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Sample records for effective dose evaluation

  1. Evaluation of effective doses and population doses for computed tomography exposure in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.H.; Hsu, W.J.; Hsiao, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    As estimated, more than 80% of the man-made radiation dose is derived from medical applications, particularly from diagnostic treatment. Therefore, evaluating the radiation dose from diagnostic treatments is very important. The purpose of this study is to investigate the organ dose distribution and the effective doses from brain, chest and abdomen CT examinations. The organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patients were evaluated by exposing a male RANDO phantom to CT X-ray. Dose distributions in various organs were investigated using TLD LiF:Mg,Ti powder. A total of 224 TLDs were embedded in various organs of the phantom for each CT exposure. The organs that were monitored included bladder, bone marrow, breast, colon, liver, long, oesophagus, skin, stomach, thyroid and tests. The effective doses were calculated with reference to the tissue weighting factors recommended by the ICRP 60 report. Experimental TLDs were carefully calibrated using a secondary standard ionization chamber and a special X-ray machine, before they were exposed at hospitals. Taiwanese hospitals are classified as medical centers, area hospitals and local hospitals. This study investigated one hospital in each category. The experiments were performed according to the parameters (kVp, mAs) and procedures used in actual clinical examinations. In addition, this investigation also adopted the statistical mean and median parameters that obtained by a nationwide questionnaire methods in 1993 for it's CT X-ray exposure experiments. The organ doses significantly affected by the exposed region, i.e., brain, chest or abdomen. The effective doses were in the range of 0.93 to 2.41 mSv, 2.96 to 14.53 mSv and 4.55 to 12.30 mSv for brain, chest and abdomen exposure respectively. The investigated hospitals showed wide range of effective dose to the patients by the reasons of different CT machine, different exposure parameters (kVp, mAs) and different treatment procedures. This is the first time to

  2. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Tsutsumi, M.; Moriuchi, S.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1991-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  3. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  4. Effective dose evaluation of multidetector CT examinations: influence of the ICRP recommendation in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Shimono, Tetsunori; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Osamu

    2009-12-01

    We compared effective doses for recent computed tomography (CT) examinations calculated based on International Commission on Radiological Protection publication number 103 (ICRP 103) with those calculated based on ICRP publication number 60 (ICRP 60), and considered the usefulness of the effective dose in CT dose evaluation. After placing radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLDs) inside or outside an anthropomorphic phantom, we examined from the chest to the pelvis, cardiac, and cranial regions of the phantom. The absorbed dose was calculated by multiplying calibrated dose values of RPLD by the mass energy coefficient ratio. The effective dose was calculated as the sum total of the value for each tissue, which was multiplied by the equivalent dose according to the tissue weighting factor recommended in ICRP 103 and ICRP 60. Calculated effective doses based on ICRP 103 were different by –11% to +82% compared with those based on ICRP 60. The values of absorbed doses for selective tissues were relatively higher than the values for the effective dose. The effective dose represents only a mean dose value for an average human. Therefore, assessing the absolute dose of particular individuals in CT examinations based exclusively on the effective dose is not recommended.

  5. Evaluation of patient effective doses in CT urography, intravenous urography and renal scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Y; Sulieman, A; Abuderman, A; Alzimami, K; Omer, H

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the renal system is performed with different techniques depending mainly on clinical symptoms and signs. This study intended to evaluate patient effective doses undergoing renal scintigraphy (technetium-99m-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid), computed tomography urography (CTU) and intravenous urography (IVU). A total of 60 patients were evaluated using Orbiter 37 Gamma camera single head, dual-slice CT scanner and conventional X-ray machine with computed radiography (CR) processing unit. Patients effective dose were estimated using the administered activity, DosCal software and dose length product value for renal scan, IVU and CTU procedures, respectively. Patients' effective doses during renal scan, CTU and IVU procedures were 0.78 ± 0.18, 2.53 ± 0.94 and 1.81 ± 0.20 mSv, in that order. Patients were exposed to a higher effective dose during CTU compared with other two procedures. Patient doses depend on the size of patient, the type of scanner and the imaging protocol used. Effective doses considered low compared with previous studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A prospective evaluation of hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory deficits following cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting Martin; Grimm, Jimm; McIntyre, Riley; Anderson-Keightly, Heather; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Hales, Russell K; Moore, Joseph; Vannorsdall, Tracy; Redmond, Kristin J

    2017-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory decline following cranial irradiation. Effects of hippocampal radiation over a wide range of doses were investigated by combining data from three prospective studies. In one, adults with small cell lung cancer received hippocampal-avoidance prophylactic cranial irradiation. In the other two, adults with glioblastoma multiforme received neural progenitor cell sparing radiation or no sparing with extra dose delivered to subventricular zone. Memory was measured by the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 6 months after radiation. Dose-volume histograms were generated and dose-response data were fitted to a nonlinear model. Of 60 patients enrolled, 30 were analyzable based on HVLT-R DR testing completion status, baseline HVLT-R DR and intracranial metastasis/recurrence or prior hippocampal resection status. We observed a dose-response of radiation to the hippocampus with regard to decline in HVLT-R DR. D50% of the bilateral hippocampi of 22.1 Gy is associated with 20% risk of decline. This prospective study demonstrates an association between hippocampal dose volume effects and memory decline measured by HVLT-R DR over a wide dose range. These data support a potential benefit of hippocampal sparing and encourage continued trial enrollment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Effective Dose from CT Scans for Overweight and Obese Adult Patients Using the VirtualDose Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Baohui; Gao, Yiming; Chen, Zhi; Xu, X George

    2017-04-25

    This paper evaluates effective dose (ED) of overweight and obese patients who undergo body computed tomography (CT) examinations. ED calculations were based on tissue weight factors in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103 (ICRP 103). ED per unit dose length product (DLP) are reported as a function of the tube voltage, body mass index (BMI) of patient. The VirtualDose software was used to calculate ED for male and female obese phantoms representing normal weight, overweight, obese 1, obese 2 and obese 3 patients. Five anatomic regions (chest, abdomen, pelvis, abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis) were investigated for each phantom. The conversion factors were computed from the DLP, and then compared with data previously reported by other groups. It was observed that tube voltage and BMI are the major factors that influence conversion factors of obese patients, and that ED computed using ICRP 103 tissue weight factors were 24% higher for a CT chest examination and 21% lower for a CT pelvis examination than the ED using ICRP 60 factors. For body CT scans, increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp would increase the conversion factors by as much as 19-54% depending on the patient's BMI. Conversion factor of female patients was ~7% higher than the factors of male patients. DLP and conversion factors were used to estimate ED, where conversion factors depended on tube voltage, sex, BMI and tissue weight factors. With increasing number of obese individuals, using size-dependence conversion factors will improve accuracy, in estimating patient radiation dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Evaluation of effective dose from CT scans for overweight and obese adult patients using the VirtualDose software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Baohui; Gao, Yiming; Chen, Zhi; Xu, X. George

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates effective dose (ED) of overweight and obese patients who undergo body computed tomography (CT) examinations. ED calculations were based on tissue weight factors in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103 (ICRP 103). ED per unit dose length product (DLP) are reported as a function of the tube voltage, body mass index (BMI) of patient. The VirtualDose software was used to calculate ED for male and female obese phantoms representing normal weight, overweight, obese 1, obese 2 and obese 3 patients. Five anatomic regions (chest, abdomen, pelvis, abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis) were investigated for each phantom. The conversion factors were computed from the DLP, and then compared with data previously reported by other groups. It was observed that tube voltage and BMI are the major factors that influence conversion factors of obese patients, and that ED computed using ICRP 103 tissue weight factors were 24% higher for a CT chest examination and 21% lower for a CT pelvis examination than the ED using ICRP 60 factors. For body CT scans, increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp would increase the conversion factors by as much as 19-54% depending on the patient's BMI. Conversion factor of female patients was ∼7% higher than the factors of male patients. DLP and conversion factors were used to estimate ED, where conversion factors depended on tube voltage, sex, BMI and tissue weight factors. With increasing number of obese individuals, using size-dependence conversion factors will improve accuracy, in estimating patient radiation dose. (authors)

  9. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  10. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  11. Evaluation of indoor radon equilibrium factor using CFD modeling and resulting annual effective dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2018-04-01

    The equilibrium factor is an important parameter for reasonably estimating the population dose from radon. However, the equilibrium factor value depended mainly on the ventilation rate and the meteorological factors. Therefore, this study focuses on investigating numerically the influence of the ventilation rate, temperature and humidity on equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny. The numerical results showed that ventilation rate, temperature and humidity have significant impacts on indoor equilibrium factor. The variations of equilibrium factor with the ventilation, temperature and relative humidity are discussed. Moreover, the committed equivalent doses due to 218Po and 214Po radon short-lived progeny were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of the members of the public from the inhalation of indoor air. The annual effective dose due to radon short lived progeny from the inhalation of indoor air by the members of the public was investigated.

  12. Dose-volume effects in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord: an evaluation of NTCP models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Marielle E P; Pop, Lucas A M; Visser, Andries G; Schellekens, Suzanne A M W; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate models for normal-tissue-complication probability (NTCP) on describing the dose-volume effect in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord. Single-dose irradiation of four field lengths (4, 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 cm) was evaluated by the endpoints paresis and white-matter necrosis. The resulting dose-response data were used to rank phenomenological and tissue architecture NTCP models. The 0.5-cm field length showed a steep increase in radiation tolerance. Statistical analysis of the model fits, which included evaluation of goodness of fit (GOF) and confidence intervals, resulted in the rejection of all the models considered. Excluding the smallest field length, the Schultheiss (D(50) = 21.5 Gy, k = 26.5), the relative seriality (D(50) = 21.4 Gy, s = 1.6, gamma(50) = 6.3), and the critical element (D(50,FSU) = 26.6 Gy, gamma(50,FSU) = 2.3, n = 1.3) model gave the best fit. A thorough statistical analysis resulted in a serial or critical-element behavior for the field lengths of 1.0 cm and greater. Including the 0.5-cm field length, the radiation response markedly diverged from serial properties, but none of the models applied acceptably described this dose-response relationship. This study suggests that the commonly assumed serial behavior of the spinal cord might be valid for daily use in external- beam irradiation.

  13. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, 8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  14. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  15. Effective dose evaluation of NORM-added consumer products using Monte Carlo simulations and the ICRP computational human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Cheol; Yoo, Do Hyeon; Testa, Mauro; Shin, Wook-Geun; Choi, Hyun Joon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. Using the Monte Carlo method, the radioactive products were simulated with ICRP reference phantom and the organ doses were calculated with the usage scenario. Finally, the annual effective doses were evaluated as lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y −1 for 44 products. It was demonstrated that NORM-added consumer products could be quantitatively assessed for the safety regulation. - Highlights: • Consumer products considered that NORM would be included should be regulated. • 44 products were collected and its gamma activities were measured with HPGe detector. • Through Monte Carlo simulation, organ equivalent doses and effective doses on human phantom were calculated. • All annual effective doses for the products were evaluated as lower than dose limit for the public.

  16. Comparative evaluation of organ and effective doses for paediatric patients with those for adults in chest and abdominal CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Koyama, S; Kawaura, C

    2007-08-01

    Patient doses in paediatric and adult CT examinations were investigated for modern multislice CT scanners by using specially constructed in-phantom dose measuring systems. The systems were composed of 32 photodiode dosemeters embedded in various tissue and organ sites within anthropomorphic phantoms representing the bodies of 6-year-old children and adults. Organ and the effective doses were evaluated from dose values measured at these sites. In chest CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 2-21 mGy for children and 7-26 mGy for adults. Thyroid doses for children were frequently the highest with a maximum of 21 mGy. In abdominal CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 3-16 mGy for children and 10-34 mGy for adults. Effective doses evaluated for children and adults were found to be proportional to the effective mAs of CT scanners, where linear coefficients were specific to the types of CT examinations and to the manufacturers of CT scanners. Effective doses in paediatric chest CT and abdominal CT examinations were lower than those in adult examinations by a factor of two or greater on average for the same CT scanners because of the lower effective mAs adopted in paediatric examinations.

  17. Evaluation of individual subjects in the analog classroom setting: II. Effects of dose of amphetamine (Adderall).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigal, S B; Swanson, J M; Greenhill, L; Waslick, B; Cantwell, D; Clevenger, W; Davies, M; Lerner, M; Regino, R; Fineberg, E; Baren, M; Browne, R

    1998-01-01

    Multiple dependent variables were graphed for 29 subjects who participated in a double-blind evaluation of 4 doses of Adderall, plus positive (methylphenidate) and placebo control conditions. Five judges ranked the conditions for each subject, and analyses of individual subjects indicated that these rankings were concordant (reliable) across judges. Consensus rankings were assigned to each subject, and an analysis of these ranks showed that the conditions differed significantly. The choice of best conditions were judged to be across 3 doses of Adderall (10, 15, and 20 mg). This confirms the clinical impression of individual differences in optimal dose of stimulant medication. The methodological, graphical, and statistical methods presented in this article provide a systematic, reliable procedure for evaluating relative response of individuals to different doses of stimulant medication.

  18. Evaluation of gamma dose effect on PIN photodiode using analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Boorboor, S.

    2018-03-01

    The PIN silicon photodiodes are widely used in the applications which may be found in radiation environment such as space mission, medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Radiation-induced damage in these devices causes to degrade the photodiode parameters. In this work, we have used new approach to evaluate gamma dose effects on a commercial PIN photodiode (BPX65) based on an analytical model. In this approach, the NIEL parameter has been calculated for gamma rays from a 60Co source by GEANT4. The radiation damage mechanisms have been considered by solving numerically the Poisson and continuity equations with the appropriate boundary conditions, parameters and physical models. Defects caused by radiation in silicon have been formulated in terms of the damage coefficient for the minority carriers' lifetime. The gamma induced degradation parameters of the silicon PIN photodiode have been analyzed in detail and the results were compared with experimental measurements and as well as the results of ATLAS semiconductor simulator to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. The results showed reasonable agreement between them for BPX65 silicon photodiode irradiated by 60Co gamma source at total doses up to 5 kGy under different reverse voltages.

  19. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Cardiac Interventional Procedures: What Is the Most Effective Method?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Saito, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Zuguchi, M.; Kagaya, Y.; Takahashi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac interventional radiology has lower risks than surgical procedures. This is despite the fact that radiation doses from cardiac intervention procedures are the highest of any commonly performed general X-ray examination. Maximum radiation skin doses (MSDs) should be determined to avoid radiation-associated skin injuries in patients undergoing cardiac intervention procedures. However, real-time evaluation of MSD is unavailable for many cardiac intervention procedures. This review describes methods of determining MSD during cardiac intervention procedures. Currently, in most cardiac intervention procedures, real-time measuring of MSD is not feasible. Thus, we recommend that physicians record the patient's total entrance skin dose, such as the dose at the interventional reference point when it can be monitored, in order to estimate MSD in intervention procedures

  20. SU-E-I-07: Proposal for a Novel Algorithm of Effective Dose Evaluation for Medical Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Dewhirst, M; Jiang, X; Qian, Z; Boon, S; Yoshizumi, T

    2012-06-01

    The validity of effective dose (ED) in medical applications, which mostly involving partial-organ irradiation, has long been argued. We now propose a new algorithm of effective dose evaluation for medical radiation exposure. The new algorithm will include new Relative Volume Factors, or RVFs, to account for the relative irradiated volume of the partially-irradiated organs, such as skin and bone marrow. To validate the proposed algorithm, three ED evaluation methods were applied to five neuro-imaging protocols of a C-arm cone-beam CT: 1) MOSFET-anthropomorphic- phantom measurement for organ doses, ED evaluated with the original ICRP algorithm; 2) using the same MOSFET-measured organ doses, ED evaluated with the new algorithm; and 3) Monte Carlo (PCXMC, developed by STUK) dose estimation as gold standard. For all five imaging protocols, the ED evaluations by the new algorithm agreed very well with the Monte Carlo simulation results (within 10% difference), whereas the original ICRP algorithm overestimated EDs by approximately a factor of 2. The proposed algorithm provides a more accurate estimation of ED in medical exposures than the original ICRP algorithm. It potentially establishes the ED as a more reasonable index for cross-protocol dose comparison. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Evaluation the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia complicates up to 3% of pregnancies in developing countries. Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in pathogenesis of preeclampsia. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients. Materials and Methods: in this triple-blind randomized clinical trial, enrolled patients were divided randomly into two groups. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA 80 mg or placebo will be taken daily by oral administration from the initiation of diagnosis until 2 months after delivery. Every patient's flow-mediated dilation (FMD were evaluated at the beginning of study and 2 months after delivery with the same experienced operator at a same period of the time (3–5 pm by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonographic. T-test or Mann–Whitney test was used in the comparison of means between the intervention and placebo groups. To compare FMD in each group, before and after the intervention, paired t-test was used. Results: Mean value of FMD in intervention (9.61 ± 5.58 and control group (9.40 ± 4.33 have no significant differences before drug consumption (P = 0.089. FMD in intervention group significantly increased after ASA consumption ([9.61 ± 5.58 vs. 13.65 ± 7.91] [P = 0.044]. Conclusion: Increase mean of FMD in intervention group shows that this supplement can improve endothelial function.

  2. Evaluation of effective dose in an anthropomorphic phantom in radiological emergencies situations; Avaliacao de dose efetiva em um fantoma antropomorfico em situacoes de emergencia radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Livia K. da, E-mail: liviatelecom@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Fisica; Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S., E-mail: liviatelecom@hotmail.com, E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br, E-mail: santosd@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Dosimetria

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to implement the code of Monte Carlo Geant4 in a male and female phantom, ADAM and EVA, to be able to evaluate the dose in individuals who have been exposed externally to ionizing radiation sources so that in the future be made a review within the limits of validity of the terms contained in TECDOC-1162, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which recommends formulas for the effective dose assessment in individuals who have been exposed to external radiation sources in various geometric configurations and for various radionuclides.

  3. Evaluation of the effective dose equivalent to tbe public of Pavia after the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altieri, S.; Berzero, A.; Meloni, S.; Rosti, G.; Genova, N.

    1988-01-01

    The Chernobyl radionuclide monitoring campaign in air particulate and foodstuffs was carried out and continued up to June 1987. On the basis of collected data estimates of the collective effective dose equivalent commitment to the public of province of Pavia, by external irradiation or by inhalation, were carried out and are reported in the present paper

  4. Effective dose evaluation for workers assisting new-borns in nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falivene, A.; Gori, C.; Mazzocchi, S.; Targetti, S.; Zatelli, G.

    2002-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is a very frequent nuclear medicine procedure for new-borns when deemed necessary after prenatal ultrasounds investigation. The procedure requires the physical proximity of workers to the patient, particularly during the examination of new-borns, in order to keep the young patients still. The irradiation of nurses during kidney examination of new-borns has been measured by simulating the examination procedure with an Alderson Rando phantom stuffed with thermoluminescent detectors, positioned near a radioactive source obtained with a tank filled with a 9 9mT c solution. Measurements have been carried out both with and without radiation protection devices positioned on the Rando phantom. Different organ doses have been evaluated. The aim of this analysis is to evaluate the amount of dose reduction that can be achieved by utilising lead aprons, glasses and thyroid collars

  5. A repository released-dose model for the evaluation of long-lived fission product transmutation effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology has been developed to quantify the total integrated dose due to a radionuclide species i emplaced in a geologic repository; the focus is on the seven long-lived fission products (LLFPs). The methodology assumes continuous exposure water contaminated with species i at the accessible environment (i.e., just beyond the geologic barrier afforded by the geologic repository). The dose integration is performed out to a reference post-release time. The integrated dose is a function of the total initial inventory of radionuclide i the repository, the time at which complete and instantaneous failure of the engineered barrier (e.g., waste canister) in, a geologic repository occurs, the fractional dissolution rate (from waste solid form) of radionuclide i in ground water, the ground water travel time to the accessible environment, the retardation factor (sorption on the geologic media) for radionuclide i, the time after radionuclide begins to enter the biosphere. In order to assess relative dose, the ratio of total integrated dose to that for a reference LLFP species j (e.g., 99 Tc) was defined. This ratio is a measure of the relative benefit of transmutation of other LLFPs compared to 99 Tc. This methodology was further developed in order to quantify the integrated dose reduction per neutron utilized for LLFP transmutation in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT). This measure of effectiveness is a function of the integrated dose due to LLFP species i, the number of total captures in LLFP species i chain per LLFP nuclide fed to the chain at equilibrium, and the number of total captures in related transmutation product (TP) chains per capture in the LLFP species i chain. To assess relative transmutation effectiveness, the ratio of integrated dose reduction per neutron utilization to that for a reference LLFP species j (e.g., 99 Tc) was defined. This relative measure of effectiveness was evaluated LLFP transmutation strategy

  6. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  7. [Effect evaluation of a 2 dose varicella vaccine immunization strategy implemented to control outbreaks in school and kindergarten settings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Luodan; Li, Juan; Zhao, Dan; Yang, Fan; Liu, Weixiang; Wu, Jiang; Pang, Xinghuo; Deng, Ying; Lu, Li

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of outbreaks control in school settings after a 2 dose varicella vaccine immunization strategy implemented in Beijing. Epidemiological data of varicella outbreaks in school and kindergarten settings, which were reported by all 16 districts (county) during 2007-2013 according to the technical management norms of Beijing, was collected. The first dose and second dose varicella vaccine coverage rate of eligible children after the 2 dose varicella vaccine immunization strategy implementation were estimated through BJIIMS. Based on above we analyzed the changes of outbreak quantity, case quantity and the distribution characteristics between the pre-adjustment era (2007-2011 years) and late adjustment era (2013) of the 2 dose immunization strategy. In pre-adjustment era (2007-2011 years), an average of 74 (95% CI: 60-89) outbreaks was reported and 964 (95% CI: 812-1 116) cases were involved per year. In late adjustment era (2013): Outbreaks (35) declined 52.7%, involved cases (371) declined 61.5%; Outbreaks epidemic duration shortened from 22 days of pre-adjustment era to 18 days; Outbreaks involved 10-24 cases declined 64.7% (from 34 to 12); Outbreaks involved ≥ 25 cases declined 71.4% (from 7 to 2); Outbreaks of different school type as well as different regions without exception declined dramatically. Cumulative one-dose vaccine coverage in children of 2-6 yr of age was 89.6% (812 859/907 579), and cumulative second-dose vaccine coverage in children of 4-7 yr of age was 44.3% (289 764/647 732). Implementation of a 2 dose varicella vaccine immunization strategy effectively controlled outbreaks in school and kindergarten settings.

  8. Evaluation of the effective equivalent dose in the general public due to the discharge of uranium in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, A.M.P.L.; Jacomino, V.M.F.

    1989-12-01

    Some facilities available at IPEN-CNEN/SP may discharge uranium in their liquid effluents. The uranium contents of these effluents are analyzed by photometry or fluorimetry, and according to the results obtained a decision is made, by the Environmental Monitoring Division, upon their discharge to the environment. In 1988 a total activity of 3.66x10 9 Bq of uranium was discharge in a volume of approximately 30 m 3 . The effective equivalent dose in the general public was evaluated by making a conservative assumption that all the liquid effluents containing uranium are discharged directly to the soil reaching the groundwater. The dose calculation was carried out by using a generic model which described the transport of radionuclides in the groundwater. In order to be conservative it was also assumed that the critical pathway is the direct in gestion of water through hypothetical wells around the Institute. Conservative assumptions were also made in the characterization of the local aquifer parameters such as vertical and longitudinal dispersivity, effective porosity of the soil, hydraulic conductivity etc., in roder to overestimate the effective equivalent dose. The result obtained, of 5.3x10 -10 mSv/a is far below the dose limit for the public adopted by the Radiological Protection Board. The derived limit for the discharge was also evaluated, using the same model, giving a result of 3.6x10 13 Bq/a. (author) [pt

  9. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  10. Study of the heterogeneity effects of lung in the evaluation of absorbed dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho

    2006-02-01

    The main objective of radiotherapy is to deliver the highest possible dose to the tumour, in order to destroy it, reducing as much as possible the doses to healthy tissues adjacent to the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to do a planning of the treatment. The more complex is the treatment, the more difficult the planning will be, demanding computation sophisticated methods in its execution, in order to consider the heterogeneities present in the human body. Additionally, with the appearing of new radiotherapeutic techniques, that used irradiation fields of small area, for instance, the intensity modulated radiotherapy, the difficulties for the execution of a reliable treatment planning, became still larger. In this work it was studied the influence of the lung heterogeneity in the planning of the curves of percentage depth dose, PDP, obtained with the Eclipse R planning system for different sizes of irradiation fields, using the correction algorithms for heterogeneities available in the planning system: modified Batho, general Batho and equivalent tissue-air ratio. A thorax phantom, manufactured in acrylic, containing a region made of cork to simulate the lung tissue, was used. The PDP curves generated by the planning system were compared to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and with the use of thermoluminescent, TL, dosimetry. It was verified that the algorithms used by the Eclipse R system for the correction of heterogeneity effects are not able to generate correct results for PDP curves in the case of small fields, occurring differences of up to 100%, when the 1x1 cm 2 treatment field is considered. These differences can cause a considerable subdosage in the lung tissue, reducing the possibility of the patient cure. (author)

  11. Evaluation of equivalent and effective dose by KAP for patient and orthopedic surgeon in vertebral compression fracture surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Felipe A.; Galeano, Diego C.; Santos, William S.; Silva, Ademir X.; Souza, Susana O.; Carvalho Júnior, Albérico B.

    2017-01-01

    in VCF surgeries. • Results allow evaluation of effective doses to patients and surgeon.

  12. Evaluation of the effect of a supratherapeutic dose of intravenous ceftaroline fosamil on the corrected QT interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccobene, Todd A; Rekeda, Ludmyla; Rank, Douglas; Llorens, Lily

    2013-04-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-period crossover study was conducted in 54 healthy adults to assess the effect of ceftaroline fosamil on the corrected QT (QTc) interval. The QT interval, corrected for heart rate using an individual correction formula (QTcIb), was determined predose and at 1, 1.25, 1.5, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24.5 h after intravenous dosing with a supratherapeutic dose (1,500 mg) of ceftaroline fosamil, 400 mg moxifloxacin (positive control), and placebo. The pharmacokinetic profile of ceftaroline was also evaluated. At each time point following ceftaroline fosamil administration, the upper limit of the 90% confidence interval (CI) for the placebo-corrected change from predose baseline in QTcIb (ΔΔQTcIb) was below 10 ms (maximum, 3.4 ms at 1.5 h after dosing), indicating an absence of clinically meaningful QTc increase. The lower limit of the 90% CI of ΔΔQTcIb for moxifloxacin versus placebo was greater than 5 ms at 5 time points (maximum, 12.8 ms at 1 h after dosing), demonstrating assay sensitivity. There was no apparent correlation between ceftaroline plasma concentrations and ΔΔQTcIb. The supratherapeutic dose of ceftaroline fosamil (1,500 mg) resulted in substantially greater systemic exposure to ceftaroline than previously observed with standard therapeutic doses. Ceftaroline fosamil was well tolerated after a single 1,500-mg intravenous dose, and no clinically meaningful abnormalities in laboratory values or vital signs were observed.

  13. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  14. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  15. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  16. SU-C-18C-04: Evaluation of Effective Dose During Ureteroscopy for Obese and Non-Obese Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C; Nguyen, G; Chung, Y; Yoshizumi, T; Cabrera, F; Lipkin, M; Shin, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ureteroscopy involves fluoroscopy which potentially results in considerable amount of radiation dose to the patient. Purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to develop the effective dose computational model for obese and non-obese patients undergoing left and right ureteroscopy, and (b) to evaluate the utility of a commercial Monte Carlo software for dose assessment in ureteroscopy. Methods: Organ dose measurements were performed on an adult male anthropomorphic phantom, representing the non-obese patients, with 20 high-sensitivity MOSFET detectors and two 0.18cc ionization chambers placed in selected organs. Fat-equivalent paddings were placed around the abdominal region to simulate for obese patients. Effective dose (ED) was calculated using ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors and normalized to the effective dose rate in miliSivert per second (mSv/s). In addition, a commercial Monte Carlo (MC) dose estimation program was used to estimate ED for the non-obese model, with table attenuation correction applied to simulate clinical procedure. Results: For the equipment and protocols involved in this study, the MOSFETderived ED rates for the obese patient model (‘Left’: 0.0092±0.0004 mSv/s; ‘Right’: 0.0086±0.0004 mSv/s) was found to be more than twice as much as that to the non-obese patient model (‘Left’: 0.0041±0.0003 mSv/s; ‘Right’: 0.0036±0.0007 mSv/s). The MC-derived ED rates for the non-obese patient model (‘Left’: 0.0041 mSv/s; ‘Right’: 0.0036 mSv/s; with statistical uncertainty of 1%) showed a good agreement with the MOSFET method. Conclusion: The significant difference in ED rate between the obese and non-obese patient models shows the limitation of directly applying commercial softwares for obese patients and leading to considerable underestimation of ED. Although commercial softwares offer a convenient means of dose estimation, but the utility may be limited to standard-man geometry as the software does not account for

  17. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent on student's practice on intra-oral dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Shin-ichi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Toyama, Michio; Takase, Hiroshi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    We tried to discuss the problems on radiological protection of students in the practice of technique of intra-oral radiography with use of classmates. This radiographic practice has been performed after the technical training use of 'DXTTR' as a preclinical training. The practice was performed as training to take peri-apical, bite-wing, occlusal and eccentric projections. The mean film numbers which were used to complete those technique were 56 films. In these practice, dosimetries were performed on six locations of the body surface of every student who was taken radiograms using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measured locations were orbit, bilateral submandible, neck, chest and abdomen. The effective dose equivalent was estimated using weighting factors of International Comission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) pub. 26 and the values of tissue dose equivalent obtained by TLD measurements. The results showed that the mean value of dose equivalent of each part was 5.40 mSv at orbit, 5.06 mSv at submandible, 0.75 mSv at neck, 0.04 mSv at chest and 0.02 mSv at abdomen. The maximum value of effective equivalent dose was 17.03 mSv which was lower than the dose equivalent limit for workers (50 mSv/year) recommended by ICRP pub. 26. The mean value of effective dose equivalent was 2.36 mSv. ICRP recommended the radiation protection for students aged 18 years or over that the procedures for restricting exposure should be broadly similar to those for occupational exposure. So the results indicate that those training was considered to be controlled in some reasonable level. The mean value of risk was estimated to be 3.94 x 10{sup -5}. Because intra-oral radiographic training with use of classmates is performed under extreme non-uniform irradiation, the evaluation of effective dose equivalent was considered to be important to control this special educational exposure and useful for optimization of the educational programs of radiographic technical training

  18. Evaluation of bismuth shielding effectiveness in reducing breast absorbed dose during thoracic CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T. C.; Mourao, A. P.; Santana, P. C.; Silva, T. A. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Program of Nuclear Science and Techniques, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is an essential method for tracking neoplasia and efficiently diagnosing a wide variety of thoracic diseases. CT is generally considered the most accurate choice for lung examination. Due to the growing use of CT, breast and other superficial and radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated during radiological procedures, thus requiring the development of strategies appropriate to optimize and, if possible, to reduce the radiation dose. The use of bismuth shielding to reduce radiation dose absorbed by breast during thoracic CT examinations has been the subject of many studies recently published by Brazilian and foreign authors of various fields. The purpose of this paper is both to accurately determine the glandular dose when breast is exposed to radiation and to assess the reduction in absorbed dose during thoracic CT examinations, using a set of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, an anthropomorphic phantom and bismuth shielding. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of bismuth shielding effectiveness in reducing breast absorbed dose during thoracic CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, T. C.; Mourao, A. P.; Santana, P. C.; Silva, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is an essential method for tracking neoplasia and efficiently diagnosing a wide variety of thoracic diseases. CT is generally considered the most accurate choice for lung examination. Due to the growing use of CT, breast and other superficial and radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated during radiological procedures, thus requiring the development of strategies appropriate to optimize and, if possible, to reduce the radiation dose. The use of bismuth shielding to reduce radiation dose absorbed by breast during thoracic CT examinations has been the subject of many studies recently published by Brazilian and foreign authors of various fields. The purpose of this paper is both to accurately determine the glandular dose when breast is exposed to radiation and to assess the reduction in absorbed dose during thoracic CT examinations, using a set of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, an anthropomorphic phantom and bismuth shielding. (Author)

  20. Evaluation of the effect of change in the radiosensitive tissue weights listed in the ICRP in estimate of effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Leal Neto, Viriato; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Lima Filho, Jose M.; Santana, Ivan E.; Andrade, Pedro H.A.; Cabral, Manuela O.M.

    2015-01-01

    For photons and electrons, the effective dose by gender is a weighted sum of the absorbed doses in radiosensitive organs and tissue of the human body. Effective dose is estimated using Exposure Computational Models (ECM) of both genders for the same age group. The FSTA and MSTA ECMs were developed by researchers from DEN/UFPE and consist of voxel phantoms representing adults coupled to EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code, which, in the folder designed for users of EGS, codes were added to simulate some radioactive sources. The reports 60 and 103 of the ICRP provide the factors that weigh the radiosensitivity of organs and tissues (W T ) required to estimate the effective dose. The two lists were placed in the FSTA and MSTA to simulate radiodiagnostic examination in different regions of the body (cranium, abdomen and thorax). The dosimetric data produced allowed an analysis of the effect of the change in the w T from the report 60 to the 103. The highest mean percent relative error, 64.3%, occurred in the results for the cranium due to the increase of the w T for most of the organs and tissues in the head and trunk in the updated list. In this case, it can be concluded that the values of the effective dose with the wT of the ICRP 60 were underestimated. Other types of simulators of radioactive sources can be used in investigating this problem and other variables related to the phantom can be considered for that proposes a W T 's list specific for the Brazilian population or recommend unrestricted use the ICRP data. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the effect of change in the radiosensitive tissue weights listed in the ICRP in estimate of effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Leal Neto, Viriato; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Lima Filho, Jose M.; Santana, Ivan E., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Andrade, Pedro H.A.; Cabral, Manuela O.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Vanildo J.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DA/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    For photons and electrons, the effective dose by gender is a weighted sum of the absorbed doses in radiosensitive organs and tissue of the human body. Effective dose is estimated using Exposure Computational Models (ECM) of both genders for the same age group. The FSTA and MSTA ECMs were developed by researchers from DEN/UFPE and consist of voxel phantoms representing adults coupled to EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code, which, in the folder designed for users of EGS, codes were added to simulate some radioactive sources. The reports 60 and 103 of the ICRP provide the factors that weigh the radiosensitivity of organs and tissues (W{sub T}) required to estimate the effective dose. The two lists were placed in the FSTA and MSTA to simulate radiodiagnostic examination in different regions of the body (cranium, abdomen and thorax). The dosimetric data produced allowed an analysis of the effect of the change in the w{sub T} from the report 60 to the 103. The highest mean percent relative error, 64.3%, occurred in the results for the cranium due to the increase of the w{sub T} for most of the organs and tissues in the head and trunk in the updated list. In this case, it can be concluded that the values of the effective dose with the wT of the ICRP 60 were underestimated. Other types of simulators of radioactive sources can be used in investigating this problem and other variables related to the phantom can be considered for that proposes a W{sub T}'s list specific for the Brazilian population or recommend unrestricted use the ICRP data. (author)

  2. Dose- and Time-Dependent Cellular Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Evaluated in 3D Skin Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Fink, Sarah; Beier, Oliver; Horn, Kerstin; Pfuch, Andreas; Schimanski, Arnd; Grünler, Bernd; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Elsner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Application of cold atmospheric pressure plasmas (CAPs) in or on the human body was termed 'plasma medicine'. So far, plasmas were utilized for sterilization of implants, other heat-sensitive products, or employed for chemical surface modifications. By now, CAPs are further used effectively for wound treatment. The present study analyses the effect of a plasma jet with air or nitrogen as process gas, previously evaluated for antimicrobial efficacy, on human cells using a 3D skin model. CAP treatment of 3D skin models consisting of a keratinocyte-containing epidermal layer and a fibroblast/collagen dermal matrix was performed using the Tigres plasma MEF technology. To evaluate the effects on the 3D skin models, the following plasma parameters were varied: process gas, input power, and treatment time. Low CAP doses exhibited good cell compatibility. Increasing input power or elongating treatment intervals led to detrimental effects on 3D skin model morphology as well as to release of inflammatory cytokines. It was further observed that air as process gas was more damaging compared to nitrogen. Treatment of 3D skin models with the plasma MEF nozzle using air or nitrogen is reported. A clearly dose- and time-dependent effect of CAPs could be observed in which the CAP based on nitrogen exhibited higher cell compatibility than the CAP generated from air. These settings might be recommended for medical in vivo applications such as wound decontamination. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Evaluation of a combination of low-dose ketamine and low-dose midazolam in terminal dyspnea-attenuation of "double-effect"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Kanti Dam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Of all symptoms in palliative medicine those concerning respiration are most excruciating and difficult to treat. Reticence about the use of morphine for palliation of dyspnea is common, especially in nonmalignant diseases, as there is a fear of causing respiratory depression, particularly where Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD exists. This factor is also compounded by the lack of availability of morphine in parts of developing countries. Ketamine has excellent anesthetic and analgesic effects in addition to being easily available. It produces bronchodilatation and does not produce respiratory or cardiovascular depression. The author seeks to evaluate the role of low-dose (0.2 mg/kg ketamine and midazolam (0.02 mg/kg in the attenuation of terminal dyspnea. Methods: Sixteen patients with terminal dyspnea, admitted to the Critical Care Unit (CCU with cancer and other noncancer diagnoses were recruited. The subjective component of dyspnea was assessed using the Graphic Rating Scale (GRS, which has values from 0 - 10, 10 being maximum dyspnea. Each patient received a low-dose of ketamine and midazolam for relief of dyspnea. All the patients received low-flow (2 L/min. oxygen therapy via nasal cannula. Immediately after admission, all the patients were reassured and nursed in a decubitus position of their choice. The GRS was recorded at the point of admission, 10 minutes after starting oxygen therapy, and ten minutes after administration of low-dose ketamine and midazolam. Hemodynamic parameters were also recorded at these three points. Result: All the patients who enrolled in our study had significant dyspnea at admission, as was evident from the GRS scores of 8.250 (SD 0.91, respiratory rate of 28.56 (SD 5.0, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP of 102.7 (SD 14.63, pulse rate of 115.62 (SD 23.3, and SpO2 of 92.43 (SD 2.38. All the patients benefited from the combination of ketamine and midazolam, as evidenced by the statistically

  4. In vivo and in vitro evaluations of intestinal gabapentin absorption: effect of dose and inhibitors on carrier-mediated transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Frølund, Sidsel; Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Garmer, Mats; Kreilgaard, Mads; Holm, René

    2015-03-01

    Gabapentin exhibits saturable absorption kinetics, however, it remains unclear which transporters that are involved in the intestinal transport of gabapentin. Thus, the aim of the current study was to explore the mechanistic influence of transporters on the intestinal absorption of gabapentin by both in vivo and in vitro investigations Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined following a range of intravenous (5-100 mg/kg) and oral doses (10-200 mg/kg) in rats. Transepithelial transport (50 μM-50 mM) and apical uptake of gabapentin (0.01-50 mM) were investigated in Caco-2 cells. The effect of co-application of the LAT-inhibitor, BCH, and the b(0,+)-substrate, L-lysine, on intestinal transport of gabapentin was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. Gabapentin showed dose-dependent oral absorption kinetics and dose-independent disposition kinetics. Co-application of BCH inhibited intestinal absorption in vivo and apical uptake in vitro, whereas no effect was observed following co-application of L-lysine. The present study shows for the first time that BCH was capable of inhibiting intestinal absorption of gabapentin in vivo. Furthermore, in Caco-2 cell experiments BCH inhibited apical uptake of gabapentin. These findings may imply that a BCH-sensitive transport-system was involved in the apical and possibly the basolateral transport of gabapentin across the intestinal wall.

  5. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El-Shanshoury

    2016-07-01

    The present findings suggest that damage from IR causes a significant reduction in blood cell counts in a dose-dependent manner, which may be considered a potential health risk during exposure to irradiation. Much effort must be done and focused on establishment of protocols for medical management of radiation injuries based on hematopoietic changes for biodosimetry.

  6. Comparison of 3-dimensional proton-photon dose distribution and evaluation of side effects after radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Poljanc, K

    2000-01-01

    The use of high precision radiation with particles (protons and ions) allows the radiation of tumors near risk organs and immedicable tumors. The aim of this work is the comparison between normal tissue complication probability for craniocerebral tumors of children and youth during simulation of photontherapy and proton therapy. The multivariate analysis gives the possibility to determine the tolerance dose for certain organs.

  7. Evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.A.; Grove, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive new drugs are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States. Before a new drug can be marketed it must have an approved New Drug Application (NDA). Clinical investigations of a radioactive new drug are carried out under a Notice of Claimed Investigational Exemption for a New Drug (IND), submitted to the FDA. In the review of the IND, radiation doses are projected on the basis of experimental data from animal models and from calculations based upon radiation characteristics, predicted biodistribution of the drug in humans, and activity to be administered. FDA physicians review anticipated doses and prevent clinical investigations in humans when the potential risk of the use of a radioactive substance outweighs the prospect of achieving beneficial results from the administration of the drug. In the evaluation of an NDA, FDA staff attempt to assure that the intended diagnostic or therapeutic effect is achievable with the lowest practicable radiation dose. Radiation doses from radioactive new drugs are evaluated by physicians within the FDA. Important radioactive new drugs are also evaluated by the Radiopharmaceuticals Advisory Committee. FDA also supports the Center for Internal Radiation Dosimetry at Oak Ridge, to provide information regarding in vivo distribution and dosimetry to critical organs and the whole body from radioactive new drugs. The process for evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive new drugs for protection against use of unnecessary radiation exposure by patients in nuclear medicine procedures, a

  8. Evaluation of the Effect of Two Systemic Doses of HESA-A on Prevention of Induced Tongue Neoplasm in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Mehdipour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of two systemic doses of HESA-A on prevention of 4-NQO-induced tongue neoplasms in rats. This study evaluated weight and histopathological changes. Materials and methods. Forty-eight male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups of A, B, C and D of each 12 rats. The rats in groups B to D received 30 ppm of 4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO in drinking water for 12 weeks. When feeding with 4-NQO was initiated, the rats in groups B and C received HESA-A at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively, 3 times a week. Body weights were measured three times a week. At the end, the rats were euthanized and the tongue was removed. Histological evaluations for carcinogenesis were carried out under a light microscope. Results. The mean body weights of rats in groups B, C and D were significantly lower than that in group A (P < 0.05. There were no significant differences in weight changes between groups B, C and D. In the present study, after 12 weeks of treatment, Tongue specimens in groups B and C did not exhibit severe dysplastic changes; however, concurrent hyperplasia, without atypia and mild-to-moderate dysplastic changes were detected. These changes were significantly less than those in group D, with significant differences between group D and groups A, B and C (P<0.001, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively. Conclusion. HESA-A has dose-dependent inhibitory effects on the development of neoplasms of the tongue.

  9. radioactivity analysis in food-stuffs and evaluation of annual effective doses from intakes of radionuclides through daily diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.N.; Chowdhury, M. I.; Kamal, M.; Ghose, S.; Islam, M. N.; Mustafa, M. N.; Islam, Al Amin S.

    1996-01-01

    The concentrations of natural and anthropogenic gamma emitting radionuclides in different vegetables, grains,fishes, sugar and common salt samples were measured by using high purity germanium ( HPGe ) detector coupled with Personal Computer Analyzer ( PCA ) and thereby the effective doses from the consumption of these diet were evaluated. The activities of 232 Th in vegetable, grains, salt, sugar and fish samples ranged from 0.13±0.02 to 1.49±0.32 Bq. kg -1 . The concentration of 238 U in these food-stuffs ranged from 0.07±0.01 to 0.95±0.26 Bq Kg -1 . The observed activity of 40 K ranged between 5.04±1.05 and 196.60±41.0 Bq Kg -1 . Caesium was not detected in any of the samples, Assessment of annual intake of these radionuclides has been made on the basis of the average annual intake of these food-stuffs by the population of Bangladesh.The annual effective dose equivalent due to ingestion of different naturally occurring radionuclides ( 232 Th, 238 U, and 40 K) by intake food-stuffs ranged from 0.2 to 113.62 μ Sv. y'-1. The annual effective doses observed in the present study for various types of food-stuffs were less than the ICRP-60 (1990) recommendation, which is 1 m Sv. y -1 for the members of the public. The result and knowledge of this study, would be helpful in making a yardstick comparing with which an appropriate radiation control limit may be imposed on food materials for public consumption in Bangladesh. 1 fig., 2 tables, 13 refs. (Author)

  10. [Evaluation of patient doses in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropolo, R; Rampado, O; Isoardi, P; Gandini, G; Rabbia, C; Righi, D

    2001-01-01

    To verify the suitability of indicative quantities to evaluate the risk related to patient exposure, in abdominal and vascular interventional radiology, by the study of correlations between dosimetric quantities and other indicators. We performed in vivo measurements of entrance skin dose (ESD) and dose area product (DAP) during 48 procedures to evaluate the correlation among dosimetric quantities, and an estimation of spatial distribution of exposure and effective dose (E). To measure DAP we used a transmission ionization chamber and to evaluate ESD and its spatial distribution we used radiographic film packed in a single envelope and placed near the patient's skin. E was estimated by a calculation software using data from film digitalisation. From the data derived for measurements in 27 interventional procedures on 48 patients we obtained a DAP to E conversion factor of 0.15 mSv / Gy cm2, with an excellent correlation (r=.99). We also found a good correlation between DAP and exposure parameters such as fluoroscopy time and number of images. The greatest effective dose was evaluated for a multiple procedure in the hepatic region, with a DAP value of 425 Gy cm2. The greatest ESD was about 550 mGy. For groups of patients undergoing similar interventional procedures the correlation between ESD and DAP had conversion factors from 6 to 12 mGy Gy-1 cm-2. The evaluation of ESD and E by slow films represents a valid method for patient dosimetry in interventional radiology. The good correlation between DAP and fluoroscopy time and number of images confirm the suitability of these indicators as basic dosimetric information. All the ESD values found are lower than threshold doses for deterministic effects.

  11. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Expósito, M., E-mail: mariateresa.romero@uab.cat; Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S. [Grup de Recerca en Radiacions Ionizants (GRRI), Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Sánchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41009 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  12. Evaluation of the effective dose of cone beam CT and multislice CT for temporomandibular joint examinations at optimized exposure levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadesjö, N; Benchimol, D; Falahat, B; Näsström, K; Shi, X-Q

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effective dose to patients from temporomandibular joint examinations using a dental CBCT device and a multislice CT (MSCT) device, both before and after dose optimization. A Promax(®) 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) dental CBCT and a LightSpeed VCT(®) (GE Healthcare, Little Chalfont, UK) multislice CT were used. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated from thermoluminescent dosemeters at 61 positions inside an anthropomorphic phantom at the exposure settings in clinical use. Optimized exposure protocols were obtained through an optimization study using a dry skull phantom, where four observers rated image quality taken at different exposure levels. The optimal exposure level was obtained when all included criteria were rated as acceptable or better by all observers. The effective dose from a bilateral examination was 184 µSv for Promax 3D and 113 µSv for LightSpeed VCT before optimization. Post optimization, the bilateral effective dose was 92 µSv for Promax 3D and 124 µSv for LightSpeed VCT. At optimized exposure levels, the effective dose from CBCT was comparable to MSCT.

