WorldWideScience

Sample records for effective dose coefficients

  1. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  2. A conversion coefficient from dose-area products to effective doses for patients in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kenji; Yosue, Takashi [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Sakaino, Rie; Harata, Yasuo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2002-06-01

    A conversion coefficient from dose-area products to effective doses was proposed as a practical estimator of patient health detriments from intraoral radiography. According to the tissue-dose data reported by Gibbs et al. (Dentomaxillofac. Radiol., 1987 and 1988) and the tissue weighting factors recommended in ICRP Publication 60, the effective doses and the dose-area products were calculated at 70, 80, and 90 kV for E-speed films employed at each of seven geometries using bisecting angle, paralleling, and bitewing techniques with round or rectangular collimated beams. The focus-skin distances were 20 cm for the short cone and 40 cm for the long cone, respectively. From a total of 90 sets of exposure factors in intraoral radiographic examinations for adults, the effective doses were in the range of 0.38 {mu}Sv to 8.0 {mu}Sv, and the corresponding dose-area products were 0.58 cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and 7.6 cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}. The obtained linear regression coefficient to convert the dose-area product to the effective dose was 0.97 {mu}Sv/cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}. We conclude that effective doses can be estimated from the dose-area products if an uncertainty of a factor of two is acceptable in intraoral radiography. (author)

  3. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, F.R.A. [Centro regional de Ciencias Nucleares, CRCN/CNEN, Rua Conego Barata, 999, Tamarineira, Recife, PE (Brazil); Kramer, R.; Vieira, J.W.; Khoury, H.J. [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, DEN/UFPE, Cidade Universitaria, Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br

    2004-07-01

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  4. Organ and Effective Dose Coefficients for Cranial and Caudal Irradiation Geometries: Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; Hiller, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations by ICRP Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors, and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to neutrons ranging in energy from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6 radiation transport code and the adult reference voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above about 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.

  5. Photon fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients calculated from a Saudi population-based phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, A. K.; Altaher, K.; Hussein, M. A.; Amer, M.; Farid, K. Y.; Alghamdi, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we will present a new set of photon fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients using the Saudi population-based voxel phantom developed recently by our group. The phantom corresponds to an average Saudi male of 173 cm tall weighing 77 kg. There are over 125 million voxels in the phantom each of which is 1.37×1.37×1.00 mm3. Of the 27 organs and tissues of radiological interest specified in the recommendations of ICRP Publication 103, all but the oral mucosa, extrathoracic tissue and the lymph nodes were identified in the current version of the phantom. The bone surface (endosteum) is too thin to be identifiable; it is about 10 μm thick. The dose to the endosteum was therefore approximated by the dose to the bones. Irradiation geometries included anterior-posterior (AP), left (LLAT) and rotational (ROT). The simulations were carried out with the MCNPX code version 2.5.0. The fluence in free air and the energy depositions in each organ were calculated for monoenergetic photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV to obtain the conversion coefficients. The radiation and tissue weighting factors were taken from ICRP Publication 60 and 103. The results from this study will also be compared with the conversion coefficients in ICRP Publication 116.

  6. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M. [Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of photon organ and effective dose coefficients for PIMAL stylized phantom in bent positions in standard irradiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, Shaheen; Hiller, Mauritius [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reed, K.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Computational phantoms with articulated arms and legs have been constructed to enable the estimation of radiation dose in different postures. Through a graphical user interface, the Phantom wIth Moving Arms and Legs (PIMAL) version 4.1.0 software can be employed to articulate the posture of a phantom and generate a corresponding input deck for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. In this work, photon fluence-to-dose coefficients were computed using PIMAL to compare organ and effective doses for a stylized phantom in the standard upright position with those for phantoms in realistic work postures. The articulated phantoms represent working positions including fully and half bent torsos with extended arms for both the male and female reference adults. Dose coefficients are compared for both the upright and bent positions across monoenergetic photon energies: 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 MeV. Additionally, the organ doses are compared across the International Commission on Radiological Protection's standard external radiation exposure geometries: antero-posterior, postero-anterior, left and right lateral, and isotropic (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, and ISO). For the AP and PA irradiation geometries, differences in organ doses compared to the upright phantom become more profound with increasing bending angles and have doses largely overestimated for all organs except the brain in AP and bladder in PA. In LLAT and RLAT irradiation geometries, energy deposition for organs is more likely to be underestimated compared to the upright phantom, with no overall change despite increased bending angle. The ISO source geometry did not cause a significant difference in absorbed organ dose between the different phantoms, regardless of position. Organ and effective fluence-to-dose coefficients are tabulated. In the AP geometry, the effective dose at the 45 bent position is overestimated compared to the upright phantom below 1 MeV by as much as 27% and 82% in the

  8. Comparison of photon organ and effective dose coefficients for PIMAL stylized phantom in bent positions in standard irradiation geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Shaheen; Reed, K Lisa; Hiller, Mauritius

    2017-08-01

    Computational phantoms with articulated arms and legs have been constructed to enable the estimation of radiation dose in different postures. Through a graphical user interface, the Phantom wIth Moving Arms and Legs (PIMAL) version 4.1.0 software can be employed to articulate the posture of a phantom and generate a corresponding input deck for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. In this work, photon fluence-to-dose coefficients were computed using PIMAL to compare organ and effective doses for a stylized phantom in the standard upright position with those for phantoms in realistic work postures. The articulated phantoms represent working positions including fully and half bent torsos with extended arms for both the male and female reference adults. Dose coefficients are compared for both the upright and bent positions across monoenergetic photon energies: 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 MeV. Additionally, the organ doses are compared across the International Commission on Radiological Protection's standard external radiation exposure geometries: antero-posterior, postero-anterior, left and right lateral, and isotropic (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, and ISO). For the AP and PA irradiation geometries, differences in organ doses compared to the upright phantom become more profound with increasing bending angles and have doses largely overestimated for all organs except the brain in AP and bladder in PA. In LLAT and RLAT irradiation geometries, energy deposition for organs is more likely to be underestimated compared to the upright phantom, with no overall change despite increased bending angle. The ISO source geometry did not cause a significant difference in absorbed organ dose between the different phantoms, regardless of position. Organ and effective fluence-to-dose coefficients are tabulated. In the AP geometry, the effective dose at the 45° bent position is overestimated compared to the upright phantom below 1 MeV by as much as 27% and 82% in the 90

  9. Effect of different doses of NPK fertilizer on the infection coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The developpement of fungi diseases such as Rice blast which cause important yield losses in rice cultivation in Cameroon is favorite by a variation of doses in minerale fertilisation. Since those elements facilitate the infection process and the development of pathogens. As part of the solutions to this constraint, a field trial ...

  10. Development of an Accommodation-Dependent Eye Model and Studying the Effects of Accommodation on Electron and Proton Dose Conversion Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Vejdani-Noghreiyan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP has provided a comprehensive discussion on threshold dose for radiation-induced cataract in ICRP publication 116. Accordingly, various parts of the eye lens have different radio-sensitivities. Recently, some studies have been performed to develop a realistic eye model with the aim of providing accurate estimation of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for different parts of the eye. However, the effect of accommodation, which changes the lens shape and pupil size, on dose conversion coefficients has not been considered yet. In this study, we purport to develop an accommodation-dependent eye model and to study the effects of accommodation on the electron and proton fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. Materials and Methods Herein, a modified eye model was developed by considering the effects of accommodation on the lens shape and pupil size. In addition, MCNPX 2.6 Monte Carlo transport code was used to calculate the effects of  eye lens accommodation on electron and proton fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. Results Calculation of dose conversion coefficients demonstrated that the accommodation causes up to 40% discrepancy for fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients of electrons in the range of 600 to 800 keV, which is due to the change of eye lens shape during the accommodation of the eye. Conclusion Since the accommodation of the eye change the lens shape and pupil size, it has considerable effect on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients of electrons at some ranges of incident particle energies that should be considered in simulation. However, the fluctuation of dose conversion coefficients of protons is negligible.

  11. Fluence to Effective Dose and Effective Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients foe Photons from 50 KeV to 10 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Pelliccioni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati; Pillon, M. [Associazione EUROATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati. Rome (Italy)

    1996-07-01

    Effective dose equivalent and effective dose per unit photon fluence have been calculated by the FLUKA code for various geometrical conditions of irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom placed in a vacuum. Calculations have been performed for monoenergetic photons of energy ranging from 50 keV to 10 GeV. The agreement with the results of other authors, when existing, is generally very satisfactory.

  12. Conversion coefficients for estimation of effective dose to patients from dose area product during fluoroscopy X-ray examinations; Konversionsfaktoren zur Ermittlung der effektiven Dosis fuer Patienten aus dem Dosisflaechenprodukt bei Roentgendurchleuchtungsuntersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosch, D.; Kahn, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Gosch, K. [Humbold Univ. Berlin, Charite (Germany). Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt fuer Psychosomatik

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: The effective dose, which is related to the stochastic radiation risk, cannot be measured directly. Therefore, conversion coefficients for estimating the effective dose for patients were calculated for fluoroscopy X-ray examinations from the dose area product which can be easily measured. Materials and Methods: Conversion coefficients were calculated using the PC-based Monte Carlo program PCXMC in software version 1.5.1. Conversion coefficients were determined for tube voltages between 60 kV and 110 kV, for additional cupper filtration up to 0.9 mm, for different projections (a. p., p. a. and lateral) and X-ray field size (between 20 cm x 20 cm and 40 cm x 40 cm in image plane) and field position (from head to leg). Results: Tube voltage, filtration and field position have a significant effect on conversion coefficients. Conversion coefficients increase as the tube voltage and filtration increase. Depending on the radiation spectrum used, the conversion coefficients may differ up to a factor of 4 for the same X-ray examination. The highest conversion coefficients were found for irradiation of the body region followed by the head and leg region. The effect of the field size and projection is moderate. Conversion coefficients for a. p. projection are higher than those for p. a. and lateral projections. Conclusion: Effective dose can be easily estimated by multiplying relevant conversion coefficients by the dose area product. Using conversion coefficients from the literature that do not take additional cupper filtration into consideration can underestimate the effective dose by a factor or up to 2 or more depending on the filtration used. (orig.)

  13. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidenbusch, Michael; Schneider, Karl [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology - Paediatric Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric x-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for segmental spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional segmental spine radiographs were calculated performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented may be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during spine radiographs of patients of all age groups and all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. (orig.)

  14. Dose conversion coefficients for partial-fan CBCT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattl, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    Due to the increasing number of cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices on the market, reliable estimates of patient doses for these imaging modality is desired. Cone-beam CT devices differ from conventional CT not only by a larger collimation but also by different recording modes. In this work, it has been investigated whether reliable patient doses can be obtained for CBCT devices in partial-fan mode using pre-computed slices. As an exemplary case, chest CBCT scans for the ICRP reference adult models has been examined. By normalizing organ doses to CTDI100w , the resulting dose conversion coefficients for CBCT could be well reproduced by precomputed slices, with a relative difference in the effective dose conversion coefficients of less than 10%.

  15. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Hunt, John G; Carvalho Júnior, A B

    2014-12-21

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  16. Dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in high energy proton accelerator facilities. Coefficients for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, K; Noguchi, H

    2002-01-01

    Effective dose coefficients, the committed effective dose per unit intake, by inhalation and ingestion have been calculated for 304 nuclides, including (1) 230 nuclides with half-lives >= 10 min and their daughters that are not listed in ICRP Publications and (2) 74 nuclides with half-lives < 10 min that are produced in a spallation target. Effective dose coefficients for inhalation of soluble or reactive gases have been calculated for 21 nuclides, and effective dose rates for inert gases have been calculated for 9 nuclides. Dose calculation was carried out using a general-purpose nuclear decay database DECDC developed at JAERI and a decay data library newly compiled from the ENSDF for the nuclides abundantly produced in a spallation target. The dose coefficients were calculated with the computer code DOCAP based on the respiratory tract model and biokinetic model of ICRP. The effective dose rates were calculated by considering both external irradiation from the surrounding cloud and irradiation of the lun...

  17. Development of an effective dose coefficient database using a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate exposure dose for the usage of NORM-added consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Jaekook; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Chang, Byung-Uck; Min, Chul Hee

    2017-11-01

    After the Fukushima accident in Japan, the Korean Government implemented the "Act on Protective Action Guidelines Against Radiation in the Natural Environment" to regulate unnecessary radiation exposure to the public. However, despite the law which came into effect in July 2012, an appropriate method to evaluate the equivalent and effective doses from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in consumer products is not available. The aim of the present study is to develop and validate an effective dose coefficient database enabling the simple and correct evaluation of the effective dose due to the usage of NORM-added consumer products. To construct the database, we used a skin source method with a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For the validation, the effective dose was compared between the database using interpolation method and the original MC method. Our result showed a similar equivalent dose across the 26 organs and a corresponding average dose between the database and the MC calculations of database with sufficient accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-dependent dose coefficients for tritium in Asian populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A

    1999-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 56 (1989) and 67 (1993) have prescribed the biokinetic models and age-dependent dose coefficients for tritiated water and organically bound tritium. The dose coefficients are computed from values selected to specify the anatomical, morphological and physiological characteristics of a three-month-old, one-year-old, five-year-old, 10-year-old, 15-year-old and adult (Reference Man) Caucasian living in North America and Western Europe. However, values for Reference Man and other age groups are not directly applicable to Asians, because of differences in race, custom, dietary habits and climatic conditions. An Asian Man model, including five age groups, has been proposed by Tanaka and Kawamura (1996, 1998) for use in internal dosimetry. The basic concept of the ICRP Reference Man and the system describing body composition in ICRP Publication 23 (1975) were used. Reference values for Asians were given for the body weight and height, the mass of soft tissue, the mass of body water and the daily fluid balance, and are used to compute the dose coefficients for tritium. The age-dependent dose coefficients for Asians for tritiated water intakes are smaller by 20 to 30% of the currently prescribed values (Trivedi, 1998). The reduction in the dose coefficient values is caused by the increased daily fluid balance among Asians. The dose coefficient for tritiated water is 1.4 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Asian Man compared to 2.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. The dose coefficients for organically bound tritium are only marginally different from those of the ICRP values. The dose coefficient for organically bound tritium for Asian Man is 4.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -11} compared to 4.6 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. (author)

  19. Reassessment of tritium dose coefficients for the general public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melintescu, A.; Galeriu, D. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Department of Life and Environmental Physics, 407 Atomistilor St., PO Box MG-6, RO-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Takeda, H. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Environmental and Toxicological Sciences Research Group, Chiba, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Concerns of increased risk from tritium intake by humans have been claimed in the past. The arguments concerning the radiobiological effectiveness of tritium, its longer retention in the human body and the presence of tritium in the DNA hydration shell are analysed in this paper. A biokinetic model for tritiated water and organically bound tritium retention in the human body is used, based on a common approach for mammals using energy and hydrogen metabolism and tested separately with animal experiments. Extension to this model to humans considers the increased role of the brain, food quality and unique growth patterns of humans. Various ages and genders for Caucasians are considered. For an intake of tritium in organic forms in the diet, the retention for the female is of about a factor 2 compared with ICRP recommendations. Effective dose coefficients are estimated to be about a factor of 2 to 3 higher than those of the ICRP. (authors)

  20. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: Applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marklund, Mette [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: mm@frh.regionh.dk; Christensen, Robin [Parker Institute: Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: robin.christensen@frh.regionh.dk; Torp-Pedersen, Soren [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: stp@frh.regionh.dk; Thomsen, Carsten [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk; Nolsoe, Christian P. [Department of Radiology, Koge Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: cnolsoe@dadlnet.dk

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. Materials and methods: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were obtained. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers (median age: 24 years (range: 21-37 years) and median bodyweight: 65 kg (51-80 kg)) completed two dynamic MRM examinations on a 0.6 T open scanner. The inter-examination time was 24 h (23.5-25 h). The following sequences were applied: axial T2W TSE and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. Results: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose, respectively (P < 0.0001); corresponding to a 65% (95% CI: 37-99%) SI increase, indicating a moderate saturation. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), the results indicated a tendency, towards lower maximal SI in the breast parenchyma of ECOC users compared to non-ECOC users. Conclusion: We conclude that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed to determine the impact of ECOC on the relative enhancement ratio, and further studies are needed to determine if a possible use of ECOC should be considered a compromising

  1. Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-01

    This present study investigates the anatomical realism of conventional stylized models of children by comparing organ dose conversion coefficients for the ORNL paediatric phantom series with those determined in the UF (University of Florida) voxel paediatric phantoms. The latter includes whole-body models of a 9 month male, 4 year female, 8 year female, 11 year male and a 14 year male. Of these phantoms, the 1 year, 5 year and 10 year ORNL phantoms, and 9 month male, 4 year female and 11 year male UF voxel phantoms were selected for side-by-side comparisons under idealized external photon irradiation. Organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy) for various radiosensitive organs and tissues were calculated for monoenergetic photons over the energy range of 15 keV to 10 MeV and for six irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right lateral (RLAT), left lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). Differences in organ dose conversion coefficients for the gonads, bone marrow, colon, lung and stomach, to which prominent tissue weighting factors are assigned, were depicted and analysed. Two major causes of observed differences were suggested: differences in organ shape and position and the differences in tissue shielding by overlying tissue regions within the phantoms. Significant discrepancies caused by anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms are also reported for several organs, and in particular, the thyroid and urinary bladder. The results of this study suggest that the paediatric series of ORNL phantoms also have less realistic internal organ and body anatomy and that dose conversion coefficients from these stylized phantoms should be re-evaluated using paediatric voxel phantoms.

  2. Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2006-09-21

    This present study investigates the anatomical realism of conventional stylized models of children by comparing organ dose conversion coefficients for the ORNL paediatric phantom series with those determined in the UF (University of Florida) voxel paediatric phantoms. The latter includes whole-body models of a 9 month male, 4 year female, 8 year female, 11 year male and a 14 year male. Of these phantoms, the 1 year, 5 year and 10 year ORNL phantoms, and 9 month male, 4 year female and 11 year male UF voxel phantoms were selected for side-by-side comparisons under idealized external photon irradiation. Organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy) for various radiosensitive organs and tissues were calculated for monoenergetic photons over the energy range of 15 keV to 10 MeV and for six irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right lateral (RLAT), left lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). Differences in organ dose conversion coefficients for the gonads, bone marrow, colon, lung and stomach, to which prominent tissue weighting factors are assigned, were depicted and analysed. Two major causes of observed differences were suggested: differences in organ shape and position and the differences in tissue shielding by overlying tissue regions within the phantoms. Significant discrepancies caused by anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms are also reported for several organs, and in particular, the thyroid and urinary bladder. The results of this study suggest that the paediatric series of ORNL phantoms also have less realistic internal organ and body anatomy and that dose conversion coefficients from these stylized phantoms should be re-evaluated using paediatric voxel phantoms.

  3. Dose coefficients for ICRP reference pediatric phantoms exposed to idealised external gamma fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lienard A; Simon, Steven L; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Schauer, David A; Lee, Choonsik

    2017-03-20

    Organ and effective dose coefficients have been calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric phantoms externally exposed to mono-energetic photon radiation (x- and gamma-rays) from 0.01 to 20 MeV. Calculations used Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques. Organ dose coefficients, i.e., organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy), were calculated for 28 organs and tissues including the active marrow (or red bone marrow) for 10 phantoms (newborn, 1 year, 5 year, 10 year, and 15 year old male and female). Radiation exposure was simulated for 33 photon mono-energies (0.01-20 MeV) in six irradiation geometries: antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational, and isotropic. Organ dose coefficients for different ages closely agree in AP geometry as illustrated by a small coefficient of variation (COV) (the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean) of 4.4% for the lungs. The small COVs shown for the effective dose and AP irradiation geometry reflect that most of the radiosensitive organs are located in the front part of the human body. In contrast, we observed differences in organ dose coefficients across the ages of the phantoms for lateral irradiation geometries. We also observed variation in dose coefficients across different irradiation geometries, where the COV ranges from 18% (newborn male) to 38% (15 year old male) across idealised whole body irradiation geometries for the major organs (active marrow, colon, lung, stomach wall, and breast) at the energy of 0.1 MeV. Effective dose coefficients were also derived for applicable situations, e.g., radiation protection or risk projection. Our results are the first comprehensive set of organ and effective dose coefficients applicable to children and adolescents based on the newly adopted ICRP pediatric phantom series. Our tabulated organ and effective dose coefficients for these next-generation phantoms should provide more

  4. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric pelvis and hip joint radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenbusch, Michael C; Schneider, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric X-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for pelvis and hip joint radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Säteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional pelvis and hip joint radiographs were calculated by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models representing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of radiation field settings was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during pelvis and hip joint radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal beam projection and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented can be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during pelvis and hip joint radiographs of children and young adults with all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings.

  5. Dose conversion coefficients for paediatric CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2012-10-01

    A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in paediatric CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of paediatric models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the impact of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDIvol leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.

  6. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,{theta}) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  7. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, Mette; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were...... and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen...... that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed...

  8. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-8300 (United States)]. E-mail: choonsiklee@gmail.com; Lee, Choonik [Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL 32806 (United States); Lee, Jai-Ki [Department of Nulcear Engineering, Hanyang University, Haengdang, Sungdong 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population.

  9. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons to 1 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2011-04-01

    The personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk, where personal dosemeters are usually worn, and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 × 30 × 15 cm(3) slab-type phantom. For this condition, the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H(p,slab)(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several megaelectronvolts, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work, conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p,slab)(10) and H(p,slab)(3) both by using the kerma approximation and tracking secondary charged particles. For H(p)(0.07), the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H(p,slab)(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom, conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological

  10. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Paulson, Erik K.; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of estimating patient dose from a CT exam using CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (denoted as h), DLP-normalized-effective dose (denoted as k), and DLP-normalized-risk index (denoted as q). However, previous studies were limited to a small number of phantom models. The purpose of this work was to provide dose coefficients (h, k, and q) across a large number of computational models covering a broad range of patient anatomy, age, size percentile, and gender. The study consisted of 100 patient computer models (age range, 0 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 2-180 kg) including 42 pediatric models (age range, 0 to 16 y.o.; weight range, 2-80 kg) and 58 adult models (age range, 18 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 57-180 kg). Multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) were included. A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which h, k, and q were derived. The relationships between h, k, and q and patient characteristics (size, age, and gender) were ascertained. The differences in conversion coefficients across the scanners were further characterized. CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (h) showed an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For organs within the image coverage, the average differences of h across scanners were less than 15%. That value increased to 29% for organs on the periphery or outside the image coverage, and to 8% for distributed organs, respectively. The DLP-normalized-effective dose (k) decreased exponentially with increasing patient size. For a given gender, the DLP-normalized-risk index (q) showed an exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The average differences in k and q across scanners were 8% and 10%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the knowledge of patient information and CTDIvol/DLP values may

  11. Effective distribution coefficients of admixtures in plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofova, D. (Vitkovicke Zelezarny Klementa Gottwalda, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia)); Kuchar, L.; Wozniakova, B. (Vysoka Skola Banska, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Nezeleznych Kovu a Jaderne Metalurgie)

    1980-01-01

    The values of effective distribution coefficients of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Si in plutonium were determined on the basis of distributing these admixtures during zone refining of plutonium. The results confirm the theoretical assumptions for distributing admixtures in plutonium which were expressed in periodical dependence of the equilibrium distribution coefficients of admixtures in plutonium on the atomic number of admixture.

  12. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    The effective stress coefficient, introduced by Biot, is used for predicting effective stress or pore pressure in the subsurface. It is not a constant value. It is different for different types of sediment and it is stress dependent. We used a model, based on contact between the grains to describe...... one dimensional rock mechanical deformation. We further investigated the effect of boundary condition on the stress dependency of effective stress coefficient and discussed its application in reservoir study. As stress field in the reservoirs are most unlikely to be hydrostatic, effective stress...... determined under uniaxial strain condition will be more relevant in reservoir studies....

  13. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M.M.; Fabricius, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    The effective stress coefficient, introduced by Biot, is used for predicting effective stress or pore pressure in the subsurface. It is not a constant value. It is different for different types of sediment and it is stress dependent. We used a model, based on contact between the grains to describe...... one dimensional rock mechanical deformation. We further investigated the effect of boundary condition on the stress dependency of effective stress coefficient and discussed its application in reservoir study. As stress field in the reservoirs are most unlikely to be hydrostatic, effective stress...... determined under uniaxial strain condition will be more relevant in reservoir studies. Copyright 2012 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association....

  14. Dependence of dose coefficients for {sup 239}Pu on transfer rates and absorption parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Ishigure, N. [Division of Radiotoxicology and Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    As it is reported of the biokinetic models and parameter values of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for dose estimation have uncertainties owing to insufficiency of human data. For most radionuclides, the data underlying such models and parameters of ICRP usually depend on animal experiments. Moreover, these values or model parameter are also greatly different between mammalian species. Recently, various radiation protection organizations are considering the biokinetic uncertainties from standpoints of data's sources, quality and completeness. In practice, a sensitivity analysis of doses to parameters is significant for the purpose of risk assessment. In general, movement or material in the body is depicted as a system of first-order processes, and parameter values are expressed as transfer rates between compartments. In this study, we made a code to reproduce the ICRP's dose coefficients for {sup 239}Pu, which is one of the most important elements for occupational exposure and its effective dose is much concerned with its own distribution in the body for dominance of alpha-decay. By using this code, we modified each transfer rate in a factor of 2, 3 and 4 in order to evaluate the effects, and calculated the sensitivities of effective doses due to these changes. Additionally, we examined the effects of modification of absorption parameters f{sub r}, S{sub r} and S{sub s}, which represent the absorption of particles from respiratory tract into blood. Consequently, the transfer rates that give a large sensitivity were specified, and it was shown that changes of transfer rates and absorption parameters are not so influential on effective doses for {sup 239}Pu in many cases. (author)

  15. Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, Luiz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toohey, Richard E [ORISE/ORAU; Sugarman, Steven A [ORISE/ORAU; Christensen, Doran R [ORISE/ORAU

    2009-01-01

    The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

  16. Determination and reliability of dose coefficients for radiopharmaceuticals; Ermittlung der Zuverlaessigkeit von Dosiskoeffizienten fuer Radiopharmaka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, V.; Li, W.B.; Zankl, M.; Oeh, U.

    2015-11-15

    The dose coefficients used in nuclear medicine for dose calculations of radiopharmaceuticals are based on recommendations by ICRP (International Commission on radiological protection) and the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee) using mathematical models for the temporal activity distributions in organs and tissues (biokinetic models) and mathematical models of the human body. These models using an idealized human body do not include uncertainty estimations. The research project is aimed to determine the uncertainties and thus the reliability of the dose coefficients for radiopharmaceuticals and to identify the biokinetic and dosimetric parameters that contribute most of the uncertainties.

  17. Organ-specific external dose coefficients and protective apron transmission factors for historical dose reconstruction for medical personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L

    2011-07-01

    While radiation absorbed dose (Gy) to the skin or other organs is sometimes estimated for patients from diagnostic radiologic examinations or therapeutic procedures, rarely is occupationally-received radiation absorbed dose to individual organs/tissues estimated for medical personnel; e.g., radiologic technologists or radiologists. Generally, for medical personnel, equivalent or effective radiation doses are estimated for compliance purposes. In the very few cases when organ doses to medical personnel are reconstructed, the data is usually for the purpose of epidemiologic studies; e.g., a study of historical doses and risks to a cohort of about 110,000 radiologic technologists presently underway at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. While ICRP and ICRU have published organ-specific external dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) (i.e., absorbed dose to organs and tissues per unit air kerma and dose equivalent per unit air kerma), those factors have been published primarily for mono-energetic photons at selected energies. This presents two related problems for historical dose reconstruction, both of which are addressed here. It is necessary to derive conversion factor values for (1) continuous distributions of energy typical of diagnostic medical x-rays (bremsstrahlung radiation), and (2) energies of particular radioisotopes used in medical procedures, neither of which are presented in published tables. For derivation of DCCs for bremsstrahlung radiation, combinations of x-ray tube potentials and filtrations were derived for different time periods based on a review of relevant literature. Three peak tube potentials (70 kV, 80 kV, and 90 kV) with four different amounts of beam filtration were determined to be applicable for historic dose reconstruction. The probabilities of these machine settings were assigned to each of the four time periods (earlier than 1949, 1949-1954, 1955-1968, and after 1968). Continuous functions were fit to each set of discrete values of the

  18. Photon dose conversion coefficients for the human teeth in standard irradiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanovsky, A.; Wieser, A.; Zankl, M.; Jacob, P.

    2005-07-01

    Photon dose conversion coefficients for the human tooth materials are computed in energy range from 0.01 to 10 MeV by the Monte Carlo method. The voxel phantom Golem of the human body with newly defined tooth region and a modified version of the EGS4 code have been used to compute the coefficients for 30 tooth cells with different locations and materials. The dose responses are calculated for cells representing buccal and lingual enamel layers. The computed coefficients demonstrate a strong dependence on energy and geometry of the radiation source and a weaker dependence on location of the enamel voxels. For isotropic and rotational radiation fields the enamel dose does not show a significant dependence on tooth sample locations. The computed coefficients are used to convert from absorbed dose in teeth to organ dose or to integral air kerma. Examples of integral conversion factors from enamel dose to air kerma are given for several photon fluences specific for the Mayak reprocessing plant in Russia. The integral conversion factors are strongly affected by the energy and angular distributions of photon fluence, which are important characteristics of an exposure scenario for reconstruction of individual occupational doses. (orig.)

  19. Effective Diffusion Coefficients in Coal Chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker

    2001-01-01

    . Particle sizes in the range 0.05-5 mm were tested, and the effective diffusion coefficients were estimated from measured effectiveness factors using the Thiele modulus. At 1079 K the effective diffusion coefficients were 5.5 X 10(-6) m(2)/s and 6.8 X 10(-6) m(2)/s for N2O and NO, respectively....... The experimental results were compared with theoretical values calculated from the mean pore radius and the cross-linked pore model. The method of mean pore radius underestimated the effective diffusion coefficient more than an order of magnitude. Using the cross-linked pore model, the bimodal pore size....... In the case of strong pore diffusion limitations, the error in the interpretation of experimental results using the mean pore radius could be a factor of 5 on the intrinsic rate constant. For an average coal char reacting with oxygen at 1300 K, this would be the case for particle sizes larger than about 50...

  20. Radiation dose estimation and mass attenuation coefficients of cement samples used in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damla, N., E-mail: ndamla@ktu.edu.tr [Batman University, Department of Physics, Batman (Turkey); Cevik, U.; Kobya, A.I. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Physics, Trabzon (Turkey); Celik, A. [Giresun University, Department of Physics, Giresun (Turkey); Celik, N. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Physics, Trabzon (Turkey); Van Grieken, R. [University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-04-15

    Different cement samples commonly used in building construction in Turkey have been analyzed for natural radioactivity using gamma-ray spectrometry. The mean activity concentrations observed in the cement samples were 52, 40 and 324 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K, respectively. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and world average limits. The radiological hazard parameters such as radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), gamma index (I{sub {gamma}}) and alpha index (I{sub {alpha}}) indices as well as terrestrial absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate were calculated and compared with the international data. The Ra{sub eq} values of cement are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg{sup -1}, equivalent to a gamma dose of 1.5 mSv y{sup -1}. Moreover, the mass attenuation coefficients were determined experimentally and calculated theoretically using XCOM in some cement samples. Also, chemical compositions analyses of the cement samples were investigated.

  1. Dose conversion coefficients for monoenergetic electrons incident on a realistic human eye model with different lens cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, P; Vaz, P [Technological and Nuclear Institute, Estrada Nacional No 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Zankl, M; Schlattl, H, E-mail: pedro.nogueira@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Research Unit Medical Radiation Physics and Diagnostics, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2011-11-07

    The radiation-induced posterior subcapsular cataract has long been generally accepted to be a deterministic effect that does not occur at doses below a threshold of at least 2 Gy. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the threshold for cataract induction may be much lower or that there may be no threshold at all. A thorough study of this subject requires more accurate dose estimates for the eye lens than those available in ICRP Publication 74. Eye lens absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients for electron irradiation were calculated using a geometrical model of the eye that takes into account different cell populations of the lens epithelium, together with the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code package. For the cell population most sensitive to ionizing radiation-the germinative cells-absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients were determined that are up to a factor of 4.8 higher than the mean eye lens absorbed dose conversion coefficients for electron energies below 2 MeV. Comparison of the results with previously published values for a slightly different eye model showed generally good agreement for all electron energies. Finally, the influence of individual anatomical variability was quantified by positioning the lens at various depths below the cornea. A depth difference of 2 mm between the shallowest and the deepest location of the germinative zone can lead to a difference between the resulting absorbed doses of up to nearly a factor of 5000 for electron energy of 0.7 MeV.

  2. Radiation dose estimation and mass attenuation coefficients of marble used in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, U. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Physics, Trabzon (Turkey); Damla, N., E-mail: ndamla@ktu.edu.t [Batman University, Department of Physics, Batman (Turkey); Kobya, A.I. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Physics, Trabzon (Turkey); Celik, A. [Giresun University, Department of Physics, Giresun (Turkey); Kara, A. [Osmaniye Korkut Ata University, Department of Physics, Osmaniye (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    In this study the natural radioactivity in marble samples used in Turkey was measured by means of gamma spectrometry. The results showed that the specific activities of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K ranged from 10 to 92 Bq kg{sup -1}, from 4 to 122 Bq kg{sup -1} and from 28 to 676 Bq kg{sup -1}, respectively. The radiological hazards in marble samples due to the natural radioactivity were inferred from calculations of radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), indoor absorbed dose rate in air values, the annual effective dose and gamma and alpha indexes. These radiological parameters were evaluated and compared with the internationally recommended values. The measurements showed that marble samples used in Turkey have low level of natural radioactivity; therefore, the use of these types of marble in dwellings is safe for inhabitants. Mass attenuation coefficients ({mu}/{rho}) were obtained both experimentally and theoretically for different marble samples produced in Turkey by using gamma-ray transmission method. Experimental values showed a good agreement with the theoretical values.

  3. The fixed-point iteration method for IMRT optimization with truncated dose deposition coefficient matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix is often pre-computed to parameterize the dose contribution to each voxel in the volume of interest from each beamlet of unit intensity. However, due to the limitation of computer memory and the requirement on computational efficiency, in practice matrix elements of small values are usually truncated, which inevitably compromises the quality of the resulting plan. A fixed-point iteration scheme has been applied in IMRT optimization to solve this problem, which has been reported to be effective and efficient based on the observations of the numerical experiments. In this paper, we aim to point out the mathematics behind this scheme and to answer the following three questions: 1) whether the fixed-point iteration algorithm converges or not? 2) when it converges, whether the fixed point solution is same as the original solution obtained with the complete DDC matrix? 3) if not the same, wh...

  4. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure—cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  5. Dose Rate and Mass Attenuation Coefficients of Gamma Ray for Concretes

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Latif, A A; Kansouh, W A; El-Sayed, F H

    2003-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the leakage gamma ray dose and mass attenuation coefficients for ordinary, basalt and dolomite concretes made from local ores. Concretes under investigation were constructed from gravel, basalt and dolomite ores, and then reconstructed with the addition of 3% steel fibers by weight. Measurements were carried out using a collimated beam from sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma ray source and sodium iodide (3x3) crystal with the genie 2000 gamma spectrometer. The obtained fluxes were transformed to gamma ray doses and displayed in the form of gamma ray dose rates distribution. The displayed curves were used to estimate the linear attenuation coefficients (mu), the relaxation lengths (lambda), half value layer (t sub 1 /2) and tenth value layer (t sub 1 /10). Also, The total mass attenuation coefficients of gamma ray have been calculated to the concerned concretes using XCOM (version 3.1) program and database elements cross sections from Z=1 to 100 at energies from 10 keV to 100 MeV. In...

  6. Average glandular dose coefficients for pendant-geometry breast CT using realistic breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Andrew M; Boone, John M

    2017-10-01

    To design volume-specific breast phantoms from breast CT (bCT) data sets and estimate the associated normalized mean glandular dose coefficients for breast CT using Monte Carlo methods. A large cohort of bCT data sets (N = 215) was used to evaluate breast volume into quintiles (plus the top 5%). The average radius profile was then determined for each of the six volume-specific groups and used to both fabricate physical phantoms and generate mathematical phantoms (V1-V6; "V" denotes classification by volume). The MCNP6 Monte Carlo code was used to model a prototype bCT system fabricated at our institution; and this model was validated against physical measurements in the fabricated phantoms. The mathematical phantoms were used to simulate normalized mean glandular dose coefficients for both monoenergetic source photons "DgNCT (E)" (8-70 keV in 1 keV intervals) and polyenergetic x-ray beams "pDgNCT " (35-70 kV in 1 kV intervals). The Monte Carlo code was used to study the influence of breast size (V1 vs. V5) and glandular fraction (6.4% vs. 45.8%) on glandular dose. The pDgNCT coefficients estimated for the V1, V3, and V5 phantoms were also compared to those generated using simple, cylindrical phantoms with equivalent volume and two geometrical constraints including; (a) cylinder radius determined at the breast phantom chest wall "Rcw "; and (b) cylinder radius determined at the breast phantom center-of-mass "RCOM ". Satisfactory agreement was observed for dose estimations using MCNP6 compared with both physical measurements in the V1, V3, and V5 phantoms (R2 = 0.995) and reference bCT dose coefficients using simple phantoms (R2 = 0.999). For a 49 kV spectrum with 1.5 mm Al filtration, differences in glandular fraction [6.5% (5th percentile) vs. 45.8% (95th percentile)] had a 13.2% influence on pDgNCT for the V3 phantom, and differences in breast size (V1 vs. V5) had a 16.6% influence on pDgNCT for a breast composed of 17% (median) fibroglandular tissue. For

  7. Overview of the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external idealised exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Zankl, M; Bolch, W E; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E; Hunt, J G; Pelliccioni, M; Schlattl, H; Menzel, H-G

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the ICRP Publications 110 and 116 describing the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its 2007 Recommendations made several revisions to the methods of calculation of the protection quantities. In order to implement these recommendations, the DOCAL task group of the ICRP developed computational phantoms representing the reference adult male and female and then calculated a set of dose conversion coefficients for various types of idealised external exposures. This paper focuses on the dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and investigates their relationship with the conversion coefficients of the protection and operational quantities of ICRP Publication 74. Contributing factors to the differences between these sets of conversion coefficients are discussed in terms of the changes in phantoms employed and the radiation and tissue weighting factors.

