potential of hydrogen atom in iron within the local stress field. Two parameters affecting the hydrogen distribution are compared, namely local stress and phase transformations.

  5. The Effect of Thermal Fluctuation on the Receptor-Mediated Adhesion of a Cell Membrane to an Elastic Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Marzban

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanics of the bilayer membrane play an important role in many biological and bioengineering problems such as cell–substrate and cell–nanomaterial interactions. In this work, we study the effect of thermal fluctuation and the substrate elasticity on the cell membrane–substrate adhesion. We model the adhesion of a fluctuating membrane on an elastic substrate as a two-step reaction comprised of the out-of-plane membrane fluctuation and the receptor–ligand binding. The equilibrium closed bond ratio as a function of substrate rigidity was computed by developing a coupled Fourier space Brownian dynamics and Monte Carlo method. The simulation results show that there exists a crossover value of the substrate rigidity at which the closed bond ratio is maximal.

  6. Effect of crosslink torsional stiffness on elastic behavior of semiflexible polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami-Marbini, H.

    2018-02-01

    Networks of semiflexible filaments are building blocks of different biological and structural materials such as cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. The mechanical response of these systems when subjected to an applied strain at zero temperature is often investigated numerically using networks composed of filaments, which are either rigidly welded or pinned together at their crosslinks. In the latter, filaments during deformation are free to rotate about their crosslinks while the relative angles between filaments remain constant in the former. The behavior of crosslinks in actual semiflexible networks is different than these idealized models and there exists only partial constraint on torques at crosslinks. The present work develops a numerical model in which two intersecting filaments are connected to each other by torsional springs with arbitrary stiffness. We show that fiber networks composed of rigid and freely rotating crosslinks are the limiting case of the present model. Furthermore, we characterize the effects of stiffness of crosslinks on effective Young's modulus of semiflexible networks as a function of filament flexibility and crosslink density. The effective Young's modulus is determined as a function of the mechanical properties of crosslinks and is found to vanish for networks composed of very weak torsional springs. Independent of the stiffness of crosslinks, it is found that the effective Young's modulus is a function of fiber flexibility and crosslink density. In low density networks, filaments primarily bend and the effective Young's modulus is much lower than the affine estimate. With increasing filament bending stiffness and/or crosslink density, the mechanical behavior of the networks becomes more affine and the stretching of filaments depicts itself as the dominant mode of deformation. The torsional stiffness of the crosslinks significantly affects the effective Young's modulus of the semiflexible random fiber networks.

  7. Effects of system net charge and electrostatic truncation on all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-01-01

    Constant pH molecular dynamics offers a means to rigorously study the effects of solution pH on dynamical processes. Here we address two critical questions arising from the most recent developments of the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method: 1) What is the effect of spatial electrostatic truncation on the sampling of protonation states? 2) Is the enforcement of electrical neutrality necessary for constant pH simulations? We first examined how the generalized reaction field and force shifting schemes modify the electrostatic forces on the titration coordinates. Free energy simulations of model compounds were then carried out to delineate the errors in the deprotonation free energy and salt-bridge stability due to electrostatic truncation and system net charge. Finally, CpHMD titration of a mini-protein HP36 was used to understand the manifestation of the two types of errors in the calculated pK a values. The major finding is that enforcing charge neutrality under all pH conditions and at all time via co-titrating ions significantly improves the accuracy of protonation-state sampling. We suggest that such finding is also relevant for simulations with particle-mesh Ewald, considering the known artifacts due to charge-compensating background plasma. PMID:25142416

  8. Effects of system net charge and electrostatic truncation on all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Jana K

    2014-10-15

    Constant pH molecular dynamics offers a means to rigorously study the effects of solution pH on dynamical processes. Here, we address two critical questions arising from the most recent developments of the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method: (1) What is the effect of spatial electrostatic truncation on the sampling of protonation states? (2) Is the enforcement of electrical neutrality necessary for constant pH simulations? We first examined how the generalized reaction field and force-shifting schemes modify the electrostatic forces on the titration coordinates. Free energy simulations of model compounds were then carried out to delineate the errors in the deprotonation free energy and salt-bridge stability due to electrostatic truncation and system net charge. Finally, CpHMD titration of a mini-protein HP36 was used to understand the manifestation of the two types of errors in the calculated pK(a) values. The major finding is that enforcing charge neutrality under all pH conditions and at all time via cotitrating ions significantly improves the accuracy of protonation-state sampling. We suggest that such finding is also relevant for simulations with particle mesh Ewald, considering the known artifacts due to charge-compensating background plasma. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effects of the pulse-driven magnetic field detuning on the calibration of coil constants while using noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the calibration of coil constants using the Free Induction Decay (FID signal of noble gases, we analyse the effects of the pulse-driven magnetic field detuning on the calibration results. This method is based on the inverse relation between the π/2 pulse duration and its amplitude. We confirmed that obtaining a precise frequency is a prerequisite for ensuring the accuracy of research using the initial amplitude of the FID signal. In this paper, the spin dynamics of noble gases and its time-domain solution under the driving pulse have been discussed with regard to different detuning ranges. Experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical predictions, which indicate the correctness of our theoretical deduction. Therefore, the frequency of the pulse-driven magnetic field is an important factor to the calibration of coil constants, it should be determined with a high degree of accuracy.

  10. Elastic properties of Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn single crystals with bcc crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.W.; Li, S.J.; Obbard, E.G.; Wang, H.; Wang, S.C.; Hao, Y.L.; Yang, R.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The single crystals of Ti2448 alloy with the bcc crystal structure were prepared. → The elastic moduli and constants were measured by several resonant methods. → The crystal shows significant elastic asymmetry in tension and compression. → The crystal exhibits weak nonlinear elasticity with large elastic strain ∼2.5%. → The crystal has weak atomic interactions against crystal distortion to low symmetry. - Abstract: Single crystals of Ti2448 alloy (Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn in wt.%) were grown successfully using an optical floating-zone furnace. Several kinds of resonant methods gave consistent Young's moduli of 27.1, 56.3 and 88.1 GPa and shear moduli of 34.8, 11.0 and 14.6 GPa for the , and oriented single crystals, and C 11 , C 12 and C 44 of 57.2, 36.1 and 35.9 GPa respectively. Uniaxial testing revealed asymmetrical elastic behaviors of the crystals: tension caused elastic softening with a large reversible strain of ∼4% and a stress plateau of ∼250 MPa, whereas compression resulted in gradual elastic stiffening with much smaller reversible strain. The crystals exhibited weak nonlinear elasticity with a large elastic strain of ∼2.5% and a high strength, approaching ∼20% and ∼30% of its ideal shear and ideal tensile strength respectively. The crystals showed linear elasticity with a small elastic strain of ∼1%. These elastic deformation characteristics have been interpreted in terms of weakened atomic interactions against crystal distortion to low crystal symmetry under external applied stresses. These results are consistent with the properties of polycrystalline Ti2448, including high strength, low elastic modulus, large recoverable strain and weak strengthening effect due to grain refinement.