  13. Development of an effective dose coefficient database using a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate exposure dose for the usage of NORM-added consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Jaekook; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Chang, Byung-Uck; Min, Chul Hee

    2017-11-01

    After the Fukushima accident in Japan, the Korean Government implemented the "Act on Protective Action Guidelines Against Radiation in the Natural Environment" to regulate unnecessary radiation exposure to the public. However, despite the law which came into effect in July 2012, an appropriate method to evaluate the equivalent and effective doses from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in consumer products is not available. The aim of the present study is to develop and validate an effective dose coefficient database enabling the simple and correct evaluation of the effective dose due to the usage of NORM-added consumer products. To construct the database, we used a skin source method with a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For the validation, the effective dose was compared between the database using interpolation method and the original MC method. Our result showed a similar equivalent dose across the 26 organs and a corresponding average dose between the database and the MC calculations of database with sufficient accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Technical Note: Phantom study to evaluate the dose and image quality effects of a computed tomography organ-based tube current modulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Diksha; Crotty, Dominic J; Stevens, Grant M; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2015-11-01

    This technical note quantifies the dose and image quality performance of a clinically available organ-dose-based tube current modulation (ODM) technique, using experimental and simulation phantom studies. The investigated ODM implementation reduces the tube current for the anterior source positions, without increasing current for posterior positions, although such an approach was also evaluated for comparison. Axial CT scans at 120 kV were performed on head and chest phantoms on an ODM-equipped scanner (Optima CT660, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, England). Dosimeters quantified dose to breast, lung, heart, spine, eye lens, and brain regions for ODM and 3D-modulation (SmartmA) settings. Monte Carlo simulations, validated with experimental data, were performed on 28 voxelized head phantoms and 10 chest phantoms to quantify organ dose and noise standard deviation. The dose and noise effects of increasing the posterior tube current were also investigated. ODM reduced the dose for all experimental dosimeters with respect to SmartmA, with average dose reductions across dosimeters of 31% (breast), 21% (lung), 24% (heart), 6% (spine), 19% (eye lens), and 11% (brain), with similar results for the simulation validation study. In the phantom library study, the average dose reduction across all phantoms was 34% (breast), 20% (lung), 8% (spine), 20% (eye lens), and 8% (brain). ODM increased the noise standard deviation in reconstructed images by 6%-20%, with generally greater noise increases in anterior regions. Increasing the posterior tube current provided similar dose reduction as ODM for breast and eye lens, increased dose to the spine, with noise effects ranging from 2% noise reduction to 16% noise increase. At noise equal to SmartmA, ODM increased the estimated effective dose by 4% and 8% for chest and head scans, respectively. Increasing the posterior tube current further increased the effective dose by 15% (chest) and 18% (head) relative to SmartmA. ODM reduced

  15. Technical Note: Phantom study to evaluate the dose and image quality effects of a computed tomography organ-based tube current modulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat, E-mail: taly.gilat-schmidt@marquette.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Crotty, Dominic J.; Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This technical note quantifies the dose and image quality performance of a clinically available organ-dose-based tube current modulation (ODM) technique, using experimental and simulation phantom studies. The investigated ODM implementation reduces the tube current for the anterior source positions, without increasing current for posterior positions, although such an approach was also evaluated for comparison. Methods: Axial CT scans at 120 kV were performed on head and chest phantoms on an ODM-equipped scanner (Optima CT660, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, England). Dosimeters quantified dose to breast, lung, heart, spine, eye lens, and brain regions for ODM and 3D-modulation (SmartmA) settings. Monte Carlo simulations, validated with experimental data, were performed on 28 voxelized head phantoms and 10 chest phantoms to quantify organ dose and noise standard deviation. The dose and noise effects of increasing the posterior tube current were also investigated. Results: ODM reduced the dose for all experimental dosimeters with respect to SmartmA, with average dose reductions across dosimeters of 31% (breast), 21% (lung), 24% (heart), 6% (spine), 19% (eye lens), and 11% (brain), with similar results for the simulation validation study. In the phantom library study, the average dose reduction across all phantoms was 34% (breast), 20% (lung), 8% (spine), 20% (eye lens), and 8% (brain). ODM increased the noise standard deviation in reconstructed images by 6%–20%, with generally greater noise increases in anterior regions. Increasing the posterior tube current provided similar dose reduction as ODM for breast and eye lens, increased dose to the spine, with noise effects ranging from 2% noise reduction to 16% noise increase. At noise equal to SmartmA, ODM increased the estimated effective dose by 4% and 8% for chest and head scans, respectively. Increasing the posterior tube current further increased the effective dose by 15% (chest) and 18% (head

  16. Evaluation of Effective Dose using TLDs With Different Weighted PMMA Phantoms Undergoing Coronary Artery Calcium Computed Tomography Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Yi; Lee, Jhih-Shian; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2013-06-01

    Objective: A reliable system is necessary for conducting effective dose (E) assessments for diagnosing coronary artery calcium (CAC) for patients with different weights undergoing computed tomography (CT) examination. Materials and Methods: A method has been designed to correlate effective dose and body weight using Rando and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms ranging from 10 to 90 kg. PMMA phantoms were derived from ICRU 48. All scans were conducted on the Toshiba 64-detector row CT scanner with fixed exposure conditions. E was measured in the organs and tissues of interest using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and recommended by ICRP 103. Results: E of these phantoms was estimated. The E decreased exponentially in an inverse correlation with increasing patient weight. Conclusion: A simple equation of effective dose relative to different body weight was fitted and can be used as advisory for radiation protection and assessment in Taiwan.

  17. DOZIM - evaluation dose code for nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprea, I.; Musat, D.; Ionita, I.

    2008-01-01

    During a nuclear accident an environmentally significant fission products release can happen. In that case it is not possible to determine precisely the air fission products concentration and, consequently, the estimated doses will be affected by certain errors. The stringent requirement to cope with a nuclear accident, even minor, imposes creation of a computation method for emergency dosimetric evaluations needed to compare the measurement data to certain reference levels, previously established. These comparisons will allow a qualified option regarding the necessary actions to diminish the accident effects. DOZIM code estimates the soil contamination and the irradiation doses produced either by radioactive plume or by soil contamination. Irradiations either on whole body or on certain organs, as well as internal contamination doses produced by isotope inhalation during radioactive plume crossing are taken into account. The calculus does not consider neither the internal contamination produced by contaminated food consumption, or that produced by radioactive deposits resuspension. The code is recommended for dose computation on the wind direction, at distances from 10 2 to 2 x 10 4 m. The DOZIM code was utilized for three different cases: - In air TRIGA-SSR fuel bundle destruction with different input data for fission products fractions released into the environment; - Chernobyl-like accident doses estimation; - Intervention areas determination for a hypothetical severe accident at Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant. For the first case input data and results (for a 60 m emission height without iodine retention on active coal filters) are presented. To summarize, the DOZIM code conception allows the dose estimation for any nuclear accident. Fission products inventory, released fractions, emission conditions, atmospherical and geographical parameters are the input data. Dosimetric factors are included in the program. The program is in FORTRAN IV language and was run on

  18. Pathogenic effects of low dose irradiation: dose-effect relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2002-01-01

    There is no evidence of pathogenic effects in human groups exposed to less than 100 mSv at low dose-rate. The attributed effects are therefore the result of extrapolations from higher doses. The validity of such extrapolations is discussed from the point of view of epidemiology as well as cellular and molecular biology. The Chernobyl accident resulted in large excess of thyroid cancers in children; it also raised the point that some actual sanitary effects among distressed populations might be a direct consequence of low doses. Studies under the control of UN have not confirmed this point identifying no dose-effect relationship and 'severe socio-economic and psychological pressures... poverty, poor diet and living conditions, and lifestyle factors' as the main cause for depressed health. Some hypothesis are considered for explaining the dose-dependence and high prevalence of non-cancer causes of death among human groups exposed to more than 300 mSv. (author)

  19. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Habeeballa, B.; Osman, H.; Abdelaziz, I.; Sassi, S.A.; Sam, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) and (ii) Dynamic Cannula Screw (DCS) and to evaluate entrance surface Air kerma (ESAK) dose and organ doses and effective doses. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used. The mean patients’ doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 mGy for DHS and DCS procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean organ and effective dose for patients and staff were higher in DHS compared to DCS. Orthopedic surgeons were exposed to unnecessary radiation doses due to the lack of protection measures. The radiation dose per hip procedure is within the safety limit and less than the previous studies

  20. Evaluating in vitro dose-response effects of Lavandula officinalis essential oil on rumen fermentation characteristics, methane production and ruminal acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadeghari, Shahin; Malecky, Mostafa; Dehghan Banadaky, Mehdi; Navidshad, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Four in vitro experiments (Exp.) were conducted to evaluate lavender essential oil (LEO) effects at 0 (control), 250 (low dose), 500 (medium dose), 750 and 1000 µL per L (high doses) of incubation medium on rumen gas production kinetics (Exp.1), ruminal digestibility and fermentation (Exp.2), methane production (Exp.3) and rumen acidosis (Exp.4). The asymptote of gas production (A) increased quadratically (p < 0.001), but the lag phase (L) increased (p = 0.003), and gas production rate (µ) decreased linearly (p = 0.031) with increasing dose of LEO. A linear and quadratic effect (p < 0.01) was observed for the gas produced after 24 hr of incubation (GP24). In vitro true dry matter degradability (IVTDMD) and in vitro true organic matter degradability (IVTOMD) both decreased linearly (p < 0.01), but microbial biomass (MB) and partitioning factor (PF) changed quadratically with increasing doses of LEO (p < 0.05). A cubic effect was observed for total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) and ammonia (NH3) concentrations (p < 0.05). Acetate molar percentage decreased (p = 0.004), whereas those of butyrate and valerate increased linearly (p < 0.05) with LEO dosage. The molar percentage of propionate increased by 10.60 and 12.00% at low and medium doses of LEO, respectively. Methane production decreased by 11.00 and 44.00 to 60.00% at medium and high doses of LEO (p < 0.05), respectively. Lavender essential oil decreased also ruminal pH at all included doses (p < 0.05), intensifying rumen acidosis. These results revealed a dose-dependent selective effect (stimulatory at low and medium, and inhibitory at high doses) of LEO on rumen fermentation.

  1. Evaluation of the Effect of a Supratherapeutic Dose of Intravenous Ceftaroline Fosamil on the Corrected QT Interval

    OpenAIRE

    Riccobene, Todd A.; Rekeda, Ludmyla; Rank, Douglas; Llorens, Lily

    2013-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-period crossover study was conducted in 54 healthy adults to assess the effect of ceftaroline fosamil on the corrected QT (QTc) interval. The QT interval, corrected for heart rate using an individual correction formula (QTcIb), was determined predose and at 1, 1.25, 1.5, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24.5 h after intravenous dosing with a supratherapeutic dose (1,500 mg) of ceftaroline fosamil, 400 mg moxifloxacin (positive control), and placebo. The pharm...

  2. Evaluation of effective dose in consequence of Para chestnut ingestion; Avaliacao da dose efetiva em consequencia da ingestao de castanha do Para

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellintani, Sandra A.; Oliveira, Joselens de; Carvalho, Jurandyr S. de; Hiromoto, Goro [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    Commercial samples of Brazil nut tree seed (Bertholletia excelsa) were analysed for the presence or uranium and thorium series of natural radionuclides. The samples were analysed for the content of {sup 238} U, {sup 226} Ra, {sup 210} Pb, {sup 232} Th, {sup 228} Th. Mean values 1.4 {+-} 0.4 Bq/kg for {sup 238} U, 26.3{+-}4.1 Bq/kG for {sup 226} Ra, 4.7{sup {+-}}1.8 Bq/kg for {sup 210} Pb, 16.5{+-}4.3 Bq/kg for {sup 232} Th, 31.3{+-}6.4 Bq/Kg for {sup 228} Ra and 12.3{+-}5.1 Bq/kg for {sup 228} Th. The effective dose due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides contained in the Brazil nuts, is 2.6 x 10{sup -2} mSv/kg ingested per year. (author). 9 refs., 1 tab.

  3. [Effective dose from pediatric CT in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjonsdottir, Jonina; Jonsdottir, Arna Bjork

    2017-11-01

    It is important to know the effective dose from computed tomography (CT) examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effective dose from pediatric CT examinations in Iceland. For all pediatric CT exams (children examination type and dose length product was retrospectively collected from the Landspitali University Hospital's archives, as was the total number of CT examinations. The ratio of pediatric CT exams and the frequency of examination types were calculated and, for the three most common examinations, the effective dose and mean dose length product were calculated for five age groups. The total number of pediatric CT examinations was 662, 3,6% of all the CT examinations performed. The three most common pediatric CT examinations were head (40,3%), abdomen (15,6%) and thorax (10,3%). The mean effective dose in those was, in the above order: for children dose length product was above European diagnostic reference levels in most examination types and age groups. Possibilities for lower effective doses from pediatric CT examinations should be explored. For that purpose, the use of size specific dose estimates is recommended.

  4. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  5. A Multiple-Dose, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group QT/QTc Study to Evaluate the Electrophysiologic Effects of THC/CBD Spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Edward M; Schoedel, Kerri; Bartlett, Cindy; Romach, Myroslava; Russo, Ethan B; Stott, Colin G; Wright, Stephen; White, Linda; Duncombe, Paul; Chen, Chien-Feng

    2013-07-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray has proved efficacious in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and chronic pain. A thorough QT/QTc study was performed to investigate the effects of THC/CBD spray on electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters in compliance with regulatory requirements, evaluating the effect of a recommended daily dose (8 sprays/day) and supratherapeutic doses (24 or 36 sprays/day) of THC/CBD spray on the QT/QTc interval in 258 healthy volunteers. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profile of THC/CBD spray were also evaluated. Therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of THC/CBD spray had no effect on cardiac repolarization with primary and secondary endpoints of QTcI and QTcF/QTcB, respectively, showing similar results. There was no indication of any effect on heart rate, atrioventricular conduction, or cardiac depolarization and no new clinically relevant morphological changes were observed. Overall, 19 subjects (25.0%) in the supratherapeutic (24/36 daily sprays of THC/CBD spray) dose group and one (1.6%) in the moxifloxacin group withdrew early due to intolerable AEs. Four psychiatric serious adverse events (AEs) in the highest dose group resulted in a reduction in the surpatherapeutic dose to 24 sprays/day. In conclusion, THC/CBD spray does not significantly affect ECG parameters. Additionally, THC/CBD spray is well tolerated at therapeutic doses with an AE profile similar to previous clinical studies. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of multiple doses of lansoprazole on the pharmacokinetics and safety of ponatinib in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dorer, David J; Davis, Jeffrey; Turner, Christopher D; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2014-10-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that the aqueous solubility of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor ponatinib decreases as pH increases. The primary aim of this study was to assess the effects of the gastric proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on the pharmacokinetics of ponatinib. The single-dose safety profile of ponatinib with and without coadministration of lansoprazole was also characterized. This was a phase I, open-label, non-randomized, two-period crossover study in 20 healthy subjects aged 18-55 years. Subjects received a single oral dose of ponatinib 45 mg alone on day 1, an oral dose of lansoprazole 60 mg on day 14, and ponatinib 45 mg plus lansoprazole 60 mg on day 15. Lansoprazole coadministration resulted in a 1-h increase in the time to maximum plasma concentration (t max) of ponatinib (6 vs. 5 h post-dose; P lansoprazole versus ponatinib alone (40.67 vs. 53.96 ng/mL). Importantly, lansoprazole did not decrease the overall ponatinib systemic exposure as assessed by the ponatinib area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC∞ 1,153 ng·h/mL for lansoprazole + ponatinib vs. 1,222 ng·h/mL for ponatinib alone). The safety profile was considered acceptable when ponatinib was administered alone or with lansoprazole. Although coadministration of lansoprazole led to a modest, albeit statistically significant, reduction in ponatinib C max, overall systemic exposure to ponatinib did not change. The findings suggest that no dose adjustment is necessary when ponatinib is administered with drugs that increase gastric pH.

  7. Impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy and evaluation of OAR doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaper, Deepak; Shukla, Arvind; Rathore, Narendra; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in CT based intracavitary brachytherapy planning and evaluation of its effect on organ at risk (OAR) like bladder, rectum and sigmoid and target volume High risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV)

  8. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  9. Creation of ORNL NURBS-based phantoms: evaluation of the voxel effect on absorbed doses from radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardumi, Anna; Farah, Jad; Desbrée, Aurélie

    2013-03-01

    Doses from radiopharmaceuticals absorbed by organs can be assessed using Monte Carlo simulations and computational phantoms. Patient-based voxel phantoms improve the realism of organ topology but present unrealistic stair-stepped surfaces. The goal of this research was to study the voxel effect on the basis of creation and voxelisation of a series of non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) reference phantoms issued from the publication of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Absorbed doses from various radiopharmaceuticals were calculated and compared with the values obtained for the corresponding analytical phantoms for models of an adult male and a 5-y-old child. Dose differences lower than 12.5 % were observed when the critical structure of the skin was excluded. Moreover, the highest differences were noted for small organs and walls. Finally, all NURBS phantoms of the ORNL series, their voxelised version and the corresponding Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended input files were programmed and are available for further simulations.

  10. An evaluation of calculation parameters in the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo codes and their effect on surface dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2012-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has proven invaluable for radiation transport simulations to accurately determine radiation doses and is widely considered a reliable computational measure that can substitute a physical experiment where direct measurements are not possible or feasible. In the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc MC codes, there are several user-specified parameters and customized transport algorithms, which may affect the calculation results. In order to fully utilize the MC methods available in these codes, it is essential to understand all these options and to use them appropriately. In this study, the effects of the electron transport algorithms in EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, which are often a trade-off between calculation accuracy and efficiency, were investigated in the buildup region of a homogeneous water phantom and also in a heterogeneous phantom using the DOSRZnrc user code. The algorithms and parameters investigated include: boundary crossing algorithm (BCA), skin depth, electron step algorithm (ESA), global electron cutoff energy (ECUT) and electron production cutoff energy (AE). The variations in calculated buildup doses were found to be larger than 10% for different user-specified transport parameters. We found that using BCA = EXACT gave the best results in terms of accuracy and efficiency in calculating buildup doses using DOSRZnrc. In addition, using the ESA = PRESTA-I option was found to be the best way of reducing the total calculation time without losing accuracy in the results at high energies (few keV ∼ MeV). We also found that although choosing a higher ECUT/AE value in the beam modelling can dramatically improve computation efficiency, there is a significant trade-off in surface dose uncertainty. Our study demonstrates that a careful choice of user-specified transport parameters is required when conducting similar MC calculations. (note)

  11. Medical exposure and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    The frequency of radiological diagnosis in Japan and individual population effective dose are reported. Questionnaire on radiological practice was delivered to selected medical facilities. The total number of X-ray diagnosis performed in 1991 was 180,000,000, being age-dependent in both men and women. The chest was the most common site to be examined. The number of X-ray films per examination was the highest for the stomach. The spread of ultrasound has decreased radiological practice in the obstetric field (approximately one sixth between 1979 and 1986). There was an 8-fold increase in the number of X-ray CT as of 1989 during the past decade. The total number of CT scanning in 1989 reached nearly 14,850,000 (about 16 times as much as that of 1979). The number of stomach X-ray screening increased to 7,800,000 which is twice as much as that in 1975. In the dental field, panoramic method brought about a 7-fold increase between 1974 and 1985. The frequency of nuclear medicine diagnosis has slightly increased, reaching 1,400,000 cases in 1992, and 99m Tc was the most common nuclide. The total population effective dose of radiography and fluoroscopy was 179,000 mSv. The highest effective dose was associated with gastric X-ray. The effective dose equivalent per diagnosis was estimated to be 1.02 mSv (the total population/total number of radiological diagnosis). The population effective dose per person was 2.3 mSv (population effective dose equivalent/national population), which was equal to the world average of yearly effective dose equivalent of natural radiation. (S.Y.)

  12. Medical exposure and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Takashi [Association of Radiation Effects, Chiba (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    The frequency of radiological diagnosis in Japan and individual population effective dose are reported. Questionnaire on radiological practice was delivered to selected medical facilities. The total number of X-ray diagnosis performed in 1991 was 180,000,000, being age-dependent in both men and women. The chest was the most common site to be examined. The number of X-ray films per examination was the highest for the stomach. The spread of ultrasound has decreased radiological practice in the obstetric field (approximately one sixth between 1979 and 1986). There was an 8-fold increase in the number of X-ray CT as of 1989 during the past decade. The total number of CT scanning in 1989 reached nearly 14,850,000 (about 16 times as much as that of 1979). The number of stomach X-ray screening increased to 7,800,000 which is twice as much as that in 1975. In the dental field, panoramic method brought about a 7-fold increase between 1974 and 1985. The frequency of nuclear medicine diagnosis has slightly increased, reaching 1,400,000 cases in 1992, and {sup 99m}Tc was the most common nuclide. The total population effective dose of radiography and fluoroscopy was 179,000 mSv. The highest effective dose was associated with gastric X-ray. The effective dose equivalent per diagnosis was estimated to be 1.02 mSv (the total population/total number of radiological diagnosis). The population effective dose per person was 2.3 mSv (population effective dose equivalent/national population), which was equal to the world average of yearly effective dose equivalent of natural radiation. (S.Y.).

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Doses of Low Energy Shock Wave Therapy on the Erectile Function of Streptozotocin (STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Cheng Xin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the therapeutic effect of different doses of low energy shock wave therapy (LESWT on the erectile dysfunction (ED in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. SD rats (n = 75 were randomly divided into 5 groups (normal control, diabetic control, 3 different dose LESWT treated diabetic groups. Diabetic rats were induced by intra-peritoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg and rats with fasting blood glucose ≥ 300 mg/dL were selected as diabetic models. Twelve weeks later, different doses of LESWT (100, 200 and 300 shocks each time treatment on penises were used to treat ED (7.33 MPa, 2 shocks/s three times a week for two weeks. The erectile function was evaluated by intracavernous pressure (ICP after 1 week washout period. Then the penises were harvested for histological study. The results showed LESWT could significantly improve the erectile function of diabetic rats, increase smooth muscle and endothelial contents, up-regulate the expression of α-SMA, vWF, nNOS and VEGF, and down- regulate the expression of RAGE in corpus cavernosum. The therapeutic effect might relate to treatment dose positively, and the maximal therapeutic effect was noted in the LESWT300 group. Consequently, 300 shocks each time might be the ideal LESWT dose for diabetic ED treatment.

  14. Topical Metered-dosing Dispenser Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Kupiec, Thomas C; Vu, Nicole T

    2016-01-01

    Topical metered-dosing dispensers are designed for dosing accuracy and ease-of-use by the patients while protecting the packaged products from environmental exposure and contamination. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, precision, and residual of available topical metered-dosing dispensers with different types of topical cream for practical application. Triplicate samples of five different dispensers were tested. This test was completed using three types of commercial topical cream-bases of dissimilar Total Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Load Percentages, Transdermal Penetration Percentages, and Specific Gravities. The dispensers were evaluated according to specified dose-uniformity criteria for a total dispensing capacity of 30 mL at 0.5 mL per dose for 60 doses. The study shows Topi-CLICK performed with the best precision and accuracy of dosing in comparison to the airless-pump type dispensers. While the dispensing was highly variable with airless pumps and may require calibration for each packaged product, remarkably the performance of Topi-CLICK was not affected by different types of cream-bases and does not require additional metering calibration. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of independent dose calculation followed by machine log file analysis against conventional measurement based IMRT QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Boddu, Sunita; Goddu, Murty; Yang, Deshan; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Wooten, Omar; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-09-06

    Experimental methods are commonly used for patient-specific IMRT delivery verification. There are a variety of IMRT QA techniques which have been proposed and clinically used with a common understanding that not one single method can detect all possible errors. The aim of this work was to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of independent dose calculation followed by machine log file analysis to conventional measurement-based methods in detecting errors in IMRT delivery. Sixteen IMRT treatment plans (5 head-and-neck, 3 rectum, 3 breast, and 5 prostate plans) created with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) were recalculated on a QA phantom. All treatment plans underwent ion chamber (IC) and 2D diode array measurements. The same set of plans was also recomputed with another commercial treatment planning system and the two sets of calculations were compared. The deviations between dosimetric measurements and independent dose calculation were evaluated. The comparisons included evaluations of DVHs and point doses calculated by the two TPS systems. Machine log files were captured during pretreatment composite point dose measurements and analyzed to verify data transfer and performance of the delivery machine. Average deviation between IC measurements and point dose calculations with the two TPSs for head-and-neck plans were 1.2 ± 1.3% and 1.4 ± 1.6%, respectively. For 2D diode array measurements, the mean gamma value with 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement was within 1.5% for 13 of 16 plans. The mean 3D dose differences calculated from two TPSs were within 3% for head-and-neck cases and within 2% for other plans. The machine log file analysis showed that the gantry angle, jaw position, collimator angle, and MUs were consistent as planned, and maximal MLC position error was less than 0.5 mm. The independent dose calculation followed by the machine log analysis takes an average 47 ± 6 minutes, while the experimental approach (using IC and

  16. Evaluation of Dose Distribution and a Pilot Study of Population Doses for Diagnostic X Ray Exposure in Taiwan in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.; Hsu, J.; Yin, L.; Su, F.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating medical radiation doses is very important because an estimated 80% of man-made radiation doses comes from medical applications. This study evaluated X ray doses from lung and abdomen examinations. An ionisation chamber was extensively used to standardise X ray doses. This investigation evaluated the deep equivalent dose, the shallow equivalent dose, the effective dose, and the effective dose equivalent, by using TLD LiF:Mg,Ti placed in a male RANDO phantom. The experiments were performed according to the parameters (kV p , mA.s) and procedures used in actual clinical examinations. In addition, this study estimated the population dose due to diagnostic X ray treatments using nationwide statistics for annual cases of X ray diagnostic examinations, in cooperation with the Central Health Insurance Agency in Taiwan. Finally, risk analyses were performed to elucidate the stochastic effects. (author)

  17. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.R. Vivek, E-mail: prvkumar06@gmail.com [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Seshadri, M. [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jaikrishan, G. [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Das, Birajalaxmi [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in radio adaptive response studied. • PBMCs of subjects from NLNRA and HLNRA were challenged with gamma radiation. • DNA damage and repair in PBMCs was compared using the alkaline comet assay. • Significant reduction in DNA damage in subjects of high dose group from HLNRA noted. • Probable induction of an in vivo radio adaptive response in subjects from HLNRA. - Abstract: This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year{sup −1}), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N = 43, range 1.07 mSv year{sup −1} to 5.55 mSv year{sup −1}) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year{sup −1} to17.41 mSv year{sup −1}), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from

  18. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  19. Evaluation of two-dimensional bolus effect of immobilization/support devices on skin doses: A radiochromic EBT film dosimetry study in phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Chan, Maria F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. Methods: For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom was exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. Results: In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to d max on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10x10 cm 2 open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150% (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with and without

  20. Evaluation of two-dimensional bolus effect of immobilization/support devices on skin doses: a radiochromic EBT film dosimetry study in phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Chan, Maria F

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom was exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to dmax on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10 x 10 cm2 open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150%, (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with and without the support device. For 6

  1. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Ali; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki; Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Ayan, Arif Kursad

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  2. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: alibabam2001@yahoo.com; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Yesilyurt, Ahmet [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ayan, Arif Kursad [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  3. Some aspects of dose evaluation, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes methods of calculating the radioiodine releases and resultant doses in the ''Guide for calculation of doses to man from routine releases of effluents from light-water-cooled nuclear power plants for evaluating compliance with dose objectives around a site of LWRs'' by the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. Examples of dose calculation in the design stage of plants and releases of radioiodine from operating plants are also given. The thyroid dose objective from radioiodine in reactor effluents was determined to be 15 mrem per year by the AEC of Japan in 1975. In the guide, models and parameters are given as most realistic on the basis of current knowledge and experience; in cases involving unknown factors these are on conservative side. Calculations of annual average releases of gaseous and liquid effluents are made using the models and parameters established through operational experiences of the LWR plants. Annual thyroid doses are calculated from inhalation and ingestion of leafy vegetable and cow's milk for gaseous effluents and ingestion of marine food for liquid effluents. In calculation of the thyroid dose, fw = 0.2 is used instead of = 0.3 in ICRP publ. 2 for ingestion of foods excluding seaweed and the specific activity method for ingestion of foods including seaweed. It is because Japanese take foods with much stable iodine. Calculated annual releases of 131 I in gaseous effluents of typical BWR (1100 MWe) and PWR (800 MWe) are about 2 Ci and 0.7 Ci per year per plant and the annual thyroid doses are about 4 mrem and 9 mrem per year, respectively. Actually, however, releases of 131 I in gaseous effluents from the operating LWR plants are about less than one tenth of the above figures. (author)

  4. Minimizing exposure to radiation in invasive cardiology using modern dose-reduction technology: evaluation of the real-life effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroux, Laurent; Blanpain, Thierry; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Tassan-Mangina, Sophie; Herce, Benoît; Tourneux, Christophe; Metz, Damien

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to measure the reduction in the estimated dose of radiation received by patients that can be achieved using dose-reduction technology (ClarityIQ, Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands), among all patients undergoing invasive cardiology procedures. Medical procedures remain the primary source of exposure to ionizing radiation in the general population. The study population comprised all patients (without exclusion criteria) undergoing invasive coronary procedures over a 1-year study period in a large referral centre equipped with two catheterization laboratories (cathlabs). Both cathlabs (A and B) were equipped with the Allura Xper FD10 imaging system (Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands), but only Cathlab B was equipped with ClarityIQ technology. The primary endpoint was the estimated total dose of radiation received by the patient, as assessed by Air Kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP). In total, 2095 invasive coronary procedures were analyzed. The patients who underwent procedures in Cathlab B received an average estimated dose that was 23% (AK) and 43% (DAP) lower than the dose received by patients undergoing procedures in Cathlab A (P technology reduced the estimated radiation dose received by patients by 23-43%, according to the method of measurement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effective dose in abdominal digital radiography: Patient factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Sung; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung Hoon; Cho, Young Chul; Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medical Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To identify independent patient factors associated with an increased radiation dose, and to evaluate the effect of patient position on the effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. We retrospectively evaluated the effective dose for abdominal digital radiography in 222 patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on the cut-off dose value of 0.311 mSv (the upper third quartile of dose distribution): group A (n = 166) and group B (n = 56). Through logistic regression, independent factors associated with a larger effective dose were identified. The effect of patient position on the effective dose was evaluated using a paired t-test. High body mass index (BMI) (≥ 23 kg/m2), presence of ascites, and spinal metallic instrumentation were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high BMI [odds ratio (OR), 25.201; p < 0.001] and ascites (OR, 25.132; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. The effective dose was significantly lesser (22.6%) in the supine position than in the standing position (p < 0.001). High BMI and ascites were independent factors associated with a larger effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. Significant dose reduction in patients with these factors may be achieved by placing the patient in the supine position during abdominal digital radiography.

  6. Evaluation of the enter surface dose, dose in organ and E effective dose, received by personnel and patients in studies of endoscopic retrograde cholangeopancreatography in the General Hospital of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, S.; Gama T, G.; Beristain, M.; Espino, H.

    2006-01-01

    The ESD for patient and personal is measured: gastroenterologuist endoscopist G1, A1 Assistant and A2 instrumentist that carried out 22 independent therapeutic procedures of CPRE, in a fluoroscopy equipment Toshiba trademark with tube under the table, operated in automatic exposure mode, CAE to average tensions of 80 kVp. The measurement is carried out with film dosemeters of double emulsion Kodak Type 2 trademark, calibrated in terms of H * for the energy of the 137 Cs, first it is determined the films sensitivity like function of the optical density DO, and second the ESD for the effective energy of the radiation beam (50 keV), in three different points from the dosemeter (C, D and H). The films was placed for the personnel in: right hand, front (eye), thyroid and thorax (under D and out F of the lead apron); in the case of the patient three positions were used: thorax, hepatic region and pelvis. The mean values of the ESD and it standard deviation SD in mGy units are determined by: study, personnel, film position in doctor and patient, dosemeter measurement point. The calculated doses in organ are also determined for the patient in the thorax region, liverwort and pelvis its are agreement with the NRPB SR 262 report. Finally the H E and E for medical personnel and patients are estimated demonstrating that its are not exceeded the annual dose limits for the case of the OEP. In the case of the the OEP have for the D thorax an ESD max = 0.04 mGy that one corresponds an H E = 0.02 and E = 0.01 mSv. (Author)

  7. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  8. Evaluation of doses in gastrointestinal fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canevaro, Lucia Viviana

    1995-04-01

    This work aims at the development of a methodology to measure radiation doses to patients and professionals (radiologists) in fluoroscopic gastrointestinal tract examinations. Also, it aims at the assessment of the performance of this type of medical x-ray equipment, from the radiation protection point of view at the Department of Radiology of the Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro). This work was developed in order to identify the actual status and to set base lines as a reference for a quality control program. The calibration procedures of thermoluminescent dosimeters for radiodiagnosis quality beams are discussed and described here as well as its application in dose measurements, for patients and radiologists. The performance of two types of x-ray equipment (fluorescent screen and image intensifier) usually used to perform this examinations was evaluated through appropriate tests. Radiation protection features are also considered. Dose to radiologists at unprotected regions and to patients at several sample points were measured. A comparison of the measured doses given by both types of equipment was made. After further analysis, the necessity to look for methods that reduce unnecessary doses became evident. The high values obtained in some procedures using fluorescent screen make the use of this type of equipment unacceptable. With these results, we consider that Health Care authorities have the responsibility of replacing all fluorescent screen equipment and of establishing standards, and raising awareness the responsible staff. (author)

  9. Measurement and evaluation of internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Young; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, J. I.; Song, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the contents and results for implementation of internal radiation monitoring programme, measurement of uranium present in lung by lung counter and assessment of committed effective dose for radiation workers of the KNFC. The aim of radiation protection was achieved by implementing this activity

  10. The Effect of Low‑Dose Ketamine (Preemptive Dose) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Effect of Low‑Dose Ketamine (Preemptive Dose) on Postcesarean. Section Pain Relief. Forozan Milani, Katayoun Haryalchi, Seyedeh Hajar Sharami, Roya Faraji, Maryam Asgharnia, Fatemeh Salamat1,. Seyedeh Saeedeh Hashemi. Reproductive Health Research Center, Alzahra Hospital, School of Medicine, 1Guilan ...

  11. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, Ch.

    2006-11-01

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of ±15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the effect of radiation levels and dose rates in irradiation of murine fibroblasts used as a feeder layer in the culture of human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshito, Daniele; Almeida, Tiago L.; Santin, Stefany Plumeri; Somessari, Elizabeth S.R.; Silveira, Carlos G. da; Mathor, Monica B.; Altran, Silvana C.; Isaac, Cesar

    2009-01-01

    In 1975, Rheinwald and Green published an effective methodology for obtaining and cultivating human keratinocytes. This methodology consisted of seeding keratinocytes onto a feeder layer composed of lineage 3T3 murine fibroblasts, the proliferation rate of which is then controlled through the action of ionizing radiation. The presence of the feeder layer encourages the development of keratinocyte colonies and their propagation in similar cultures, becoming possible several clinical applications as skin substitutes or wound dressings in situations such as post burn extensive skin loss and other skin disorders. However, good development of these keratinocytes depends on a high quality feeder layer among other factors. In the present work, we evaluated the relationship between radiation levels and dose rates applied to fibroblasts used in construction of feeder layers and the radiation effect on keratinocytes colonies forming efficiency. Results indicate 3T3 lineage murine fibroblasts irradiated with doses varying between 60 and 100 Gy can be used as a feeder layer immediately after irradiation or storage of the irradiated cells in suspension at 4 g C for 24 hours with similar results. The exception is when the irradiation dose rate is 2.75 Gyh -1 ; in this case, results suggested that the fibroblasts should be used immediately after irradiation. (author)

  13. Notes on the effect of dose uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent dose-response relationship between amount of exposure to acute radiation and level of mortality in humans is affected by uncertainties in the dose values. It is apparent that one of the greatest concerns regarding the human data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki is the unexpectedly shallow slope of the dose response curve. This may be partially explained by uncertainty in the dose estimates. Some potential effects of dose uncertainty on the apparent dose-response relationship are demonstrated

  14. Evaluation of the radioprotective effect of turmeric extract and vitamin E in mice exposed to therapeutic dose of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhartiya, Uma S.; Raut, Yogita S.; Joseph, Lebana J.; Hawaldar, Rohini W.; Rao, Badanidiyoor S.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of turmeric extract (40 mg/kg body weight) and vitamin E (α - tocopherol acetate, 400 IU/kg body weight) supplementation on lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and antioxidant defense enzymes in various organs like liver, kidney and salivary glands at 24 h in adult Swiss mice. 131 Iodine exposure significantly increased lipid peroxidation in kidney and salivary glands in comparison to control animals. Pre supplementation with turmeric extract for 15 days showed significant lowering of lipid peroxidation in kidney. On the other hand vitamin E pre supplementation showed marked reduction in lipid peroxidation in salivary glands. Reduced glutathione levels decreased significantly in liver after radiation exposure. However, pre supplementation with turmeric extract and vitamin E did not improve glutathione levels in liver. In conclusion we have observed differential radioprotective effect of turmeric extract and vitamin E in kidney and salivary glands. However, Vitamin E seems to offer better radioprotection for salivary glands which is known to be the major site of cellular destruction after radioiodine therapy in patients. (author)

  15. Assessment of breast absorbed doses during thoracic computed tomography scan to evaluate the effectiveness of bismuth shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Thessa C; Mourão, Arnaldo P; Santana, Priscila C; da Silva, Teógenes A

    2016-11-01

    During a lung computed tomography (CT) examination, breast and nearby radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated because they are in the path of the primary beam. The purpose of this paper is to determine the absorbed dose in breast and nearby organs for unshielded and shielded exposures with bismuth. The experiment was done with a female anthropomorphic phantom undergoing a typical thoracic CT scan, with TLD-100 thermoluminescent detectors insert at breast, lung and thyroid positions. Results showed that dose reduction due to bismuth shielding was approximately 30% and 50% for breast and thyroid, respectively; however, the influence of the bismuth on the image quality needs to be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the Effect of a Preoperative Single Dose of Gabapentin on Emergence Agitation in Patients Undergoing Breast Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Azemati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence agitation is a transient confusional state that usuallyoccurs within 10 to 30 minutes of recovery from general anesthesia. It may lead to seriousconsequences and increasing hospital costs. This study evaluates the effect of gabapentinon emergence agitation in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery.Methods: This randomized, double blind controlled trial enrolled 100 femalepatients with American Society of Anesthesiologists' classifications I and II who werecandidates for breast cancer surgery. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups(n=50 that received either oral gabapentin 600 mg or placebo. Induction andmaintenance of anesthesia were similar in both groups. At the end of surgery, patient'sagitation score, pain score, and presence of nausea or vomiting were reported. In theward, the presence of headache or dizziness was checked during the first 8 h. Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison of agitation and pain scores between two groups.Chi-square test was used for comparing occurrence of nausea, vomiting and qualitative.The qualitative demographic variable and t-test compared quantitative demographicvariables.Results: There was a significantly lower incidence of emergence agitation in thegabapentin group before (P<0.001 and after (P=0.029 extubation. There weresignificantly lower mean agitation scores before (P<001 and after (P=0.006 extubationand in the pain score (P=0.005 in the gabapentin group. The need for remifentanilinfusion (P<0.05 during surgery was significantly lower in the gabapentin groupcompared with the placebo group. Occurrence of nausea and vomiting and gabapentinside effects that included headache or dizziness did not significantly differ between twogroups (P=0.126, P=1, P=0.629 respectively.Conclusion: Gabapentin not only decreased postoperative pain but also effectivelyreduced emergence agitation without any significant side effects in patients undergoingbreast cancer surgery.

  17. Dose evaluation from multiple detector outputs using convex optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.

    2011-01-01

    A dose evaluation using multiple radiation detectors can be improved by the convex optimisation method. It enables flexible dose evaluation corresponding to the actual radiation energy spectrum. An application to the neutron ambient dose equivalent evaluation is investigated using a mixed-gas proportional counter. The convex derives the certain neutron ambient dose with certain width corresponding to the true neutron energy spectrum. The range of the evaluated dose is comparable to the error of conventional neutron dose measurement equipments. An application to the neutron individual dose equivalent measurement is also investigated. Convexes of particular dosemeter combinations evaluate the individual dose equivalent better than the dose evaluation of a single dosemeter. The combinations of dosemeters with high orthogonality of their response characteristics tend to provide a good suitability for dose evaluation. (authors)

  18. LUDEP: A Lung Dose Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchall, A.; Bailey, M.R.; James, A.C.

    1990-06-01

    A Task Group of the ICRP is currently reviewing its dosimetric model for the respiratory tract with the aim of producing a more comprehensive and realistic model which can be used both for dosimetry and bioassay purposes. This in turn requires deposition, clearance, and dosimetry to be treated in a more detailed manner in than in the current model. In order to examine the practical application and radiological implications of the proposed model, a microcomputer program has been developed in a modular form so that changes can be easily included as the model develops. LUDEP (Lung Dose Evaluation Program) is a user-friendly menu-driven program which can be operated on any IBM-compatible PC. It enables the user to calculate (a) doses to each region of the respiratory tract and all other body organs, and (b) excretion rates and retention curves for bioassay purposes. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Evaluation of the effect of various parameters on the amount of radiation dose received by family members after 131-I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Dehghanpour, M.; Saghari, M.; Ghiasinezhad, M.

    2001-01-01

    The main concern with respect to discharge of patients from hospital after 131-I therapy is contamination of their surroundings and exposure of people who are in close contact with them. In this study, we evaluated absorbed dose received by home mates of these patients within one week of discharge from hospital. This study was based on 100 patients (23 patients with thyroid cancer together with 70 members of their families and 2 hyperthyroid patients plus 5 of their family members). Measurements were performed by TLD. Patients were discharged from hospital if the dose rate from a meter distance of their thyroid was below 20 μSv/hr (ICRP-60). The hospitalization period for those patients with thyroid cancer varied between 2-3 days (depending on the amount of radioactivity received). Hyperthyroid patients were treated as outpatients. Our data indicate that although hyperthyroid patients received much less activity in comparison to those with thyroid cancer, but due to the slow iodine discharge rate from their bodies, they radiated more to their surroundings. For patients with thyroid cancer, when the given activity increased from 100 mCi to 150 mCi, the average dose absorbed by their family members increased by a factor of 3. The duration of hospitalization as well as the amount of activity given to the patients have a significant effect on the amount of radiation dose received by the family members. In a group of patients who received 100 mCi of 131-I, the average radiation dose received by the family members of those patients who were hospitalized for 2 days were 1.5 times more than of those patients who were hospitalized for 3 days, whereas following therapy with 150 mCi of 131-Iodine, the average radiation dose received by the family members of those patients who were hospitalized for 2 days were about 6.5 times more than that of those who were hospitalized for 3 days. The size of the patient's house and the time that family spends with the patient at house are

  20. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso, each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso. The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2=0.93 followed by CSI (R2=0.82 and electromyographic activity (R2=0.79. EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94. Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs.

  1. Estimation of effective dose during hysterosalpingography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzimamil, K.; Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.; Alsafi, K.; Omer, H.

    2014-08-01

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is the most frequently used diagnostic tool to evaluate the endometrial cavity and fallopian tube by using conventional x-ray or fluoroscopy. Determination of the patient radiation doses values from x-ray examinations provides useful guidance on where best to concentrate efforts on patient dose reduction in order to optimize the protection of the patients. The aims of this study were to measure the patients entrance surface air kerma doses (ESA K), effective doses and to compare practices between different hospitals in Sudan. ESA K were measured for patient using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters (TLDs, Gr-200A). Effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. This study was conducted in five radiological departments: Two Teaching Hospitals (A and D), two private hospitals (B and C) and one University Hospital (E). The mean ESD was 20.1 mGy, 28.9 mGy, 13.6 mGy, 58.65 mGy, 35.7, 22.4 and 19.6 mGy for hospitals A,B,C,D, and E), respectively. The mean effective dose was 2.4 mSv, 3.5 mSv, 1.6 mSv, 7.1 mSv and 4.3 mSv in the same order. The study showed wide variations in the ESDs with three of the hospitals having values above the internationally reported values. Number of x-ray images, fluoroscopy time, operator skills x-ray machine type and clinical complexity of the procedures were shown to be major contributors to the variations reported. Results demonstrated the need for standardization of technique throughout the hospital. The results also suggest that there is a need to optimize the procedures. Local DRLs were proposed for the entire procedures. (author)

  2. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  3. Evaluating the Effect of Electron-Beam Irradiation on Linguatula serrata Destroy Isolated from Animal Products and Determining its Effective Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khalatbari-limaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Foodborne parasitic diseases are considered common in most parts of the world, which can cause significant health problems. Linguatula serrata is a zoonotic parasite causing human linguatulosis due to consumption of raw and semi-cooked animal offal infected with nymphs of this parasite. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to determine the effect of Electron beam irradiation on death of the Linguatula serrata nymphs isolated from animal products. Methods: Linguatula serrata nymphs were irradiated with E-beam irradiation of 1, 2, 3 and 5 kGy doses 15 nymphs were classified into three groups of 5 for each dose. Death time of the nymphs was recorded by examining their movement under a stereomicroscope and then was compared with that of the control group stored at 4 °C. In order to analyze the study data, T-test and ANOVA were utilized setting the significance level at 0.05. Results: The comparison between treatment and control groups demonstrated a statistically significant difference in death time of the nymphs (P 0.05. Moreover, there was a statistically significant difference between the doses of 1, 2 and 3 kGy with dose of 5 kGy (P 0.05 in regard with their lethality speed. The results showed that minimum destruction dose of Linguatula serrata nymphs was 1 kGy and 5 KGy , resulted in a more rapidly death within the nymphs. Conclusion: Regarding the high sensitivity of Linguatula serrata nymphs to E-beam irradiation, this method can be used to enhance the safety of animal products in future.