  8. Conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenzel, R., E-mail: roselikunzel@gmail.co [Area de Ciencias Naturais e Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano, Rua dos Andradas 1614, 97010-032 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Levenhagen, R.S. [Universidade Nove de Julho, Av. Dr. Adolfo Pinto, 109, Barra Funda, 01156-050 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Herdade, S.B. [Secao Tecnica de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico em Saude, Instituto de Eletrotecnica e Energia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida Professor Luciano Gualberto, 1289, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-010 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-05-15

    In this work, the scattered X-ray beams produced by a mammography unit with a Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh anode/filter combinations were applied in the evaluation of the H{sub p}(10,0{sup 0}) and mean conversion coefficients from air kerma to the personal dose equivalent (C-bar{sub H{sub p(10,0{sup 0})}}). The higher values of H{sub p}(10,0{sup 0}) are related to the Mo/Rh combination whereas the lower ones are for the W/Rh target/filter. C-bar{sub H{sub p(10,0{sup 0})}} values are in the range 0.19-0.54 Sv/Gy, where the higher values comprise the W/Rh combination.

  9. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Bellamy, Michael B [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  10. Absorbed fraction and dose conversion coefficients of alpha particles for radon dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikezic, D. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Faculty of Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Yugoslavia); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Vucic, D. [Faculty of Technology, University of Nis, Lescovac (Yugoslavia)

    2001-07-01

    The sensitivity to different relevant parameters of the absorbed fraction of alpha particles emitted from the {sup 222}Rn chain in sensitive cells of the tracheo-bronchial tree have been investigated. The structure of the airway wall given by ICRP (ICRP66) has been adopted and employed in the present calculations. The source thickness (mucous gel and sol + cilia), target layer thickness and the depth of the sensitive layers have been varied within reasonable ranges around the default values recommended by ICRP66. The results have shown that the depth of the sensitive layers is the most important parameter in calculating the absorbed fraction. In addition, dose conversion coefficients were calculated and presented along with the absorbed fractions. (author)

  11. Using the Monte Carlo technique to calculate dose conversion coefficients for medical professionals in interventional radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, W. S.; Carvalho, A. B., Jr.; Hunt, J. G.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate doses in the physician and the nurse assistant at different positions during interventional radiology procedures. In this study, effective doses obtained for the physician and at points occupied by other workers were normalised by air kerma-area product (KAP). The simulations were performed for two X-ray spectra (70 kVp and 87 kVp) using the radiation transport code MCNPX (version 2.7.0), and a pair of anthropomorphic voxel phantoms (MASH/FASH) used to represent both the patient and the medical professional at positions from 7 cm to 47 cm from the patient. The X-ray tube was represented by a point source positioned in the anterior posterior (AP) and posterior anterior (PA) projections. The CC can be useful to calculate effective doses, which in turn are related to stochastic effects. With the knowledge of the values of CCs and KAP measured in an X-ray equipment, at a similar exposure, medical professionals will be able to know their own effective dose.

  12. Measurement of secondary cosmic radiation and calculation of associated dose conversion coefficients for humans; Messung sekundaerer kosmischer Strahlung und Berechnung der zugehoerigen Dosiskonversionskoeffizienten fuer den Menschen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmer, Gregor

    2012-04-11

    Due to secondary cosmic radiation (SCR), pilots and flight attendants receive elevated effective doses at flight altitudes. For this reason, since 2003 aircrew members are considered as occupationally exposed, in Germany. This work deals with the calculation of dose conversion coefficients (DCC) for protons, neutrons, electrons, positrons, photons and myons, which are crucial for estimation of effective dose from SCR. For the first time, calculations were performed combining Geant4 - a Monte Carlo code developed at CERN - with the voxel phantoms for the reference female and male published in 2008 by ICRP and ICRU. Furthermore, measurements of neutron fluence spectra - which contribute the major part to the effective dose of SCR - were carried out at the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (UFS) located at 2650 m above sea level nearby the Zugspitze mountain, Germany. These measured neutron spectra, and additionally available calculated spectra, were then folded with the DCC calculated in this work, and effective dose rates for different heights were calculated.

  13. Static and dynamic effective stress coefficient of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Christensen, Helle Foged

    2012-01-01

    Deformation of a hydrocarbon reservoir can ideally be used to estimate the effective stress acting on it. The effective stress in the subsurface is the difference between the stress due to the weight of the sediment and a fraction (effective stress coefficient) of the pore pressure. The effective...... stress coefficient is thus relevant for studying reservoir deformation and for evaluating 4D seismic for the correct pore pressure prediction. The static effective stress coefficient n is estimated from mechanical tests and is highly relevant for effective stress prediction because it is directly related...... to mechanical strain in the elastic stress regime. The corresponding dynamic effective stress coefficient α is easy to estimate from density and velocity of acoustic (elastic) waves. We studied n and α of chalk from the reservoir zone of the Valhall field, North Sea, and found that n and α vary...

  14. [Radiation exposure of children in pediatric radiology. Part 3: Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ doses achieved during chest X-ray examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenbusch, M C; Regulla, D; Schneider, K

    2008-12-01

    Calculation of conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses from entrance doses for chest radiographs of 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30-year-old patients in conventional pediatric radiology for the radiographic settings recommended by the German and European guidelines for quality management in diagnostic radiology. The conversion coefficients for pediatric chest radiographs were calculated using the commercially available personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Säteilyturvakeskus STUK). PCXMC is a Monte Carlo program for computing organ and effective doses in about 40 organs of mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The possible clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation fields on the phantoms' surfaces. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses from measured entrance doses during chest radiographs for 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30-year-old pediatric patients were presented. Conversion coefficients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus film distances of 100 cm, 115 cm, and 150 cm using the standard radiation qualities according to the recommendations of the German and European guidelines for quality management in diagnostic radiology. These conversion coefficients allow the reconstruction of the absorbed dose in about 40 organs and tissues of the human body for optimal and suboptimal radiation field collimations. The conversion coefficients presented in this paper may be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during chest radiographs of patients of all age groups with all beam collimations within optimal and suboptimal standard beam collimations. While the influence of the beam collimation on organ doses of organs localized near the center of the beam is expectedly low, the radiation exposure of

  15. (Non)-renormalization of the chiral vortical effect coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golkar, Siavash; Son, Dam T. [Kadanoff Center for Theoretical Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,5640 South Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-02-26

    We show using diagramtic arguments that in some (but not all) cases, the temperature dependent part of the chiral vortical effect coefficient is independent of the coupling constant. An interpretation of this result in terms of quantization in the effective 3 dimensional Chern-Simons theory is also given. In the language of 3D, dimensionally reduced theory, the value of the chiral vortical coefficient is related to the formula ∑{sub n=1}{sup ∞}n=−1/12. We also show that in the presence of dynamical gauge fields, the CVE coefficient is not protected from renormalization, even in the large N limit.

  16. Influence of effective stress coefficient on mechanical failure of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Hjuler, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The Effective stress coefficient is a measure of how chalk grains are connected with each other. The stiffness of chalk may decrease if the amount of contact cements between the grains decreases, which may lead to an increase of the effective stress coefficient. We performed CO2 injection in chal...... precise failure strength of chalk during changed stress state and under the influence of chemically reactive fluids during production of hydrocarbon and geological storage CO2....

  17. Impact on Dose Coefficients Calculated with ICRP Adult Mesh-type Reference Computational Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chan Soo; Lee, Han Jin; Han, Hae Gin; Han, Min Cheol; Shin, Bang Ho; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In 2016, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) formulated a new Task Group (TG) (i.e., TG 103) within Committee 2. The ultimate aim of the TG 103 is to develop the mesh-type reference computational phantoms (MRCPs) that can address dosimetric limitations of the currently used voxel-type reference computational phantoms (VRCPs) due to their limited voxel resolutions. The objective of the present study is to investigate dosimetric impact of the adult MRCPs by comparing dose coefficients (DCs) calculated with the MRCPs for some external and internal exposure cases and the reference DCs in ICRP Publications 116 and 133 that were produced with the adult VRCPs. In the present study, the DCs calculated with the adult MRCPs for some exposure cases were compared with the values in ICRP Publications 116 and 133. This comparison shows that in general the MRCPs provide very similar DCs for uncharged particles, but for charged particles provide significantly different DCs due to the improvement of the MRCPs.

  18. Characterization of the effective electrostriction coefficients in ferroelectric thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholkin, A. L.; Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.; Chauvy, P.-F.; Setter, N.

    2001-06-15

    Electromechanical properties of a number of ferroelectric films including PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1{minus}x}O{sub 3}(PZT), 0.9PbMg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3}O{sub 3}{endash}0.1PbTiO{sub 3}(PMN-PT), and SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}(SBT) are investigated using laser interferometry combined with conventional dielectric measurements. Effective electrostriction coefficients of the films, Q{sub eff}, are determined using a linearized electrostriction equation that couples longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient, d{sub 33}, with the polarization and dielectric constant. It is shown that, in PZT films, electrostriction coefficients slightly increase with applied electric field, reflecting the weak contribution of non-180{degree} domains to piezoelectric properties. In contrast, in PMN-PT and SBT films electrostriction coefficients are field independent, indicating the intrinsic nature of the piezoelectric response. The experimental values of Q{sub eff} are significantly smaller than those of corresponding bulk materials due to substrate clamping and possible size effects. Electrostriction coefficients of PZT layers are shown to depend strongly on the composition and preferred orientation of the grains. In particular, Q{sub eff} of (100) textured rhombohedral films (x=0.7) is significantly greater than that of (111) layers. Thus large anisotropy of the electrostrictive coefficients is responsible for recently observed large piezoelectric coefficients of (100) textured PZT films. Effective electrostriction coefficients obtained by laser interferometry allow evaluation of the electromechanical properties of ferroelectric films based solely on the dielectric parameters and thus are very useful in the design and fabrication of microsensors and microactuators. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Characterization of the effective electrostriction coefficients in ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholkin, A. L.; Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.; Chauvy, P.-F.; Setter, N.

    2001-06-01

    Electromechanical properties of a number of ferroelectric films including PbZrxTi1-xO3(PZT), 0.9PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3-0.1PbTiO3(PMN-PT), and SrBi2Ta2O9(SBT) are investigated using laser interferometry combined with conventional dielectric measurements. Effective electrostriction coefficients of the films, Qeff, are determined using a linearized electrostriction equation that couples longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient, d33, with the polarization and dielectric constant. It is shown that, in PZT films, electrostriction coefficients slightly increase with applied electric field, reflecting the weak contribution of non-180° domains to piezoelectric properties. In contrast, in PMN-PT and SBT films electrostriction coefficients are field independent, indicating the intrinsic nature of the piezoelectric response. The experimental values of Qeff are significantly smaller than those of corresponding bulk materials due to substrate clamping and possible size effects. Electrostriction coefficients of PZT layers are shown to depend strongly on the composition and preferred orientation of the grains. In particular, Qeff of (100) textured rhombohedral films (x=0.7) is significantly greater than that of (111) layers. Thus large anisotropy of the electrostrictive coefficients is responsible for recently observed large piezoelectric coefficients of (100) textured PZT films. Effective electrostriction coefficients obtained by laser interferometry allow evaluation of the electromechanical properties of ferroelectric films based solely on the dielectric parameters and thus are very useful in the design and fabrication of microsensors and microactuators.

  20. Derived Intervention Levels for Tritium Based on Food and Drug Administration Methodology Using ICRP 56 Dose Coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A

    1999-06-09

    In 1998, the FDA released its recommendations for age-dependent derived intervention levels for several radionuclides involved in nuclear accidents. One radionuclide that is not included in that document is tritium. Therefore an analysis is presented here using dose coefficients from ICRP 56 to develop Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) for tritium in two forms: water (HTO) and organically bound tritium (OBT).

  1. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations 20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks slab phantom.

  2. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  3. Enhancement of Seebeck Coefficients by Resonant Tunneling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daqiq, Reza

    2017-10-01

    The Seebeck coefficients in an MgO-based double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DBMTJ) with a semiconductor (e.g., Ge) spacer are studied using non-equilibrium Green's function formalism in the linear response regime. The DBMTJ results show a magnitude enhancement compared with a single-barrier MTJ (SBMTJ) at the specific thicknesses of the semiconductor spacer due to the resonant tunneling effect through the DBMTJ structure. With an increase of the average temperature of the junctions, the Seebeck coefficients also increase and they are at a maximum in the anti-parallel configuration of the magnetizations. Therefore, it is possible to achieve large Seebeck coefficients using a DBMTJ compared with a conventional SBMTJ structure.

  4. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Justus, Alan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, S Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olsher, Richard H [RP-2; Devine, Robert T [RP-2

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  5. Committed effective doses at various times after intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed effective doses at nine times after intake from intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu 1 AMAD particles by adults. Data are given for various chemical forms of 359 nuclides. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on committed equivalent doses to organs is given in NRPB-M288. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  6. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  7. Effect of hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing on capillary filtration coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, R S; Wangensteen, O D; Jo, J K; Tsai, M Y; Bolman, R M

    2000-07-27

    We previously demonstrated that surfactant dilution and inhibition occur immediately after pulmonary artery flushing with hypothermic modified Euro-Collins solution. Consequently, we speculated that increased capillary permeability contributed to these surfactant changes. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing on the pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), and additionally performed a biochemical analysis of surfactant. We used a murine isolated, perfused lung model to measure the pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient and hemodynamic parameters, to determine the wet to dry weight ratio, and to evaluate surfactant by biochemical analysis of lung lavage fluid. We defined three study groups. In group I (controls), we harvested lungs without hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing, and measured Kfc immediately. In group II (in situ flush), we harvested lungs after hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing with modified Euro-Collins solution, and then measured Kfc. Experiments in groups I and II were designed to evaluate persistent changes in Kfc after pulmonary artery flushing. In group III (ex vivo flush), we flushed lungs ex vivo to evaluate transient changes in Kfc during hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing. Groups I and II did not differ significantly in capillary filtration coefficient and hemodynamics. Group II showed significant alterations on biochemical surfactant analysis and a significant increase in wet-to-dry weight ratio, when compared with group I. In group III, we observed a significant transient increase in capillary filtration coefficient during pulmonary artery flushing. Hypothermic pulmonary artery flushing transiently increases the capillary filtration coefficient, leads to an increase in the wet to dry weight ratio, and induces biochemical surfactant changes. These findings could be explained by the effects of hypothermic modified Euro-Collins solution on pulmonary capillary

  8. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon energy range of 279.2 to 320.07 keV, 514.0 to 661.6 keV and 1115.5 to 1332.5 keV by a piece-wise interpolation method were then used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in agreement with other ...

  9. Effects of Partition Coefficients, Diffusion Coefficients, and Solidification Paths on Microsegregation in Fe-Based Multinary Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunwei; Long, Mujun; Liu, Peng; Chen, Dengfu; Chen, Huabiao; Gui, Lintao; Liu, Tao; Yu, Sheng

    2017-10-01

    To quantitatively study the effects of partition coefficients, diffusion coefficients, and solidification paths on solute microsegregation, an analytical model was developed combined with the calculation of thermodynamic software FactSage. This model, applied with variational partition coefficients and temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients, is based on the Voller-Beckermann model and is extended to take into account the effects of multiple components and the peritectic phase transformation using FactSage. The predictions agree well with a range of measured data and the results of other numerical solutions. As the results indicate, the partition coefficients of solutes are functions of temperature and phase fraction during the solidification process, and the solute microsegregation increases significantly with decreasing partition coefficients. The calculations of solute microsegregation ratio ( C L/ C 0) in the interdendritic region are related to solidification paths. The microsegregation ratios of P and S increase as the initial C concentration increases, while they reduce with increasing initial C contents for solutes C and Si. Parameter sensitivity analysis was performed, and the results indicate that the solute microsegregation shows larger variation with partition coefficients and solidification paths than diffusion coefficients.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the CTA/IEAV electron linear accelerator environmental doses using albedo coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viera, Wilson J.; Ono, Shizuca; Claro, Luiz H.; Dias, Artur F. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados], e-mail: wjvieira@ieav.cta.br, e-mail: shizuca@ieav.cta.br, e-mail: luizhenu@ieav.cta.br, e-mail: arturf@ieav.cta.br

    2001-07-01

    With the purpose of determining the radiation field in the accelerator environment in an efficient way, it was developed an approximate methodology which uses multigroup albedo coefficients to describe the particle reflection by the walls. This method avoids the particle transport calculation inside the walls, which spends much of the processing time. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was suitably modified to allow the simulation of such calculations. To assess the accuracy achieved with this methodology, very realistic calculations considering the transport of particles inside all the walls are performed. The results showed that the use of albedo coefficients for some walls while allowing the transport of particles inside the other walls in the same calculation gives accurate results, saving significant computational time. The results obtained for the accelerator showed an excellent agreement with the realistic calculation, and that the technique is applicable to large environments. (author)

  11. The local skin dose conversion coefficients of electrons, protons and alpha particles calculated using the Geant4 code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bintuan; Dang, Bingrong; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Li, Wenjian

    2013-10-01

    The skin tissue-equivalent slab reported in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 116 to calculate the localised skin dose conversion coefficients (LSDCCs) was adopted into the Monte Carlo transport code Geant4. The Geant4 code was then utilised for computation of LSDCCs due to a circular parallel beam of monoenergetic electrons, protons and alpha particles electrons and alpha particles are found to be in good agreement with the results using the MCNPX code of ICRP 116 data. The present work thus validates the LSDCC values for both electrons and alpha particles using the Geant4 code.

  12. COMPRESSIBILITY EFFECTS ON DISTRIBUTIONS OF PRESSURE AND LIFT COEFFICIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZZEDINE NAHOUI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reduce energy consumption of airplanes, or enhance the aerodynamic performance of compressors and turbines by reducing drag, or increasing lift is a major challenge for many institutions specializing in aerodynamics [1, 2]. One way to achievethis, isconsidered the study of compressible potential flow compared to incompressible potential flow [3], Outside the boundary layer, to study the effects of compressibility and the control parameters. And the pressure coefficient and lift distributions around the NACA 0012 profile, NACA 0015 and NACA 0018 were studied and presented in terms of the Mach number, angle of attack and the relative thickness of the profiles.

  13. An effect size index for comparing two independent alpha coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yun; Weng, Li-Jen

    2009-05-01

    Since Cronbach proposed the alpha coefficient in 1951, researchers have contributed to the derivation of its sampling distribution and the testing of related statistical hypotheses. Yet, there has been no research on effect size index relevant to coefficient alpha to our knowledge. Considering the importance of effect size in understanding quantitative research findings, we therefore developed an effect size index Delta for the comparison of two independent alphas with equal test length based on the asymptotic distribution of (1/2)ln(1 - alphahat) under the assumptions of normality and compound symmetry. Simulations indicated that the index was applicable when the sample size was at least 100. The robustness of the derived index when the required assumptions were violated was also explored. It is suggested that the index should be applicable in most cases of unequal test lengths and could be extended to non-normally distributed component scores. Moreover, a small simulation was conducted to explore the behaviour of Delta with correlated errors, a frequently studied situation violating the assumption of compound symmetry. The proposed index was found to be robust unless a large number of highly correlated errors were present in the data.

  14. Inclusion of skin target layer in mesh-type ICRP reference phantoms and calculations of skin dose coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chan Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The current ICRP-110 reference phantoms cannot represent the 50-μm-thick sensitive target layer within the skin due to their limited voxel resolutions. Thus, skin doses have been approximated by averaging absorbed dose over the entire skin of the ICRP-110 phantoms and were used to produce the skin dose coefficients (SDC) for whole body external exposures given in ICRP Publication 116. In order to address the limitation, the present study included the 50-μm-thick skin target layer in the mesh-type ICRP reference phantoms which have been converted from the ICRP-110 phantoms in a research project under ICRP Committee 2. The mesh phantoms including the target layer were then used to calculate SDCs for whole body external exposures and the calculated values were compared with the values in the ICRP-116 values. In order to address the limitation of the ICRP-110 phantoms, the present study included the 50-μm-thick target layer in the skin of the mesh-type ICRP reference phantoms under development and calculated SDCs considering the target layer for whole body external exposures. The results of the study showed significant dose differences for electron exposures when compared with the ICRP-116 data.

  15. Dose Conversion Coefficients Based on Taiwanese Reference Phantoms and Monte Carlo Simulations for Use in External Radiation Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Jun; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Hung, Shih-Yen; Liu, Yan-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Wu, Jay

    2017-05-01

    Reference phantoms are widely applied to evaluate the radiation dose for external exposure. However, the frequently used reference phantoms are based on Caucasians. Dose estimation for Asians using a Caucasian phantom can result in significant errors. This study recruited 40 volunteers whose body sizes are close to the average Taiwanese population. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to obtain the organ volume for construction of the Taiwanese reference man (TRM) and Taiwanese reference woman (TRW). The dose conversion coefficients (DCC) resulting from photo beams in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right-lateral, left-lateral, and isotropic irradiation geometries were estimated. In the anterior-posterior geometry, the mean DCC differences among organs between the TRM and ORNL phantom at 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV were 7.3%, 5.8%, and 5.2%, respectively. For the TRW, the mean differences from the ORNL phantom at the three energies were 10.6%, 7.4%, and 8.3%. The DCCs of the Taiwanese reference phantoms and the ORNL phantom presented similar trends in other geometries. The torso size of the phantom and the mass and geometric location of the organ have a significant influence on the DCC. The Taiwanese reference phantoms can be used to establish dose guidelines and regulations for radiation protection from external exposure.

  16. Effect of electrostatic field on dynamic friction coefficient of pistachio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H Aghkhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Separation and grading of agricultural products from the production to supply, has notable importance. The separation can be done based on physical, electrical, magnetic, optical properties and etc. It is necessary for any development of new systems to study enough on the properties and behavior of agricultural products. Some characteristics for separation are size (length, width and thickness, hardness, shape, density, surface roughness, color, speed limit, aerodynamic properties, electrical conductivity, elasticity and coefficient of static friction point. So far, the friction properties of agricultural products used in the separating process, but the effect of electrostatic charging on static and dynamic coefficients of friction for separation had little attention. The aim of this study was to find out the interactions between electrostatic and friction properties to find a way to separate products that separation is not possible with conventional methods or not sufficiently accurate. In this paper, the separation of close and smiley pistachios by electrostatic charging was investigated. Materials and Methods: Kallehghoochi pistachio cultivar has the top rank in production in Iran. Therefore, it was used as a sample. The experimental design that used in this study, had moisture content at three levels (24.2, 14.5 and 8.1 percent, electric field intensity at three levels (zero, 4000 and 7000 V, speed of movement on the surface at three levels (1300, 2500 and 3300 mm per minute, friction surface (galvanized sheet iron, aluminum and flat rubber and pistachio type at two levels (filled splits and closed that was measured and analyzed in completely randomized factorial design. A friction measuring device (built in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad used to measure the friction force. It has a removable table that can move in two directions with adjustable speed. The test sample put into the vessel with internal dimensions of 300 × 150

  17. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  18. The effect of the band edges on the Seebeck coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Joachim

    2010-06-16

    The classical thermopower formulae generally applied for the calculation of the Seebeck coefficient S are argued to be incomplete. S can be separated into two different contributions, a scattering term, S(0), and a thermodynamic term, ΔS, representing the additional change of the electrochemical potential μ with temperature T caused by 'non-scattering' effects, for instance, the band edge shift with T. On the basis of this separation into S(0) and ΔS, it is shown that shifts of the band edges with T lead to an additional contribution to the classical thermopower formulae. This separation provides the basis for an interpretation of positive thermopowers measured for many metals. Positive thermopower is expected if the energy of the conduction band edge increases with T and if this effect overcompensates for the influence of the energy dependent conductivity, σ(E). Using experimental thermopower data, the band edge shifts are determined for a series of liquid normal metals.

  19. Field-effect-modulated Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernstich, K P; Rössner, B; Batlogg, B

    2008-04-01

    Central to the operation of organic electronic and optoelectronic devices is the transport of charge and energy in the organic semiconductor, and to understand the nature and dynamics of charge carriers is at the focus of intense research efforts. As a basic transport property of solids, the Seebeck coefficient S provides deep insight as it is given by the entropy transported by thermally excited charge carriers and involves in the simplest case only electronic contributions where the transported entropy is determined by details of the band structure and scattering events. We have succeeded for the first time to measure the temperature- and carrier-density-dependent thermopower in single crystals and thin films of two prototypical organic semiconductors by a controlled modulation of the chemical potential in a field-effect geometry. Surprisingly, we find the Seebeck coefficient to be well within the range of the electronic contribution in conventional inorganic semiconductors, highlighting the similarity of transport mechanisms in organic and inorganic semiconductors. Charge and entropy transport is best described as band-like transport of quasiparticles that are subjected to scattering, with exponentially distributed in-gap trap states, and without further contributions to S.

  20. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Zhuo, W; Liu, H [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Y; Chen, T [Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  1. Calculation of dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in a spallation neutron source utilizing NUBASE and the evaluated nuclear structure data file databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, J; Eckerman, K; Arndt, A; Gold, C; Patton, P; Rudin, M; Brey, R; Gesell, T; Rusetski, V; Pagava, S

    2006-01-01

    Based on a mercury spallation neutron source target, the UNLV Transmutation Research Program has identified 72 radionuclides with a half-life greater than or equal to a minute as lacking an appropriate reference for a published dose coefficient according to existing radiation safety dose coefficient databases. A method was developed to compare the nuclear data presented in the ENSDF and NUBASE databases for these 72 radionuclides. Due to conflicting or lacking nuclear data in one or more of the databases, internal and external dose coefficient values have been calculated for only 14 radionuclides, which are not currently presented in Federal Guidance Reports Nos. 11, 12, and 13 or Publications 68 and 72 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Internal dose coefficient values are reported for inhalation and ingestion of 1 microm and 5 microm AMAD particulates along with the f1 values and absorption types for the adult worker. Internal dose coefficient values are also reported for inhalation and ingestion of 1 microm AMAD particulates as well as the f1 values and absorption types for members of the public. Additionally, external dose coefficient values for air submersion, exposure to contaminated ground surface, and exposure to soil contaminated to an infinite depth are also presented.

  2. Nonscaling calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient in periodic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinay, Pavol

    2017-01-21

    An algorithm calculating the effective diffusion coefficient D(x) in 2D and 3D channels with periodically varying cross section along the longitudinal coordinate x is presented. Unlike other methods, it is not based on scaling of the transverse coordinates, or the smallness of the width of the channel. The result is expressed as an integral of specific contributions to D(x) coming from the positions neighboring to x. The method avoids the hierarchy of derivatives of the channel shaping function h(x), so it is also suitable for the channels with cusps or jumps of their width. The method describes correctly D(x) in wide channels, giving the expected behavior in the limit of infinite width (no confinement).

  3. Organ Doses and Effective Doses in Pediatric Radiography: Patient-Dose Survey in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Tietaevaeinen, A.; Parviainen, T.; Viitala, A.; Kortesniemi, M. (Radiation Practices Regulation, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Use of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology permits the radiation exposure of diverse diagnostic procedures to be quantified. Fundamental knowledge of patient doses enhances the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Purpose: To provide comparative information on pediatric examination protocols and patient doses in skull, sinus, chest, abdominal, and pelvic radiography examinations. Material and Methods: 24 Finnish hospitals were asked to register pediatric examination data, including patient information and examination parameters and specifications. The total number of examinations in the study was 1916 (1426 chest, 228 sinus, 96 abdominal, 94 skull, and 72 pelvic examinations). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area products (DAP) were calculated retrospectively or DAP meters were used. Organ doses and effective doses were determined using a Monte Carlo program (PCXMC). Results: There was considerable variation in examination protocols between different hospitals, indicating large variations in patient doses. Mean effective doses of different age groups ranged from 5 muSv to 14 muSv in skull and sinus examinations, from 25 muSv to 483 muSv in abdominal examinations, and from 6 muSv to 48 muSv in chest examinations. Conclusion: In chest and sinus examinations, the amount of data was extensive, allowing national pediatric diagnostic reference levels to be defined. Parameter selection in pediatric examination protocols should be harmonized in order to reduce patient doses and improve optimization

  4. Calculation of conversion coefficients of dose of a computational anthropomorphic simulator sit exposed to a plane source; Calculo de coeficientes de conversao de dose de um simulador antropomorfico computacional sentado exposto a uma fonte plana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, William S.; Carvalho Junior, Alberico B. de; Pereira, Ariana J.S.; Santos, Marcos S.; Maia, Ana F., E-mail: williathan@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: ablohem@gmail.co, E-mail: ariana-jsp@hotmail.co, E-mail: m_souzasantos@hotmail.co, E-mail: afmaia@ufs.b [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    In this paper conversion coefficients (CCs) of equivalent dose and effective in terms of kerma in the air were calculated suggested by the ICRP 74. These dose coefficients were calculated considering a plane radiation source and monoenergetic for a spectrum of energy varying from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The CCs were obtained for four geometries of irradiation, anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, lateral right side and lateral left side. It was used the radiation transport code Visual Monte Carlo (VMC), and a anthropomorphic simulator of sit female voxel. The observed differences in the found values for the CCs at the four irradiation sceneries are direct results of the body organs disposition, and the distance of these organs to the irradiation source. The obtained CCs will be used for estimative more precise of dose in situations that the exposed individual be sit, as the normally the CCs available in the literature were calculated by using simulators always lying or on their feet

  5. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the posture modification of Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference phantoms of ICRP 110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Alves, M. C.; Souza, D. N.; Carvalho, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to modify the standing posture of the anthropomorphic reference phantoms of ICRP publication 110, AM (Adult Male) and AF (Adult Female), to the sitting posture. The change of posture was performed using the Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the phantoms and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. Scion Image software was used to reconstruct and smooth the knee and hip contours of the phantoms in a sitting posture. For 3D visualization of phantoms, the VolView software was used. In the change of postures, the organ and tissue masses were preserved. The MCNPX was used to calculate the equivalent and effective dose conversion coefficients (CCs) per fluence for photons for six irradiation geometries suggested by ICRP publication 110 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO) and energy range 0.010-10 MeV. The results were compared between the standing and sitting postures, for both sexes, in order to evaluate the differences of scattering and absorption of radiation for different postures. Significant differences in the CCs for equivalent dose were observed in the gonads, colon, prostate, urinary bladder and uterus, which are present in the pelvic region, and in organs distributed throughout the body, such as the lymphatic nodes, muscle, skeleton and skin, for the phantoms of both sexes. CCs for effective dose showed significant differences of up to 16% in the AP irradiation geometry, 27% in the PA irradiation geometry and 13% in the ROT irradiation geometry. These results demonstrate the importance of using phantoms in different postures in order to obtain more precise conversion coefficients for a given exposure scenario.

  6. Effect of applied mechanical stress on absorption coefficient of compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: mkgupta.sliet@gmail.com [Department of Applied Sciences, Bhai Gurdas Institute of Engineering and Technology, Sangrur (India); Singh, Gurinderjeet; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Kahlon, K. S. [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering & Technology Deemed University, Longowal (Sangrur) India-148106 (India)

    2015-08-28

    The absorption coefficient of given materials is the parameter required for the basic information. The measurement of absorption coefficient of compounds Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, ZnO{sub 2}, SmO{sub 2} and PbO has been taken at different incident photon energies 26, 59.54, 112, 1173, 1332keV. The studies involve the measurements of absorption coefficient of the self supporting samples prepared under different mechanical stress. This mechanical stress is render in terms of pressure up to 0-6 ton by using hydraulic press. Measurements shows that absorption coefficient of a material is directly proportional to applied mechanical stress on it up to some extent then become independent. Experimentally measured results are in fairly good agreement with in theoretical values obtained from WinXCOM.

  7. Linear attenuation coefficient and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy for dose accuracy, beam collimation, and radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Deidre N; Maqbool, Muhammad; Islam, Mohammed S

    2012-07-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy were determined for (60)Co, (54)Mn, and (137)Cs gamma emitters and a NaI detector. The thickness of the MCP-96 attenuator was varied from 1 to 4 cm. A collimated beam of gamma rays was allowed to pass through various thicknesses of the MCP-96 alloy. The attenuated beam was detected by a NaI detector, and data were recorded by a multichannel analyzer. The run was repeated without the collimator for broad-beam geometry. For each run, the attenuated beam intensity was normalized by the intensity of the unattenuated incident beam obtained by removing the attenuators. Linear attenuation coefficients were determined by plotting of the intensity of the collimated beam against the attenuator thickness. For every thickness of the alloy, the ratio of the attenuated to the unattenuated beam was found to be higher in broad-beam geometry as compared to the same ratio in narrow-beam geometry. We used the difference in these ratios in broad and narrow-beam geometries to calculate the buildup factor. The buildup factor was found to increase with beam energy and attenuator thickness. Variation in the source-to-detector distance gave a lower value of the buildup factor for a small and a large distance and a higher value for an intermediate distance. The buildup factor was found to be greater than 1 in all cases. We conclude that the buildup factor must be calculated and incorporated for dose correction and precision when the MCP-96 alloy is used for tissue compensation or radiation shielding and protection purposes.

  8. Comparing Hp(3) evaluated from the conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent for eye lens dosimetry calibrated on a new cylindrical PMMA phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esor, J.; Sudchai, W.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.; Intang, A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on a new occupational dose limit recommended by ICRP (2011), the annual dose limit for the lens of the eye for workers should be reduced from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y averaged over 5 consecutive years in which no single year exceeding 50 mSv. This new dose limit directly affects radiologists and cardiologists whose work involves high radiation exposure over 20 mSv/y. Eye lens dosimetry (Hp(3)) has become increasingly important and should be evaluated directly based on dosimeters that are worn closely to the eye. Normally, Hp(3) dose algorithm was carried out by the combination of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) values while dosimeters were calibrated on slab PMMA phantom. Recently, there were three reports from European Union that have shown the conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(3). These conversion coefficients carried out by ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay projects were performed by using a new cylindrical head phantom. In this study, various delivered doses were calculated using those three conversion coefficients while nanoDot, small OSL dosimeters, were used for Hp(3) measurement. These calibrations were performed with a standard X-ray generator at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). Delivered doses (Hp(3)) using those three conversion coefficients were compared with Hp(3) from nanoDot measurements. The results showed that percentage differences between delivered doses evaluated from the conversion coefficient of each project and Hp(3) doses evaluated from the nanoDots were found to be not exceeding -11.48 %, -8.85 % and -8.85 % for ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay project, respectively.

  9. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  10. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  11. The effect of activity coefficient on growth control of ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, AsiehSadat; Ketabi, Seyed Ahmad; Bagheri-Mohagheghi, Mohamad Mehdi; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relative importance of effective parameters such as the activity coefficient, thermal decomposition and pH of chemical additives is investigated on the control procedure of ZnO nanoparticle growth. It is found that the activity coefficient is of greater importance compared with other parameters and should not be neglected in nanosynthesis any longer. This effect of activity coefficient of additives may also improve the fabrication and properties of other applicable nanostructures.

  12. The effect of activity coefficient on growth control of ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, AsiehSadat [Engineering Department, Islamic Azad University, Bojnourd Branch, Bojnourd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ketabi, Seyed Ahmad; Bagheri-Mohagheghi, Mohamad Mehdi [School of Physics and Center for Solid State Research, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abadyan, Mohamadreza, E-mail: abadyan@yahoo.com [Mechanical Engineering Group, Islamic Azad University, Ramsar branch, Ramsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, the relative importance of effective parameters such as the activity coefficient, thermal decomposition and pH of chemical additives is investigated on the control procedure of ZnO nanoparticle growth. It is found that the activity coefficient is of greater importance compared with other parameters and should not be neglected in nanosynthesis any longer. This effect of activity coefficient of additives may also improve the fabrication and properties of other applicable nanostructures.

  13. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  14. Committed equivalent organ doses and committed effective doses from intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed equivalent doses to individual organs for intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu m AMAD particles of 359 nuclides by infants aged 3 months, by children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and by adults. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on the way committed doses increase with the integration period is given in NRPB-M289. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  15. Nonlinearity Effects of Lateral Density Diffusion Coefficient on Gain-Guided VCSEL Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Cheung, Samson H.; Ning, C. Z.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron and hole diffusions in the plane of semiconductor quantum wells play an important part in the static and dynamic operations of semiconductor lasers. In this paper, we apply a hydrodynamic model developed from the semiconductor Bloch equations to numerically study the effects of nonlinearity in the diffusion coefficient on single mode operation and direct modulation of a gain-guided InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well laser, operating not too far from threshold. We found that a small diffusion coefficient is advantageous for lowering the threshold current and increasing the modulation bandwidth. Most importantly, the effects of nonlinearity in the coefficient can be approximately reproduced by replacing the coefficient with an effective constant diffusion coefficient, which corresponds roughly to the half height density of the density distribution.

  16. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) where fi = (ni/ ∑j nj) and Zi are the fractional abundance and atomic number respectively of the constituent element. Here, ni is the total number of atoms of the constituent element and ∑j nj are the total number of atoms of all types present in the compound as per its chemical formula. The effective atomic number, Zeff,.

  17. Measurements of low energy hydrogen ion effective sticking coefficients on titanium in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, H.; Post, R. S.

    1981-02-01

    The effective sticking coefficient for low energy (< 30 eV) hydrogen ions on titanium gettered aluminium walls has been measured in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. A value of greater than 0.75 was measured. The H/sub 2/ effective sticking coefficient for the same conditions is less than 0.01. Seventy-four percent of the wall area of the Octupole is gettered. The effects of recycling on plasma parameters is also discussed.