  11. The effective differential cross section for elastic scattering of electrons by atoms and its use for Monte Carlo simulation of electron passage through matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikin, E G

    2010-01-01

    The effective differential cross section (DCS) for elastic scattering of electrons by atoms is proposed that reproduces known energy dependences for the first and second transport cross sections but provides a total elastic cross section that is significantly small compared with the known energy dependences. The number of elastic collisions of electrons in matter when using the effective DCS in Monte Carlo simulations is significantly lower than that when using the real DCS. The results of our Monte Carlo simulation of electron propagation in aluminium using the proposed DCS are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. 'In situ' and 'Post-mortem' TEM study of the super-elastic effect in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, A.; San Juan, J.; Bocanegra, E.H.; Caillard, D.; No, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of the microstructure evolution during super-elastic cycling has been performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-mechanical properties evolution, as well as the martensitic transformation ageing. Particularly, in this work we have studied the super-elastic effect in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys by 'in situ' TEM experiments. The bright field images and diffraction patterns have allowed us to determine, during the transformation, the kind of nucleated martensite variants and their relative orientations. Finally, we have analysed the super-elastic effect on the dislocation microstructure and on the transformation temperatures

  13. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  14. Acute effects of elastic bands during the free-weight barbell back squat exercise on velocity, power, and force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Mark W; Warpeha, Joseph M; Dietz, Cal C; Giveans, Russell M; Erdman, Arthur G

    2010-11-01

    The use of elastic bands in resistance training has been reported to be effective in increasing performance-related parameters such as power, rate of force development (RFD), and velocity. The purpose of this study was to assess the following measures during the free-weight back squat exercise with and without elastic bands: peak and mean velocity in the eccentric and concentric phases (PV-E, PV-C, MV-E, MV-C), peak force (PF), peak power in the concentric phase, and RFD immediately before and after the zero-velocity point and in the concentric phase (RFDC). Twenty trained male volunteers (age = 26.0 ± 4.4 years) performed 3 sets of 3 repetitions of squats (at 55% one repetition maximum [1RM]) on 2 separate days: 1 day without bands and the other with bands in a randomized order. The added band force equaled 20% of the subjects' 55% 1RM. Two independent force platforms collected ground reaction force data, and a 9-camera motion capture system was used for displacement measurements. The results showed that PV-E and RFDC were significantly (p squats with elastic bands in terms of RFD. Practitioners concerned with improving RFD may want to consider incorporating this easily implemented training variation.

  15. Effect of interfacial stresses in an elastic body with a nanoinclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakaeva, Aleksandra B.; Grekov, Mikhail A.

    2018-05-01

    The 2-D problem of an infinite elastic solid with a nanoinclusion of a different from circular shape is solved. The interfacial stresses are acting at the interface. Contact of the inclusion with the matrix satisfies the ideal conditions of cohesion. The generalized Laplace - Young law defines conditions at the interface. To solve the problem, Gurtin - Murdoch surface elasticity model, Goursat - Kolosov complex potentials and the boundary perturbation method are used. The problem is reduced to the solution of two independent Riemann - Hilbert's boundary problems. For the circular inclusion, hypersingular integral equation in an unknown interfacial stress is derived. The algorithm of solving this equation is constructed. The influence of the interfacial stress and the dimension of the circular inclusion on the stress distribution and stress concentration at the interface are analyzed.

  16. Elastic and inelastic surface effects on ion penetration and the resulting sputtering and backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The computer code ITMC (Ion Transport in Materials and Compounds) has been developed to study in detail the transport of charged particles in solid materials and surface related phenomena such as sputtered atoms and backscattered ions. The code is based on Monte Carlo methods to follow the path and the damage produced by the charged particles in three dimension as they slow down in target materials. Single-element targets as well as alloys with possible different surface and bulk compositions or with layered structures of different materials can be used. Various models developed to calculate the inelastic energy losses with target electrons can be used in the code. Most known interatomic potentials can also be used to calculate the elastic energy losses. The major advantages of the code are its ability and flexibility to use and compare various models of elastic and inelastic energy losses in any target with different compounds and different surface and bulk composition

  17. A frictional contact problem with wear involving elastic-viscoplastic materials with damage and thermal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoumene Djabi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical problem for quasistatic contact between a thermo-elastic-viscoplastic body with damage and an obstacle. The contact is frictional and bilateral with a moving rigid foundation which results in the wear of the contacting surface. We employ the thermo-elasticviscoplastic with damage constitutive law for the material. The damage of the material caused by elastic deformations. The evolution of the damage is described by an inclusion of parabolic type. The problem is formulated as a coupled system of an elliptic variational inequality for the displacement, a parabolic variational inequality for the damage and the heat equation for the temperature. We establish a variational formulation for the model and we prove the existence of a unique weak solution to the problem. The proof is based on a classical existence and uniqueness result on parabolic inequalities, differential equations and fixed point arguments.

  18. The effect of pressure on open-framework silicates: elastic behaviour and crystal-fluid interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, G. D.; Lotti, P.; Tabacchi, G.

    2018-02-01

    The elastic behaviour and the structural evolution of microporous materials compressed hydrostatically in a pressure-transmitting fluid are drastically affected by the potential crystal-fluid interaction, with a penetration of new molecules through the zeolitic cavities in response to applied pressure. In this manuscript, the principal mechanisms that govern the P-behaviour of zeolites with and without crystal-fluid interaction are described, on the basis of previous experimental findings and computational modelling studies. When no crystal-fluid interaction occurs, the effects of pressure are mainly accommodated by tilting of (quasi-rigid) tetrahedra around O atoms that behave as hinges. Tilting of tetrahedra is the dominant mechanism at low-mid P-regime, whereas distortion and compression of tetrahedra represent the mechanisms which usually dominate the mid-high P regime. One of the most common deformation mechanisms in zeolitic framework is the increase of channels ellipticity. The deformation mechanisms are dictated by the topological configuration of the tetrahedral framework; however, the compressibility of the cavities is controlled by the nature and bonding configuration of the ionic and molecular content, resulting in different unit-cell volume compressibility in isotypic structures. The experimental results pertaining to compression in "penetrating" fluids, and thus with crystal-fluid interaction, showed that not all the zeolites experience a P-induced intrusion of new monoatomic species or molecules from the P-transmitting fluids. For example, zeolites with well-stuffed channels at room conditions (e.g. natural zeolites) tend to hinder the penetration of new species through the zeolitic cavities. Several variables govern the sorption phenomena at high pressure, among those: the "free diameters" of the framework cavities, the chemical nature and the configuration of the extra-framework population, the partial pressure of the penetrating molecule in the