  4. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  5. Effective dose to radon considering people's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, M.; Seki, K.; Kikuchi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The tidal volume was estimated for evaluating the effective dose due to radon concentration in the atmosphere. In this study regional population was separated to vocation and non-vocation. The occupancy time and the breathing rate for both vocation and non-vocation groups were estimated, and the annual tidal volume for both groups were calculated. Human actions were separated to 18 activities in the process for estimating the breathing rate. It was clear that the breathing rate depended on human activity and that the human activity changed with its age, so the breathing rate varied with age. Finally the effective doses due to radon and radon progeny indoors and outdoors were evaluated. The maximum annual effective dose was estimated to be 1.2 mSv, minimum 0.2 mSv, and mean 0.51 mSv for vocation. For non-vocation, the male maximum value 0.43 mSv was obtained at the 16 age and the minimum 0.12 mSv at the 70 age, whereas female maximum 0.26 mSv was obtained at the 12 age and the minimum 0.11 mSv at the 70 age. In addition in this study objective areas are Aichi, Gifu, and Mie prefectures for vocation and only Aichi prefecture for non-vocation. (author)

  6. Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Omer, E.; Suliman, I. I.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). TLDs were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, CTDIvol 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients ESDs values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

  7. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (

  8. Improvement of dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onda, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Kudo, Seiichi; Nishimura, Kazuya

    2003-01-01

    It is expected that the selection of access routes for employees who engage in emergency work at a severe accident in a nuclear power plant makes a difference in their radiation dose values. In order to examine how much difference arises in the dose by the selection of the access routes, in the case of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor plant, we improved the method to obtain the dose for employees and expanded the analyzing system. By the expansion of the system and the improvement of the method, we have realized the followings: (1) in the whole plant area, the dose evaluation is possible, (2) the efficiency of calculation is increased by the reduction of the number of radiation sources, etc, and (3) the function is improved by introduction of the sky shine calculation into the highest floor, etc. The improved system clarifies the followings: (1) the doses change by selected access routes, and this system can give the difference in the doses quantitatively, and (2) in order to suppress the dose, it is effective to choose the most adequate access route for the employees. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the effective dose of cone beam computed tomography and multi-slice computed tomography for temporomandibular joint examinations at optimized exposure levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadesjö, Nils; Benchimol, Daniel; Falahat, Babak; Näsström, Karin; Shi, Xie-Qi

    2015-06-02

    To compare the effective dose to patients from temporomandibular joint examinations using a dental cone-beam CT device and a multi-slice CT device, both before and after dose optimization. A Promax3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) dental cone-beam CT and a Lightspeed VCT (GE, Fairfield, USA) multi-slice CT were used. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated from thermoluminescent dosimeters at 61 positions inside an anthropomorphic phantom at the exposure settings in clinical use. Optimized exposure protocols were obtained through an optimization study using a dry skull phantom, where four observers rated image quality taken at different exposure levels. The optimal exposure level was obtained when all included criteria were rated as acceptable or better by all observers. The effective dose from a bilateral examination was 184 µSv for Promax3D and 113 µSv for Lightspeed VCT before optimization. Post optimization the bilateral effective dose was 92 µSv for Promax3D and 124 µSv for Lightspeed VCT. At optimized exposure levels, the effective dose from cone-beam CT was comparable to MSCT.

  10. ACCEPTABILITY EVALUATION FOR USING ICRP TISSUE WEIGHTING FACTORS TO CALCULATE EFFECTIVE DOSE VALUE FOR SEPARATE GENDER-AGE GROUPS OF RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Repin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An article describes radiation risk factors for several gender-age population groups according to Russian statistical and medical-demographic data, evaluates the lethality rate for separate nosologic forms of malignant neoplasms based on Russian cancer registries according to the method of the International Agency for Cancer Research. Relative damage factors are calculated for the gender-age groups under consideration. The tissue weighting factors recommended by ICRP to calculate effective doses are compared with relative damage factors calculated by ICRP for the nominal population and with similar factors calculated in this work for separate population cohorts in theRussian Federation. The significance of differences and the feasibility of using tissue weighting factors adapted for the Russian population in assessing population risks in cohorts of different gender-age compositions have been assessed.

  11. Automated effective dose estimation in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M Sánchez; Cameán, M Pombar; Busto, R Lobato; Vega, V Luna; Sueiro, J Mosquera; Martínez, C Otero; del Río, J R Sendón

    2010-01-01

    European regulations require the dose delivered to patients in CT examinations to be monitored and checked against reference levels. Dose estimation has traditionally been performed manually. This is time consuming and therefore it is typically performed on just a few patients and the results extrapolated to the general case. In this work an automated method to estimate the dose in CT studies is presented. The presented software downloads CT studies from the corporative picture archiving and communication system and uses the information on the DICOM headers to perform the dose calculation. Automation enables dose estimations to be performed on a larger fraction of studies, enabling more significant comparisons with diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). A preliminary analysis involving 5800 studies is presented with details of dose distributions for selected CT protocols in use at a university hospital. Average doses are compared with DRLs. Effective dose estimations are also compared with estimations based on the dose length product.

  12. Organ Doses and Effective Doses in Pediatric Radiography: Patient-Dose Survey in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Tietaevaeinen, A.; Parviainen, T.; Viitala, A.; Kortesniemi, M. (Radiation Practices Regulation, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Use of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology permits the radiation exposure of diverse diagnostic procedures to be quantified. Fundamental knowledge of patient doses enhances the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Purpose: To provide comparative information on pediatric examination protocols and patient doses in skull, sinus, chest, abdominal, and pelvic radiography examinations. Material and Methods: 24 Finnish hospitals were asked to register pediatric examination data, including patient information and examination parameters and specifications. The total number of examinations in the study was 1916 (1426 chest, 228 sinus, 96 abdominal, 94 skull, and 72 pelvic examinations). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area products (DAP) were calculated retrospectively or DAP meters were used. Organ doses and effective doses were determined using a Monte Carlo program (PCXMC). Results: There was considerable variation in examination protocols between different hospitals, indicating large variations in patient doses. Mean effective doses of different age groups ranged from 5 muSv to 14 muSv in skull and sinus examinations, from 25 muSv to 483 muSv in abdominal examinations, and from 6 muSv to 48 muSv in chest examinations. Conclusion: In chest and sinus examinations, the amount of data was extensive, allowing national pediatric diagnostic reference levels to be defined. Parameter selection in pediatric examination protocols should be harmonized in order to reduce patient doses and improve optimization

  13. Effects of interportal error on dose distribution in patients undergoing breath-holding intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer: evaluation of a new treatment planning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Toru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakata, Manabu; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Higashimura, Kyoji; Teshima, Teruki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-09-06

    In patients with pancreatic cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) under breath holding facilitates concentration of the radiation dose in the tumor, while sparing the neighboring organs at risk and minimizing interplay effects between movement of the multileaf collimator and motion of the internal structures. Although the breath-holding technique provides high interportal reproducibility of target position, dosimetric errors caused by interportal breath-holding positional error have not been reported. Here, we investigated the effects of interportal breath-holding positional errors on IMRT dose distribution by incorporating interportal positional error into the original treatment plan, using random numbers in ten patients treated for pancreatic cancer. We also developed a treatment planning technique that shortens breath-holding time without increasing dosimetric quality assurance workload. The key feature of our proposed method is performance of dose calculation using the same optimized fluence map as the original plan, after dose per fraction in the original plan was cut in half and the number of fractions was doubled. Results confirmed that interportal error had a negligible effect on dose distribution over multiple fractions. Variations in the homogeneity index and the dose delivered to 98%, 2%, and 50% of the volume for the planning target volume, and the dose delivered to 1 cc of the volume for the duodenum and stomach were ±1%, on average, in comparison with the original plan. The new treatment planning method decreased breath-holding time by 33%, and differences in dose-volume metrics between the original and the new treatment plans were within ± 1%. An additional advantage of our proposed method is that interportal errors can be better averaged out; thus, dose distribution in the proposed method may be closer to the planned dose distribution than with the original plans.

  14. Organ or tissue doses, effective dose and collective effective dose from X-ray diagnosis, in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Noda, Yutaka; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1996-01-01

    Effective doses and collective effective doses from X-ray diagnostic examinations were calculated on the basis of the frequency of examinations estimated by a nationwide survey and the organ or tissue doses experimentally determined. The average organ or tissue doses were determined with thermoluminescence dosimeters put at various sites of organs or tissues in an adult and a child phantom. Effective doses (effective dose equivalents) were calculated as the sum of the weighted equivalent doses in all the organs or tissues of the body. As the examples of results, the effective doses per radiographic examination were approximately 7 mGy for male, and 9 mGy for female angiocardiography, and about 3 mGy for barium meal. Annual collective effective dose from X-ray diagnostic examinations in 1986 were about 104 x 10 3 person Sv from radiography and 118 x 10 3 person Sv from fluoroscopy, with the total of 222 x 10 3 person Sv. (author)

  15. A study evaluating the dependence of the patient dose on the CT dose change in a SPECT/CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Woo

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed ways of reducing the patient dose by examining the dependence of the patient dose on the CT (computed tomography) dose in a SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT scan. To measure the patient dose, we used Precedence 16 SPECT/CT along with a phantom for the CT dose measurement (CT dose phantom kit for adult's head and body, Model 76-414-4150), a 100-mm ionization chamber (CT Ion Chamber) and an X-ray detector (Victoreen Model 4000M+). In addition, the patient dose was evaluated under conditions similar to those for an actual examination using an ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) dosimetry calculator in the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental method involved the use of a CT dose phantom to measure the patient dose under different CT conditions (kVp and mAs) to determine the CTDI (CT dose index) under each condition. An ImPACT dosimetry calculator was also used to measure CTDIw (CT dose index water ), CTDIv (CT dose index volume ), DLP (dose-length product), and effective dose. According to the patient dose measurements using the CT dose phantom, the CTDI showed an approximately 54 fold difference between when the maximum (140 kVp and 250 mAs) and the minimum dose (90 kVp and 25 mAs) was used. The CTDI showed a 4.2 fold difference between the conditions (120 kVp and 200 mAs) used mainly in a common CT scan and the conditions (120 kVp and 50 mAs) used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. According to the measurement results using the dosimetry calculator, the effective dose showed an approximately 35 fold difference between the conditions for the maximum and the minimum doses, as in the case with the CT dose phantom. The effective dose showed a 4.1 fold difference between the conditions used mainly in a common CT scan and those used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. This study examined the patient dose by reducing the CT dose in a SPECT/CT scan. As various examinations can be conducted due to the development of

  16. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  17. Dose evaluation in diagnostic for computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, W.; Borges, J.C.; Mota, H.

    1998-01-01

    The patients which are subjected to computerized tomography tests are exposed to relatively high doses given as result doses on organs that are not matter to test. It was realized a dose levels raising in patients subjected to tests by T C, utilizing to measure this magnitude, TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters which were put directly on the patient, in eye regions, thyroid, breast and navel; founding doses fluctuating between 29.10-49.39 mGy in organs examined and dose values between 0.21-29.10 mGy for organs that no matter to test. The applications of ionizing radiations in medicine do not have dose limits, but paying attention to the radiological protection optimization principle, it is recommended the use of clothes to anti-rays protection for zones not examined, getting with this to reduce the level doses as low as possible, without this to diminish the test quality. (Author)

  18. The concept of the effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiation of the human body by external or internal sources leads mostly to a simultaneous exposure of several organs. However, so far no clear and consistent recommendations for the combination of organ doses and the assessment of an exposure limit under such irradiation conditions are available. Following a proposal described in ICRP-publication 14 one possible concept for the combination of organ doses is discussed in this paper. This concept is based on the assumption that at low doses the total radiation detriment to the exposed person is given by the sum of radiation detriments to the single organs. Taking into account a linear dose-risk relationship, the sum of weighted organ doses leads to the definition of an 'Effective Dose'. The applicability and consequences of this 'Effective Dose Concept' are discussed especially with regard to the assessment of the maximum permissible intake of radionuclides into the human body and the combination of external and internal exposure. (orig.) [de

  19. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  20. Does low dose oral ketamine have oxytocic effect? | Okorie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate if low dose oral Ketamine has oxytotic effect on term pregnant uterus. Methodology: This is a cross sectional double blind placebo control prospective study. A total of 745 parturients were studied, 261 had low dose oral Ketamine in active phase of labour (group A), 227 had Oxytocin augmentation ...

  1. Nitrogen dose and plant density effects on popcorn grain yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... dose x plant density interaction effects. These results indicated that the grain yield of popcorn was affected differently by different nitrogen doses and plant densities in different years (Table 4). When years were evaluated together, the highest grain yields were obtained at 88,000 plants haˉı density in.

  2. Biological effective dose studies in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of cervix is the second most common cancer worldwide among women. Several treatments related protocols of radiotherapy have been followed over few decades in its treatment for evaluating the response. These physical doses varying on the basics of fractionation size, dose rate and total dose needed to be indicated as biological effective dose (BED) to rationalize these treatments. The curative potential of radiation therapy in the management of carcinoma of the cervix is greatly enhanced by the use of intracavitary brachytherapy. Successful brachytherapy requires the high radiation dose to be delivered to the tumor where as minimum radiation dose reach to surrounding normal tissue. Present study is aimed to evaluate biologically effective dose in patients receiving high dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy based on tumor cell proliferation values in cancer of the cervix patients. The study includes 30 patients' data as a retrospective analysis. In addition determine extent of a dose-response relationship existing between the biological effective dose at Point A and the bladder and rectum and the clinical outcomes

  3. Collaborative work to evaluate toxicity on male reproductive organs by repeated dose studies in rats 22). Effects of 2- and 4-week administration of theobromine on the testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, H; Fujioka, M; Kohchi, M; Tateishi, Y; Matsuoka, N

    2000-10-01

    The effects of theobromine, a xanthine derivative, on the testis were compared between rats dosed for 2 and 4 weeks to determine whether a 2-week dosing period is long enough to detect toxicity. Theobromine was administered orally to male Sprague-Dawley rats at dose levels of 250 and 500 mg/kg for 2 weeks starting at the age of 6 or 8 weeks, and for 4 weeks from the age of 6 weeks. Histopathological examination of reproductive organs revealed toxic findings in the testis at 500 mg/kg after 2 weeks of dosing at both ages, and at 250 and 500 mg/kg after 4 weeks of dosing. The primary findings were degeneration/necrosis and desquamation of spermatids and spermatocytes, vacuolization of seminiferous tubules, and multinucleated giant cell formation. These findings were present mainly in stages I-VI and XII-XIV. From these results, it is concluded that the toxic effects of theobromine on the testis can be detected by repeated dosing for 2 weeks as well as for 4 weeks.

  4. The EFFECT trial: evaluating exacerbations, biomarkers, and safety outcomes with two dose levels of fluticasone propionate/formoterol in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papi A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Papi,1 Paul W Jones,2 Prashant S Dalvi,3 Kirsten McAulay,4 Tammy McIver,5 Sanjeeva Dissanayake3 1Department of Internal and CardioRespiratory Medicine, Research Centre on Asthma and COPD, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; 2Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George’s, University of London, London, UK; 3Medical Science – Respiratory, 4Medical Operations, 5Data Management and Statistics, Mundipharma Research Ltd, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist combination therapy is recommended in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients at high risk of exacerbations. The EFFECT (Efficacy of Fluticasone propionate/FormotErol in COPD Treatment trial is a Phase III, 52-week, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of two doses of fluticasone propionate/formoterol compared to formoterol monotherapy in COPD patients with FEV1 ≤50% predicted and a history of exacerbations. The primary endpoint is the annualized rate of moderate and severe exacerbations. Secondary endpoints include pre-dose FEV1, EXACT-PRO (EXAcerbations of Chronic pulmonary disease Tool – Patient-Reported Outcome-defined exacerbations, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire for COPD, COPD Assessment Test, and EXACT-Respiratory Symptoms total score. Lung-specific biomarkers (surfactant protein D and CC chemokine ligand-18 will be measured in a subset of patients to explore their relationship to other clinical indices in COPD and their predictive utility. Pneumonia will be diagnosed per criteria defined by the British Thoracic Society community acquired pneumonia guideline, primarily by radiological confirmation and, additionally, using clinical criteria when a chest radiograph cannot be obtained. Serial measurements of serum potassium, vital signs and electrocardiograms, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and 24-hour urinary cortisol measurement will be performed in a subset of patients in addition to

  5. Evaluation of absorbed and effective doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals using the ICRP 110 reference computational phantoms and ICRP 103 formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadid, L.; Gardumi, A.; Desbree, A.

    2013-01-01

    In diagnostic nuclear medicine, mean absorbed doses to patients' organs and effective doses are published for standard stylised anatomic models. To provide more realistic and detailed geometries of the human morphology, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently adopted male and female voxel phantoms to represent the reference adult. This work investigates the impact of the use of these new computational phantoms. The absorbed doses were calculated for 11 different radiopharmaceuticals currently used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. They were calculated for the ICRP 110 reference computational phantoms using the OEDIPE software and the MCNP extended Monte Carlo code. The biokinetic models were issued from ICRP Publications 53, 80 and 106. The results were then compared with published values given in these ICRP Publications. To discriminate the effect of anatomical differences on organ doses from the effect of the calculation method, the Monte Carlo calculations were repeated for the reference adult stylised phantom. The voxel effect, the influence of the use of different densities and nuclear decay data were also investigated. Effective doses were determined for the ICRP 110 adult reference computational phantom with the tissue weighting factor of ICRP Publication 60 and the tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 103. The calculation method and, in particular, the simulation of the electron transport have a significant influence on the calculated doses, especially, for small and walled organs. Overestimates of >200 % were observed for the urinary bladder wall of the stylised phantom compared with the computational phantoms. The unrealistic organ topology of the stylised phantom leads to important dose differences, sometimes by an order of magnitude. The effective doses calculated using the new computational phantoms and the new tissue weighting factors are globally lower than the published ones, except for some

  6. Effects of low doses: Proof and inferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Ph.

    2010-01-01

    It is essential to discuss the plausibility of 'low-dose' effects from environmental exposures. The question, nonetheless, is wrongly labelled, for it is not the magnitude of the dose that matters, but rather the effect. The question thus concerns 'doses with low effects'. More precisely, because the low effects on large populations are not that small, even when epidemiological tools fail to detect them, it would be more accurate to talk about 'doses with undetectable or barely detectable effects'. Hereafter, we describe this 'low-effect dose' concept from the viewpoint of toxicology and epidemiology and discuss the fragile boundary line for these low-effect doses. Next, we review the different types of inference from observed situations (i.e., with high effects) to situations relevant to public health, to characterize the level of confidence to be accorded them. The first type is extrapolation - from higher to lower doses or from higher to lower dose rates. The second type is transposition - from humans to other humans or from animals to humans. The third type can be called 'analogy' as in 'read across' approaches, where QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) methodology can be used. These three types of inferences can be based on an estimate of the 'distance' between observed and predicted areas, but can also rely on knowledge and theories of the relevant mechanisms. The new tools of predictive toxicology are helpful both in deriving quantitative estimates and grounding inferences on sound bases. (author)

  7. Multicenter phase II randomized study evaluating dose-response of antiperistaltic effect of L-menthol sprayed onto the gastric mucosa for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiki, Naoki; Kaminishi, Michio; Yasuda, Kenjiro; Uedo, Noriya; Kobari, Masumi; Sakai, Terufumi; Hiratsuka, Takashi; Ohno, Kyota; Honjo, Hajime; Nomura, Sachiyo; Yahagi, Naohisa; Tajiri, Hisao; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2012-03-01

    Peppermint oil solution was found to be effective for reducing gastric spasm during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the gastric peristalsis-suppressing effect is dose-dependently induced by L-menthol, the major constituent of peppermint oil, and to determine the recommended dose of an L-menthol preparation. In this phase II, multicenter, double-blind, dose-response study, 131 eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 20 mL of 0.4% L-menthol (n = 32), 0.8% L-menthol (n = 35), 1.6% L-menthol (n = 30), or placebo (n = 34). The primary efficacy measure was the proportion of subjects with no peristalsis in two time periods, 75 to 105 s after treatment and immediately before the completion of endoscopy. The peristalsis-suppressing effect of L-menthol increased dose dependently (5.6%, 32.0%, 47.4% and 52.9% in the 0%, 0.4%, 0.8% and 1.6% groups, respectively: P peristalsis after administration was significantly higher in the 0.8% group (P = 0.015) and 1.6% group (P = 0.009). Adverse events in the L-menthol dose groups occurred with similar frequencies in the placebo group. L-menthol suppresses peristalsis in a dose-dependent manner, and the dose-response reaches a plateau at 0.8% L-menthol. Further Phase III studies are needed to establish the superiority of 0.8% L-menthol over placebo. © 2011 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2011 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  8. Prescribing and evaluating target dose in dose-painting treatment plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Katrin; Specht, Lena; Aznar, Marianne C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of target dose conformity in multi-dose-level treatment plans is challenging due to inevitable over/underdosage at the border zone between dose levels. Here, we evaluate different target dose prescription planning aims and approaches to evaluate the relative merit of such p......-painting and multi-dose-level plans. The tool can be useful for quality assurance of multi-center trials, and for visualizing the development of treatment planning in routine clinical practice....... of such plans. A quality volume histogram (QVH) tool for history-based evaluation is proposed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty head and neck cancer dose-painting plans with five prescription levels were evaluated, as well as clinically delivered simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) plans from 2010 and 2012. The QVH...

  9. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Nersissian, Denise Yanikian; Melo, Camila Souza, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-05-15

    The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose magnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation. (author)

  10. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose mgnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation.

  11. Effective dose evaluation of head and abdomen CT exams in adult patients at the Instituto de Radiologia of Faculdade de Medicina of University of Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nersissian, Denise Y.; Scolastici, Eric F.; Doro, Renato B.; Furquim, Tania A.C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an estimate of the effective dose from CTDI vol for exams of skull and abdomen in adult patients. Thereafter, measurements were taken of CTDI using an ionization chamber type pencil (Radcal Corportation, model 10 x 5 - 3CT) and cylindrical phantom of PMMA equivalent to regions of the skull (diameter = 16 cm) and abdomen (diameter = 32 cm). The results of effective dose for abdomen varied between 7,3 and 12,1 mSv and for skull between 1,4 and 5,0 mSv. Comparing with the literature data, for abdomen exams between 5 and 7 mSV and skull exams between 1 and 2 mSv, it is shown that it is possible to optimize these protocols, aiming to reduce the doses to patients

  12. Effect of low dose 131I-MIBG therapy in metastatic neural crest tumors: Evaluation by RECIST and quality of life questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.; Joseph, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The primary aim of 131I-MIBG therapy in advanced metastatic or recurrent neural crest tumors is palliation i.e. disease control and improvement of health related quality of life. No clear guidelines regarding the dosage and schedule of 131I-MIBG therapy in neural crest tumors exist at present. In general, a fixed dose of 100-300 mCi has been suggested for each therapy. We share our experience of 131I-MIBG therapy in various subgroups of neural crest tumors and discuss the response assessed by the RECIST and the quality of life questionnaire. A total number of 14 patients were treated with indigenously produced 131I-MIBG, which was administered as continuous intravenous infusion over a period of 2-4 hours. Patient isolation according to guidelines set by the national regulatory authority and thyroid blockade with Lugol's iodide were strictly adhered to. Antihypertensive measures were undertaken in case of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma to prevent effects of catecholamine release during or following 131I-MIBG infusion. The primaries included neuroblastoma (n=7), pheochromocytoma (n=5) and paraganglioma (n=2). The cases of neuroblastoma included patients with progressive disease where the conventional chemotherapy had failed, while those of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma were cases with recurrent / metastatic disease following surgery. In cases of multiple therapies, the minimum interval between two consecutive therapies was 12 weeks. Regular renal and haematological profiles were monitored in all the cases. Response to therapy was assessed by RECIST. The findings of 131I-MIBG scintigraphy were incorporated with CT scan in assessing the target lesions. Biochemical response was evaluated by 24 hours urinary VMA estimation. The quality of life status was evaluated by the conventional questionnaire. A total of 27 therapies were administered in 14 patients. In five treated cases of pheochromocytoma, three received multiple therapies. Follow up results

  13. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  14. Effect of scattered radiation in the total body irradiation technique: evaluation of the spoiler and wall dose component in the depthdose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, T.; Malicki, J.; Adamska, K.

    2007-01-01

    regions close to the phantom surface, compensating for the dose decrease over that area due to build-up effect. Radiation backscattered from the wall enhanced the dose in regions close to the phantom surface facing the wall. (author)

  15. Evaluation of shipping doses and compositions for vitrified waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, A.

    1996-01-01

    Shipments of radioactive materials must adhere to dose limits specified in the Code of Federal Regulations. This paper discusses methods for evaluating shipping doses of vitrified waste. A methodology was developed for evaluating the change in vitrification composition required to maintain shipping dose rates within limits. The point kernel codes QAD and Microshield were used to evaluate dose equivalent rates from specified waste forms and radioactivity measurements. The Origen code was utilized to provide the gamma-ray activity as a function of time from isotopic activity measurements. This gamma-ray activity served as source input for QAD. Microshield developed its own source from the given isotopic activities

  16. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1991-08-01

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60 Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  17. Radiation risk evaluation and reference doses in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Vano, E.; Padovani, R.; Zoetelief, J.

    2001-01-01

    In interventional radiology, there are two potential hazards to the patient. These are somatic risks and, for certain procedures, deterministic injuries. The task of radiation protection in interventional radiology is to minimise somatic risks and avoid deterministic injuries. Radiation protection tools and protocols must be developed to achieve these two objectives. Reference doses have been proposed as a method of identifying high dose centres and equipment. The role of reference doses in interventional radiology will be discussed. There are two approaches to reference doses in interventional radiology. These are the measurement of patient entrance skin dose or skin dose rate, or image intensifier input dose rate. Alternatively, dose area product or effective dose to the patient may be monitored. These two main approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the sterility of single-dose medications used in a multiple-dose fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth P; Mukherjee, Jean; Sharp, Claire R; Sinnott-Stutzman, Virginia B

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial proliferation was evaluated in single-dose medications used in a multi-dose fashion and when medications were intentionally inoculated with bacteria. Of 5 experimentally punctured medications, 1 of 75 vials (50% dextrose) became contaminated. When intentionally inoculated, hydroxyethyl starch and heparinized saline supported microbial growth. Based on these findings, it is recommended that hydroxyethyl starch and heparinized saline not be used in a multi-dose fashion.

  19. An evaluation of high-dose jobs for ALARA improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, J. H.; Kim, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that about 70 percent of occupational dose have incurred from maintenance jobs at outage period. To reduce occupational dose, first, the high-dose jobs at the outage period should be identified and evaluated. For this, the database program is used, which contains the ORE data of reference plants, Kori Units 3 and 4. As a result, it is found that the jobs related to steam generator are the highest dose jobs in terms of collective ORE dose. From the analysis of the job procedures of those jobs, the ALARA improvements are also derived

  20. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  1. Evaluation of the dose uniformity for double-plane high dose rate interstitial breast implants with the use of dose reference points and dose non-uniformity ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAjor, T.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Nemeth, G.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dwell time optimizations on dose uniformity characterized by dose values in dose points and dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR) and analyzed which implant parameters have influence on the DNR. Double-plane breast implants with catheters arranged in triangular pattern were used for the calculations. At a typical breast implant, dose values in dose reference points inside the target volume and volumes enclosed by given isodose surfaces were calculated and compared for non-optimized and optimized implants. The same 6-cm treatment length was used for the comparisons. Using different optimizations plots of dose non-uniformity ratio as a function of catheter separation, source step size, number of catheters, length of active sections were drawn and the minimum DNR values were determined. Optimization resulted in less variation in dose values over dose points through the whole volume and in the central plane only compared to the non-optimized case. At implant configurations consisting of seven catheters with 15-mm separation, 5-mm source step size and various active lengths adapted according to the type of optimization, the no optimization, geometrical (volume mode) and dose point (on dose points and geometry) optimization resulted in similar treatment volumes, but an increased high dose volume was observed due to the optimization. The dose non-uniformity ratio always had the minimum at average dose over dose normalization points, defined in the midpoints between the catheters through the implant volume. The minimum value of DNR depended on catheter separation, source step size, active length and number of catheters. The optimization had only a small influence on DNR. In addition to the reference points in the central plane only, dose points positioned in the whole implant volume can be used for evaluating the dose uniformity of interstitial implants. The dose optimization increases not only the dose uniformity within the implant but

  2. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  3. Evaluating the accuracy of electronic pediatric drug dosing rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, Eric S; Spooner, S Andrew; Logan, Judith R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the accuracy of vendor-supplied dosing eRules for pediatric medication orders. Inaccurate or absent dosing rules can lead to high numbers of false alerts or undetected prescribing errors and may potentially compromise safety in this already vulnerable population. Materials and methods 7 months of medication orders and alerts from a large pediatric hospital were analyzed. 30 medications were selected for study across 5 age ranges and 5 dosing parameters. The resulting 750 dosing rules from a commercial system formed the study corpus and were examined for accuracy against a gold standard created from traditional clinical resources. Results Overall accuracy of the rules in the study corpus was 55.1% when the rules were transformed to fit a priori age ranges. Over a pediatric lifetime, the dosing rules were accurate an average of 57.6% of the days. Dosing rules pertaining to the newborn age range were as accurate as other age ranges on average, but exhibited more variability. Daily frequency dosing parameters showed more accuracy than total daily dose, single dose minimum, or single dose maximum. Discussion The accuracy of a vendor-supplied set of dosing eRules is suboptimal when compared with traditional dosing sources, exposing a gap between dosing rules in commercial products and actual prescribing practices by pediatric care providers. More research on vendor-supplied eRules is warranted in order to understand the effects of these products on safe prescribing in children. PMID:23813541

  4. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Orthopedic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H; Elzaki, A.; Sam, A.K.; Sulieman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The number of orthopedic procedures requiring the use of the fluoroscopic guidance has increased over the recent years. Consequently the patient exposed to un avoidable radiation doses. The aim of the current study was to evaluate patient radiation dose during these procedures.37 patients under went dynamic hip screw (DHS) and dynamic cannulated screw (DCS) were evaluated using calibrated Thermolumincent Dosimeters (TLDs), under carm fluoroscopic machines ,in three centers in Khartoum-Sudan. The mean Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was 7.9 m Gy per procedure. The bone marrow and gonad organ exposed to significant doses. No correlation was found between ESD and Body Mass Index (BMI), or patient weight. Well correlation was found between kilo voltage applied and ESD. Orthopedic surgeries delivered lower radiation dose to patients than cardiac catheterization or hysterosalpingraphy (HSG) procedures. More study should be implemented to follow radiation dose before surgery and after surgery

  5. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun

    2003-02-01

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  6. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  7. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Barakat, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D.

    2015-10-01

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  8. Cost-effective pediatric head and body phantoms for computed tomography dosimetry and its evaluation using pencil ion chamber and CT dose profiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Saravanakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a pediatric head and body phantom was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA at a low cost when compared to commercially available phantoms for the purpose of computed tomography (CT dosimetry. The dimensions of head and body phantoms were 10 cm diameter, 15 cm length and 16 cm diameter, 15 cm length, respectively. The dose from a 128-slice CT machine received by the head and body phantom at the center and periphery were measured using a 100 mm pencil ion chamber and 150 mm CT dose profiler (CTDP. Using these values, the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw and in turn the volumetric CTDI (CTDIv were calculated for various combinations of tube voltage and current-time product. A similar study was carried out using standard calibrated phantom and the results have been compared with the fabricated ones to ascertain that the performance of the latter is equivalent to that of the former. Finally, CTDIv measured using fabricated and standard phantoms were compared with respective values displayed on the console. The difference between the values was well within the limits specified by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB, India. These results indicate that the cost-effective pediatric phantom can be employed for CT dosimetry.

  9. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, Mette; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen......PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were...... containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. RESULTS: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose...

  10. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study; Conception et developpement d'un fantome anthropomorphe equipe de detecteurs dans le but d'evaluer la dose efficace a un poste de travail: etude de faisabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furstoss, Ch

    2006-11-15

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of {+-}15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  11. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.

    2000-01-01

    -300 mGy were obtained using TL (210 degreesC TL and pre-dose) and OSL (single and multiple aliquot) procedures. Overall, good inter-laboratory concordance of dose evaluations was achieved, with a variance (1 sigma) of similar to+/-10 mGy for the samples examined. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All...

  12. [Safety Evaluation of Rare Sugar Syrup: Single-dose Oral Toxicity in Rats, Reverse Mutation Assay, Chromosome Aberration Assay, and Acute Non-Effect Level for Diarrhea of a Single Dose in Humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Takamine, Satoshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The safety of rare sugar syrup obtained from high-fructose corn syrup under slightly alkaline conditions was studied. Mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was assessed by a reverse mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, and an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using Chinese hamster lung cell line (CHL/IU). No mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was detected under these experimental conditions. Oral administration of single dose (15,000 mg/kg) of rare sugar syrup to rats caused no abnormalities, suggesting no adverse effect of rare sugar syrup. In humans, the acute non-effect level of rare sugar syrup for causing diarrhea was estimated as 0.9 g/kg body weight as dry solid base in both males and females.

  13. Study of the heterogeneity effects of lung in the evaluation of absorbed dose in radiotherapy; Estudo dos efeitos da heterogeneidade de pulmao na avaliacao da dose absorvida em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho

    2006-02-15

    The main objective of radiotherapy is to deliver the highest possible dose to the tumour, in order to destroy it, reducing as much as possible the doses to healthy tissues adjacent to the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to do a planning of the treatment. The more complex is the treatment, the more difficult the planning will be, demanding computation sophisticated methods in its execution, in order to consider the heterogeneities present in the human body. Additionally, with the appearing of new radiotherapeutic techniques, that used irradiation fields of small area, for instance, the intensity modulated radiotherapy, the difficulties for the execution of a reliable treatment planning, became still larger. In this work it was studied the influence of the lung heterogeneity in the planning of the curves of percentage depth dose, PDP, obtained with the Eclipse{sup R} planning system for different sizes of irradiation fields, using the correction algorithms for heterogeneities available in the planning system: modified Batho, general Batho and equivalent tissue-air ratio. A thorax phantom, manufactured in acrylic, containing a region made of cork to simulate the lung tissue, was used. The PDP curves generated by the planning system were compared to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and with the use of thermoluminescent, TL, dosimetry. It was verified that the algorithms used by the Eclipse{sup R} system for the correction of heterogeneity effects are not able to generate correct results for PDP curves in the case of small fields, occurring differences of up to 100%, when the 1x1 cm{sup 2} treatment field is considered. These differences can cause a considerable subdosage in the lung tissue, reducing the possibility of the patient cure. (author)

  14. Radiation dose effects, hardening of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont-Nivet, E.

    1991-01-01

    This course reviews the mechanism of interaction between ionizing radiation and a silicon oxide type dielectric, in particular the effect of electron-hole pairs creation in the material. Then effects of cumulated dose on electronic components and especially in MOS technology are examined. Finally methods hardening of these components are exposed. 93 refs

  15. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  16. Evaluation of biological effect of {sup 90}Sr beta radiation in human blood cells and dose-response curve elaboration; Avaliacao do efeito biologico da radiacao beta do {sup 90}Sr em celulas sanguineas humanas e elaboracao de curva dose-resposta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Elaine Mendes de

    2000-07-01

    Among several environmental genotoxins, ionizing radiation has been received special attention because of its mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic potential. In this context, the aim of this study was evaluate the effects of {sup 90}Sr beta radiation in human cells, in view of the scarcity of literature data. For that, blood cells of five healthy donors were irradiated in vitro with doses between 0.2 and 5.0 Gy in a {sup 90}Sr source (0.2 Gy/min) and were processed for chromosome aberration analysis and for comet assay. Cytogenetic results showed that the type of structural chromosome aberrations found more frequently were acentric fragments, double minutes and dicentrics. The values of {alpha} and {beta} coefficient of linear-quadratic model used to fit dose response curves showed that {sup 90}Sr beta radiation was more efficient in induction of lesions from only one ionizing track than two independent tracks in chromosome aberration formation. Apparently, {sup 90}Sr beta radiation neither influenced the modal number of chromosome in irradiated cells nor in cell cycle kinetic of analyzed dose interval. Concerning the comet assay, there was an increase in DNA migration in a dose dependent manner, evaluated by either image analysis system (tail moment) or visual classification (DNA damage), which dose-response relation was adequately fitted to non-linear regression model. Both adopted techniques were complement in evaluating the biological effect of {sup 90}Sr beta radiation in human cells. (author)

  17. Effect of physiological factors on dose due to organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the understanding of the effect of age, anatomical and physiological data on the doses in order to prescribe dose coefficient for radionuclides. The published data on OBT dose fraction after acute or chronic intakes of HTO are evaluated to examine the variation of OBT dose with the age and physiology of occupational workers. (author)

  18. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: Applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marklund, Mette [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: mm@frh.regionh.dk; Christensen, Robin [Parker Institute: Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: robin.christensen@frh.regionh.dk; Torp-Pedersen, Soren [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: stp@frh.regionh.dk; Thomsen, Carsten [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk; Nolsoe, Christian P. [Department of Radiology, Koge Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: cnolsoe@dadlnet.dk

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. Materials and methods: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were obtained. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers (median age: 24 years (range: 21-37 years) and median bodyweight: 65 kg (51-80 kg)) completed two dynamic MRM examinations on a 0.6 T open scanner. The inter-examination time was 24 h (23.5-25 h). The following sequences were applied: axial T2W TSE and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. Results: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose, respectively (P < 0.0001); corresponding to a 65% (95% CI: 37-99%) SI increase, indicating a moderate saturation. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), the results indicated a tendency, towards lower maximal SI in the breast parenchyma of ECOC users compared to non-ECOC users. Conclusion: We conclude that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed to determine the impact of ECOC on the relative enhancement ratio, and further studies are needed to determine if a possible use of ECOC should be considered a compromising

  19. Design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Irie, Takashi; Kohriyama, Tamio; Kudo, Seiichi; Nishimura, Kazuya

    2001-01-01

    When we assume a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, it is required for rescue activity in the plant, accident management, repair work of failed parts and evaluation of employees to obtain radiation dose rate distribution or map in the plant and estimated dose value for the above works. However it might be difficult to obtain them accurately along the progress of the accident, because radiation monitors are not always installed in the areas where the accident management is planned or the repair work is thought for safety-related equipments. In this work, we analyzed diffusion of radioactive materials in case of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor plant, investigated a method to obtain radiation dose rate in the plant from estimated radioactive sources, made up a prototype analyzing system by modeling a specific part of components and buildings in the plant from this design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident, and then evaluated its availability. As a result, we obtained the followings: (1) A new dose evaluation method was established to predict the radiation dose rate in any point in the plant during a severe accident scenario. (2) This evaluation of total dose including moving route and time for the accident management and the repair work is useful for estimating radiation dose limit for these actions of the employees. (3) The radiation dose rate map is effective for identifying high radiation areas and for choosing a route with lower radiation dose rate. (author)

  20. Pediatric Obesity: Pharmacokinetic Alterations and Effects on Antimicrobial Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Stephanie; Bradley, John; Nguyen, William Huy; Tran, Tri; Ny, Pamela; La, Kirsten; Vivian, Eva; Le, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Limited data exist for appropriate drug dosing in obese children. This comprehensive review summarizes pharmacokinetic (PK) alterations that occur with age and obesity, and these effects on antimicrobial dosing. A thorough comparison of different measures of body weight and specific antimicrobial agents including cefazolin, cefepime, ceftazidime, daptomycin, doripenem, gentamicin, linezolid, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, tobramycin, vancomycin, and voriconazole is presented. PubMed (1966-July 2015) and Cochrane Library searches were performed using these key terms: children, pharmacokinetic, obesity, overweight, body mass index, ideal body weight, lean body weight, body composition, and specific antimicrobial drugs. PK studies in obese children and, if necessary, data from adult studies were summarized. Knowledge of PK alterations stemming from physiologic changes that occur with age from the neonate to adolescent, as well as those that result from increased body fat, become an essential first step toward optimizing drug dosing in obese children. Excessive amounts of adipose tissue contribute significantly to body size, total body water content, and organ size and function that may modify drug distribution and clearance. PK studies that evaluated antimicrobial dosing primarily used total (or actual) body weight (TBW) for loading doses and TBW or adjusted body weight for maintenance doses, depending on the drugs' properties and dosing units. PK studies in obese children are imperative to elucidate drug distribution, clearance, and, consequently, the dose required for effective therapy in these children. Future studies should evaluate the effects of both age and obesity on drug dosing because the incidence of obesity is increasing in pediatric patients. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  1. Evaluation of three somatic genetic biomarkers as indicators of low dose radiation effects in clean-up workers of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, I.M.; Tucker, J.D.; Langlois, R.G.; Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pleshanov, P.; Nelson, D.O

    2001-07-01

    The goals of this study were to assess three biomarkers of genetic effect for their individual and collective ability to detect and estimate radiation exposure in Russian Chernobyl clean-up workers. Work assignments were planned to limit dose to 0.25 Gy. The three biomarkers employed were chromosome translocations detected in lymphocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and mutation at two genes, glycophorin A (GPA) in red blood cells detected by flow cytometry and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) in lymphocytes detected by selective cell culture. Samples were obtained from 1992 to 2000. The time between exposure at Chernobyl and sample acquisition was 5 years. The lymphocyte assays detected an elevation over controls in average outcomes in clean-up workers: translocation rates were 46% higher when adjusted for age and smoking and HPRT mutant frequencies were 16% higher when adjusted for age. The GPA assay did not detect an exposure effect. The results indicate that measuring frequency of translocations by FISH is preferred for low dose radiation, retrospective biodosimetry. (author)

  2. Computing effective dose in cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Tipnis, Sameer; Sterzik, Alexander; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-07-01

    We present a method of estimating effective doses in cardiac CT that accounts for selected techniques (kV mAs-1), anatomical location of the scan and patient size. A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator) was used to estimate effective doses (E) using ICRP 103 weighting factors for a 70 kg patient undergoing cardiac CT examinations. Using dose length product (DLP) for the same scans, we obtained values of E/DLP for three CT scanners used in cardiac imaging from two vendors. E/DLP ratios were obtained as a function of the anatomical location in the chest and for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. We also computed the ratio of the average absorbed dose in a water cylinder modeling a patient weighing W kg to the corresponding average absorbed dose in a water cylinder equivalent to a 70 kg patient. The average E/DLP for a 16 cm cardiac heart CT scan was 26 µSv (mGy cm)-1, which is about 70% higher than the current E/DLP values used for chest CT scans (i.e. 14-17 µSv (mGy cm)-1). Our cardiac E/DLP ratios are higher because the cardiac region is ~30% more radiosensitive than the chest, and use of the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors increases cardiac CT effective doses by ~30%. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases the E/DLP conversion factor for cardiac CT by 17%. For the same incident radiation at 120 kV, doses in 45 kg adults were ~22% higher than those in 70 kg adults, whereas doses in 120 kg adults were ~28% lower. Accurate estimates of the patient effective dose in cardiac CT should use ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors, and account for a choice of scan techniques (kV mAs-1), exposed scan region, as well as patient size.

  3. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients in intraoral dental radiography using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Il; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Oh, Seung Chul; Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The use of dental radiographic examinations is common although radiation dose resulting from the dental radiography is relatively small. Therefore, it is required to evaluate radiation dose from the dental radiography for radiation safety purpose. The objectives of the present study were to develop dosimetry method for intraoral dental radiography using a Monte Carlo method based radiation transport code and to calculate organ doses and effective doses of patients from different types of intraoral radiographies. Radiological properties of dental radiography equipment were characterized for the evaluation of patient radiation dose. The properties including x-ray energy spectrum were simulated using MCNP code. Organ doses and effective doses to patients were calculated by MCNP simulation with computational adult phantoms. At the typical equipment settings (60 kVp, 7 mA, and 0.12 sec), the entrance air kerma was 1.79 mGy and the measured half value layer was 1.82 mm. The half value layer calculated by MCNP simulation was well agreed with the measurement values. Effective doses from intraoral radiographies ranged from 1 μSv for maxilla premolar to 3 μSv for maxilla incisor. Oral cavity layer (23⁓82 μSv) and salivary glands (10⁓68 μSv) received relatively high radiation dose. Thyroid also received high radiation dose (3⁓47 μSv) for examinations. The developed dosimetry method and evaluated radiation doses in this study can be utilized for policy making, patient dose management, and development of low-dose equipment. In addition, this study can ultimately contribute to decrease radiation dose to patients for radiation safety.

  4. Hanford Site Annual Report Radiological Dose Calculation Upgrade Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Sandra F.

    2010-02-28

    Operations at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, result in the release of radioactive materials to offsite residents. Site authorities are required to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed offsite resident. Due to the very low levels of exposure at the residence, computer models, rather than environmental samples, are used to estimate exposure, intake, and dose. A DOS-based model has been used in the past (GENII version 1.485). GENII v1.485 has been updated to a Windows®-based software (GENII version 2.08). Use of the updated software will facilitate future dose evaluations, but must be demonstrated to provide results comparable to those of GENII v1.485. This report describes the GENII v1.485 and GENII v2.08 dose exposure, intake, and dose estimates for the maximally exposed offsite resident reported for calendar year 2008. The GENII v2.08 results reflect updates to implemented algorithms. No two environmental models produce the same results, as was again demonstrated in this report. The aggregated dose results from 2008 Hanford Site airborne and surface water exposure scenarios provide comparable dose results. Therefore, the GENII v2.08 software is recommended for future offsite resident dose evaluations.