  18. Transfer coefficients for the prediction of the dose to man via the forage-cow-milk pathway from radionuclides released to the biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y C; Colsher, C S; Quinn, D J; Thompson, S E

    1977-07-15

    This document presents tables of diet-to-milk transfer coefficients for radioactive and stable isotopes in the cow. The values are based on an extensive literature review of the secretion of radioisotopes in milk and the concentrations of radioactive or stable isotopes in milk and feed. Transfer coefficients were compiled and tabulated for isotopes of more than 70 elements. The values are summarized in a table of elemental transfer coefficients and also organized into separate tables that reveal their elemental systematics and the effects of physical and chemical form.

  19. The Effect of New Collision-Induced Absorption Coefficients on the Early Mars Limit Cycle Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayworth, B. P.; Payne, R. C.; Kasting, J. F.

    2017-11-01

    Updating the Limit Cycling (LC) Model for early Mars with new absorption coefficients to test for changes to LC behavior and to potentially lower needed concentrations of greenhouse gases. Thought will be given to the effect of LC on habitability.

  20. Effects of Coarse Grouping and Skewed Marginal Distributions on the Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Peter B.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve non-normal bivariate distributions were constructed to investigate the effects which coarsley grouped, skewed marginal distributions have on the correlation coefficient and the accuracy of current methods of correction for grouping. (Author/RC)

  1. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilia Anisa, Nor; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10-11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10-11 m2/s.

  2. RANS SIMULATION OF HYDROFOIL EFFECTS ON HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS OF A PLANING CATAMARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Najafi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of high-speed crafts’ hydrodynamic coefficients will help to analyze the dynamics of these kinds of vessels and the factors affecting their dynamic stabilities. Also, it can be useful and effective in controlling the vessel instabilities. The main purpose of this study is to determine the coefficients of longitudinal motions of a planing catamaran with and without a hydrofoil using RANS method to evaluate the foil effects on them. Determination of hydrodynamic coefficients by experimental approach is costly, and requires meticulous laboratory equipment; therefore, utilizing numerical methods and developing a virtual laboratory seems highly efficient. In the present study, the numerical results for hydrodynamic coefficients of a high-speed craft are verified against Troesch’s (1992 experimental results. In the following, after determination of hydrodynamic coefficients of a planing catamaran with and without foil, the foil effects on its hydrodynamic coefficients are evaluated. The results indicate that most of the coefficients are frequency independent especially at high frequencies.

  3. A new method for effective dose calculation based on the ambient dose height distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebmann Mario

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The realistic determination of effective dose of the staff in diagnostic radiology has been a challenge both for personal dosimetry and ambient dose measurement. A model for dosimetry of occupational exposure is presented that allows direct determination of effective dose from measured or even manufacturer given ambient dose distribution in front of the personnel. This model considers a wide range of radiation energies, different radiation protection situations, and gender effects.

  4. The influence of physique on dose conversion coefficients for idealised external photon exposures: a comparison of doses for Chinese male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile anthropometric parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2017-09-01

    For evaluating radiation risk, the construction of anthropomorphic computational phantoms with a variety of physiques can help reduce the uncertainty that is due to anatomical variation. In our previous work, three deformable Chinese reference male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile body mass indexes and body circumference physiques (DCRM-10, DCRM-50 and DCRM-90) were constructed to represent underweight, normal weight and overweight Chinese adult males, respectively. In the present study, the phantoms were updated by correcting the fat percentage to improve the precision of radiological dosimetry evaluations. The organ dose conversion coefficients for each phantom were calculated and compared for four idealized external photon exposures from 15 keV to 10 MeV, using the Monte Carlo method. The dosimetric results for the three deformable Chinese reference male phantom (DCRM) phantoms indicated that variations in physique can cause as much as a 20% difference in the organ dose conversion coefficients. When the photon energy was physiques. Hence, it is difficult to predict the conversion coefficients of the phantoms from the anthropometric parameters alone. Nevertheless, the complex organ conversion coefficients presented in this report will be helpful for evaluating the radiation risk for large groups of people with various physiques. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  5. The effect of chalk on the finger-hold friction coefficient in rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amca, Arif Mithat; Vigouroux, Laurent; Aritan, Serdar; Berton, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chalk on the friction coefficient between climber's fingers and two different rock types (sandstone and limestone). The secondary purpose was to investigate the effects of humidity and temperature on the friction coefficient and on the influence of chalk. Eleven experienced climbers took part in this study and 42 test sessions were performed. Participants hung from holds which were fixed on a specially designed hang board. The inclination of the hang board was progressively increased until the climber's hand slipped from the holds. The angle of the hang board was simultaneously recorded by using a gyroscopic sensor and the friction coefficient was calculated at the moment of slip. The results showed that there was a significant positive effect of chalk on the coefficient of friction (+18.7% on limestone and +21.6% on sandstone). Moreover sandstone had a higher coefficient of friction than limestone (+15.6% without chalk, +18.4% with chalk). These results confirmed climbers' belief that chalk enhances friction. However, no correlation with humidity/temperature and friction coefficient was noted which suggested that additional parameters should be considered in order to understand the effects of climate on finger friction in rock climbing.

  6. Experimental investigation of the effect vertical oscillation on the heat transfer coefficient of the finned tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadhim S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate experimentally the effect of the forced vibrations on the free convection heat transfer coefficient using heated longitudinally finned cylinder made of Aluminium. The effect of the vibration frequency ranged from 2 to16 Hz with various heat fluxes ranged from 500-1500 W/m2. It was found that, the relation between the heat transfer coefficient and amplitude of vibration increased for all inclination angles from (0°-45°, while the increment of inclination angle decreases the values of convection heat transfer coefficient. The results show that the heat transfer coefficient ratio (hv/ho of longitudinal finned cylinders in (0° angle was (8% and (30% greater than those for the (30° and (45° respectively.

  7. Effect of particle size on the diffuse reflection coefficient of titanium dioxide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, V. A.; Astafyev, A. L.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work a model of light scattering is shown which explains the result about effect of particle size on the diffuse reflection coefficient of initial titanium dioxide powders. The diffuse reflection coefficient depending on particle size for TiO2 pigment varies on the curve with maximum. The experimental results and the model can be used for technology development of manufacturing pigment for light-reflecting temperature-control coatings of spacecraft

  8. Effect of particle size on the diffuse reflection coefficient of titanium dioxide powder

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasov, Vitaliy Anatolievich; Astafyev, Alexander Leonidovich; Zarubin, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work a model of light scattering is shown which explains the result about effect of particle size on the diffuse reflection coefficient of initial titanium dioxide powders. The diffuse reflection coefficient depending on particle size for TiO2 pigment varies on the curve with maximum. The experimental results and the model can be used for technology development of manufacturing pigment for light-reflecting temperature-control coatings of spacecraft.

  9. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-24

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  10. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  11. Patient radiation exposure in uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata: calculation of organ doses and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, S.; Strecker, E.P. [Department of Radiology, Diakonissenkrankenhaus, Diakonissenstrasse 28, 76199, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schultz, F.W.; Zoetelief, J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Medical Physics, Delft University of Technology, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this study was estimation of patient effective dose from uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata. Parameters and data relevant to patient dose were recorded for 33 consecutive procedures. Using Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, organ and effective doses were calculated in detail for a subset of five procedures, to estimate the effective dose for all procedures. Mean dose area product was 59.9, median 23.4, and range 8.8-317.5 Gycm{sup 2}. Mean absorbed ovarian dose was calculated as 51 mGy in the five procedures. Using the dose conversion factor estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation for all procedures a mean estimated effective dose of 34 mSv (median 13 mSv, range 5-182 mSv) results, with a tendency to lower values regarding the succession of the procedures. Patients' radiation exposure level is up to twice of that of an abdominal CT examination. Angiographic equipment related dose-reducing features and radiographic technique essentially influence organ doses and effective dose. Consistent application of dose-reducing techniques and awareness of radiation exposure justifies uterine artery embolization as a therapeutic option for the treatment of uterine fibroids. (orig.)

  12. Effective stresses and shear failure pressure from in situ Biot's coefficient, Hejre Field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regel, Jeppe Bendix; Orozova-Bekkevold, Ivanka; Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2017-01-01

    , is significantly different from 1. The log-derived Biot's coefficient is above 0.8 in the Shetland Chalk Group and in the Tyne Group, and 0.6-0.8 in the Heno Sandstone Formation. We show that the effective vertical and horizontal stresses obtained using the log-derived Biot's coefficient result in a drilling...... window for a vertical well larger than if approximating Biot's coefficient by 1. The estimation of the Biot's coefficient is straightforward in formations with a stiff frame, whereas in formations such as shales, caution has to be taken. We discuss the consequence of assumptions made on the mineral...... composition of shales as unphysical results could be obtained when choosing inappropriate mineral moduli....

  13. The effect of magnetization and electric polarization on the anomalous transport coefficients of a chiral fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadooghi, N.; Tabatabaee, S. M. A.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of finite magnetization and electric polarization on dissipative and non-dissipative (anomalous) transport coefficients of a chiral fluid are studied. First, using the second law of thermodynamics as well as Onsager’s time-reversal symmetry principle, the complete set of dissipative transport coefficients of this medium is derived. It is shown that the properties of the resulting shear and bulk viscosities are mainly affected by the anisotropy induced by external electric and magnetic fields. Then, using the fact that the anomaly induced currents do not contribute to entropy production, the corresponding algebro-differential equations to non-dissipative anomalous transport coefficients are derived in a certain derivative expansion. The solutions of these equations show that, within this approximation, anomalous transport coefficients are, in particular, given in terms of the electric susceptibility of the medium.

  14. Effects of the blockage ratio of a valve disk on loss coefficient in a butterfly valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rho, Hyung Joon; Lee, Jee Keun [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hee Joo [Firstec Co., Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    The loss coefficient of the butterfly valve which allows partial opening of the valve at closed position and is applicable to the small-sized pipe system with the diameter of 1 inch was measured for the variation of the valve disk blockage ratio. Two different types of the valve disk configuration to adjust the blockage ratio were considered. One was the solid type valve disk of which the diameter was changed into the smaller size rather than the pipe diameter, and the other was the perforate type valve disk on which some holes were perforated. The results from two types of valve disk were compared to identify their characteristics in the loss coefficient distributions. The loss coefficient and the controllable angle of the valve disk were decreased exponentially with the decrease of the blockage ratio. In addition, the perforate valve disk had the effect on the higher loss coefficient rather than the solid type valve disk.

  15. Development of a technique for improving coefficient of variation of CaSO4:Dy teflon-based TLD personnel monitoring system in low-dose region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S M; Sneha, C; Sahai, M K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2015-12-01

    In view of the importance of zero-dose background (null signal) in influencing the coefficient of variation in low-dose region, a technique for the estimation of the same from composite (gross) signal is developed for CaSO4:Dy-based personnel monitoring system being used in India. The technique is based on simple analysis of glow curves (GCs) of unexposed and exposed dosemeters, evolution of trend/model for the zero-dose curves, generation of simulation protocol for individual zero-dose curves, establishment of characteristics of GCs of exposed dosemeters and finally preparation of an algorithm to segregate the components from composite signal. The technique offers the separation of real-time background and gives superior results over other method of approximation of the background. The results also prove efficiency of the empirical trending and simulation protocol of background GCs. The proposed technique can be implemented in routine monitoring without any extra man hours and reader time. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effect of Opening the Sash of a Centre-Pivot Roof Window on Wind Pressure Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Wigö, Hans; Heiselberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of outward opening the sash of a window on local and overall wind pressures. Wind tunnel experiments were used for the purpose of evaluation. A centre-pivot roof window on a pitched roof in a modelled scaled building was used in the analysis of wind pressures. The ...... pressure distribution nearby the window. The use of wind pressure coefficients from the analysis of sealed plain surface may lead to erroneous estimation of airflow rate........ The wind pressures were defined in terms of wind pressure coefficients. Traditionally wind pressure coefficients are extracted from the analysis of sealed plain surface. These wind pressure coefficients are used to estimate the natural ventilation rate through windows/openings due to wind effect. Surface...... averaged wind pressure coefficients do not accurately estimate the airflow rates. Therefore, local wind pressure coefficients are needed especially for dynamic calculation of airflow rates. From the wind tunnel experiments, it is concluded that outward opening the sash can significantly affect the wind...

  17. Adjustment of minimum seismic shear coefficient considering site effects for long-period structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Minsheng; Du, Hongbiao; Cui, Jie; Zeng, Qingli; Jiang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Minimum seismic base shear is a key factor employed in the seismic design of long-period structures, which is specified in some of the major national seismic building codes viz. ASCE7-10, NZS1170.5 and GB50011-2010. In current Chinese seismic design code GB50011-2010, however, effects of soil types on the minimum seismic shear coefficient are not considered, which causes problems for long-period structures sited in hard or rock soil to meet the minimum base shear requirement. This paper aims to modify the current minimum seismic shear coefficient by taking into account site effects. For this purpose, effective peak acceleration (EPA) is used as a representation for the ordinate value of the design response spectrum at the plateau. A large amount of earthquake records, for which EPAs are calculated, are examined through the statistical analysis by considering soil conditions as well as the seismic fortification intensities. The study indicates that soil types have a significant effect on the spectral ordinates at the plateau as well as the minimum seismic shear coefficient. Modified factors related to the current minimum seismic shear coefficient are preliminarily suggested for each site class. It is shown that the modified seismic shear coefficients are more effective to the determination of minimum seismic base shear of long-period structures.

  18. Effect of dose and dosing rate on the mutagenesis of nitric oxide in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of dose and dosing rate on the mutagenesis of nitric oxide in supF shuttle vector. Ji Hye Kim1 and ... Purpose: To determine how the dose and rate of NO• treatment affects mutagenic responses. Methods: Shuttle vector pSP189 was ... form a strong oxidant and nitrating agent, peroxynitrite (ONOO-), which can initiate.

  19. Effective higher-order nonlinear coefficients of composites with weakly nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natenapit, Mayuree; Thongboonrithi, Chaivej

    2010-05-01

    The field equations, based on the third-order perturbation expansion of electrostatic potential, are derived, and our general formulae for higher-order effective nonlinear coefficients based on the energy definition, are presented and applied to dielectric composites consisting of dilute linear cylindrical inclusions randomly dispersed in a weakly nonlinear host media. The effective nonlinear coefficients are determined up to the ninth order. In addition, the results are also compared to those obtained using the average field method and likely to provide more accurate predictions of effective higher-order nonlinear responses.

  20. Effects of Exposure Imprecision on Estimation of the Benchmark Dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose......Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose...

  1. Shielding calculation constants for use in effective dose evaluation for photons, neutrons and Bremsstrahlung from beta-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Yukio; Endo, Akira; Tsuda, Shuichi; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    Dose quantity in the shielding design calculation will be changed from the 1 cm depth dose equivalent to effective dose on the occasion of the introduction of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations (ICRP Publication 60) into domestic laws. In the shielding calculation for the radiation facilities, simple dose estimation methods by using the shielding calculation constants instead of calculation of radiation energy spectra behind the shielding materials are effective and widely used. These shielding calculation constants depend on the dose quantity to be estimated and those for the evaluation of 1 cm depth dose equivalents should be replaced by those for the evaluation of effective dose. In the present report, the shielding calculation constants are summarized for photons, neutrons and Bremsstrahlung from beta-ray. For mono-energetic photons with energies from 0.015 MeV to 10 MeV, effective dose buildup factors, effective conversion coefficients from air kerma to effective dose and transmission data of effective dose were calculated. Effective dose rate constants, which represent an effective dose value at 1 m apart from a source without shielding, and transmission data of effective dose were also calculated for gamma-ray and X-ray from 33 radioisotopes, Bremsstrahlung from 13 radioisotopes beta-ray and 4 neutron sources. (author)

  2. Surplus thermal energy model of greenhouses and coefficient analysis for effective utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.H.; Son, J.E.; Lee, S.D.; Cho, S.I.; Ashtiani-Araghi, A.; Rhee, J.Y.

    2016-11-01

    If a greenhouse in the temperate and subtropical regions is maintained in a closed condition, the indoor temperature commonly exceeds that required for optimal plant growth, even in the cold season. This study considered this excess energy as surplus thermal energy (STE), which can be recovered, stored and used when heating is necessary. To use the STE economically and effectively, the amount of STE must be estimated before designing a utilization system. Therefore, this study proposed an STE model using energy balance equations for the three steps of the STE generation process. The coefficients in the model were determined by the results of previous research and experiments using the test greenhouse. The proposed STE model produced monthly errors of 17.9%, 10.4% and 7.4% for December, January and February, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of the coefficients on the model accuracy were revealed by the estimation error assessment and linear regression analysis through fixing dynamic coefficients. A sensitivity analysis of the model coefficients indicated that the coefficients have to be determined carefully. This study also provides effective ways to increase the amount of STE. (Author)

  3. Surplus thermal energy model of greenhouses and coefficient analysis for effective utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwan Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available If a greenhouse in the temperate and subtropical regions is maintained in a closed condition, the indoor temperature commonly exceeds that required for optimal plant growth, even in the cold season. This study considered this excess energy as surplus thermal energy (STE, which can be recovered, stored and used when heating is necessary. To use the STE economically and effectively, the amount of STE must be estimated before designing a utilization system. Therefore, this study proposed an STE model using energy balance equations for the three steps of the STE generation process. The coefficients in the model were determined by the results of previous research and experiments using the test greenhouse. The proposed STE model produced monthly errors of 17.9%, 10.4% and 7.4% for December, January and February, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of the coefficients on the model accuracy were revealed by the estimation error assessment and linear regression analysis through fixing dynamic coefficients. A sensitivity analysis of the model coefficients indicated that the coefficients have to be determined carefully. This study also provides effective ways to increase the amount of STE.

  4. Dose-ranging design and analysis methods to identify the minimum effective dose (MED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yijie; Chen, Su; Sullivan, Danielle; Li, Yihan; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Wangang; Zhang, Hongtao; Tang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Li; Hartford, Alan; Yang, Bo

    2017-12-01

    In dose ranging clinical trials, it is critical to investigate the dose-response profile and to identify a minimum effective dose (MED) to guide the dose selection for phase 3 confirmatory trials. Traditional dose ranging trials focus on pairwise comparisons between placebo and each investigational dose, while in recent years MCP-Mod (Multiple Comparison Procedures & Modeling) arose and gained popularity in the design and analysis of dose ranging trials. Comprehensive comparison between MCP-Mod and other methods have been made on continuous variables assuming a normal distribution. In this article, we extend the comparison to binary/binomial response variables. Via simulation, the rate of correct and incorrect MED identification are compared for Dunnett's test, trend test and MCP-Mod for a variety of underlying dose response profiles including both monotone and non-monotone dose responses and are compared under a large number of trial design settings. The precision of MED estimation using MCP-Mod is also evaluated comparing the design options of more dose levels and smaller sample size per dose versus fewer dose levels and larger sample size per dose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of dose rate dependent effects of total ionizing dose /TID/ irradiations. [on semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    The basic effects of ionizing radiation are summarized. The problem of the existence of a true dose rate effect is examined. Consideration is given to the nature of long term annealing, which is sometimes manifested as an 'apparent' dose rate effect. Both analytical and experimental work is considered and the results are related to practical testing requirements.

  6. The Effect of a Variable Disc Pad Friction Coefficient for the Mechanical Brake System of a Railway Vehicle: e0135459

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nam-Jin Lee; Chul-Goo Kang

    2015-01-01

    ... and interaction with other components. The friction coefficient between the brake disc and the pad used in simulations has been conventionally considered constant, and the effect of a variable friction coefficient is ignored...

  7. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  8. Investigation of La3+ Doping Effect on Piezoelectric Coefficients of BLT Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wodecka-Dus B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of La3+ admixture in barium lanthanum titanate (BLT ceramics system with colossal permittivity on performance of prospective piezoelectric cold plasma application were studied. Usage of cold atmospheric pressure plasma appears promising in terms of industrial and healthcare applications. Performed investigation provide consistent evaluation of doping lanthanum amount on piezoelectric coefficients values with simultaneous capability of charge accumulation for effective plasma generation. Modification of ferroelectric materials with heterovalent ions, however with the lower radii than the original atoms, significantly affects their domain mobility and consequently electromechanical properties. To determine the piezoelectric coefficients, the resonance-antiresonance method was implemented, and values of piezoelectric and dielectric parameters were recorded. Finally the results indicated that addition of 0.4 mol.% of La3+ ions to the ceramic structure maximally increased the values of piezoelectric coefficient to d33 = 20 pC/N and to huge dielectric constant to ε33T = 29277.

  9. Tailoring of Seebeck coefficient with surface roughness effects in silicon sub-50-nm films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bagga, Anjana; Neeleshwar, S

    2012-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the Seebeck coefficient in the sub-50-nm scale silicon ultra thin films is investigated theoretically using nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. For systematic studies, the surface roughness is modelled by varying thickness periodically with square wave profile characterized by two parameters: amplitude (A 0) and wavelength (λ). Since high Seebeck coefficient is obtained if the temperature difference between the ends of device produces higher currents and higher induced voltages, we investigate how the generated current and induced voltage is affected with increasing A 0 and λ. The theoretical investigations show that pseudoperiodicity of the device structure gives rise to two effects: firstly the threshold energy at which the transmission of current starts is shifted towards higher energy sides and secondly transmission spectra of current possess pseudobands and pseudogaps. The width of the pseudobands and their occupancies determine the total generated current. It is found that current decreases with increasing A 0 but shows a complicated trend with λ. The trends of threshold energy determine the trends of Seebeck voltage with roughness parameters. The increase in threshold energy makes the current flow in higher energy levels. Thus, the Seebeck voltage, i.e. voltage required to nullify this current, increases. Increase in Seebeck voltage results in increase in Seebeck coefficient. We find that threshold energy increases with increasing A 0 and frequency (1/λ). Hence, Seebeck voltage and Seebeck coefficient increase vice versa. It is observed that Seebeck coefficient is tuneable with surface roughness parameters.

  10. Velocity distribution function and effective restitution coefficient for a granular gas of viscoelastic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Awadhesh Kumar; Bodrova, Anna; Puri, Sanjay; Brilliantov, Nikolai

    2013-06-01

    We perform large-scale event-driven molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for granular gases of particles interacting with the impact-velocity-dependent restitution coefficient ε(v(imp)). We use ε(v(imp)) as it follows from the simplest first-principles collision model of viscoelastic spheres. Both cases of force-free and uniformly heated gases are studied. We formulate a simplified model of an effective constant restitution coefficient ε(eff), which depends on a current granular temperature, and we compute ε(eff) using the kinetic theory. We develop a theory of the velocity distribution function for driven gases of viscoelastic particles and analyze the evolution of granular temperature and of the Sonine coefficients, which characterize the form of the velocity distribution function. We observe that for not large dissipation the simulation results are in an excellent agreement with the theory for both the homogeneous cooling state and uniformly heated gases. At the same time, a noticeable discrepancy between the theory and MD results for the Sonine coefficients is detected for large dissipation. We analyze the accuracy of the simplified model based on the effective restitution coefficient ε(eff), and we conclude that this model can accurately describe granular temperature. It provides also an acceptable accuracy for the velocity distribution function for small dissipation, but it fails when dissipation is large.

  11. Effective dose in abdominal digital radiography: Patient factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Sung; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung Hoon; Cho, Young Chul; Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medical Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To identify independent patient factors associated with an increased radiation dose, and to evaluate the effect of patient position on the effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. We retrospectively evaluated the effective dose for abdominal digital radiography in 222 patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on the cut-off dose value of 0.311 mSv (the upper third quartile of dose distribution): group A (n = 166) and group B (n = 56). Through logistic regression, independent factors associated with a larger effective dose were identified. The effect of patient position on the effective dose was evaluated using a paired t-test. High body mass index (BMI) (≥ 23 kg/m2), presence of ascites, and spinal metallic instrumentation were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high BMI [odds ratio (OR), 25.201; p < 0.001] and ascites (OR, 25.132; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. The effective dose was significantly lesser (22.6%) in the supine position than in the standing position (p < 0.001). High BMI and ascites were independent factors associated with a larger effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. Significant dose reduction in patients with these factors may be achieved by placing the patient in the supine position during abdominal digital radiography.

  12. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different composite nanolubricant concentrations on Aluminium 2024 plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, N. N. M.; Azmi, W. H.; Redhwan, A. A. M.; Sharif, M. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Wear of sliding parts and operational machine consistency enhancement can be avoided with good lubrication. Lubrication reduce wear between two contacting and sliding surfaces and decrease the frictional power losses in compressor. The coefficient of friction and wear rate effects study were carried out to measure the friction and anti-wear abilities of Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants a new type of compressor lubricant to enhanced the compressor performances. The tribology test rig employing reciprocating test conditions to replicate a piston ring contact in the compressor was used to measure the coefficient of friction and wear rate. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different Al2O3-SiO2/PAG composite nanolubricants of Aluminium 2024 plate for 10-kg load at different speed were investigated. Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG 46) lubricant using two-steps method of preparation. The result shows that the coefficient friction and wear rate of composite nanolubricants decreased compared to pure lubricant. The maximum reduction achievement for friction of coefficient and wear rate by Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants by 4.78% and 12.96% with 0.06% volume concentration. Therefore, 0.06% volume concentration is selected as the most enhanced composite nanolubricants with effective coefficient of friction and wear rate reduction compared to other volume concentrations. Thus, it is recommended to be used as the compressor lubrication to enhanced compressor performances.

  13. Estimate Of Reference Effective Dose And Renal Dose During Abdominal CT Scan For Dose Optimization Procedures In Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issahaku Shirazu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study is to estimate renal and effective dose during abdominal MDCT scan using image data for dose optimization for purposes of radiation protection in Ghana. In addition dose influencing parameters including CTDIVOL DLP and MSAD were recorded and compared with ICRPICRU AAPM EU and IAEA dose optimization recommendations. All the measurements were done during abdominal MDCT examination. The measured parameters were part of image data on the MeVisLab DICOM application software platform. The total photon fluence mAs per area and the photon energy fluence kVp per area on the abdominal and renal surface was also determined. Renal and effective dose were estimated using ICRP publication 103 recommendations. The results of the measured parameters based on the average renal surface area of 29.52cm2 and 30.67cm2 for the right and left kidney respectively shows that The mean dose parameters were 6.33mGy 7.78mGy 936.25mGy cm 5.76mGy 10.99mSv and 14.09mSv for CTDIV CTDIW DLP MSAD RD and E respectively. The average values were lower than the general recommended average critical values but this seems misleading based on the fact that 37 of the individual dose and exposure parameters exceeded the recommended critical values. A tradeoff between patient radiation dose and image quality in abdominal CT has been established. Where at a mean SNR of 6.6 decibels an adequate images were produce to answer all the clinical questions with an average effective dose of 14.09mSv and renal dose of 10.99mSv. Radiation dose during x-ray CT imaging is an important patient safety concern. Reducing radiation dose result in a reduction of the risk to patient however reducing dose also reduces the signal strength and thereby reduces the signal to noise ratio in the resulting CT image hence the image quality is affected. It is recommended that the established reference values be use as clinical advisory mechanism to protect patience and clinicians. It is also recommended that

  14. The application of a semiconductor detector in the estimation of the effective dose in radiographic examination of the extremities

    CERN Document Server

    Eyden, A C

    2001-01-01

    15 energy dependent calibration coefficients formulated from the data gathered at the NRPB. The dose in air was then multiplied by the appropriate mass energy absorption coefficient for each particular tissue type and following a scatter correction factor the organ dose was calculated. ICRP weighting factors (1990, P68) were then applied to the organ and tissue doses to calculate the effective dose. The effective dose value was found to be 0.42 mu Sv for a male and 0.41 mu Sv for a female. The aim of this project was to measure the effective dose from radiographic examination of the ankle. Previous work investigating effective dose values resultant from extremity examinations has made estimations using computer simulations of scattering processes. To measure the effective dose, certain key pieces of apparatus were required. The dose levels within the body were in the order of 10 sup - sup 9 Gy and therefore an extremely sensitive x-ray detector was required. To estimate the effective dose, a specific set of o...

  15. Effective intraparticle diffusion coefficients of CoCl2 in mesoporous functionalized silica adsorbents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djekic, T.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; de Haan, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this work is to determine the effective intraparticle diffusion coefficient of CoCl2 over mesoporous functionalized silica. Silica is selected as a carrier of the functionalized groups for its rigid structure which excludes troublesome swelling, often found in polymeric adsorbents.

  16. A numerical study of a method for measuring the effective in situ sound absorption coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.; Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; de Boer, A

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of a method [Wijnant et al., “Development and applica- tion of a new method for the in-situ measurement of sound absorption”, ISMA 31, Leuven, Belgium (2010).], for measurement of the effective area-averaged in situ sound absorption coefficient is investigated. Based on a local plane

  17. THE EFFECT OF THE ALUMINIUM ALLOY SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON THE RESTITUTION COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Bławucki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the effect of the surface roughness of aluminum alloy on its coefficient of restitution. It describes the current method of finishing the workpiece surface layer after cutting and innovative measuring device which was used in the research. The material used in the research was aluminium alloy EN AW 7075. The paper also presents a relationship between the coefficient of restitution and surface roughness of the milled samples as well as impressions left by bead in function of velocity and a sample surface roughness.

  18. The Effect of Baffles on the Temperature Distribution and Heat-transfer Coefficients of Finned Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schey, Oscar W; Rollin, Vern G

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the effect of baffles on the temperature distribution and the heat-transfer coefficient of finned cylinders. The tests were conducted in a 30-inch wind tunnel on electrically heated cylinders with fins of 0.25 and 0.31 inch pitch. The results of these tests showed that the use of integral baffles gave a reduction of 31.9 percent in the rear wall temperatures and an increase of 54.2 percent in the heat transfer coefficient as compared with a cylinder without baffles.

  19. Pathogenic effects of low dose irradiation: dose-effect relationships; Effets pathogenes d'un faible debit de dose: la relation ''dose-effet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Academie des Technologies, 91 - Saint Michel sur Orge (France)

    2002-10-01

    There is no evidence of pathogenic effects in human groups exposed to less than 100 mSv at low dose-rate. The attributed effects are therefore the result of extrapolations from higher doses. The validity of such extrapolations is discussed from the point of view of epidemiology as well as cellular and molecular biology. The Chernobyl accident resulted in large excess of thyroid cancers in children; it also raised the point that some actual sanitary effects among distressed populations might be a direct consequence of low doses. Studies under the control of UN have not confirmed this point identifying no dose-effect relationship and 'severe socio-economic and psychological pressures... poverty, poor diet and living conditions, and lifestyle factors' as the main cause for depressed health. Some hypothesis are considered for explaining the dose-dependence and high prevalence of non-cancer causes of death among human groups exposed to more than 300 mSv. (author)

  20. Calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient during the drying of clay samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to calculate the effective diffusion coefficient based on experimentally recorded drying curves for two masonry clays obtained from different localities. The calculation method and two computer programs based on the mathematical calculation of the second Fick’s law and Cranck diffusion equation were developed. Masonry product shrinkage during drying was taken into consideration for the first time and the appropriate correction was entered into the calculation. The results presented in this paper show that the values of the effective diffusion coefficient determined by the designed computer programs (with and without the correction for shrinkage have similar values to those available in the literature for the same coefficient for different clays. Based on the mathematically determined prognostic value of the effective diffusion coefficient, it was concluded that, whatever the initial mineralogical composition of the clay, there is 90% agreement of the calculated prognostic drying curves with the experimentally recorded ones. When a shrinkage correction of the masonry products is introduced into the calculation step, this agreement is even better.

  1. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  2. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, T I; Wøhni, T

    1984-02-01

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy.

  3. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Eiskjær, Søren Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... leads to tissue damage. It has been documented in large cohort studies that radiographic imaging during childhood for spinal deformities eg. scoliosis, increases the lifetime risk of breast cancer. The EOS biplane x-ray imaging system (EOS Imaging S.A, Paris France) has been developed to produce high...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...

  4. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of surface modification, microstructure, and trapping on hydrogen diffusion coefficients in high strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebaraj Johnley Muthuraj, Josiah

    Cathodic protection is widely used for corrosion prevention. However, this process generates hydrogen at the protected metal surface, and diffusion of hydrogen through the metal may cause hydrogen embrittlement or hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking. Thus the choice of a metal for use as fasteners depends upon its hydrogen uptake, permeation, diffusivity and trapping. The diffusivity of hydrogen through four high strength alloys (AISI 4340, alloy 718, alloy 686, and alloy 59) was analyzed by an electrochemical method developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. The effect of plasma nitriding and microstructure on hydrogen permeation through AISI 4340 was studied on six different specimens: as-received (AR) AISI 4340, nitrided samples with and without compound layer, samples quenched and tempered (Q&T) at 320° and 520°C, and nitrided samples Q&T 520°C. Studies on various nitrided specimens demonstrate that both the gamma'-Fe 4N rich compound surface layer and the deeper N diffusion layer that forms during plasma nitriding reduce the effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient, although the gamma'-Fe4N rich compound layer has a larger effect. Multiple permeation transients yield evidence for the presence of only reversible trap sites in as-received, Q&T 320 and 520 AISI 4340 specimens, and the presence of both reversible and irreversible trap sites in nitrided specimens. Moreover, the changes in microstructure during the quenching and tempering process result in a significant decrease in the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen compared to as-received specimens. In addition, density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations yield hydrogen diffusion coefficients through gamma'- Fe4N one order of magnitude lower than through α-Fe, which supports the experimental measurements of hydrogen permeation. The effect of microstructure and trapping was also studied in cold rolled, solutionized, and precipitation hardened Inconel 718 foils. The effective hydrogen

  6. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions.

  7. Change in Biot's effective stress coefficient of chalk during pore collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Biot's effective stress coefficient (α) is a measure of how well grains in the rocks are connected with each other. The amount of contact cements between the grains determines the stiffness of rocks. Change in grain contact occurs during natural diagenesis of sedimentary rock. Contact between...... the grains could also change during elastic deformation of the grains in a rock mechanics test. Diagenetic change in grain contact cement of chalk can be compared with stress-induced change in the laboratory. The change in porosity is studied with reference to the change in effective stress on grain contacts...... and porosity reduces at a slower rate. We noticed that presence of non carbonates and hydrocarbon could increase σ'm. During rock mechanics test in the lab, with increased applied stress, σ'm increases, Biot's effective stress coefficient shows a decreasing trend, while a minor porosity reduction was observed...

  8. Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Omer, E.; Suliman, I. I.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). TLDs were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, CTDIvol 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients ESDs values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

  9. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dao-jun; Wu, Li-fang; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2001-02-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+, N+(20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased with the increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in the higher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerably radio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  10. The effect of time fractality on the transition coefficients: Historical Stern-Gerlach experiment revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Hueseyin, E-mail: huseyin.sirin@ege.edu.t [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Bueyuekkilic, Fevzi; Ertik, Hueseyin; Demirhan, Dogan [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: The influence of time discreteness on the transition coefficients of quantum systems. Time fractional Schroedinger Equation. Time fractional transition coefficients of historical Stern-Gerlach experiment. - Abstract: In this article, the influence of time discreteness on the transition coefficients is investigated within the framework of time fractional development of quantum systems which has been developed recently by the present authors . In this formalism, fractional mathematics which is a powerful tool to study the non-Markovian and non-Gaussian properties of physical processes is used in order to obtain time fractional evolution operator and transition probability. They are given in terms of Mittag-Leffler function which plays an important role in the mathematical structure as well as the physical interpretation of the phenomena under investigation. In order to place the presented formalism on a concrete basis, historical Stern-Gerlach experiment has been revisited with the purpose of studying transition coefficients which have a non-Markovian feature. The effect of the time fractionalization has been clearly illustrated in the figures via fractional derivative order {alpha}.

  11. Effect of graphene nanoplatelets on coefficient of thermal expansion of polyetherimide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huang, E-mail: huang.wu.84@gmail.com [Composite Materials and Structures Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Drzal, Lawrence T. [Composite Materials and Structures Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Thermal expansion is one of the major concerns for polymer composites. In this research, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were added to polyetherimide (PEId) thermoplastic polymer in order to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the injection molded composite. First, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (LTE) was measured in three directions in the anisotropic coupon: 0°, 90° and the out of plane Z direction. It is found that the GNP particles are very effective in terms of reducing the LTE in 0° direction due to high degree of alignment. After annealing above glass transition temperature, significant increase of 0° LTE and decrease of Z° LTE were observed. The bulk CTE was calculated by adding up the LTEs in all three directions and is found to be independent of annealing. Second, several models were applied to predict both CTE and LTE. It is found that Schapery's lower limit model fits the experimental CTE very well. Chow's model was applied for LTEs in three directions. The behavior of GNP-5/PEId composites is explained by the combination of Chow's model and morphology obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). - Highlights: • Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of polymer composite is characterized. • Reduction of linear thermal expansion depends on filler orientation. • Filler orientation is characterized based on the location of the specimen. • Filler orientation is changed by annealing, causing subsequent change in CTE. • CTE and linear thermal expansion coefficient are modeled.

  12. The effect of non-equilibrium condensation on the drag coefficient in a transonic airfoil flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I. W.; Alam, M. M. A.; Lee, S. J.; Kwon, Y. D.; Kwon, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a transonic flow past NACA0012 profile at angle of attack α=00 whose aspect ratio AR is 1.0 with non-equilibrium condensation is analyzed by numerical analysis using a TVD scheme and is investigated using an intermittent indraft type supersonic wind tunnel. Transonic flows of 0.78-0.90 in free stream Mach number with the variations of the stagnation relative humidity(Φ0) are tested. For the same free stream Mach number, the increase in Φ0 causes decrease in the drag coefficient of profile which is composed of the drag components of form, viscous and wave. In the case of the same M∞ and T0, for more than Φ0=30%, despite the irreversibility of process in non-equilibrium condensation, the drag by shock wave decreases considerably with the increase of Φ0. On the other hand, it shows that the effect of condensation on the drag coefficients of form and viscous is negligible. As an example, the decreasing rate in the drag coefficient of profile caused by the influence of non-equilibrium condensation for the case of M∞=0.9 and Φ0 =50% amounts to 34%. Also, it were turned out that the size of supersonic bubble (that is, the maximum height of supersonic zone) and the deviation of pressure coefficient from the value for M=1 decrease with the increase of Φ0 for the same M∞.