  19. EFFECTS OF PARENT ARTERY SEGMENTATION AND ANEURISMALWALL ELASTICITY ON PATIENT-SPECIFIC HEMODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-liang; DING Guang-hong; YANG Xin-jian; LI Hai-yun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that hemodynamics and wall tension play an important role in the formation,growth and rupture of aneurysms.In the present study,the authors investigated the influence of parent artery segmentation and aneurismal-wall elasticity on patient-specific hemodynamic simulations with two patient-specific eases of cerebral aneurysms.Realistic models of the aneurysms were constructed from 3-D angiography images and blood flow dynamics was studied under physiologically representative waveform of inflow.For each aneurysm three computational models were constructed:Model 1 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 2 with the partial upstream parent artery with the elastic arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 3 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid wall for arterial wall far from the aneurysm and the elastic wall for arterial wall near the aneurysm.The results show that Model 1 could predict complex intra-aneurismal flow patterns and wall shear stress distribution in the aneurysm,but is unable to give aneurismal wall deformation and tension,Model 2 demonstrates aneurismal wall deformation and tension,but fails to properly model inflow pattern contributed by the upstream parent artery,resulting in local misunderstanding Wall Shear Stress (WSS) distribution,Model 3 can overcome limitations of the former two models,and give an overall and accurate analysis on intra-aneurismal flow patterns,wall shear stress distribution,aneurismal-wall deformation and tension.Therefore we suggest that the proper length of extensive upstream parent artery and aneuri-smal-wall elasticity should be considered carefully in establishing computational model to predict the intra-aneurismal hemodynamic and wall tension.

  20. Effects of Defect Size and Number Density on the Transmission and Reflection of Guided Elastic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    localized region, a photoacoustic source generates elastic waves on one side of the damaged region, and then two ultrasound transducers measure the...Panther OPO) operating at 1.55um and with a pulse width of 7ns, a repetition rate of 30Hz and an average power of 65mW. This configuration seems...where the defects are of the same order as the wavelength of the ultrasound , we find ourselves confronted with Mie scattering, which has weaker

  1. Exploring the Local Elastic Properties of Bilayer Membranes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieffet, Gilles; Botero, Alonso; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane mechanical elastic properties regulate a variety of cellular processes involving local membrane deformation, such as ion channel function and vesicle fusion. In this work, we used molecular dynamics simulations to estimate the local elastic properties of a membrane. For this, we calculated...... the stretching process in molecular detail, allowing us to fit this profile to a previously proposed continuum elastic model. Through this approach, we calculated an effective membrane spring constant of 42 kJ-2.mol-1, which is in good agreement with the PMF calculation. Furthermore, the solvation energy we...

  2. Elastic models for the non-Arrhenius relaxation time of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short-time...... elastic properties are all determined by just one effective, temperature-dependent force constant). We finally discuss the connection between the elastic models and two well-established research fields of condensed-matter physics: point defects in crystals and solid-state diffusion....

  3. Elastic models for the Non-Arrhenius Relaxation Time of Glass-Forming Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short-time...... elastic properties are all determined by just one effective, temperature-dependent force constant). We finally discuss the connection between the elastic models and two well-established research fields of condensed-matter physics: point defects in crystals and solid-state diffusion....

  4. Effect of fiber content on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of hair fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Nanda, Bishnu; Satapathy, Alok

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports on the dielectric and thermal properties of hair fibers reinforced epoxy composites. Hair is an important part of human body which also offers protection to the human body. It is also viewed as a biological waste which is responsible for creating environmental pollution due to its low decomposition rate. But at the same time it has unique microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties. In the present work, epoxy composites are made by solution casting method with different proportions of short hair fiber (SHF). Effects of fiber content on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of epoxy resin are studied. Thermal conductivities of the composites are obtained using a UnithermTM Model 2022 tester. An HIOKI-3532-50 Hi Tester Elsier Analyzer is used for measuring the capacitance of the epoxy-SHF composite, from which dielectric constant (Dk) of the composite are calculated. A reduction in thermal conductivity of the composite is noticed with the increase in wt. % of fiber. The dielectric constant value of the composites also found to be significantly affected by the fiber content.

  5. Correlation Among the Variant Group, Effective Grain Size, and Elastic Strain Energy During the Phase Transformation in 9Ni Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Hidenori; Moriguchi, Koji; Tomio, Yusaku; Yamagishi, Hideki; Morito, Shigekazu

    2017-12-01

    The effect of carbon content on the density of variant-pair boundaries was investigated in 9Ni steel using an electron backscatter diffraction patterns method. The changes in the density of variant-pair boundaries were correlated with the nondestructive measured values of shear modulus of the austenite phase at the phase transformation point. Furthermore, the effective grain size was correlated with the shear modulus and the density of variant-pair boundaries. These relations are discussed from the viewpoint of self-accommodation of elastic strain energy and the nucleation event in the bainite and martensitic transformations.

  6. Elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leader, Elliot

    1991-01-01

    With very few unexplained results to challenge conventional ideas, physicists have to look hard to search for gaps in understanding. An area of physics which offers a lot more than meets the eye is elastic and diffractive scattering where particles either 'bounce' off each other, emerging unscathed, or just graze past, emerging relatively unscathed. The 'Blois' workshops provide a regular focus for this unspectacular, but compelling physics, attracting highly motivated devotees

  7. The elastic properties of zirconium alloy fuel cladding and pressure tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Northwood, D.O.

    1979-01-01

    A knowledge of the elastic properties of zirconium alloys is required in the mathematical modelling of cladding and pressure tubing performance. Until recently, little of this type of data was available, particularly at elevated temperatures. The dynamic elastic moduli of zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, the alloys Zr-1.0 wt%Nb, Zr-2.5 wt%Nb and Marz grade zirconium have therefore been determined over the temperature range 275 to 1000 K. Young's modulus and shear modulus for all the zirconium alloys decrease with temperature and are expressed by empirical relations fitted to the data. The elastic properties are texture dependent and a detailed study has been conducted on the effect of texture on the elastic properties of Zr-1.0 wt% Nb over the temperature range 275 to 775 K. The results are compared with polycrystalline elastic constants computed from single crystal elastic constants, and the effect of texture on the dynamic elastic moduli is discussed in detail. (Auth.)