  5. Biological effects of low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    For a long time, radiation, biological research concentrated on the diagnosis and the effect chains to be taken into consideration in the case of acute and chronic radiation effects due to intensive irradiation. Approximately at the beginning of the Thirties, the research results of the geneticist Mueller and the radiation-biologists Oliver and Timofeef-Ressovsky brought a fundamental change in the way of looking at things in radiation biology. From the results then obtained it can be deduced that even the smallest quantities of radiation can cause effects. Basically, two processes leading to different radiation reactions have to be recognized: 1) A change in the genetical code, especially by direct irradiation of the nucleus. The effects thus arising are called stochastic effects. 2) A change of the cell in total by inactivation of the cell division or by cell death. These are called non-stochastic effects. Here, a threshold dose is existent. In these cases, the degree of the effects depends on the quantity of the dose. Therefore, the stochastic effects are paid special attention when determining radiation effects with low doses. Here, the emphasis of the research was moved from the genetic effects to the generation of somatic effects, especially the generation of malign neoformations and the shortening of the life connected with them. In the generation of malign neoformations by ionising radiation, probably only the transformation of a single cell is necessary, however only then when ionising radiation is absorbed in the nucleus several times (multi-hit theory). This leads to the assumption that the induction of malignant neoformations possesses a linear quadratic function, at least in the region of medium doses. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojreh, Azadeh; Weber, Michael; Homolka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice

  7. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  8. First-dose effects of fingolimod after switching from injectable therapies in the randomized, open-label, multicenter, Evaluate Patient OutComes (EPOC) study in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Bruce; Cascione, Mark; Freedman, Mark S; Agius, Mark; Kantor, Daniel; Gudesblatt, Mark; Goldstick, Lawrence P; Agashivala, Neetu; Schofield, Lesley; McCague, Kevin; Hashmonay, Ron; Barbato, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    In pivotal phase 3 studies, fingolimod treatment initiation was associated with a transient reduction in heart rate (HR). Atrioventricular (AV) conduction delays, which were typically asymptomatic, were detected in a small minority of patients. We report the first-dose effects of fingolimod in patients who switched from injectable therapies during the Evaluate Patient OutComes (EPOC) study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01216072). This was a phase 4, 6-month, randomized, active-comparator, open-label, multicenter study. It included over 900 fingolimod-treated patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis, with subgroups of individuals who were receiving common concomitant HR-lowering medications or had pre-existing cardiac conditions (PCCs). Vital signs were recorded hourly for 6h post-dose. A 12-lead electrocardiogram was obtained at baseline and at 6h post-dose. A transient decrease in mean HR and blood pressure occurred within 6h of the first fingolimod dose. The incidence of symptomatic bradycardia was low (1%); eight patients reported dizziness and there was one case each of fatigue, palpitations, dyspnea, cardiac discomfort, and gait disturbance. These symptomatic events were typically mild or moderate in severity and all resolved spontaneously, without intervention or fingolimod discontinuation. First-dose effects in patients with PCCs and in those receiving concomitant HR-lowering medications were consistent with effects observed in the overall study population and with results from previous clinical trials. The EPOC study provides additional data demonstrating the transient and generally benign nature of fingolimod first-dose effects on HR and AV conduction in a large population that is more representative of patients encountered in routine clinical practice than in the pivotal trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Organ doses in interventional radiology procedures: Evaluation of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tort, I.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Perez-Martinez, M.; Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Diez de los Rios, A.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures require large fluoroscopy times and important number of radiological images, so the levels of radiation to patient are high, which leads us to calculate the organ doses. The objective of this work is to estimate and make a comparison of the results given by the different software that we have to do the calculation of organ doses in complex procedures of IR. To do this, 28 patients have been selected, distributed in the 3 procedures with highest doses. The determination of organ doses and effective doses has been made using the projections utilized and different software based on Monte Carlo Methods: Eff-dose, PCXMC and Diasoft. We have obtained very high dispersion in the average organ dose between the 3 programs. In many cases, it is higher than 25% and in some particular cases, it is greater than 100%. Dispersion obtained in effective doses is not so high, being under 20% in all cases. This shows that a better solution is needed to solve the problem of the organ doses calculation; a more accurate method is necessary that brings us to a trustworthy approach to reality, and, at the moment, that we do not dispose of it. (author)

  10. Health effects of daily airborne particle dose in children: Direct association between personal dose and respiratory health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Marks, Guy B.; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution is a widespread health problem associated with respiratory symptoms. Continuous exposure monitoring was performed to estimate alveolar and tracheobronchial dose, measured as deposited surface area, for 103 children and to evaluate the long-term effects of exposure to airborne particles through spirometry, skin prick tests and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). The mean daily alveolar deposited surface area dose received by children was 1.35 × 10 3 mm 2 . The lowest and highest particle number concentrations were found during sleeping and eating time. A significant negative association was found between changes in pulmonary function tests and individual dose estimates. Significant differences were found for asthmatics, children with allergic rhinitis and sensitive to allergens compared to healthy subjects for eNO. Variation is a child's activity over time appeared to have a strong impact on respiratory outcomes, which indicates that personal monitoring is vital for assessing the expected health effects of exposure to particles. -- Highlights: •Particle dose was estimated through personal monitoring on more than 100 children. •We focused on real-time daily dose of particle alveolar deposited surface area. •Spirometry, skin prick and exhaled Nitric Oxide tests were performed. •Negative link was found between changes in pulmonary functions and individual doses. •A child's lifestyle appeared to have a strong impact on health respiratory outcomes. -- The respiratory health effects of daily airborne particle dose on children through personal monitoring

  11. Evaluating correlation between geometrical relationship and dose difference caused by respiratory motion using statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yu Yoon [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three-dimensional dose (3D dose) can consider coverage of moving target, however it is difficult to provide dosimetric effect which occurs by respiratory motions. Four-dimensional dose (4D dose) which uses deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images can consider dosimetric effect by respiratory motions. The dose difference between 3D dose and 4D dose can be varied according to the geometrical relationship between a planning target volume (PTV) and an organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the overlap volume histogram (OVH), which quantitatively shows the geometrical relationship between the PTV and OAR, and the dose differences. In conclusion, no significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value. No significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value.

  12. Dose evaluation of organs at risk (OAR) cervical cancer using dose volume histogram (DVH) on brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Wibowo, R.; Haris, Bambang; Inganatul Islamiyah, dan

    2017-05-01

    Brachytherapy is one way to cure cervical cancer. It works by placing a radioactive source near the tumor. However, there are some healthy tissues or organs at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum which received radiation also. This study aims to evaluate the radiation dose of the bladder and rectum. There were 12 total radiation dose data of the bladder and rectum obtained from patients’ brachytherapy. The dose of cervix for all patients was 6 Gy. Two-dimensional calculation of the radiation dose was based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) points or called DICRU while the 3-dimensional calculation derived from Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) on a volume of 2 cc (D2cc). The radiation dose of bladder and rectum from both methods were analysed using independent t test. The mean DICRU of bladder was 4.33730 Gy and its D2cc was4.78090 Gy. DICRU and D2cc bladder did not differ significantly (p = 0.144). The mean DICRU of rectum was 3.57980 Gy and 4.58670 Gy for D2cc. The mean DICRU of rectum differed significantly from D2cc of rectum (p = 0.000). The three-dimensional method radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was higher than the two-dimensional method with ratios 1.10227 for bladder and 1.28127 for rectum. The radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was still below the tolerance dose. Two-dimensional calculation of the bladder and rectum dose was lower than three-dimension which was more accurate due to its calculation at the whole volume of the organs.

  13. Personal dosimetry statistics and specifics of low dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, R.E.; Gómez Salinas, R.A.; Oyarzún Cortés, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    The dose statistics of a personal dosimetry service, considering 35,000+ readings, display a sharp peak at low dose (below 0.5 mSv) with skewness to higher values. A measure of the dispersion is that approximately 65% of the doses fall below the average plus 2 standard deviations, an observation which may prove helpful to radiation protection agencies. Categorizing the doses by the concomitant use of a finger ring dosimeter, that skewness is larger in the whole body, and ring dosimeters. The use of Harshaw 5500 readers at high gain leads to frequent values of the glow curve that are judged to be spurious, i.e. values not belonging to the roughly normal noise over the curve. A statistical criterion is shown for identifying those anomalous values, and replacing them with the local behavior, as fit by a cubic polynomial. As a result, the doses above 0.05 mSv which are affected by more than 2% comprise over 10% of the data base. The low dose peak of the statistics, above, has focused our attention on the evaluation of LiF(Mg,Ti) dosimeters exposed at low dose, and read with Harshaw 5500 readers. The standard linear procedure, via an overall reader calibration factor, is observed to fail at low dose, in detailed calibrations from 0.02 mSv to 1 Sv. A significant improvement is achieved by a piecewise polynomials calibration curve. A cubic, at low dose is matched, at ∼10 mSv, in value and first derivative, to a linear dependence at higher doses. This improvement is particularly noticeable below 2 mSv, where over 60% of the evaluated dosimeters are found. (author)

  14. Dose evaluation in special fluoroscopy procedures: Hysterosalpingography and Dacryocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Cintya Carolina Barbosa

    2006-04-01

    The hysterosalpingography (HSG) and dacryocystography (DCG) are among the special fluoroscopy procedures. The HSG is a radiodiagnostic technique used to detect uterine and tubal pathologies and it is fundamental for the investigation of infertility. The DCG is a form of lacrimal system imaging, being important to show the level of obstruction, the presence of dilatation of the lacrimal sac, as well as alterations in nearby structures. At this research, the study of skin entrance dose was evaluated for these two special fluoroscopy procedures, besides the analyses of staff doses whose performs the exams. The exams of 22 HSG patients and 8 DCG patients were evaluated using TL-100 dosimeters attached on patient' skin at anatomical landmarks evolved on each exam. In the case of HSG, the results showed that skin entrance doses varied from 0.5 mGy to 73.4 mGy, with an average value of 22.1 mGy. The estimated uterus dose was 5.5 mGy, and 6.6 mGy was the average dose estimated to the ovaries. The patient' skin entrance dose undergoing to DCG examinations varied from 2.1 mGy to 10.6 mGy, and the average eye's dose was 6.1 mGy. The results of staff dose showed that, on HSG, the average dose on doctor's right hand was 4.3 mGy per examination. This value had to the fact that the physician introduces the contrast manually while all contrast exposures. In relation of DCG, the staff's dose values were nearby background radiation, evidencing that, inside of permitted limits, there is no risk for the physicians at this procedure. (author)

  15. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  16. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  17. Effective dose measurement at workplaces within an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagrasa, C.; Darreon, J.; Martin-Burtat, N.; Clairand, I.; Colin, J.; Fontbonne, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry of the IRSN (France) is developing an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose for photon fields at workplaces. This anthropomorphic phantom will be equipped with small active detectors located inside at chosen positions. The aim of this paper is to present the development of these new detectors showing the results of the characterisation of the prototype under metrological conditions. New evaluations of the effective dose for standard and non-homogenous irradiation configurations taking into account the real constraints of the project have been done validating the feasibility and utility of the instrument. (authors)

  18. The Effect of Low‑Dose Ketamine (Preemptive Dose) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Average dosage of diclofenac suppository and mean time for taking the first dosage of opioids have not statistical difference too (respectively; P = 0.76, P = 0.87). Average dose of pethidine was lesser than placebo statistically. It means, the case group did not take pethidine but this amount was 6 (20%) in the control one (P ...

  19. Low-dose effects hypothesis and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In the modern world the use of different ionizing radiation sources is almost ubiquitous. They find applications in industry, medicine, science, agriculture and others. The doses received by workers exposed to occupational exposure are comparable to those of natural background radiation. The published data about the health effects of occupational exposure persons are contradictory. The question about ‘negative’ (bystander effects, genomic instability) and ‘positive’ (adaptive response, radiation hormesis) effects of low doses exposure is essential and has significant social and economic impact. What you will learn: In this lecture we will summarize information about: Primary radiation damage; Influence of defense mechanisms; Model for risk assessment, Epidemiological studies and results; Molecular mechanisms

  20. Evaluation of patient dose in some mammography centres in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paknyat, A.; Samarin, E. R. P.; Jeshvaghane, N. A.; Paydar, R.; Fasaei, B.; Karamloo, A.; Khosravi, H. R.; Deevband, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    High diagnostic sensitivity and specificity while maintaining the least dose to the patient is the ideal mammography. The objective of this work was to evaluate patient dose and image quality of mammograms to propose corrective actions. The image quality for 1242 patient in 7 mammography facilities in Tehran city was evaluated based on selected image quality criteria using a three-point scale. Clinical image quality, the entrance surface air kerma, the average glandular dose and optical density of films for standard PMMA phantom of 4.5 cm thickness were evaluated. The results showed that up to 72 % of mammograms were in good condition to be diagnosed, and only about 3.4 % of the images were unacceptable or with suboptimal quality. The entrance surface air kerma values were in the range of 3.8-10.5 mGy, average glandular dose 0.5-1.8 mGy and optical density of films 0.74-2.03. The image quality evaluation after correction actions, periodic image quality evaluation and using the correct equipment certainly will improve patient dose. (authors)

  1. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The interest about possible 3 H induced health detriment corresponding to low dose domain is justified by the use of nuclear power as well as by the ongoing research on fusion reactor technology. During the past decade a large number of radiobiological studies have become available for 3 H, most of them focusing on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays. A point of interest concerning the tritium induced low-level effects came from the research on the adaptive response of mitogen stimulated human lymphocytes to low-LET (linear energy transfer) radiation exposure. The present paper reports the results of two different types of experiments: one is referring to in vitro induced effects on human lymphocytes, while the other one is referring to in vivo effects observed on internally contaminated animals. The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. The response induced by the pre-treatment of the human lymphocytes with HTO of different specific 3 H activities and for different time intervals was subsequently provoked by acute gamma irradiation of the cells. The frequency of micronucleus induction, used as biological end-point, was evaluated after culturing the whole blood. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to HTO (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with 1 Gy gamma-rays showed an induction frequency of micronuclei significantly lower (40%) than the sum of the yields induced by HTO and gamma-rays separately. The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated

  2. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J; Park, H; Lee, J; Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Lee, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  3. Antipsychotic treatment dosing profile in patients with schizophrenia evaluated with electronic monitoring (MEMS®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Francisco J; Ramallo-Fariña, Yolanda; Bosch, Esperanza; Mayans, Teresa; Rodríguez, Carlos J; Caravaca, Ana

    2013-05-01

    Although the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS®) device offers accurate information on treatment dosing profile, such profile has never been studied in patients with schizophrenia. Enhancing our knowledge on this issue would help in developing intervention strategies to improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment in these patients. 74 outpatients with schizophrenia were monitored with the MEMS device for a 3-month period, for evaluation of antipsychotic treatment dosing profile, possible influence of medication schedule-related variables, adherence to treatment--considering dose intake within prescribed timeframes--and possible Hawthorne's effect of using the MEMS device. Dose-omission gaps occurred in 18.7% of monitoring days, most frequently during weekends, almost significantly. Almost one-third of prescribed doses were taken out of prescribed time. Neither the prescribed number of daily doses nor the indicated time of the day for dose intake (breakfast, dinner), were associated with correct antipsychotic dosing. Excess-dose was rare in general, and more frequent out of prescribed dose timeframe. No Hawthorne's effect was found for the MEMS device. Adherence reached only 35% according to a definition that included dose intake within prescribed timeframes. Antipsychotic treatment dosing was considerably irregular among patients with schizophrenia. Strategies to reduce dose-omission gaps and increase dosing within prescribed timeframes seem to be necessary. Gaining knowledge on precise oral antipsychotic dosing profiles or the influence of schedule-related variables may be useful to design strategies towards enhancing adherence. There appears to be no Hawthorne's effect associated with the use of MEMS devices in outpatients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparison of the angular dependence of effective dose and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, M.A.; Gierga, D.P.; Xu, X.G.

    1996-01-01

    In ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) Publication 60, the set of critical organs and their weighing factors were changed, defining the quantity effective dose, E. This quantity replaced the effective dose equivalent, H E , as defined by ICRP 26. Most notably, the esophagus was added to the list of critical organs. The Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code MCNP was used to determine the effective dose to sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms, developed in previous research, were modified to include the esophagus. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for monoenergetic photon beams of energies 0.08 MeV, 0.3 MeV, and 1.0 MeV for various azimuthal and polar angles. Separate organ equivalent doses were determined for male and female phantoms. The resulting organ equivalent doses were calculated from arithmetic mean averages. The angular dependence of effective dose was compared with that of effective dose equivalent reported in previous research. The differences between the two definitions and possible implications to regulatory agencies were summarized

  5. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8-35 mGy and 7-18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12-33 mGy and 10-21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4-17 mGy and 3-7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5-14 mGy and 3-9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDI(vol)), dose-length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) and 0.019 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively.

  6. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  7. The biologically effective dose in inhalation nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Schinwald, Anja; Murphy, Fiona; Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Tran, Lang; Poland, Craig

    2013-03-19

    In all branches of toxicology, the biologically effective dose (BED) is the fraction of the total dose of a toxin that actually drives any toxic effect. Knowledge of the BED has a number of applications including in building structure-activity relationships, the selection of metrics, the design of safe particles, and the determination of when a nanoparticle (NP) can be considered to be "new" for regulatory purposes. In particle toxicology, we define the BED as "the entity within any dose of particles in tissue that drives a critical pathophysiogically relevant form of toxicity (e.g., oxidative stress, inflammation, genotoxicity, or proliferation) or a process that leads to it." In conventional chemical toxicology, researchers generally use the mass as the metric to describe dose (such as mass per unit tissue or cells in culture) because of its convenience. Concentration, calculated from mass, may also figure in any description of dose. In the case of a nanoparticle dose, researchers use either the mass or the surface area. The mass of nanoparticles is not the only driver of their activity: the surfaces of insoluble particles interact with biological systems, and soluble nanoparticles can release factors that interact with these systems. Nanoparticle shape can modify activity. In this Account, we describe the current knowledge of the BED as it pertains to different NP types. Soluble toxins released by NPs represent one potential indicator of BED for wholly or partially soluble NPs composed of copper or zinc. Rapid dissolution of these NPs into their toxic ions in the acidic environment of the macrophage phagolysosome causes those ions to accumulate, which leads to lysosome destabilization and inflammation. In contrast, soluble NPs that release low toxicity ions, such as magnesium oxide NPs, are not inflammogenic. For insoluble NPs, ζ potential can serve as a BED measurement because the exposure of the particle surface to the acidic milieu of the phagolysosome and

  8. Evaluation of thromboembolic disease using single dose dual phase scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.R.; Charan, S.; Silva, I.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical presentation of thromboembolic disease (TED) is caused by three mechanisms 1) obstruction to venous outflow 2) vascular inflammation and 3) pulmonary emboli. Single Dose (Tc-99m MAA) Dual Phases (Veno-Pulmonary) scintigraphy is theoretically capable of evaluating two of three above mentioned patho-physiological factors. Therefore, a prospective study was designed to explore potential of Single Dose Dual Phase (SDDP) scintigraphy in the evaluation of thromboembolic disease. Materials and methods: Sixty consecutive patients with high clinical likelihood of thromboembolic disease (onset of painful and edematous lower limb, chest pain, shortness of breath, presence of risk factors for DVT, H/o of previous episode of DVT, right ventricular strain on ECHO, hypoxaemia on blood gas analysis), were included in this study. There were 43 men and 17 women (mean age 36 years). They were subjected to single dose dual phase (SDDP) scintigraphy using Tc-99m MAA (4 mci). Firstly venous phase of imaging was obtained with simultaneous injection of Tc-99m MAA diluted in 10 ml normal saline in syringe into superficial veins of dorsum of both feet (large volume continuous flow technique) in whole body acquisition mode on Dual Detectors Gamma Camera; followed by lung perfusion scintigraphy in conventional projections as second phase of study. Venous phase (Venography) was interpreted as per Ziffer's criteria in four venous segments (Unpaired- Inferior Vena Cava, 3 paired - Iliac, Femoral and Popliteal). Interpretation of lung perfusion scan was made as per PIOPED Criteria. Results: Forty-one of sixty patients (67%) showed scintigraphic evidence of venous occlusion (DVT) during venous phase. Out of these, 17 patients eventually had high probability lung scan for pulmonary embolism (29%). None of the patient with negative venous phase (n=19) showed perfusion defects on lung perfusion scan. Venous thrombosis most commonly affected the left lower limb (n=29, 71%). In 5

  9. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I.; Alzimami, K.; Osman, H.; Omer, H.; Sassi, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  11. Design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Irie, Takashi; Kohriyama, Tamio; Kudo, Seiichi; Nishimura, Kazuya

    2002-01-01

    If a severe accident occurs in a pressurized water reactor plant, it is required to estimate dose values of operators engaged in emergency such as accident management, repair of failed parts. However, it might be difficult to measure radiation dose rate during the progress of an accident, because radiation monitors are not always installed in areas where the emergency activities are required. In this study, we analyzed the transport of radioactive materials in case of a severe accident, investigated a method to obtain radiation dose rate in the plant from estimated radioactive sources, made up a prototype analyzing system from this design study, and then evaluated its availability. As a result, we obtained the following: (1) A new dose evaluation method was established to predict the radiation dose rate at any point in the plant during a severe accident scenario. (2) This evaluation of total dose including access route and time for emergency activities is useful for estimating radiation dose limit for these employee actions. (3) The radiation dose rate map is effective for identifying high radiation areas and for choosing a route with lower radiation dose rate. (author)

  12. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, Omar, E-mail: omar.lozanogarcia@unamur.be [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mejia, Jorge [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye [Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Centre (NTHC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Toussaint, Olivier [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Cellular Biology (URBC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Dogné, Jean-Michel [Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Centre (NTHC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Lucas, Stéphane [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints)

  13. Principles of protection: a formal approach for evaluating dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikman-Svahn, Per; Peterson, Martin; Hansson, Sven Ove

    2006-01-01

    One of the central issues in radiation protection consists in determining what weight should be given to individual doses in relation to collective or aggregated doses. A mathematical framework is introduced in which such assessments can be made precisely in terms of comparisons between alternative distributions of individual doses. In addition to evaluation principles that are well known from radiation protection, a series of principles that are derived from parallel discussions in moral philosophy and welfare economics is investigated. A battery of formal properties is then used to investigate the evaluative principles. The results indicate that one of the new principles, bilinear prioritarianism, may be preferable to current practices, since it satisfies efficiency-related properties better without sacrificing other desirable properties

  14. Effective doses in panoramic images from conventional and CBCT equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, W. O. G.; Navarro, M. V. T.; Maia, A. F.

    2008-01-01

    Dental radiology is being extensively used especially after the consolidation of the dental implant technique. Although dental radiology has always been regarded as a low-dose technique, this scenario has changed with the introduction of volumetric techniques and consequent changes that have resulted from the use of the new technique. To compare dose values related to the use of different technologies used in the acquisition of dental panoramic images, the effective dose associated with this image technique was calculated using two different conversion factors for kerma-area product, P KA , in the effective dose. Twenty-four pieces of equipment were evaluated and distributed into three categories: (1) 19 units of conventional equipment, (2) 3-cone beam computed tomography equipment (CBCT) which has a specific sensor to obtain panoramic images and (3) 2 items of CBCT equipment which only have sensors for volumetric acquisition, and the obtainment of panoramic images is through software reconstruction. The results show values of P KA and effective dose are higher for devices using digital image receptors. It is concluded that optimisation procedures and critical analysis should always be applied when adopting new technologies. (authors)

  15. Median lethal dose (LD 50 ) evaluation of some polyherbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The polyherbal preparations reported here are traditionally used in Northern Nigeria for the treatment of wide range of illnesses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity potential of 70% ethanol extracts of forty polyherbal products by determining their median lethal dose (LD50) estimates intraperitoneally and ...

  16. Radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudan: CT dose, organ and effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Khamis, H.M.; Ombada, T.H.; Alzimami, K.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudanese hospitals. Doses were determined from CT acquisition parameters using CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated for three patient ages (0-1, 1-5 and 5-10 y) and two common procedures (head and abdomen). For children aged 0-1 y, volume CT air kerma index (C vol ), air Kerma-length product and effective dose (E) values were 19.1 mGy, 265 mGy.cm and 3.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and those at abdominal CT were 8.8 mGy, 242 mGy.cm and 7.7 mSv, respectively. Those for children aged 1-5 y were 22.5 mGy, 305 mGy.cm and 1.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and 12.6 mGy, 317 mGy.cm, and 5.1 mSv, respectively, at abdominal CT. Dose values and variations were comparable with those reported in the literature. Organ equivalent doses vary from 7.5 to 11.6 mSv for testes, from 9.0 to 10.0 mSv for ovaries and from 11.1 to 14.3 mSv for uterus in abdominal CT. The results are useful for dose optimisation and derivation of national diagnostic reference levels. (authors)

  17. Field study to evaluate radiation doses in dental practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, W.; Scheurer, C.

    1984-05-01

    An inexpensive and simple test device was developed and used in a field study to evaluate entrance dose, dose to an intra-oral film, filtration and field size under routine conditions in more than 150 dental practices. The test device consists of two films of different speed and a set of 5 thin copper filters for a filter analytical determination of the radiation quality. Dentists voluntarily participating in the study were asked to expose the test device like they usually do when examining a molar tooth. The main result was the evidence of a significant dose reduction compared to the findings of similar studies performed in 1970 and 1976. This reduction is due to a general shift to lower values and a complete disappearance of values above 45 mGy (5 R) which in 1970 were still more than 15%. In the same way the number of facilities showing insufficient filtration or collimation had decreased. Nevertheless, a large spread of dose values could still be observed, ranging from less than 0.45 mGy (50 mR) to more than 26 mGy (3 R), for the entrance dose. The most striking result, however, was that such an important parameter like the speed of the films used at the respective unit turned out to have no impact on the entrance dose. (orig./HP)

  18. Semiempirical algorithms for dose evaluation in electron-beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, T.; Ito, R.; Tsukui, S.

    1990-01-01

    The code EDEPOS to compute the depth-dose curve of electrons normally incident on the semi-infinite absorber has been revised to improve its own output and the output of the multilayer depth-dose code EDMULT, in which EDEPOS serves as a subprogram. The values of adjustable parameters in the algorithm of EDEPOS have been determined by the least-squares fit to the depth-dose data collected from the literature. The data used cover the energies from 0.1 to 20 MeV, and the atomic numbers from 5.28 (an effective atomic number for polyethylene) to 82. The revision has removed the spurious cusp in the depth-dose curve generated by the old code, and has resulted in better agreement with a majority of the data. Illustrative results of computation by the revised version of EDMULT are given. (author)

  19. A comparative evaluation of therapeutic effects of once a day dose of losartan potassium versus enalapril maleate in mild to moderate essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neki, N S; Arora, P

    2001-11-01

    Hypertension is a major public health problem both in the developing and developed countries of the world and if untreated, can lead to various fatal complications like cerebral stroke, encephalopathy, ischaemic heart disease (IHD), renal failure and sudden cardiac death, etc. In the present study, a comparative evaluation was made between angiotensin-II receptor antagonists like losartan potassium (50 mg daily) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors like enalapril maleate (5 mg daily) in 100 patients (50 males and 50 females having 25-50 years of age) of mild to moderate essential hypertension with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) 90-109 mmHg. Both the drugs were tried as monotherapy for their clinical efficacy, safety, tolerability and adverse effect profile in this open trial. Losartan potassium lowered the DBP to <90 mmHg in 62% of the patients at the end of 8 weeks compared to 40% in the enalapril group. Percentage of side effects with losartan was 20 and 50 with enalapril. It is concluded that both the drugs are effective antihypertensive agents and cause significant and comparable fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and DBP in patients of mild to moderate essential hypertension. But losartan potassium has been found to be more effective with fewer side effects when compared to enalapril maleate.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Solithromycin (CEM-101) after Single or Multiple Oral Doses and Effects of Food on Single-Dose Bioavailability in Healthy Adult Subjects▿

    OpenAIRE

    Still, J. Gordon; Schranz, Jennifer; Degenhardt, Thorsten P.; Scott, Drusilla; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Clark, Kay

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of orally administered solithromycin (CEM-101), a novel fluoroketolide, were evaluated in healthy subjects in three phase 1 studies. In two randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies, escalating single oral doses of solithromycin (50 to 1,600 mg) or seven oral daily doses (200 to 600 mg) of solithromycin were administered. A third study evaluated the effects of food on the bioavailability of single oral doses (400 mg) of solithromycin. Following single doses, ...

  1. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  2. Total Skin Electron Irradiation: Evaluation of Dose Uniformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Y.; Arican, Z.; Bar-Deroma, R.; Kuten, A.

    2002-01-01

    Total Skin Electron Beam Irradiation (TSEI) is one of the most sophisticated treatment techniques of modern radiation oncology practice. TSEI is used in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides (MF), and Kaposi sarcoma. The objective of TSEI is to uniformly deliver a specified dose over the entire skin surface down to a particular depth. However, considerable technical and dosimetric difficulties exist in achieving this goal due to patient and treatment machine factors. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements are usually performed to evaluate dose distribution throughout the body. This paper presents the in vivo dosimetric data of 67 treatments on 58 patients with MF, treated with TSEI

  3. Evaluation of effectiveness of a computer system (CAD) in the identification of lung nodules with low-dose MSCT: scanning technique and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraioli, Francesco; Catalano, Carlo; Almberger, Maria; Bertoletti, Linda; Cantisani, Vito; Danti, Massimiliano; Pediconi, Federica; Passariello, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in the identification of pulmonary nodules. Materials and methods: Two observers (A1, A2) with different levels of experience independently evaluated 20 chest MSCT studies with and without the aid of a CAD system (LungCheck, R2 Technology, Inc.). The study parameters were as follows: 140 kVs, 40 mAs, collimation 4x1 mm, slice thickness 1.25 mm, reconstruction interval 1.0 mm. The observers analysed the images with and without CAD and evaluated: 1) nodule size (longer axis); 2) number and location of nodules; 3) reading time for each observer. The gold standard was represented by the evaluation of both readers in consensus with the aid of the CAD system. Results: Without CAD support the two readers identified 77 (A1) and 79 (A2) nodules and with CAD 81 (A1) and 82 (A2) nodules. Working in consensus the two observers identified 81 nodules without the aid of CAD and 84 nodules with the aid of CAD. Total number of nodules identified by CAD was 104, 25 of which were false positive and 5 false negative. The average reading time with the aid of CAD decreased by as much as 40% for both the observers. Conclusions: The preliminary results of our study suggest that the CAD technique is an accurate automatic support tool in the identification of pulmonary nodules. It reduces reading time and automatically supplies the size, volume, density and number of nodules, thus being useful both in screening programmes and in the follow-up of cancer patients, in whom comparison of the images is particularly difficult [it

  4. Dose dependent sun protective effect of topical melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Cecilie; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) by sunlight results in an increasing number of skin conditions. Earlier studies have suggested a protective effect of topical treatment with the pineal hormone melatonin. However, this protective effect has never been evaluated in natural sunlight, and the ......BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) by sunlight results in an increasing number of skin conditions. Earlier studies have suggested a protective effect of topical treatment with the pineal hormone melatonin. However, this protective effect has never been evaluated in natural sunlight......, and the optimal dosing has not been clarified. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the sun protective effect of topical treatment with three different doses of melatonin (0.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%) against erythema induced by natural sunlight. METHOD: The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double......-blind study in healthy volunteers. Twenty-three healthy volunteers, 8 male and 15 female, were enrolled. The protective effect of three different doses of melatonin cream (0.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%) against erythema induced by natural sunlight was tested. All participants had their backs exposed to sun from 1:22 PM...

  5. Dose-volume effects in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord: the effects of nonuniform dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Pop, Lucas A M; Visser, Andries G; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2007-09-01

    To investigate dose-volume effects in rat spinal cord irradiated with nonuniform dose distributions and to assess regional differences in radiosensitivity. A total of 106 rats divided into three groups were irradiated with (192)Ir gamma-rays at a high dose rate. The groups were irradiated with one, two, or six catheters distributed around the thoracolumbar spinal cord to create different dose distributions. After irradiation, the animals were tested for motor function for 9 months. The response was defined as motor dysfunction and WM or nerve root necrosis. Dose-response data were analyzed with a probit analysis as function of the dose level at a percentage of the volume (D(%)) and with different normal tissue complication probability models. Additionally, the histologic responses of the individual dose voxels were analyzed after registration with the histologic sections. The probit analysis at D(24) (24% of the volume) gave the best fit results. In addition, the Lyman Kutcher Burman model and the relative seriality model showed acceptable fits, with volume parameters of 0.17 and 0.53, respectively. The histology-based analysis revealed a lower radiosensitivity for the dorsal (50% isoeffective dose [ED(50)] = 32.3) and lateral WM (ED(50) = 33.7 Gy) compared with the dorsal (ED(50) = 25.9 Gy) and ventral nerve roots (ED(50) = 24.1 Gy). For this nonuniform irradiation, the spinal cord did not show typical serial behavior. No migration terms were needed for an acceptable fit of the dose-response curves. A higher radiosensitivity for the lumbar nerve roots than for the thoracic WM was found.

  6. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  7. Dose rates evaluation of HiPER facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.juarez@upm.es [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear/UPM, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear/UPM, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain); Dept. Ingenieria Energetica UNED, Madrid (Spain); Perlado, Jose M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear/UPM, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain); Le Garrec, Bruno [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France)

    2011-10-15

    During the operation of the HiPER first engineering facility, up to 1.2 x 10{sup 5} MJ/yr of fusion neutrons yields are foreseen. This irradiation level could be distributed in 100 MJ detonations, accounting up to 100 detonations in a single burst, with 10 Hz repetition rate. A burst would take place every month. The dose rates are computed and different concrete shields are evaluated within the target bay. During the operation of the facility the entrance is forbidden inside the bioshield. Between bursts, manual maintenance might be performed inside the bioshield but outside the final optics assembly (FOA) shield. Inside the FOA shield the residual dose rates are so high that only remote maintenance is allowed. The FOA shield reduces the delivered dose rate to optics in a factor of 30.3.

  8. Two gamma dose evaluation methods for silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Faguo; Jin Gen; Yang Yapeng; Xu Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Silicon PIN diodes have been widely used as personal and areal dosimeters because of their small volume, simplicity and real-time operation. However, because silicon is neither a tissue-equivalent nor an air-equivalent material, an intrinsic disadvantage for silicon dosimeters is that a significant over-response occurs at low-energy region, especially below 200 keV. Using a energy compensation filter to flatten the energy response is one method overcoming this disadvantage. But for dose compensation method, the estimated dose depends only on the number of the detector pulses. So a weight function method was introduced to evaluate gamma dose, which depends on pulse number as well as its amplitude. (authors)

  9. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  10. Initiating or changing to a fixed-dose combination of Fluticasone propionate/Formoterol over Fluticasone propionate/Salmeterol: A real-life effectiveness and cost impact evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Yau Ming, Simon; Haughney, John; Small, Iain; Wolfe, Stephanie; Hamill, John; Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin; Daly, Cathal; Soriano, Joan B; Gardener, Elizabeth; Skinner, Derek; Stagno d'Alcontres, Martina; Price, David B

    2017-08-01

    Asthma has a substantial impact on quality of life and health care resources. The identification of a more cost-effective, yet equally efficacious, treatment could positively influence the economic burden of this disease. Fluticasone propionate/Formoterol (FP/FOR) may be as effective as Fluticasone Salmeterol (FP/SAL). We evaluated non-inferiority of asthma control in terms of the proportion of patients free from exacerbations, and conducted a cost impact analysis. This historical, matched cohort database study evaluated two treatment groups in the Optimum Patient Care Research Database in the UK: 1) an FP/FOR cohort of patients initiating treatment with FP/FOR or changing from FP/SAL to FP/FOR and; 2) an FP/SAL cohort comprising patients initiating, or remaining on FP/SAL pMDI combination therapy. The main outcome evaluated non-inferiority of effectiveness (defined as prevention of severe exacerbations, lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the mean difference between groups in patient proportions with no exacerbations is -3.5% or higher) in patients treated with FP/FOR versus FP/SAL. After matching 1:3, we studied a total of 2472 patients: 618 in the FP/FOR cohort (174 patients initiated on FP/FOR and 444 patients changed to FP/FOR) and 1854 in the FP/SAL cohort (522 patients initiated FP/SAL and 1332 continued FP/SAL). The percentage of patients prescribed FP/FOR met non-inferiority as the adjusted mean difference in proportion of no severe exacerbations (95%CI) was 0.008 (-0.032, 0.047) between the two cohorts. No other significant differences were observed except acute respiratory event rates, which were lower for patients prescribed FP/FOR (rate ratio [RR] 0.82, 95% CI 0.71, 0.94). Changing to, or initiating FP/FOR combination therapy, is associated with a non-inferior proportion of patients who are severe exacerbation-free at a lower average annual cost compared with continuing or initiating treatment with FP/SAL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  11. Measurement of effective dose for paediatric scoliotic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chih-I. [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); McLean, Donald [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)]. E-mail: rdmc@imag.wsahs.nsw.gov.au; Robinson, John [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Paediatric radiation dose from scoliosis X-ray examinations is of concern because of its routine nature. Few studies have calculated effective dose which is the primary indicator of radiation risk. This study reports on the use of a new flexible Monte Carlo software package PCXMC14 for such calculation from documented radiographic and patient data. Method: Patient and radiographic data were collected from 54 patient examinations for both postero-anterior (PA) and lateral X-ray projections. A spreadsheet mainly based on radiographic calibration was used to process the raw data and compute entrance air kerma for input in the PCXMC program. A partitioning model was developed to more accurately estimate the effect of an aluminium wedge filter. Results: Results showed the effective dose ranged from 81 to 123 {mu}Sv for the PA projection and 124 to 207 {mu}Sv for the lateral projection, with patient weights varying from 20 to 70 kg. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the usefulness of the PCXMC program to evaluate the effective dose in paediatric scoliosis radiography.

  12. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampado, Osvaldo; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo; Ropolo, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate various approaches for assessing patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT (CBCT), by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms, a Monte Carlo based dose calculation software, and different dose indicators as presently defined. Dose evaluations were performed on a CBCT Elekta XVI (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for different protocols and anatomical regions. The first part of the study focuses on using pcxmc software (pcxmc 2.0, STUK, Helsinki, Finland) for calculating organ doses, adapting the input parameters to simulate the exposure geometry, and beam dose distribution in an appropriate way. The calculated doses were compared to readouts of TLDs placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. After this validation, the software was used for analyzing organ dose variability associated with patients' differences in size and gender. At the same time, various dose indicators were evaluated: kerma area product (KAP), cumulative air-kerma at the isocenter (Kair), cone-beam dose index, and central cumulative dose. The latter was evaluated in a single phantom and in a stack of three adjacent computed tomography dose index phantoms. Based on the different dose indicators, a set of coefficients was calculated to estimate organ doses for a range of patient morphologies, using their equivalent diameters. Maximum organ doses were about 1 mGy for head and neck and 25 mGy for chest and pelvis protocols. The differences between pcxmc and TLDs doses were generally below 10% for organs within the field of view and approximately 15% for organs at the boundaries of the radiation beam. When considering patient size and gender variability, differences in organ doses up to 40% were observed especially in the pelvic region; for the organs in the thorax, the maximum differences ranged between 20% and 30%. Phantom dose indexes provided better correlation with organ doses than Kair and KAP, with average

  13. Effect of Residential Radon Decay Product Dose Factor Variability on Reporting of Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Naomi H

    2018-04-01

    Guidelines for occupational exposure to radiation are based on annual absorbed or effective dose. Guidelines for Rn exposure are currently based on air concentrations of Rn or decay products. Models of bronchial dose from decay product exposure are based on calculations that have five major parameters with parameter variabilities ranging from 20 to 50%. Many countries currently use the ICRP dose conversion convention, which is a ratio of lifetime Rn lung cancer risk to lifetime atomic bomb dose risk. The results of ongoing epidemiology changed both lifetime risk values, and the dose conversion convention has increased by a factor of 2. Therefore, the current dose conversion convention risk ratio is to be replaced by biokinetic dosimetric models. The main effect of variability in the value of Rn dose factors on industry is that the workplace atmosphere must be characterized accurately, and at present, this is not possible. A history of the dose factor models is central to factor development. The values of the dose model parameters are described illustrating the difficulty in calculation of a dose factor with universal applicability. The objective is to show the range of each parameter and the effect of the dose factor used when reporting occupational or residential bronchial dose.

  14. Influence of Distribution of Animals between Dose Groups on Estimated Benchmark Dose and Animal Welfare for Continuous Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringblom, Joakim; Kalantari, Fereshteh; Johanson, Gunnar; Öberg, Mattias

    2017-10-30

    The benchmark dose (BMD) approach is increasingly used as a preferred approach for dose-effect analysis, but standard experimental designs are generally not optimized for BMD analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the use of unequally sized dose groups affects the quality of BMD estimates in toxicity testing, with special consideration of the total burden of animal distress. We generated continuous dose-effect data by Monte Carlo simulation using two dose-effect curves based on endpoints with different shape parameters. Eighty-five designs, each with four dose groups of unequal size, were examined in scenarios ranging from low- to high-dose placements and with a total number of animals set to 40, 80, or 200. For each simulation, a BMD value was estimated and compared with the "true" BMD. In general, redistribution of animals from higher to lower dose groups resulted in an improved precision of the calculated BMD value as long as dose placements were high enough to detect a significant trend in the dose-effect data with sufficient power. The improved BMD precision and the associated reduction of the number of animals exposed to the highest dose, where chemically induced distress is most likely to occur, are favorable for the reduction and refinement principles. The result thereby strengthen BMD-aligned design of experiments as a means for more accurate hazard characterization along with animal welfare improvements. © 2017 The Authors Risk Analysis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. How to Appropriately Calculate Effective Dose for CT Using Either Size-Specific Dose Estimates or Dose-Length Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Samuel L; Mirro, Amy E; Moore, Bria M; Kaufman, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to show how to calculate effective dose in CT using size-specific dose estimates and to correct the current method using dose-length product (DLP). Data were analyzed from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT images. Size-specific dose estimate was used as a surrogate for organ dose in the chest and abdominopelvic regions. Organ doses were averaged by patient weight-based populations and were used to calculate effective dose by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report 103 method using tissue-weighting factors (EICRP). In addition, effective dose was calculated using population-averaged CT examination DLP for the chest and abdominopelvic region using published k-coefficients (EDLP = k × DLP). EDLP differed from EICRP by an average of 21% (1.4 vs 1.1) in the chest and 42% (2.4 vs 3.4) in the abdominopelvic region. The differences occurred because the published kcoefficients did not account for pitch factor other than unity, were derived using a 32-cm diameter CT dose index (CTDI) phantom for CT examinations of the pediatric body, and used ICRP 60 tissue-weighting factors. Once it was corrected for pitch factor, the appropriate size of CTDI phantom, and ICRP 103 tissue-weighting factors, EDLP improved in agreement with EICRP to better than 7% (1.4 vs 1.3) and 4% (2.4 vs 2.5) for chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Current use of DLP to calculate effective dose was shown to be deficient because of the outdated means by which the k-coefficients were derived. This study shows a means to calculate EICRP using patient size-specific dose estimate and how to appropriately correct EDLP.

  16. Evaluation of environmental radiation dose in Ibaraki Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Ryoji

    1977-01-01

    In Ibaraki Prefecture, there is Environmental Radioactivity Surveillance Committee in order to ensure the safety around nuclear power facilities. Environmental radioactivity data are collected every three months, and the grasp of the present situation, the clarification of causes, the evaluation of dose and the publication of results are made. Two instances in particular are described: of contamination paddies due to 14 C contained in drainage; contamination of rivers due to U contained in drainage. (Mori, K.)

  17. Compare to evaluate the image dose of MVCT and CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Bo Reum; Hong, Mi Lan; Ahn, Jong Ho; Song, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In case of the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using Tomotherapy and linear accelerator (Linac), it was to compare and to evaluate the imaging dose of MVCT and CBCT that were performed daily for the correct set up of the patient. The human body model Phantom (Anderson rando Phantom, USA) was divided into the three parts as Head, Thorax, pelvis, and after GafChromic EBT3 film cut to the size of 0.5x0.5 cm2.in the center of the recording area were situated on the ant, post, left, and right surface of the phantom and 2cm in depth from the ant, post, left, right, and center surface of the phantom, the surface dose and inner dose were measured repeatedly three times, respectively, using the tomotherapy (Hi Art) and the OBI of NovalisTx. The measured film calculated the output value by RIP version 6.0 and then the average value of the dose was calculated by the one-way analysis of variance. Using the human body model phantom, the results of MVCT and CBCT performance were that measurements of MVCT inner dose were showed 15.43cGy ± 6.05 in the head, 16.62cGy ± 3.08 in the thorax, 16.81cGy ± 5.24 in the pelvis, and measurements of CBCT inner dose were showed 13.28 ± 3.68 in the head, from 13.66 ± 4.04 in the thorax, 15.52 ± 3.52 in the pelvis. The measurements of surface dose were showed in case of MVCT performance, 11.64 ± 4.05 in the head, 12.16 ± 4.38 in the thorax, 12.05 ± 2.71 in the pelvis, and in case of CBCT performance, 14.59 ± 3.51 in the head, 15.82 ± 2.89 in the thorax, 17.48 ± 2.80 in the pelvis, respectively. In case of Inner dose, the MVCT using MV energy showed higher than the CBCT using kV energy at 1.16 times in the head, at 1.22 times in the thorax, at 1.08 times in the pelvis, and in case of surface dose, the CBCT was higher than MVCT, at 1.25 times in the head, at 1.30 times in the thorax, at 1.45 times in the pelvis. Imaging dose was a small amount compared to the therapeutic dose but it was thought to affect partially to

  18. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  19. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Shiri, Isaac; Salimi, Yazdan; Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi; Sohrabi, Ahmad; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  20. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: Hamid_rbp@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiri, Isaac [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Yazdan [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Deevband, Mohammad Reza [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Biology Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, Ahmad [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad, E-mail: bitarafan@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  1. Evaluation of occupational dose from the special procedures guided by fluoroscopy: cardiac catheterism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amanda Juliene da

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by health professionals in the hemodynamic sector of a university hospital in Sao Paulo city. A self-applied questionnaire was used to delineate the profile of health professionals, taking into account sociodemographic variables and variables related to the work with ionizing radiation. The assessment of occupational doses was performed by consulting of the individual dose records of the institution database from 2000 to 2009. A total of 240 records was evaluated, corresponding to 38 active professionals (2009), divided in different professional category: physician, nurses, radiologic technologists and nursing assistants. The annual doses were compared with the limits established by national regulatory authorities. Based on the effective doses received and recorded during the studied period, experimental measures were performed with TL dosimeters in five physicians to evaluate the equivalent dose, in the left hand, during hemodynamic procedures. In addition, the radioprotection measures adopted by health professionals were verified. This study allowed delineating the profile of medical staff that integrates the hemodynamic service as well as knowing the distribution of their doses in relation to limits over the years. (author)

  2. Robust ray-tracing algorithms for interactive dose rate evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotte, L.