  13. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Condensation on Force Coefficients in Transonic Airfoil Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Min; Kang, Hui Bo; Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Soon Bum [Kyungpook National Univeristy, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heung Kyun [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The present study investigated the effects of non-equilibrium condensation with the angle of attack on the coefficients of pressure, lift, and drag in the transonic 2-D flow of NACA0012 by numerical analysis of the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. At T{sub 0}=298 K and α=3°, the lift coefficients for M{sub ∞}=0.78 and 0.81 decreased monotonically with increasing Φ{sub 0}. In contrast, for M{sub ∞} corresponding to the Mach number of the force break, CL increased with Φ{sub 0}. For α=3° and Φ{sub 0}=0%, CD increased markedly as M{sub ∞} increased. However, at Φ{sub 0}=60% and α=3°, which corresponded to the case of the condensation having a large influence, CD increased slightly as M{sub ∞} increased. The decrease in profile drag by non-equilibrium condensation grew as the angle of attack and stagnation relative humidity increased for the same free stream transonic Mach number. At Φ{sub 0}=0%, the coefficient of the wave drag increased with the attack angle and free stream Mach number. When Φ{sub 0}>50%, the coefficient of the wave drag decreased as α and M{sub ∞} increased. Lowering Φ{sub 0} and increasing M{sub ∞} increased the maximum Mach number.

  14. Heat transformation coefficient as an effectiveness indicator of different heat supply techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalafati, D.D. (Moskovskij Ehnergeticheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-02-01

    For comparing heat effectiveness of different heat supply techniques it is suggested to use the heat transformation coefficient which is determined as the ratio of heat supplied to the user to the work performed. This coefficient is calculated for various heat supply techniques. It equals for electric heating 1, for boiler room 2.2-2.4, for heat pump 2.5-3, for nuclear heat supply plant (NHSP) 3.2, for central heating-and-power plant (CHPP) and for nuclear central heating-and-power plant (NCPP) 5-6. The technique outlined permits to clearly estimate comparative heat effectiveness of various heat supply techniques and determine the economy of the total spent or lost work (electric power) in the course of transition from one heat supply technique to another.

  15. USAGE OF INTERVAL CAUSE-EFFECT RELATIONSHIP COEFFICIENTS IN THE QUANTITATIVE MODEL OF STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry M. Yershov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the method to obtain values of the coefficients of cause-effect relationships between strategic objectives in the form of intervals and use them in solving the problem of the optimal allocation of organization’s resources. We suggest taking advantage of the interval analytical hierarchy process for obtaining the ntervals. The quantitative model of strategic performance developed by M. Hell, S. Vidučić and Ž. Garača is employed for finding the optimal resource allocation. The uncertainty originated in the optimization problem as a result of interval character of the cause-effect relationship coefficients is eliminated through the application of maximax and maximin criteria. It is shown that the problem of finding the optimal maximin, maximax, and compromise resource allocation can be represented as a mixed 0-1 linear programming problem. Finally, numerical example and directions for further research are given.

  16. In Vivo Mutagenic Effect of Very Low Dose Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Pamela J.; Day, Tanya K.; Swinburne, Sarah J.; Lane, Joanne M.; Morley, Alexander A.; Hooker, Antony M.; Bhat, Madhava

    2006-01-01

    Almost all of our knowledge about the mutational effect of radiation has come from high dose studies which are generally not relevant to public exposure. The pKZ1 mouse recombination mutagenesis assay enables study of the mutational effect of very low doses of low LET radiation (μGy to cGy range) in a whole animal model. The mutational end-point studied is chromosomal inversion which is a common mutation in cancer. We have observed 1) a non-linear dose response of induced inversions in pKZ1 mice exposed to a wide dose range of low LET radiation, 2) the ability of low priming doses to cause an adaptive response to subsequent higher test doses and 3) the effect of genetic susceptibility where animals that are heterozygous for the Ataxia Telangiectasia gene (Atm) exhibit different responses to low dose radiation compared to their normal litter-mates. PMID:18648587

  17. Trends in Effective Diffusion Coefficients for Ion-Exchange Strengthening of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Karlsson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Monovalent cations enable efficient ion-exchange processes due to their high mobility in silicate glasses. Numerous properties can be modified in this way, e.g., mechanical, optical, electrical, or chemical performance. In particular, alkali cation exchange has received significant attention, primarily with respect to introducing compressive stress into the surface region of a glass, which increases mechanical durability. However, most of the present applications rely on specifically tailored matrix compositions in which the cation mobility is enhanced. This largely excludes the major area of soda-lime-silicates (SLS such as are commodity in almost all large-scale applications of glasses. Basic understanding of the relations between structural parameters and the effective diffusion coefficients may help to improve ion-exchanged SLS glass products, on the one hand in terms of obtainable strength and on the other in terms of cost. In the present paper, we discuss the trends in the effective diffusion coefficients when exchanging Na+ for various monovalent cations (K+, Cu+, Ag+, Rb+, and Cs+ by drawing relations to physicochemical properties. Correlations of effective diffusion coefficients were found for the bond dissociation energy and the electronic cation polarizability, indicating that localization and rupture of bonds are of importance for the ion-exchange rate.

  18. Trends in Effective Diffusion Coefficients for Ion-exchange Strengthening of Soda Lime Silicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Stefan; Wondraczek, Lothar; Ali, Sharafat; Jonson, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Monovalent cations enable efficient ion exchange processes due to their high mobility in silicate glasses. Numerous properties can be modified in this way, e.g., mechanical, optical, electrical or chemical performance. In particular, alkali cation exchange has received significant attention, primarily with respect to introducing compressive stress into the surface region of a glass, which increases mechanical durability. However, most of the present applications rely on specifically tailored matrix compositions in which the cation mobility is enhanced. This largely excludes the major area of soda lime silicates (SLS) such as are commodity in almost all large-scale applications of glasses. Basic understanding of the relations between structural parameters and the effective diffusion coefficients may help to improve ion-exchanged SLS glass products, on the one hand in terms of obtainable strength and on the other in terms of cost. In the present paper, we discuss the trends in the effective diffusion coefficients when exchanging Na+ for various monovalent cations (K+, Cu+, Ag+, Rb+ and Cs+) by drawing relations to physico-chemical properties. Correlations of effective diffusion coefficients were found for the bond dissociation energy and the electronic cation polarizability, indicating that localization and rupture of bonds are of importance for the ion exchange rate.

  19. Interference effects between two rectangular-section high-rise buildings on local peak pressure coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Yi; Yoshida, Akihito; Tamura, Yukio

    2013-02-01

    This study investigates the interference effects between two rectangular-section high-rise buildings by wind tunnel experiments, focusing on local peak pressure coefficients. Wind tunnel experiments were carried out under 72 wind incidence angles for various configurations. Two building arrangements were considered: parallel and perpendicular. To evaluate the interference effects for local peak pressures in detail, interference factors for largest positive and smallest negative peak pressures are presented and discussed. The results show that interference effects greatly depend on configuration and wind direction. Unfavorable positions are generally concentrated at the edges and corners of a building. Flow visualization was also conducted to check the flow field between two buildings.

  20. A model for low dose effects of low-LET radiation delivered at high dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllnberger, H.; Stewart, R.D.; Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro studies show that protective tumour-reducing effects occur for low dose rates (mGy per minute). To account for these phenomena, we have previously developed stochastic and deterministic multi-stage cancer models that include radiation-induced adaptations in DNA repair processes and radical scavenging. Here, these models are extended to account for the induction of radioprotective mechanisms for low doses of low LET radiation delivered at high dose rates. Cellular adaptations in DNA repair are related to temporal changes in the amount of DNA damage in a cell. The combined effects of endogenous DNA damage, background radiation and artificial irradiation are considered. PMID:22318364

  1. Incorporating swirl effects into the coefficient of momentum for separation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Kunihiko; Munday, Phillip

    2017-11-01

    Addition of swirl in flow control has been known to enhance suppression of separation over airfoils at high angles of attack. Utilizing large eddy simulations, the present open-loop control study examines the influence of wall-normal and angular momentum injections in mitigating separation over a NACA0012 airfoil at α =9° and Re = 23 , 000 . We introduce these swirling jets near the separation point with wall-normal momentum and swirl independently prescribed through velocity boundary conditions. The changes to the flow from control are examined and the corresponding lift enhancement and drag reduction are assessed as a function of the two velocity components. Since the standard coefficient of momentum does not consider swirling effects, we extend its definition to incorporate both the wall-normal momentum and swirl to quantify the overall flow control effectiveness. We are able to observe a trend in lift force enhancement over this single modified coefficient of momentum (that is dependent on the non-dimensional jet velocity ratio and swirl number). Moreover, we are able to identify a critical value for the modified momentum coefficient and categorize controlled flows into separated, transitional, and attached flows. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Award Number FA9550-13-1-0183) and the Office of Naval Research (Award Number N00014-16-1-2443).

  2. Determinations of equilibrium segregation, effective segregation and diffusion coefficients for Nd+3 doped in molten YAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadian, M.; Saeedi, H.; Yadegari, M.; Shojaee, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a new mathematical model has been presented to determine the equilibrium segregation (k0) and effective segregation (keff) coefficients for neodymium (Nd) in YAG crystal grown by Czochralski (CZ) method. Determination of diffusion coefficient (DL) of Nd impurity in molten YAG is also investigated. In this model, utilizing Lambert W-function is a new idea to solve the Scheil equation for calculation of effective segregation coefficient. The Nd concentration in the crystal has been measured by optical absorption method to calculate keff. The analyses show that the keff is related to the growth parameters such as crystal growth rate (ug) and crystal rotation rate (ω), ( ug/√{ω}) but it is independent of the Nd concentration in the initial melt (C0). Based on obtained keff and experimental growth data, k0 and DL of Nd in molten YAG have been calculated. For all experiments, the average value of k0=0.216 and DL=1.4×10-6 (cm2/s) are obtained. Our results are corroborated by the theoretical and experimental data from the literature.

  3. Effects of poroelastic coefficients on normal vibration modes in vocal-fold tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2011-02-01

    The vocal-fold tissue is treated as a transversally isotropic fluid-saturated porous material. Effects of poroelastic coefficients on eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of the vocal-fold vibration are investigated using the Ritz method. The study demonstrates that the often-used elastic model is only a particular case of the poroelastic model with an infinite fluid-solid mass coupling parameter. The elastic model may be considered appropriate for the vocal-fold tissue when the absolute value of the fluid-solid mass coupling parameter is larger than 10(5) kg/m(3). Otherwise, the poroelastic model may be more accurate. The degree of compressibility of the vocal tissue can also been described by the poroelastic coefficients. Finally, it is revealed that the liquid and solid components in a poroelastic model could have different modal shapes when the coupling between them is weak. The mode decoupling could cause desynchronization and irregular vibration of the folds.

  4. Effect of friction coefficients on the dynamic response of gear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingli; Deng, Zhenyong; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew D.; Li, Xuejun

    2017-09-01

    The inevitable deterioration of the lubrication conditions in a gearbox in service can change the tribological properties of the meshing teeth. In turn, such changes can significantly affect the dynamic responses and running status of gear systems. This paper investigates such an effect by utilizing virtual prototype technology to model and simulate the dynamics of a wind turbine gearbox system. The change in the lubrication conditions is modeled by the changes in the friction coefficients, thereby indicating that poor lubrication causes not only increased frictional losses but also significant changes in the dynamic responses. These results are further demonstrated by the mean and root mean square values calculated by the simulated responses under different friction coefficients. In addition, the spectrum exhibits significant changes in the first, second, and third harmonics of the meshing components. The findings and simulation method of this study provide theoretical bases for the development of accurate diagnostic techniques.

  5. Spatially varying cross-correlation coefficients in the presence of nugget effects

    KAUST Repository

    Kleiber, William

    2012-11-29

    We derive sufficient conditions for the cross-correlation coefficient of a multivariate spatial process to vary with location when the spatial model is augmented with nugget effects. The derived class is valid for any choice of covariance functions, and yields substantial flexibility between multiple processes. The key is to identify the cross-correlation coefficient matrix with a contraction matrix, which can be either diagonal, implying a parsimonious formulation, or a fully general contraction matrix, yielding greater flexibility but added model complexity. We illustrate the approach with a bivariate minimum and maximum temperature dataset in Colorado, allowing the two variables to be positively correlated at low elevations and nearly independent at high elevations, while still yielding a positive definite covariance matrix. © 2012 Biometrika Trust.

  6. Measurement of conversion coefficients between air Kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors for diagnostic X-ray beams; Determinacao experimental dos coeficientes de conversao de Kerma no ar para o equivalente de dose pessoal, Hp(d), e fatores de retroespalhamento em feixes de raios-x diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, Paulo Henrique Goncalves

    2008-07-01

    Two sets of quantities are import in radiological protection: the protection and operational quantities. Both sets can be related to basic physical quantities such as kerma through conversion coefficients. For diagnostic x-ray beams the conversion coefficients and backscatter factors have not been determined yet, those parameters are need for calibrating dosimeters that will be used to determine the personal dose equivalent or the entrance skin dose. Conversion coefficients between air kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic x-ray qualities RQR and RQA recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The air kerma in the phantom and the mean energy of the spectrum were measured for such purpose. Harshaw LiF-100H thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used for measurements after being calibrated against an 180 cm{sup 3} Radcal Corporation ionization chamber traceable to a reference laboratory. A 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab phantom was used for deep-dose measurements. Tl dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at 5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm depth in the phantom upstream the beam direction Another required parameter for determining the conversion coefficients from was the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum. The spectroscopy of x-ray beams was done with a CdTe semiconductor detector that was calibrated with {sup 133} Ba, {sup 241} Am and {sup 57} Co radiation sources. Measurements of the x-ray spectra were carried out for all RQR and RQA IEC qualities. Corrections due to the detector intrinsic efficiency, total energy absorption, escape fraction of the characteristic x-rays, Compton effect and attenuation in the detector were done aiming an the accurate determination of the mean energy. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected with the stripping method by using these response functions. The typical combined standard uncertainties of

  7. Calculating the Effect of External Shading on the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient of Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shukla, Yash [CEPT Univ., Ahmedabad (India); Rawal, Rajan [CEPT Univ., Ahmedabad (India)

    2017-08-09

    Current prescriptive building codes have limited ways to account for the effect of solar shading, such as overhangs and awnings, on window solar heat gains. We propose two new indicators, the adjusted Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (aSHGC) which accounts for external shading while calculating the SHGC of a window, and a weighted SHGC (SHGCw) which provides a seasonal SHGC weighted by solar intensity. We demonstrate a method to calculate these indices using existing tools combined with additional calculations. The method is demonstrated by calculating the effect of an awning on a clear double glazing in New Delhi.

  8. Effect of Inclusion Morphology on the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion in Filled Epoxy Matrix (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Aeronautics and Astronautics 6 F. Effect of Inclusion Shape on Effective CTE There has been tremendous interest in Zirconium Tungstate ( ZrW2O8 ), a ceramic...with a strongly negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). In contrast to most other ceramics exhibiting negative CTE, the CTE of ZrW2O8 is...unusual properties suggest the incorporation of ZrW2O8 into a polymeric matrix, to create a composite with very low CTE. The objective of the

  9. Estimation of Inbreeding Coefficient and Its Effects on Lamb Survival in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad almasi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The mating of related individuals produces an inbred offspring and leads to an increased homozygosity in the progeny, genetic variance decrease within families and increase between families. The ration of homozygosity for individuals was calculated by inbreeding coefficient. Inbred individuals may carry two alleles at a locus that are replicated from one gene in the previous generations, called identical by descent. The inbreeding coefficient should be monitored in a breeding program, since it plays an important role at decreasing of homeostasis, performance, reproduction and viability. The trend of inbreeding is an indicator for determining of inbreeding level in the herd. Inbreeding affects both phenotypic means of traits and genetic variances within population, thus it is an important factor for delimitations of genetic progress in a population. Reports showed an inbreeding increase led to decrease of phenotypic value in some of the productive and reproductive traits. Materials and Methods In the current study, the pedigree data of 14030 and 6215 records of Baluchi and Iranblack lambs that collected from 1984 to 2011 at the Abbasabad Sheep Breeding Station in Mashhad, Iran, 3588 records of Makoei lambs that collected from 1994 to 2011 at the Makoei sheep breeding station and 6140, records of Zandi lambs that collected from 1991 to 2011 at the Khejir Sheep Breeding Station in Tehran, Iran were used to estimating the inbreeding coefficient and its effects on lamb survival in these breeds. Lamb survival trait was scored as 1 and 0 for lamb surviving and not surviving at weaning weight, respectively. Inbreeding coefficient was estimated by relationship matrix algorithm (A=TDT' methodology using the CFC software program. Effects of inbreeding coefficient on lamb survival were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood (REML method under 12 different animal models using ASReml 3.0 computer programme. Coefficient of inbreeding for each

  10. uv keratoconjunctivitis vs. established dose effect relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulvady, N.U.

    1976-08-01

    A patient who received a uv dose to his eyes 11 times greater than the photokeratitic threshold of Pitts and 4/sup 1///sub 2/ times the photokeratitic threshold as found by Leach. The patient had severe keratoconjunctivitis for 3 days and did not develop any keratitis.

  11. The average effective dose of 4-amino-5-(furan-2-yl-4H-1 ,2,4-triazole-3-thiol in experimental hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Belay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the research of the average effective dose of 4-amino-5-(furan-2-yl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol in experimental hepatitis. Recalculations conducted for the human with the sensitivity coefficient, average effective dose for human is 13,87 mg/kg.

  12. Effect of stacking sequence on the coefficients of mutual influence of composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupir (Hudișteanu, I.; Țăranu, N.; Axinte, A.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites are nowadays widely used in engineering applications due to their outstanding features, such as high specific strength and specific stiffness as well as good corrosion resistance. A major advantage of fibrous polymeric composites is that their anisotropy can be controlled through suitable choice of the influencing parameters. The unidirectional fiber reinforced composites provide much higher longitudinal mechanical properties compared to the transverse ones. Therefore, composite laminates are formed by stacking two or more laminas, with different fiber orientations, as to respond to complex states of stresses. These laminates experience the effect of axial-shear coupling, which is caused by applying normal or shear stresses, implying shear or normal strains, respectively. The normal-shear coupling is expressed by the coefficients of mutual influence. They are engineering constants of primary interest for composite laminates, since the mismatch of the material properties between adjacent layers can produce interlaminar stresses and/or plies delamination. The paper presents the variation of the in-plane and flexural coefficients of mutual influence for three types of multi-layered composites, with different stacking sequences. The results are obtained using the Classical Lamination Theory (CLT) and are illustrated graphically in terms of fiber orientations, for asymmetric, antisymmetric and symmetric laminates. Conclusions are formulated on the variation of these coefficients, caused by the stacking sequence.

  13. Investigating the Effect of Soil Texture and Fertility on Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficient of Maize Forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbanian Kerdabadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crop coefficient varies in different environmental conditions, such as deficit irrigation, salinity and intercropping. The effect of soil fertility and texture of crop coefficient and evapotranspiration of maize was investigated in this study. Low soil fertility and food shortages as a stressful environment for plants that makes it different evapotranspiration rates of evapotranspiration calculation is based on the FAO publication 56. Razzaghi et al. (2012 investigate the effect of soil type and soil-drying during the seed-filling phase on N-uptake, yield and water use, a Danish-bred cultivar (CV. Titicaca was grown in field lysimeters with sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soil. Zhang et al (2014 were investigated the Effect of adding different amounts of nitrogen during three years (from 2010 to 2012 on water use efficiency and crop evapotranspiration two varieties of winter wheat. The results of their study showed. The results indicated the following: (1 in this dry land farming system, increased N fertilization could raise wheat yield, and the drought-tolerant Changhan No. 58 showed a yield advantage in drought environments with high N fertilizer rates; (2 N application affected water consumption in different soil layers, and promoted wheat absorbing deeper soil water and so increased utilization of soil water; and (3 comprehensive consideration of yield and WUE of wheat indicated that the N rate of 270 kg/ha for Changhan No. 58 was better to avoid the risk of reduced production reduction due to lack of precipitation; however, under conditions of better soil moisture, the N rate of 180 kg/ha was more economic. Materials and Methods: The study was a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three soil texture treatment, including silty clay loam, loam and sandy-loam soil and three fertility treatment, including without fertilizer, one and two percent fertilizer( It was conducted at the experimental farm in

  14. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 {mu}Sv and 37.8 {mu}Sv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 {mu}Sv, 27.6 {mu}Sv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 {mu}Sv, 15.9 {mu}Sv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  15. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  16. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun

    2003-02-15

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology.

  17. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  18. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Jankowski, Piotr; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Harvey, Allan H

    2014-07-28

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2) in the temperature range 15-2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H2 between 100 and 200 K.

  19. Low-Temperature Seebeck Coefficients for Polaron-Driven Thermoelectric Effect in Organic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Neto, Pedro Henrique; da Silva Filho, Demétrio A; Roncaratti, Luiz F; Acioli, Paulo H; E Silva, Geraldo Magela

    2016-07-14

    We report the results of electronic structure coupled to molecular dynamics simulations on organic polymers subject to a temperature gradient at low-temperature regimes. The temperature gradient is introduced using a Langevin-type dynamics corrected for quantum effects, which are very important in these systems. Under this condition we were able to determine that in these no-impurity systems the Seebeck coefficient is in the range of 1-3 μV/K. These results are in good agreement with reported experimental results under the same low-temperature conditions.

  20. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garberoglio, Giovanni, E-mail: garberoglio@fbk.eu [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science (LISC), FBK-CMM and University of Trento, via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Jankowski, Piotr [Department of Quantum Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, PL-87-100 Toruń (Poland); Szalewicz, Krzysztof [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Harvey, Allan H. [Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and deuterium (D{sub 2}) in the temperature range 15–2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H{sub 2} between 100 and 200 K.

  1. From quantum field theory to hydrodynamics: Transport coefficients and effective kinetic theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, S.; Yaffe, L.G. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The evaluation of hydrodynamic transport coefficients in relativistic field theory, and the emergence of an effective kinetic theory description, is examined. Even in a weakly coupled scalar field theory, interesting subtleties arise at high temperatures where thermal renormalization effects are important. In this domain, a kinetic theory description in terms of the fundamental particles ceases to be valid, but one may derive an effective kinetic theory describing excitations with temperature dependent properties. While the shear viscosity depends on the elastic scattering of typical excitations whose kinetic energies are comparable to the temperature, the bulk viscosity is sensitive to particle nonconserving processes at small energies. As a result, the shear and the bulk viscosities have very different dependence on the interaction strength and temperature, with the bulk viscosity providing an especially sensitive test of the validity of an effective kinetic theory description. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. [About Dose-Effect Relationship in the Environment Radiation Protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalova, A A

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important stages in the development of a methodology for the environment radiation protection is the assessment and justification of critical radiation exposure levels for ecosystem components. In this study application of the approach for critical dose level estimation is demonstrated on the example of the data about ionizing radiation effect on reproduction and survival of agricultural plants after acute and chronic exposures. Influence of the type of dose-effect relationship on the estimated values of the critical doses and dose rates is studied using three models (linear, logarithmic and logistic). The findings obtained do not provide any robust recommendations in favor of one of the three tested functions. The models of dose-effect relationship (threshold or non-threshold) and types of radiation-induced effects (stochastic and deterministic) are discussed from the viewpoint of developing a system for radiation protection of human and non-human biota.

  3. Effect of Stall Strip Position, Size and Geometry on the Lift Coefficient of NACA 001 Aerofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tee Wee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the optimum position and geometry of stall strips (SS to control sudden fall of lift in wind turbine blades. The type of airfoil used in this study is NACA 0015 with 150 mm of chord length. Total of five positions, two geometries and three sizes of SS configurations are simulated by using Ansys Fluent software. For position configuration, SS of size 2 mm is placed on the apex (POS-1, and on the upper and lower surfaces at distance of 0.65 mm (POS-4 and POS-2 respectively, and 2.45 mm (POS-5 and POS-3, respectively, from the leading edge. The shapes tested are dome and equilateral triangle. The results show that the addition of SS as a method of controlling sudden loss of lift decreases the maximum lift coefficient. Attachment of SS at the lower surface of the airfoil did not bring any significant effect to the lift and stall characteristics; while for the upper surface it reduces the sudden fall of lift but at the cost of big reduction in maximum lift coefficient. The optimum position and geometry of SS are POS-1 and triangle shape. Increasing in size of SS shows positive effect in control stalling effect.

  4. Note: Determination of effective gas diffusion coefficients of stainless steel films with differently shaped holes using a Loschmidt diffusion cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, N G C; Shen, J; Astrath, F B G; Zhou, J; Huang, C; Yuan, X Z; Wang, H; Navessin, T; Liu, Z S; Vlajnic, G; Bessarabov, D; Zhao, X

    2010-04-01

    In this work, an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell is used to measure the effective O(2)-N(2) diffusion coefficients through four porous samples of different simple pore structures. One-dimensional through-plane mass diffusion theory is applied to process the experimental data. It is found that both bulk diffusion coefficient and the effective gas diffusion coefficients of the samples can then be precisely determined, and the measured bulk one is in good agreement with the literature value. Numerical computation of three-dimensional mass diffusion through the samples is performed to calculate the effective gas diffusion coefficients. The comparison between the measured and calculated coefficient values shows that if the gas diffusion through a sample is dominated by one-dimensional diffusion, which is determined by the pore structure of the sample, these two values are consistent, and the sample can be used as a standard sample to test a gas diffusion measurement system.

  5. Collective effective dose from diagnostic radiology in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnyk, L; Shalopa, O; Nosyk, O

    2015-07-01

    The frequencies and effective doses for the most common X-ray diagnostic examinations in Ukraine were assessed in the frame of the European Commission (EC) Study on European Population Doses from Medical Exposure (Dose Datamed 2). The average effective doses for all radiographic procedures were estimated using the ODS-60 software (Finland). The estimation of the effective doses for the chest film fluorography was carried out from the results of own representative measurements with thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry and a standard Alderson-Rando phantom. The effective doses for fluoroscopy procedures were assessed using the Russian guidelines for estimation of effective doses. For all other X-ray examinations and procedures [computed tomography (CT), angiography and interventional procedures], typical effective dose values were taken from the EC Guidance RP154. The most frequently performed in Ukraine is chest film fluorography, with 389 examinations per 1000 population annually, reflecting in the greatest contribution to the total collective effective dose (CED) of 428 mSv per 1000 population (44 %). The total frequency and CED from all X-ray diagnostic examinations and procedures were estimated to be 1218 examinations and 1060 mSv per 1000 populations, respectively. The expected additional cancer risk from X-ray diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures is 2680 cases per year, with 1200 of them due to the contribution of chest fluorography. The main important action in radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology is the organisation of the monitoring of patient doses for different types of X-ray diagnostic examinations and replacement of chest film fluorography with digital X-ray systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The effect of core configuration on temperature coefficient of reactivity in IRR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettan, M.; Silverman, I.; Shapira, M.; Nagler, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1997-08-01

    Experiments designed to measure the effect of coolant moderator temperature on core reactivity in an HEU swimming pool type reactor were performed. The moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity ({alpha}{sub {omega}}) was obtained and found to be different in two core loadings. The measured {alpha}{sub {omega}} of one core loading was {minus}13 pcm/{degrees}C at the temperature range of 23-30{degrees}C. This value of {alpha}{sub {omega}} is comparable to the data published by the IAEA. The {alpha}{sub {omega}} measured in the second core loading was found to be {minus}8 pcm/{degrees}C at the same temperature range. Another phenomenon considered in this study is core behavior during reactivity insertion transient. The results were compared to a core simulation using the Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants. It was found that in the second core loading factors other than the moderator temperature influence the core reactivity more than expected. These effects proved to be extremely dependent on core configuration and may in certain core loadings render the reactor`s reactivity coefficient undesirable.

  7. Generalized derivation of an exact relationship linking different coefficients that characterize thermodynamic effects of preferential interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles F; Felitsky, Daniel J; Hong, Jiang; Record, M Thomas

    2002-12-10

    In solutions consisting of solvent water (component '1') and two solute components ('2' and '3'), various thermodynamic effects of differences between solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions are quantitatively characterized by state functions commonly called 'preferential interaction coefficients': gamma(mu(1),mu(3)) triple bond (delta(m3)/delta(m2))(T,mu(1),mu(3)) and gamma(mu(k)) triple bond (delta(m3)/delta(m2))(T,P,mu(k)), where k = 1,2 or 3. These different derivatives are not all directly accessible to experimental determination, nor are they entirely equivalent for analyses and interpretations of thermodynamic and molecular effects of preferential interactions. Consequently, various practical and theoretical considerations arise when, for a given system, different kinds of preferential interaction coefficients have significantly different numerical values. Previously we derived the exact relationship linking all three coefficients of the type gamma(mu(k), and hence identified the physical origins of the differences between gamma(mu(1)) and gamma(mu(3)) that have been experimentally determined for each of various common biochemical solutes interacting with a protein [J. Phys. Chem. B, 106 (2002) 418-433]. Continuing our investigation of exact thermodynamic linkages among different types of preferential interaction coefficients, we present here a generalized derivation of the relationship linking gamma(mu(1),mu(3)), gamma(mu(3)) and gamma(mu(1)), with no restrictions on m(2), m(3) or any physical characteristic of either solute component (such as partial molar volume). Hence, we show that (gamma(mu(1),mu(3)) - gamma(mu(3))) is related directly to (gamma(mu(3)) - gamma(mu(1))), for which the physical determinants have been considered in detail previously, and to a factor dependent on the ratio of the partial molar volumes V3/V1. Our generalized expression also provides a basis for calculating gamma(mu(1),mu(3)), even in situations where preferential

  8. Does low dose oral ketamine have oxytocic effect? | Okorie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate if low dose oral Ketamine has oxytotic effect on term pregnant uterus. Methodology: This is a cross sectional double blind placebo control prospective study. A total of 745 parturients were studied, 261 had low dose oral Ketamine in active phase of labour (group A), 227 had Oxytocin augmentation ...

  9. Effects of sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron on the ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, it is concluded that sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron reduced the amounts of ovarian constituents during ovarian development and oogenesis in S. litura. These reductions increased with an increase in dose from LD10 to LD30. The effects of chlorfluazuron on the amounts of ovarian constituents are presumed to ...

  10. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  11. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  12. Towards a new dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF)? Some comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, K H

    2017-06-26

    The aim of this article is to offer a broader, mechanism-based, analytical tool than that used by (Rühm et al 2016 Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) for the interpretation of cancer induction relationships. The article explains the limitations of this broader analytical tool and the implications of its use in view of the publications by Leuraud et al 2015 (Lancet Haematol. 2 e276-81) and Richardson et al 2015 (Br. Med. J. 351 h5359). The publication by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79), which is clearly work in progress, reviews the current status of the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) as recommended by the ICRP. It also considers the issues which might influence a reassessment of both the value of the DDREF as well as its application in radiological protection. In this article, the problem is approached from a different perspective and starts by commenting on the limited scientific data used by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) to develop their analysis which ultimately leads them to use a linear-quadratic dose effect relationship to fit solid cancer mortality data from the Japanese life span study of atomic bomb survivors. The approach taken here includes more data on the induction of DNA double strand breaks and, using experimental data taken from the literature, directly relates the breaks to cell killing, chromosomal aberrations and somatic mutations. The relationships are expanded to describe the induction of cancer as arising from radiation induced cytological damage coupled to cell killing since the cancer mutated cell has to survive to express its malignant nature. Equations are derived for the induction of cancer after both acute and chronic exposure to sparsely ionising radiation. The equations are fitted to the induction of cancer in mice to illustrate a dose effect relationship over the total dose range. The 'DDREF' derived from the two equations varies with dose and the DDREF concept is called into question. Although the equation for

  13. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  14. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  15. Temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient of thin films and aging effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossel, C., E-mail: rsl@zurich.ibm.com; Sousa, M.; Abel, S.; Caimi, D. [IBM Research—Zurich, CH-8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Suhm, A.; Abergel, J.; Le Rhun, G.; Defay, E. [CEA-LETI, Minatec, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-01-21

    We present a technique to measure the temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient e{sub 31,f} of thin films of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), aluminum nitride, and BaTiO{sub 3} deposited on Si wafers. It is based on the collection of electric charges induced by the deflection of a Si cantilever coated with the piezoelectric film. The aim of this work is to assess the role of temperature in the decay of the remnant polarization of these materials, in particular, in optimized gradient-free PZT with composition PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3}. It is found that in contrast to theoretical predictions, e{sub 31,f} decreases with temperature because of the dominance of relaxation effects. The observation of steps in the logarithmic aging decay law is reminiscent of memory effects seen in frustrated spin glasses.

  16. Field-effect modulation of Seebeck coefficient in single PbSe nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenjie; Hochbaum, Allon I; Fardy, Melissa; Rabin, Oded; Zhang, Minjuan; Yang, Peidong

    2009-04-01

    In this Letter, we present a novel strategy to control the thermoelectric properties of individual PbSe nanowires. Using a field-effect gated device, we were able to tune the Seebeck coefficient of single PbSe nanowires from 64 to 193 microV x K(-1). This direct electrical field control of sigma and S suggests a powerful strategy for optimizing ZT in thermoelectric devices. These results represent the first demonstration of field-effect modulation of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a single semiconductor nanowire. This novel strategy for thermoelectric property modulation could prove especially important in optimizing the thermoelectric properties of semiconductors where reproducible doping is difficult to achieve.

  17. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Degradability Coefficients and Ruminalpostruminal Digestibility of Dry Matter and Crude Protein of some Plant Protein Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gasem tahan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Effect of electron beam irradiation on degradability coefficients and ruminal- postruminal digestibility of dry matter and crude protein of soybean meal, canola meal and Lathyrus sativus seed, irradiated at doses of 50, 100 and 150 kGy was investigated. Ruminal degradability of dry matter and crude protein was determined by in situ method using two cannulated Holstein heifers. Ruminal- postruminal digestibility of dry matter and crude protein was determined by in situ (nylon bag-in vitro (daisy digestor techniques. Data analyzed using SAS software as randomized completely design and the treatment means were compared using Tukey test. The results indicated that irradiation had no effect on dry matter, ether extract and ash content of feeds. In soybean meal, washout fraction and potentially degradable fraction of dry matter and crude protein was higher and lower at dose of 150 kGy irradiation than other treatments, respectively, and degradation rate constant and ruminal effective degradability of dry matter and crude protein was lower at all doses of irradiation than untreated soybean meal. In canola meal, irradiation at doses of 50 and 100 kGy decreased washout fraction and increased potentially degradable fraction of crude protein compared with untreated canola meal. In Lathyrus sativus seed, only potentially degradable fraction of dry matter and crude protein was lower at dose of 150 kGy irradiation than untreated Lathyrus sativus seed. Ruminal digestibility of crude protein decreased in soybean meal at doses of 100 and 150 kGy irradiation and for canola meal at all doses of irradiation than untreated samples. Total tract digestibility of crude protein decreased in soybean meal at dose of 150 kGy irradiation and for canola meal at all doses of irradiation than untreated samples. In Lathyrus sativus seed, ruminal-postruminal digestibility and total tract digestibility of dry matter increased at doses of 100 and 150 kGy irradiation than untreated

  18. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  19. The effect of methadone dose regimen on neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John J; Leamon, Martin H; Willits, Neil H; Salo, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a multiple daily dose methadone regimen in pregnancy on neonatal outcomes. Although methadone maintenance has been the standard for the treatment of opioid dependence in pregnancy, there is no consensus on proper dosing. Single daily dosing is the most common strategy. Because of accelerated metabolism of methadone in pregnancy, this regimen may expose mother and fetus to daily episodes of withdrawal and possibly contribute to more severe Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). This study reports on a protocol that increased both methadone dose and dose frequency in response to maternal reports of withdrawal. Treatment of NAS was needed in 29% of neonates, compared to a published rate of 60% to 80%. The mean methadone dose was 152 mg at delivery, divided into 2 to 6 doses per day. Ninety-two percent of mothers were free of illicit drug use at delivery. There was no relationship between methadone dose and treatment of NAS. Female babies had a treatment rate of 16% versus 38% for male babies. Beyond abstinence symptoms, cohort outcomes in terms of gestational age, birth weight, prematurity, Caesarian sections, and breastfeeding equaled or approximated US population norms. The protocol was associated with low rates of treatment of NAS and high rates of maternal recovery. High rates of treatment for NAS reported in methadone-exposed neonates might relate in part to iatrogenic factors and be reduced through the use of divided daily doses and protocols that minimize maternal withdrawal.

  20. Detecting a Local Cohort Effect for Cancer Mortality Data Using a Varying Coefficient Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Tonda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer mortality is increasing with the aging of the population in Japan. Cancer information obtained through feasible methods is therefore becoming the basis for planning effective cancer control programs. There are three time-related factors affecting cancer mortality, of which the cohort effect is one. Past descriptive epidemiologic studies suggest that the cohort effect is not negligible in cancer mortality. Methods: In this paper, we develop a statistical method for automatically detecting a cohort effect and assessing its statistical significance for cancer mortality data using a varying coefficient model. Results: The proposed method was applied to liver and lung cancer mortality data on Japanese men for illustration. Our method detected significant positive or negative cohort effects. The relative risk was 1.54 for liver cancer mortality in the cohort born around 1934 and 0.83 for lung cancer in the cohort born around 1939. Conclusions: Cohort effects detected using the proposed method agree well with previous descriptive epidemiologic findings. In addition, the proposed method is expected to be sensitive enough to detect smaller, previously undetected birth cohort effects.