  8. Effects of porosity on seismic velocities, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios of solid materials and rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbo Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The generalized mixture rule (GMR is used to provide a unified framework for describing Young's (E, shear (G and bulk (K moduli, Lame parameter (λ, and P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs as a function of porosity in various isotropic materials such as metals, ceramics and rocks. The characteristic J values of the GMR for E, G, K and λ of each material are systematically different and display consistent correlations with the Poisson's ratio of the nonporous material (ν0. For the materials dominated by corner-shaped pores, the fixed point at which the effective Poisson's ratio (ν remains constant is at ν0 = 0.2, and J(G > J(E > J(K > J(λ and J(G  0.2 and ν0  J(Vp and J(Vs  0.2 and ν0  0.2 and ν0 = 0.2, respectively. For natural rocks containing thin-disk-shaped pores parallel to mineral cleavages, grain boundaries and foliation, however, the ν fixed point decreases nonlinearly with decreasing pore aspect ratio (α: width/length. With increasing depth or pressure, cracks with smaller α values are progressively closed, making the ν fixed point rise and finally reach to the point at ν0 = 0.2.

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of analytical wake models for wind farm with constant and variable hub heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Longyan; Tan, Andy C.C.; Cholette, Michael; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effectiveness of three analytical wake models is studied. • The results of the analytical wake models are compared with the CFD simulations. • The results of CFD simulation are verified by comparison to the offshore wind farm observation data. • The onshore wind farm with both constant and different hub height turbines are analyzed. • PARK model is able to predict the total wind farm power production well with tuned surface roughness value. - Abstract: Extensive power losses of wind farm have been witnessed due to the wake interactions between wind turbines. By applying analytical wake models which describe the wind speed deficits in the wake quantitatively, the power losses can be regained to a large extent through wind farm layout optimization, and this has been extensively reported in literature. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of the analytical wake models in predicting the wind farm power production have rarely been studied and compared for wind farm with both constant and variable wind turbine hub heights. In this study, the effectiveness of three different analytical wake models (PARK model, Larsen model and B-P model) is thoroughly compared over a wide range of wake properties. After the validation with the observation data from offshore wind farm, CFD simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the analytical wake models for an onshore wind farm. The results show that when using the PARK model the surface roughness value (z 0 ) must be carefully tuned to achieve good performance in predicting the wind farm power production. For the other two analytical wake models, their effectiveness varies depending on the situation of wind farm (offshore or onshore) and the wind turbine hub heights (constant or variable). It was found that the results of B-P model agree well with the CFD simulations for offshore wind farm, but not for the onshore wind farm. The Larsen model is more accurate for the wind farm with variable wind turbine

  10. Effects of constant and cyclical thermal regimes on growth and feeding of juvenile cutthroat trout of variable sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Dunham, J.B.; Hayes, J.P.; Vinyard, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of constant (12, 18, and 24 A?C) and cyclical (daily variation of 15a??21 and 12a??24 A?C) thermal regimes on the growth and feeding of Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi) of variable sizes were examined. Higher constant temperatures (i.e., 24 A?C) and more variable daily temperatures (i.e., 12a??24 A?C daily cycle) negatively affected growth rates. As fish mass increased (from 0.24 to 15.52 g) the effects of different thermal regimes on mass growth became more pronounced. Following 14 days exposure to the thermal regimes, feeding rates of individual fish were assessed during acute exposure (40 min) to test temperatures of 12, 18, and 24 A?C. Feeding rate was depressed during acute exposure to 24 A?C, but was not significantly affected by the preceding thermal regime. Our results indicate that even brief daily exposure to higher temperatures (e.g., 24 A?C) can have considerable sublethal effects on cutthroat trout, and that fish size should be considered when examining the effects of temperature.

  11. Mathematical methods in elasticity imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Habib; Garnier, Josselin; Kang, Hyeonbae; Lee, Hyundae; Wahab, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first to comprehensively explore elasticity imaging and examines recent, important developments in asymptotic imaging, modeling, and analysis of deterministic and stochastic elastic wave propagation phenomena. It derives the best possible functional images for small inclusions and cracks within the context of stability and resolution, and introduces a topological derivative-based imaging framework for detecting elastic inclusions in the time-harmonic regime. For imaging extended elastic inclusions, accurate optimal control methodologies are designed and the effects of uncertainties of the geometric or physical parameters on stability and resolution properties are evaluated. In particular, the book shows how localized damage to a mechanical structure affects its dynamic characteristics, and how measured eigenparameters are linked to elastic inclusion or crack location, orientation, and size. Demonstrating a novel method for identifying, locating, and estimating inclusions and cracks in elastic...

  12. The Effects of 24 weeks of Resistance Training with Simultaneous Elastic and Free Weight Loading on Muscular Performance of Novice Lifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoepe, Todd C; Ramirez, David A; Rovetti, Robert J; Kohler, David R; Almstedt, Hawley C

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of variable resistance as provided through elastic plus free weight techniques in college aged males and females. Twenty novice lifters were randomly assigned to a traditional free weight only (6 males and 5 females) or elastic band plus free weight group (5 males and 5 females) and 9 more normally active controls (5 males and 4 females), were recruited to maintain normal activity for the duration of the study. No differences existed between control, free weight and elastic band at baseline for age, body height, body mass, body mass index, and body fat percentage. One-repetition maximums were performed for squat and bench press while both strength and power were assessed using isokinetic dynamometry. Elastic groups and free-weight groups completed 24 weeks of whole body, periodized, high intensity resistance (65-95% of one-repetition maximum) training three times/week. Training programs were identical except that the elastic group trained the barbell squat, bench press and stiff-legged deadlift with 20-35% of their total prescribed training loads coming from band resistance (assessed at the top of the range of motion) with the remainder from free weight resistance. A mixed-model analysis revealed that peak torque, average power and one-repetition maximums for squat were significantly greater after training for the elastic group compared to the control (pfree weight group also showed significantly greater improvements over the control in peak torque and one-repetition maximums for squat and bench press. No significant differences were observed between the elastic band and free weight groups. Combined variable elastic band plus free weight exercises are effective at increasing strength and power similar to free-weights alone in novice college aged males and females. However, due to complexity in set-up and load assignment elastic adoption by novice lifters in an unsupervised situation is not advised.

  13. Investigations of Magnetic Structural Phase Transition of Layered Systems by Moessbauer Effect and by Dielectric Constant Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulhem, J.; Mostafa, M.; Shaban, H.