    2011-01-01

    More than ever, it is essential today to develop simulation tools to rapidly evaluate the dose rate received by operators working on nuclear sites. In order to easily study numerous different scenarios of intervention, computation times of available softwares have to be all lowered. This mainly implies to accelerate the geometrical computations needed for the dose rate evaluation. These computations consist in finding and sorting the whole list of intersections between a big 3D scene and multiple groups of 'radiative' rays meeting at the point where the dose has to be measured. In order to perform all these computations in less than a second, we first propose a GPU algorithm that enables the efficient management of one big group of coherent rays. Then we present a modification of this algorithm that guarantees the robustness of the ray-triangle intersection tests through the elimination of the precision issues due to floating-point arithmetic. This modification does not require the definition of scene-dependent coefficients ('epsilon' style) and only implies a small loss of performance (less than 10%). Finally we propose an efficient strategy to handle multiple ray groups (corresponding to multiple radiative objects) which use the previous results.Thanks to these improvements, we are able to perform an interactive and robust dose rate evaluation on big 3D scenes: all of the intersections (more than 13 million) between 700 000 triangles and 12 groups of 100 000 rays each are found, sorted along each ray and transferred to the CPU in 470 milliseconds. (author) [fr

  3. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Iori, E-mail: sumida@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  4. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  5. Evaluating the maximum patient radiation dose in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Chida, K.; Sato, T.; Oosaka, H.; Tosa, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the X-ray systems that are used for cardiac interventional radiology provide no way to evaluate the patient maximum skin dose (MSD). The authors report a new method for evaluating the MSD by using the cumulative patient entrance skin dose (ESD), which includes a back-scatter factor and the number of cine-angiography frames during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Four hundred consecutive PCI patients (315 men and 85 women) were studied. The correlation between the cumulative ESD and number of cine-angiography frames was investigated. The irradiation and overlapping fields were verified using dose-mapping software. A good correlation was found between the cumulative ESD and the number of cine-angiography frames. The MSD could be estimated using the proportion of cine-angiography frames used for the main angle of view relative to the total number of cine-angiography frames and multiplying this by the cumulative ESD. The average MSD (3.0±1.9 Gy) was lower than the average cumulative ESD (4.6±2.6 Gy). This method is an easy way to estimate the MSD during PCI. (authors)

  6. Construction of Taiwanese Adult Reference Phantoms for Internal Dose Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Jun Chang

    Full Text Available In the internal dose evaluation, the specific absorbed fraction (SAF and S-value are calculated from the reference phantom based on Caucasian data. The differences in height and weight between Caucasian and Asian may lead to inaccurate dose estimation. In this study, we developed the Taiwanese reference phantoms. 40 volunteers were recruited. Magnetic resonance images (MRI were obtained, and the contours of 15 organs were drawn. The Taiwanese reference man (TRM and Taiwanese reference woman (TRW were constructed. For the SAF calculation, the differences in the self-absorption SAF (self-SAF between the TRM, TRW, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL adult phantom were less than 10% when the difference in organ mass was less than 20%. The average SAF from liver to pancreas of TRM was 38% larger than that of the ORNL adult phantom, and the result of TRW was 2.02 times higher than that of the ORNL adult phantom. For the S-value calculation, the ratios of TRW and ORNL adult phantom ranged from 0.91 to 1.57, and the ratios of TRM and ORNL adult phantom ranged from 1.04 to 2.29. The SAF and S-value results were dominantly affected by the height, weight, organ mass, and geometric relationship between organs. By using the TRM and TRW, the accuracy of internal dose evaluation can be increased for radiation protection and nuclear medicine.

  7. Study of hard X-ray dose enhancement effects for some kinds of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Guo Hong Xia; Chen Yu Sheng; Zhou Hui; He Chao Hui; Xie Ya Ning; Huang Yu Ying; He Wei; Hu Tian Dou

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results of X-ray dose enhancement effects are given for CMOS4069 and floating gate ROMs irradiated in Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility and in cobalt source. Shift of threshold voltage vs. total dose for CMOS4069 and the errors vs. total dose for 28f256 and 29c256 have been tested on line and the equivalent relation of total dose damage under the same accumulated dose is provided comparing the response of devices irradiated by X-ray and gamma-ray source. These results can be provided for X-ray radiation hardening technology as an effective evaluation data

  8. Analysis and evaluation of planned and delivered dose distributions: practical concerns with γ- and χ- Evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L J; Salomons, G; Holmes, O

    2013-01-01

    One component of clinical treatment validation, for example in the commissioning of new radiotherapy techniques or in patient specific quality assurance, is the evaluation and verification of planned and delivered dose distributions. Gamma and related tests (such as the chi evaluation) have become standard clinical tools for such work. Both functions provide quantitative comparisons between dose distributions, combining dose difference and distance to agreement criteria. However, there are some practical considerations in their utilization that can compromise the integrity of the tests, and these are occasionally overlooked especially when the tests are too readily adopted from commercial software. In this paper we review the evaluation tools and describe some practical concerns. The intent is to provide users with some guidance so that their use of these evaluations will provide valid rapid analysis and visualization of the agreement between planned and delivered dose distributions.

  9. A pre–postintervention study to evaluate the impact of dose calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Anas; Cavell, Gillian; Hinton, James; Wade, Paul; Whittlesea, Cate

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gentamicin and vancomycin are narrow-therapeutic-index antibiotics with potential for high toxicity requiring dose individualisation and continuous monitoring. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools have been effective in reducing gentamicin and vancomycin dosing errors. Online dose calculators for these drugs were implemented in a London National Health Service hospital. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses. Methods The study used a pre–postintervention design. Data were collected using electronic patient records and paper notes. Random samples of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses administered during the 8 months before implementation of the calculators were assessed retrospectively against hospital guidelines. Following implementation of the calculators, doses were assessed prospectively. Any gentamicin dose not within ±10% and any vancomycin dose not within ±20% of the guideline-recommended dose were considered incorrect. Results The intranet calculator pages were visited 721 times (gentamicin=333; vancomycin=388) during the 2-month period following the calculators’ implementation. Gentamicin dose errors fell from 61.5% (120/195) to 44.2% (95/215), pcalculator implementation, pcalculators significantly improved the prescribing of initial doses of these agents. Therefore, healthcare organisations should consider using such CDS tools to support the prescribing of these high-risk drugs. PMID:26044758

  10. A pre-postintervention study to evaluate the impact of dose calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Anas; Cavell, Gillian; Hinton, James; Wade, Paul; Whittlesea, Cate

    2015-06-04

    Gentamicin and vancomycin are narrow-therapeutic-index antibiotics with potential for high toxicity requiring dose individualisation and continuous monitoring. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools have been effective in reducing gentamicin and vancomycin dosing errors. Online dose calculators for these drugs were implemented in a London National Health Service hospital. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses. The study used a pre-postintervention design. Data were collected using electronic patient records and paper notes. Random samples of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses administered during the 8 months before implementation of the calculators were assessed retrospectively against hospital guidelines. Following implementation of the calculators, doses were assessed prospectively. Any gentamicin dose not within ± 10% and any vancomycin dose not within ± 20% of the guideline-recommended dose were considered incorrect. The intranet calculator pages were visited 721 times (gentamicin=333; vancomycin=388) during the 2-month period following the calculators' implementation. Gentamicin dose errors fell from 61.5% (120/195) to 44.2% (95/215), pcalculator implementation, pcalculators significantly improved the prescribing of initial doses of these agents. Therefore, healthcare organisations should consider using such CDS tools to support the prescribing of these high-risk drugs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Dose Evaluation and Quality Criteria in Dental Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gori, C.; Rossi, F.; Stecco, A.; Villari, N.; Zatelli, G

    2000-07-01

    Radioprotection in dental radiology is of particular interest in the framework of the Revised Medical Exposure Directive for the great number of examinations involving the adult as well as the paediatric population (Article 9: Special Practice). The present study is intended to find the quality criteria of orthodontic imaging and for evaluating the dose absorbed within the dental and maxillary volume in connection with radiological examinations performed with either spiral CT, dental panoramic tomography or teleradiography. The X ray dose to organs sited in the body, neck, ocular and intracranial area was measured using lithium fluoride dosemeters, positioned in a Rando phantom. Quality criteria have been established by an expert radiologist considering the diagnostic information obtained in the images. The dosimetric data obtained were comparable with other authors', although with some differences due to technical characteristics. These result data are useful for choosing the patient's diagnostic path, considering the radiobiological risk associated with increasing orthodontic imaging. (author)

  12. Dose Evaluation and Quality Criteria in Dental Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, C.; Rossi, F.; Stecco, A.; Villari, N.; Zatelli, G.

    2000-01-01

    Radioprotection in dental radiology is of particular interest in the framework of the Revised Medical Exposure Directive for the great number of examinations involving the adult as well as the paediatric population (Article 9: Special Practice). The present study is intended to find the quality criteria of orthodontic imaging and for evaluating the dose absorbed within the dental and maxillary volume in connection with radiological examinations performed with either spiral CT, dental panoramic tomography or teleradiography. The X ray dose to organs sited in the body, neck, ocular and intracranial area was measured using lithium fluoride dosemeters, positioned in a Rando phantom. Quality criteria have been established by an expert radiologist considering the diagnostic information obtained in the images. The dosimetric data obtained were comparable with other authors', although with some differences due to technical characteristics. These result data are useful for choosing the patient's diagnostic path, considering the radiobiological risk associated with increasing orthodontic imaging. (author)

  13. Organ and effective dose reduction in adult chest CT using abdominal lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iball, G R; Brettle, D S

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare organ and effective dose savings that could be achieved using conventional lead aprons and a new, custom-designed shield as out-of-plane shielding devices during chest CT scans. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure doses throughout the abdomen and pelvis during CT scans of the chest of a RANDO phantom. Dose measurements were made with no shielding, with lead aprons and with the new shield around the abdomen and pelvis in order to quantify the achievable organ and effective dose reductions. Average dose savings in the 10 phantom sections ranged from 5% to 78% with the highest point dose saving of 93% being found in the mid-pelvis. When shielding was used, the maximum measured organ dose reduction was a 72% dose saving to the testes. Significant dose savings were found throughout the abdomen and pelvis, which contributed to an effective dose saving of 4% that was achieved over and above the dose savings obtained through conventional optimisation strategies. This could yield significant population dose savings and reductions in collective radiation risk. In this study significant organ and effective dose reductions have been achieved through the use of abdominal shielding during chest CT examinations and it is therefore recommended that out-of-plane patient shielding devices should be used for all chest CT scans and potentially for every CT scan, irrespective of body part.

  14. Does iterative reconstruction lower CT radiation dose: evaluation of 15,000 examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Peter B; Renger, Bernhard; Fiebich, Martin; Münzel, Daniela; Fingerle, Alexander A; Rummeny, Ernst J; Dobritz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of 15,000 computed tomography (CT) examinations to investigate if iterative reconstruction (IR) reduces sustainably radiation exposure. Information from 15,000 CT examinations was collected, including all aspects of the exams such as scan parameter, patient information, and reconstruction instructions. The examinations were acquired between January 2010 and December 2012, while after 15 months a first generation IR algorithm was installed. To collect the necessary information from PACS, RIS, MPPS and structured reports a Dose Monitoring System was developed. To harvest all possible information an optical character recognition system was integrated, for example to collect information from the screenshot CT-dose report. The tool transfers all data to a database for further processing such as the calculation of effective dose and organ doses. To evaluate if IR provides a sustainable dose reduction, the effective dose values were statistically analyzed with respect to protocol type, diagnostic indication, and patient population. IR has the potential to reduce radiation dose significantly. Before clinical introduction of IR the average effective dose was 10.1±7.8mSv and with IR 8.9±7.1mSv (p*=0.01). Especially in CTA, with the possibility to use kV reduction protocols, such as in aortic CTAs (before IR: average14.2±7.8mSv; median11.4mSv /with IR:average9.9±7.4mSv; median7.4mSv), or pulmonary CTAs (before IR: average9.7±6.2mSV; median7.7mSv /with IR: average6.4±4.7mSv; median4.8mSv) the dose reduction effect is significant(p*=0.01). On the contrary for unenhanced low-dose scans of the cranial (for example sinuses) the reduction is not significant (before IR:average6.6±5.8mSv; median3.9mSv/with IR:average6.0±3.1mSV; median3.2mSv). The dose aspect remains a priority in CT research. Iterative reconstruction algorithms reduce sustainably and significantly radiation dose in the clinical routine. Our results illustrate that not only in studies with a limited

  15. Collective effective dose equivalent, population doses and risk estimates from occupational exposures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo; Mase, Naomichi.

    1993-01-01

    Collective dose equivalent and population dose from occupational exposures in Japan, 1988 were estimated on the basis of a nationwide survey. The survey was conducted on annual collective dose equivalents by sex, age group and type of radiation work for about 0.21 million workers except for the workers in nuclear power stations. The data on the workers in nuclear power stations were obtained from the official report of the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. The total number of workers including nuclear power stations was estimated to be about 0.26 million. Radiation works were subdivided as follows: medical works including dental; non-atomic energy industry; research and education; atomic energy industry and nuclear power station. For the determination of effective dose equivalent and population dose, organ or tissue doses were measured with a phantom experiment. The resultant doses were compared with the doses previously calculated using a chord length technique and with data from ICRP publications. The annual collective effective dose equivalent were estimated to be about 21.94 person·Sv for medical workers, 7.73 person·Sv for industrial workers, 0.75 person·Sv for research and educational workers, 2.48 person·Sv for atomic energy industry and 84.4 person ·Sv for workers in nuclear power station. The population doses were calculated to be about 1.07 Sv for genetically significant dose, 0.89 Sv for leukemia significant dose and 0.42 Sv for malignant significant dose. The population risks were estimated using these population doses. (author)

  16. Dose-response relationships in normal tissues and their evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Matsui, Masanori

    1990-01-01

    Radiotherapeutic effects can be defined as the ratio of radiation injuries in normal tissues to in cancer tissues. Much more attention has been paid to refractory delayed reaction rather than early reaction to normal tissues. Focusing on the reevaluation of the Rubin's and Casarett's data concerning delayed injuries in the cerebrospinal nerves, gastrointestinal organ, and lung tissues, this chapter compares tolerance doses of low LET radiation with those of high LET radiation, and discusses how normal tissue reaction is modified by the combination of antineoplastic agents, radiosensitizers, and/or hyperthermia. An effort is also made here to reevaluate daily hyperfractionation from the basic and clinical points of view. The information is allocated into the following 12 subjects: (1) radiation injury of the normal brain tissue after external radiotherapy for brain tumor; (2) treatment policies with active intention for brain tumor and tolerance doses for the nervous system; (3) radiation enteritis - mucosal regeneration and stromal reaction of the small intestine after irradiation; (4) tolerance doses for the small intestine and colon in carcinoma of the uterine cervix; (5) radiation tolerance of the normal lung - pulmonary radiation syndromes; (6) clinical study on development factors of radiation pneumonitis; (7) effect of repeated small doses of radiation on cell killing and repair capacity in plateau phase C3H10T1/2 cells; (8) fractionation and radiation injury - clinical aspect; (9) normal tissue tolerance to high LET radiotherapy; (10) tolerance doses for normal tissues by radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients; (11) radiosensitization of mouse intestinal epithelial cells with BrdR; (12) arterial blood flow changes after hyperthermia in the normal liver, brain, and small intestine. (N.K.)

  17. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  18. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  19. The absorbed dose and the effective dose of panoramic temporo mandibular joint radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Ayae; Gotoh, Kenichi; Yokoi, Midori; Hirukawa, Akiko; Okumura, Shinji; Okano, Tsuneichi; Koyama, Syuji

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the radiation doses absorbed by the patient during Panoramic temporo mandibular joint radiography (Panoramic TMJ), Schullers method and Orbitoramus projection. The dose of the frontal view in Panoramic TMJ was compared to that with Orbitoramus projection and the lateral view in Panoramic TMJ was compared to that with Schuellers method. We measured the doses received by various organs and calculated the effective doses using the guidelines of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in Publication 103. Organ absorbed doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom, loaded with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), located at 160 sensitive sites. The dose shows the sum value of irradiation on both the right and left sides. In addition, we set a few different exposure field sizes. The effective dose for a frontal view in Panoramic TMJ was 11 μSv, and that for the lateral view was 14 μSv. The lens of the Orbitoramus projection was 40 times higher than the frontal view in Panoramic TMJ. Although the effective dose of the lateral view in Panoramic TMJ was 3 times higher than that of the small exposure field (10 x 10 cm on film) in Schueller's method, it was the same as that of a mid-sized exposure field. When the exposure field in the inferior 1/3 was reduced during panoramic TMJ, the effective doses could be decreased. Therefore we recommend that the size of the exposure field in Panoramic TMJ be decreased. (author)

  20. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  1. Voxel-based frog phantom for internal dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinase, Sakae

    2008-01-01

    A voxel-based frog phantom has been developed for radiation protection of the environment. The voxel-based frog phantom was applied to evaluating self-absorbed fractions (self-AFs), which are defined as the fraction of energy emitted by a radiation source that is absorbed within the source organ. The self-AFs were evaluated for both photons and electrons in the spleen, kidneys, and liver using Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, self-S values (μGy/MBq·s) for 18 F and 90 Y in the organs were calculated using the results of the self-AFs. Consequently, the voxel-based frog phantom was found to be useful for the organ dose evaluations, which have not been proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It was also confirmed that the self-AFs and self-S values are largely dependent on the mass of the source organ. (author)

  2. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  3. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of impact to effective dose due to radionuclide carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujaniene, G.; Gudelis, A.

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of contamination of the Lithuanian territory after the Chernobyl accident were investigated. Evaluation based on measurements of activity concentration of 137 Cs, 239,240 Pu, 238 Pu, 241 Am and 90 Sr their activity ratio and physical chemical characteristics of their aerosol carriers indicated that the pollution was caused both by condensed and fuel components with different their contribution to the total atmospheric activity on different phases of the Chernobyl NPP accident. Studies of physical chemical forms of actinides showed that two type of fraction distribution were characteristic of aerosol samples Chernobyl origin. They could be interpreted as presence of fuel particles themselves in aerosol samples and possible transport of highly dispersed fuel component on the graphite particles and their burning products. Later the increase in activity concentration in the atmosphere in Lithuania was conditioned by two main sources of radionuclides. They are forest fires and resuspension products transferred from polluted regions. In order to understand better the influence of forest fires on the radionational situation the special fire experiment was performed in the highly contaminated Briansk region (Russia). Data on activity concentration, size distribution and physical chemical forms of aerosol carriers of radionuclides obtained from this experiment were used to estimate effective doses received from inhalation and ingestion of emitted radioactive particles. The calculations of effective doses received from inhalation of 137 Cs, 239,240 Pu, 238 Pu, 90 Sr and 241 Am during the Chernobyl accident in Vilnius showed that the activity concentrations of insoluble radionuclides contributed considerably into effective dozes received from inhalation. The results of calculation indicated that contribution of activities of water soluble and insoluble cesium and plutonium to the total effective dose differed more than by factor. The calculation of effective

  5. Scalp Dose Evaluation According Radiation Therapy Technique of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joon Yung; Park, Soo Yun; Kim, Jong Sik; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Opposing portal irradiation with helmet field shape that has been given to a patient with brain metastasis can cause excess dose in patient's scalp, resulting in hair loss. For this reason, this study is to quantitatively analyze scalp dose for effective prevention of hair loss by comparing opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy designed to protect patient's scalp with conventional radiation therapy. Scalp dose was measured by using three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO) after five thermo-luminescence dosimeters were positioned along center line of frontal lobe by using RANDO Phantom. Scalp dose and change in dose distribution were compared and analyzed with DVH after radiation therapy plan was made by using Radiation Treatment Planning System (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System, USA) and 6 MV X-ray (Clinac 6EX, VARIAN, USA). When surface dose of scalp by using thermo-luminescence dosimeters was measured, it was revealed that scalp dose decreased by average 87.44% at each point in MLC technique and that scalp dose decreased by average 88.03% at each point in TOMO compared with HELMET field therapy. In addition, when percentage of volume (V95%, V100%, V105% of prescribed dose) was calculated by using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) in order to evaluate the existence or nonexistence of hotspot in scalp as to three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO), it was revealed that MLC technique and TOMO plan had good dose coverage and did not have hot spot. Reducing hair loss of a patient who receives whole brain radiotherapy treatment can make a contribution to improve life quality of the patient. It is expected that making good use of opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy to protect scalp of a patient based on this study will reduce hair loss of a patient.

  6. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions.

  7. Effective dose and organ doses estimation taking tube current modulation into account with a commercial software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rendon, X. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, H.; Zanca, F. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, R. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the effect of including tube current modulation (TCM) versus using the average mAs in estimating organ and effective dose (E) using commercial software. Forty adult patients (24 females, 16 males) with normal BMI underwent chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) performed with TCM at 120 kVp, reference mAs of 110 (chest) and 200 (abdomen). Doses to fully irradiated organs (breasts, lungs, stomach, liver and ovaries) and E were calculated using two versions of a dosimetry software: v.2.0, which uses the average mAs, and v.2.2, which accounts for TCM by implementing a gender-specific mAs profile. Student's t-test was used to assess statistically significant differences between organ doses calculated with the two versions. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was found for E on chest and abdomen CT, with E being lower by 4.2 % when TCM is considered. Similarly, organ doses were also significantly lower (p < 0.001): 13.7 % for breasts, 7.3 % for lungs, 9.1 % for the liver and 8.5 % for the stomach. Only the dose to the ovaries was higher with TCM (11.5 %). When TCM is used, for the stylized phantom, the doses to lungs, breasts, stomach and liver decreased while the dose to the ovaries increased. (orig.)

  8. Effective dose and organ doses estimation taking tube current modulation into account with a commercial software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Rendon, X.; Bosmans, H.; Zanca, F.; Oyen, R.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of including tube current modulation (TCM) versus using the average mAs in estimating organ and effective dose (E) using commercial software. Forty adult patients (24 females, 16 males) with normal BMI underwent chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) performed with TCM at 120 kVp, reference mAs of 110 (chest) and 200 (abdomen). Doses to fully irradiated organs (breasts, lungs, stomach, liver and ovaries) and E were calculated using two versions of a dosimetry software: v.2.0, which uses the average mAs, and v.2.2, which accounts for TCM by implementing a gender-specific mAs profile. Student's t-test was used to assess statistically significant differences between organ doses calculated with the two versions. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was found for E on chest and abdomen CT, with E being lower by 4.2 % when TCM is considered. Similarly, organ doses were also significantly lower (p < 0.001): 13.7 % for breasts, 7.3 % for lungs, 9.1 % for the liver and 8.5 % for the stomach. Only the dose to the ovaries was higher with TCM (11.5 %). When TCM is used, for the stylized phantom, the doses to lungs, breasts, stomach and liver decreased while the dose to the ovaries increased. (orig.)

  9. Radiation dose evaluation in patients submitted to conventional radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly Junior, Joao G.

    1997-01-01

    This work presents the results of the evaluation of radiation dose delivered to the patients undergoing conventional radiological procedures. Based in the realized measurement some indicators are settled to quantitative appraisal of the radiological protection conditions offered to the population. Data assessment was done in the county of Curitiba, in Parana State, Brazil, from 12/95 to 04/96, in ten rooms of three different institutions, under 101 patients, adults with 70 ± 10 kg, during real examinations of chest PA, chest LAT and abdomen AP. (author)

  10. [Evaluation of methods to calculate dialysis dose in daily hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduell, F; Gutiérrez, E; Navarro, V; Torregrosa, E; Martínez, A; Rius, A

    2003-01-01

    Daily dialysis has shown excellent clinical results because a higher frequency of dialysis is more physiological. Different methods have been described to calculate dialysis dose which take into consideration change in frequency. The aim of this study was to calculate all dialysis dose possibilities and evaluate the better and practical options. Eight patients, 6 males and 2 females, on standard 4 to 5 hours thrice weekly on-line hemodiafiltration (S-OL-HDF) were switched to daily on-line hemodiafiltration (D-OL-HDF) 2 to 2.5 hours six times per week. Dialysis parameters were identical during both periods and only frequency and dialysis time of each session were changed. Time average concentration (TAC), time average deviation (TAD), normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), Kt/V, equilibrated Kt/V (eKt/V), equivalent renal urea clearance (EKR), standard Kt/V (stdKt/V), urea reduction ratio (URR), hemodialysis product and time off dialysis were measured. Daily on-line hemodiafiltration was well accepted and tolerated. Patients maintained the same TAC although TAD decreased from 9.7 +/- 2 in baseline to a 6.2 +/- 2 mg/dl after six months, p time off dialysis was reduced to half. Dialysis frequency is an important urea kinetic parameter which there are to take in consideration. It's necessary to use EKR, stdKt/V or weekly URR to calculate dialysis dose for an adequate comparison between different frequency dialysis schedules.

  11. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: Evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haedinger, U.; Thiele, W.; Wulf, J.

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial sterotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3%±2.3% (lung), 95.0%±4.5% (liver), and 92.1%±5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73±0.09 (lung), 0.77±0.10 (liver), and 0.70±0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields. (orig.) [de

  12. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús, E-mail: jesus.silva.rodriguez@sergas.es; Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Pombar, Miguel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Ruibal, Álvaro [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Fundación Tejerina, 28003, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  13. Estimation of effective dose to public from external exposure to natural background radiation in saudi arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The effective dose values in sixteen cities in Saudi Arabia due to external exposure to natural radiation were evaluated. These doses are based on natural background components including external exposure to terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. The importance of evaluating the effective dose to the public due to external exposure to natural background radiation lies in its epidemiological and dosimetric importance and in forming a basis for the assessment of the level of radioactive contamination or pollution in the environment in the future. The exposure to terrestrial radiation was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The exposure from cosmic radiation was determined using empirical correlation. The values evaluated for the total annual effective dose in all cities were within the world average values. The highest total annual effective dose measured in Al-Khamis city was 802 μSv/y, as compared to 305 μSv/y in Dammam city, which was considered the lowest value

  14. Radiation damage in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy: effects of dose and dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Karimi Nejadasl, Fatemeh; Vulovic, Milos; Koster, Abraham J.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of dose and dose-rate were investigated for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy using stroboscopic data collection. A dose-rate effect was observed favoring lower flux densities. Radiation damage is an important resolution limiting factor both in macromolecular X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Systematic studies in macromolecular X-ray crystallography greatly benefited from the use of dose, expressed as energy deposited per mass unit, which is derived from parameters including incident flux, beam energy, beam size, sample composition and sample size. In here, the use of dose is reintroduced for electron microscopy, accounting for the electron energy, incident flux and measured sample thickness and composition. Knowledge of the amount of energy deposited allowed us to compare doses with experimental limits in macromolecular X-ray crystallography, to obtain an upper estimate of radical concentrations that build up in the vitreous sample, and to translate heat-transfer simulations carried out for macromolecular X-ray crystallography to cryo-electron microscopy. Stroboscopic exposure series of 50–250 images were collected for different incident flux densities and integration times from Lumbricus terrestris extracellular hemoglobin. The images within each series were computationally aligned and analyzed with similarity metrics such as Fourier ring correlation, Fourier ring phase residual and figure of merit. Prior to gas bubble formation, the images become linearly brighter with dose, at a rate of approximately 0.1% per 10 MGy. The gradual decomposition of a vitrified hemoglobin sample could be visualized at a series of doses up to 5500 MGy, by which dose the sample was sublimed. Comparison of equal-dose series collected with different incident flux densities showed a dose-rate effect favoring lower flux densities. Heat simulations predict that sample heating will only become an issue for very large dose rates (50 e − Å −2 s

  15. Cumulative high doses of inhaled formoterol have less systemic effects in asthmatic children 6-11 years-old than cumulative high doses of inhaled terbutaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Rikke; Agertoft, Lone; Pedersen, Sören

    2004-01-01

    pressure (BP), ECG, plasma potassium, glucose, lactate, and adverse events were monitored up to 10 h to assess tolerability and relative systemic dose potency. RESULTS: Formoterol and terbutaline had significant beta2-adrenergic effects on most outcomes. Apart from the effect on systolic BP, QRS duration......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate high dose tolerability and relative systemic dose potency between inhaled clinically equipotent dose increments of formoterol and terbutaline in children. METHODS: Twenty boys and girls (6-11 years-old) with asthma and normal ECGs were studied. Ten doses of formoterol (Oxis...

  16. Effective dose equivalents from external radiation due to Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkin, V.G.; Debedev, O.V.; Balonov, M.I.; Parkhomenko, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized data on measurements of individual dose of external γ-sources in 1987-1990 of population of western areas of Bryansk region were presented. Type of distribution of effective dose equivalent, its significance for various professional and social groups of population depending on the type of the house was discussed. Dependences connecting surface soil activity in the populated locality with average dose of external radiation sources were presented. Tendency of dose variation in 1987-1990 was shown

  17. Air contamination measurements for the evaluation of internal dose to workers in nuclear medicine departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Massimi, B.; Bianchini, D.; Sarnelli, A.; D'Errico, V.; Marcocci, F.; Mezzenga, E.; Mostacci, D.

    2017-11-01

    Radionuclides handled in nuclear medicine departments are often characterized by high volatility and short half-life. It is generally difficult to monitor directly the intake of these short-lived radionuclides in hospital staff: this makes measuring air contamination of utmost interest. The aim of the present work is to provide a method for the evaluation of internal doses to workers in nuclear medicine, by means of an air activity sampling detector, to ensure that the limits prescribed by the relevant legislation are respected. A continuous air sampling system measures isotope concentration with a Nal(TI) detector. Energy efficiency of the system was assessed with GEANT4 and with known activities of 18F. Air is sampled in a number of areas of the nuclear medicine department of the IRST-IRCCS hospital (Meldola- Italy). To evaluate committed doses to hospital staff involved (doctors, technicians, nurses) different exposure situations (rooms, times, radionuclides etc) were considered. After estimating the intake, the committed effective dose has been evaluated, for the different radionuclides, using the dose coefficients mandated by the Italian legislation. Error propagation for the estimated intake and personal dose has been evaluated, starting from measurement statistics.

  18. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  19. Evaluation of radiation dose of triple rule-out coronary angiography protocols with different scan length using 256-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lee, Jason J.S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau (Macau) and Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Hsu, Shih-Ming, E-mail: smhsu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University No. 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    Triple rule-out coronary CT angiography (TRO-CTA) is a new approach for providing noninvasive visualization of coronary arteries with simultaneous evaluation of pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and other intrathoracic structures. The increasing use of TRO-CTA examination with longer scan length is associated with the concerns about radiation dose and their corresponding cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to evaluate organ dose and effective dose for the TRO-CTA examination with 2 scan lengths: TRO{sub std} and TRO{sub ext}, using 256-slice CT. TRO-CTA examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner without ECG-based tube current modulation. Absorbed organ doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermal-luminance dosimeters (TLDs). Effective dose was determined by taking a sum of the measured absorbed organ doses multiplied with the tissue weighting factor based on ICRP-103, and compared to that calculated using the dose-length product (DLP) method. We obtained high organ doses in the thyroid, esophagus, breast, heart and lung in both TRO-CTA protocols. Effective doses of the TRO{sub std} and TRO{sub ext} protocols with the phantom method were 26.37 and 42.49 mSv, while those with the DLP method were 19.68 and 38.96 mSv, respectively. Our quantitative dose information establishes a relationship between radiation dose and scanning length, and can provide a practical guidance to best clinical practice.

  20. Evaluation of radiation dose of triple rule-out coronary angiography protocols with different scan length using 256-slice CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lee, Jason J. S.; Chen, Liang-Kuang; Mok, Greta S. P.; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-10-01

    Triple rule-out coronary CT angiography (TRO-CTA) is a new approach for providing noninvasive visualization of coronary arteries with simultaneous evaluation of pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and other intrathoracic structures. The increasing use of TRO-CTA examination with longer scan length is associated with the concerns about radiation dose and their corresponding cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to evaluate organ dose and effective dose for the TRO-CTA examination with 2 scan lengths: TRO std and TRO ext, using 256-slice CT. TRO-CTA examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner without ECG-based tube current modulation. Absorbed organ doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermal-luminance dosimeters (TLDs). Effective dose was determined by taking a sum of the measured absorbed organ doses multiplied with the tissue weighting factor based on ICRP-103, and compared to that calculated using the dose-length product (DLP) method. We obtained high organ doses in the thyroid, esophagus, breast, heart and lung in both TRO-CTA protocols. Effective doses of the TRO std and TRO ext protocols with the phantom method were 26.37 and 42.49 mSv, while those with the DLP method were 19.68 and 38.96 mSv, respectively. Our quantitative dose information establishes a relationship between radiation dose and scanning length, and can provide a practical guidance to best clinical practice.

  1. Effect of low-dose gaseous ozone on pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontes Belchor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of chronically infected wounds is a challenge, and bacterial environmental contamination is a growing issue in infection control. Ozone may have a role in these situations. The objective of this study was to determine whether a low dose of gaseous ozone/oxygen mixture eliminates pathogenic bacteria cultivated in Petri dishes. Methods A pilot study with 6 bacterial strains was made using different concentrations of ozone in an ozone-oxygen mixture to determine a minimally effective dose that completely eliminated bacterial growth. The small and apparently bactericidal gaseous dose of 20 μg/mL ozone/oxygen (1:99 mixture, applied for 5min under atmospheric pressure was selected. In the 2nd phase, eight bacterial strains with well characterized resistance patterns were evaluated in vitro using agar-blood in adapted Petri dishes (105 bacteria/dish. The cultures were divided into 3 groups: 1- ozone-oxygen gaseous mixture containing 20 μg of O3/mL for 5 min; 2- 100% oxygen for 5 min; 3- baseline: no gas was used. Results The selected ozone dose was applied to the following eight strains: Escherichia coli, oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter baumannii susceptible only to carbapenems, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. All isolates were completely inhibited by the ozone-oxygen mixture while growth occurred in the other 2 groups. Conclusion A single topical application by nebulization of a low ozone dose completely inhibited the growth of all potentially pathogenic bacterial strains with known resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  2. Individually dosed omalizumab: an effective treatment for severe peanut allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandström, J; Vetander, M; Lilja, G; Johansson, S G O; Sundqvist, A-C; Kalm, F; Nilsson, C; Nopp, A

    2017-04-01

    Treatment with omalizumab has shown a positive effect on food allergies, but no dosages are established. Basophil allergen threshold sensitivity (CD-sens) can be used to objectively measure omalizumab treatment efficacy and correlates with the outcome of double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge to peanut. To evaluate whether individualized omalizumab treatment monitored by CD-sens could be an effective intervention for suppression of allergic reactions to peanut. Severely peanut allergic adolescents (n = 23) were treated with omalizumab for 8 weeks, and CD-sens was analysed before and after. Based on whether CD-sens was suppressed after 8 weeks, the patients either were subject to a peanut challenge or received eight more weeks with increased dose of omalizumab, followed by peanut challenge or another 8-week cycle of omalizumab. IgE and IgE-antibodies to peanut and its components were analysed before treatment. After individualized omalizumab treatment (8-24 weeks), all patients continued with an open peanut challenge with no (n = 18) or mild (n = 5) objective allergic symptoms. Patients (n = 15) needing an elevated omalizumab dose (ED) to suppress CD-sens had significantly higher CD-sens values at baseline 1.49 (0.44-20.5) compared to those (n = 8) who managed with normal dose (ND) 0.32 (0.24-5.5) (P omalizumab, monitored by CD-sens, is an effective and safe treatment for severe peanut allergy. The ratio of IgE-ab to storage protein Ara h 2/IgE as well as CD-sens to peanut may predict the need of a higher omalizumab dose. Clinical trials numbers: EudraCT; 2012-005625-78, ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT02402231. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of the radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDIVOL) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to ...

  4. Evaluation of patient radiation doses using DAP meter in interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Byung Sam [Dept. of Radiological Technology. Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Su [Dept. of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu Univeristy, Kyushu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The author investigated interventional radiology patient doses in several other countries, assessed accuracy of DAP meters embedded in intervention equipment in domestic country, conducted measurement of patient doses for 13 major interventional procedures with use of Dose Area Product(DAP) meters from 23 hospitals in Korea, and referred to 8,415 cases of domestic data related to interventional procedures by radiation exposure after evaluation the actual effective of dose reduction variables through phantom test. Finally, dose reference level for major interventional procedures was suggested. In this study, guidelines for patient doses were 237.7 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TACE, 17.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in AVF, 114.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in LE PTA and STENT, 188.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TFCA, 383.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Aneurysm Coil, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PTBD, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Biliary Stent, 22.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCN, 4.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Hickman, 2.8 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Chemo-port, 4.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Perm-Cather, 17.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCD, and 357.9 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Vis, EMB. Dose reference level acquired in this study is considered to be able to use as minimal guidelines for reducing patient dose in the interventional radiology procedures. For the changes and advances of materials and development of equipment and procedures in the interventional radiology procedures, further studies and monitoring are needed on dose reference level Korean DAP dose conversion factor for the domestic procedures.

  5. Technology Development for Radiation Dose Measurement and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Hwan; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, T. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The correction factors essential for the operation of In-Vivo counting system were produced and implemented into a field operation for the improvement of accuracy in measurement of the radioactivity inside a human body. The BiDAS2007 code which calculate an internal dose was developed by upgrading the former code prepared in the previous stage of this project. The method of using the multibioassy data, the maximum likelihood function and the Bayesian statistics were established to an internal dose based on the measurement data of radioactivity, intakes and retention of radioactivity in a human body and it can improve the accuracy in estimation of the intakes of radioactivity and the committed effective dose equivalent. In order to solve the problem of low detection efficiency of the conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) to a high energy neutron, the extended BS's were manufactured and the technique for neutron field spectrometry was established. The fast neutron and gamma spectrometry system with a BC501A scintillation detector was also prepared. Several neutron fluence spectra at several nuclear facilities were measured and collected by using the extended BS. The spectrum weighted responses of some neutron monitoring instruments were also derived by using these spectra and the detector response functions. A high efficient TL material for the neutron personal dosimeter was developed. It solved the main problem of low thermal stability and high residual dose of the commercial TLDs and has the sensitivity to neutron and to gamma radiation with 40 and 10 times higher respectively than them.

  6. Ultra-low dose naltrexone potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of low dose morphine on clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honar, H; Riazi, K; Homayoun, H; Sadeghipour, H; Rashidi, N; Ebrahimkhani, M R; Mirazi, N; Dehpour, A R

    2004-01-01

    Significant potentiation of analgesic effects of opioids can be achieved through selective blockade of their stimulatory effects on intracellular signaling pathways by ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists. However, the generality and specificity of this interaction is not well understood. The bimodal modulation of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold by opioids provide a model to assess the potential usefulness of this approach in seizure disorders and to examine the differential mechanisms involved in opioid anti- (morphine at 0.5-3 mg/kg) versus pro-convulsant (20-100 mg/kg) effects. Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (100 fg/kg-10 ng/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of morphine at 0.5 mg/kg while higher degrees of opioid receptor antagonism blocked this effect. Moreover, inhibition of opioid-induced excitatory signaling by naltrexone (1 ng/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of morphine (1 ng/kg-100 microg/kg), suggesting that a presumed inhibitory component of opioid receptor signaling can exert strong seizure-protective effects even at very low levels of opioid receptor activation. However, ultra-low dose naltrexone could not increase the maximal anticonvulsant effect of morphine (1-3 mg/kg), possibly due to a ceiling effect. The proconvulsant effects of morphine on seizure threshold were minimally altered by ultra-low doses of naltrexone while being completely blocked by a higher dose (1 mg/kg) of the antagonist. The present data suggest that ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility, especially in conjunction with very low doses of opioids.

  7. Evaluation of patient absorbed dose in a PET-CT test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra P, F.; Mourao F, A. P.; Santana, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    Images of PET-CT has important diagnostic applications, especially in oncology. This equipment allows overlapping of functional images obtained from the administration of radionuclides and anatomical, generated by X-rays. The PET-CT technique may generate higher doses in patients due to the fact that two diagnostic modalities are used in a single examination. A whole body CT scan is performed and in sequence, a capture of the signal generated by the photons emitted is done. In this study, the absorbed and effective doses generated by the CT scan and incorporated by the administration of the radionuclide were evaluated in 19 organs. To evaluate the CT dose, 32 radiochromic film strips were correctly positioned into the anthropomorphic male phantom. The CT protocol performed was whole-body scanning and a high-resolution lung scan. This protocol is currently used in most services. The calculation of the effective dose from the injected activity in the patient was performed using the ICRP 106 Biokinetic model (ICRP 106, 2008). The activity to be injected may vary according to the patients body mass and with the sensitivity of the detector. The mass of the simulator used is 73.5 kg, then the simulation with and injected activity of 244.76 MBq was used. It was observed that 87.4% of the effective dose in examination PET/CT comes from the CT scans, being 63.8% of the whole body scan and 23.6% of high resolution lung scan. Using activity of 0.09 mCi x kg 18 F-FDG radiopharmaceutical contributes only 12.6% of the final effective dose. As a conclusion, it was observed that the dose in patients submitted to the 18 F-FDG PET-CT examination is high, being of great value efforts for its reduction, such as the use of appropriate image acquisition techniques and promoting the application of the principle of optimization of practice. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of the absorbed dose in odontological computerized tomography; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em tomografia computadorizada odontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnani, Adriano; Schelin, Hugo R.; Rocha, Anna Silvia P.S. da, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: anna@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluated the absorbed dose at the surface entry known as 'cone beam computed tomography' (CBCT) in odontological computerized tomography. Examination were simulated with CBCT for measurements of dose. A phantom were filled with water, becoming scatter object of radiation. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned on points correspondent to eyes and salivary glands

  9. Evaluation of genotype-guided acenocoumarol dosing algorithms in Russian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, Dmitriy Alexeyevich; Rozhkov, Aleksandr Vladimirovich; Ananichuk, Anna Viktorovna; Kazakov, Ruslan Evgenyevich

    2017-05-24

    Acenocoumarol dose is normally determined via step-by-step adjustment process based on International Normalized Ratio (INR) measurements. During this time, the risk of adverse reactions is especially high. Several genotype-based acenocoumarol dosing algorithms have been created to predict ideal doses at the start of anticoagulant therapy. Nine dosing algorithms were selected through a literature search. These were evaluated using a cohort of 63 patients with atrial fibrillation receiving acenocoumarol therapy. None of the existing algorithms could predict the ideal acenocoumarol dose in 50% of Russian patients. The Wolkanin-Bartnik algorithtm based on European population was the best-performing one with the highest correlation values (r=0.397), mean absolute error (MAE) 0.82 (±0.61). EU-PACT also managed to give an estimate within the ideal range in 43% of the cases. The two least accurate results were yielded by the Indian population-based algorithms. Among patients receiving amiodarone, algorithms by Schie and Tong proved to be the most effective with the MAE of 0.48±0.42 mg/day and 0.56±0.31 mg/day, respectively. Patient ethnicity and amiodarone intake are factors that must be considered when building future algorithms. Further research is required to find the perfect dosing formula of acenocoumarol maintenance doses in Russian patients.

  10. Effective doses to family members of patients treated with radioiodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocovska, M Zdraveska; Vaskova, O; Majstorov, V; Kuzmanovska, S; Gjorceva, D Pop; Jokic, V Spasic

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose to family members of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine-131, and also to compare the results with dose constraints proposed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the estimation of the effective doses, sixty family members of sixty patients, treated with radioiodine-131, and thermoluminiscent dosimeters (Model TLD 100) were used. Thyroid cancer patients were hospitalized for three days, while hyperthyroid patients were treated on out-patient basis. The family members wore TLD in front of the torso for seven days. The radiation doses to family members of thyroid cancer patients were well below the recommended dose constraint of 1 mSv. The mean value of effective dose was 0.21 mSv (min 0.02 - max 0.51 mSv). Effective doses, higher than 1 mSv, were detected for 11 family members of hyperthyroid patients. The mean value of effective dose of family members of hyperthyroid patients was 0.87 mSv (min 0.12 - max 6.79). The estimated effective doses to family members of hyperthyroid patients were higher than the effective doses to family members of thyroid carcinoma patients. These findings may be considered when establishing new national guidelines concerning radiation protection and release of patients after a treatment with radioiodine therapy.

  11. Evaluation of doses in conventional radiology in the cities of Rio de Janeiro e Recife, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Ana Cecilia P.; Osibote, Adelaja O.; Khoury, Helen J.

    2005-01-01

    This work is part of a program of evaluating doses in patients developed in several hospitals in the States of Rio de Janeiro and Pernambuco. We used the program DoseCal to evaluate the Input Skin Dose (DEP) and the Effective Dose (DE) in big public hospitals in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Recife. It were included in the survey the doses of chest radiographs, cervical spine, lumbar spine, skull and pelvis in the projections AP, PA and LAT. To chest in PA the average value of DEP for the hospital A was 0.19 mGy. For to hospital B was 0.07 mGy. For the exam of the skull in PA the average value in A was 3.25 mGy and B of 0.49 mGy. With respect to radiological techniques might be noted that in most cases the hospital A used kilovoltage lower than in B and miliamperes higher. This can be one of the explanations for the difference of the values found for DEP and DE. The results showed significant discrepancies in values of doses as radiographic techniques when compared to the requirements established by the European Community for X-rays with image quality. This result is due to several factors: filtration, radiographic technique, professional technical experience and performance of radiographic equipment

  12. Effect of Dose Rate Variation on Dose Distribution in IMRT with a Dynamic Multileaf Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyoung Dal; Jae, Young Wan; Yoon, Il Kyu; Lee, Jae Hee; Yoo, Suk Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate dose distribution differences when the dose rates are randomly changed in intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a dynamic multileaf collimator. Two IMRT treatment plans including small-field and large-field plans were made using a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan had three sub-plans according to various dose rates of 100, 400, and 600 MU/min. A chamber array (2D-Array Seven729, PTW-Freiburg) was positioned between solid water phantom slabs to give measurement depth of 5 cm and backscattering depth of 5 cm. Beam deliveries were performed on the array detector using a 6 MV beam of a linear accelerator (Clinac 21EX, Varian, Palo Alto, CA) equipped with 120-leaf MLC (Millenium 120, Varian). At first, the beam was delivered with same dose rates as planned to obtain reference values. After the standard measurements, dose rates were then changed as follows: 1) for plans with 100 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min, 2) for plans with 400 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 500 and 600 MU/min, 3) for plans with 600 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Finally, using an analysis software (Verisoft 3.1, PTW-Freiburg), the dose difference and distribution between the reference and dose-rate-varied measurements was evaluated. For the small field plan, the local dose differences were -0.8, -1.1, -1.3, -1.5, and -1.6% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100 MU/min reference), +0.9, +0.3, +0.1, -0.2, and -0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 400 MU/min reference) and +1.4, +0.8, +0.5, +0.3, and +0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 MU/min, respectively (for 600 MU/min reference). On the other hand, for the large field plan, the pass-rate differences were -1.3, -1.6, -1.8, -2.0, and -2.4% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100

  13. Neuromuscular responses to incremental caffeine doses: performance and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallarés, Jesús G; Fernández-Elías, Valentín E; Ortega, Juan F; Muñoz, Gloria; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Mora-Rodríguez, Ricardo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the oral dose of caffeine needed to increase muscle force and power output during all-out single multijoint movements. Thirteen resistance-trained men underwent a battery of muscle strength and power tests in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, under four different conditions: (a) placebo ingestion (PLAC) or with caffeine ingestion at doses of (b) 3 mg · kg(-1) body weight (CAFF 3mg), (c) 6 mg · kg(-1) (CAFF 6mg), and (d) 9 mg · kg(-1) (CAFF 9mg). The muscle strength and power tests consisted in the measurement of bar displacement velocity and muscle power output during free-weight full-squat (SQ) and bench press (BP) exercises against four incremental loads (25%, 50%, 75%, and 90% one-repetition maximum [1RM]). Cycling peak power output was measured using a 4-s inertial load test. Caffeine side effects were evaluated at the end of each trial and 24 h later. Mean propulsive velocity at light loads (25%-50% 1RM) increased significantly above PLAC for all caffeine doses (5.4%-8.5%, P = 0.039-0.003). At the medium load (75% 1RM), CAFF 3mg did not improve SQ or BP muscle power or BP velocity. CAFF 9mg was needed to enhance BP velocity and SQ power at the heaviest load (90% 1RM) and cycling peak power output (6.8%-11.7%, P = 0.03-0.05). The CAFF 9mg trial drastically increased the frequency of the adverse side effects (15%-62%). The ergogenic dose of caffeine required to enhance neuromuscular performance during a single all-out contraction depends on the magnitude of load used. A dose of 3 mg · kg(-1) is enough to improve high-velocity muscle actions against low loads, whereas a higher caffeine dose (9 mg · kg(-1)) is necessary against high loads, despite the appearance of adverse side effects.