  1. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Nersissian, Denise Yanikian; Melo, Camila Souza, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-05-15

    The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose magnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation. (author)

  2. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Light Interception and Light Extinction Coefficient in Different Wheat Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Samadiyan

    2016-07-01

    amount of a third off chemical fertilizer of urea, 46 % Nitrogen was given to the plant and two third by the end of clawing the plot. In the period of growing in order to control brushes 2, 4, D herbicide and Fenitrothion insecticidal was used for countering the louse pest and other insects. In the laboratory, leaf area was measured using scanner and 4.Image 0.2 software program. To determine changes of growth indices, regression relations were used. Total dry matter, leaf area index, net assimilation rate, crop growth rate, light interception extinction were measured. Results and Discussion The results showed that the effects of N fertilizilation were significant on the maximum leaf area index, total dry matter and light interception percent were related to Pishtaz cultivar and 150 kg N ha-1 fertilizer treatment significantly resulted Maximum light interception percent, net assimilation rate, with other treatments. Effects of cultivar were significant on maximum light absorption. The Maximum absorption of light, crop growth rate, total dry matter was related to Pishtaz. The interaction between nitrogen and the harvest index was significant at the five percent level. The evidence showed that higher light interception in plants, is associated with the higher performance of plant. The increase of light interception promote the biological and economic performance. Conclusions The results showed that application of 150 kg nitrogen per hectare, with the highest level of leaf area index and higher light absorption caused higher extinction coefficient of light in the canopy. Nitrogen fertilizer consumption increased light absorption by leaves, therefore the light extinction coefficient consuming more nitrogen in the plant community. The Maximum absorption of light, crop growth rate, total dry matter was related to pishtaz. Scale of light extinction coefficient for fertilizer treatment control, 50, 100, 150 kg ha-1, was 0.4675, 0.4794, 0.4858 and 0.495, respectively and for

  3. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Claus

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Methods Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB dose on tumor control probability (TCP was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Results Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition. Discussion Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on

  4. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer--modelling of dose effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-03-18

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for alpha/beta, gamma 50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high gamma 50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only

  5. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Methods Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Results Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Discussion Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than

  6. Charge effect on the diffusion coefficient and the bimolecular reaction rate of diiodide anion radical in room temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshio; Terazima, Masahide; Kimura, Yoshifumi

    2009-04-16

    The diffusion coefficients of diiodide anion radical, I(2)(-), in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) were determined by the transient grating (TG) method using the photochemical reaction of iodide. The diffusion coefficients we obtained were larger in RTILs than the theoretical predictions by the Stokes-Einstein relation, whereas both values are similar in conventional solvents. By comparison with the diffusion coefficients of neutral molecules, it was suggested that the Coulomb interaction between I(2)(-) and constituent ions of RTILs strongly affects the diffusion coefficients. The bimolecular reaction rates between I(2)(-) were calculated by the Debye-Smoluchowski equation using the experimentally determined diffusion coefficients. These calculated reaction rate were much smaller than the experimentally determined rates (Takahashi, K.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 4807), indicating the charge screening effect of RTILs.

  7. Apparent diffusion coefficient of the renal tissue. The effect of diuretic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Jin; Munechika, Hirotsugu [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the renal tissue was studied at diffusion-weighted images of the kidney which were obtained from spin-echo type sequence before and after furosemide (100 mg) injection in twelve healthy volunteers. ADC (mm{sup 2}/sec) of the renal cortex and medulla before furosemide injection was 2.08{+-}0.52 and 1.96{+-}0.52, respectively. No appreciable ADC difference was seen between the cortex and the medulla of the kidney. After furosemide injection, ADC of the renal cortex and medulla became 2.09{+-}0.42 and 1.78{+-}0.38, respectively. It was found that furosemide produced no significant effect on ADC of the renal tissue. (author)

  8. EFFECT OF THE FLOW FIELD DEFORMATION IN THE WIND TUNNEL ON THE AERODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Maturkanič

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow field quality has a principal signification at wind tunnel measurement. The creation of the flow field of air by fan leads to the rotation of entire flow field which is, moreover, deformed at the bends of the wind tunnel with close circulation. Despite the wind tunnels are equipped with the devices which eliminate these non-uniformities, in the most of cases, the air flow field has not ideal parameters in the test section. For the evaluation of the measured results of the model in the wind tunnel, the character of flow field deformation is necessary. The following text describes the possible general forms of the flow field nonuniformity and their effect on the aerodynamic coefficients calculation.

  9. Temperature dependence of stream aeration coefficients and the effect of water turbulence: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, B O L; Manson, J R

    2013-01-01

    the Dobbins model may be used tentatively as a simple theoretical guide for streams with free surface water but not self-aerated flows encountered in whitewater rapids, cascades or weirs. Greater awareness of the different models and conditions of applications should help choosing an appropriate correction. Three case studies investigated the effect of the temperature coefficient on reaeration and stream metabolism (photosynthesis and respiration). In practice, the temperature correction may be an important parameter under constant turbulence conditions, but as the range in turbulence increases, the role of temperature may become negligible in determining K(L), whatever the temperature correction. The theoretical models reviewed here are also useful references to correct K(L) values determined using a reference tracer gas to a second species of interest. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Nonzero Autocorrelation Coefficients on the Distributions of Durbin-Watson Test Estimator: Three Autoregressive Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yu LEE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the nonzero autocorrelation coefficients on the sampling distributions of the Durbin-Watson test estimator in three time-series models that have different variance-covariance matrix assumption, separately. We show that the expected values and variances of the Durbin-Watson test estimator are slightly different, but the skewed and kurtosis coefficients are considerably different among three models. The shapes of four coefficients are similar between the Durbin-Watson model and our benchmark model, but are not the same with the autoregressive model cut by one-lagged period. Second, the large sample case shows that the three models have the same expected values, however, the autoregressive model cut by one-lagged period explores different shapes of variance, skewed and kurtosis coefficients from the other two models. This implies that the large samples lead to the same expected values, 2(1 – ρ0, whatever the variance-covariance matrix of the errors is assumed. Finally, comparing with the two sample cases, the shape of each coefficient is almost the same, moreover, the autocorrelation coefficients are negatively related with expected values, are inverted-U related with variances, are cubic related with skewed coefficients, and are U related with kurtosis coefficients.

  11. Effective secondary electron emission coefficient in DC abnormal glow discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Saravanan; Alex, Prince; Sinha, Suraj Kumar

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a self-consistent model has been used to estimate the effective secondary electron emission coefficient (γE) of the cathode in typical abnormal dc glow discharge conditions. Using this model, the value of γE has been obtained for tungsten (W), copper (Cu), and stainless steel (SS304) cathode samples for argon (Ar) and nitrogen (N2) discharges. The γE for W is lower than the Cu cathode under identical operating conditions. The results show possible dependence of γE on the Fermi energy of the cathode material since it influences the probability of electron to be emitted by the incident ion. In addition to this, we found, significant contribution of cathode directed species other than ion to γE. Further, the effect of pressure on γE for the N2 discharge has been investigated in the pressure range of 0.5 mbar to 2.0 mbar and its value increases from 0.38 to 0.47 with pressure for the SS304 cathode. The knowledge of γE successfully explains the governing processes in abnormal glow discharge plasma that cannot be explained by the value of the ion induced secondary electron emission coefficient γi. The measurement of the γE value of the cathode material in typical abnormal glow discharge plasma conditions presents possibilities of exciting advancement in various applications by accurate estimation of discharge characteristics including flux of species, fraction of power carried by ions and electrons, plasma density, discharge current density, etc.

  12. The Effect of a Variable Disc Pad Friction Coefficient for the Mechanical Brake System of a Railway Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Kang, Chul-Goo

    2015-01-01

    A brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) system for a railway vehicle is widely applied to estimate and validate braking performance in research studies and field tests. When we develop a simulation model for a full vehicle system, the characteristics of all components are generally properly simplified based on the understanding of each component's purpose and interaction with other components. The friction coefficient between the brake disc and the pad used in simulations has been conventionally considered constant, and the effect of a variable friction coefficient is ignored with the assumption that the variability affects the performance of the vehicle braking very little. However, the friction coefficient of a disc pad changes significantly within a range due to environmental conditions, and thus, the friction coefficient can affect the performance of the brakes considerably, especially on the wheel slide. In this paper, we apply a variable friction coefficient and analyzed the effects of the variable friction coefficient on a mechanical brake system of a railway vehicle. We introduce a mathematical formula for the variable friction coefficient in which the variable friction is represented by two variables and five parameters. The proposed formula is applied to real-time simulations using a brake HILS system, and the effectiveness of the formula is verified experimentally by testing the mechanical braking performance of the brake HILS system.

  13. The Effect of a Variable Disc Pad Friction Coefficient for the Mechanical Brake System of a Railway Vehicle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Jin Lee

    Full Text Available A brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS system for a railway vehicle is widely applied to estimate and validate braking performance in research studies and field tests. When we develop a simulation model for a full vehicle system, the characteristics of all components are generally properly simplified based on the understanding of each component's purpose and interaction with other components. The friction coefficient between the brake disc and the pad used in simulations has been conventionally considered constant, and the effect of a variable friction coefficient is ignored with the assumption that the variability affects the performance of the vehicle braking very little. However, the friction coefficient of a disc pad changes significantly within a range due to environmental conditions, and thus, the friction coefficient can affect the performance of the brakes considerably, especially on the wheel slide. In this paper, we apply a variable friction coefficient and analyzed the effects of the variable friction coefficient on a mechanical brake system of a railway vehicle. We introduce a mathematical formula for the variable friction coefficient in which the variable friction is represented by two variables and five parameters. The proposed formula is applied to real-time simulations using a brake HILS system, and the effectiveness of the formula is verified experimentally by testing the mechanical braking performance of the brake HILS system.

  14. The Effect of a Variable Disc Pad Friction Coefficient for the Mechanical Brake System of a Railway Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Kang, Chul-Goo

    2015-01-01

    A brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) system for a railway vehicle is widely applied to estimate and validate braking performance in research studies and field tests. When we develop a simulation model for a full vehicle system, the characteristics of all components are generally properly simplified based on the understanding of each component’s purpose and interaction with other components. The friction coefficient between the brake disc and the pad used in simulations has been conventionally considered constant, and the effect of a variable friction coefficient is ignored with the assumption that the variability affects the performance of the vehicle braking very little. However, the friction coefficient of a disc pad changes significantly within a range due to environmental conditions, and thus, the friction coefficient can affect the performance of the brakes considerably, especially on the wheel slide. In this paper, we apply a variable friction coefficient and analyzed the effects of the variable friction coefficient on a mechanical brake system of a railway vehicle. We introduce a mathematical formula for the variable friction coefficient in which the variable friction is represented by two variables and five parameters. The proposed formula is applied to real-time simulations using a brake HILS system, and the effectiveness of the formula is verified experimentally by testing the mechanical braking performance of the brake HILS system. PMID:26267883

  15. Effects of micro-sized and nano-sized WO3 on mass attenauation coefficients of concrete by using MCNPX code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, H O; Singh, V P; Manici, T

    2017-03-01

    In the present work the effect of tungsten oxide (WO3) nanoparticles on mass attenauation coefficients of concrete has been investigated by using MCNPX (version 2.4.0). The validation of generated MCNPX simulation geometry has been provided by comparing the results with standard XCOM data for mass attenuation coefficients of concrete. A very good agreement between XCOM and MCNPX have been obtained. The validated geometry has been used for definition of nano-WO3 and micro-WO3 into concrete sample. The mass attenuation coefficients of pure concrete and WO3 added concrete with micro-sized and nano-sized have been compared. It was observed that shielding properties of concrete doped with WO3 increased. The results of mass attenauation coefficients also showed that the concrete doped with nano-WO3 significanlty improve shielding properties than micro-WO3. It can be concluded that addition of nano-sized particles can be considered as another mechanism to reduce radiation dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CAN HALF VALUE LAYER MEASUREMENTS BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE EFFECTIVE ENERGY TO OBTAIN CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FOR X-RAY SPECTRA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, B; Hupe, O

    2017-04-15

    Conversion coefficients are a substantial vehicle in practical radiation protection to determine the dose (rate) of a given radiation field. According to ICRU report 57, their values shall be obtained by means of spectrometry. This is, however, a time-consuming complicated procedure that cannot be performed by all dosimetry laboratories. Therefore, it is desired to find acceptable alternative methods to replace spectrometry. One possibility is to set up the X-ray facility in accordance with international standard ISO 4037-1:1997 and use the tabulated values from that standard. However, this needs to be considered during the construction phase of the X-ray facility. In this work, the combined usage of half-value layer measurements and the effective energy (both with respect to air kerma) to determine the conversion coefficients is investigated and compared with the values obtained by spectrometry. The investigations utilise all combinations of the H-, W-, N- and L-series, reference distances of 1 and 2.5 m and aluminium and copper as attenuation materials. We find that for most of the radiation qualities, the investigated method results in conversion coefficients that show an unacceptable deviation from the conventionally true values. However, the values of conversion coefficients of selected N- and L-qualities could be reproduced with high accuracy (within ±1 %). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  18. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Light Interception and Light Extinction Coefficient in Different Wheat Cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    F Samadiyan; Soleymani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is a cereal grain, originated from the levant region of the near east and Ethiopian highlands, currently cultivated worldwide. Light extinction coefficient K is a coefficient that represents the amount of light reduced by the plant. Light or radiation extinction coefficient is a concept that expresses the light penetration decrease into the canopy in the way the upper leaves of the canopy with less angles have lower amount of K in comparison with the ...

  19. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  20. Committed effective dose determination in cereal flours by gamma-ray spectrometry; Determinacao das doses efetivas por ingestao de farinhas de cereais atraves da espectrometria de raios gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibel, Viviane

    2006-07-01

    The health impact from radionuclides ingestion of foodstuffs was evaluated by the committed effective doses determined in commercial samples of South-Brazilian cereal flours (soy, wheat, corn, manioc, rye, oat, barley and rice flour). The radioactivity traces of {sup 228}Th, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry employing a 66% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The energy resolution for the 1332.46 keV line of {sup 60}Co was 2.03 keV. The committed effective doses were calculated with the activities analyzed in the present flour samples, the foodstuff rates of consumption (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) and the ingestion dose coefficients (International Commission of Radiological Protection). The reliability median activities were verified with {chi}{sup 2} tests, assuring the fittings quality. The highest concentration levels of {sup 228}Th and {sup 40}K were 3.5 {+-} 0.4 and 1469 {+-} 17 Bq.kg{sup -1} for soy flour, respectively, with 95% of confidence level. The lower limit of detection for {sup 137}Cs ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 Bq.kg{sup -1}. The highest committed effective dose was 0.36 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra in manioc flour (adults). All committed effective doses determined at the present work were lower than the UNSCEAR limits of 140 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} and much lower than the ICRP (1991) limits of 1 mSv.y{sup -1}, for general public. There are few literature references for natural and artificial radionuclides in foodstuffs and mainly for committed effective doses. This work brings the barley flour data, which is not present at the literature and {sup 7}Be data which is not encountered in foodstuffs at the literature, besides all the other flours data information about activities and committed effective doses. (author)

  1. Effect of multiple perfusion components on pseudo-diffusion coefficient in intravoxel incoherent motion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Zi-Xiang; Liu, Wan-Yu; Zhu, Yue-Min

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of multiple perfusion components on the pseudo-diffusion coefficient D * in the bi-exponential intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model. Simulations were first performed to examine how the presence of multiple perfusion components influences D *. The real data of livers (n  =  31), spleens (n  =  31) and kidneys (n  =  31) of 31 volunteers was then acquired using DWI for in vivo study and the number of perfusion components in these tissues was determined together with their perfusion fraction and D *, using an adaptive multi-exponential IVIM model. Finally, the bi-exponential model was applied to the real data and the mean, standard variance and coefficient of variation of D * as well as the fitting residual were calculated over the 31 volunteers for each of the three tissues and compared between them. The results of both the simulations and the in vivo study showed that, for the bi-exponential IVIM model, both the variance of D * and the fitting residual tended to increase when the number of perfusion components was increased or when the difference between perfusion components became large. In addition, it was found that the kidney presented the fewest perfusion components among the three tissues. The present study demonstrated that multi-component perfusion is a main factor that causes high variance of D * and the bi-exponential model should be used only when the tissues under investigation have few perfusion components, for example the kidney.

  2. Neuroimmune Effects of Inhaling Low Dose Sarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    effects of sarin on Src-like pretein tyrosine kinases (Fyn and Lck) (19-22 months). b. Examine the effects of sarin on PLC-¥1 (23-26 months) c. Investigate...proliferative response of spleen cells to the T-cell Palo Alto, CA, USA), rats were anesthetized with an mitogen, Concanavalin A (Con A), was measured ...mitogen, Concanavalin A (Con A), was measured as previ- intramuscular injection of a mixture of ketamine and xyla- ously described (Sopori et al

  3. Dose-response effects in an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mintz, E. D.; Cartter, M. L.; Hadler, J. L.; Wassell, J. T.; Zingeser, J. A.; Tauxe, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ingested Salmonella enteritidis (SE) dose on incubation period and on the severity and duration of illness were estimated in a cohort of 169 persons who developed gastroenteritis after eating hollandaise sauce made from grade-A shell eggs. The cohort was divided into three groups based on self-reported dose of sauce ingested. As dose increased, median incubation period decreased (37 h in the low exposure group v. 21 h in the medium exposure group v. 17.5 h in the high exposure ...

  4. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Y; Al, T; Mazurek, M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I(-)) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax=12MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I(-) tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (±12%) suggesting that, for

  5. Measurement of ageing effect on chloride diffusion coefficients in cementitious matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, C.; Castellote, M.; d'Andrea, R.

    2011-05-01

    Most of the low-level nuclear waste disposal facilities are based in engineered multi barrier systems where reinforced concrete is one of the basic materials. The calculation of the time until steel reinforcement depassivation is a need due to the demand of prediction of the service life of concrete structures in radioactive repositories. In doing that, one of the main steps is the transport of chloride ions towards the reinforcement, as one of the most aggressive agents for the rebars in concrete is chloride ions. Ageing of concrete related to chloride penetration leads to significant decrease of the "apparent diffusion" coefficient with time. If this effect is not considered, considerable bias can be introduced when predicting service life of reinforced concrete of repositories. Several effects have been addressed on their influence on the ageing of concrete, including the evolution with time of the concrete pore refinement, the binding of chlorides to the cement phases and to the changes of chloride "surface concentration". These effects have been studied in specimens made with different mixes trying to represent a wide range of mineral addition proportions. The analysis of their evolution with time has shown that the resistivity alone or the joint consideration of resistivity and binding capacity ( Cb/ Cf), are appropriate parameters to appraise the diffusivity ageing. For practical reasons, an accelerated procedure is proposed in order to calculate ageing for short periods of time.

  6. Radiation effects on livestock: physiological effects, dose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M C

    1985-06-01

    Farm livestock show no measurable effects from being exposed to ionizing radiation unless the level is greatly in excess of the natural background radiation. Possible sources of ionizing radiation which might affect livestock or contribute to radioactivity in the food chain to humans are reactor accidents, fuel reprocessing plant accidents and thermonuclear explosions. Most data on ionizing radiation effects on livestock are from whole body gamma doses near the LD 50/60 level. However, grazing livestock would be subjected to added beta exposure from ingested and skin retained radioactive particles. Results of attempts to simulate exposure of the Hereford cattle at Alamogardo, NM show that cattle are more sensitive to ingested fallout radiation than other species. Poultry LD 50/60 for gamma exposure is about twice the level for mammals, and swine appear to have the most efficient repair system being able to withstand the most chronic gamma exposure. Productivity of most livestock surviving an LD 50/60 exposure is temporarily reduced and longterm effects are small. Livestock are good screeners against undesirables in our diet and with the exception of radiosotopes of iodine in milk, very little fission product radioactivity would be expected to be transferred through the food chain in livestock products for humans. Feeding of stored feed or moving livestock to uncontaminated pastures would be the best protective action to follow.

  7. The effect of different doses of isotretinoin on pituitary hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Takci, Zennure; Ertugrul, Derun Taner; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Balahoroglu, Ragip; Takir, Mumtaz

    2015-01-01

    There are a limited number of studies investigating the side effects and effectiveness of various doses of isotretinoin (ISO). We have previously shown that high-dose ISO affects pituitary hormones. To our knowledge, there is no study in the literature looking into the effects of various doses of ISO on pituitary hormones. We searched pituitary hormones in three groups of different doses in acne patients. We included 105 acne vulgaris patients from two different centers. We divided the patients into three groups; the first group received 0.5-1 mg/kg/day, the second 0.2-0.5 mg/kg/day and the third intermittent 0.5-1 mg/kg/day (only 1 week in 1 month) ISO treatment. Blood samples were collected for biochemistry and hormone analysis, before the treatment and after 3 months. After 3 months of treatment with ISO, luteinizing hormone (LH) (p testosterone (p < 0.001), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) (p < 0.001), cortisol (p < 0.001), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (p < 0.001), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (p = 0.002), growth hormone (GH) (p = 0.002) and free T3 (fT3) (p < 0.001) levels had decreased significantly. Furthermore, we split data into three different groups. Among the patients receiving intermittent-dose ISO, LH, ACTH, IGF-1, GH and fT3 measurements lost significance. Most of the significant measurements observed in the whole group were also significant among the patients receiving high-dose ISO. Additionally, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (p = 0.003) levels increased, and free T4 levels decreased significantly. ISO affects pituitary hormones at all of these three doses. The differences in pituitary hormones are more pronounced in high-dose treatment. The weakest effect was observed in the intermittent-dose group. Choosing lower doses of ISO may decrease side effects, however the effectiveness of the treatment may also be diminished. ISO, by affecting the PPARγ/RXR system, may affecting hormone systems. These changes in various

  8. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  9. The effective air absorption coefficient for predicting reverberation time in full octave bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenmaekers, R H C; Hak, C C J M; Hornikx, M C J

    2014-12-01

    A substantial amount of research has been devoted to producing a calculation model for air absorption for pure tones. However, most statistical and geometrical room acoustic prediction models calculate the reverberation time in full octave bands in accordance with ISO 3382-1 (International Organization for Standardization, 2009). So far, the available methods that allow calculation of air absorption in octave bands have not been investigated for room acoustic applications. In this paper, the effect of air absorption on octave band reverberation time calculations is investigated based on calculations. It is found that the approximation method, as described in the standard ANSI S1.26 (American National Standards Institute, 1995), fails to estimate accurate decay curves for full octave bands. In this paper, a method is used to calculate the energy decay curve in rooms based on a summation of pure tones within the band. From this decay curve, which is found to be slightly concave upwards, T20 and T30 can be determined. For different conditions, an effective intensity attenuation coefficient mB ;eff for the full octave bands has been calculated. This mB ;eff can be used for reverberation time calculations, if results are to be compared with T20 or T30 measurements. Also, guidelines are given for the air absorption correction of decay curves, measured in a scale model.

  10. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  11. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted...

  12. Effects of solvents on skin absorption of nonvolatile lipophilic and polar solutes under finite dose conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarakumhaeng, Rattikorn; Wanasathop, Apipa; Li, S Kevin

    2017-11-24

    The effects of solvents upon the deposition of a moderately lipophilic solute on skin and skin permeation were investigated previously. The present study was a continuing effort to investigate the effects of solvents on finite dose skin absorption of nonvolatile lipophilic and polar solutes and examine the relationships between solute physicochemical properties, solvent effects, and skin absorption of these solutes after solvent deposition. Skin permeation experiments under the finite dose conditions were conducted with model solutes (corticosterone, urea, mannitol, glycerol, triamcinolone acetonide, and estradiol) and model solvents (ethanol, butanol, water, and propylene glycol) using Franz diffusion cells and human epidermal membrane. Urea showed unexpectedly high skin permeation under the finite dose conditions compared to the other solutes based on their skin permeability coefficients (obtained under infinite dose condition). The influences of the solvents on solute permeation suggest that these solvents did not act solely as a vehicle for spreading the solutes during solvent deposition. In the testing of skin permeation mechanisms, model analyses indicated a correlation between solute permeation and their molecular weights and solubilities, suggesting that the solute permeation mechanism with the volatile solvent was related to solute dissolution on the skin surface and its diffusion across the skin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF COWPEA VARIETY, DOSE AND EXPOSURE TIME ON. BRUCHID .... of cowpea variety as well as its interactive effect with exposure .... RESULTS. Seed morphometrics and characteristics. Table. 1 shows seed morphometrics and characteristics of the cowpea varieties used for this study. KDV.

  14. Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers' performance. ... The potential performance-enhancement effect of pseudoephedrine (PSE) use has led to its prohibition in competition sports (urine concentrations >150 μg/ml). Data are, however ... Method. A double-blinded cross-over study design was used.

  15. Effects of the friction coefficient on the torque characteristics of a hydraulic cam-rotor vane motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qiankun; Wang, Xuyong; Yuan, Fan; Chen, Liang Shen; Tao, Jian Feng [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Miao, Zhong Hua [School of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, Shanghai University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-15

    The friction coefficient between the vane and the slot is one of the most critical factors that affects the performance of a continuous rotary hydraulic cam-rotor vane motor. To study the effects of this coefficient on the torque characteristics of the motor, the mathematical model for the normal force and the disturbing torque between the cam rotors and the vanes of the motor was established by analyzing the forces exerted on the vanes. The mathematical model was simulated with MATLAB, and simulation results show that an increase in the friction coefficient would simultaneously decrease the normal force and increase the disturbing torque, which would negatively affect the performance of the motor. Further experimental research indicated that the low-speed performance of the hydraulic cam-rotor motor was significantly improved when the friction coefficient was reduced by controlling the parallelism tolerance, flatness and roughness between the vanes and the slots.

  16. The clamped and unclamped effective electro-optic coefficients of zirconium-doped congruent lithium niobate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarkan, Mustapha; Danielyan, Anush; Kokanyan, Ninel; Aillerie, Michel; Kostritskii, Sergey; Kokanyan, Edvard

    2017-07-01

    All coefficients of the unclamped and clamped electro-optic tensor of zirconium-doped congruent LiNbO3 single crystals are determined as function of the dopant concentration at room temperature. With a distribution coefficient of zirconium closer to one in the considered range, the dopant concentration is in the range up to 2.5 mol% of ZrO2. The electro-optic coefficients are measured by direct techniques based on interferometric and Sénarmont optical arrangements at the wavelength of 633 nm. It is found that all the unclamped and clamped effective electro-optic coefficients are relatively constant, except for the sample grown with 2 mol% of zirconium. The electro-optic behavior of LN:Zr as function of the dopant concentration was confirmed by dielectric characterizations. The concentration equal 2 mol% of ZrO2 can be considered to a threshold concentration for various physical and optical properties.

  17. Thermal dose requirement for tissue effect: experimental and clinical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, Mark; Viglianti, Benjamin L.; Lora-Michiels, Michael; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hanson, Margaret A.

    2003-06-01

    In this review we have summarized the basic principles that govern the relationships between thermal exposure (temperature and time of exposure) and thermal damage, with an emphasis on normal tissue effects. We have also attempted to identify specific thermal dose information (for safety and injury) for a variety of tissues in a variety of species. We address the use, accuracy and difficulty of conversion of an individual time and temperature (thermal dose) to a standardized value (eg equivalent minutes at 43degC) for comparison of thermal treatments. Although, the conversion algorithm appears to work well within a range of moderately elevated temperatures (2-15degC) above normal physiologic baseline (37-39degC) there is concern that conversion accuracy does not hold up for temperatures which are minimally or significantly above baseline. An extensive review of the literature suggests a comprehensive assessment of the "thermal dose-to-tissue effect" has not previously been assembled for most individual tissues and never been viewed in a semi-comprehensive (tissues and species) manner. Finally, we have addressed the relationship of thermal dose-to-effect vs. baseline temperature. This issues is important since much of the thermal dose-to-effect information has been accrued in animal models with baseline temperatures 1-2 deg higher than that of humans.

  18. Determination of coefficient of thermal expansion effects on Louisiana's PCC pavement design : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    PROBLEM: The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is a fundamental property of construction : materials such as steel and concrete. Although the CTE of steel is a well-defined : constant, the CTE of concrete varies substantially with aggregate type...

  19. Mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of biological compounds for gamma ray interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Dhammajyot Kundlik; Pawar, Pravina P.; Selvam, T. Palani

    2017-09-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) for some enzymes, proteins, amino acids and fatty acids were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies, by performing transmission experiments using 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 22Na sources collimated to produce 0.52 cm diameter beams. A NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energy resolution 8.2% at 663 keV was used for detection. The experimental values of (μ/ρ) were then used to determine the atomic cross section (σa), electronic cross section (σe), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Neff). It was observed that (μ/ρ), σa and σe decrease initially and then tends to be almost constant at higher energies. Values of Zeff and Neff were observed roughly constant with energy. The deviations in experimental results of radiological parameters were believed to be affected by physical and chemical environments. Experimental results of radiological parameters were observed in good agreement with WinXCom values.

  20. The effect of electrohydrodynamic force on the lift coefficient of a NACA 0015 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Y.; Hossain, A.; Abdullah, A. H.; Nasir, Rizal M. E.; Hamid, A.; Muthmainnah, N.; N, M.

    2017-11-01

    Lift, the force component that is perpendicular to the line of flight, is generated when a small aircraft moves through the air. With the help of the sets of flaps and slats on its wing, the pilot controls his aircraft manoeuvring in the air. In this study, we preferred to cut the drawbacks of the flaps system by introducing the electrohydrodynamic actuator. Widely known as plasma actuator, it is able to improve the induced lift force as well as the efficiency of a small aircraft system. A dielectric-barrier-discharge actuator using a 6 kV AC power supply was developed and tested on a NACA 0015 airfoil using copper as the electrodes and kapton as its dielectric component. The experimental results showed that it was successful in presenting a positive effect of the plasma actuator on the lift coefficient of the airfoil at smaller angle of attack, where enhancements ranged between 0.7% and 1.8%. However, at a higher angle, the results were not as swayed as it was desired since the energy exerted by the plasma actuator on the lift performance of the airfoil was inadequate. Further tests are needed using higher rated voltage supply and other equipment to improve the capability of the actuator in refining the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil.

  1. The effect of ambient temperature on the shoe-surface interface release coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torg, J S; Stilwell, G; Rogers, K

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies of the shoe-surface interface correlated foot fixation with cleat length, configuration, and material composition as well as turf type and surface conditions. Our study examined the effect of temperature on the rotational torsion resistance of artificial turf football shoes. Five football shoe models, a flat-soled basketball-style turf shoe, a natural grass soccer-style shoe, and three multistudded turf shoes, were studied on dry Astro Turf at five temperatures (range, 52 degrees F to 110 degrees F). An assay device, a prosthetic foot mounted on a loaded stainless steel shaft, was used to determine the force necessary to release a shoe from the turf's surface. We used a torque wrench to apply a rotational force so that each shoe was pivoted counterclockwise through an arc of 60 degrees. Our results indicated that release coefficients differ within and among the shoe models at various turf temperatures. We also found that an increase in turf temperature, in combination with cleat characteristics, affects shoe-surface interface friction and potentially places the athlete's knee and ankle at risk of injury. Based on an established risk criterion, which correlated shoe-surface interface combinations in the laboratory with documented clinical occurrences, only the flat-soled basketball-style turf shoe could be designated "safe" or "probably safe" at all five temperatures.

  2. Effects of heat treatment on sound absorption coefficients in nanosilver-impregnated and normal solid woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmailpour, Ayoub; Taghiyari, Hamid Reza; Zolfaghari, Habib

    2017-06-01

    Effects of impregnation with silver nano-suspension as well as heat-treatment on sound absorption coefficients (AC) were studied in tangential direction of five different solid woods based on their importance. AC was measured at two frequencies of 250 and 500 Hz. A 400 ppm nanosuspension was used for the impregnation; silver nanoparticles had a size range of 30-80 nm. Based on the obtained results, the species reacted significantly different in absorbing sound at the two frequencies. Impregnation with nano-suspension substantially decreased AC at the lower frequency of 250 Hz; it did not show any particular trend when AC was measured at the frequency of 500 Hz. Heat treatment significantly increased AC at the frequency of 250 Hz. ACs of mulberry tended to be similar at the two frequencies; in the other four species though, ACs were significantly different. High significant correlations were found in the hardwoods between the ACs measured at the two frequencies.

  3. An Evaluation of the Effects of Wavelet Coefficient Quantization in Transform Based EEG Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Garry; McGinley, Brian; Jones, Edward; Glavin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the compression of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals for telemedical and ambulatory EEG applications. Data compression is an important factor in these applications as a means of reducing the amount of data required for transmission. Allowing for a carefully controlled level of loss in the compression method can provide significant gains in data compression. Quantization is an easy to implement method of data reduction that requires little power expenditure. However, it is a relatively simple, noninvertible operation, and reducing the bit-level too far can result in the loss of too much information to reproduce the original signal to an appropriate fidelity. Other lossy compression methods allow for finer control over compression parameters, generally relying on discarding signal components the coder deems insignificant. SPIHT is a state of the art signal compression method based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), originally designed for images but highly regarded as a general means of data compression. This paper compares the approaches of compression by changing the quantization level of the DWT coefficients in SPIHT, with the standard thresholding method used in SPIHT, to evaluate the effects of each on EEG signals. The combination of increasing quantization and the use of SPIHT as an entropy encoder has been shown to provide significantly improved results over using the standard SPIHT algorithm alone. PMID:23668341

  4. Fractional quantum Hall effect in suspended graphene: Transport coefficients and electron interaction strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanin, D. A.; Skachko, I.; Du, X.; Andrei, E. Y.; Levitov, L. S.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, fractional-quantized Hall effect was observed in suspended graphene (SG), a free-standing monolayer of carbon, where it was found to persist up to T=10K . The best results in those experiments were obtained on micron-size flakes, on which only two-terminal transport measurements could be performed. Here we address the problem of extracting transport coefficients of a fractional quantum Hall state from the two-terminal conductance. We develop a general method, based on the conformal invariance of two-dimensional magnetotransport, and employ it to analyze the measurements on SG. From the temperature dependence of longitudinal conductivity, extracted from the measured two-terminal conductance, we estimate the energy gap of quasiparticle excitations in the fractional-quantized ν=1/3 state. The gap is found to be significantly larger than in GaAs-based structures, signaling much stronger electron interactions in suspended graphene. Our approach provides a tool for the studies of quantum transport in suspended graphene and other nanoscale systems.

  5. Effect of water content on strontium retardation factor and distribution coefficient in Chinese loess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Lijuan; Qian, Tianwei; Hao, Junting; Liu, Hongfang; Zhao, Dongye

    2013-12-01

    Geological burial and landfill are often employed for disposal of nuclear wastes. Typically, radionuclides from nuclear facilities transport through the unsaturated zone before reaching the groundwater aquifer. However, transport studies are often conducted under saturated and steady-state flow conditions. This research aimed to examine the effects of unsaturated flow conditions and soil water content (θ) on Sr sorption and retardation in Chinese loess through 1D column transport experiments. Reagent SrCl2 was used as a surrogate for the radioactive isotope ((90)Sr) in the experiment because of their analogous adsorption and transportation characteristics. The spatial distribution of Sr along the column length was determined by segmenting the soil bed and analysing the Sr content in each soil segment following each column breakthrough test. The single-region (SR) and two-region (TR) models were employed to interpret the transport data of Sr as well as a tracer (Br(-)), which resulted in the dispersion coefficient (D) and retardation factor (Rd) under a given set of unsaturated flow conditions. For the tracer, the SR and TR models offered nearly the same goodness of fitting to the breakthrough curves (R(2) ≈ 0.97 for both models). For the highly sorptive Sr, however, the TR model provided better fitting (R(2), 0.80-0.96) to the Sr retention profiles than the SR model (R(2), 0.20-0.89). The Sr retention curves exhibited physical non-equilibrium characteristics, particularly at lower water content of the soil. For the unsaturated soil, D and the pore water velocity (v) displayed a weak linear correlation, which is attributed to the altering dispersivity as the water content varies. A much improved linear correlation was observed between D and v/θ. The retardation factor of Sr increased from 69.1 to 174.2 as θ decreased from 0.46 to 0.26 (cm(3) cm(-3)), while the distribution coefficient (Kd) based on Rd remained nearly unchanged at various θ levels. These

  6. Estimation of Inbreeding Coefficient and Its Effects on Lamb Survival in Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    mohammad almasi; Amir Rashidi; Mohammad Razmkabir; mohammad mehdi gholambabaeion

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mating of related individuals produces an inbred offspring and leads to an increased homozygosity in the progeny, genetic variance decrease within families and increase between families. The ration of homozygosity for individuals was calculated by inbreeding coefficient. Inbred individuals may carry two alleles at a locus that are replicated from one gene in the previous generations, called identical by descent. The inbreeding coefficient should be monitored in a breeding pro...

  7. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in {mu}Sv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  8. The determination of effective antiviral doses using a computer program for sigmoid dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J L; O'Brien, W J; Goldman, A I

    1984-05-01

    A computer program was designed to construct best fit sigmoid dose-response curves for determination of the dose required to reduce the yield of virus by 50%, effective antiviral dose (ED50). A single antiviral agent, 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine, was examined for effectiveness against four strains of herpes simplex virus type 1. The resulting ED50 values were compared with those obtained by probit analysis. The statistical parameters obtained from sigmoid curve fit program were utilized to evaluate statistical differences between ED50 values for resistant and sensitive virus strains and to evaluate the goodness-of-fit of the regression line to the data. In addition, using this analytical method, it was shown that a change in one experimental variable, i.e., multiplicity of infection, in the yield reduction assay significantly affected the apparent ED50 value. The computer program was easily utilized for analysis of data obtained from both plaque reduction and yield reduction assays and generated the parameters necessary for statistical comparison of relative antiviral activity of any antiviral agent.

  9. Effective UV radiation dose in polyethylene exposed to weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mota, R.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Calero Marín, S. P.; Vega-Durán, J. T.; Moreno-Virgen, R.

    2009-09-01

    In this work we quantified the effective UV radiation dose in orange and colorless polyethylene samples exposed to weather in the city of Aguascalientes, Ags. Mexico. The spectral distribution of solar radiation was calculated using SMART 2.9.5.; the samples absorption properties were measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy and the quantum yield was calculated using samples reflectance properties. The determining factor in the effective UV dose is the spectral distribution of solar radiation, although the chemical structure of materials is also important.