    2002-01-01

    Moessbauer Effect (ME) of compounds like (C n H 2 N +1 NH 3 ) 2 -Fe(Π)CL 4 and (CH 2 ) 6 (NH 3 ) 2 Fe(Π)CL 4 have been measured. The results indicate a conted spin antiferromagnet, with transition temperatures and magnetic field strengths according to value of n. Dielectric constant measurements of the above compounds as afunction of temperatures at different selected frequencies also have been carried out. The results confirm existence of structural phase transition shown by Me. (Author's) 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. The focusing effect of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional photonic crystals with gradually varying lattice constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bakhshi Garmi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the focusing effect of electromagnetic wave in the two-dimensional graded photonic crystal consisting of Silicon rods in the air background with gradually varying lattice constant. The results showed that graded photonic crystal can focus wide beams on a narrow area at frequencies near the lower edge of the band gap, where equal frequency contours are not concave. For calculation of photonic band structure and equal frequency contours, we have used plane wave expansion method and revised plane wave expansion method, respectively. The calculation of the electric and magnetic fields was performed by finite difference time domain method.

  15. A proof of the cancellation of the redistribution tidal potential effects on the rotation of an elastic Earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenas, Tomás; Escapa, Alberto; Ferrándiz, Jose Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The gravitational action of the Moon and the Sun on the elastic Earth originates a redistribution of its mass. In turn, this redistribution is responsible of an additional term in the gravitational potential energy of the system, commonly referred to as tidal potential of redistribution. Its effects on the Earth rotation were previously discussed in Escapa et al. (2004) and Lambert & Mathews (2006). A numerical approach was followed in those works to show that for an elastic Earth model, assumed to be spherical and non-rotating in the undeformed state, there is no net contribution to the motion of the figure axis. This result is consistent with the corresponding one deduced from the torque approach, where one can derive analytically that the redistribution torque for that elastic Earth model vanishes (e.g., Krasinsky 1999). However, it is far from being a trivial question to recover the same result when working directly with the tidal potential of redistribution, as in Escapa et al. (2004) or Lambert & Mathews (2006). In this investigation we revisit the issue, enhancing and completing former results by Escapa et al. (2004). In particular, we aim at proving, by analytical means, that the redistribution tidal potential of the former elastic Earth model does not affect its rotational motion. To this end we expand that potential in terms of an Andoyer-like set of canonical variables, and then compute the torque associated to it. This choice was motivated by the suitability of this set of variables to extend our calculations to the nutations of other different elastic or anelastic Earth models, through the Hamiltonian framework (e.g., Ferrándiz et al. 2012). We show the exact cancellation of the derived expressions as a consequence of certain properties fulfilled by the expansions of the orbital motion of the perturbing bodies. Acknowledgement. - This work has been partially supported by the Spanish government trhough the MINECO projects I+D+I AYA201022039-C02-01, AYA

  16. Effects of constant and stepwise changes in temperature on the species abundance dynamics of four cladocera species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbitsky V. B.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments with natural zooplankton communities were carried out to study the effects of two contrasting temperature regimes: constant temperature (15, 20, and 25 °C and graded changes in temperature. The graded regime consisted of repeated sustained (three weeks controlled stepwise temperature changes of 5 or 10 °C within 15–25 °C on the population dynamics of four dominant species of lake littoral zooplankton, Daphnia longispina (Müller, 1785, Diaphanosoma brachyurum (Lievin, 1848, Simocephalus vetulus (Müller, 1776 and Chydorus sphaericus (Müller, 1785. The results show that controlled stepwise changes (positive or negative in temperature within the ranges of 15–20, 20–25, and 15–25 °C can exert either stimulating or inhibitory effect (direct or delayed on the development of D. longispina and S. vetulus populations. The development of D. brachyurum and Ch. sphaericus, both more steno-thermophile, was only stimulated by a stable elevated temperature (25 °C. These results support the previously formulated hypothesis that, in determining the ecological temperature optimum of a species within a natural community, it is not enough to define its optimum from constant, cyclic or random temperature fluctuations, but also from unidirectional stepwise changes in temperature. These stepwise changes may also induce prolonged or delayed effects.

  17. Synergic effect of salivary pH baselines and low pH intakes on the force relaxation of orthodontic latex elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Shabnam; Farjood, Amin; Zare, Mahbubeh

    2017-01-01

    Latex elastics are still in common use due to their low cost and high flexibility to improve sagittal discrepancies or interdigitation of teeth. Mechanical properties of elastics are influenced by several environmental factors such as pH changes. This study evaluated similar latex elastics to define the influence of synergic effect of intermittent low pH and various baselines pH of saliva. Four groups of latex elastics (3-M Unitek, 3/16 inch) were tested ( n = 15 in each group). Two groups of elastics were immersed in two tanks of artificial saliva with different pH levels of 7 and 5, and two groups were immersed in two tanks of artificial saliva with intermittent drop of pH to 4. The force was measured when the elastics were stretched to 25 mm. These measurements were taken in 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h for each group. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's test were used to assess the findings. The level of significance was 0.05%. The interaction between pH and time analyzed with RMANOVA showed no significant differences ( P > 0.05) except in 36 h ( P = 0.014). The Tukey's analysis showed that each comparison between any two groups did not indicate significant differences ( P > 0.05) except between Groups 1 and 3 and between Groups 2 and 3 ( P pH and force degradation in latex elastic band except in 36 h.

  18. The Effects of Shear Strain, Fabric, and Porosity Evolution on Elastic and Mechanical Properties of Clay-Rich Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasonic/seismic waves are widely used for probing fault zone elastic and mechanical properties (gouge composition, frictional strength, density) and elastic properties (Vp, Vs, bulk and shear moduli), as it can provide insight into key processes and fault properties during shearing. These include fabric and force chain formation, porosity evolution, and fault zone stiffness, which are in turn factors in fault slip, damage, and healing. We report on a suite of direct shear experiments on synthetic fault gouge composed of 50% smectite /50% quartz at a normal stress of 25 MPa, in which we use ultrasonic wave transmission to continuously monitor compressional and shear wave velocities (Vp, Vs) up to shear strains of 25, while simultaneously measuring friction and monitoring the evolution of density and porosity. We find that wavespeeds vary with shear strain, due to fabric development and the evolution of density and porosity. The coefficient of friction peaks at μ .47 at a shear strain of .5 - 1, decreases to a steady state value of μ .43 by shear strains of 4.5- 6 and then remains rather constant to shear strains of 6 - 25, consistent with previous work. Density increases rapidly from 1.78 g/cm3 to 1.83 g/cm3 at shear strains from 0-2 (porosity decreases from 33% to 25% over that range), and then more gradually increases to a density of 2.08 g/cm3 (porosity of 21%) at a shear strain of 25. Vp increases from 2400 m/s to 2900 m/s during the onset of shear until a shear strain of 3, and then decreases to 2400-2500 by shear strain of 7-9. At shear strains above 9, Vp slowly increases as the layer becomes denser and less porous. We interpret the co-evolving changes in friction, porosity, and elastic moduli/wavespeed to reflect fabric development and alignment of clay particles as a function of shearing. More specifically, the decrease in Vp at a shear strain of 3 reflects the clay particles gradually aligning. Once the particles are aligned, the gradual increase of