  14. Computing effective doses to pediatric patients undergoing body CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M

    2008-04-01

    The computation of patient effective doses to children is of particular interest given the relatively high doses received from this imaging modality, as well as the increased utilization of CT in all areas of medicine. Current methods for computing effective doses to children are relatively complex, and it would be useful to develop a simple method of computing pediatric effective doses for clinical purposes that could be used by radiologists and technologists. To obtain pediatric effective doses for body CT examinations by the use of adult effective doses obtained from effective dose (E) per unit dose length product (DLP) coefficients, and energy imparted to a child relative to an adult. Adult E/DLP coefficients were obtained at 120 kV using the ImPACT CT dosimetry spreadsheet. Patients were modeled as cylinders of water, and values of energy imparted to cylinders of varying radii were generated using Monte Carlo modeling. The amounts of energy imparted to the chest and abdomen of children relative to adults (R(en)) were obtained. Pediatric effective doses were obtained using scaling factors that accounted for scan length, mAs, patient weight, and relative energy imparted (R(en)). E/DLP values were about 16 microSv/mGy cm for males and about 19 microSv/mGy cm for females. R(en) at 120 kV for newborns was 0.35 for the chest and 0.49 for the abdomen. At constant mAs, the effective dose to 6-month-old patients undergoing chest CT examinations was found to be about 50% higher than that to adults, and for abdominal examinations about 100% higher. Adult effective doses can be obtained using DLP data and can be scaled to provide corresponding pediatric effective doses from body examinations on the same CT scanner.

  15. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  16. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampado, Osvaldo, E-mail: orampado@cittadellasalute.to.it; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Ropolo, Roberto [Struttura Complessa Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Città della Salute e della Scienza, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Turin, Torino 10126 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate various approaches for assessing patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT (CBCT), by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms, a Monte Carlo based dose calculation software, and different dose indicators as presently defined. Methods: Dose evaluations were performed on a CBCT Elekta XVI (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for different protocols and anatomical regions. The first part of the study focuses on using PCXMC software (PCXMC 2.0, STUK, Helsinki, Finland) for calculating organ doses, adapting the input parameters to simulate the exposure geometry, and beam dose distribution in an appropriate way. The calculated doses were compared to readouts of TLDs placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. After this validation, the software was used for analyzing organ dose variability associated with patients’ differences in size and gender. At the same time, various dose indicators were evaluated: kerma area product (KAP), cumulative air-kerma at the isocenter (K{sub air}), cone-beam dose index, and central cumulative dose. The latter was evaluated in a single phantom and in a stack of three adjacent computed tomography dose index phantoms. Based on the different dose indicators, a set of coefficients was calculated to estimate organ doses for a range of patient morphologies, using their equivalent diameters. Results: Maximum organ doses were about 1 mGy for head and neck and 25 mGy for chest and pelvis protocols. The differences between PCXMC and TLDs doses were generally below 10% for organs within the field of view and approximately 15% for organs at the boundaries of the radiation beam. When considering patient size and gender variability, differences in organ doses up to 40% were observed especially in the pelvic region; for the organs in the thorax, the maximum differences ranged between 20% and 30%. Phantom dose indexes provided better correlation with organ

  17. Comparison of organ dosimetry methods and effective dose calculation methods for paediatric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Z; Cain, T M; Johnston, P N

    2012-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the single biggest ionising radiation risk from anthropogenic exposure. Reducing unnecessary carcinogenic risks from this source requires the determination of organ and tissue absorbed doses to estimate detrimental stochastic effects. In addition, effective dose can be used to assess comparative risk between exposure situations and facilitate dose reduction through optimisation. Children are at the highest risk from radiation induced carcinogenesis and therefore dosimetry for paediatric CT recipients is essential in addressing the ionising radiation health risks of CT scanning. However, there is no well-defined method in the clinical environment for routinely and reliably performing paediatric CT organ dosimetry and there are numerous methods utilised for estimating paediatric CT effective dose. Therefore, in this study, eleven computational methods for organ dosimetry and/or effective dose calculation were investigated and compared with absorbed doses measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters placed in a physical anthropomorphic phantom representing a 10 year old child. Three common clinical paediatric CT protocols including brain, chest and abdomen/pelvis examinations were evaluated. Overall, computed absorbed doses to organs and tissues fully and directly irradiated demonstrated better agreement (within approximately 50 %) with the measured absorbed doses than absorbed doses to distributed organs or to those located on the periphery of the scan volume, which showed up to a 15-fold dose variation. The disparities predominantly arose from differences in the phantoms used. While the ability to estimate CT dose is essential for risk assessment and radiation protection, identifying a simple, practical dosimetry method remains challenging.

  18. A consideration on internal dose evaluation and intervention based on a surface contamination concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, H.

    1997-01-01

    Long-term radiation doses received by the inhabitants after the Chernobyl accident have been evaluated according to the surface contamination levels on the ground surface. The health effects have also been discussed by comparison between the surface-contaminated area and the uncontaminated control area. Selected protective measures were carried out in accordance with the contamination level of surface soil. These have been based on the 'surface contamination concept' which assumes that the radiation risk to inhabitants is proportional to the level of ground-surface contamination. The observations collected in regions around Chernobyl, however, show that the internal radiation doses to the inhabitants poorly correlate with the surface contamination level. This fact poses a question on the suitability of dose evaluations and interventions based on this concept

  19. Cumulative effects of repeated subthreshold doses of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, J.A.; Zaynoun, S.; Anderson, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    For fair Caucasian skin, the minimal delayed erythema dose (MED) 24 hr after exposure to broadband UVA is about 1200 times greater than the MED of broadband UVB, for both single and multiple daily exposures. Repeated daily exposure to doses less than MED results in cumulative effects manifest by gradual lowering of the daily dose threshold for delayed erythema and pigmentation induced by UVA or UVB. At threshold doses, UVB is more erythemogenic than melanogenic; the opposite is true for UVA. Repeated daily UVA exposure greatly enhances melanogenesis such that markedly suberythemogenic exposure doses of UVA result in true melanogenesis

  20. The rationale and a computer evaluation of a gamma irradiation sterilization dose determination method for medical devices using a substerilization incremental dose sterility test protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K W; Strawderman, W E; Whitby, J L

    1984-08-01

    The experimental procedure described is designed to allow calculation of the radiation sterilization dose for medical devices to any desired standard of sterility assurance. The procedure makes use of the results of a series of sterility tests on device samples exposed to doses of radiation from 0.2 to 1.8 Mrad in 0.2 Mrad increments. From the sterility test data a 10(-2) sterility level dose is determined. A formula is described that allows a value called DS Mrad to be calculated. This is an estimate of the effective radiation resistance of the heterogeneous microbial population remaining in the tail portion of the inactivation curve at the 10(-2) dose and above. DS Mrad is used as a D10 value and is applied, in conjunction with the 10(-2) sterility level dose, to an extrapolation factor to estimate a sufficient radiation sterilization dose. A computer simulation of the substerilization process has been carried out. This has allowed an extensive evaluation of the procedure, and the sterilization dose obtained from calculation to be compared with the actual dose required. Good agreement was obtained with most microbial populations examined, but examples of both overdosing and underdosing were found with microbial populations containing a proportion of organisms displaying pronounced shoulder inactivation kinetics. The method allows the radiation sterilization dose to be derived from the natural resistance of the microbial population to gamma sterilization.

  1. The effect of rare-earth filtration on organ doses in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asako, Satoshi; Satoh, Kenji; Furumoto, Keiichi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-08-01

    Filters of rare-earth elements such as lanthanum (La, Z=57), samarium (Sm, Z=62), gadolinium (Gd, Z=64) and erbium (Er, Z=68) are frequently used in radiography for the purpose of reducing the patient dose by eliminating low-energy and high-energy X-rays which are not involved in imaging. It is useful to evaluate the dose reduction achieved by these rare-earth filters in terms of organ dose, and the effective dose equivalent, which is used for evaluating carcinogenic risks and hereditary effects of X-ray irradiation, for the purpose of optimizing the radiographic technique and radiation protection. Therefore, we calculated the organ dose and effective dose equivalent during intraoral radiography of the maxillary incisor region by simulation using samarium or erbium, typical rare-earth elements, in filtration. We evaluated the effects of these metals in dose reduction. When samarium or erbium, 0.1 mm thick, was used in added filtration at tube voltage of 60, 70, 80 and 90 kV, the time required for radiography almost doubled, respectively. The organ dose at each tube voltage was the largest in the parathyroid and thyroid glands, followed by bone surfaces and the optic lenses, skin, red bone marrow and salivary glands, larynx, and brain, in that order. The organ dose at sites other than the larynx and brain decreased as the quality of the incident X-ray beam was hardened. When samarium or erbium was added at each voltage, the effective dose equivalent was reduced by about 20% to 45%. Erbium was more effective than samarium in reducing the effective dose equivalent, and either of the two elements decreased its effectiveness with an increase in tube voltage. (author) 43 refs.

  2. Evaluation of the enter surface dose, dose in organ and E effective dose, received by personnel and patients in studies of endoscopic retrograde cholangeopancreatography in the General Hospital of Mexico; Evaluacion de la dosis de entrada superficie, dosis en organo y dosis efectiva E, recibidas por personal y pacientes en estudios de colangiopancreatografia retrograda endoscopica en el Hospital General de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, S.; Gama T, G. [Calidad XXI SA de CV, Zacatecas 67-007 Col. Roma, 06700 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Beristain, M.; Espino, H. [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: cxxi@prodigy.net.mx

    2006-07-01

    The ESD for patient and personal is measured: gastroenterologuist endoscopist G1, A1 Assistant and A2 instrumentist that carried out 22 independent therapeutic procedures of CPRE, in a fluoroscopy equipment Toshiba trademark with tube under the table, operated in automatic exposure mode, CAE to average tensions of 80 kVp. The measurement is carried out with film dosemeters of double emulsion Kodak Type 2 trademark, calibrated in terms of H{sup *} for the energy of the {sup 137} Cs, first it is determined the films sensitivity like function of the optical density DO, and second the ESD for the effective energy of the radiation beam (50 keV), in three different points from the dosemeter (C, D and H). The films was placed for the personnel in: right hand, front (eye), thyroid and thorax (under D and out F of the lead apron); in the case of the patient three positions were used: thorax, hepatic region and pelvis. The mean values of the ESD and it standard deviation SD in mGy units are determined by: study, personnel, film position in doctor and patient, dosemeter measurement point. The calculated doses in organ are also determined for the patient in the thorax region, liverwort and pelvis its are agreement with the NRPB SR 262 report. Finally the H{sub E} and E for medical personnel and patients are estimated demonstrating that its are not exceeded the annual dose limits for the case of the OEP. In the case of the the OEP have for the D thorax an ESD{sub max} = 0.04 mGy that one corresponds an H{sub E} = 0.02 and E = 0.01 mSv. (Author)

  3. Evaluation of occupational dose from the special procedures guided by fluoroscopy: cardiac catheterism; Avaliacao da dose ocupacional oriunda dos procedimentos especiais guiados por fluoroscopia: cateterismo cardiaco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Amanda Juliene da

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by health professionals in the hemodynamic sector of a university hospital in Sao Paulo city. A self-applied questionnaire was used to delineate the profile of health professionals, taking into account sociodemographic variables and variables related to the work with ionizing radiation. The assessment of occupational doses was performed by consulting of the individual dose records of the institution database from 2000 to 2009. A total of 240 records was evaluated, corresponding to 38 active professionals (2009), divided in different professional category: physician, nurses, radiologic technologists and nursing assistants. The annual doses were compared with the limits established by national regulatory authorities. Based on the effective doses received and recorded during the studied period, experimental measures were performed with TL dosimeters in five physicians to evaluate the equivalent dose, in the left hand, during hemodynamic procedures. In addition, the radioprotection measures adopted by health professionals were verified. This study allowed delineating the profile of medical staff that integrates the hemodynamic service as well as knowing the distribution of their doses in relation to limits over the years. (author)

  4. Page 1 ~'----------------------------- Dose-dependent effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract We cOInpared the serwn levels of oestrogen and progesterone and the endoInetrial Inorphology of. nOrInal pregnant rats at 5,5 days' gestation ~th those of pregnant rats given either low (10 IU) or high (20 IU) doses of two gonadotrophins: follicle-. stiInulating hOrInone (FSH) and hwnan chorionic gonadotrophin ...

  5. Experimental study on x-rays dose enhancement effects for floating gate ROMs

    CERN Document Server

    Guo Hong Xia; Chen Yu Sheng; Han Fu Bin; He Chao Hui; Zhao Hui

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results of x-ray dose enhancement effects are given for floating gate read-only memory (ROMs) irradiated in the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The wrong byte numbers vs. total irradiation dose have been tested and the equivalent relation of total dose damage is provided compared the response of devices irradiated with sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-ray source. The x-ray dose enhancement factors for floating gate ROMs are obtained firstly in China. These results can be an effective evaluation data for x-rays radiation hardening technology

  6. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) assisted performance evaluation of the Twincer (TM) disposable high-dose dry powder inhaler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anne H.; Hagedoorn, Paul; Woolhouse, Robert; Wynn, Ed

    Objectives To use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for evaluating and understanding the performance of the high-dose disposable Twincer (TM) dry powder inhaler, as well as to learn the effect of design modifications on dose entrainment, powder dispersion and retention behaviour. Methods Comparison

  7. Vaginal dose assessment in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Can we really rely on dose-point evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limkin, Elaine Johanna; Dumas, Isabelle; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Chargari, Cyrus; Maroun, Pierre; Annède, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Seisen, Thomas; Doyeux, Kaya; Tailleur, Anne; Martinetti, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Haie-Meder, Christine; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Although dose-volume parameters in image-guided brachytherapy have become a standard, the use of posterior-inferior border of the pubic symphysis (PIBS) points has been recently proposed in the reporting of vaginal doses. The aim was to evaluate their pertinence. Nineteen patients who received image-guided brachytherapy after concurrent radiochemotherapy were included. Per treatment, CT scans were performed at Days 2 and 3, with reporting of the initial dwell positions and times. Doses delivered to the PIBS points were evaluated on each plan, considering that they were representative of one-third of the treatment. The movements of the applicator according to the PIBS point were analysed. Mean prescribed doses at PIBS -2, PIBS, PIBS +2 were, respectively, 2.23 ± 1.4, 6.39 ± 6.6, and 31.85 ± 36.06 Gy. Significant differences were observed between the 5 patients with vaginal involvement and the remaining 14 at the level of PIBS +2 and PIBS: +47.60 Gy and +7.46 Gy, respectively (p = 0.023 and 0.03). The variations between delivered and prescribed doses at PIBS points were not significant. However, at International commission on radiation units and measurements rectovaginal point, the delivered dose was decreased by 1.43 ± 2.49 Gy from the planned dose (p = 0.019). The delivered doses at the four points were strongly correlated with the prescribed doses with R(2) ranging from 0.93 to 0.95. The movements of the applicator in regard of the PIBS point assessed with the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates were insignificant. The doses evaluated at PIBS points are not impacted by intrafractional movements. PIBS and PIBS +2 dose points allow distinguishing the plans of patients with vaginal infiltration. Further studies are needed to correlate these parameters with vaginal morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals: introduction to drug evaluation and dose estimation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Lawrence E

    2011-01-01

    ...), absorbed dose method for imaging agents, vivo methods for obtaining activity data, errors of activity estimation techniques, phantom-based and patient-based dose estimates and their associated...

  9. Dose rate-dependent marrow toxicity of TBI in dogs and marrow sparing effect at high dose rate by dose fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storb, R; Raff, R F; Graham, T; Appelbaum, F R; Deeg, H J; Schuening, F G; Sale, G; Seidel, K

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the marrow toxicity of 200 and 300 cGy total-body irradiation (TBI) delivered at 10 and 60 cGy/min, respectively, in dogs not rescued by marrow transplant. Additionally, we compared toxicities after 300 cGy fractionated TBI (100 cGy fractions) to that after single-dose TBI at 10 and 60 cGy/min. Marrow toxicities were assessed on the basis of peripheral blood cell count changes and mortality from radiation-induced pancytopenia. TBI doses studied were just below the dose at which all dogs die despite optimal support. Specifically, 18 dogs were given single doses of 200 cGy TBI, delivered at either 10 (n=13) or 60 (n=5) cGy/min. Thirty-one dogs received 300 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min, delivered as either single doses (n=21) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Seventeen dogs were given 300 cGy TBI at 60 cGy/min, administered either as single doses (n=5) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Within the limitations of the experimental design, three conclusions were drawn: 1) with 200 and 300 cGy single-dose TBI, an increase of dose rate from 10 to 60 cGy/min, respectively, caused significant increases in marrow toxicity; 2) at 60 cGy/min, dose fractionation resulted in a significant decrease in marrow toxicities, whereas such a protective effect was not seen at 10 cGy/min; and 3) with fractionated TBI, no significant differences in marrow toxicity were seen between dogs irradiated at 60 and 10 cGy/min. The reduced effectiveness of TBI when a dose of 300 cGy was divided into three fractions of 100 cGy or when dose rate was reduced from 60 cGy/min to 10 cGy/min was consistent with models of radiation toxicity that allow for repair of sublethal injury in DNA.

  10. Dose and risk evaluation to the thyroid gland in intra-oral dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Edmilson M.; Lima, Marco A.F.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Correa, Samanda C.A.; Silva, Ademir X.; Brito, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Intra-oral technique is one of the most frequently used procedures of dental radiology, allowing the detection of a variety of dental anomalies such as caries, dental trauma and periodontal lesions, while exposing patients to relatively low doses of radiation. However, although the adverse effects of doses generated by dental radiology are essentially stochastic, a number of epidemiological studies have provided evidence of an increased risk of thyroid tumors for dental radiography. Many studies have measured doses of radiation for dental radiography, but only a few have estimated thyroid dose. Furthermore, most of the studies on dose evaluation in dental radiology are based on standardized calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. The purpose of this study is to use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the FAX (Female Adult voXel) and MAX (Male Adult voXel) phantoms to investigate how absorbed doses to the thyroid gland in intraoral dental examinations vary in female and male patients. The lifetime cancer incidence attributable to dental examinations were estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The phantoms study proved a useful trial for detecting the radiation dose to the thyroid gland and conclusively supported that the anatomy may be regarded as an influencing factor in radiation dose received during dental examination. Finally, the results have also confirmed that the association of the MCNPX code and the MAX and FAX phantoms is very useful in dosimetric studies on radiographic examinations of female and male patients. (author)

  11. Benefits of the effective dose equivalent concept at a medical center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Classic, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    A primary objective of the recommendations of the International Committee on Radiological Protection Publication 26 is to insure that no source of radiation exposure is unjustified in relation to its benefits. This objective is consistent with goals of the Radiation Safety Committee and Institutional Review Board at medical centers where research may involve radiation exposure of human subjects. The effective dose equivalent concept facilitates evaluation of risk by those who have little or no knowledge of quantities or biological effects of radiation. This paper presents effective dose equivalent data used by radiation workers and those who evaluate human research protocols as these data relate to personal dosimeter reading, entrance skin exposure, and target organ dose. The benefits of using effective dose equivalent to evaluate risk of medical radiation environments and research protocols are also described

  12. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects.......The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  13. Evaluation of dose to cardiac structures during breast irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Korreman, S-S; Pedersen, A N

    2011-01-01

    was still being delivered to the LAD. In 1 case, the dose to the LAD was low while 19% of the contoured heart volume received over 20 Gy. In five patients, the dose to the arch LAD was relatively low while the dose to the whole LAD was considerably higher. CONCLUSION: This study indicates...

  14. Dose and risk evaluation in digital mammography using computer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de, E-mail: scorrea@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: emonteiro@nuclear.ufrj.b [Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CCMAT/UEZO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Humberto de Oliveira, E-mail: hbetorj@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro IF/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Magalhaes, Sarah Braga, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: smagalhaes@nuclear.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2010-07-01

    Digital mammography has been introduced in several countries in the last years. The new technology requires new optimising methods considering for instance the increased possibility of changing the absorbed dose, mainly in modern mammographic systems that allow the operator to choose the beam quality by varying the tube voltage, and filter and target materials. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used in order to investigate how the average glandular dose vary with tube voltage (23-32 kV) and anode-filter combination (Mo-Mo,Mo-Rh and Rh-Rh) in digital mammographic examinations. Furthermore, the risk of breast cancer incidence attributable to mammography exams was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The results show that the risk of breast cancer incidence in women younger than 30 years of age tends to decrease significantly using Rh-Rh anode-filter combination and higher tube voltage. For women older than 50 years of age the variation of tube voltage, and anode-filter combination did not influence the risk values considerably. (author)

  15. Dose and risk evaluation in digital mammography using computer modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de; Silva, Humberto de Oliveira; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Magalhaes, Sarah Braga

    2010-01-01

    Digital mammography has been introduced in several countries in the last years. The new technology requires new optimising methods considering for instance the increased possibility of changing the absorbed dose, mainly in modern mammographic systems that allow the operator to choose the beam quality by varying the tube voltage, and filter and target materials. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used in order to investigate how the average glandular dose vary with tube voltage (23-32 kV) and anode-filter combination (Mo-Mo,Mo-Rh and Rh-Rh) in digital mammographic examinations. Furthermore, the risk of breast cancer incidence attributable to mammography exams was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The results show that the risk of breast cancer incidence in women younger than 30 years of age tends to decrease significantly using Rh-Rh anode-filter combination and higher tube voltage. For women older than 50 years of age the variation of tube voltage, and anode-filter combination did not influence the risk values considerably. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the radiation doses to uranium mine employees exposed to external gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.G.; Wilson, O.J.

    1983-02-01

    Factors to convert a personal monitor badge reading to an effective dose equivalent are given for several exposure geometries encountered in uranium mines. Factors are also given that relate a free air absorbed dose measurement to an effective dose equivalent. In addition, factors are reported which can be used to estimate the dose equivalent to the testes, ovaries and active bone marrow

  17. Dose evaluation for digital X-ray imaging of premature neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkels, T.J.M.; Jeukens, C.R.L.P.N.; Andriessen, P.; Van der Linden, A.N.; Dam, A.J.; Van Straaten, H.L.M.; Cottaar, E.J.E.; Van Pul, C.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray radiography is a commonly used diagnostic method for premature neonates. However, because of higher radiosensitivity and young age, premature neonates are more sensitive to the detrimental effects of ionising radiation. Therefore, it is important to monitor and optimise radiation doses at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The number of X-ray examinations, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses are evaluated for three Dutch NICUs using digital flat panel detectors. Thorax, thorax abdomen and abdomen protocols are included in this study. Median number of examinations is equal to 1 for all three hospitals. Median DAP ranges between 0.05 and 1.02 μGy m2 for different examination types and different weight categories. These examinations result in mean effective doses between 4 ± 4 and 30 ± 10 μSv per examination. Substantial differences in protocols and doses can be observed between hospitals. This emphasises the need for up-to-date reference levels formulated specifically for premature neonates. (authors)

  18. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  19. Radiation dose optimization in coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). II. Clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geijer, Haakan; Andersson, Torbjoern; Beckman, Karl-Wilhelm; Persliden, Jan

    2002-01-01

    In a previous part of this study, the fluoroscopy dose rate was reduced in a cardiac catheterization laboratory. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the effects in a clinical population undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the dose-reducing measures detailed previously. Kerma area-product (KAP) values were first recorded for 154 patients undergoing PCI. Then, the fluoroscopy KAP rate was reduced from 44 to 16 mGy cm 2 /s by increasing filtration and reducing the image intensifier dose request. After this optimization, KAP was recorded for another 138 PCI procedures. After adjustment for differing proportions of combined procedures (coronary angiography+PCI), the total KAP was reduced to 67% of the original value with a 95% confidence interval from 57 to 78%, statistically significant. The mean total KAP values were 93.6 Gy cm 2 before and 69.1 Gy cm 2 after optimization. The KAP for digital acquisition did not change significantly. It is possible to make a large dose reduction in PCI by reducing the fluoroscopy dose rate. This dose reduction is beneficial for both patients and staff. (orig.)

  20. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  1. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  2. A system of dose-effects relationships for the Northern wildlife: radiation protection criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    The key issue in the assessment system for radiation protection of wildlife is the establishment of a set of dose-effects relationships for reference representatives of natural biota, based on scientific data from a range of doses and a range of radiation effects. Risks to natural populations in particular habitats can be evaluated from a comparison of estimated doses to biota with the scale of dose-effects relationships for different types of biota. Within the frame of the EC Project EPIC 'Environmental Protection from Ionizing Contaminants' 2000-2003), a database has been created, which include the published and unpublished data relating to dose effects relationships for flora and fauna in the Northern and Arctic areas. The EPIC database contains information based exclusively on Russian/FSU experimental and field studies; chronic/lifetime exposures were the focus of the work, owing to the fact that such exposures are the most typical in radiological assessments for biota. In total, the EPIC database radiation effects on biota contains about 1600 records from 440 publications, including datasets on terrestrial and aquatic animals, plants, soil fauna and microorganisms. The EPIC database information cover a very wide range of radiation dose rates to wild flora and fauna: from below 10 -5 Gy d -1 up to more than 1 Gy d -1 . A great variety of radiation effects are registered in the EPIC database, from stimulation at low doses up to death from acute radiation syndrome at high doses. From data, compiled in the EPIC database, the dose-effects relationships were derived for different types of northern organisms. The system of dose-effects relationships forms the scale of severity of radiation effects at increasing levels of chronic radiation exposure. With its focus on the effects of low-to-moderate chronic exposure, the system of dose effects relationships provides a useful tool for scientists and decision-makers to establish safety standards for protecting the

  3. Image Quality, Overall Evaluability, and Effective Radiation Dose of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography With Prospective Electrocardiographic Triggering Plus Intracycle Motion Correction Algorithm in Patients With a Heart Rate Over 65 Beats Per Minute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Baggiano, Andrea; Andreini, Daniele; Guaricci, Andrea I; Guglielmo, Marco; Fazzari, Fabio; Mushtaq, Saima; Conte, Edoardo; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Mancini, Elisabetta; Verdecchia, Massimo; Fusini, Laura; Bonfanti, Lorenzo; Consiglio, Elisa; Rabbat, Mark G; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Pepi, Mauro

    2018-01-16

    Recently, a new intracycle motion correction algorithm (MCA) was introduced to reduce motion artifacts from heart rate (HR) in coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA). The aim of the study was to evaluate the image quality, overall evaluability, and effective radiation dose (ED) of cCTA with prospective electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering plus MCA as compared with standard protocol with retrospective ECG triggering in patients with HR≥65 bpm. One hundred consecutive patients (67±10 y) scheduled for cCTA with 65Ethics Committee and a written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Image noise, signal to noise ratio, contrast to noise ratio, Likert image quality score (score 1, nondiagnostic; score 2, adequate; score 3, good; score 4, excellent), overall image evaluability, and ED were measured and compared between the 2 groups. Both vessel-based and patient-based analyses were evaluated. Student test or Wilcoxon test were used to evaluate differences of continuous variables, whereas the χ test was used to study differences with regard to categorical data. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. cCTA was successfully performed in all patients. In a segment-based model, group 1 compared with group 2 showed a lower rate of overall artifacts (67% vs. 83%; P<0.001) and motion artifacts (49% vs. 66%; P<0.001), resulting in a better Likert image quality score (2.83±1.03 vs. 2.37±1.02; P<0.01) and overall evaluability (85% vs. 75%; P<0.01). Group 1 showed a lower ED as compared with group 2 (3.1±1.9 vs. 11.9±3.3 mSv; P<0.01). MCA and cCTA with prospective ECG-triggering acquisition in patients with high HR improves image quality and overall evaluability compared with cCTA with standard retrospective ECG triggering.

  4. Evaluating adherence to ocular hypotensives using the Travatan dosing aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dell L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leslie O'Dell1, Amy L Hennessy2,3, Alan L Robin2–41May Eye Care Center, Hanover, PA, USA; 2Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Glaucoma Specialists, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAPurpose: The Travatan™ Dosing Aid (TDA is the first commercially available device designed to aid in patients' adherence to their glaucoma therapies and to record patients' eyedrop administration, so that doctors can better assess adherence. No prior studies have objectively evaluated adherence to glaucoma medications and its relationship to the severity of glaucoma or the use of multiple systemic medications.Methods: We enrolled 100 consecutive subjects from a private glaucoma practice, all currently using topical travoprost 0.004%. Each subject was issued a TDA to record the time and date of each drop instilled. Informed consents were signed and the subjects were aware that their medication use was being monitored. Patients returned for follow-up 30–60 days after their initial exam.Results: 89 subjects completed the study: 44 were male, with a mean age of 67 years, and 69.7% were Caucasian. Overall, patient adherence was 74.8% (range 22%–100% improving to 85.4% on the day prior to follow-up. The mean number of missed doses per month was 6.24 ± 5.9. Only 7.9% of the study population never missed a dose and 23.6% ± 4.3% missed more than ten drops per month. No marked association was observed between the severity of glaucoma, race, or the number of systemic medications and adherence. A marked improvement in adherence was noted in patients using travoprost 0.004% as monocular therapy rather than binocular therapy, 84.0% ± 17.1% vs 67.4% ± 23.5% (P < 0.005.Conclusion: Patient adherence to glaucoma medical therapy is a major barrier in the management and treatment of glaucoma patients given the chronic nature and asymptomatic course of the disease. Until recently

  5. Characterization of Dose in a TC of 64-Detectors used in pediatrics. Evaluation of the effects of the Over beaming and Over ranging; Caracterizacion de dosis en un TC de 64 detectores utilizado en pediatria. Evaluacion de los efectos del Overbeaming y Overranging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Castanon, P.; Roch Gonzalez, M.; Rodriguez Martin, G.; Espana Lopez, M. L.; Giner Sala, M.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of effects over beaming and over ranging dose received by the patient in a TC multislice with 64 detectors, installed at a children's hospital, for the different acquisition modes available, in order to assess the adequacy of the protocols pre-set for Pediatrics and more accurately assess the received dose. (Author)

  6. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  7. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  8. Effects of Chronic Antihypertensives on Vasopressor Dosing in Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, Joshua M; Patel, Gourang; Lat, Ishaq

    2018-01-01

    In septic shock, chronic antihypertensive medications are held acutely. Vasopressors are often required to maintain blood pressure. The effect of chronic exposure to antihypertensive therapies on vasopressor dosing in septic shock is not known. To determine the effects of chronic exposure to antihypertensive therapies, specifically β-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, on cumulative vasopressor dosing in septic shock. This was a retrospective cohort review, with data collected from routine care. Patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit with septic shock and vasopressor use were included and divided into 4 groups based on chronic medication use: (1) no β-blocker or ACE inhibitor, (2) β-blocker only, (3) ACE inhibitor only, and (4) β-blocker and ACE inhibitor. Cumulative vasopressor dose at 48 hours was assessed. Demographics, comorbid conditions, suspected site of infection, disease severity, mortality, and concomitant therapies were evaluated between groups. A total of 133 patients with septic shock treated with vasopressors were included. No difference in cumulative vasopressor dose at 48 hours was detected between the 4 groups, respectively (median norepinephrine milligram equivalents [interquartile range (IQR)]: no β-blocker or ACE inhibitor, 13.7 mg [6.0-35.7]; β-blocker only, 13.1 mg [5.4-23.9]; ACE inhibitor only, 13.2 mg [1.2-36.7]; β-blocker and ACE inhibitor, 11.3 mg [4.7-42.9]; P = 0.669). Total time on vasopressors differed between groups (median hours [IQR]: no β-blocker or ACE inhibitor, 30h [17-60]; β-blocker only, 24h [10-69]; ACE inhibitor only, 19h [6-25]; β-blocker and ACE inhibitor, 30h [15-58]; P = 0.031). Comorbid conditions, suspected infection sites, disease severity, mortality, and concomitant therapies were similar. Chronic β-blocker, ACE inhibitor use, or the combination of both did not affect cumulative vasopressor dose at 48 hours in septic shock. However, prior-to-admission medications may

  9. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from panoramic radiography to the critical organs of head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo; Lee, Ae Ryeon

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalent and effective dose, and estimate radiation risk to the critical organs of head and neck region from the use of adult and child mode in panoramic radiography. The results were as follows. 1. The salivary glands showed the highest equivalent and effective dose in adult and child mode. The equivalent and effective dose in adult mode were 837 μSv and 20.93 μSv, those in child mode were 462 μSv and 11.54 μSv, respectively. 2. Total effective doses to the critical head and neck organs were estimated 34.2l μSv in adult mode, 20.14 μSv in child mode. From these data, the probabilities of stochastic effect from adult and child mode were 2.50xl0 -6 and 1.47x10 -6 3. The other remainder showed the greatest risk of fatal cancer. The risk estimate were 4.5 and 2.7 fatal malignancies in adult and child mode from million examinations. The bone marrow and thyroid gland showed about 0.1 fatal cancer in adult. and child mode from these examinations.

  10. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from panoramic radiography to the critical organs of head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ae Ryeon [Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalent and effective dose, and estimate radiation risk to the critical organs of head and neck region from the use of adult and child mode in panoramic radiography. The results were as follows. 1. The salivary glands showed the highest equivalent and effective dose in adult and child mode. The equivalent and effective dose in adult mode were 837 {mu}Sv and 20.93 {mu}Sv, those in child mode were 462 {mu}Sv and 11.54 {mu}Sv, respectively. 2. Total effective doses to the critical head and neck organs were estimated 34.2l {mu}Sv in adult mode, 20.14 {mu}Sv in child mode. From these data, the probabilities of stochastic effect from adult and child mode were 2.50xl0{sup -6} and 1.47x10{sup -6} 3. The other remainder showed the greatest risk of fatal cancer. The risk estimate were 4.5 and 2.7 fatal malignancies in adult and child mode from million examinations. The bone marrow and thyroid gland showed about 0.1 fatal cancer in adult. and child mode from these examinations.

  11. Effects of types and doses of yeast on gas production and in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-12

    Nov 12, 2016 ... Effects of types and doses of yeast on gas production and in vitro digestibility of diets containing ... Several studies have been conducted to evaluate neutral detergent fibre (NDF) levels with yeast (Plata ... to evaluate the effects of two commercial yeast products on in vitro fermentation kinetic parameters, as ...

  12. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  13. The Evaluation of Skin Toxicity during Brain Tumor Irradiation Dose Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana A. Pashkovskaya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiotherapy is the keystone in brain tumor treatment, including posterior fossa tumors, and can achieve better patient health-related quality of life. Radiation exposure can be associated with the risk of skin radiation injuries. Accurate tumor and critical structure delineations and precise dose planning may improve the outcomes and decrease radiation complications. The objective of this study was to compare the influence of the headrest and treatment couch during dose planning, on the dose distributions and skin injury post irradiation. Material and Methods: Treatment planning calculations were performed for 14 brain tumor patients using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to study the dose distribution and dose-volume histograms (DVH. We compared the following three cases of general patient contours: patient body contour alone, body contour including the headrest, and body contour with headrest, couch and immobilization mask. The same configuration beams were used in all these cases; general patient contours alone were altered. Results: For dose estimations, the skin was delineated as a 2 mm layer beneath the patient’s body contour. The comparisons showed that the average dose on the skin, among all the patients included in this study, in the case of body contour alone is 3.3 Gy, whereas in the case of body contour with headrest, it is 6.3 Gy and in the case of body contour with headrest, couch and immobilization mask it is 9.4 Gy. Conclusion: For brain tumors, located in the posterior fossa and near the patient’s skin, the skin needed to be included as a critical structure. The skin dose should be considered when evaluating treatment plans, taking into account the bolus effect of the headrest and couch.

  14. Dose evaluation in special fluoroscopy procedures: Hysterosalpingography and Dacryocystography; Avaliacao de dose em procedimentos especiais de fluoroscopia: histerossalpingografia e dacriocistografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Cintya Carolina Barbosa

    2006-04-15

    The hysterosalpingography (HSG) and dacryocystography (DCG) are among the special fluoroscopy procedures. The HSG is a radiodiagnostic technique used to detect uterine and tubal pathologies and it is fundamental for the investigation of infertility. The DCG is a form of lacrimal system imaging, being important to show the level of obstruction, the presence of dilatation of the lacrimal sac, as well as alterations in nearby structures. At this research, the study of skin entrance dose was evaluated for these two special fluoroscopy procedures, besides the analyses of staff doses whose performs the exams. The exams of 22 HSG patients and 8 DCG patients were evaluated using TL-100 dosimeters attached on patient' skin at anatomical landmarks evolved on each exam. In the case of HSG, the results showed that skin entrance doses varied from 0.5 mGy to 73.4 mGy, with an average value of 22.1 mGy. The estimated uterus dose was 5.5 mGy, and 6.6 mGy was the average dose estimated to the ovaries. The patient' skin entrance dose undergoing to DCG examinations varied from 2.1 mGy to 10.6 mGy, and the average eye's dose was 6.1 mGy. The results of staff dose showed that, on HSG, the average dose on doctor's right hand was 4.3 mGy per examination. This value had to the fact that the physician introduces the contrast manually while all contrast exposures. In relation of DCG, the staff's dose values were nearby background radiation, evidencing that, inside of permitted limits, there is no risk for the physicians at this procedure. (author)

  15. Radiation dose evaluation in tomosynthesis and C-arm cone-beam CT examinations with an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shuji; Aoyama, Takahiko; Oda, Nobuhiro; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate organ dose and the effective dose to patients undergoing tomosynthesis (TS) and C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations and to compare the doses to those in multidetector CT (MDCT) scans. Patient doses were measured with small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, 48 in number, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. The doses in head, chest, abdomen, and hip-joint TS, and in head and abdomen C-arm CBCT were evaluated for routine protocols on Shimadzu TS and C-arm CBCT systems, and the doses in MDCT with the same scan regions as in TS and CBCT were on Toshiba 64-detector-row CT scanners. In TS examination of the head, chest, abdomen, and hip-joint, organ doses for organs within scan ranges were 1-4 mGy, and effective doses were 0.07 mSv for the head scan and around 1 mSv for other scans. In C-arm CBCT examinations of the head and abdomen, organ doses within scan range were 2-37 mGy, and effective doses were 1.2 mSv for the head scan and 4-5 mSv for abdominal scans. Effective doses in TS examinations were approximately a factor of 10 lower, while the doses in CBCT examinations were nearly the same level, compared to the doses in the corresponding MDCT examinations. TS examinations with low doses and excellent resolutions in coronal images compared to recent MDCT would widely be used in tomographic examinations of the chest, abdomen, pelvis, skeletal-joints, and knee instead of MDCT examinations with significantly high doses. Since patient dose in C-arm CBCT was nearly the same level as that in recent MDCT, the same consideration for high radiation dose would be required for the use of CBCT.

  16. Absorbed and effective dose in direct and indirect digital panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jae Duk [Department of Oral and Maxilloficial Radiology School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    We evaluated the absorbed doses to the organs and calculated the effective doses when using the digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose averages in major organs of oral and maxillofacial region were measured using the Dental head phantom (CIRS Co., USA), nLi2B4O7 TLD chip and UD-716AGL dosimeter (Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., JPN) when performing indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography. Effective doses were calculated from correspond to ICRP 2007 recommendations for two panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average on indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography was highest in parotid glands as measured 1259.6 mGy and 680.7 mGy respectively. Absorbed dose average in another organs were high in order of esophagus, submandibular gland, tongue and thyroid gland on both types of digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average was higher on indirect type than direct one (p?0.05). The effective dose was higher on indirect type than direct one as measured 13.28 mSv and 8.70 mSv respectively. The absorbed doses in salivary gland and oral mucosa were high. However, thyroid gland also demands the attention on radiography due to high tissue weighting factor in spite of the low absorbed dose.

  17. Absorbed and effective dose in direct and indirect digital panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jae Duk

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the absorbed doses to the organs and calculated the effective doses when using the digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose averages in major organs of oral and maxillofacial region were measured using the Dental head phantom (CIRS Co., USA), nLi2B4O7 TLD chip and UD-716AGL dosimeter (Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., JPN) when performing indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography. Effective doses were calculated from correspond to ICRP 2007 recommendations for two panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average on indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography was highest in parotid glands as measured 1259.6 mGy and 680.7 mGy respectively. Absorbed dose average in another organs were high in order of esophagus, submandibular gland, tongue and thyroid gland on both types of digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average was higher on indirect type than direct one (p?0.05). The effective dose was higher on indirect type than direct one as measured 13.28 mSv and 8.70 mSv respectively. The absorbed doses in salivary gland and oral mucosa were high. However, thyroid gland also demands the attention on radiography due to high tissue weighting factor in spite of the low absorbed dose.

  18. The effect of ongoing exposure dynamics in dose response relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Pujol

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing infectivity as a function of pathogen dose is integral to microbial risk assessment. Dose-response experiments usually administer doses to subjects at one time. Phenomenological models of the resulting data, such as the exponential and the Beta-Poisson models, ignore dose timing and assume independent risks from each pathogen. Real world exposure to pathogens, however, is a sequence of discrete events where concurrent or prior pathogen arrival affects the capacity of immune effectors to engage and kill newly arriving pathogens. We model immune effector and pathogen interactions during the period before infection becomes established in order to capture the dynamics generating dose timing effects. Model analysis reveals an inverse relationship between the time over which exposures accumulate and the risk of infection. Data from one time dose experiments will thus overestimate per pathogen infection risks of real world exposures. For instance, fitting our model to one time dosing data reveals a risk of 0.66 from 313 Cryptosporidium parvum pathogens. When the temporal exposure window is increased 100-fold using the same parameters fitted by our model to the one time dose data, the risk of infection is reduced to 0.09. Confirmation of this risk prediction requires data from experiments administering doses with different timings. Our model demonstrates that dose timing could markedly alter the risks generated by airborne versus fomite transmitted pathogens.

  19. Evaluation of sphingolipids in Wistar rats treated to prolonged and single oral doses of fumonisin b₁.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Glória M; Almeida, Adriana P; Aquino, Simone; dos Reis, Tatiana Alves; Pozzi, Claudia Rodrigues; Corrêa, Benedito

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate sphingolipid levels (sphingosine-So and sphinganine-Sa) and to compare the Sa/So ratio in liver, serum and urine of Wistar rats after prolonged administration (21 days) of fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)). In parallel, the kinetics of sphingolipid elimination in urine was studied in animals receiving a single dose of FB(1). Prolonged exposure to FB(1) caused an increase in Sa levels in urine, serum and liver. The most marked effect on sphingolipid biosynthesis was observed in animals treated with the highest dose of FB(1). Animals receiving a single dose of FB(1) presented variations in Sa and So levels and in the Sa/So ratio.

  20. Social-demographic profile and dose evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical facility workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanches, Matias P.; Carneiro, Janete C. Gaburo; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The main aims of this work are to identify the social-demographic profile of the workers based on stratification variables such as gender, age, and tasks performed by the workers, and to evaluate the annual collective doses of workers with potential risk of ionizing radiation exposure at the workplace during the years 2004 to 2008. In this context, the knowledge of the workforce composition in the facility responsible for the radioisotope production and its distribution was used. The individual monitoring programme has been carried out by individual dosimeters, TLDs, and internal contamination monitoring (in vivo method). The reported doses, in the period studied, suggest that the external exposure was the main source of occupational exposure in radioisotope production and distribution areas. The internal exposure was not included in the doses estimated, because it was negligible. This study has an important exploratory character, in order to analyze possible correlations related to adverse health effects, aiming to provide directions for occupational epidemiology research. (author)

  1. Committed effective doses at various times after intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed effective doses at nine times after intake from intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu 1 AMAD particles by adults. Data are given for various chemical forms of 359 nuclides. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on committed equivalent doses to organs is given in NRPB-M288. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  2. Dose-effect relationships, epidemiological analysis and the derivation of low dose risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenhouts, H P; Chadwick, K H

    2011-01-01

    This paper expands on our recent comments in a letter to this journal about the analysis of epidemiological studies and the determination of low dose RBE of low LET radiation (Chadwick and Leenhouts 2009 J. Radiol. Prot. 29 445-7). Using the assumption that radiation induced cancer arises from a somatic mutation (Chadwick and Leenhouts 2011 J. Radiol. Prot. 31 41-8) a model equation is derived to describe cancer induction as a function of dose. The model is described briefly, evidence is provided in support of it, and it is applied to a set of experimental animal data. The results are compared with a linear fit to the data as has often been done in epidemiological studies. The article presents arguments to support several related messages which are relevant to epidemiological analysis, the derivation of low dose risk and the weighting factor of sparsely ionising radiations. The messages are: (a) cancer incidence following acute exposure should, in principle, be fitted to a linear-quadratic curve with cell killing using all the data available; (b) the acute data are dominated by the quadratic component of dose; (c) the linear fit of any acute data will essentially be dependent on the quadratic component and will be unrelated to the effectiveness of the radiation at low doses; consequently, (d) the method used by ICRP to derive low dose risk from the atomic bomb survivor data means that it is unrelated to the effectiveness of the hard gamma radiation at low radiation doses; (e) the low dose risk value should, therefore, not be used as if it were representative for hard gamma rays to argue for an increased weighting factor for tritium and soft x-rays even though there are mechanistic reasons to expect this; (f) epidemiological studies of chronically exposed populations supported by appropriate cellular radiobiological studies have the best chance of revealing different RBE values for different sparsely ionising radiations.

  3. CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He, Wenjun

    2011-03-01

    To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/ pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E103/E60). Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by approximately 11%, for chest scans by approximately 20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by approximately 25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 microSv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 microSv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

  4. The Effect of NPP's Stack Height to Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandi, Liliana Yetta; Rohman, Budi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of dose calculation for accidents is to analyze the capability of NPP to maintain the safety of public and workers in case an accident occurs on the Plant in a site. This paper calculates the Loss of Coolant Accident in PWR plant. The calculation results shows that no risks of serious radiation exposure are given to the neighboring public even if such a large accident occurred, and the effect of stack height can be predicted by analysis of the calculation results. The whole dose is calculated for some location (100 m, 300 m, 500 m, 700 m, 900 m, 1500 m, and 2000 m) with three difference stack height i.e. 0 m, 40 m and 100 m. The result of the whole dose calculation is under permitted criteria for whole dose : 0.25 Sv and thyroid dose : 3.0 Sv. The calculation of radiation dose in this paper use EEDCDQ code

  5. Effects of sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron on the ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, it is concluded that sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron reduced the amounts of ovarian constituents during ovarian development and oogenesis in S. litura. These reductions increased with an increase in dose from LD10 to LD30. The effects of chlorfluazuron on the amounts of ovarian constituents are presumed to ...