  10. Cocaine and Pavlovian fear conditioning: dose-effect analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Suzanne C; Fay, Jonathan; Sage, Jennifer R; Anagnostaras, Stephan G

    2007-01-25

    Emerging evidence suggests that cocaine and other drugs of abuse can interfere with many aspects of cognitive functioning. The authors examined the effects of 0.1-15mg/kg of cocaine on Pavlovian contextual and cued fear conditioning in mice. As expected, pre-training cocaine dose-dependently produced hyperactivity and disrupted freezing. Surprisingly, when the mice were tested off-drug later, the group pre-treated with a moderate dose of cocaine (15mg/kg) displayed significantly less contextual and cued memory, compared to saline control animals. Conversely, mice pre-treated with a very low dose of cocaine (0.1mg/kg) showed significantly enhanced fear memory for both context and tone, compared to controls. These results were not due to cocaine's anesthetic effects, as shock reactivity was unaffected by cocaine. The data suggest that despite cocaine's reputation as a performance-enhancing and anxiogenic drug, this effect is seen only at very low doses, whereas a moderate dose disrupts hippocampus and amygdala-dependent fear conditioning.

  11. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  12. A COMPARATIVE LOOK INTO HOW TO MEASURE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VOCABULARY LEARNING STRATEGIES: THROUGH USING PERCENTAGES OR CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Hakkı ERTEN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to compare the appropriateness of two statistical procedures for measuring the effectiveness of vocabulary learning strategies: percentages and correlation coefficients. To do this a group of 20 learners of English were asked to study 12 words in a written list, with their pronunciations, dictionary definitions, and example sentences. Data was collected through introspection where students were asked to verbalize their mental processes as they studied the target words. A pre-test and post-test were given to measure the task achievement. The qualitative data was transcribed verbatim and content-analysed for tokens of strategy use as well as by noting whether each use of strategies led to successful recall of the words on which they were used. To calculate the strategy effectiveness, both simple percentage calculation and correlation coefficients were employed for comparison. The findings indicated that percentage calculation can give a more realistic picture of strategy effectiveness than correlation coefficients.

  13. Effect of smoking on dose requirements for vecuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teiriä, H; Rautoma, P; Yli-Hankala, A

    1996-01-01

    We have compared the potency of vecuronium given to 12 smokers and 12 non-smokers during propofol-alfentanil-nitrous oxide anaesthesia. After obtaining individual dose-response curves, bolus doses of vecuronium were given to maintain neuromuscular block at 90-98% for 60 min. Adductor pollicis EMG was used to monitor neuromuscular block. Mean ED95 values were 61.38 micrograms kg-1 and 47.49 micrograms kg-1 for smokers and non-smokers, respectively (P < 0.01). The dose of vecuronium to maintain 90-98% neuromuscular block was 25% higher in smokers than in non-smokers (96.80 vs 72.11 micrograms kg-1 h-1; P < 0.01). These data reflect the effects of smoking on neuromuscular block induced by vecuronium. The effect may be at the receptor level, although possible increased metabolism of vecuronium in smokers cannot be excluded.

  14. Determination of the conversion coefficient for ambient dose equivalent, H(10), from air kerma measurements; Determinacion del coeficiente de conversion para la dosis equivalente ambiental, H*(10), a partir de mediciones de kerma en aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez J, F. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Namely the operational magnitudes can be determined by the product of a conversion coefficient by exposure air kerma or fluence, etc. In particular in Mexico for the first time is determined the conversion coefficient (Cc) for operational magnitude Environmental Dose Equivalent H(10) by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) technique. First 30 TLD-100 dosimeters are calibrated in terms of air kerma, then these dosimeters are irradiated inside a sphere ICRU type of PMMA and with the aid of theory cavity the absorbed dose in PMMA is determined at a depth of 10 mm within the sphere D{sub PMMA}(10), subsequently absorbed dose to ICRU tissue is corrected and the dose equivalent H(10) is determined. The Cc is determined as the ratio of H(10)/K{sub a} obtaining a value of 1.20 Sv Gy{sup -1} with a u{sub c}= 3.66%, this being consistent with the published value in ISO-4037-3 of 1.20 Sv Gy{sup -1} with a u{sub c}= 2%. (Author)

  15. A kinematic model to estimate effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-05-01

    The great earthquake occurred in the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. Facility system to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following giant tsunami. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure became a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplifying the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a sophisticated model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that ICRP method is fine, it is rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional tank model in hydrology. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of the present method is to estimate the energy radiated in the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of β decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this model are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no operational parameters or coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to ICRP. Figure shows the time-varying effective dose with ingestion duration, and we can confirm the validity of our model. The time-varying effective dose with

  16. Effect on effective diffusion coefficients and investigation of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togrul, Inci Turk; Ispir, Ayse [Firat University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    This article represents the results of the variation in density and shrinkage of apricots during its osmotic dehydration. Shrinkage was investigated by means of dimensionless volume, diameter and length. Various osmotic agents such as sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltodextrin and sorbitol were used. It was found that the shrinkage of apricots could be well correlated with the moisture content of the sample during osmotic dehydration. The relationship between dimensionless parameters and moisture content was investigated by using eight non-linear models for each osmotic agent. It was find that the following proposed model can be confidently use for explaining the effect of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricots.V/V{sub 0},D/D{sub 0},L/L{sub 0},{rho}/{rho}{sub 0}=a+b. exp (cX)+d. exp (e.X{sup f})In addition, the osmotic dehydration kinetics of apricots with and without shrinkage was studied. The effective diffusivities calculated from the diffusional model with and without shrinkage varied from 10.342 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s to 5.139 x 10{sup -9} and from 1.755 x 10{sup -10} and 0.767 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. (author)

  17. Effects of high dose gamma irradiation on ITO thin film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyamani, A. [National Nanotechnology Center, King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mustapha, N., E-mail: nazirmustapha@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physics, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, P.O. Box 90950, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-07-29

    Transparent thin-film Indium Tin Oxides (ITO) were prepared on 0.7 mm thick glass substrates using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process with average thickness of 150 nm. The samples were then exposed to high gamma γ radiation doses by {sup 60}Co radioisotope. The films have been irradiated by performing exposure cycles up to 250 kGy total doses at room temperature. The surface structures before and after irradiation were analysed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was performed on all samples before and after irradiation to investigate any change in the grain sizes, and also in the roughness of the ITO surface. We investigated the influence of γ irradiation on the spectra of transmittance T, in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrum using spectrophotometer measurements. Energy band gap E{sub g} was then calculated from the optical spectra for all ITO films. It was found that the optical band gap values decreased as the radiation dose was increased. To compare the effect of the irradiation on refractive index n and extinction coefficient k properties, additional measurements were done on the ITO samples before and after gamma irradiation using an ellipsometer. The optical constants n and k increased by increasing the irradiation doses. Electrical properties such as resistivity and sheet resistance were measured using the four-point probe method. The good optical, electrical and morphological properties maintained by the ITO films even after being exposed to high gamma irradiation doses, made them very favourable to be used as anodes for solar cells and as protective coatings in space windows. - Highlights: • Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • Effects of Gamma irradiation were investigated. • Changes of optical transmission and electrical properties of ITO films were studied. • Intensity of the diffraction peaks and the film's structure changed with increasing irradiation doses.

  18. A novel method for effective diffusion coefficient measurement in gas diffusion media of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Sun, Hai; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Suli; Jiang, Luhua; Sun, Gongquan

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for measuring effective diffusion coefficient of porous materials is developed. The oxygen concentration gradient is established by an air-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The porous sample is set in a sample holder located in the cathode plate of the PEMFC. At a given oxygen flux, the effective diffusion coefficients are related to the difference of oxygen concentration across the samples, which can be correlated with the differences of the output voltage of the PEMFC with and without inserting the sample in the cathode plate. Compared to the conventional electrical conductivity method, this method is more reliable for measuring non-wetting samples.

  19. Measurement of effective gas diffusion coefficients of catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells with a Loschmidt diffusion cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bessarabov, Dmitri; Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Astrath, Nelson G.C.; Navessin, Titichai

    2011-01-01

    In this work, using an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell, we measure the effective coefficient of dry gas (O2–N2) diffusion in cathode catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells at 25 °C and 1 atmosphere. The thicknesses of the catalyst layers under investigation are from 6 to 29 μm. Each catalyst layer is deposited on an Al2O3 membrane substrate by an automated spray coater. Diffusion signal processing procedure is developed to deduce the effective diffusion coefficient, which is found to be (1....

  20. Effects of environmental temperature and dietary energy on energy partitioning coefficients of female broiler breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishnamazi, A; Renema, R A; Paul, D C; Wenger, I I; Zuidhof, M J

    2015-10-01

    With increasing disparity between broiler breeder target weights and broiler growth potential, maintenance energy requirements have become a larger proportion of total broiler breeder energy intake. Because energy is partitioned to growth and egg production at a lower priority than maintenance, accurate prediction of maintenance energy requirements is important for practical broiler breeder feed allocation decisions. Environmental temperature affects the maintenance energy requirement by changing rate of heat loss to the environment. In the ME system, heat production (energy lost) is part of the maintenance requirement (ME). In the current study, a nonlinear mixed model was derived to predict ME partitioning of broiler breeder hens under varied temperature conditions. At 21 wk of age, 192 Ross 708 hens were individually caged within 6 controlled environmental chambers. From 25 to 41 wk, 4 temperature treatments (15°C, 19°C, 23°C, and 27°C) were randomly assigned to the chambers for 2-week periods. Half of the birds in each chamber were fed a high-energy (HE; 2,912 kcal/kg) diet, and half were fed a low-energy (LE; 2,790 kcal/kg) diet. The nonlinear mixed regression model included a normally distributed random term representing individual hen maintenance, a quadratic response to environmental temperature, and linear ADG and egg mass (EM) coefficients. The model assumed that energy requirements for BW gain and egg production were not influenced by environmental temperature because hens were homeothermic, and the cellular processes for associated biochemical processes occurred within a controlled narrow core body temperature range. Residual feed intake (RFI) and residual ME (RME) were used to estimate efficiency. A quadratic effect of environmental temperature on broiler breeder MEm was predicted ( broiler breeders fed the HE diet.

  1. The postoperative analgesic effects of low-dose gabapentin in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Clinical studies have suggested that gabapentin may produce analgesia in postoperative patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic effects of low-dose gabapentin administered during the first 24 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods. A prospective, double-blind, randomised study ...

  2. Beneficial effects of low dose Musa paradisiaca on the semen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study aimed at determining the effects of administration of mature green fruits of Musa paradisiaca on the semen quality of adult male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: The animals used for the study were grouped into three: the control group, given 2 ml of double distilled water, a low dose group given ...

  3. Hepatotoxic effects of low dose oral administration of monosodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study is aimed at investigating the potentials of low concentration administration of monosodium glutamate in inducing hepatotoxic effects in male albino rats. Thus, monosodium glutamate at a dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight was administered to adult male albino rats by oral intubation. Treatment was daily for ...

  4. Effects of a Single Dose of Caffeine on Resting Cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of 5mg/kg body weight dose of caffeine on cardiovascular system of normal young adult males of Black African Origin. Twenty normal young adult male volunteers participated. A repeated measures 2 randomized Crosse over (counter balanced) double blind design was ...

  5. Effect of high dose thiamine therapy on activity and molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... This study was therefore designed to investigate the effect of high dose thiamine therapy on the activity and molecular aspects of transketolase in Type 2 diabetic patients. Over 100 Type 2 microalbuminuric diabetics were enrolled in a randomized, double blind placebo controlled clinical trial for 6 months.

  6. Effects of a Single Dose of Caffeine on Resting Cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Cardiovascular System of Normal Young Black. African Adults. Lamina Sikiru and Musa Danladi I. (Prof). Abstract. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of. 5mg/kg body weight dose of caffeine on cardiovascular system of normal .... Test procedure: On arrival to the exercise Physiology Laboratory of the.

  7. Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in increased oxygenated blood supply to the exercising muscles, reducing the premature onset of muscle fatigue. The total torque production of the muscles is consequently increased and may result in enhanced athletic performance.[2,3] These and other positive effects of PSE appeal to athletes, although doses ≥240 mg ...

  8. Low-dose spinal anaesthesia provides effective labour analgesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-dose spinal anaesthesia provides effective labour analgesia and does not limit ambulation. T Anabaha*, A Olufolabia,b,d, J Boydc and R Georgec,d. aSchool of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana. bDuke University Medical Centre, Durham, NC, USA. cIWK Health Centre ...

  9. Measurement of effective dose for paediatric scoliotic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chih-I. [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); McLean, Donald [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)]. E-mail: rdmc@imag.wsahs.nsw.gov.au; Robinson, John [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Paediatric radiation dose from scoliosis X-ray examinations is of concern because of its routine nature. Few studies have calculated effective dose which is the primary indicator of radiation risk. This study reports on the use of a new flexible Monte Carlo software package PCXMC14 for such calculation from documented radiographic and patient data. Method: Patient and radiographic data were collected from 54 patient examinations for both postero-anterior (PA) and lateral X-ray projections. A spreadsheet mainly based on radiographic calibration was used to process the raw data and compute entrance air kerma for input in the PCXMC program. A partitioning model was developed to more accurately estimate the effect of an aluminium wedge filter. Results: Results showed the effective dose ranged from 81 to 123 {mu}Sv for the PA projection and 124 to 207 {mu}Sv for the lateral projection, with patient weights varying from 20 to 70 kg. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the usefulness of the PCXMC program to evaluate the effective dose in paediatric scoliosis radiography.

  10. Comparison of two dose and three dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules: cost effectiveness analysis based on transmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Brisson, Marc; Laprise, Jean-François; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2015-01-06

    To investigate the incremental cost effectiveness of two dose human papillomavirus vaccination and of additionally giving a third dose. Cost effectiveness study based on a transmission dynamic model of human papillomavirus vaccination. Two dose schedules for bivalent or quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines were assumed to provide 10, 20, or 30 years' vaccine type protection and cross protection or lifelong vaccine type protection without cross protection. Three dose schedules were assumed to give lifelong vaccine type and cross protection. United Kingdom. Males and females aged 12-74 years. No, two, or three doses of human papillomavirus vaccine given routinely to 12 year old girls, with an initial catch-up campaign to 18 years. Costs (from the healthcare provider's perspective), health related utilities, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios. Giving at least two doses of vaccine seems to be highly cost effective across the entire range of scenarios considered at the quadrivalent vaccine list price of £86.50 (€109.23; $136.00) per dose. If two doses give only 10 years' protection but adding a third dose extends this to lifetime protection, then the third dose also seems to be cost effective at £86.50 per dose (median incremental cost effectiveness ratio £17,000, interquartile range £11,700-£25,800). If two doses protect for more than 20 years, then the third dose will have to be priced substantially lower (median threshold price £31, interquartile range £28-£35) to be cost effective. Results are similar for a bivalent vaccine priced at £80.50 per dose and when the same scenarios are explored by parameterising a Canadian model (HPV-ADVISE) with economic data from the United Kingdom. Two dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules are likely to be the most cost effective option provided protection lasts for at least 20 years. As the precise duration of two dose schedules may not be known for decades, cohorts given two doses should be closely

  11. The effect of dose reduction on the detection of anatomical structures on panoramic radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, G; Dietz, K; Reinert, S

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of dose reduction on diagnostic accuracy using different screen-film combinations and digital techniques for panoramic radiography. Five observers assessed 201 pairs of panoramic radiographs (a total of 402 panoramic radiographs) taken with the Orthophos Plus (Sirona, Bensheim, Germany), for visualization of 11 anatomical structures on each side, using a 3-point scale -1, 0 and 1. Two radiographs of each patient were taken at two different times (conventional setting and setting with decreased dose, done by increasing tube potential settings or halving tube current). To compare the dose at different tube potential settings dose-length product was measured at the secondary collimator. Films with medium and regular intensifying screens (high and low tube potential settings) and storage phosphor plates (low tube potential setting, tube current setting equivalent to regular intensifying screen and halved) were compared. The five observers made 27 610 assessments. Intrarater agreement was expressed by Cohen's kappa coefficient. The results demonstrated an equivalence of regular screens (low tube potential setting) and medium screens (high and low tube potential settings). A significant difference existed between medium screens (low tube potential setting, mean score 0.92) and the group of regular film-screen combinations at high tube potential settings (mean score 0.89) and between all film-screen combinations and the digital system irrespective of exposure (mean score below 0.82). There were no significant differences between medium and regular screens (mean score 0.88 to 0.92) for assessment of the periodontal ligament space, but there was a significant difference compared with the digital system (mean score below 0.76). The kappa coefficient for intrarater agreement was moderate (0.55). New regular intensifying screens can replace medium screens at low tube potential settings. Digital panoramic radiographs should be taken at low

  12. The ratios of effective dose to entrance skin dose to the air kerma for some medical sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, K.N. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Results are presented for the ratios of the effective dose to skin entrance dose and to air kerma for broad beams of radiation expected to be encountered by medical workers. These workers are monitored by the Personal Radiation Monitoring Service (PRMS) using thermoluminescent dosimeters worn at the front of the body to provide estimates of the entrance skin dose. Factors are given for converting estimates of entrance skin dose to effective dose as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1991) for beams incident on the body by one of three modes-from the front of the subject, from the back of the subject or by rotation around the subject. Additional tables are also given to calculate effective dose for these beams from a measurement of air kerma free-in-air 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Dose-response effects in an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, E D; Cartter, M L; Hadler, J L; Wassell, J T; Zingeser, J A; Tauxe, R V

    1994-02-01

    The effects of ingested Salmonella enteritidis (SE) dose on incubation period and on the severity and duration of illness were estimated in a cohort of 169 persons who developed gastroenteritis after eating hollandaise sauce made from grade-A shell eggs. The cohort was divided into three groups based on self-reported dose of sauce ingested. As dose increased, median incubation period decreased (37 h in the low exposure group v. 21 h in the medium exposure group v. 17.5 h in the high exposure group, P = 0.006) and greater proportions reported body aches (71 v. 85 v. 94%, P = 0.0009) and vomiting (21 v. 56 v. 57%, P = 0.002). Among 118 case-persons who completed a follow-up questionnaire, increased dose was associated with increases in median weight loss in kilograms (3.2 v. 4.5 v. 5.0, P = 0.0001), maximum daily number of stools (12.5 v. 15.0 v. 20.0, P = 0.02), subjective rating of illness severity (P = 0.0007), and the number of days of confinement to bed (3.0 v. 6.5 v. 6.5, P = 0.04). In this outbreak, ingested dose was an important determinant of the incubation period, symptoms and severity of acute salmonellosis.

  14. Effective diffusion coefficients of DNAPL waste components in saturated low permeability soil materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayral-Cinar, Derya; Demond, Avery H.

    2017-12-01

    Diffusion is regarded as the dominant transport mechanism into and out of low permeable subsurface lenses and layers in the subsurface. But, some reports of mass storage in such zones are higher than what might be attributable to diffusion, based on estimated diffusion coefficients. Despite the importance of diffusion to efforts to estimate the quantity of residual contamination in the subsurface, relatively few studies present measured diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in saturated low permeability soils. This study reports the diffusion coefficients of a trichloroethylene (TCE), and an anionic surfactant, Aerosol OT (AOT), in water-saturated silt and a silt-montmorillonite (25:75) mixture, obtained using steady-state experiments. The relative diffusivity ranged from 0.11 to 0.17 for all three compounds for the silt and the silt-clay mixture that was allowed to expand. In the case in which the swelling was constrained, the relative diffusivity was about 0.07. In addition, the relative diffusivity of 13C-labeled TCE through a water saturated silt-clay mixture that had contacted a field dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) for 18 months was measured and equaled 0.001. These experimental results were compared with the estimates generated using common correlations, and it was found that, in all cases, the measured diffusion coefficients were significantly lower than the estimated. Thus, the discrepancy between mass accumulations observed in the field and the mass storage that can attributable to diffusion may be greater than previously believed.

  15. Beam hardening : Analytical considerations of the effective attenuation coefficient of x-ray tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alles, J.; Mudde, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Polychromatic x-ray beams traveling though material are prone to beam hardening, i.e., the high energy part of the incident spectrum gets over represented when traveling farther into the material. This study discusses the concept of a mean attenuation coefficient in a formal way. The total energy

  16. Experimental and numerical study on effects of airflow and aqueous ammonium solution temperature on ammonia mass transfer coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation, based on fundamental fluid dynamics and mass transfer theory, carried out to obtain a general understanding of ammonia mass transfer from an emission surface. The effects of airflow and aqueous ammonium solution temperature on ammonia mass transfer are investigated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and by a mechanism modeling using dissociation constant and Henry's constant models based on the parameters measured in the experiments performed in a wind tunnel. The validated CFD model by experimental data is used to investigate the surface concentration distribution and mass transfer coefficient at different temperatures and velocities for which the Reynolds number is from 1.36 x 10(4) to 5.43 x 10(4) (based on wind tunnel length). The surface concentration increases as velocity decreases and varies greatly along the airflow direction on the emission surface. The average mass transfer coefficient increases with higher velocity and turbulence intensity. However, the mass transfer coefficient estimated by CFD simulation is consistently larger than the calculated one by the method using dissociation constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under the conditions that the liquid temperature is lower than the air temperature. Although there are differences of mass transfer coefficients between these two methods, the mass transfer coefficients determined by these two methods are significantly related.

  17. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Z; Mayr, Nina A; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-04-01

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters (alpha=0.15 Gy(-1) and alpha/beta=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD2) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for 125I and 103Pd implants. The EUD2 analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D90 (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for 125I and 103Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for 125I and 1.3-1.6 for 103Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies

  18. Effect of fuel burnup and cross sections on modular HTGR (High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) reactivity coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefler, W.; Baxter, A.; Mathews, D.

    1987-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the reactivity coefficient in a prismatic block Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design is examined and found to be large and negative. Temperature coefficient results obtained with the ENDF/B-V data library were almost the same as results obtained with the earlier versions of the ENDF/B data library usually used at GA Technologies Inc., in spite of a significant eigenvalue increase with the ENDF/B-V data. The effects of fuel burnup and arbitrarily assumed cross section variations were examined and tabulated.

  19. EFFECTS OF TIN ON HARDNESS, WEAR RATE AND COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION OF CAST CU-NI-SN ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ILANGOVAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out to understand the effects of Sn on hardness, wear rate and the coefficient of friction of spinodal Cu-Ni-Sn alloys. Alloys of appropriate compositions were melted in a crucible furnace under argon atmosphere and cast into sand moulds. Solution heat treated and aged specimens were tested for hardness, wear rate and the coefficient of friction. It was found that the hardness increases when the Sn content increases from 4% to 8% in the solution heat treated conditions. The peak aging time is found to decrease with an increase in the Sn content. Further, the coefficient of friction is independent of hardness whereas the wear rate decreases linearly with hardness irrespective of Sn content.

  20. Effect of the off-diagonal Onsager rate coefficient on the relaxation times in a spin-1 Ising system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Erdem, Rıza

    2002-05-01

    As a continuation of our previously published works, we used the lowest approximation of the cluster variation method that is identical to the mean-field approximation and linearized equations of motions which are obtained by the Onsager reciprocity theorem to study the effect of the off-diagonal Onsager rate coefficient ( γ) on the relaxation times τ1 and τ2 near the critical point of the spin-1 Ising system. The temperature variations of the relaxation times have been studied for different values of the kinetic coefficient ( γ) which couples the dipolar and quadrupolar order currents in the system. Below and above the critical temperature ( TC), a maximum of τ2 is observed according to the values of off-diagonal coefficient ( γ).

  1. Site Distribution and Aliasing Effects in the Inversion for Load Coefficients and Geocenter Motion from GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Argus, Donald F.; Heflin, Michael B.; Ivins, Erik R.; Webb, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    Precise GPS measurements of elastic relative site displacements due to surface mass loading offer important constraints on global surface mass transport. We investigate effects of site distribution and aliasing by higher-degree (n greater than or equal 2) loading terms on inversion of GPS data for n = 1 load coefficients and geocenter motion. Covariance and simulation analyses are conducted to assess the sensitivity of the inversion to aliasing and mismodeling errors and possible uncertainties in the n = 1 load coefficient determination. We found that the use of center-of-figure approximation in the inverse formulation could cause 10- 15% errors in the inverted load coefficients. n = 1 load estimates may be contaminated significantly by unknown higher-degree terms, depending on the load scenario and the GPS site distribution. The uncertainty in n = 1 zonal load estimate is at the level of 80 - 95% for two load scenarios.

  2. Effect of age and sex on warfarin dosing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoury G

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ghada Khoury,1 Marwan Sheikh-Taha2 1School of Pharmacy, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon Objective: We examined the potential effect of sex and age on warfarin dosing in ambulatory adult patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients attending an anticoagulation clinic. We included patients anticoagulated with warfarin for atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolism who had a therapeutic international normalized ratio of 2–3 for 2 consecutive months. We excluded patients who had been on any drug that is known to have a major interaction with warfarin, smokers, and heavy alcohol consumers. Out of 340 screened medical records, 96 met the predetermined inclusion criteria. The primary outcome assessed was warfarin total weekly dose (TWD. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the TWD among the ages (P<0.01; older patients required lower doses. However there was no statistically significant difference in the TWD between sexes (P=0.281. Conclusion: Age was found to have a significant effect on warfarin dosing. Even though women did require a lower TWD than men, this observation was not statistically significant. Keywords: warfarin, INR, anticoagulation, vitamin K antagonists, age

  3. Effective dose of 3 types machines with panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazuo; Honjoya, Takashi; Sawada, Kunihiko; Satomi, Reiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Shinoda, Koji; Maruyama, Takashi [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2000-01-01

    A study was done to measure and compare the organ and tissue doses of radioactivity during panoramic X-ray radiography using three types of device. The panoramic X-ray machines used were an HIDA N70-R100 (orthopantomography), a Morita Veraview (elipsopantomography), and a Philips Stat ORALIX (intra-oral tube panoramic radiography). The organs and tissues for which the radiation dose was measured were the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, lungs, stomach, large intestine, liver, esophagus, breast, bladder, eyes, brain and salivary glands. National UD-170A and UD-110S thermoluminescent dosimeters were used for measurement. These were calibrated with a standard dosimeter from the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The measurements were done using a RANDO woman phantom. The effective doses were calculated as 9.1, 15.2 and 11.6 {mu}Sv by intraoral panoramic radiography of the upper, lower and lateral, respectively. The effective doses during panoramic radiography for the elipso and or ortho machines were 16.1 and 24.9 {mu}Sv, respectively. (author)

  4. Comparison of TID Effects in Space-Like Variable Dose Rates and Constant Dose Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard D.; McClure, Steven S.; Rax, Bernard G.; Evans, Robin W.; Jun, Insoo

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied at different TID dose rate profiles, including several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. A comparison of results following constant dose rate vs. variable dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predict the performance during a simulated space-like mission. Testing at a constant dose rate equal to the lowest dose rate seen during the simulated flare provides an extremely conservative estimate of the overall amount of degradation. A constant dose rate equal to the average dose rate is also more conservative than the variable rate. It appears that, for this part, weighting the dose rates by the amount of total dose received at each rate (rather than the amount of time at each dose rate) results in an average rate that produces an amount of degradation that is a reasonable approximation to that received by the variable rate.

  5. Effect of dosing frequency on chronic cardiovascular disease medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Craig I; Roberts, Matthew S; Sobieraj, Diana M; Lee, Soyon; Alam, Tawfikul; Kaur, Rajbir

    2012-05-01

    Many cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) require patients to take one or more long term medications, often administered multiple times a day. We sought to determine the effect of chronic CVD medication dosing frequency on medication adherence. A search of Medline and Embase from 1986 to December 2011 was performed. Included studies used a prospective design, assessed adults with chronic CVDs, evaluated scheduled oral medications administered one to four times daily, and measured adherence for ≥1 month using an electronic monitoring device. Mixed linear model meta-regression was used to determine how dosing frequency affected adherence using three definitions of increasing strictness: taking, regimen and timing adherence. A total of 29 studies, comprising 41, 29, and 27 dosing frequency arms for the taking, regimen and timing adherence definitions were included. Crude pooled adherence estimates were highest when the lenient taking definition was assessed (range for dosing frequencies: 80.1%-93.1%), and lowest when the strictest timing definition was assessed (range: 57.1%-76.3%). Upon meta-regression, the adjusted weighted mean percentage adherence for twice and three times daily dosing regimens (no studies evaluated four times daily regimens), were 6.9% and 13.7% lower than once daily regimens for the taking, 14.0% and 27.5% lower for the regimen, and 22.9% and 30.4% lower for the timing adherence definition (p adherent with once daily dosing compared with more frequently scheduled chronic CVD medication regimens. This finding is magnified when more stringent definitions of adherence are used.

  6. Effect of plasma actuator and splitter plate on drag coefficient of a circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbıyık Hürrem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental study on flow control around a circular cylinder with splitter plate and plasma actuator is investigated. The study is performed in wind tunnel for Reynolds numbers at 4000 and 8000. The wake region of circular cylinder with a splitter plate is analyzed at different angles between 0 and 180 degrees. In this the study, not only plasma actuators are activated but also splitter plate is placed behind the cylinder. A couple electrodes are mounted on circular cylinder at ±90 degrees. Also, flow visualization is achieved by using smoke wire method. Drag coefficient of the circular cylinder with splitter plate and the plasma actuator are obtained for different angles and compared with the plain circular cylinder. While attack angle is 0 degree, drag coefficient is decreased about 20% by using the splitter plate behind the circular cylinder. However, when the plasma actuators are activated, the improvement of the drag reduction is measured to be 50%.

  7. Fully Coupled Simulation of the Plasma Liquid Interface and Interfacial Coefficient Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Lindsay, Alexander; Shannon, Steven

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of coupled plasma-liquid systems because of their applications to biomedicine, biological and chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other areas. Without an understanding of the near-surface gas dynamics, modellers are left to make assumptions about the interfacial conditions. For instance it is commonly assumed that the surface loss or sticking coefficient of gas-phase electrons at the interface is equal to 1. In this work we explore the consequences of this assumption and introduce a couple of ways to think about the electron interfacial condition. In one set of simulations we impose a kinetic condition with varying surface loss coefficient on the gas phase interfacial electrons. In a second set of simulations we introduce a Henry's law like condition at the interface in which the gas-phase electron concentration is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium with the liquid-phase electron concentration. It is shown that for a range of electron Henry coefficients spa...

  8. Effective dose efficiency: an application-specific metric of quality and dose for digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T; Dobbins, James T III; Ravin, Carl E, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the effective DQE (eDQE) are relevant metrics of image quality for digital radiography detectors and systems, respectively. The current study further extends the eDQE methodology to technique optimization using a new metric of the effective dose efficiency (eDE), reflecting both the image quality as well as the effective dose (ED) attributes of the imaging system. Using phantoms representing pediatric, adult and large adult body habitus, image quality measurements were made at 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp using the standard eDQE protocol and exposures. ED was computed using Monte Carlo methods. The eDE was then computed as a ratio of image quality to ED for each of the phantom/spectral conditions. The eDQE and eDE results showed the same trends across tube potential with 80 kVp yielding the highest values and 120 kVp yielding the lowest. The eDE results for the pediatric phantom were markedly lower than the results for the adult phantom at spatial frequencies lower than 1.2-1.7 mm{sup -1}, primarily due to a correspondingly higher value of ED per entrance exposure. The relative performance for the adult and large adult phantoms was generally comparable but affected by kVps. The eDE results for the large adult configuration were lower than the eDE results for the adult phantom, across all spatial frequencies (120 and 140 kVp) and at spatial frequencies greater than 1.0 mm{sup -1} (80 and 100 kVp). Demonstrated for chest radiography, the eDE shows promise as an application-specific metric of imaging performance, reflective of body habitus and radiographic technique, with utility for radiography protocol assessment and optimization.

  9. Modeling of biological doses and mechanical effects on bone transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Romain; Jennane, Rachid; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.003

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress, hormones like parathyroid and mineral elements like calcium mediate the amplitude of stimulus signal which affects the rate of bone remodeling. The current study investigates the theoretical effects of different metabolic doses in stimulus signal level on bone. The model was built considering the osteocyte as the sensing center mediated by coupled mechanical shear stress and some biological factors. The proposed enhanced model was developed based on previously published works dealing with different aspects of bone transduction. It describes the effects of physiological doses variations of Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 on the stimulus level sensed by osteocytes in response to applied shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow. We retained the metabolic factors (Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandin E2) as parameters of bone cell mechanosensitivity because stimulation/inhibition of induced pathways stimulates osteogenic response in vivo. We t...

  10. [Doses-related effects of lynestrenol on ovulation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, M A; Thomas, K; Ferin, J

    1976-01-01

    8 women, aged 22-28, with normal, ovulatory menstrual cycles, volunteered to take different doses of Lynestrenol to determine its effects on Luteineizing Hormone (LH) secretion, and on plasma progesterone levels. Blood samples were taken in the morning and plasma was immediately separated. Results showed that body temperature varied unpredictably during the cycle, and therefore could not be considered a reliable parameter of ovulation. 0.35 mg of Lynestrenol administered daily was enough to suppress ovulation, as evidenced by the absence of LH during midcycle. Although differences exists in individual reactions, administration of Lynestrenol beyond 0.6 mg. daily always suppresses ovulation because of hypothalamo-pituitary inhibition, while doses below 0.5mg. daily can bring about episodic peaks. It is still not clear how Lynestrenol influences gonadotropins, especially LH, while intermittent bleeding seems to be the only sure side effect.

  11. Research on Effective Electric-Mechanical Coupling Coefficient of Sandwich Type Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Transducer Using Bending Vibration Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model on electromechanical coupling coefficient and the length optimization of a bending piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer are proposed. The piezoelectric transducer consists of 8 PZT elements sandwiched between four thin electrodes, and the PZT elements are clamped by a screwed connection between fore beam and back beam. Firstly, bending vibration model of the piezoelectric transducer is built based on the Timoshenko beam theory. Secondly, the analytical model of effective electromechanical coupling coefficient is built based on the bending vibration model. Energy method and electromechanical equivalent circuit method are involved in the modelling process. To validate the analytical model, sandwich type piezoelectric transducer example in second order bending vibration mode is analysed. Effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of the transducer is optimized with simplex reflection technique, and the optimized ratio of length of the transducers is obtained. Finally, experimental prototypes of the sandwich type piezoelectric transducers are fabricated. Bending vibration mode and impedance of the experimental prototypes are tested, and electromechanical coupling coefficient is obtained according to the testing results. Results show that the analytical model is in good agreement with the experimental model.

  12. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  13. Fully coupled simulation of the plasma liquid interface and interfacial coefficient effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander D.; Graves, David B.; Shannon, Steven C.

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of coupled plasma-liquid systems because of their applications to biomedicine, biological and chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other areas. Optimizing these applications requires a fundamental understanding of the coupling between phases. Though much progress has been made in this regard, there is still more to be done. One area that requires more research is the transport of electrons across the plasma-liquid interface. Some pioneering works (Rumbach et al 2015 Nat. Commun. 6, Rumbach et al 2015 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 48 424001) have begun revealing the near-surface liquid characteristics of electrons. However, there has been little work to determine the near-surface gas phase electron characteristics. Without an understanding of the near-surface gas dynamics, modellers are left to make assumptions about the interfacial conditions. For instance it is commonly assumed that the surface loss or sticking coefficient of gas-phase electrons at the interface is equal to 1. In this work we explore the consequences of this assumption and introduce a couple of ways to think about the electron interfacial condition. In one set of simulations we impose a kinetic condition with varying surface loss coefficient on the gas phase interfacial electrons. In a second set of simulations we introduce a Henry’s law like condition at the interface in which the gas-phase electron concentration is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium with the liquid-phase electron concentration. It is shown that for a range of electron Henry coefficients spanning a range of known hydrophilic specie Henry coefficients, the gas phase electron density in the anode can vary by orders of magnitude. Varying reflection of electrons by the interface also has consequences for the electron energy profile; increasing reflection may lead to increasing thermalization of electrons depending on choices about the electron energy boundary condition. This variation

  14. Electrode size and boundary condition independent measurement of the effective piezoelectric coefficient of thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stewart

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the piezoelectric coefficient of thin films using interferometry is hindered by bending contributions. Using finite element analysis (FEA simulations, we show that the Lefki and Dormans approximations using either single or double-beam measurements cannot be used with finite top electrode sizes. We introduce a novel method for characterising piezoelectric thin films which uses a differential measurement over the discontinuity at the electrode edge as an internal reference, thereby eliminating bending contributions. This step height is shown to be electrode size and boundary condition independent. An analytical expression is derived which gives good agreement with FEA predictions of the step height.