  19. Effects of endurance training on reduction of plasma glucose during high intensity constant and incremental speed tests in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Abreu

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of endurance training on reduction of plasma glucose during high intensity constant and incremental speed tests in Wistar rats. We hypothesized that plasma glucose might be decreased in the exercised group during heavy (more intense exercise. Twenty-four 10-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to sedentary and exercised groups. The prescription of endurance exercise training intensity was determined as 60% of the maximum intensity reached at the incremental speed test. The animals were trained by running on a motorized treadmill, five days/week for a total period of 67 weeks. Plasma glucose during the constant speed test in the exercised group at 20 m/min was reduced at the 14th, 21st and 28th min compared to the sedentary group, as well at 25 m/min at the 21st and 28th min. Plasma glucose during the incremental speed test was decreased in the exercised group at the moment of exhaustion (48th min compared to the sedentary group (27th min. Endurance training positively modulates the mitochondrial activity and capacity of substrate oxidation in muscle and liver. Thus, in contrast to other studies on high load of exercise, the effects of endurance training on the decrease of plasma glucose during constant and incremental speed tests was significantly higher in exercised than in sedentary rats and associated with improved muscle and hepatic oxidative capacity, constituting an important non-pharmacological intervention tool for the prevention of insulin resistance, including type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Effect of kinesiotaping, non-elastic taping and bracing on segmental foot kinematics during drop landing in healthy subjects and subjects with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuni, B; Mussler, J; Kalkum, E; Schmitt, H; Wolf, S I

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of kinesiotape, non-elastic tape, and soft brace on segmental foot kinematics during drop landing in subjects with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects. Controlled study with repeated measurements. Three-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. Twenty participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 healthy subjects. The subjects performed drop landings with 17 retroreflective markers on the foot and lower leg in four conditions: barefoot, with kinesiotape, with non-elastic tape and with a soft brace. Ranges of motion of foot segments using a foot measurement method. In participants with chronic ankle instability, midfoot movement in the frontal plane (inclination of the medial arch) was reduced significantly by non-elastic taping, but kinesiotaping and bracing had no effect. In healthy subjects, both non-elastic taping and bracing reduced that movement. In both groups, non-elastic taping and bracing reduced rearfoot excursion in inversion/eversion significantly, which indicates a stabilisation effect. No such effect was found with kinesiotaping. All three methods reduced maximum plantar flexion significantly. Non-elastic taping stabilised the midfoot best in patients with chronic ankle instability, while kinesiotaping did not influence foot kinematics other than to stabilise the rearfoot in the sagittal plane. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01810471. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonlinear elastic properties of superconducting antiperovskites MNNi 3 (M =Zn, Cd, Mg, Al, Ga, and In) from first principles

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lili

    2014-05-22

    We present theoretical studies for the third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of superconducting antiperovskites MNNi 3 (M = Zn, Cd, Mg, Al, Ga, and In) using the density functional theory (DFT) and homogeneous deformation method. From the nonlinear least-square fitting, the elastic constants are extracted from a polynomial fit to the calculated strain-energy data. Calculated second-order elastic constants (SOECs) are compared with the previous theoretical calculations, and a very good agreement was found. The nonlinear effects often play an important role when the finite strains are larger than approximately 2.5 %. Besides, we have computed the pressure derivatives of SOECs and provided rough estimations for the Grüneisen constants of long-wavelength acoustic modes by using the calculated TOECs. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  2. Nonlinear elastic properties of superconducting antiperovskites MNNi 3 (M =Zn, Cd, Mg, Al, Ga, and In) from first principles

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lili; Wu, Xiaozhi; Wang, Rui; Gan, Liyong; Wei, Qunyi

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical studies for the third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of superconducting antiperovskites MNNi 3 (M = Zn, Cd, Mg, Al, Ga, and In) using the density functional theory (DFT) and homogeneous deformation method. From the nonlinear least-square fitting, the elastic constants are extracted from a polynomial fit to the calculated strain-energy data. Calculated second-order elastic constants (SOECs) are compared with the previous theoretical calculations, and a very good agreement was found. The nonlinear effects often play an important role when the finite strains are larger than approximately 2.5 %. Besides, we have computed the pressure derivatives of SOECs and provided rough estimations for the Grüneisen constants of long-wavelength acoustic modes by using the calculated TOECs. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  3. Effect of elastic collisions on acoustic wave propagation in simplified nuclear glass: Molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deladerriere, N.; Delaye, J.-M.; Peuget, S.; Bureau, G.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method based on classical molecular dynamics was used to measure acoustic velocities in simplified glasses and in pure silica. The method was then applied to observe the acoustic velocity variation in a simple glass subjected to displacement cascades. The Rayleigh velocity and Young's modulus were observed to decrease; this behavior is consistent with experimental results obtained for the same glass irradiated by heavy ions. The increasing disorder and reduction in atomic density resulting from elastic collisions are thus directly related to the drop in the Rayleigh velocities and Young's modulus

  4. Elastic Metamaterials with Simultaneously Negative Effective Shear Modulus and Mass Density

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2011-09-02

    We propose a type of elastic metamaterial comprising fluid-solid composite inclusions which can possess a negative shear modulus and negative mass density over a large frequency region. Such a material has the unique property that only transverse waves can propagate with a negative dispersion while longitudinal waves are forbidden. This leads to many interesting phenomena such as negative refraction, which is demonstrated by using a wedge sample and a significant amount of mode conversion from transverse waves to longitudinal waves that cannot occur on the interface of two natural solids.