  6. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  7. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  8. Evaluation of glandular dose in conventional and digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, Celia Maria Campos

    2009-01-01

    A survey was conducted to estimate the average glandular dose (D g ) for patients undergoing mammography and to report the distribution of incident air kerma (K i ), patient age, compressed breast thickness and glandular tissue content. From 1183 cranio caudal mammograms clinical data were collected and doses were measured. The survey data included mammograms from six mammography equipment: two screen/film units (SFM), two computed radiography units (CR) and two full-field digital (DR). Mean value for patient age and compressed breast thickness were 57 +-12 y and 5.4 +-1.4 cm, respectively. To investigate the importance of technical characteristics of three different mammography systems and breast glandularity, K i and D g were measured for individual breast of 392 patients from the original sample with compressed breast thickness in the range of 5.5 cm to 6.5 cm using tissue-equivalent phantoms of different glandularities manufactured in this study to mimic both the attenuation and the density of breast tissues. Mean K i value was 10.0 +-3.6 mGy for SFM systems, 12.0 +-3.6 mGy for CR systems and 4.9 +-1.3 mGy for DR systems. Mean D g value was 1.4 +-0.5 mGy for S/F systems, 1.7 +-0.5 mGy for CR systems and 0.9 +-0.2 mGy for D R systems. Statistical analysis for differences in mean values of K i and D g between mammography systems showed significant effect of their technical characteristics (p i and D g , it was observed statistically significant differences between the group of patients with 0 to 50% glandularity and the group of patients with 50 to 100% glandularity. (author)

  9. SIDE EFFECTS OF TUBERCULOSIS TREATMENT WITH FIXED-DOSE COMBINATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Q; Xi, X E; Wang, Y L; Han, W; Zhang, C X; Jiao, J H

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to explore the therapeutic effect and safety of Fixed-dose Combinations (FDCs) on tuberculosis. A computer search was carried out to review the literature related to clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trails (CCTs) on the curative effect and safety of treating pulmonary tuberculosis with FDCs. The results demonstrated that, in the 22 studies examined, comparison of sputum negative conservation rate of treating smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis with FDCs and single drug, the relative risk (RR) value and 95% confidence interval (CI) were 1.02 (1.01, 1.03) and 1.01 (1.00, 1.02), respectively, at the end of the 2nd month and 6th month (P0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in total occurrence of the rates of side effects pertaining to skin reaction, gastrointestinal tract side reaction, occurrence rate of liver and gall side reaction or occurrence rate of drug withdrawal because of side effects (P>0.05). After sensitivity analysis, it was found that occurrence rate of gastrointestinal tract side effects and occurrence rate of liver and gall side effects were unstable. All the findings suggest that the curative effect of treating tuberculosis with FDCs is better than that of a single drug. More reliable evidence is required since the safety evaluation results are not stable.

  10. Evaluation of an electron Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Eve; Beaulieu, Luc; Lachance, Bernard

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm included in a commercial treatment planning system and compare its performance against an electron pencil beam algorithm. Several tests were performed to explore the system's behavior in simple geometries and in configurations encountered in clinical practice. The first series of tests were executed in a homogeneous water phantom, where experimental measurements and eMC-calculated dose distributions were compared for various combinations of energy and applicator. More specifically, we compared beam profiles and depth-dose curves at different source-to-surface distances (SSDs) and gantry angles, by using dose difference and distance to agreement. Also, we compared output factors, we studied the effects of algorithm input parameters, which are the random number generator seed, as well as the calculation grid size, and we performed a calculation time evaluation. Three different inhomogeneous solid phantoms were built, using high- and low-density materials inserts, to clinically simulate relevant heterogeneity conditions: a small air cylinder within a homogeneous phantom, a lung phantom, and a chest wall phantom. We also used an anthropomorphic phantom to perform comparison of eMC calculations to measurements. Finally, we proceeded with an evaluation of the eMC algorithm on a clinical case of nose cancer. In all mentioned cases, measurements, carried out by means of XV-2 films, radiographic films or EBT2 Gafchromic films. were used to compare eMC calculations with dose distributions obtained from an electron pencil beam algorithm. eMC calculations in the water phantom were accurate. Discrepancies for depth-dose curves and beam profiles were under 2.5% and 2 mm. Dose calculations with eMC for the small air cylinder and the lung phantom agreed within 2% and 4%, respectively. eMC calculations for the chest wall phantom and the anthropomorphic phantom also

  11. Adult head CT scans: the uncertainties of effective dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Kent J.; Bibbo, Giovanni; Pattison, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: CT scanning is a high dose imaging modality. Effective dose estimates from CT scans can provide important information to patients and medical professionals. For example, medical practitioners can use the dose to estimate the risk to the patient, and judge whether this risk is outweighed by the benefits of the CT examination, while radiographers can gauge the effect of different scanning protocols on the patient effective dose, and take this into consideration when establishing routine scan settings. Dose estimates also form an important part of epidemiological studies examining the health effects of medical radiation exposures on the wider population. Medical physicists have been devoting significant effort towards estimating patient radiation doses from diagnostic CT scans for some years. The question arises: How accurate are these effective dose estimates? The need for a greater understanding and improvement of the uncertainties in CT dose estimates is now gaining recognition as an important issue (BEIR VII 2006). This study is an attempt to analyse and quantify the uncertainty components relating to effective dose estimates from adult head CT examinations that are calculated with four commonly used methods. The dose estimation methods analysed are the Nagel method, the ImpaCT method, the Wellhoefer method and the Dose-Length Product (DLP) method. The analysis of the uncertainties was performed in accordance with the International Standards Organisation's Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement as discussed in Gregory et al (Australas. Phys. Eng. Sci. Med., 28: 131-139, 2005). The uncertainty components vary, depending on the method used to derive the effective dose estimate. Uncertainty components in this study include the statistical and other errors from Monte Carlo simulations, uncertainties in the CT settings and positions of patients in the CT gantry, calibration errors from pencil ionization chambers, the variations in the organ

  12. Pigment abnormalities in irradiated hair follicles: effects of low doses, dose rate, and LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fu-Du; Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments are reported concerning the effect of dose-rate and LET on the induction of pigment abnormalities in mice. The distribution of abnormalities among individual follicles at low doses was also measured. The radiations were 137 Cs γ-rays delivered at 5 Gy/min, 60 Co γ-rays at 0.0005 Gy/min, and collimated 14.7 MeV neutrons at 0.005, 0.015, or 0.15 Gy/min. Results indicated that pigment clumping responds to dose-rate and LET, and that the assay could be used to resolve acute γ-ray doses of 0.3 Gy or more. Zigzag hair follicles had a lower threshold dose than the less numerous but larger guard hair follicles. The RBE value for neutrons was 2.3. From 0 to 1.25 Gy γ-rays or at 0.30 Gy neutrons, the distribution of clumps per follicle was approximately Poisson. At doses of γ-rays greater than 1.25 Gy, the distribution diverged from a Poisson, with more highly-affected follicles and fewer lightly-affected follicles observed than would be expected. Follicles lacking pigment cells or containing 'albino' pigment cells could not apparently be induced by radiation to exhibit pigment clumping. (U.K.)

  13. Estimation of effective dose equivalente from external irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, T.

    1985-07-01

    A methodology for computing effective dose equivalent, derived from the computer code ALGAM: Monte Carlo Estimation of Internal Dose from Gamma-ray Sources in a Phantom Man, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is presented. The modified code was run for 12 different photon energy levels, from 0,010 Mev to 4.0 Mev, which provides computing the absorved dose, for these energy levels, in each one of the 97 organs of the original code. The code also was run for the principal energy levels used in the calibration of the dosimetric films. The results of the absorved doses per photon obtained for these levels of energy have been transformed in effective dose equivalents. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. UV-radiation and skin cancer dose effect curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, T.; Dahlback, A.; Larsen, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Norwegian skin cancer data were used in an attempt to arrive at the dose effect relationship for UV-carcinogenesis. The Norwegian population is relatively homogenous with regard to skin type and live in a country where the annual effective UV-dose varies by approximately 40 percent. Four different regions of the country, each with a broadness of 1 o in latitude (approximately 111 km), were selected . The annual effective UV-doses for these regions were calculated assuming normal ozone conditions throughout the year. The incidence of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (mainly basal cell carcinoma) in these regions were considered and compared to the annual UV-doses. For both these types of cancer a quadratic dose effect curve seems to be valid. Depletions of the ozone layer results in larger UV-doses which in turn may yield more skin cancer. The dose effect curves suggest that the incidence rate will increase by an ''amplification factor'' of approximately 2

  15. Effective dose for patient in multimode panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasaki, Shiro; Daibo, Motoji

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, multimode panoramic radiography has had various functions, such as the auto exposure function, auto focus function (auto function), TMJ radiography and tomogram radiography functions. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective dose for patients in each mode of the new multimode panoramic radiography (J. MORITA MFG. CORP. Dental Panorama X-ray Apparatus: Veraview Scope X 600). The absorbed doses in important organs involved in the causation of stochastic effects were measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter using RANDO phantom. The effective doses were calculated using modified tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 1999. The mean field size over skin in typical panoramic and tomographic examinations was about 3% and 0.4% of the total body surface area of 15000 cm 2 . Assuming that the incidence of skin cancer is proportional to the area of skin exposed to ionizing radiation, the tissue weighting factor of skin can be estimated to be about 0.0003 and 0.00004. The estimate in effective dose was lower (5.3 μSv) in the panoramic auto function mode (an average exposure condition of 69 kV 7 mA) than that (6.5-13.8 μSv) in the linear tomogram modes. Since the linear tomogram mode requires a scout view, such as standard panoramic radiography, the dose in the linear tomogram mode becomes higher than other modes. A percentage of gonad doses in effective doses was negligible. (author)

  16. Effective dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides exponentially distributed in the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Schlattl, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    In order to provide fundamental data required for dose evaluation due to environmental exposures, effective dose conversion coefficients, that is, the effective dose rate per unit activity per unit area, were calculated for a number of potentially important radionuclides, assuming an exponential distribution in ground, over a wide range of relaxation depths. The conversion coefficients were calculated for adults and a new-born baby on the basis of dosimetric methods that the authors and related researchers have previously developed, using Monte Carlo simulations and anthropomorphic computational phantoms. The differences in effective dose conversion coefficients due to body size between the adult and baby phantoms were found to lie within 50 %, for most cases; however, for some low energies, differences could amount to a factor of 3. The effective dose per unit source intensity per area was found to decrease by a factor of 2-5, for increasing relaxation depths from 0 to 5 g/cm 2 , above a source energy of 50 keV. It is also shown that implementation of the calculated coefficients into the computation of the tissue weighting factors and the adult reference computational phantoms of ICRP Publication 103 does not significantly influence the effective dose conversion coefficients of the environment. Consequently, the coefficients shown in this paper could be applied for the evaluation of effective doses, as defined according to both recommendations of ICRP Publications 103 and 60. (orig.)

  17. Effective dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides exponentially distributed in the ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kimiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Ishigure, Nobuhito [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City (Japan); Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Schlattl, Helmut [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Radiation Physics and Diagnostics, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    In order to provide fundamental data required for dose evaluation due to environmental exposures, effective dose conversion coefficients, that is, the effective dose rate per unit activity per unit area, were calculated for a number of potentially important radionuclides, assuming an exponential distribution in ground, over a wide range of relaxation depths. The conversion coefficients were calculated for adults and a new-born baby on the basis of dosimetric methods that the authors and related researchers have previously developed, using Monte Carlo simulations and anthropomorphic computational phantoms. The differences in effective dose conversion coefficients due to body size between the adult and baby phantoms were found to lie within 50 %, for most cases; however, for some low energies, differences could amount to a factor of 3. The effective dose per unit source intensity per area was found to decrease by a factor of 2-5, for increasing relaxation depths from 0 to 5 g/cm{sup 2}, above a source energy of 50 keV. It is also shown that implementation of the calculated coefficients into the computation of the tissue weighting factors and the adult reference computational phantoms of ICRP Publication 103 does not significantly influence the effective dose conversion coefficients of the environment. Consequently, the coefficients shown in this paper could be applied for the evaluation of effective doses, as defined according to both recommendations of ICRP Publications 103 and 60. (orig.)

  18. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  19. Analytical evaluation of dose measurement of critical accident at SILENE (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K

    2003-01-01

    Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) jointly organized SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise to intercompare the dose measurement systems of participating countries. Each participating country carried out dose measurements in the same irradiation field, and the measurement results were mutually compared. The participated in the exercise to measure the doses of gamma rays and neutron from SILENE by using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) and an alanine dosimeter. In this examination, the derived evaluation formulae for obtaining a tissue-absorbed dose from measured value (ambient dose equivalent) of TLD for neutron. We reported the tissue-absorbed dose computed using this evaluation formula to OECD/NEA. TLD's for neutron were irradiated in the TRACY facility to verify the evaluation formulae. The results of TLD's were compared with the calculations of MCNP and measurements with alanine dose meter. We found that the ratio of the dose b...

  20. Quantitative comparison of low dose and standard dose radioiodine therapy effectiveness in patients with low risk differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Tutus, Ahmet; Isik, Ilknur; Kurt, Yurdagul; Kula, Mustafa

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the results of postoperative I-131 remnant ablation therapy using a quantitative data in the low activity (1110 MBq) and standard dose (3700 MBq). The study included two groups of patients with low risk differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC): Group L (low dose group) included 54 patients who were treated with 1110 MBq I-131 and Group S (standard dose group) included 61 patients treated with 3700 MBq. The postoperative thyroid remnants were assessed with the pretreatment thyroid uptake test (PTUT) and the whole body scans (WBS) were performed in the 7th day after the ablation treatment. We obtained the average count per pixel from the standard region of interest analysis of the thyroid bed (Tavc), liver (Lavc), thigh (Thavc) and whole body (WBkc). At the sixth month after the treatment, WBS were performed to 106 patients (45 patients from Group L and 61 patients from Group S) to evaluate the success of ablation treatment. A significant difference in PTUT and Tavc was not found between the two groups (P>0.05). However, Lavc, Thavc and WBkc were significantly higher in Group S compared with Group L (P0.05). In low risk DTC patients, low dose radioactive iodine can ablate thyroid remnants as effectively as a higher dose with less radiation exposure to other non-target organs and the whole body.

  1. Dose-related effects of propericiazine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cechin E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of the neuroleptic agent propericiazine on animal models of anxiety and memory. Adult male Wistar rats (250 to 350 g received intraperitoneal injections of propericiazine (0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 mg/kg, diazepam (1 mg/kg, saline, or diazepam vehicle (20% propylene glycol and 80% saline 30 min prior to the experimental procedure. Animals (10-15 for each task were tested for step-down inhibitory avoidance (0.3-mA footshock and habituation to an open-field for memory assessment, and submitted to the elevated plus-maze to evaluate the effects of propericiazine in a model of anxiety. Animals treated with 0.075 mg/kg propericiazine showed a reduction in anxiety measures (P0.05 in the elevated plus-maze model of anxiety. Memory was not affected by propericiazine in any of the tests, but was impaired by diazepam. The results indicate a dose-related, inverse U-shaped effect of propericiazine in an anxiety model, but not on memory tasks, perhaps reflecting involvement of the dopaminergic system in the mechanisms of anxiety.

  2. Dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Mantovani, Fernanda B; Taylor, Polly M; Dixon, Mike J; Luna, Stelio P L

    2009-11-01

    The dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous (IV) buprenorphine were evaluated in cats. Thermal (TT) and mechanical threshold (MT) devices were used for nociceptive stimulation. After baseline threshold recordings, buprenorphine was administered IV (0.01, 0.02 or 0.04 mg/kg; B1, B2 and B4, respectively) in a randomised, blinded and cross-over study. Data were analysed by ANOVA (P<0.05) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). TT increased 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.2+/-2.7 degrees C), 2, 3 and 4 h after B1; 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.1+/-3.9 degrees C) and 2 h after B2, and 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.4+/-3.3 degrees C), 2, 3, 6 and 8 h after B4. MT increased 15 and 45 min after B2 (260+/-171 mmHg), and 30 (209+/-116 mmHg) and 45 min and 1 and 2 h after B4. At 45 min, MT values were significantly higher after B2 compared to B1 (P<0.05). With MT, B2 and B4 produced more antinociception and longer duration of action than B1, respectively. No dose response to thermal stimulation was detected.

  3. Evaluation of paediatric X-ray doses in Moroccan university hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nfaoui, K.; Bentayeb, F.; El Basraoui, O.; De Azevedo, A. C. P.

    2010-01-01

    This work evaluates the entrance skin dose (ESD), the body organ dose (BOD) and the effective dose (E) for chest X-ray exposures of paediatric patients. Two Moroccan university hospitals in Rabat, composed of two departments, and one in Casablanca with one paediatric compartment has been considered. For reasons of confidentiality, the departments are named A, B and C. Patients were divided into four age groups: 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 y, so that the results could be compared with previous published data found in the literature. The results have been calculated with the use of the Dose Cal software. Results of mean ESD for the age interval 1-5 y and antero-posterior (AP) projection are: 162 μGy for hospital A, 91 μGy for hospital B and 105 μGy for hospital C. The diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) of 100 μGy for this age range is exceeded in hospital A, while in the other two hospitals results were within the DRL and comparable with the results found in Brazil, Soudan (Nigeria) and other radiological centres in European Countries. The results of BOD and E showed that for the three departments, the BOD varies in the same proportion as the ESD. The highest values are those of hospital A. For the PA examination, the dose is reduced compared with the AP projection, especially for sensitive organs. (authors)

  4. Dose-dependent effects of luteinizing hormone and follicle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dose-dependent effects of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone on in vitro maturation, apoptosis, secretion function and expression of follicle stimulating hormone receptor and luteinizing hormone receptor of sheep oocytes.

  5. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  6. To Compare the Effectiveness of Short‑term Three Dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To Compare the Effectiveness of Short‑term Three Dose Perioperative Antibiotic Coverage during Decisive Period with Conventional Prolonged Postoperative Antibiotic Usage in Clean Elective Surgical Cases: An Indian Perspective.

  7. Evaluation of the local dose enhancement in the combination of proton therapy and nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Rovira, I., E-mail: immamartinez@gmail.com; Prezado, Y. [Laboratoire d’Imagerie et Modélisation en Neurobiologie et Cancérologie (IMNC), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Université Paris 7 and 11, Campus Universitaire, Bât. 440, 1er étage, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Orsay Cedex 91406 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The outcome of radiotherapy can be further improved by combining irradiation with dose enhancers such as high-Z nanoparticles. Since 2004, spectacular results have been obtained when low-energy x-ray irradiations have been combined with nanoparticles. Recently, the same combination has been explored in hadron therapy. In vitro studies have shown a significant amplification of the biological damage in tumor cells charged with nanoparticles and irradiated with fast ions. This has been attributed to the increase in the ionizations and electron emissions induced by the incident ions or the electrons in the secondary tracks on the high-Z atoms, resulting in a local energy deposition enhancement. However, this subject is still a matter of controversy. Within this context, the main goal of the authors’ work was to provide new insights into the dose enhancement effects of nanoparticles in proton therapy. Methods: For this purpose, Monte Carlo calculations (GATE/GEANT4 code) were performed. In particular, the GEANT4-DNA toolkit, which allows the modeling of early biological damages induced by ionizing radiation at the DNA scale, was used. The nanometric radial energy distributions around the nanoparticle were studied, and the processes (such as Auger deexcitation or dissociative electron attachment) participating in the dose deposition of proton therapy treatments in the presence of nanoparticles were evaluated. It has been reported that the architecture of Monte Carlo calculations plays a crucial role in the assessment of nanoparticle dose enhancement and that it may introduce a bias in the results or amplify the possible final dose enhancement. Thus, a dosimetric study of different cases was performed, considering Au and Gd nanoparticles, several nanoparticle sizes (from 4 to 50 nm), and several beam configurations (source-nanoparticle distances and source sizes). Results: This Monte Carlo study shows the influence of the simulations’ parameters on the local

  8. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  9. SU-E-J-69: Evaluation of the Lens Dose On the Cone Beam IGRT Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo-Llinares, R; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona Meseguer, V; Lliso-Valverde, F; Candela-Juan, C; Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Pujades, M [National Dosimetry Center, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the establishment of the IGRT as a standard technique, the extra dose that is given to the patients should be taken into account. Furthermore, it has been a recent decrease of the dose threshold in the lens, reduced to 0.5 Gy (ICRP ref 4825-3093-1464 on 21st April, 2011).The purpose of this work was to evaluate the extra dose that the lens is receive due to the Cone-Beam (CBCT) location systems in Head-and-Neck treatments. Methods: The On-Board Imaging (OBI) v 1.5 of the two Varian accelerators, one Clinac iX and one True Beam, were used to obtain the dose that this OBI version give to the lens in the Head-and-Neck location treatments. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard Dose Head protocol (100 kVp, 80 mA, 8 ms and 200 degree of rotation).The measurements were taken with thermoluminescence (TLD) EXTRAD (Harshaw) dosimeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom over the eye and under 3 mm of bolus material to mimic the lens position. The center of the head was placed at the isocenter. To reduce TLD energy dependence, they were calibrated at the used beam quality. Results: The average lens dose at the lens in the OBI v 1.5 systems of the Clinac iX and the True Beam is 0.071 and 0.076 cGy/CBCT, respectively. Conclusions: The extra absorbed doses that receive the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the new ICRP recommended threshold for the lens. However, the addition effect of several CBCT acquisition during the whole treatment should be taken into account.

  10. Evaluation of skin dose in tomographic radiographs of temporomandibular joint; Avaliacao da dose pele em radiografias tomograficas da articulacao tempromandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, S.B.; Chaves, F.C.; Rocha, F.E.F.C. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Khoury, H.J. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear]. E-mail: khoury@elogica.com.br

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the skin entrance dose, in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunctions submitted to computerized tomography. For this purpose, in a private medical establishment, in the city of Recife-Pe/Br, 40 patients were evaluated, in according to radiation doses received in eyes, thyroid and TMJ regions. The value found for eye region range from 0.004 to 0.125 mGy, for thyroid range from 0.002 to 0.113 mGy and for TMJ range from 0.112 to 0.541 mGy.

  11. Elucidating the role of dose in the biopharmaceutics classification of drugs: the concepts of critical dose, effective in vivo solubility, and dose-dependent BCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoftaki, Georgia; Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Valsami, Georgia; Macheras, Panos

    2012-11-01

    To develop a dose dependent version of BCS and identify a critical dose after which the amount absorbed is independent from the dose. We utilized a mathematical model of drug absorption in order to produce simulations of the fraction of dose absorbed (F) and the amount absorbed as function of the dose for the various classes of BCS and the marginal cases in between classes. Simulations based on the mathematical model of F versus dose produced patterns of a constant F throughout a wide range of doses for drugs of Classes I, II and III, justifying biowaiver claim. For Classes I and III the pattern of a constant F stops at a critical dose Dose(cr) after which the amount of drug absorbed, is independent from the dose. For doses higher than Dose(cr), Class I drugs become Class II and Class III drugs become Class IV. Dose(cr) was used to define an in vivo effective solubility as S(eff) = Dose(cr)/250 ml. Literature data were used to support our simulation results. A new biopharmaceutic classification of drugs is proposed, based on F, separating drugs into three regions, taking into account the dose, and Dose(cr), while the regions for claiming biowaiver are clearly defined.

  12. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel-group, dose-escalating, repeat dose study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamic effects and pharmacokinetics of the once daily rectal application of NRL001 suppositories for 14 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D; Duffin, A; Jacobs, A; Pediconi, C; Gruss, H J

    2014-03-01

    The 1R,2S stereoisomer of methoxamine hydrochloride, NRL001, is a highly selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist being developed for the local treatment of non-structural faecal incontinence caused by weak internal anal sphincter tone. This study investigated the steady state pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of 2 g rectal suppositories containing NRL001 in different strengths (7.5, 10, 12.5 or 15 mg). Healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years received 14 daily doses of NRL001 2 g suppositories or matching placebo. In each dose group nine participants received NRL001 and three received placebo. Blood samples to determine NRL001 concentrations were taken on Days 1, 7 and 14. Cardiovascular parameters were collected via electrocardiograms, Holter monitoring (three lead Holter monitor) and vital signs. Forty-eight volunteers were enrolled; 43 completed the study and were included in the PK analysis population. AUC and Cmax broadly increased with increasing dose, Tmax generally occurred between 4.0 and 5.0 h. Although the data did not appear strongly dose proportional, dose proportionality analysis did not provide evidence against dose proportionality as the log(dose) coefficients were not significantly < 1. NRL001 did not accumulate over time for any dose. Increasing NRL001 concentrations were related to changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. The most commonly reported adverse events (AEs) in the active treatment groups were paraesthesia and piloerection. Treatment with NRL001 was generally well tolerated over 14 days once daily dosing and plasma NRL001 did not accumulate over time. Treatment was associated with changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. AEs commonly reported with NRL001 treatment were events indicative of a systemic α-adrenergic effect. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Effective Dose of Positioning Scans for Five CBCT Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    dose was measured with metal –oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters for five CBCT devices in a postgraduate dental clinic... measured cosmic and terrestrial sources. Cosmic radiation is dependent on elevation and latitude; while it measures about 240 µSv per year at sea level...13  1.2  Effective Dose: Sources and Definitions ............................................................. 13  1.3  Measuring

  14. Evaluation of the population dose due to the gaseous emission of a radioisotopes production unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, A.M.P.L.; Jacomino, V.M.F.; Sordi, G.-M.A.A.

    1990-05-01

    In order to control the emission of gaseous radioactive iodine from the unit responsible for the production of radioisotopes of IPEN-CNEN/SP, a discharge monitoring is carried out. In 1988 an activity of 65 GBq of I-131 was discharged to the environment. Based upon this value and the site analysis, the effective equivalent dose in the general public was evaluated for normal operation and for an incidental discharge. The evaluation was carried out by using a diffusion atmospheric model, 500 to 7000 m away from the discharge point and using 8 different wind direction sectors. The critical group was identified as being the people who lives 3000 m far from the discharge point, in the diffusion sector NW. The dose evaluated at this point is 10 9 times lower than the annual dose limit for individual of the public, according to Radiological Protection Standards. The derived limit for discharge of iodine was also evaluated and it was concluded that the IPEN-CNEN/SP can increase their production up to a level which results in an annual discharge of 1,5 x 10 12 of I-131. (author) [pt

  15. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  16. Lateral topography for reducing effective dose in low-dose chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dong-Ho; Lim, Daekeon; Hwang, Wi-Sub; Park, Seong-Hoon; Jeong, Ok-man; Kang, Kyung Wook; Kang, Hohyung

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess radiation exposure during low-dose chest CT by using lateral topography and to compare the lateral topographic findings with findings obtained with anteroposterior topography alone and anteroposterior and lateral topography combined. From November 2011 to February 2012, 210 male subjects were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, and height of the men were recorded. All subjects were placed into one of three subgroups based on the type of topographic image obtained: anteroposterior topography, lateral topography, and both anteroposterior and lateral topography. Imaging was performed with a 128-MDCT scanner. CT, except for topography, was the same for all subjects. A radiologist analyzed each image, recorded scan length, checked for any insufficiencies in the FOV, and calculated the effective radiation dose. One-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were used to compare the effective radiation exposure and scan length between groups. The mean scan length in the anteroposterior topography group was significantly greater than that of the lateral topography group and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (p topography group (0.735 ± 0.033 mSv) was significantly lower than that for the anteroposterior topography group (0.763 ± 0.038 mSv) and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (0.773 ± 0.038) (p < 0.001). Lateral topographic low-dose CT was associated with a lower effective radiation dose and scan length than either anteroposterior topographic low-dose chest CT or low-dose chest CT with both anteroposterior and lateral topograms.

  17. Dose and effect relationship of radiation induced cancer and its influencing factors in experimental animals, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shunsaku; Sato, Fumiaki; Eto, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    The data of risk evaluation of external irradiation were integrated with animal experiments from the aspects of qualitative generalizations of characteristics of radiation induced tumors. Studies covered competition of cause of death, figure of dose-to-effect relationship, characteristics of low dose rate of irradiation, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high LET radiation, effects of feactionated irradiation, complex actions with chemical substances, effects of protectional medium, differences of radiosensitivity by species and strains, and age dependency of sensitivities. Competition of cause of death by time length of latent period and degree of malignancy of the disease. Discussion on competition of death suggested the following idea: 1) incidence of tumor induction in the individual level did not correspond to transformation in the cellular level, and 2) relative incidence of tumor induction after a certain dose of whole body irradiation did not indicate the relative sensitivity of each tissue, for the relationship between tumor incidence and exposure dose was not a linear relationship. The dose-to-effect relationship of tumor induction was decided by following factors: i) sensitivity on transformation of cells, ii) sensitivity on the death of potential tumor cells, and iii) competition of the cause of death. Tumor induction by low dose rate irradiation was also studied by comparing qualitative and quantitative differences between high dose rate single irradiation and a series of low dose rate irradiation. (Serizawa, K.)

  18. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only under the

  19. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  20. Effective dose delivered by conventional radiology to Aosta Valley population between 2002 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, F; Aimonetto, S; Catuzzo, P; Peruzzo Cornetto, A; Marchisio, P; Natrella, M; Rosanò, A M; Meloni, T; Pasquino, M; Tofani, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective Medical diagnostic procedures can be considered the main man-made source of ionising radiation exposure for the population. Conventional radiography still represents the largest contribution to examination frequency. The present work evaluates procedure frequency and effective dose from the majority of conventional radiology examinations performed at the Radiological Department of Aosta Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Method Effective dose to the patient was evaluated by means of the software PCXMC. Data provided by the radiological information system allowed us to obtain collective effective and per caput dose. Results The biggest contributors to per caput effective dose from conventional radiology are vertebral column, abdomen, chest, pelvis and (limited to females) breast. Vertebral column, pelvis and breast procedures show a significant dose increment in the period of the study. The mean effective dose per inhabitant from conventional radiology increased from 0.131 mSv in 2002 to 0.156 mSv in 2009. Combining these figures with those from our study of effective dose from CT (0.55 mSv in 2002 to 1.03 mSv in 2009), the total mean effective dose per inhabitant increased from 0.68 mSv to 1.19 mSv. The contribution of CT increased from 81% to 87% of the total. In contrast, conventional radiology accounts for 85% of the total number of procedures, but only 13% of the effective dose. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that conventional radiography still represents the biggest contributor to examination frequency in Aosta Valley in 2009. However, the frequency of the main procedures did not change significantly between 2002 and 2009. PMID:21937611

  1. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Oosterveld, Bernard; Oinam, Arun; Hudej, Robert; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. In a subset of patients from the

  2. Evaluation of occupational radiation dose of extremities on hysterosalpingography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipov, D.; Kotowski, S.T.A.

    2017-01-01

    In the Hysterosalpingography (HSG) exam there is always a professional present with their hands very close to the radiation field. Based on CNEN, individuals occupationally exposed to radiation have equivalent dose limit values for the extremities (500 mSv / year). The objective of the study was to verify the equivalent dose in the hand region of an IOE (Occupationally Exposed Individual) that performs the HSG test and to compare it with the CNEN limit and with similar studies. A humanoid phantom was used to simulate the patient and an ionization chamber, which was placed in the place commonly occupied by the professional. The equivalent hand dose result (∼ 30 mSv / year) equals 6% of the CNEN annual dose limit, but is close to most studies using fluoroscopes. Therefore, the optimization of radiological protection is necessary to reduce these results

  3. Evaluation of occupational exposure in intraoral radiography; Avaliacao da dose ocupacional em radiografia intraoral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, Cristiano; Barros, Frieda S.; Rocha, Anna S.P.S.; Godoi, Walmor C., E-mail: miguel_cristianoch@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: saicla@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: annarocha@yahoo.com, E-mail: walmor.godoi@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Tilly Junior, Joao G., E-mail: joao.tilly@derax.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (HC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas

    2014-07-01

    The intraoral radiography is widely performed in the dental office due to low cost and agility. The doses in intraoral radiology are considered low, however it is known that doses below the threshold for deterministic radiation has the potential to induce stochastic effects. An intraoral radiography has a risk of inducing fatal cancer or serious in order of 1:10,000,000. Besides the patient, the dentist may also be being exposed to radiation during the work with the radiographics practices. The bibliographies demonstrates the lack of information on radiation protection of dentists, however, the occupational dose reduction was observed in radiology over the past 14 years. This work aims to evaluate the effective dose of radiation to which workers can be exposed dentists in dental offices to perform intraoral radiographs. In this context, a study was be conducted between June 2013 and May 2014 with 44 professionals in Curitiba city. For each dentist was given a personal dosimeter to be used for 30 days. During this period, the number of radiographies and the length of the cable triggers of the X-ray equipment was registered and, the dosimeter´s dose was read. It was observed that the cables triggers meet regulatory standards and allow dentists to get the mean minimum distance of two meters from the radiation source in 93% of cases. Through analysis of the doses, it was concluded that occupational exposures of these workers are within the recommended threshold by regulatory 453/1998 of the Ministry of Health from Brazil. (author)

  4. Estimates of effective dose in adult CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mustafa Awad Elhaj.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of study was to estimate effective dose (E) in adult CT examinations for Toshiba X64 slice using CT. Exp version 2.5 software in Sudan. Using of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. lack of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. In order to achieve these objectives, data of CT-scanner has been collected from three hospitals ( ANH, ZSH and MMH). Data collected included equipment information and scan parameters for individual patients, who were used to asses. 300 adult patients underwent head, chest, abdomen-pelvis and peivis CT examinations. The CT1 w , CTD1 v ol, DLP, patient effective dos and organ doses were estimated, using CT exposure parameters and CT Exp version 2.5 software. A large variation of mean effective dose and organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scan length. The mean effective dose in this study in the Brain, PNS, Chest, pulmonary, Abdomen-pelvis, Pelvis, KUB and CTU were 3.2 mSv, 2.6 mSv, 18.9 mSv 17.6 mSv 27.1 mSv, 11.2 mSv, 9.6 mSv and 23.7 mSv respectively, and organ equivalent, doses presented in this study in this study for the eye lens (for head), lungs and thymus ( for chest) , liver, kidney and small intest ( for abdomen t-pelvis), bladder, uterus and gonads ( for pelvis), were 62.9 mSv, 39.5 mSv, 34.1 mSv, 53.9 mSv, 52.6 mSv, 58.1 mSv, 37 mSv, and 34.6 mSv, respectively. These values were mostly comparable to and slightly higher than the values of effective doses reported from similar studies the United Kingdom, Tanzania, Australia, Canada and Sudan. It was concluded that patient effective dose and organ doses could be substantially minimized through careful selection of scanning parameters based on clinical indications of study, patient size, and body

  5. Pharmacokinetics of single-dose sildenafil administered orally in clinically healthy dogs: Effect of feeding and dose proportionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akabane, R; Sato, T; Sakatani, A; Miyagawa, Y; Tazaki, H; Takemura, N

    2018-01-19

    Basic information related to the pharmacokinetics of sildenafil in dogs is scarce. This study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetic properties of oral sildenafil and determine the effect of feeding and dose proportionality. The effect of feeding on pharmacokinetics of sildenafil (1 mg/kg) was investigated using a crossover study with six dogs. In addition, the dose proportionality of sildenafil ranging 1-4 mg/kg was evaluated using five dogs in the fasted states. The plasma concentrations of sildenafil were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a noncompartmental analysis. Sildenafil administrations were well tolerated in all studies. Feeding reduced the area under the curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC inf ) and the maximum plasma concentration (C max ) significantly. The elimination half-life (T 1/2 ) did not differ between the fasted and the fed states. For dose proportionality, nonproportional increases in AUC inf and C max at 1-4 mg/kg doses were detected by a power model analysis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  7. [Effect of prostate matching on dose distribution by on board imager kV-CBCT image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Hideaki; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Fukunaga, Junichi; Hirose, Takaaki; Nagata, Hironori; Mohri, Issai; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Hirata, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of prostate matching on dose distribution using kilovolt cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) with image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Sixteen prostate cancer patients were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy to 76 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 38 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using "bone matching" and "prostate matching" based on planning CT and kV-CBCT. Prostate dose coverage was assessed by the proportion of the CTV fully encompassed by 95%, 98% isodose lines, and mean dose lines. As for rectal and bladder, dose coverage was assessed by volumes which received 40 Gy, 60 Gy, 70 Gy, 75 Gy and mean dose at treatment. And we calculated the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), accordingly. They were compared to the bone and prostate matching image. Our study found an improvement in dose usage in CTV and bladder which enabled us to compare the bone matching image and the prostate matching image. However, it did not improve dose usage in the rectal. Then we chose patients who were a large shift from bone matching image to prostate matching image. As a result, rectal dose and NTCP were reduced. Prostate matching is useful and safe when compared to bone matching because of improving CTV dose usage and reducing dose rectal and bladder.

  8. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. Material...... and methods In a subset of patients from the EMBRACE study, vaginal doses were evaluated. Doses at the applicator surface left/right and anterior/posterior and at 5 mm depth were measured. In addition, the dose at the Posterior–Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS) vaginal dose point and PIBS±2 cm......, corresponding to the mid and lower vagina, was measured. Results 153 patients from seven institutions were included. Large dose variations expressed in EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy were seen between patients, in particular at the top left and right vaginal wall (median 195 (range 61–947) Gy/178 (61–980) Gy...

  9. Dose and induction to cancer risk evaluation associated to use of X ray body scanners by transmission at airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de; Silva, Ademir Xavier da

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses the Monte Carlo MCNPX and the phantoms in male voxel and female voxel to evaluate the absorbed doses effective doses and the induction risk and the mortality due to cancer associated to exposures of individual submitted to X ray body scanners by transmission at various projections. The values of effective dose were calculated according to the recommended by the new ICRP 103 and the values of induction risks and mortality due to cancer were estimated through the document BEIR VII. (author)

  10. Evaluation of experimental animal biological state at exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.A.; Rejtarova, T.Je.; Chernyikov, G.B.; Timoshevs'ka, Je.V.; Kozozojeva, O.O.

    1997-01-01

    New approaches to quantitative evaluation of ionizing radiation absorbed dose within the low-dose range (up to 400 mGy) according to the degree of the organism biological response was developed. The purpose of the stage of the work published in Communication 1 is to evaluate the shifts in the animal behaviour and cellular composition of the blood at irradiation by the dose of 100,200 and 400 mGy. Distinct dose dependence of behaviour reactions and hematological indices within the dose range of 100-400 mGy was not noted

  11. Measurement of radioactive aerosol behavior during dismantling and reflection to the exposure dose evaluation - 16107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro; Kato, Masami

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive aerosol disperses slightly via contamination prevention systems such as control enclosures and filters when the nuclear installation is dismantled, and it might impact the environment. Therefore, when decommissioning is planned, it is necessary to assess the safety such as exposure dose evaluation to the public. For the radioactive aerosol, it is possible that the dispersion ratio is different according to the contamination condition, the dismantlement method of the material, nuclides (elements), etc. The radiation exposure evaluation for the decommissioning plan has been executed by operators in Japan based on a number of experiments (mostly cold tests) and overseas results. The decommissioning is now being carried out at the Tokai Power Station (GCR) and Fugen Decommissioning Engineering Center in Japan. In this study, the results data is acquired at the decommissioning sites, and the methodology and data for the exposure dose evaluation are verified and confirmed. These examination results will lead to the upgrading and improvement of the exposure evaluation methodology. In particular, the dismantlement work of connected piping of the heat exchanger (steam generator) was executed in the Tokai Power Station in 2008. In this study, we paid attention to the radionuclides of Co-60 and Cs-137 that adhered to piping, and the dispersion behavior of aerosol was measured and contamination prevention effect was assured. As a result, the data show that the cesium concentrates about four times higher than cobalt. Moreover, the effects of the prevention measures of contamination were confirmed and the behavior of the radioactive aerosol became clear and the effective findings about the dose evaluation of the dismantling were collected. (authors)

  12. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  13. Different doses of Pilates-based exercise therapy for chronic low back pain : a randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miyamoto, Gisela Cristiane; Franco, Katherinne Ferro Moura; van Dongen, Johanna M; Franco, Yuri Rafael Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Naiane Teixeira Bastos; Amaral, Diego Diulgeroglo Vicco; Branco, Amanda Nery Castelo; da Silva, Maria Liliane; van Tulder, Maurits W; Cabral, Cristina Maria Nunes

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-utility of the addition of different doses of Pilates to an advice for non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) from a societal perspective. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation. SETTING: Physiotherapy clinic in São Paulo,

  14. Comparative in vitro evaluation of four corticosteroid metered dose inhalers : Consistency of delivered dose and particle size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Tjalling W; Rottier, Bart L; Gjaltema, Doetie; Hagedoorn, Paul; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recent developments concerning pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the introduction of ciclesonide and the replacement of propellants. As the results of in vivo studies depend on pMDI performance, it is necessary to evaluate pMDIs in vitro

  15. Assessment of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb concentration in mineral waters from Parque das Águas de Lambari and Contendas, MG and evaluation of the committed effective doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakasugi, Denise S.M.; Damatto, Sandra R., E-mail: denise.sanny@usp.br, E-mail: damatto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The exploration of several Brazilian hydromineral resorts, that have springs of radioactive mineral water consumed by the population support the relevance of the present work. This study is being developed in the IPEN with the aid of the responsible for Parque das Águas de Lambari and Contendas. Thereby, this work aims to determine the activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb to verify the influence of seasonality in these water parks springs. Thereunto, gross alpha and beta measurements were used after radiochemical separation for these radionuclides determination and measurement in a low background proportional detector. The results showed that Parque das Águas de Lambari presented highest concentration values when compared with Contendas. In Parque das Águas de Contendas , the highest concentration values were 77 ± 5 mBq/L and 129 ± 5 mBq/L for {sup 226}Ra for Gasosa II springs and {sup 228}Ra for Gasosa I spring, respectively, which correspond to the spring season; for {sup 210}Pb, 27 ± 2 mBq/L for Magnesiana spring in the same season. In Parque das Águas de Lambari, the highest concentration values for {sup 226}Ra was 177 ± 2 mBq/L and for {sup 210}Pb, 36 ± 2 mBq/L, both in the Magnesiana spring, for the summer season and 135 ± 5 mBq/L for {sup 228}Ra, in Magnesiana spring, for the spring season. The data were analyzed through descriptive and correlational statistical techniques. Therefore, it was possible to evaluate the committed effective doses due to the consumption of these waters and to assess the radiological risk for the radionuclides studied. (author)

  16. Assessment of 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb concentration in mineral waters from Parque das Águas de Lambari and Contendas, MG and evaluation of the committed effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Denise S.M.; Damatto, Sandra R.

    2017-01-01

    The exploration of several Brazilian hydromineral resorts, that have springs of radioactive mineral water consumed by the population support the relevance of the present work. This study is being developed in the IPEN with the aid of the responsible for Parque das Águas de Lambari and Contendas. Thereby, this work aims to determine the activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb to verify the influence of seasonality in these water parks springs. Thereunto, gross alpha and beta measurements were used after radiochemical separation for these radionuclides determination and measurement in a low background proportional detector. The results showed that Parque das Águas de Lambari presented highest concentration values when compared with Contendas. In Parque das Águas de Contendas , the highest concentration values were 77 ± 5 mBq/L and 129 ± 5 mBq/L for 226 Ra for Gasosa II springs and 228 Ra for Gasosa I spring, respectively, which correspond to the spring season; for 210 Pb, 27 ± 2 mBq/L for Magnesiana spring in the same season. In Parque das Águas de Lambari, the highest concentration values for 226 Ra was 177 ± 2 mBq/L and for 210 Pb, 36 ± 2 mBq/L, both in the Magnesiana spring, for the summer season and 135 ± 5 mBq/L for 228 Ra, in Magnesiana spring, for the spring season. The data were analyzed through descriptive and correlational statistical techniques. Therefore, it was possible to evaluate the committed effective doses due to the consumption of these waters and to assess the radiological risk for the radionuclides studied. (author)

  17. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Oosterveld, Bernard; Oinam, Arun; Hudej, Robert; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. In a subset of patients from the EMBRACE study, vaginal doses were evaluated. Doses at the applicator surface left/right and anterior/posterior and at 5mm depth were measured. In addition, the dose at the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS) vaginal dose point and PIBS±2cm, corresponding to the mid and lower vagina, was measured. 153 patients from seven institutions were included. Large dose variations expressed in EQD2 with α/β=3Gy were seen between patients, in particular at the top left and right vaginal wall (median 195 (range 61-947)Gy/178 (61-980)Gy, respectively). At 5mm depth, doses were 98 (55-212)Gy/91 (54-227)Gy left/right, and 71 (51-145)Gy/67 (49-189)Gy anterior/posterior, respectively. The dose at PIBS and PIBS±2cm was 41 (3-81)Gy, 54 (32-109)Gy and 5 (1-51)Gy, respectively. At PIBS+2cm (mid vagina) dose variation was coming from BT. The variation at PIBS-2cm (lower vagina) was mainly dependent on EBRT field border location. This novel method for reporting vaginal doses coming from EBRT and BT through well-defined dose points gives a robust representation of the dose along the vaginal axis. In addition, it allows comparison of vaginal dose between patients from different centres. The doses at the PIBS points represent the doses at the mid and lower parts of the vagina. Large variations in dose throughout the vagina were observed between patients and centres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases from Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Effect of Radiation Dose Escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the extent of pain response and objective response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) for bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma according to RT dose. From January 2007 to June 2010, palliative RT was conducted for 103 patients (223 sites) with bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma. Treatment sites were divided into the high RT dose and low RT dose groups by biologically effective dose (BED) of 39 Gy10. Pain responses were evaluated using the numeric rating scale. Pain scores before and after RT were compared and categorized into 'Decreased', 'No change' and 'increased'. Radiological objective responses were categorized into complete response, partial response, stable disease and progression using modified RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) criteria; the factors predicting patients' survival were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 6 months (range, 0 to 46 months), and the radiologic responses existed in 67 RT sites (66.3%) and 44 sites (89.8%) in the high and low RT dose group, respectively. A dose-response relationship was found in relation to RT dose (p=0.02). Pain responses were 75% and 65% in the high and low RT dose groups, respectively. However, no statistical difference in pain response was found between the two groups (p=0.24). There were no differences in the toxicity profiles between the high and low RT dose groups. Median survival from the time of bone metastases diagnosis was 11 months (range, 0 to 46 months). The Child-Pugh classification at the time of palliative RT was the only significant predictive factor for patient survival after RT. Median survival time was 14 months under Child-Pugh A and 2 months under Child-Pugh B and C. The rate of radiologic objective response was higher in the high RT dose group. Palliative RT with a high dose would provide an improvement in patient quality of life through enhanced tumor response, especially in patients with proper liver function.

  19. Annual effective dose due to residential radon progeny in Sweden: Evaluations based on current risk projections models and on risk estimates from a nation-wide Swedish epidemiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, M.; Lagarde, F.