  15. The coefficient of determination R(2) and intra-class correlation coefficient from generalized linear mixed-effects models revisited and expanded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shinichi; Johnson, Paul C D; Schielzeth, Holger

    2017-09-01

    The coefficient of determination R(2) quantifies the proportion of variance explained by a statistical model and is an important summary statistic of biological interest. However, estimating R(2) for generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) remains challenging. We have previously introduced a version of R(2) that we called [Formula: see text] for Poisson and binomial GLMMs, but not for other distributional families. Similarly, we earlier discussed how to estimate intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) using Poisson and binomial GLMMs. In this paper, we generalize our methods to all other non-Gaussian distributions, in particular to negative binomial and gamma distributions that are commonly used for modelling biological data. While expanding our approach, we highlight two useful concepts for biologists, Jensen's inequality and the delta method, both of which help us in understanding the properties of GLMMs. Jensen's inequality has important implications for biologically meaningful interpretation of GLMMs, whereas the delta method allows a general derivation of variance associated with non-Gaussian distributions. We also discuss some special considerations for binomial GLMMs with binary or proportion data. We illustrate the implementation of our extension by worked examples from the field of ecology and evolution in the R environment. However, our method can be used across disciplines and regardless of statistical environments. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Regional radiation dose susceptibility within the parotid gland: Effects on salivary loss and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Haley, E-mail: hdclark@phas.ubc.ca; Reinsberg, Stefan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hovan, Allan [Oral Oncology/Dentistry, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Thomas, Steven [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Xerostomia is one of the most likely late toxic effects of radiotherapy treatment in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Modern treatment techniques can incorporate knowledge of complication risk into treatment plans. To this end, the authors attempt to quantify the regional radiotherapy dose-dependence of salivary output loss and recovery in a prospective study. Methods: Salivary output was collected from patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment for head-and-neck cancers at the BC Cancer Agency between February 2008 and May 2013. Regional dose-dependence (i.e., dose susceptibility) of loss and recovery is quantified using nonparametric (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients, local linear regression) and parametric (least-sum of squares, least-median of squares) techniques. Results: Salivary flow recovery was seen in 79 of 102 patients considered (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon sign rank test). Output loss was strongly correlated with left- and right parotid combined dose φ = min (D{sub L},  45 Gy) + min (D{sub R},  45 Gy), and can be accurately predicted. Median early loss (three months) was 72% of baseline, while median overall loss (1 yr) was 56% of baseline. Fitting an exponential model to whole parotid yields dose sensitivities A{sub 3m} = 0.0604 Gy{sup −1} and A{sub 1y} = 0.0379 Gy{sup −1}. Recovery was not significantly associated with dose. Hints of lateral organ sub-segment dose–response dimorphism were observed. Conclusions: Sub-segmentation appears to predict neither loss nor recovery with any greater precision than whole parotid mean dose, though it is not any worse. Sparing the parotid to a combined dose φ of <50 Gy is recommended for a patient to keep ≈40% of baseline function and thus avoid severe xerostomia at 12 months post-treatment. It seems unlikely that a population’s mean recovery will exceed 20%–30% of baseline output at 1 yr after radiotherapy treatment using current (whole-organ based) clinical guidelines.

  17. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  18. STRESS ANALYSIS IN CUTTING TOOLS COATED TiN AND EFFECT OF THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT IN TOOL-CHIP INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay ASLANTAŞ

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The coated tools are regularly used in today's metal cutting industry. Because, it is well known that thin and hard coatings can reduce tool wear, improve tool life and productivity. Such coatings have significantly contributed to the improvements cutting economies and cutting tool performance through lower tool wear and reduced cutting forces. TiN coatings have especially high strength and low friction coefficients. During the cutting process, low friction coefficient reduce damage in cutting tool. In addition, maximum stress values between coating and substrate also decrease as the friction coefficient decreases. In the present study, stress analysis is carried out for HSS (High Speed Steel cutting tool coated with TiN. The effect of the friction coefficient between tool and chip on the stresses developed at the cutting tool surface and interface of coating and HSS is investigated. Damage zones during cutting process was also attempted to determine. Finite elements method is used for the solution of the problem and FRANC2D finite element program is selected for numerical solutions.

  19. Effect Of Beauveria Bassiana Doses On Spodoptera Litura Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Rini Indriyanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Beauveria bassiana is a parasitic mold for insect it is commonly used as a control agent. Spodoptera litura is insect pest attacked tobacco plants in Salatiga. This studied would give analysis the effectiveness of B. Bassiana on S. litura larvae mortality with various doses. B. bassiana was obtained from Estate Crop Protection Board BPTBUN in Salatiga Central Java as dust formulation. The S. litura. larvae were obtained from tobacco farm then adapted to laboratory environment for two days before used for Bioessay. There were five different doses treatment 1g 100 mL-1 2g 100 mL-1 4g 100 mL-1 8g 100 mL-1 and 0 g 100 mL-1 as control. Each treatment used 10 larvae and repeated five times. The result showed that B. bassiana with 8 g100 mL-1 concentration was more effective to kill S.litura larvae than others doses. The important finding of this research is that B. Bassiana can be used to control S. litura larvae safely and not pollute the environment.

  20. Effects of molecular weight on the diffusion coefficient of aquatic dissolved organic matter and humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, J; Guéguen, C

    2015-01-01

    In situ measurements of labile metal species using diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) passive samplers are based on the diffusion rates of individual species. Although most studies have dealt with chemically isolated humic substances, the diffusion of dissolved organic matter (DOM) across the hydrogel is not well understood. In this study, the diffusion coefficient (D) and molecular weight (MW) of 11 aquatic DOM and 4 humic substances (HS) were determined. Natural, unaltered aquatic DOM was capable of diffusing across the diffusive gel membrane with D values ranging from 2.48×10(-6) to 5.31×10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). Humic substances had diffusion coefficient values ranging from 3.48×10(-6) to 6.05×10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), congruent with previous studies. Molecular weight of aquatic DOM and HS samples (∼500-1750 Da) measured using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) strongly influenced D, with larger molecular weight DOM having lower D values. No noticeable changes in DOM size properties were observed during the diffusion process, suggesting that DOM remains intact following diffusion across the diffusive gel. The influence of molecular weight on DOM mobility will assist in further understanding and development of the DGT technique and the uptake and mobility of contaminants associated with DOM in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of silicide/silicon hetero-junction structure on thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wonchul; Park, Young-Sam; Hyun, Younghoon; Zyung, Taehyoung; Kim, Jaehyeon; Kim, Soojung; Jeon, Hyojin; Shin, Mincheol; Jang, Moongyu

    2013-12-01

    We fabricated a thermoelectric device with a silicide/silicon laminated hetero-structure by using RF sputtering and rapid thermal annealing. The device was observed to have Ohmic characteristics by I-V measurement. The temperature differences and Seebeck coefficients of the proposed silicide/silicon laminated and bulk structure were measured. The laminated thermoelectric device shows suppression of heat flow from the hot to cold side. This is supported by the theory that the atomic mass difference between silicide and silicon creates a scattering center for phonons. The major impact of our work is that phonon transmission is suppressed at the interface between silicide and silicon without degrading electrical conductivity. The estimated thermal conductivity of the 3-layer laminated device is 126.2 +/- 3.7 W/m. K. Thus, by using the 3-layer laminated structure, thermal conductivity is reduced by around 16% compared to bulk silicon. However, the Seebeck coefficient of the thermoelectric device is degraded compared to that of bulk silicon. It is understood that electrical conductivity is improved by using silicide as a scattering center.

  2. Effect of Boundary-Layer Bleed Hole Inclination Angle and Scaling on Flow Coefficient Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorn, Michael B.; Barnhart, Paul J.; Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Phase II data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments study at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented which include flow coefficient behavior for 21 bleed hole configurations. The bleed configurations are all round holes with hole diameters ranging from 0.795 to 6.35 mm, hole inclination angles from 20deg to 90deg, and thickness-to-diameter ratios from 0.25 to 2.0. All configurations were tested at a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m and at discrete local Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92. Interactions between the design parameters of hole diameter, hole inclination angle, and thickness-to-diameter as well as the interactions between the flow parameters of pressure ratio and Mach number upon the flow coefficient are examined, and a preliminary statistical model is proposed. An existing correlation is also examined with respect to this data.

  3. Effects of exposure imprecision on estimation of the benchmark dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    In regression analysis failure to adjust for imprecision in the exposure variable is likely to lead to underestimation of the exposure effect. However, the consequences of exposure error for determination of safe doses of toxic substances have so far not received much attention. The benchmark...... approach is one of the most widely used methods for development of exposure limits. An important advantage of this approach is that it can be applied to observational data. However, in this type of data, exposure markers are seldom measured without error. It is shown that, if the exposure error is ignored......, then the benchmark approach produces results that are biased toward higher and less protective levels. It is therefore important to take exposure measurement error into account when calculating benchmark doses. Methods that allow this adjustment are described and illustrated in data from an epidemiological study...

  4. The Influence of Biot’s Coefficient on the Estimation of Effective Stress on Deep Sea Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awadalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    In this paper we addresse the changes in physical properties of the Eocene and Paleocene shale from the Atlantic Basin, as a function of burial diagenesis. We also showed the influence of using correct Biot’s coefficient (β) on the estimation of vertical effective stress. We correlated our porosity...... and P-wave velocity data with the calculated effective stresses to show how different calculated vertical effective stress influences shale compaction trends. This may provide a basis to understand how physical properties vary with effective stress and shale mineralogy. Our results may be relevant...

  5. Effect of Substrate and Process Parameters on the Gas-Substrate Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient During Cold Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Amirhossein; McDonald, André

    2017-11-01

    The final quality of cold-sprayed coatings can be significantly influenced by gas-substrate heat exchange, due to the dependence of the deposition efficiency of the particles on the substrate temperature distribution. In this study, the effect of the air temperature and pressure, as process parameters, and surface roughness and thickness, as substrate parameters, on the convective heat transfer coefficient of the impinging air jet was investigated. A low-pressure cold spraying unit was used to generate a compressed air jet that impinged on a flat substrate. A comprehensive mathematical model was developed and coupled with experimental data to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and the surface temperature of the substrate. The effect of the air total temperature and pressure on the heat transfer coefficient was studied. It was found that increasing the total pressure would increase the Nusselt number of the impinging air jet, while total temperature of the air jet had negligible effect on the Nusslet number. It was further found that increasing the roughness of the substrate enhanced the heat exchange between the impinging air jet and the substrate. As a result, higher surface temperatures on the rough substrate were measured. The study of the effect of the substrate thickness on the heat transfer coefficient showed that the Nusselt number that was predicted by the model was independent of the thickness of the substrate. The surface temperature profile, however, decreased in increasing radial distances from the stagnation point of the impinging jet as the thickness of the substrate increased. The results of the current study were aimed to inform on the influence and effect of substrate and process parameters on the gas-substrate heat exchange and the surface temperature of the substrate on the final quality of cold-sprayed coatings.

  6. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  7. Mixed-effects varying-coefficient model with skewed distribution coupled with cause-specific varying-coefficient hazard model with random-effects for longitudinal-competing risks data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Wang, Min; Liu, Guangying; Dong, Guang-Hui; Qian, Feng

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that there is strong relationship between HIV viral load and CD4 cell counts in AIDS studies. However, the relationship between them changes during the course of treatment and may vary among individuals. During treatments, some individuals may experience terminal events such as death. Because the terminal event may be related to the individual's viral load measurements, the terminal mechanism is non-ignorable. Furthermore, there exists competing risks from multiple types of events, such as AIDS-related death and other death. Most joint models for the analysis of longitudinal-survival data developed in literatures have focused on constant coefficients and assume symmetric distribution for the endpoints, which does not meet the needs for investigating the nature of varying relationship between HIV viral load and CD4 cell counts in practice. We develop a mixed-effects varying-coefficient model with skewed distribution coupled with cause-specific varying-coefficient hazard model with random-effects to deal with varying relationship between the two endpoints for longitudinal-competing risks survival data. A fully Bayesian inference procedure is established to estimate parameters in the joint model. The proposed method is applied to a multicenter AIDS cohort study. Various scenarios-based potential models that account for partial data features are compared. Some interesting findings are presented.

  8. Effects of Adopting Different Kinds of Collecting Method for Years on Film Residual Coefficient and Maize Yields

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Wen-Xue; MA Zhong-ming; Wei, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Wide usage of mulching technology has increased crop yields, but the large amounts of mulching film residue resulting from widespread use of plastic film in China has brought about a series of pollution hazards. Based on a 4-year (2011-2014) long-term experiment, the effects of different kinds of collecting mothod (zero plastic film residues, conventional plastic film residues, whole plastic film residues remainded) on plastic film residues, residual coefficient and maize yield were explored....

  9. Determination of attenuation factors for mortar of barite in terms of environmental dose equivalent and effective dose; Determinacao de fatores de atenuacao para argamassa de barita em termos do equivalente de dose ambiental e dose efetiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T.; Campos, L.L.R., E-mail: airtontavares@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araujo, F.G.S. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Santos, M.A.P. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Nogueira, M.S., E-mail: mnogueira@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimeto da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work addresses the characterization of barite mortars used as Xray shielding materials through the following quantities: mass attenuation coefficient, air kerma, effective dose and ambient dose - H⁎(10). The experiment was carried out with the use of the following reference qualities: RQR4, RQR6, RQR9 e RQR10, specified in accordance with norm IEC 61267: Medical diagnostic Xray equipment - radiation conditions for use in the determination of characteristics. In this study values was determined experimentally for the attenuation of the Cream barite (density 2.99g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Sao Paulo), Purple barite (density 2.95g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Bahia) and White barite (density 3.10g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Paraiba). These materials, in the form of mortar, were disposed in the form of squares namely poof bodies, whose dimensions were 10 x 10 cm and thickness ranging from 3 to 15 mm approximately. In the experimental procedure, these proof bodies were irradiated with a Pantak, model HF320 industrial X-ray apparatus. The potentials applied to the respective X-ray tube were: 60kV, 80kV, 120kV and 150kV at a constant current of 1mA. The attenuation responses in function of thickness, for each of the materials analyzed, were used to draw the attenuation and transmission curves. The efficiency of the barite studied concerning the capacity to attenuate X-ray radiation for X-ray beams ranging from 60 to 150 kV indicated.

  10. Dose uncertainty due to aperture effects in dynamic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, P D; Alaei, P

    2006-07-01

    Dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation therapy requires accurate modeling of the beamlets that comprise each treatment segment. Planning systems such as Varian Eclipse and Philips Pinnacle recommend measuring dose distributions and output factors for fields as small as possible, generally down to at least 2 x 2 cm2. Conventionally, we perform these measurements for regular fields, defined by the secondary collimators. In practice, it is the multileaf collimation system (MLC) that defines the intensity map and provides dynamic dose modulation in either a moving window or segmented step-and-shoot mode. For this review we have only considered the latter delivery mode. Using this method, we have studied aperture motion effects on the dynamic collimator scatter (S(c)), total scatter (S(c,p)), and phantom scatter (S(p)) factors for various combinations of collimator settings (4 x 4-14 x 40 cm2) and dynamically stepped leaf gaps (0.1 to 1.0 cm) in comparison with those for static field factors. For two different Varian linear accelerators, we found similar results in a systematic dependence of collimator scatter on gap width and collimator setting. As the gap increases from 0.1 to 1.0 cm the dynamic collimator scatter factors converge from a maximum difference of about 30% toward the static field values. At the same time, there is no measurable difference between dynamic field phantom scatter factors and those conventionally obtained for static fields. Second, we evaluated the two planning systems as to how well they account for collimator scatter by attempting to mimic the dynamic apertures used above by planning and measuring dose distributions to several small, cylindrical targets for a similar range of fixed collimator settings. We found that the ratio of measured-to-planned doses as a function of target size were similar to the measured, dynamic S(c) data for the Varian Eclipse planning system, indicating underestimation of dose for targets smaller than 1 cm

  11. Effect of Dose Rate Variation on Dose Distribution in IMRT with a Dynamic Multileaf Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyoung Dal; Jae, Young Wan; Yoon, Il Kyu; Lee, Jae Hee; Yoo, Suk Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate dose distribution differences when the dose rates are randomly changed in intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a dynamic multileaf collimator. Two IMRT treatment plans including small-field and large-field plans were made using a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan had three sub-plans according to various dose rates of 100, 400, and 600 MU/min. A chamber array (2D-Array Seven729, PTW-Freiburg) was positioned between solid water phantom slabs to give measurement depth of 5 cm and backscattering depth of 5 cm. Beam deliveries were performed on the array detector using a 6 MV beam of a linear accelerator (Clinac 21EX, Varian, Palo Alto, CA) equipped with 120-leaf MLC (Millenium 120, Varian). At first, the beam was delivered with same dose rates as planned to obtain reference values. After the standard measurements, dose rates were then changed as follows: 1) for plans with 100 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min, 2) for plans with 400 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 500 and 600 MU/min, 3) for plans with 600 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Finally, using an analysis software (Verisoft 3.1, PTW-Freiburg), the dose difference and distribution between the reference and dose-rate-varied measurements was evaluated. For the small field plan, the local dose differences were -0.8, -1.1, -1.3, -1.5, and -1.6% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100 MU/min reference), +0.9, +0.3, +0.1, -0.2, and -0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 400 MU/min reference) and +1.4, +0.8, +0.5, +0.3, and +0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 MU/min, respectively (for 600 MU/min reference). On the other hand, for the large field plan, the pass-rate differences were -1.3, -1.6, -1.8, -2.0, and -2.4% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100

  12. Flow distributions and discharge coefficient effects for jet array impingement with initial crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Isoda, Y.

    1982-01-01

    To model the impingement cooled mid-chord region of gas turbine airfoils in cases where an initial crossflow is present, the paper presents experimentally determined flow distributions for jet arrays with ten spanwise rows of holes, which range from uniform to highly nonuniform. The jet flow after impingement is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the impingement surface. The streamwise distributions and crossflow velocities are presented for ratios of the initial crossflow rate to the total jet flow rate ranging from zero to unity. For crossflow to jet velocity ratios greater than a value somewhat less than unity, jet orifice discharge coefficients do not remain constant, but decrease significantly, showing a secondary dependence on z/d, where z is the channel height and d is the jet hole diameter.

  13. Dose-related effects of alcohol on cognitive functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Dry

    Full Text Available We assessed the suitability of six applied tests of cognitive functioning to provide a single marker for dose-related alcohol intoxication. Numerous studies have demonstrated that alcohol has a deleterious effect on specific areas of cognitive processing but few have compared the effects of alcohol across a wide range of different cognitive processes. Adult participants (N = 56, 32 males, 24 females aged 18-45 years were randomized to control or alcohol treatments within a mixed design experiment involving multiple-dosages at approximately one hour intervals (attained mean blood alcohol concentrations (BACs of 0.00, 0.048, 0.082 and 0.10%, employing a battery of six psychometric tests; the Useful Field of View test (UFOV; processing speed together with directed attention; the Self-Ordered Pointing Task (SOPT; working memory; Inspection Time (IT; speed of processing independent from motor responding; the Traveling Salesperson Problem (TSP; strategic optimization; the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART; vigilance, response inhibition and psychomotor function; and the Trail-Making Test (TMT; cognitive flexibility and psychomotor function. Results demonstrated that impairment is not uniform across different domains of cognitive processing and that both the size of the alcohol effect and the magnitude of effect change across different dose levels are quantitatively different for different cognitive processes. Only IT met the criteria for a marker for wide-spread application: reliable dose-related decline in a basic process as a function of rising BAC level and easy to use non-invasive task properties.

  14. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h(-1)) with the dos...

  15. TID Effects in Space-like Variable Dose Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied with different types of TID dose rates. These include several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. The varying dose rate of a solar flare is the type of real total dose exposure that a space mission might see in lunar or Martian orbit. A comparison of these types of dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predicts the performance during a simulated space-like mission.

  16. Effect of low dose oral contraceptives on exercise performance.

    OpenAIRE

    Bryner, R W; Toffle, R C; Ullrich, I H; Yeater, R A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--to examine the effect of cycle phase or a low dose oral contraceptive on exercise performance in young women. METHODS--As controls, 15 men were tested twice by a maximal treadmill test (Vo2 max) and by an endurance run 14 d apart to determine performance variability from causes other than hormonal fluctuations. Ten women ages 18-30 were then tested for Vo2 max and endurance in the same way in both the follicular and the luteal phase (random order, ovulation assessed by sonography)....

  17. Mathematics anxiety and its effect on drug dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, W H; O'Neill, G P

    1989-10-01

    Eighty learners were randomly selected from 160 first-year nursing students enrolled in an urban community college nursing program in Ontario. They were subsequently divided into control and treatment groups to investigate the effects of different teaching methods on mathematics anxiety and the students' ability to accurately calculate fractional drug doses. The results obtained in this study indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the control and treatment groups in either mathematics anxiety levels or in arithmetic test performance. These findings counter many of those found in previous investigations. Reasons for these discrepancies are provided along with recommendations for present practice and future research.

  18. Effect of heat treatment on an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel evaluated by the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghanizadeh, Abbas; Farzi, Abolfazl [Islamic Azad Univ., Esfarayen (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2016-07-01

    The properties of metals can be substantially changed by various methods, one of them is using heat treatment processes. Moreover, ultrasonic testing is the most preferred and effective, nondestructive testing technique for characterization of mechanical material properties. Austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 serves in many applications due to high strength and corrosion resistance. In certain applications, it is important to evaluate the mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel. In this study, the ultrasonic method (attenuation measurement technique) is used to evaluate the hardness of AISI 304 stainless steel samples which were heat treated at different levels. Due to the heat treatment process, each sample has its specific microstructure and hardness which attenuate ultrasonic waves appropriately. The ultrasonic and hardness test show that it is possible to evaluate the hardness of AISI 304 stainless steel by ultrasonic attenuation coefficient. In addition, the relationship between ultrasonic attenuation coefficients and time of heat treatment is investigated.

  19. Evaluation of equivalent and effective dose by KAP for patient and orthopedic surgeon in vertebral compression fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Felipe A.; Galeano, Diego C.; Santos, William S.; Silva, Ademir X.; Souza, Susana O.; Carvalho Júnior, Albérico B.

    2017-03-01

    Clinical scenarios were virtually modeled to estimate both the equivalent and effective doses normalized by KAP (Kerma Area Product) to vertebra compression fracture surgery in patient and surgeon. This surgery is known as kyphoplasty and involves the use of X-ray equipment, the C-arm, which provides real-time images to assist the surgeon in conducting instruments inserted into the patient and in the delivery of surgical cement into the fractured vertebra. The radiation transport code used was MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and a pair of UFHADM (University of Florida Hybrid ADult Male) virtual phantoms. The developed scenarios allowed us to calculate a set of equivalent dose (HT) and effective dose (E) for patients and surgeons. In additional, the same scenario was calculated KAP in the tube output and was used for calculating conversion coefficients (E/KAP and HT/KAP). From the knowledge of the experimental values of KAP and the results presented in this study, it is possible to estimate absolute values of effective doses for different exposure conditions. In this work, we developed scenarios with and without the surgical table with the purpose of comparison with the existing data in the literature. The absence of the bed in the scenario promoted a percentage absolute difference of 56% in the patient effective doses in relation to scenarios calculated with a bed. Regarding the surgeon, the use of the personal protective equipment (PPE) reduces between 75% and 79% the effective dose and the use of the under table shield (UTS) reduces the effective dose of between 3% and 7%. All these variations emphasize the importance of the elaboration of virtual scenarios that approach the actual clinical conditions generating E/KAP and HT/KAP closer to the actual values.

  20. Effective dose and organ doses estimation taking tube current modulation into account with a commercial software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rendon, X. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, H.; Zanca, F. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, R. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the effect of including tube current modulation (TCM) versus using the average mAs in estimating organ and effective dose (E) using commercial software. Forty adult patients (24 females, 16 males) with normal BMI underwent chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) performed with TCM at 120 kVp, reference mAs of 110 (chest) and 200 (abdomen). Doses to fully irradiated organs (breasts, lungs, stomach, liver and ovaries) and E were calculated using two versions of a dosimetry software: v.2.0, which uses the average mAs, and v.2.2, which accounts for TCM by implementing a gender-specific mAs profile. Student's t-test was used to assess statistically significant differences between organ doses calculated with the two versions. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was found for E on chest and abdomen CT, with E being lower by 4.2 % when TCM is considered. Similarly, organ doses were also significantly lower (p < 0.001): 13.7 % for breasts, 7.3 % for lungs, 9.1 % for the liver and 8.5 % for the stomach. Only the dose to the ovaries was higher with TCM (11.5 %). When TCM is used, for the stylized phantom, the doses to lungs, breasts, stomach and liver decreased while the dose to the ovaries increased. (orig.)

  1. Assimilation of river altimetry data for effective bed elevation and roughness coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brêda, João Paulo L. F.; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Bravo, Juan Martin; Passaia, Otávio

    2017-04-01

    Hydrodynamic models of large rivers are important prediction tools of river discharge, height and floods. However, these techniques still carry considerable errors; part of them related to parameters uncertainties related to river bathymetry and roughness coefficient. Data from recent spatial altimetry missions offers an opportunity to reduce parameters uncertainty through inverse methods. This study aims to develop and access different methods of altimetry data assimilation to improve river bottom levels and Manning roughness estimations in a 1-D hydrodynamic model. The case study was a 1,100 km reach of the Madeira River, a tributary of the Amazon. The tested assimilation methods are direct insertion, linear interpolation, SCE-UA global optimization algorithm and a Kalman Filter adaptation. The Kalman Filter method is composed by new physically based covariance functions developed from steady-flow and backwater equations. It is accessed the benefits of altimetry missions with different spatio-temporal resolutions, such as ICESAT-1, Envisat and Jason 2. Level time series of 5 gauging stations and 5 GPS river height profiles are used to assess and validate the assimilation methods. Finally, the potential of future missions are discussed, such as ICESAT-2 and SWOT satellites.

  2. Photochemical determination of O densities in the Martian thermosphere: Effect of a revised rate coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jane L.; Johnson, Austin S.; Ard, Shaun G.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the production and loss rates of O2+ in the photochemical equilibrium region of the Martian ionosphere near the subsolar point. We adopt neutral and ion densities measured by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatiles EvolutioN (MAVEN) Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS), electron densities and temperatures measured by the Langmuir Probe and Waves, and ion temperatures measured by the Supra-Thermal and Thermal Ion Composition instruments on the MAVEN spacecraft. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, we find that loss of O2+ by dissociative recombination is balanced mainly by production due to the reaction of O+ with CO2, with a smaller contribution due to the reaction of CO2+ with O. We find that the O densities derived from this calculation are larger than those measured by the NGIMS instrument by a factor that averages about 4 over the range of 130-155 km. This general conclusion is supported by a newly measured rate coefficient for the reaction of O with CO2+, which is smaller by a factor of about 6 than the only value in the literature, which was measured 47 years ago.

  3. Impact of implicit effects on uncertainties and sensitivities of the Doppler coefficient of a LWR pin cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursin, Mathieu; Leray, Olivier; Perret, Gregory; Pautz, Andreas; Bostelmann, Friederike; Aures, Alexander; Zwermann, Winfried

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, PSI and GRS sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods, SHARK-X and XSUSA respectively, are compared for reactivity coefficient calculation; for reference the results of the TSUNAMI and SAMPLER modules of the SCALE code package are also provided. The main objective of paper is to assess the impact of the implicit effect, e.g., considering the effect of cross section perturbation on the self-shielding calculation, on the Doppler coefficient SA and UQ. Analyses are done for a Light Water Reactor (LWR) pin cell based on Phase I of the UAM LWR benchmark. The negligence of implicit effects in XSUSA and TSUNAMI leads to deviations of a few percent between the sensitivity profiles compared to SAMPLER and TSUNAMI (incl. implicit effects) except for 238U elastic scattering. The implicit effect is much larger for the SHARK-X calculations because of its coarser energy group structure between 10 eV and 10 keV compared to the applied SCALE libraries. It is concluded that the influence of the implicit effect strongly depends on the energy mesh of the nuclear data library of the neutron transport solver involved in the UQ calculations and may be magnified by the response considered.

  4. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J [Dept. of Pediatrics, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, H [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B [Dept. of Bio-Convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  5. Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent from Internal Exposure to 222Rn in Ramsar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyeb Allahverdi Pourfallah

    2015-05-01

    It is clear that the annual effective dose from internal exposure to 222Rn in areas of Ramsar with high levels of natural radiation was significantly higher than the maximum annual effective dose permissible for public.

  6. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation coefficient and temperature gradient inside droplets. It is pointed out that for the parameters typical for Diesel engine-like conditions, the heat flux in the kinetic region is a linear function of the vapour temperature at the outer boundary of this region, but practically does not depend on vapour density at this boundary for all models, including and not including the effects of inelastic collisions, and including and not including the effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient. For any given temperature at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the heat flux are shown to decrease with increasing numbers of internal degrees of freedom of the molecules. The rate of this decrease is strong for small numbers of these degrees of freedom but negligible when the number of these degrees exceeds 20. This allows us to restrict the analysis to the first 20 arbitrarily chosen degrees of freedom of n-dodecane molecules when considering the effects of inelastic collisions. The mass flux at this boundary decreases almost linearly with increasing vapour density at the same location for all above-mentioned models. For any given vapour density at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the mass flux are smaller for the model, taking into account the contribution of internal degrees of freedom, than for the model ignoring these degrees of freedom. It is shown that the effects of inelastic collisions lead to stronger increase in the predicted droplet evaporation time in Diesel engine-like conditions relative to the hydrodynamic model, compared with the similar increase predicted by the kinetic model considering only elastic collisions. The effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient are shown to be

  7. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  8. Application of a simple phantom in assessing the effects of dose reduction on image quality in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbe, N.O. [Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, AB25 2ZD, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nneoyiegbe@yahoo.com; Heaton, B.; Sharp, P.F. [Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, AB25 2ZD, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Firstly, to evaluate a commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert by comparing exposure measurements on the phantom with those of actual patients and, secondly, to assess the value of the phantom for image quality and dose optimisation. Methods: In the first part of the study entrance surface doses (ESD), Beam transmission (BT), and optical density (OD) were obtained for 77 chest radiography patients and compared with measurements made from exposures of the phantom using the respective patient exposure factors from chest examination. Differences were assessed with a student t-test, while the Pearson's linear correlation coefficient was used to test for any linear relationship. The second part assessed the applicability of the phantom to image quality studies by investigating the effect, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions made from gelatine, of reducing patient dose below current dose levels. Clarity of linear objects of different dimensions was also studied. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (D{sub ref}) was assessed from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from D{sub ref}. Results: Results show that, with the exception of entrance doses and beam transmission through the diaphragm (P > 0.05), differences in OD and beam transmission between patients and phantom were statistically significant (P < 0.05). A Pearson's correlation test showed good positive correlation in ESD (r = 0.9) and beam transmission (r = 0.8) for all regions and a weaker positive correlation (r = 0.3) for OD in all areas. In both cases the correlation was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Extending dose reduction by between 41 and 65% below D{sub ref} produced significant changes in both clarity and detectability. Conclusion: Within limits posed by the observed differences, the

  9. Effect of interfacial turbulence and accommodation coefficient on CFD predictions of pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks are to a large extent affected by heat and mass transport across the liquid-vapor interface. These mechanisms are, in turn, controlled by the kinetics of the phase change process and the dynamics of the turbulent recirculating flows in the liquid and vapor phases. In this paper, the effects of accommodation coefficient and interfacial turbulence on tank pressurization and pressure control simulations are examined. Comparison between numerical predictions and ground-based measurements in two large liquid hydrogen tank experiments, performed in the K-site facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are used to show the impact of accommodation coefficient and interfacial and vapor phase turbulence on evolution of pressure and temperatures in the cryogenic storage tanks. In particular, the self-pressurization comparisons indicate that: (1) numerical predictions are essentially independent of the magnitude of the accommodation coefficient; and (2) surprisingly, laminar models sometimes provide results that are in better agreement with experimental self-pressurization rates, even in parametric ranges where the bulk flow is deemed fully turbulent. In this light, shortcomings of the present CFD models, especially, numerical treatments of interfacial mass transfer and turbulence, as coupled to the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) interface capturing scheme, are underscored and discussed.

  10. The dose and dose-rate effects of paternal irradiation on transgenerational instability in mice: a radiotherapy connection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safeer K Mughal

    Full Text Available The non-targeted effects of human exposure to ionising radiation, including transgenerational instability manifesting in the children of irradiated parents, remains poorly understood. Employing a mouse model, we have analysed whether low-dose acute or low-dose-rate chronic paternal γ-irradiation can destabilise the genomes of their first-generation offspring. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR locus Ms6-hm was established in DNA samples extracted from sperm of directly exposed BALB/c male mice, as well as from sperm and the brain of their first-generation offspring. For acute γ-irradiation from 10-100 cGy a linear dose-response for ESTR mutation induction was found in the germ line of directly exposed mice, with a doubling dose of 57 cGy. The mutagenicity of acute exposure to 100 cGy was more pronounced than that for chronic low-dose-rate irradiation. The analysis of transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation revealed that ESTR mutation frequencies were equally elevated in the germ line (sperm and brain of the offspring of fathers exposed to 50 and 100 cGy of acute γ-rays. In contrast, neither paternal acute irradiation at lower doses (10-25 cGy, nor low-dose-rate exposure to 100 cGy affected stability of their offspring. Our data imply that the manifestation of transgenerational instability is triggered by a threshold dose of acute paternal irradiation. The results of our study also suggest that most doses of human exposure to ionising radiation, including radiotherapy regimens, may be unlikely to result in transgenerational instability in the offspring children of irradiated fathers.

  11. Blood flow vs. venous pressure effects on filtration coefficient in oleic acid-injured lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglade, D; Corboz, M; Menaouar, A; Parker, J C; Sanou, S; Bayat, S; Benchetrit, G; Grimbert, F A

    1998-03-01

    On the basis of changes in capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) in 24 rabbit lungs, we determined whether elevations in pulmonary venous pressure (Ppv) or blood flow (BF) produced differences in filtration surface area in oleic acid-injured (OA) or control (Con) lungs. Lungs were cyclically ventilated and perfused under zone 3 conditions by using blood and 5% albumin with no pharmacological modulation of vascular tone. Pulmonary arterial, venous, and capillary pressures were measured by using arterial, venous, and double occlusion. Before and during each Kfc-measurement maneuver, microvascular/total vascular compliance was measured by using venous occlusion. Kfc was measured before and 30 min after injury, by using a Ppv elevation of 7 cmH2O or a BF elevation from 1 to 2 l . min-1 . 100 g-1 to obtain a similar double occlusion pressure. Pulmonary arterial pressure increased more with BF than with Ppv in both Con and OA lungs [29 +/- 2 vs. 19 +/- 0.7 (means +/- SE) cmH2O; P Kfc (200 +/- 40 vs. 83 +/- 14%, respectively; P < 0.01) and microvascular/total vascular compliance ratio (86 +/- 4 vs. 68 +/- 5%, respectively; P < 0.01) increased more with BF than with Ppv. In conclusion, for a given OA-induced increase in hydraulic conductivity, BF elevation increased filtration surface area more than did Ppv elevation. The steep pulmonary pressure profile induced by increased BF could result in the recruitment of injured capillaries and could also shift downstream the compression point of blind (zone 1) and open injured vessels (zone 2).

  12. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  13. Path coefficient analysis of the effects of stripe rust and cultivar mixtures on yield and yield components of winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanda, S I; Mundt, C C

    1996-05-01

    Four club wheat cultivars and three two-component cultivar mixtures, planted at five frequencies, were grown in three environments in both the presence and absence of stripe rust. The effect of stripe rust on wheat yield was through the yield components, with weight of individual seed being the component most affected by rust. In some cases, yield component compensation was indicated by the presence of negative correlations among the yield components. Path analysis of the yield components revealed that components with the highest correlations to yield also had the largest direct effects on yield. Of the yield components, number of heads per unit area exerted the largest direct influence on yield. The direct effects of number of seeds per head and weight of individual seed were similar, although number of seeds per head was more important in the absence of rust than in its presence. The pure stands and mixtures differed considerably with respect to correlation coefficients, but were very similar for direct effects of yield components on yield. Most of these discrepancies were due to opposing indirect effects, which were not evident from correlation coefficients alone.

  14. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S. J.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Monti Hughes, A.; Provenzano, L.; Koivunoro, H.; Carando, D. G.; Thorp, S. I.; Casal, M. R.; Bortolussi, S.; Trivillin, V. A.; Garabalino, M. A.; Curotto, P.; Heber, E. M.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Kankaanranta, L.; Joensuu, H.; Schwint, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  15. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S J; Pozzi, E C C; Monti Hughes, A; Provenzano, L; Koivunoro, H; Carando, D G; Thorp, S I; Casal, M R; Bortolussi, S; Trivillin, V A; Garabalino, M A; Curotto, P; Heber, E M; Santa Cruz, G A; Kankaanranta, L; Joensuu, H; Schwint, A E

    2017-10-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  16. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  17. Effects of a moderate evening alcohol dose. II: performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Tracy L; Acebo, Christine; Seifer, Ronald; Carskadon, Mary A

    2007-08-01

    This second of a pair of papers investigates the effects of a moderate dose of alcohol and staying up late on driving simulation performance and simple visual reaction time (RT) at a known circadian phase in well-rested young adults. Twenty-nine adults (9 males), ages 21 to 25 years, spent 1 week on an at-home stabilization schedule of 8.5 to 9 hours, followed by 3 nonconsecutive nights in-lab: adaptation, placebo, and alcohol. Performance task practice occurred on 3 occasions before the study. Alcohol (vodka; 0.54 g/kg men; 0.49 g/kg women mixed with tonic) was consumed over 30 minutes ending 1 hour before normal bedtime; the same quantity of beverage was given on placebo. Driving simulation (with drive-only and dual-task drive and subtract components) and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) testing occurred before and after alcohol/placebo ingestion. Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) readings were taken before all test sessions. Saliva samples were taken approximately every 30 minutes to determine circadian phase. Driving simulation and PVT variables significantly deteriorated with increasing time awake. Driving simulator lane variability was worse with alcohol compared with placebo at 15.5 hours awake. No PVT variable showed an effect of alcohol. Driving simulation performance deteriorated with extended waking and with alcohol; driving was most impaired at the peak alcohol level. The PVT, less complex than the driving simulation, did not show effects of alcohol, a finding consistent with previous literature that disruptive effects of low alcohol concentrations increase with task complexity. Overall, simulated driving performance is significantly impaired late at night when even a moderate dose of alcohol is consumed.

  18. Corticosteroids in acute severe asthma: effectiveness of low doses.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowler, S D; Mitchell, C. A.; Armstrong, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the need for corticosteroids in acute severe asthma is well established the appropriate dose is not known. METHODS: The response to intravenous hydrocortisone 50 mg (low dose), 100 mg (medium dose), and 500 mg (high dose), administered every six hours for 48 hours and followed by oral prednisone, was compared in patients with acute asthma in a double blind randomised study. After initial emergency treatment with bronchodilators subjects received oral theophylline or intra...