  5. EFFECT OF STRAIN HARDENING ON FATIGUE CRACK CLOSURE IN ALUMINUM ALLOY UNDER CONSTANT AMPLITUDE WITH SINGLE OVERLOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirpesh Vikram

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study effect of strain hardening on crack closure has been examined with the help of experiments and finite element method on the side edge notched specimen of five different Aluminum alloy (3003 Al, 5052 Al, 6061 T6, 6063 T6, 6351 in mode I under constant amplitude fatigue loading with single overload using Abaqus® 6.10 which is very well accepted FEM application in research. Extended Finite Element Method Module has been used to determine effective stress intensity factor at the crack tip while propagation takes place. FEM results have given good agreement with experimental results. Regression analysis has also been done with SPSS® 16 and dependency of strain hardening coefficient on crack closure has analyzed. A generalized empirical formula has been developed based on strain hardening to calculate effective stress intensity range ratio and a modified Paris law has also been formulated for these aluminum alloy.

  6. Spin effects in elastic scattering of nucleons and new approach to problem of account for spin structure of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, Z.R.; Shchelkachev, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Prospects of decribing polarization effects within the framework of quark-parton models (QPM) using a density matrix in order to describe the parton spin states in hadrons are discussed. Such an approach allows one to get rid of contradictions occuring when describing the QPM of reactions of hadrons polarized in perpendicular to the scattering plane in case of applying spin distribution functions. Different model predictions for the observed one- and two-spin correlations in elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering are analyzed. 12 refs., 2 tabs

  7. The effect of shock-wave strain on the acoustic and elastic properties of titanium nickelide upon phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.N.; Panchenko, A.M.; Sevryugina, I.V.; Novikov, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    The data are obtained for the influence of preliminary plastic deformation of titanium nickelide in an austenitic state on the character of its elastic properties variation during various type phase transitions. It is shown that the defect structure evolution occurring as a result of shock wave loading has a combined ambiguous effect on microstructural mechanisms being the basis for martensitic phase transformations. Shock wave loading is stated to stimulate the dislocation-displacement mechanism of R-phase formation and to increase the stability of R-phase to R→B19'-transition [ru

  8. Test of complex effective interaction by folding analysis of 32S elastic scattering on s-d shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilwes, B.; Bilwes, R.; Diaz, J.; Ferrero, J.L.; Pacheco, J.C.; Ruiz, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data of elastic scattering between nuclei of various structures on a large energy scale has been analyzed in the framework of the folding model by use of the complex effective interaction of Faessler et al (1981). A general good reproduction of the data is obtained if renormalization coefficients for the real and the imaginary parts of the optical potential are introduced. The application of the dispersion relation of Mahaux et al (1986) allows to reproduce the observed energy dependence of the real part of the potential

  9. The Effects of 24 weeks of Resistance Training with Simultaneous Elastic and Free Weight Loading on Muscular Performance of Novice Lifters

    OpenAIRE

    Shoepe, Todd C.; Ramirez, David A.; Rovetti, Robert J.; Kohler, David R.; Almstedt, Hawley C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of variable resistance as provided through elastic plus free weight techniques in college aged males and females. Twenty novice lifters were randomly assigned to a traditional free weight only (6 males and 5 females) or elastic band plus free weight group (5 males and 5 females) and 9 more normally active controls (5 males and 4 females), were recruited to maintain normal activity for the duration of the study. No differences e...

  10. Effect of species structure and dielectric constant on C-band forest backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R. H.; Landry, R.; Kilic, O.; Chauhan, N.; Khadr, N.; Leckie, D.

    1993-01-01

    A joint experiment between Canadian and USA research teams was conducted early in Oct. 1992 to determine the effect of species structure and dielectric variations on forest backscatter. Two stands, one red pine and one jack pine, in the Petawawa National Forestry Institute (PNFI) were utilized for the experiment. Extensive tree architecture measurements had been taken by the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) several months earlier by employing a Total Station surveying instrument which provides detailed information on branch structure. A second part of the experiment consisted of cutting down several trees and using dielectric probes to measure branch and needle permittivity values at both sites. The dielectric and the tree geometry data were used in the George Washington University (GWU) Vegetation Model to determine the C band backscattering coefficients of the individual stands for VV polarization. The model results show that backscatter at C band comes mainly from the needles and small branches and the upper portion of the trunks acts only as an attenuator. A discussion of variation of backscatter with specie structure and how dielectric variations in needles for both species may affect the total backscatter returns is provided.

  11. Elastic gauge fields and Hall viscosity of Dirac magnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiros, Yago; Vozmediano, María A. H.

    2018-02-01

    We analyze the coupling of elastic lattice deformations to the magnon degrees of freedom of magnon Dirac materials. For a honeycomb ferromagnet we find that, as happens in the case of graphene, elastic gauge fields appear coupled to the magnon pseudospinors. For deformations that induce constant pseudomagnetic fields, the spectrum around the Dirac nodes splits into pseudo-Landau levels. We show that when a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is considered, a topological gap opens in the system and a Chern-Simons effective action for the elastic degrees of freedom is generated. Such a term encodes a phonon Hall viscosity response, entirely generated by quantum fluctuations of magnons living in the vicinity of the Dirac points. The magnon Hall viscosity vanishes at zero temperature, and grows as temperature is raised and the states around the Dirac points are increasingly populated.

  12. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun

    2011-06-26

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun; Wu, Ying; Sheng, Ping; Zhang, Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Parity violating weak neutral-current effects in elastic e-12C scattering. Progress report, April 15, 1981-February 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubell, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Unified gauge theories of the electro-weak interaction incorporate a neutral weak current, which, although many orders of magnitude smaller than the neutral-electromagnetic current, can be isolated through the manifestation of its parity violating effects. As a consequence, neutral current parity violation experiments provide direct access to the measurement of the weak coupling constants as well as fundamental tests of the unified theories. The verification of unified theories at low energies is a crucial prerequisite of the application of these theories to the range of higher energies where the W+- and the Z 0 are predicted to exist. One highly sensitive measurement of parity violation in the neutral current sector is provided by the determination of the asymmetry, A = (sigma + - sigma - )/(sigma + + sigma - ), for elastic scattering of positive (+) and negative (-) helicity electrons from 12 C nuclei. We have been pursuing such a program at the Bates Electron Accelerator with the goal of measuring A to a precision of approx. 10 -7 . By contrast, the standard model predicts a value for A of approx. 2 x 10 -6

  15. Effect of rotation on the elastic moduli of solid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuiki, T.; Takahashi, D.; Murakawa, S.; Okuda, Y.; Kono, K.; Shirahama, K.