    1996-12-01

    Effective dose per unit radon progeny exposure to Swedish population in 1992 is estimated by the risk projection model based on the Swedish epidemiological study of radon and lung cancer. The resulting values range from 1.29 - 3.00 mSv/WLM and 2.58 - 5.99 mSv/WLM, respectively. Assuming a radon concentration of 100 Bq/m 3 , an equilibrium factor of 0.4 and an occupancy factor of 0.6 in Swedish houses, the annual effective dose for the Swedish population is estimated to be 0.43 - 1.98 mSv/year, which should be compared to the value of 1.9 mSv/year, according to the UNSCEAR 1993 report. 27 refs, tabs, figs

  20. Annual effective dose due to residential radon progeny in Sweden: Evaluations based on current risk projections models and on risk estimates from a nation-wide Swedish epidemiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, M. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Lagarde, F. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Medicine; Falk, R.; Swedjemark, G.A. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Effective dose per unit radon progeny exposure to Swedish population in 1992 is estimated by the risk projection model based on the Swedish epidemiological study of radon and lung cancer. The resulting values range from 1.29 - 3.00 mSv/WLM and 2.58 - 5.99 mSv/WLM, respectively. Assuming a radon concentration of 100 Bq/m{sup 3}, an equilibrium factor of 0.4 and an occupancy factor of 0.6 in Swedish houses, the annual effective dose for the Swedish population is estimated to be 0.43 - 1.98 mSv/year, which should be compared to the value of 1.9 mSv/year, according to the UNSCEAR 1993 report. 27 refs, tabs, figs.

  1. Preparation and the Biopharmaceutical Evaluation for the Metered Dose Transdermal Spray of Dexketoprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangding Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to develop a metered dose transdermal spray (MDTS formulation for transdermal delivery of dexketoprofen (DE. DE release from a series of formulations was assessed in vitro. Various qualitative and quantitative parameters like spray pattern, pump seal efficiency test, average weight per metered dose, and dose uniformity were evaluated. The optimized formulation with good skin permeation and an appropriate drug concentration and permeation enhancer (PE content was developed incorporating 7% (w/w, % DE, 7% (v/v, % isopropyl myristate (IPM, and 93% (v/v, % ethanol. In vivo pharmacokinetic study indicated that the optimized formulation showed a more sustainable plasma-concentration profile compared with the Fenli group. The antiinflammatory effect of DE MDTS was evaluated by experiments involving egg-albumin-induced paw edema in rats and xylene-induced ear swelling in mice. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction was used to evaluate the anti-nociceptive actions of DE MDTS. Pharmacodynamic studies indicated that the DE MDTS has good anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Besides, skin irritation studies were performed using rat as an animal model. The results obtained show that the MDTS can be a promising and innovative therapeutic system used in transdermal drug delivery for DE.

  2. Preparation and the Biopharmaceutical Evaluation for the Metered Dose Transdermal Spray of Dexketoprofen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huafei; Zhu, Zhuangzhi; Wu, Yubo; Luo, Jing; Wang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a metered dose transdermal spray (MDTS) formulation for transdermal delivery of dexketoprofen (DE). DE release from a series of formulations was assessed in vitro. Various qualitative and quantitative parameters like spray pattern, pump seal efficiency test, average weight per metered dose, and dose uniformity were evaluated. The optimized formulation with good skin permeation and an appropriate drug concentration and permeation enhancer (PE) content was developed incorporating 7% (w/w, %) DE, 7% (v/v, %) isopropyl myristate (IPM), and 93% (v/v, %) ethanol. In vivo pharmacokinetic study indicated that the optimized formulation showed a more sustainable plasma-concentration profile compared with the Fenli group. The antiinflammatory effect of DE MDTS was evaluated by experiments involving egg-albumin-induced paw edema in rats and xylene-induced ear swelling in mice. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction was used to evaluate the anti-nociceptive actions of DE MDTS. Pharmacodynamic studies indicated that the DE MDTS has good anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Besides, skin irritation studies were performed using rat as an animal model. The results obtained show that the MDTS can be a promising and innovative therapeutic system used in transdermal drug delivery for DE. PMID:24660066

  3. {sup 99m}Tc Auger electrons - Analysis on the effects of low absorbed doses by computational methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S., E-mail: adriana_tavares@msn.co [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (FEUP), Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, S/N, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Tavares, Joao Manuel R.S., E-mail: tavares@fe.up.p [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (FEUP), Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, S/N, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-03-15

    We describe here the use of computational methods for evaluation of the low dose effects on human fibroblasts after irradiation with Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) Auger electrons. The results suggest a parabolic relationship between the irradiation of fibroblasts with {sup 99m}Tc Auger electrons and the total absorbed dose. Additionally, the results on very low absorbed doses may be explained by the bystander effect, which has been implicated on the cell's effects at low doses. Further in vitro evaluation will be worthwhile to clarify these findings.

  4. Proactively evaluating training effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Harry E.

    2003-01-01

    A common model of the five phase Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) displays the fifth phase, evaluation, feeding back into the previous four phases: analysis, design, development, and implementation. Evaluating training effectiveness in PP and L's Nuclear Department is not simply the fifth phase of the SAT. PP and L has demonstrated a more effective methodology is realized when evaluation is built into each of the other four phases. At PP and L, evaluation is conducted formatively throughout the first four phases of the SAT process and summatively after implementation. (author)

  5. The Population Effective Dose of Medical Computed Tomography Examinations in Taiwan for 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Da-Ming; Tsai, Hui-Yu; Tyan, Yen-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Chen, Tou-Rong

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the annual effective dose per capita attributed to computed tomography (CT) examinations in 2013 and to predict the population effective dose from 2000 to 2013 in Taiwan. A CT examination database collected from 30 hospitals was divided into 22 procedures and classified into six regions: head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and other, respectively. The effective doses in different regions were evaluated by dose-length product (DLP) multiplied by conversion factors. The CT scan dose parameters were collected from 4,407 patients. For the six scanned regions, the percentages of patients scanned were: head (39.8%), neck (3.9%), chest (23.3%), abdomen (26.7%), pelvis (4.8%), and other (1.6%), respectively. The DLPs per patient (mGy·cm/patient) were head (1,071±225), neck (1,103±615), chest (724±509), abdomen (1,315±550), pelvis (1,231±620) and other (1,407±937), respectively. The number of CT examinations increased rapidly, with an average annual growth rate of 7.6%. The number of CT examinations in 2013 was 2.6 times that in 2000. The population effective dose was 0.30 mSv per capita in 2000 and increased to 0.74 mSv per capita in 2013, with an annual growth rate of 7.2%. The growth trend indicates that the effective dose will continue to rise in Taiwan. Some strategies should be applied to cope with this growth. Defining the CT dose reference level stipulated in official recommendations and encouraging the use of iterative reconstruction imaging instead of filtered back-projection imaging could be a useful method for optimizing the effective dose and image quality.

  6. Low-dose effects hypothesis and observations on NPP personal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, R.; Acheva, A.; Boteva, R.; Chobanova, N.; Djounova, J.; Gyuleva, I.; Ivanova, K.; Kurchatova, G.; Milchev, A.; Negoicheva, K.; Nikolov, V.; Panova, D.; Pejankov, I.; Rupova, I.; Stankova, K.; Zacharieva, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the modern world the use of various sources of ionizing radiation is nearly ubiquitous. They have numerous applications in industry, medicine, science, agriculture, etc. Radiation doses to workers nevertheless are commensurable to the natural background exposure. Published data on the health effects of occupational radiation exposure are often contradictory. Addressing the issue of „negative” (bystander effects, genomic instability) and „positive” (adaptive response, radiation hormesis) effects of low doses is important and has a significant social and economic impact. In this paper we summarize the results of our extensive monitoring of nuclear power plant (NPP) staff. We believe it is a cohort suitable for analysis of health effects at low doses, because of their good medical and dosimetric control. Our results rather support the idea of absence of adverse health effects in NPP workers. (author)

  7. Effective dose calculation in CT using high sensitivity TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To determine the effective dose for common paediatric CT examinations using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) mea surements. High sensitivity TLD chips (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, TLD-IOOH, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) were calibrated on a linac at an energy of 6 MY. A calibration was also performed on a superricial X-ray unit at a kilovoltage energy to validate the megavoltage cali bration for the purpose of measuring doses in the diagnostic energy range. The dose variation across large organs was assessed and a methodology for TLD placement in a 10 year old anthropomorphic phantom developed. Effective dose was calculated from the TLD measured absorbed doses for typical CT examinations after correcting for the TLD energy response and taking into account differences in the mass energy absorption coefficients for different tissues and organs. Results Using new tissue weighting factors recommended in ICRP Publication 103, the effective dose for a CT brain examination on a 10 year old was 1.6 millisieverts (mSv), 4.9 mSv for a CT chest exa ination and 4.7 mSv for a CT abdomen/pelvis examination. These values are lower for the CT brain examination, higher for the CT chest examination and approximately the same for the CT abdomen/ pelvis examination when compared with effective doses calculated using ICRP Publication 60 tissue weighting factors. Conclusions High sensitivity TLDs calibrated with a radiotherapy linac are useful for measuring dose in the diagnostic energy range and overcome limitations of output reproducibility and uniformity asso ciated with traditional TLD calibration on CT scanners or beam quality matched diagnostic X-ray units.

  8. The effects of various doses of ovaprim on reproductive performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artificial spawning of two African Catfish species viz: C. gariepinus and H. longifilis of 0.18 – 0.64kg and 0.53 – 1.63 kg respectively were carried out using various doses of Ovaprim with carp pituitary extract (C.P.E.) as the control. Oocyte maturation and ovulation were successfully effected with Ovaprim doses of 0.2, 0.25, ...

  9. Effectiveness of the Medical Emergency Team: the importance of dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daryl; Bellomo, Rinaldo; DeVita, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Up to 17% of hospital admissions are complicated by serious adverse events unrelated to the patients presenting medical condition. Rapid Response Teams (RRTs) review patients during early phase of deterioration to reduce patient morbidity and mortality. However, reports of the efficacy of these teams are varied. The aims of this article were to explore the concept of RRT dose, to assess whether RRT dose improves patient outcomes, and to assess whether there is evidence that inclusion of a physician in the team impacts on the effectiveness of the team. A review of available literature suggested that the method of reporting RRT utilization rate, (RRT dose) is calls per 1,000 admissions. Hospitals with mature RRTs that report improved patient outcome following RRT introduction have a RRT dose between 25.8 and 56.4 calls per 1,000 admissions. Four studies report an association between increasing RRT dose and reduced in-hospital cardiac arrest rates. Another reported that increasing RRT dose reduced in-hospital mortality for surgical but not medical patients. The MERIT study investigators reported a negative relationship between MET-like activity and the incidence of serious adverse events. Fourteen studies reported improved patient outcome in association with the introduction of a RRT, and 13/14 involved a Physician-led MET. These findings suggest that if the RRT is the major method for reviewing serious adverse events, the dose of RRT activation must be sufficient for the frequency and severity of the problem it is intended to treat. If the RRT dose is too low then it is unlikely to improve patient outcomes. Increasing RRT dose appears to be associated with reduction in cardiac arrests. The majority of studies reporting improved patient outcome in association with the introduction of an RRT involve a MET, suggesting that inclusion of a physician in the team is an important determinant of its effectiveness.

  10. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics, and Bioavailability of Higher Doses of Tocotrienols in Healthy Fed Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asaf A; Khan, Dilshad A; Silswal, Neerupma; Saleem, Shahid; Qureshi, Nilofer

    2016-01-01

    Background Tocotrienols has been known to lower serum lipid parameters below 500 mg/d, while increase lipid parameters at higher dose of 750 mg/d. δ-Tocotrienol has a novel inflammatory property of concentration-dependent inhibition and activation. Therefore, inhibition (anti-inflammatory) property of tocotrienols at low doses is useful for cardiovascular disease, whereas, activation (pro-inflammatory) property using high dose is found effective for treatments of various types of cancer. We have recently described plasma bioavailability of 125 mg/d, 250 mg/d and 500 mg/d doses of δ-tocotrienol in healthy fed subjects, which showed dose-dependent increases in area under the curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (Cmax). Hence, in the current study, higher doses of tocotrienols have used to analyze its effect on plasma pharmacokinetic parameters. Aims To evaluate the safety and bioavailability of higher doses (750 mg and 1000 mg) of annatto-based tocotrienols in healthy fed subjects. All four isomers (α-, β-, γ-, δ-) of tocols (tocotrienols and tocopherols) present in the plasmas of subjects were quantified and analyzed for various pharmacokinetic parameters. Study design An open-label, randomized study was performed to analyze pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of δ-tocotrienol in 6 healthy fed subjects. All subjects (3/dose) were randomly assigned to one of each dose of 750 mg or 1000 mg. Blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 h intervals and all isomers of α-,β-,γ-,δ-tocotrienols, and tocopherols in plasmas were quantified by HPLC. Results Oral administration of 750 and 1000 mg/d of tocotrienols resulted in dose-dependent increases in plasmas (ng/ml) AUCt0-t8 6621, 7450; AUCt0-∞ 8688, 9633; AUMC t0-∞ 52497, 57199; MRT 6.04, 5.93; Cmax 1444, 1592 (P<0.05), respectively, of δ-tocotrienol isomer. Moreover, both doses also resulted in plasmas Tmax 3.33–4 h; elimination half-life (t1/2 h) 2.74, 2.68; time of clearance (Cl-T, l/h) 0.086, 0

  11. A new method of real-time skin dose visualization. Clinical evaluation of fluoroscopically guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boujan, Fazel [Hopital Hautepierre, Service d' Imagerie 2 - Neuroradiologie, Strasbourg (France); University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Division of Neurointerventional Radiology, Imaging Department, Strasbourg (France); Clauss, Nicolas; Mertz, Luc [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Division of Radiation Physics and Radiation Safety, Imaging Department, Strasbourg (France); Santos, Emilie; Boon, Sjirk; Schouten, Gerard [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Dietemann, Jean-Louis [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Division of Neuroradiology and Neurointerventional, Imaging Department, Strasbourg (France)

    2014-11-15

    We have conducted a prospective study to clinically evaluate a new radiation dose observing tool that displays patient's peak skin dose (PSD) map in real time. The skin dose map (SDM) prototype quantifies the air kerma based on exposure parameters from the X-ray system. The accuracy of this prototype was evaluated with radiochromic films, which were used as a mean for PSD measurement. The SDM is a reliable tool that provides an accurate PSD estimation and location. SDM also has many advantages over the radiochromic films, such as real-time dose evaluation and easy access to critical operational parameters for physicians and technicians. (orig.)

  12. Dose rate effects on the radiation induced oxidation of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttafava, A.; Tavares, A.; Arimondi, M.; Zaopo, A.; Nesti, S.; Dondi, D.; Mariani, M.; Faucitano, A.

    2007-01-01

    The yields and spatial distribution of the products arising from the in source oxidation of 50 μm LDPE films induced by 60-Co gamma radiations and by 300 kev electrons have been investigated as a function of the dose rate. The dose rate was found to have a strong influence on the reaction, the hydroperoxides and carbonyls yields at the lowest gamma dose rate of 0.04 kGy/h being decreased by a factor of about three with increasing the gamma dose rate up to 0.69 kGy/h and by a factor of about 30 when operating at the e-beam dose rate of 1.5 kGy/s. The carbonyls depth concentration profiles, the EPR measurements on radicals intermediates and the experiments of post-irradiation oxidation are consistent with the conclusion that, as far as the gamma irradiation is concerned, the observed dose rate effects cannot be imputed to oxygen diffusion control and/or to the chain branching via hydroperoxides decomposition coupled to the longer times between the initiation events. The hypothesis of the dose rate acting on the kinetic chain length of the radioxidation which in turn implies a substantially uniform distribution of radicals in the amorphous phase attained through spur expansion is proposed

  13. Low dose effects detected by micronucleus assay in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Bojtor, I.; Kubasova, T.; Horvath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low doses of X-rays between 0.01 and 1 Gy were studied on whole blood samples of various individuals using the cytokinesis-blocked lymphocyte micronucleus assay as an endpoint. The adaptive response could be induced in G 0 cells by 0.01 Gy followed by 1 Gy challenging dose within a time period of 8 hours, in vitro. The probability distribution of micronucleus increments in those samples which had received very low doses in the range 0.01-0.05 Gy proved to be of asymmetrical type (i.e. lognormal) -very likely to the same shape which has been verified for unirradiated (control) population - while the variable turned to be normally distributed at or above 1 Gy. Profound changes have been experienced in the main characteristics of the linear dose - response relationship and in regression parameters, as well, when successively lessened dose ranges were studied toward 0.01 Gy. In the range below ∼ 0.2 Gy the response were found to be unrelated to the absorbed dose. These findings suggest that in (very) low dose range a higher attention should be needed to biological parameters like repair, protective mechanisms and antioxidant capacities, rather than to the absorbed radiation energy only. (author)

  14. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been devised to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats, and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines have been reviewed, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to human is discussed

  15. Dose-Time Effect of Crude Oil and Hydro-test Effluent on Freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The project therefore has provided a learning tool and a platform in evaluating the concentrations of the chemical and the duration of exposure required to produce the criterion effect. Moreover, test results validated the age long theory that 'the most important factor that determines the effect of any substance is the dose-time ...

  16. Absorbed and effective dose from newly developed cone beam computed tomography in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Nyeong; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2007-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides a lower dose and cost alternative to conventional CT, promising to revolutionize the practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absolved and effective doses of Implagraphy and VCT (Vatech Co., Hwasung, Korea) and compare them with those of panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 27 sites throughout the layers of Female ART Head and Neck Phantom for dosimetry. Implagraphy, VCT units, and Planmeca Proline XC panoramic unit were used for radiation exposure. Radiation weighted doses and effective doses were measured and calculated using 1990 and 2005 ICRP tissue weighting factors. Effective doses in Sv (ICRP 2005, ICRP 1990) were 90.19, 61.62 for Implagraphy at maxillay molar area, 123.20, 90.02 for Implagraphy at mandibular molar area, 183.55, 139.26 for VCT and 40.92, 27.16 for panoramic radiography. Effective doses for VCT and Implagraphy were only about 2.2 to 4.5 times greater than those for panoramic radiography. VCT and Implagraphy, CBCT machines recently developed in Korea, showed moderately low effective doses

  17. Absorbed and effective dose from newly developed cone beam computed tomography in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Nyeong; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides a lower dose and cost alternative to conventional CT, promising to revolutionize the practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absolved and effective doses of Implagraphy and VCT (Vatech Co., Hwasung, Korea) and compare them with those of panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 27 sites throughout the layers of Female ART Head and Neck Phantom for dosimetry. Implagraphy, VCT units, and Planmeca Proline XC panoramic unit were used for radiation exposure. Radiation weighted doses and effective doses were measured and calculated using 1990 and 2005 ICRP tissue weighting factors. Effective doses in Sv (ICRP 2005, ICRP 1990) were 90.19, 61.62 for Implagraphy at maxillay molar area, 123.20, 90.02 for Implagraphy at mandibular molar area, 183.55, 139.26 for VCT and 40.92, 27.16 for panoramic radiography. Effective doses for VCT and Implagraphy were only about 2.2 to 4.5 times greater than those for panoramic radiography. VCT and Implagraphy, CBCT machines recently developed in Korea, showed moderately low effective doses.

  18. New technology development for radiation dose measurement and evaluation based on the operational quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Lyul; Kim, B. H.; Lee, J. I.; Lim, K. S.; Song, M. Y.; Joo, G. S.; Kim, S. I.; Chang, I. S.

    2012-04-01

    · Development of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for multi-purpose radiation dosimetry - Development of a semi-automatic type OSL measurement system · Number of sample holders: 10 ea · Development of a built-in type reference radiation irradiation system using 50 kV-1 mA X-rays of the maximum dose rate of 230 mGy/s - Development of an automatic diameter control system and crystal growth system for making a new OSL material: LiMgF 3 : X, LiAlO 2 : C - Development of a procedure of retrospective accident dosimetry · Establishment of Practical Technology for Internal Dose Assessment - Development of the technology to the internal dose assessment for an injection of radionuclides and intercomparison on the evaluation results of the committed effective dose between the estimators of Korea · Construction of workplace monitoring technique by quantification of neutron fields - Preparation of the neutron spectra DB of various neutron fields and production of those dosimetric data: 29 kinds of neutron fields using a thermal neutron irradiator, a proton accelerator and a neutron generator - Neutron monitoring procedure at workplace using neutron fluence spectra

  19. Dose-dependent effects of alcohol administration on behavioral profiles in the MCSF test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Roman, Erika

    2016-02-01

    The acute effects of alcohol administration are age-, dose-, time- and task-dependent. Although generally considered to be a sedative drug, alcohol has both stimulatory and depressant effects on behavior, depending on dose and time. Alcohol-induced motor activating effects are consistently shown in mice but rarely demonstrated in adult, outbred rats using conventional behavioral tests. The aim of the present experiment was to study acute alcohol-induced effects on behavioral profiles in a more complex environment using the novel multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF) test, designed for assessing different behaviors in the same trial including locomotor activity. Adult male Wistar rats (Sca:WI) were administered one intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of alcohol (0.0 g/kg, 0.5 g/kg, 1.0 g/kg, or 1.5 g/kg) 5 min prior to the 30-min MCSF test. The two highest doses induced marked motor-suppressing effects. A significant interaction between group and time was found in general activity when comparing rats exposed to alcohol at 0.0 g/kg and 0.5 g/kg. In contrast to the 0.0 g/kg dose that increased the activity over time, animals administered the low dose (0.5 g/kg) demonstrated an initial high activity followed by a decline over time. No indications for acute alcohol-induced anxiolytic-like effects were found. The multivariate setting in the MCSF test appears to be sensitive for detecting motor-activating effects of low doses of alcohol as well as reduced locomotion at doses lower than in other behavioral tasks. The detection of subtle changes in behavior across time and dose is important for understanding alcohol-induced effects. This approach may be useful in evaluating alcohol doses that correspond to different degrees of intoxication in humans. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojreh, Azadeh; Weber, Michael; Homolka, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal-pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen-pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs - available only for CCT and thorax CT - showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 4. Evaluation of the quality of fixed dose combination anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Methodology: This was a cross sectional study whose objective was to determine the quality of 3 types of fixed dose combination (FDC) anti TB drugs namely 4FDC, 3FDC and 2FDC tablets available in Lusaka District by assessing the presence of active ingredients and the percentage content of these active ingredients ...

  2. A clinical evaluation of statin pleiotropy: statins selectively and dose-dependently reduce vascular inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien van der Meij

    Full Text Available Statins are thought to reduce vascular inflammation through lipid independent mechanisms. Evaluation of such an effect in atherosclerotic disease is complicated by simultaneous effects on lipid metabolism. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are part of the atherosclerotic spectrum of diseases. Unlike atherosclerotic occlusive disease, AAA is not lipid driven, thus allowing direct evaluation of putative anti-inflammatory effects. The anti-inflammatory potency of increasing doses (0, 20 or 40 mg/day simvastatin or atorvastatin was evaluated in 63 patients that were at least 6 weeks on statin therapy and who underwent open AAA repair. A comprehensive analysis using immunohistochemistry, mRNA and protein analyses was applied on aortic wall samples collected during surgery. The effect of statins on AAA growth was analyzed in a separate prospective study in incorporating 142 patients. Both statins equally effectively and dose-dependently reduced aortic wall expression of NFκB regulated mediators (i.e. IL-6 (P<0.001 and MCP-1 (P<0.001; shifted macrophage polarization towards a M2 phenotype (P<0.0003; selectively reduced macrophage-related markers such as cathepsin K and S (P<0.009 and 0.0027 respectively, and ALOX5 (P<0.0009, and reduced vascular wall NFκB activity (40 mg/day group, P<0.016. No effect was found on other cell types. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of statins to reduce AAA progression did not indicate an effect of statins on aneurysm growth (P<0.337. Hence, in the context of AAA the clinical relevance of statins pleiotropy appears minimal.

  3. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  4. Cosmic rays exposure during aircraft flight (3). Guideline and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Council of MEXT drew up the Guideline of Cosmic Ray Exposure Control for Air Crew in 2006. The content of the Guideline and evaluation methods of dose are explained. The Guideline stated five items for Airline Company. It consists of 1) exposure dose control for air crew, 2) evaluation methods of cosmic rays exposure dose of air crew, 3) explanation and education of cosmic rays exposure for air crew, 4) reading, record and store of cosmic rays exposure dose of air crew, and 5) health control of air crew. The doses of four airlines were calculated by the Civil Aeromedical Research Institute (CARI) code and the European Program package for the Calculation of Aviation Route Doses (EPCARD) code. The difference of two codes was about 15 to 25%. Japanese Internet System for Calculation of Aviation Route Doses (JISCAED) has been developed by Japan. (S.Y.)

  5. The effects of dose and diet on the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, B W; Underwood, C; McGowan, C M; Mills, P C

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of diet and dose on the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole in the horse. Six horses received two doses (1 and 4 mg/kg) of omeprazole orally once daily for 5 days. Each dose was evaluated during feeding either a high-grain/low-fibre (HG/LF) diet or an ad libitum hay (HAY) diet in a four-way crossover design. Plasma samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis on days 1 and 5. Plasma omeprazole concentrations were determined by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In horses being fed the HG/LF diet, on day 1, the area under the curve (AUC) and maximal plasma concentration (C max ) were higher on the 4 mg/kg dose than on the 1 mg/kg dose. The AUC was higher on day 5 compared to day 1 with the 4 mg/kg dose on the HG/LF diet. On days 1 and 5, the AUC and C max were higher in horses being fed the HG/LF diet and receiving the 4 mg/kg dose than in horses being fed the HAY diet and receiving the 1 mg/kg dose. These findings suggest that both dose and diet may affect pharmacokinetic variables of omeprazole in the horse. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Benzheng; Ma Shumei; Yi Heqing; Kong Dejuan; Zhao Guangtong; Gao Lin; Liu Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  7. Quantitative evaluation of radiation dose by γ-H2AX on a microfluidic chip in a miniature fluorescence cytometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Junsheng; Song, Wendong; Song, Yongxin; Xu, Dan; Zhang, Min; Pan, Xinxiang; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Dongqing

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of radiation dose is very important for the detection of radiation damage. γ-H2AX is a popular biological dosimeter to evaluate the radiation effect. Typically, bulky and expensive commercial flow cytometers are used to detect γ-H2AX. This paper presents a miniaturized and high sensitive cytometer using a microfluidic chip for evaluating the radiation dose by detecting the mean immunofluorescence intensity of γ-H2AX. A compact optical focusing system and a shift-phase differential amplifier are designed to improve the detection sensitivity. Sample lymphocyte cells are stained by FITC fluorescent dye after being irradiated by UVC. Comparison experiments between the developed miniature cytometer and a commercial flow cytometer were conducted under different radiation doses. The developed microfluidic cytometer also demonstrates a good linear correlation between the measured fluorescence intensity and the irradiation dose with a detection limit similar to that of the commercial flow cytometer. The developed cytometer can evaluate quantitatively the radiation dose by the mean fluorescence intensity of γ-H2AX with a significantly smaller amount of blood samples than a commercial flow cytometer. - Highlights: • A new microfluidic cytometer for evaluating irradiation dose was developed. • The utility of this biosensor is verified by comparison experiments using FCM. • The developed cytometer is small size, high sensitivity, low cost, and simple. • The cytometer can dramatically reduce sample consumption and analysis time

  8. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of Silicon. We obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, we study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates.

  9. Application of a sitting MIRD phantom for effective dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R. H.; Van Riper, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    In typical realistic scenarios, dose factors due to 60 Co contaminated steel, used in consumer products, cannot be approximated by standard exposure geometries. It is then necessary to calculate the effective dose using an appropriate anthropomorphic phantom. MCNP calculations were performed using a MIRD human model in two settings. In the first, a male office worker is sitting in a chair containing contaminated steel, surrounded by contaminated furniture. In the second, a male driver is seated inside an automobile, the steel of which is uniformly contaminated. To accurately calculate the dose to lower body organs, especially the gonads, it was essential to modify the MIRD model to simulate two sitting postures: chair and driving position. The phantom modifications are described, and the results of the calculations are presented. In the case of the automobile scenarios, results are compared to those obtained using an isotropic fluence-to-dose conversion function. (authors)

  10. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Quantitative evaluation of radiation dose rates for depleted uranium in PRIDE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Il Je; Sim, Jee Hyung; KIm, Yong Soo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiation dose rates in PRIDE facility is evaluated quantitatively for assessing radiation safety of workers because of large amounts of depleted uranium being handled in PRIDE facility. Even if direct radiation from depleted uranium is very low and will not expose a worker to significant amounts of external radiation. ORIGEN-ARP code was used for calculating the neutron and gamma source term being generated from depleted uranium (DU), and the MCNP5 code was used for calculating the neutron and gamma fluxes and dose rates. The neutron and gamma fluxes and dose rates due to DU on spherical surface of 30 cm radius were calculated with the variation of DU mass and density. In this calculation, an imaginary case in which DU density is zero was added to check the self-shielding effect of DU. In this case, the DU sphere was modeled as a point. In case of DU mixed with molten salt of 50-250 g, the neutron and gamma fluxes were calculated respectively. It was found that the molten salt contents in DU had little effect on the neutron and the gamma fluxes. The neutron and the gamma fluxes, under the respective conditions of 1 and 5 kg mass of DU, and 5 and 19.1 g.cm{sup -3} density of DU, were calculated with the molten salt (LiCl+KCl) of 50 g fixed, and compared with the source term. As the results, similar tendency was found in neutron and gamma fluxes with the variation of DU mass and density when compared with source spectra, except their magnitudes. In the case of the DU mass over 5 kg, the dose rate was shown to be higher than the environmental dose rate. From these results, it is concluded that if a worker would do an experiment with DU having over 5 kg of mass, the worker should be careful in order not to be exposed to the radiation.

  12. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  13. Dose-response tests and semi-field evaluation of lethal and sub-lethal effects of slow release pyriproxyfen granules (Sumilarv®0.5G) for the control of the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbare, Oscar; Lindsay, Steven W; Fillinger, Ulrike

    2013-03-14

    Recently research has shown that larviciding can be an effective tool for integrated malaria vector control. Nevertheless, the uptake of this intervention has been hampered by the need to re-apply larvicides frequently. There is a need to explore persistent, environmentally friendly larvicides for malaria vector control to reduce intervention efforts and costs by reducing the frequency of application. In this study, the efficacy of a 0.5% pyriproxyfen granule (Surmilarv®0.5G, Sumitomo Chemicals) was assessed for the control of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis, the major malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa. Dose-response and standardized field tests were implemented following standard procedures of the World Health Organization's Pesticide Evaluation Scheme to determine: (i) the susceptibility of vectors to this formulation; (ii) the residual activity and appropriate retreatment schedule for field application; and, (iii) sub-lethal impacts on the number and viability of eggs laid by adults after exposure to Sumilarv®0.5G during larval development. Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis were highly susceptible to Sumilarv®0.5G. Estimated emergence inhibition (EI) values were very low and similar for both species. The minimum dosage that completely inhibited adult emergence was between 0.01-0.03 parts per million (ppm) active ingredient (ai). Compared to the untreated control, an application of 0.018 ppm ai prevented 85% (95% confidence interval (CI) 82%-88%) of adult emergence over six weeks under standardized field conditions. A fivefold increase in dosage of 0.09 ppm ai prevented 97% (95% CI 94%-98%) emergence. Significant sub-lethal effects were observed in the standardized field tests. Female An. gambiae s.s. that were exposed to 0.018 ppm ai as larvae laid 47% less eggs, and females exposed to 0.09 ppm ai laid 74% less eggs than females that were unexposed to the treatment. Furthermore, 77% of eggs laid by females exposed to 0

  14. Epidemiology and effects on health of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Artalejo, F.; Andres Manzano, B. de; Rel Calero, J. del

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the concept and aims of epidemiology, its methods and contribution to the knowledge of the effects of low ionizing radiation doses on health. The advantages of epidemiological studies for knowing the consequences of living near nuclear facilities and the effects of occupational exposure to radiations are also described. (Author) 43 refs

  15. Effect of vertical angulation to dose of thyroid glands in periapical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Keitaro; Satoh, Keiji; Furumoto, Keiichi

    1992-01-01

    Much attention has been given to reducing the dose of radiation in dental radiography in terms of the highest risk for the head and neck. Organ doses in intraoral radiography vary greatly with subtle differences in vertical angulation. Quantitative determination of doses delivered to the thyroid gland is thus necessary in determining adequate doses and risk for dental radiography. A personal computer program, prepared for estimating organ doses under various radiographic conditions, was used to evaluate the effect of vertical angulation on the dose delivered to the thyroid gland in radiography of the maxillary and mandibular incisors. Review of the literature revealed that the calculated dose delivered to the thyroid gland is approximately in accordance with the data of the actual determination under the same radiographic conditions. The dose-dependence of radiation delivered to the thyroid gland on vertical angulation of the maxilla was much more than that of the mandible. In the mandible, the dose delivered to the thyroid gland increased about three fold at a field size of 6 cmφ and about 1.5 fold at 8 cmφ when the vertical angulation changed from -40deg to 0deg. In the maxilla, the delivered dose increased about 480 times at a field size of 6 cmφ when vertical angulation changed from 0deg to 50deg and rapidly increased about 280 times at 8 cmφ when the angulation changed from 0deg to 40deg. The dose of radiation delivered to the thyroid gland was evaluated as a function of product of the irradiated volume within the primary beam directed at the thyroid gland and the inverse square of the distance between a subject's surface and the thyroid gland. (N.K.)

  16. Effect of vertical angulation to dose of thyroid glands in periapical radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoi, Keitaro; Satoh, Keiji; Furumoto, Keiichi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry)

    1992-10-01

    Much attention has been given to reducing the dose of radiation in dental radiography in terms of the highest risk for the head and neck. Organ doses in intraoral radiography vary greatly with subtle differences in vertical angulation. Quantitative determination of doses delivered to the thyroid gland is thus necessary in determining adequate doses and risk for dental radiography. A personal computer program, prepared for estimating organ doses under various radiographic conditions, was used to evaluate the effect of vertical angulation on the dose delivered to the thyroid gland in radiography of the maxillary and mandibular incisors. Review of the literature revealed that the calculated dose delivered to the thyroid gland is approximately in accordance with the data of the actual determination under the same radiographic conditions. The dose-dependence of radiation delivered to the thyroid gland on vertical angulation of the maxilla was much more than that of the mandible. In the mandible, the dose delivered to the thyroid gland increased about three fold at a field size of 6 cm[phi] and about 1.5 fold at 8 cm[phi] when the vertical angulation changed from -40deg to 0deg. In the maxilla, the delivered dose increased about 480 times at a field size of 6 cm[phi] when vertical angulation changed from 0deg to 50deg and rapidly increased about 280 times at 8 cm[phi] when the angulation changed from 0deg to 40deg. The dose of radiation delivered to the thyroid gland was evaluated as a function of product of the irradiated volume within the primary beam directed at the thyroid gland and the inverse square of the distance between a subject's surface and the thyroid gland. (N.K.).

  17. Trends and the determination of effective doses for standard X-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.M.; Neduzak, C.; Gallet, J.; Sandeman, J.

    2001-01-01

    Trends in the entrance skin exposures (air kerma) for standard x-ray imaging procedures are reported for the Province of Manitoba, Canada. Average annual data per procedure using standard phantoms and standard ion chambers have been recorded since 1981. For example, chest air kerma (backscatter included) has decreased from 0.14 to 0.09 mGy. Confounding factors may negate the gains unless facility quality control programs are maintained. The data were obtained for a quality assurance and regulatory compliance program. Quoting such data for risk evaluation purposes lacks rigor hence a compartment model for organ apportioning, using organ absorbed doses and weighting factors, has been applied to determine effective dose per procedure. The effective doses for the standard procedures are presented, including the value of 0.027 mSv (1999) calculated for the effective dose in PA chest imaging. (author)

  18. Thermal dose requirement for tissue effect: experimental and clinical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, Mark; Viglianti, Benjamin L.; Lora-Michiels, Michael; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hanson, Margaret A.

    2003-06-01

    In this review we have summarized the basic principles that govern the relationships between thermal exposure (temperature and time of exposure) and thermal damage, with an emphasis on normal tissue effects. We have also attempted to identify specific thermal dose information (for safety and injury) for a variety of tissues in a variety of species. We address the use, accuracy and difficulty of conversion of an individual time and temperature (thermal dose) to a standardized value (eg equivalent minutes at 43degC) for comparison of thermal treatments. Although, the conversion algorithm appears to work well within a range of moderately elevated temperatures (2-15degC) above normal physiologic baseline (37-39degC) there is concern that conversion accuracy does not hold up for temperatures which are minimally or significantly above baseline. An extensive review of the literature suggests a comprehensive assessment of the "thermal dose-to-tissue effect" has not previously been assembled for most individual tissues and never been viewed in a semi-comprehensive (tissues and species) manner. Finally, we have addressed the relationship of thermal dose-to-effect vs. baseline temperature. This issues is important since much of the thermal dose-to-effect information has been accrued in animal models with baseline temperatures 1-2 deg higher than that of humans.

  19. Evaluation of radiation dose to neonate on special care baby unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A. Y. I.

    2012-08-01

    A total of 132 patients in One-armed Maternity Hospital in Khartoum State. ESDs from patient exposure parameters using DosCal software. Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factor and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean patient dose was 80 μGy per procedures. The mean organ doses per procedures were ranged between 0.04 to 0.0002 mGy per procedure. The mean effective dose was 0.02 mSv. Patients' doses showed wide variations. This variation in patient dose could be attributed to the variation in patient weight, tube voltage and tube current time product.The radiation risk per procedures was very low. However, due to their sensitive tissues, additional dose reduction is justifiable. A dedicated x-ray machine with additional filtration is recommended for patient dose reductions. (Author)

  20. Training effectiveness evaluation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    NAESCO's Training Effectiveness Evaluation Model (TEEM) integrates existing evaluation procedures with new procedures. The new procedures are designed to measure training impact on organizational productivity. TEEM seeks to enhance organizational productivity through proactive training focused on operation results. These results can be identified and measured by establishing and tracking performance indicators. Relating training to organizational productivity is not easy. TEEM is a team process. It offers strategies to assess more effectively organizational costs and benefits of training. TEEM is one organization's attempt to refine, manage and extend its training evaluation program

  1. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric coronary computed tomography: assessment of effective dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Calmon, Raphael; Boddaert, Nathalie; Khraiche, Diala; Bonnet, Damien; Raimondi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of different protocols on radiation dose and image quality for paediatric coronary computed tomography (cCT). From January-2012 to June-2014, 140 children who underwent cCT on a 64-slice scanner were included. Two consecutive changes in imaging protocols were performed: 1) the use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR); 2) the optimization of acquisition parameters. Effective dose (ED) was calculated by conversion of the dose-length product. Image quality was assessed as excellent, good or with significant artefacts. Patients were divided in three age groups: 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years. The use of ASIR combined to the adjustment of scan settings allowed a reduction in the median ED of 58 %, 82 % and 85 % in 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years group, respectively (7.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.1 ± 0.7 mSv, 5.5 ± 1.6 vs 1 ± 1.9 mSv and 5.3 ± 5.0 vs 0.8 ± 2.0 mSv, all p < 0,05). Prospective protocol was used in 51 % of children. The reduction in radiation dose was not associated with reduction in diagnostic image quality as assessed by the frequency of coronary segments with excellent or good image quality (88 %). cCT can be obtained at very low radiation doses in children using ASIR, and prospective acquisition with optimized imaging parameters. (orig.)

  2. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  3. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations

  4. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M [Univ Florida, Jacksonville Beach, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations.

  5. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luevano-Gurrola

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  6. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-09-30

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  7. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-01-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  8. Effects of low-dose niacin on dyslipidemia and serum phosphorus in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jin Kang

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Low-dose niacin had a low frequency of adverse effects and also improved dyslipidemia, lowered serum phosphorus level, and increased GFR in patients with CKD. Further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose niacin for renal progression of CKD.

  9. Pediatric and staff dose evaluation in fluoroscopy upper gastrointestinal series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipov, Danielle; Nascimento, Eduarda X. do; Lacerda, Camila M., E-mail: diilipov@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UFTPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R.; Ledesma, Jorge A.; Denyak, Valeriy; Legnani, Adriano, E-mail: ledesmajorgealberto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluoroscopy upper GI series are widely used for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children. Pediatric radiological procedures bring concern due to the high life expectancy and radiosensitivity on children, as well as the risks to the exposed staff Important studies present the mean KAP values on patients and the European Commission (EC) recommends specific techniques for these procedures. For the occupational expositions, staffs doses must be within the annual limit, according to the CNEN 3.01. Based on those data, the aims of the current study are: analyzing the upper GI procedure; determining the KAP on the patient and estimating the annual equivalent dose on the staff's crystalline. LiF :Mg,Ti TLDs were positioned on the patient upper chest center, so that the entrance surface air kerma could be determined. The field size on the patient s surface and the kerma were multiplied so that the KAP was obtained. LiF:Mg,Cu,P dosimeters were used to estimate the equivalent dose on the staff s crystalline. The results showed discrepancy in the kVp range and in the exposure time when compared to the EC data. The mean KAP values for the 0-1,1-3 and 3-10 years old patients were, respectively: 102 ± 19 cGy.cm2, 142 ± 25 cGy.cm2 and 323 ± 39 cGy.cm2; which are higher than the KAPs presented in the studies used for comparison. The estimated annual equivalent dose in the staff s crystalline would be approximately 85% higher than the limit set by the CNEN. Analyzing the data, it becomes clear that an optimization implementation is necessary in order to reduce the radiation levels. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the stepwise collimation method for the reduction of the patient dose in full spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunyoung [Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Injeong [Seoul National University Hospital Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myeonggeun [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose reduction when using the stepwise collimation method for scoliosis patients undergoing full spine radiography. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to acquire dose vs. volume data for organs at risk (OAR) in the human body. While the effective doses in full spine radiography were reduced by 8, 15, 27 and 44% by using four different sizes of the collimation, the doses to the skin were reduced by 31, 44, 55 and 66%, indicating that the reduction of the dose to the skin is higher than that to organs inside the body. Although the reduction rates were low for the gonad, being 9, 14, 18 and 23%, there was more than a 30% reduction in the dose to the heart, suggesting that the dose reduction depends significantly on the location of the OARs in the human body. The reduction rate of the secondary cancer risk based on the excess absolute risk (EAR) varied from 0.6 to 3.4 per 10,000 persons, depending on the size of the collimation. Our results suggest that the stepwise collimation method in full spine radiography can effectively reduce the patient dose and the radiation-induced secondary cancer risk.

  11. Radiation dose evaluation in head and neck MDCT examinations with a 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Fujii, Keisuke; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Yamauchi, Masato

    2010-07-01

    CT examinations of the head and neck are the most commonly performed CT studies in children, raising concern about radiation dose and their risks to children. The purpose of this study was to clarify radiation dose levels for children of 6 years of age undergoing head and neck multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations. Radiation doses were measured with small-sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters that were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within a standard 6-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. Organ and effective doses of brain CT were evaluated for 19 protocols in nine hospitals on various (2-320 detector rows) MDCT scanners. The maximum value of mean organ dose in brain CT was 34.3 mGy for brain. Maximum values of mean doses for the radiosensitive lens and thyroid were 32.7 mGy for lens in brain CT and 17.2 mGy for thyroid in neck CT. seventy-fifth percentile of effective dose distribution in brain CT was approximately the same as the diagnostic reference level (DRL) in the 2003 UK survey. The results of this study would encourage revision of MDCT protocols in pediatric head and neck CT examinations for dose reduction and protocol standardization.

  12. Radiation dose evaluation in head and neck MDCT examinations with a 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji [Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Fujii, Keisuke [Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiological Protection, Chiba (Japan); Yamauchi, Masato [Aichi Medical University Hospital, Division of Radiology, Nagakute-cho, Aichi-gun, Aichi (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    CT examinations of the head and neck are the most commonly performed CT studies in children, raising concern about radiation dose and their risks to children. The purpose of this study was to clarify radiation dose levels for children of 6 years of age undergoing head and neck multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations. Radiation doses were measured with small-sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters that were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within a standard 6-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. Organ and effective doses of brain CT were evaluated for 19 protocols in nine hospitals on various (2-320 detector rows) MDCT scanners. The maximum value of mean organ dose in brain CT was 34.3 mGy for brain. Maximum values of mean doses for the radiosensitive lens and thyroid were 32.7 mGy for lens in brain CT and 17.2 mGy for thyroid in neck CT. seventy-fifth percentile of effective dose distribution in brain CT was approximately the same as the diagnostic reference level (DRL) in the 2003 UK survey. The results of this study would encourage revision of MDCT protocols in pediatric head and neck CT examinations for dose reduction and protocol standardization. (orig.)

  13. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Wilson, David L., E-mail: dlw@case.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, P{sub C}. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit

  14. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, P C . Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit and

  15. Identification and dose evaluation of irradiated beef containing bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangiacotti, M.; Alberti, A.; Fuochi, P.G.; Chiesa, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Food irradiation is a well-established technique to extend the food shelf life and to reduce the food-related health hazards caused by pathogenic micro-organisms. At present, radiation treatment is permitted for various categories of food and food ingredients in many countries. At the European level, irradiation of food is regulated by the European Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC. Community legislation states that any food or food ingredients, authorised in the European Union, must be labelled with the word 'irradiated' and that every year each Member State has to carry out checks at the product marketing stage to enforce correct labelling. The present work aimed at identifying irradiated beef meat by using a reliable and sensitive detection of DNA comets as screening biological method and performing an Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry as confirmatory qualitative standard. The influence of storage conditions and time after irradiation on DNA degradation was also investigated. Furthermore the application of ESR technique as a quantitative method was successfully applied to beef bones, using the approach of calibration curve. Results, although the limited statistics, proved for reliability of the dose reconstruction method and blind tests were carried out resulting in very satisfactory difference between actual treatment dose and reconstructed dose.

  16. Predicted effects of countermeasures on radiation doses from contaminated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Nielsen, S.P.; Nielsen, F.

    1993-02-01

    Quantitative assessments of the effects on radiation-dose reductions from nine typical countermeasures against accidental fod contamination have been carried out with dynamic radioecological models. The foodstuffs are assumed to be contaminated with iodine-131, caesium-134 and caesium-137 after a release of radioactive materials from the Ringhals nuclear power station in Sweden resulting from a hypothetical core melt accident. The release of activity of these radionuclides is assumed at 0.07% of the core inventory of the unit 1 reactor (1600 TBq of I-131, 220 TBq of Cs-134 and 190 TBq of Cs-137). Radiation doses are estimated for the 55,000 affected inhabitants along the south-eastern coast of Sweden eating locally produced foodstuffs. The average effective dose equivalent to an individual in the critical group is predicted to be 2.9 mSv from food consumption contaminated with I-131. An accident occurring during winter is estimated to cause average individual doses of 0.32 mSv from Cs-134 and 0.47 mSv from Cs-137, and 9.4 mSv and 6.8 mSv from Cs-134 and Cs-137, respectively, for an accident occurring during summer. Doses from the intake of radioiodine may be reduced by up to a factor of 60 by rejecting contaminated food for 30 days. For the doses from radiocaesium, the largest effect is found form deep ploughing which may reduce the dose by up to a factor of 80. (au) (12 tabs., 6 ills., 19 refs.)