    2018-02-01

    We report measurements of elastic moduli of hcp solid 4He down to 15 mK when the samples are rotated unidirectionally. Recent investigations have revealed that the elastic behavior of solid 4He is dominated by gliding of dislocations and pinning of them by 3He impurities, which move in the solidlike Bloch waves (impuritons). Motivated by the recent controversy of torsional oscillator studies, we have performed direct measurements of shear and Young's moduli of annular solid 4He using pairs of quarter-circle-shape piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) while the whole apparatus is rotated with angular velocity Ω up to 4 rad/s. We have found that shear modulus μ is suppressed by rotation below 80 mK, when shear strain applied by PZT exceeds a critical value, above which μ decreases because the shear strain unbinds dislocations from 3He impurities. The rotation-induced decrement of μ at Ω =4 rad/s is about 14.7(12.3)% of the total change of temperature dependent μ for solid samples of pressure 3.6(5.4) MPa. The decrements indicate that the probability of pinning of 3He on dislocation segment G decreases by several orders of magnitude. We propose that the motion of 3He impuritons under rotation becomes strongly anisotropic by the Coriolis force, resulting a decrease in G for dislocation lines aligning parallel to the rotation axis.

  16. NUMERICAL ESTIMATION OF EFFECTIVE ELASTIC MODULI OF SYNTACTIC FOAMS REINFORCED BY SHORT GLASS FIBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of hollow glass microsphere/epoxy resin syntactic foams reinforced by short glass fibers are studied using representative volume elements. Both the glass fibers and the hollow glass microspheres exhibit random arrangement in the epoxy resin. The volume fraction and wall thickness of hollow glass microspheres and the volume fraction of glass fibers are considered as parameters. It is observed that the elastic modulus values of syntactic foams decrease with the increase of microsphere volume fraction when the microsphere relative wall thickness is lower. However, it increases with the increase of microsphere volume fraction when the relative wall thickness exceeds a critical value. The elastic modulus value goes through a maximum when the relative wall thickness is around 0.06 at 25 % volume fraction of microspheres. The addition of glass fibers reduces the critical wall thickness values of the microspheres and increases the mechanical properties of the composites. The highest stress lies on the equatorial plane perpendicular to the loading direction. Adding fibers reduces the large stress distribution areas on the microspheres, and the fibers aligned with the loading direction play an important load-bearing role.

  17. Effect of TeO2 on the elastic moduli of sodium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddeek, Y.B.; Abd El Latif, Lamia

    2004-01-01

    Sodium borate glass containing tellurite as Te x Na 2-2x B 4-4x O 7-5x with x=0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35 have been prepared by rapid quenching. Ultrasonic velocity (both longitudinal and shear) measurements have been made using a transducer operated at the fundamental frequency of 4 MHz at room temperature. The density was measured by the conventional Archimedes method. The elastic moduli, the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and the parameters derived from the Makishima-Mackenzie model and the bond compression model have been obtained as a function of TeO 2 content. The monotonic decrease in the velocities and the elastic moduli, and the increase in the ring diameter and the ratio K bc /K e as a function of TeO 2 modifier content reveals the loose packing structure, which is attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the reduction in the vibrations of the borate lattice. The observed results confirm that the addition of TeO 2 changes the rigid character of Na 2 B 4 O 7 to a matrix of ionic behaviour bonds (NBOs). This is due to the creation of more and more discontinuities and defects in the glasses, thus breaking down the borax structure

  18. Adaptation of generalized Hill inequalities to anisotropic elastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Thallium manganese chloride(TIMnCl 3 ). 101.4. 16.5. 32.2. 5.2 For Isotropic Media. For some materials, it is possible to make approaches from cubic symmetry to isotropic symmetry. With cubic symmetry, three independent elastic constants are needed. If the medium is elastically isotropic, the elastic properties are ...

  19. Elasticity of Pargasite Amphibole: A Hydrous Phase at Mid Lithospheric Discontinuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y.; Mookherjee, M.

    2017-12-01

    Mid Lithospheric Discontinuity (MLD) is characterized by a low shear wave velocity ( 3 to 10 %). In cratons, the depth of MLD varies between 80 and 100 km. The reduction of the shear wave velocity at MLD is similar to what is observed in the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Such low velocity at MLD could be caused by partial melting, temperature induced grain boundary sliding, changes in the elastic anisotropy, and/or metasomatism which may lead to the formation of hydrous phases including mica and amphibole. Thus, it is clear that in order to assess the role of metasomatism at MLD, we need better constraints on the elasticity of hydrous phases. However, such elasticity data are scarce. In this study, we explore elasticity of pargasite amphibole [NaCa2(Mg4Al)(Si6Al2)O22(OH)2] using density functional theory (DFT) with local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). We find that the pressure-volume results can be adequately described by a finite strain equation with the bulk modulus, K0 being 102 and 85 GPa for LDA and GGA respectively. We also determined the full elastic constant tensor (Cij) using the finite difference method. The bulk modulus, K0 determined from the full elastic constant tensor is 104 GPa for LDA and 87 GPa for GGA. The shear modulus, G0 determined from the full elastic constant tensor is 64 GPa for LDA and 58 GPa for GGA. The bulk and shear moduli predicted with LDA are 5 and 1 % stiffer than the recent results [1]. In contrast, the bulk and shear moduli predicted with GGA are 12 and 10 % softer compared to the recent results [1]. The full elastic constant tensor for pargasite shows significant anisotropy. For instance, LDA predicts compressional (AVP) and shear (AVS) wave anisotropy of 22 and 20 % respectively. At higher pressure, elastic moduli stiffen. However, temperature is likely to have an opposite effect on the elasticity and this remains largely unknown for pargasite. Compared to the major mantle

  20. Anomalous magneto-elastic and charge doping effects in thallium-doped BaFe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefat, Athena S.; Li, Li; Cao, Huibo B.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian; Custelcean, Radu; Parker, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Within the BaFe2As2 crystal lattice, we partially substitute thallium for barium and report the effects of interlayer coupling in Ba1-xTlxFe2As2 crystals. We demonstrate the unusual effects of magneto-elastic coupling and charge doping in this iron-arsenide material, whereby Néel temperature rises with small x, and then falls with additional x. Specifically, we find that Néel and structural transitions in BaFe2As2 (TN = Ts = 133 K) increase for x = 0.05 (TN = 138 K, Ts = 140 K) from magnetization, heat capacity, resistivity, and neutron diffraction measurements. Evidence from single crystal X-ray diffraction and first principles calculations attributes the stronger magnetism in x = 0.05 to magneto-elastic coupling related to the shorter intraplanar Fe-Fe bond distance. With further thallium substitution, the transition temperatures decrease for x = 0.09 (TN = Ts = 131 K), and this is due to charge doping. We illustrate that small changes related to 3d transition-metal state can have profound effects on magnetism. PMID:26867821