  19. The effect of microbubbles on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient and degradation rate of COD in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kangning; Chi, Yong; Wang, Fei; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    A commonly used aeration device at present has the disadvantages of low mass transfer rate because the generated bubbles are several millimeters in diameter which are much bigger than microbubbles. Therefore, the effect of a microbubble on gas-liquid mass transfer and wastewater treatment process was investigated. To evaluate the effect of each bubble type, the volumetric mass transfer coefficients for microbubbles and conventional bubbles were determined. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was 0.02905 s(-1) and 0.02191 s(-1) at a gas flow rate of 0.67 L min(-1) in tap water for microbubbles and conventional bubbles, respectively. The degradation rate of simulated municipal wastewater was also investigated, using aerobic activated sludge and ozone. Compared with the conventional bubble generator, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 2.04, 5.9, 3.26 times higher than those of the conventional bubble contactor at the same initial COD concentration of COD 200 mg L(-1), 400 mg L(-1), and 600 mg L(-1), while aerobic activated sludge was used. For the ozonation process, the rate of COD removal using microbubble generator was 2.38, 2.51, 2.89 times of those of the conventional bubble generator. Based on the results, the effect of initial COD concentration on the specific COD degradation rate were discussed in different systems. Thus, the results revealed that microbubbles could enhance mass transfer in wastewater treatment and be an effective method to improve the degradation of wastewater.

  20. Dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Mantovani, Fernanda B; Taylor, Polly M; Dixon, Mike J; Luna, Stelio P L

    2009-11-01

    The dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous (IV) buprenorphine were evaluated in cats. Thermal (TT) and mechanical threshold (MT) devices were used for nociceptive stimulation. After baseline threshold recordings, buprenorphine was administered IV (0.01, 0.02 or 0.04 mg/kg; B1, B2 and B4, respectively) in a randomised, blinded and cross-over study. Data were analysed by ANOVA (P<0.05) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). TT increased 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.2+/-2.7 degrees C), 2, 3 and 4 h after B1; 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.1+/-3.9 degrees C) and 2 h after B2, and 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.4+/-3.3 degrees C), 2, 3, 6 and 8 h after B4. MT increased 15 and 45 min after B2 (260+/-171 mmHg), and 30 (209+/-116 mmHg) and 45 min and 1 and 2 h after B4. At 45 min, MT values were significantly higher after B2 compared to B1 (P<0.05). With MT, B2 and B4 produced more antinociception and longer duration of action than B1, respectively. No dose response to thermal stimulation was detected.

  1. Bayesian designs of phase II oncology trials to select maximum effective dose assuming monotonic dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beibei; Li, Yisheng

    2014-07-29

    For many molecularly targeted agents, the probability of response may be assumed to either increase or increase and then plateau in the tested dose range. Therefore, identifying the maximum effective dose, defined as the lowest dose that achieves a pre-specified target response and beyond which improvement in the response is unlikely, becomes increasingly important. Recently, a class of Bayesian designs for single-arm phase II clinical trials based on hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative prior densities has been proposed and shown to outperform common Bayesian designs based on posterior credible intervals and common frequentist designs. We extend this and related approaches to the design of phase II oncology trials, with the goal of identifying the maximum effective dose among a small number of pre-specified doses. We propose two new Bayesian designs with continuous monitoring of response rates across doses to identify the maximum effective dose, assuming monotonicity of the response rate across doses. The first design is based on Bayesian hypothesis tests. To determine whether each dose level achieves a pre-specified target response rate and whether the response rates between doses are equal, multiple statistical hypotheses are defined using nonlocal alternative prior densities. The second design is based on Bayesian model averaging and also uses nonlocal alternative priors. We conduct simulation studies to evaluate the operating characteristics of the proposed designs, and compare them with three alternative designs. In terms of the likelihood of drawing a correct conclusion using similar between-design average sample sizes, the performance of our proposed design based on Bayesian hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative priors is more robust than that of the other designs. Specifically, the proposed Bayesian hypothesis test-based design has the largest probability of being the best design among all designs under comparison and the smallest probability of

  2. Effective Admittivity of Biological Tissues as a Coefficient of Elliptic PDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Keun Seo

    2013-01-01

    can be computed from pointwise admittivity by solving Maxwell equations. We compute the effective admittivity of simple models as a function of frequency to obtain Maxwell-Wagner interface effects and Debye relaxation starting from mathematical formulations. Finally, layer potentials are used to obtain the Maxwell-Wagner-Fricke expression for a dilute suspension of ellipses and membrane-covered spheres.

  3. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  4. Field-effect modulated Seebeck coefficient measurements in an organic polymer using a microfabricated on-chip architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Venkateshvaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an on-chip microfabricated architecture for high-accuracy gate voltage modulated Seebeck coefficient measurements on an organic field-effect transistor (FET. The microfabricated device comprises integrated heaters and temperature sensors that enable simultaneous Seebeck and FET measurements on devices with practical channel lengths on the order of 50 μm. We exemplify the capabilities of this architecture by investigating the transition from conduction in the semiconductor bulk to conduction in the accumulation layer of a conjugated polymer FET.

  5. Zero temperature coefficient of resistivity induced by photovoltaic effect in Y Ba2Cu3O6.96 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available I-V characteristics of YBCO-Ag system under blue laser (λ = 450 nm illumination were studied from 100 to 300 K and obvious photovoltaic effects were observed. All the I-V curves in the temperature range intersect at a point in the first quadrant while the laser points to the cathode electrode, indicating a zero temperature coefficient of resistivity. This implies that the outputting voltage keeps constant in a broad temperature range when a critical bias current is assigned. The intersection points of different laser intensities fall in a straight line, the slope of which (Rc is independent of temperature and laser intensity.

  6. Effect of Silicon on Activity Coefficients of Platinum in Liquid Fe-Si, With Application to Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Humayun, M.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's core contains approximately 10% of a light element that is likely a combination of S, C, Si, and O, with Si possibly being the most abundant light element. Si dissolved into Fe liquids can have a large effect on the magnitude of the activity coefficient of siderophile elements (SE) in Fe liquids, and thus the partitioning behavior of those elements between core and mantle. The effect of Si can be small such as for Ni and Co, or large such as for Mo, Ge, Sb, As. The effect of Si on many siderophile elements is unknown yet could be an important, and as yet unquantified, influence on the core-mantle partitioning of SE. Here we report new experiments designed to quantify the effect of Si on the partitioning of Pt (with Re and Ru in progress or planned) between metal and silicate melt. The results will be applied to Earth, for which we have excellent constraints on the mantle Pt concentrations.

  7. Resource Letter EIRLD-2: Effects of Ionizing Radiation at Low Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard

    2012-04-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on people at low doses. Journal articles, books and web pages are provided for the following: data at high dose levels, effects of moderate to high doses (leukemia, solid cancer, lung cancer, childhood cancer, and non-cancer outcomes), effects of dose rate, relationship to background, supra linearity and hormesis, and policy implications.

  8. Evaluation of gamma dose effect on PIN photodiode using analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Boorboor, S.

    2018-03-01

    The PIN silicon photodiodes are widely used in the applications which may be found in radiation environment such as space mission, medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Radiation-induced damage in these devices causes to degrade the photodiode parameters. In this work, we have used new approach to evaluate gamma dose effects on a commercial PIN photodiode (BPX65) based on an analytical model. In this approach, the NIEL parameter has been calculated for gamma rays from a 60Co source by GEANT4. The radiation damage mechanisms have been considered by solving numerically the Poisson and continuity equations with the appropriate boundary conditions, parameters and physical models. Defects caused by radiation in silicon have been formulated in terms of the damage coefficient for the minority carriers' lifetime. The gamma induced degradation parameters of the silicon PIN photodiode have been analyzed in detail and the results were compared with experimental measurements and as well as the results of ATLAS semiconductor simulator to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. The results showed reasonable agreement between them for BPX65 silicon photodiode irradiated by 60Co gamma source at total doses up to 5 kGy under different reverse voltages.

  9. Alcohol and cirrhosis: dose--response or threshold effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Grønbaek, Morten; Tolstrup, Janne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: General population studies have shown a strong association between alcohol intake and death from alcoholic cirrhosis, but whether this is a dose-response or a threshold effect remains unknown, and the relation among alcohol misusers has not been studied. METHODS: A cohort of 6152...... alcohol misusing men and women aged 15-83 were interviewed about drinking pattern and social issues and followed for 84,257 person-years. Outcome was alcoholic cirrhosis mortality. Data was analyzed by means of Cox-regression models. RESULTS: In this large prospective cohort study of alcohol misusers...... there was a 27 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in men and a 35 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in women compared to the Danish population. Number of drinks per day was not significantly associated with death from alcoholic cirrhosis, since there was no additional risk of death...

  10. Dose-dependent effects of atorvastatin on myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbarash O

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Olga Barbarash, Olga Gruzdeva, Evgenya Uchasova, Ekaterina Belik, Yulia Dyleva, Victoria KaretnikovaFederal State Budgetary Institution, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, the Russian Federation Background: Dyslipidemia is a key factor determining the development of both myocardial infarction (MI and its subsequent complications. Dyslipidemia is associated with endothelial dysfunction, activation of inflammation, thrombogenesis, and formation of insulin resistance. Statin therapy is thought to be effective for primary and secondary prevention of complications associated with atherosclerosis.Methods: This study examined 210 patients with Segment elevated MI (ST elevated MI who were treated with atorvastatin from the first 24 hours after MI. Group 1 (n=110 were given atorvastatin 20 mg/day. Group 2 (n=100 were given atorvastatin 40 mg/day. At days 1 and 12 after MI onset, insulin resistance levels determined by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, lipid profiles, and serum glucose, insulin, adipokine, and ghrelin levels were measured.Results: Free fatty acid levels showed a sharp increase during the acute phase of MI. Treatment with atorvastatin 20 mg/day, and especially with 40 mg/day, resulted in a decrease in free fatty acid levels. The positive effect of low-dose atorvastatin (20 mg/day is normalization of the adipokine status. Administration of atorvastatin 20 mg/day was accompanied with a statistically significant reduction in glucose levels (by 14% and C-peptide levels (by 38%, and a decrease in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index on day 12.Conclusion: Determination of atorvastatin dose and its use during the in-hospital period and subsequent periods should take into account changes in biochemical markers of insulin resistance and adipokine status in patients with MI.Keywords: myocardial infarction, statin, insulin resistance, adipokines

  11. More Dose-dependent Side Effects with Mercaptopurine over Azathioprine in IBD Treatment Due to Relatively Higher Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekman, Mark M T J; Coenen, Marieke J H; van Marrewijk, Corine J; Wanten, Geert J A; Wong, Dennis R; Verbeek, Andre L M; Klungel, Olaf H; Hooymans, Piet M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Derijks, Luc J J; de Jong, Dirk J

    2017-10-01

    There are substantial global differences in the preference for mercaptopurine (MP) or its prodrug azathioprine (AZA) as first-choice thiopurine to treat inflammatory bowel diseases. Studies comparing both agents are scarce. Our aim was to compare AZA and MP in thiopurine-naive patients with inflammatory bowel disease for the frequency of side effects and efficacy. Post hoc analysis of the "Thiopurine response Optimization by Pharmacogenetic testing in Inflammatory bowel disease Clinics" (TOPIC) trial, in which thiopurine-naive patients with inflammatory bowel disease with an indication for a thiopurine were randomized for a genotype-based dose versus standard of care. For this study, Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated to compare AZA and MP for discontinuation rates within 5 months, incidence of hepatotoxicity, leukopenia, and gastrointestinal side effects. Treatment efficacy was compared by logistic regression. Patient characteristics were similar for patients treated with AZA (n = 494, 64.4%) and MP (n = 273, 35.6%), yet patients with MP were relatively higher dosed compared with those on AZA. Discontinuation rates within 5 months were not different, 39.3% (AZA) and 38.1% (MP), HR 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.17; P = 0.50); however, patients on MP were more often subjected to dose reductions (30% versus 14%, P < 0.01). Higher rates of hepatotoxicity, HR 1.93 (95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.76; P < 0.01) and leukopenia, HR 2.55 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-4.30; P < 0.01) were observed with MP, which annulled in a secondary analysis with adjustment for the higher dose and metabolite levels. Patients treated with MP were relatively higher dosed, which resulted in more dose-dependent side effects and a higher rate of dose reductions.

  12. Effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for computed tomography in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Soo Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severely injured trauma patients are exposed to clinically significant radiation doses from computed tomography (CT imaging in the emergency department. Moreover, this radiation exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine some effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department. Methods We implemented the radiation dose reduction strategy in May 2009. A prospective observational study design was used to collect data from patients who met the inclusion criteria during this one year study (intervention group from May 2009 to April 2010. The prospective data were compared with data collected retrospectively for one year prior to the implementation of the radiation dose reduction strategy (control group. By comparison of the cumulative effective dose and the number of CT examinations in the two groups, we evaluated effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy. All the patients met the institutional adult trauma team activation criteria. The radiation doses calculated by the CT scanner were converted to effective doses by multiplication by a conversion coefficient. Results A total of 118 patients were included in this study. Among them, 33 were admitted before May 2009 (control group, and 85 were admitted after May 2009 (intervention group. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding baseline characteristics, such as injury severity and mortality. Additionally, there was no difference between the two groups in the mean number of total CT examinations per patient (4.8 vs. 4.5, respectively; p = 0.227. However, the mean effective dose of the total CT examinations per patient significantly decreased from 78.71 mSv to 29.50 mSv (p Conclusions The radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients effectively decreased the cumulative effective dose of the total

  13. Dose effects of raw soybean flour on pancreatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R G; Crass, R A; Oates, P S

    1986-01-01

    Raw soya flour (RSF) feeding to rats produces pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and, if sufficiently prolonged, the spontaneous development of pancreatic neoplasms and the potentiation of pancreatic carcinogens. With continuous exposure to RSF the threshold dose for pancreatic growth is approximately 20% RSF, but the threshold for the other effects has not been defined. If 100% RSF is fed for less than 24 weeks continuously the effects on the pancreas are completely reversible, but feeding for longer than this leads to irreversible progression to pancreatic adenoma and carcinoma over the next 50-70 weeks. Repeated alternation of the diet between 100% RSF and rat chow for prolonged periods leads to effects on the pancreas at least as marked as those seen with continuous RSF feeding. This occurs with RSF feeding for periods as short as 2 days out of 7. The effects seen in the rat must be applied to human nutrition with caution, but it is suggested that infants fed soya based milk substitutes and fad dieters who frequently radically alter dietary composition may be more susceptible to spontaneous or carcinogen-induced pancreatic neoplasms.

  14. Thickness dependence of anomalous Nernst coefficient and longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in ferromagnetic NixFe100-x films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Harsha; Fan, Xin; Celik, Halise; Han, Xiufeng; Xiao, John Q

    2017-07-21

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) measured for metallic ferromagnetic thin films in commonly used longitudinal configuration contains the contribution from anomalous Nernst effect (ANE). The ANE is considered to arise from the bulk of the ferromagnet (FM) and the proximity-induced FM boundary layer. We fabricate a FM alloy with zero Nernst coefficient to mitigate the ANE contamination of SSE and insert a thin layer of Cu to separate the heavy metal (HM) from the FM to avoid the proximity contribution. These modifications to the experiment should permit complete isolation of SSE from ANE in the longitudinal configuration. However, further thickness dependence studies and careful analysis of the results revealed, ANE contribution of the isolated FM alloy is twofold, surface and bulk. Both surface and bulk contributions, whose magnitudes are comparable to that of the SSE, can be modified by the neighboring layer. Hence surface contribution to the ANE in FM metals is an important effect that needs to be considered.

  15. Effect of gamma-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Pradeep K. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Department of Management Science, U.P. Technical University, Lucknow 226021 (India); Jha, Rakhi [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Ch. C.S. University, Meerut 200005 (India); Gupta, B.L. [CH3/56 Kendriya Vihar, Kharghar, Sector-11, Navi Mumbai-410 210 (India); Guha, Sujoy K., E-mail: guha_sk@yahoo.co [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of gamma-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min gamma-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy gamma-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  16. Effect of γ-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pradeep K.; Jha, Rakhi; Gupta, B. L.; Guha, Sujoy K.

    2010-05-01

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of γ-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG ® (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG ®. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min γ-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy γ-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  17. The use of equivalent radiation dose in the evaluation of late effects after childhood cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Irma W. E. M.; van Os, Rob M.; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; van der Pal, Helena J. H.; Koning, Caro C. E.; Caron, Huib N.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic research radiation-associated late effects after childhood cancer are usually analyzed without considering fraction dose. According to radiobiological principles, fraction dose is an important determinant of late effects. We aim to provide the rationale for using equivalent dose in

  18. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, Karen Mandrup; Boberg, Julie; Isling, Louise Krag

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in food contact materials, toys, and other products. Several studies have indicated that effects observed at doses near human exposure levels may not be observed at higher doses. Many studies have shown effects on mammary glands at low doses of BPA, however, because...

  19. Significance testing of synergistic/antagonistic, dose level-dependent, or dose ratio-dependent effects in mixture dose-response analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.J.; Svendsen, C.; Bedaux, J.J.; Bongers, M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, the state of the art for effect assessment of chemical mixtures is through multiple dose¿response analysis of single compounds and their combinations. Investigating whether such data deviate from the reference models of concentration addition and/or independent action to identify

  20. Absorbed organ and effective doses from digital intra-oral and panoramic radiography applying the ICRP 103 recommendations for effective dose estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, Christina; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ylhan, Betȕl; Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Ekestubbe, Annika

    2016-10-01

    During dental radiography, the salivary and thyroid glands are at radiation risk. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) updated the methodology for determining the effective dose, and the salivary glands were assigned tissue-specific weighting factors for the first time. The aims of this study were to determine the absorbed dose to the organs and to calculate, applying the ICRP publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, the effective doses delivered during digital intraoral and panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. The organ-absorbed doses were measured at 30 locations, representing different radiosensitive organs in the head and neck, and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP recommendations. The salivary glands and the oral mucosa received the highest absorbed doses from both intraoral and panoramic radiography. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination was 15 μSv and for panoramic radiography, the effective dose was in the range of 19-75 μSv, depending on the panoramic equipment used. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination is lower and that from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported. Clinicians should be aware of the higher effective dose delivered during panoramic radiography and the risk-benefit profile of this technique must be assessed for the individual patient. The effective dose of radiation from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported and there is large variability in the delivered radiation dosage among the different types of equipment used.

  1. Absorbed organ and effective doses from digital intra-oral and panoramic radiography applying the ICRP 103 recommendations for effective dose estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ylhan, Betȕl; Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Ekestubbe, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Objective: During dental radiography, the salivary and thyroid glands are at radiation risk. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) updated the methodology for determining the effective dose, and the salivary glands were assigned tissue-specific weighting factors for the first time. The aims of this study were to determine the absorbed dose to the organs and to calculate, applying the ICRP publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, the effective doses delivered during digital intraoral and panoramic radiography. Methods: Thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. The organ-absorbed doses were measured at 30 locations, representing different radiosensitive organs in the head and neck, and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP recommendations. Results: The salivary glands and the oral mucosa received the highest absorbed doses from both intraoral and panoramic radiography. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination was 15 μSv and for panoramic radiography, the effective dose was in the range of 19–75 μSv, depending on the panoramic equipment used. Conclusion: The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination is lower and that from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported. Clinicians should be aware of the higher effective dose delivered during panoramic radiography and the risk–benefit profile of this technique must be assessed for the individual patient. Advances in knowledge: The effective dose of radiation from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported and there is large variability in the delivered radiation dosage among the different types of equipment used. PMID:27452261

  2. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  3. Bias-corrected estimator for intraclass correlation coefficient in the balanced one-way random effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atenafu Eshetu G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs are used in a wide range of applications. However, most commonly used estimators for the ICC are known to be subject to bias. Methods Using second order Taylor series expansion, we propose a new bias-corrected estimator for one type of intraclass correlation coefficient, for the ICC that arises in the context of the balanced one-way random effects model. A simulation study is performed to assess the performance of the proposed estimator. Data have been generated under normal as well as non-normal scenarios. Results Our simulation results show that the new estimator has reduced bias compared to the least square estimator which is often referred to as the conventional or analytical estimator. The results also show marked bias reduction both in normal and non-normal data scenarios. In particular, our estimator outperforms the analytical estimator in a non-normal setting producing estimates that are very close to the true ICC values. Conclusions The proposed bias-corrected estimator for the ICC from a one-way random effects analysis of variance model appears to perform well in the scenarios we considered in this paper and can be used as a motivation to construct bias-corrected estimators for other types of ICCs that arise in more complex scenarios. It would also be interesting to investigate the bias-variance trade-off.

  4. Bias-corrected estimator for intraclass correlation coefficient in the balanced one-way random effects model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atenafu, Eshetu G; Hamid, Jemila S; To, Teresa; Willan, Andrew R; Feldman, Brian M; Beyene, Joseph

    2012-08-20

    Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) are used in a wide range of applications. However, most commonly used estimators for the ICC are known to be subject to bias. Using second order Taylor series expansion, we propose a new bias-corrected estimator for one type of intraclass correlation coefficient, for the ICC that arises in the context of the balanced one-way random effects model. A simulation study is performed to assess the performance of the proposed estimator. Data have been generated under normal as well as non-normal scenarios. Our simulation results show that the new estimator has reduced bias compared to the least square estimator which is often referred to as the conventional or analytical estimator. The results also show marked bias reduction both in normal and non-normal data scenarios. In particular, our estimator outperforms the analytical estimator in a non-normal setting producing estimates that are very close to the true ICC values. The proposed bias-corrected estimator for the ICC from a one-way random effects analysis of variance model appears to perform well in the scenarios we considered in this paper and can be used as a motivation to construct bias-corrected estimators for other types of ICCs that arise in more complex scenarios. It would also be interesting to investigate the bias-variance trade-off.

  5. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials used in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida J, A. T. [FUNDACENTRO, Centro Regional de Minas Gerais, Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Belo Horizonte, 30180-100 Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S. [Center of Development of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santos, M. A. P., E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br [Regional Center for Nuclear Science / CNEN, 50.740-540 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In this paper, the interaction of X-rays with some shielding materials has been studied for materials containing different amounts of barite and aggregates. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μ{sub t}) for three shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from RQR qualities (RQR-4, RQR-6, RQR-9, and RQR-10). They were: cream barite (density 2.99 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Sao Paulo), purple barite (density 2.95 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Bahia) and white barite (density 3.10 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Paraiba). The chemical analysis was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer model EDX-720, through dispersive energy. The six elements of the higher concentration found in the sample and analyzed by Spectrophotometry of Energy Dispersive X-ray for the samples were Ba(60.9% - white barite), Ca(17,92% - cream barite), Ce(3,60% - white barite), Fe(17,16% - purple barite), S(12,11% - white barite) and Si(29,61% - purple barite). Also, the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and the effective electron density (N{sub eff}) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined. (Author)

  6. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in painful bone metastases: Using quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient as an indicator of effectiveness of single fraction versus multiple fraction radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musio, Daniela; De Francesco, Irene; Galdieri, Alessandro; Marsecano, Claudia; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Napoli, Alessandro; De Felice, Francesca; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2018-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common cause of cancer-related pain. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal radiotherapy schedule for the treatment of painful bone metastases and verify if could cause different biological effects on bone. This has been achieved using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Fifteen patients received Multiple Fractions Radiation Therapy (MFRT) with a total dose of 30Gy in 10 daily fractions of 3Gy given over 2 weeks and 15 patients received a Single Fraction Radiation Therapy (SFRT) with a dose of 8Gy. Quantitative Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values after SFRT or MFRT were compared with response to treatment (pain relief), assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before radiotherapy and at 1 and 3 months after the completion of treatment. The two schedules had equal efficacy in terms of pain control, without any difference at 1 and 3 months post radiotherapy. In both treatments, pain reduction was related to an increase in the ADC. However, the median ADC value had an increase of 575 points between the baseline and 3 months (from 1010 to 1585, p=0.02) in the 30Gy group, while it was only 178 points (from 1417 to 1595) in the 8Gy group. The increase in the ADC values after radiotherapy corresponds to increased cell death. Despite an equal pain control, MFRT treatment seems to be more effective to achieve cancer cells kill. Our preliminary data could also explain the higher retreatment rates in SFRT vs MFRT in long survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Computation of antenna vibration mode elastic-rigid and effective-weight coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.

    1992-01-01

    A significant amount of both qualitative and quantitative information about structures can be derived from the elastic-rigid structural coupling matrices, and from the effective modal inertias and masses. Typical finite-element analysis programs do not provide this information as part of the regular output. This report presents an easy way to develop the necessary information from ordinary program output, and shows how to deal with alternative origins for the reference coordinate system.

  8. Effect of Two Temperatures on Reflection Coefficient in Micropolar Thermoelastic with and without Energy Dissipation Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reflection of plane waves at the free surface of thermally conducting micropolar elastic medium with two temperatures is studied. The theory of thermoelasticity with and without energy dissipation is used to investigate the problem. The expressions for amplitudes ratios of reflected waves at different angles of incident wave are obtained. Dissipation of energy and two-temperature effects on these amplitude ratios with angle of incidence are depicted graphically. Some special and particular cases are also deduced.

  9. Applicator Attenuation Effect on Dose Calculations of Esophageal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using EDR2 Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini Daghigh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Interaluminal brachytherapy is one of the important methods of esophageal cancer treatment. The effect of applicator attenuation is not considered in dose calculation method released by AAPM-TG43. In this study, the effect of High-Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy esophageal applicator on dose distribution was surveyed in HDR brachytherapy. Materials and Methods A cylindrical PMMA phantom was built in order to be inserted by various sizes of esophageal applicators. EDR2 films were placed at 33 mm from Ir-192 source and irradiated with 1.5 Gy after planning using treatment planning system for all applicators. Results The results of film dosimetry in reference point for 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm applicators were 1.54, 1.53, 1.48, and 1.50 Gy, respectively. The difference between practical and treatment planning system results was 0.023 Gy (

  10. Dose-related effects of propericiazine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cechin E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of the neuroleptic agent propericiazine on animal models of anxiety and memory. Adult male Wistar rats (250 to 350 g received intraperitoneal injections of propericiazine (0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 mg/kg, diazepam (1 mg/kg, saline, or diazepam vehicle (20% propylene glycol and 80% saline 30 min prior to the experimental procedure. Animals (10-15 for each task were tested for step-down inhibitory avoidance (0.3-mA footshock and habituation to an open-field for memory assessment, and submitted to the elevated plus-maze to evaluate the effects of propericiazine in a model of anxiety. Animals treated with 0.075 mg/kg propericiazine showed a reduction in anxiety measures (P0.05 in the elevated plus-maze model of anxiety. Memory was not affected by propericiazine in any of the tests, but was impaired by diazepam. The results indicate a dose-related, inverse U-shaped effect of propericiazine in an anxiety model, but not on memory tasks, perhaps reflecting involvement of the dopaminergic system in the mechanisms of anxiety.

  11. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from panoramic radiography to the critical organs of head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ae Ryeon [Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalent and effective dose, and estimate radiation risk to the critical organs of head and neck region from the use of adult and child mode in panoramic radiography. The results were as follows. 1. The salivary glands showed the highest equivalent and effective dose in adult and child mode. The equivalent and effective dose in adult mode were 837 {mu}Sv and 20.93 {mu}Sv, those in child mode were 462 {mu}Sv and 11.54 {mu}Sv, respectively. 2. Total effective doses to the critical head and neck organs were estimated 34.2l {mu}Sv in adult mode, 20.14 {mu}Sv in child mode. From these data, the probabilities of stochastic effect from adult and child mode were 2.50xl0{sup -6} and 1.47x10{sup -6} 3. The other remainder showed the greatest risk of fatal cancer. The risk estimate were 4.5 and 2.7 fatal malignancies in adult and child mode from million examinations. The bone marrow and thyroid gland showed about 0.1 fatal cancer in adult. and child mode from these examinations.

  12. Estimating dose painting effects in radiotherapy: a mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos López Alfonso

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity is widely considered to be a determinant factor in tumor progression and in particular in its recurrence after therapy. Unfortunately, current medical techniques are unable to deduce clinically relevant information about tumor heterogeneity by means of non-invasive methods. As a consequence, when radiotherapy is used as a treatment of choice, radiation dosimetries are prescribed under the assumption that the malignancy targeted is of a homogeneous nature. In this work we discuss the effects of different radiation dose distributions on heterogeneous tumors by means of an individual cell-based model. To that end, a case is considered where two tumor cell phenotypes are present, which we assume to strongly differ in their respective cell cycle duration and radiosensitivity properties. We show herein that, as a result of such differences, the spatial distribution of the corresponding phenotypes, whence the resulting tumor heterogeneity can be predicted as growth proceeds. In particular, we show that if we start from a situation where a majority of ordinary cancer cells (CCs and a minority of cancer stem cells (CSCs are randomly distributed, and we assume that the length of CSC cycle is significantly longer than that of CCs, then CSCs become concentrated at an inner region as tumor grows. As a consequence we obtain that if CSCs are assumed to be more resistant to radiation than CCs, heterogeneous dosimetries can be selected to enhance tumor control by boosting radiation in the region occupied by the more radioresistant tumor cell phenotype. It is also shown that, when compared with homogeneous dose distributions as those being currently delivered in clinical practice, such heterogeneous radiation dosimetries fare always better than their homogeneous counterparts. Finally, limitations to our assumptions and their resulting clinical implications will be discussed.

  13. THE EFFECT OF BORON DOSES ON PARICA (Schizolobium amazonicum Herb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Ferreira de Lima

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted in a greenhouse in order to evaluate the effects of boron on parica growth and on concentration and contents of macro and micronutrients indry matter of shoots and roots. Six treatments constituted by boron doses of 0.0; 0.1; 0.3; 0.9;1.5 and 2.1 mg/dm3 in four replications were used. It was evaluated the characteristics:visual diagnostic, plants height and diameter, dry matter production of shoots and roots,concentration and contents of nutrients in dry matter of shoots and roots. The symptoms ofdeficiency can be observed in new leaves and roots and the toxicity in older leaves. Bothboron deficiency and excess inhibits plants growth, but toxicity is more damaging. The Comportamento do paricá (Schizolobium amazonicum Herb. submetido ...193approximate dose of 0 Estimate of average equilibrium moisture content of wood for 26Brazilian states, by Hailwood and Harrobin one hydrate sorption theory equation.15mg/dm3 was the best for plants growth in MSPA and MSRA. The concentration of boronincreased in MSPA and MSRA with application of increasing concentration of B, with a smallreduction in concentration of MSRA from the concentration 1.9 mg/dm3. The toxicity of boronbegins when concentration reaches 36.06 mg/dm3 in shoots and 32.38 in roots. The contentsof all nutrients, except Mn and Fe in MSPA and Cu, Fe and B in MSRA, followed its own drymatter production curves.

  14. Absorbed and effective dose from periapical radiography by portable intraoral x-ray machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure the absorbed dose and to calculate the effective dose for periapical radiography done by portable intraoral x-ray machines. 14 full mouth, upper posterior and lower posterior periapical radiographs were taken by wall-type 1 and portable type 3 intraoral x-ray machines. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed at 23 sites at the layers of the tissue-equivalent ART woman phantom for dosimetry. Average tissue absorbed dose and radiation weighted dose were calculated for each major anatomical site. Effective dose was calculated using 2005 ICRP tissue weighted factors. On 14 full mouth periapical radiographs, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 30 Sv; for portable x-ray machines were 30 Sv, 22 Sv, 36 Sv. On upper posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 4 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 3 Sv, 5 Sv. On lower posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall type x-ray machine was 5 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 4 Sv, 5 Sv. Effective doses for periapical radiographs performed by portable intraoral x-ray machines were similar to doses for periapical radiographs taken by wall type intraoral x-ray machines.

  15. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, is required to be converted to electron density for radiation dose calculation for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages were applied to take the patient CT image without applying the specific CT number to electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of dose calculation would be unassured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to change in tube voltage were demonstrated and the dose calculation errors in percentage depth dose (PDD) and a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in PDD from TPS dose calculation and Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3 % and 1.1 % respectively when applying the same CT number to electron density conversion curve to the 80 kVp and 140 kVp images. In the clinical case, the different CT nu...

  16. EFFECT OF NON-DARCY FLOW COEFFICIENT VARIATION DUE TO WATER VAPORIZATION ON WELL PRODUCTIVITY OF GAS CONDENSATE RESERVOIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sheikhi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Well productivity of gas condensate reservoirs is highly affected by near-wellbore phenomena. Inertial force resulting from convective acceleration of fluid particles in the medium, as well as viscous force, determines the flow of gas through porous media at high velocity. Pressure drop builds up the molar content of water in gas by water vaporization in the near-wellbore region, which means a drop in connate water saturation. Given that the inertial force is a function of the non-Darcy coefficient, β, which itself depends upon connate water saturation, this can ultimately lessen the non-Darcy component of the pressure drop and therefore inertial forces, leading to improvement of well deliverability. Currently, no physically relevant model takes into account the non-Darcian flow coefficient variation due to this phenomenon. This paper utilizes a single-well compositional simulation to exhibit how water vaporization could compensate for the effect of inertia on well productivity of gas condensate reservoirs.

  17. Theoretical examination of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient and electrical conductivity of polymer electrolyte fuel cell porous components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Gen; Yokoyama, Kouji; Ooyama, Junpei; Terao, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Kubo, Norio; Kawase, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    The reduction of oxygen transfer resistance through porous components consisting of a gas diffusion layer (GDL), microporous layer (MPL), and catalyst layer (CL) is very important to reduce the cost and improve the performance of a PEFC system. This study involves a systematic examination of the relationship between the oxygen transfer resistance of the actual porous components and their three-dimensional structure by direct measurement with FIB-SEM and X-ray CT. Numerical simulations were carried out to model the properties of oxygen transport. Moreover, based on the model structure and theoretical equations, an approach to the design of new structures is proposed. In the case of the GDL, the binder was found to obstruct gas diffusion with a negative effect on performance. The relative diffusion coefficient of the MPL is almost equal to that of the model structure of particle packing. However, that of CL is an order of magnitude less than those of the other two components. Furthermore, an equation expressing the relative diffusion coefficient of each component can be obtained with the function of porosity. The electrical conductivity of MPL, which is lower than that of the carbon black packing, is considered to depend on the contact resistance.

  18. The effective dose of different scanning protocols using the Sirona GALILEOS(®) comfort CBCT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D; Bohay, R; Kaci, L; Barnett, R; Battista, J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effective dose and CT dose index (CTDI) for a range of imaging protocols using the Sirona GALILEOS(®) Comfort CBCT scanner (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim, Germany). Calibrated optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed at 26 sites in the head and neck of a modified RANDO(®) phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Greenwich, NY). Effective dose was calculated for 12 different scanning protocols. CTDI measurements were also performed to determine the dose-length product (DLP) and the ratio of effective dose to DLP for each scanning protocol. The effective dose for a full maxillomandibular scan at 42 mAs was 102 ± 1 μSv and remained unchanged with varying contrast and resolution settings. This compares with 71 μSv for a maxillary scan and 76 μSv for a mandibular scan with identical milliampere-seconds (mAs) at high contrast and resolution settings. Changes to mAs and beam collimation have a significant influence on effective dose. Effective dose and DLP vary linearly with mAs. A collimated maxillary or mandibular scan decreases effective dose by approximately 29% and 24%, respectively, as compared with a full maxillomandibular scan. Changes to contrast and resolution settings have little influence on effective dose. This study provides data for setting individualized patient exposure protocols to minimize patient dose from ionizing radiation used for diagnostic or treatment planning tasks in dentistry.

  19. Effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for computed tomography in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hyun; Jung, Seung Eun; Oh, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyu Nam; Youn, Chun Song

    2011-11-03

    Severely injured trauma patients are exposed to clinically significant radiation doses from computed tomography (CT) imaging in the emergency department. Moreover, this radiation exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine some effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department. We implemented the radiation dose reduction strategy in May 2009. A prospective observational study design was used to collect data from patients who met the inclusion criteria during this one year study (intervention group) from May 2009 to April 2010. The prospective data were compared with data collected retrospectively for one year prior to the implementation of the radiation dose reduction strategy (control group). By comparison of the cumulative effective dose and the number of CT examinations in the two groups, we evaluated effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy. All the patients met the institutional adult trauma team activation criteria. The radiation doses calculated by the CT scanner were converted to effective doses by multiplication by a conversion coefficient. A total of 118 patients were included in this study. Among them, 33 were admitted before May 2009 (control group), and 85 were admitted after May 2009 (intervention group). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding baseline characteristics, such as injury severity and mortality. Additionally, there was no difference between the two groups in the mean number of total CT examinations per patient (4.8 vs. 4.5, respectively; p = 0.227). However, the mean effective dose of the total CT examinations per patient significantly decreased from 78.71 mSv to 29.50 mSv (p trauma patients effectively decreased the cumulative effective dose of the total CT examinations in the emergency department. But not effectively decreased the number of CT examinations.

  20. Generation of composite dose and biological effective dose (BED) over multiple treatment modalities and multistage planning using deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Feygelman, Vladimir; Stevens, Craig; Forster, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are no commercially available tools to generate composite plans across different treatment modalities and/or different planning image sets. Without a composite plan, it may be difficult to perform a meaningful dosimetric evaluation of the overall treatment course. In this paper, we introduce a method to generate composite biological effective dose (BED) plans over multiple radiotherapy treatment modalities and/or multistage plans, using deformable image registration. Two cases were used to demonstrate the method. Case I was prostate cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a permanent seed implant. Case II involved lung cancer treated with two treatment plans generated on two separate computed tomography image sets. Thin-plate spline or optical flow methods were used as appropriate to generate deformation matrices. The deformation matrices were then applied to the dose matrices and the resulting physical doses were converted to BED and added to yield the composite plan. Cell proliferation and sublethal repair were considered in the BED calculations. The difference in BED between normal tissues and tumor volumes was accounted for by using different BED models, alpha/beta values, and cell potential doubling times. The method to generate composite BED plans presented in this paper provides information not available with the traditional simple dose summation or physical dose summation. With the understanding of limitations and uncertainties of the algorithms involved, it may be valuable for the overall treatment plan evaluation. 2010 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Baricity of Bupivacaine on Median Effective Doses for Motor Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Quan; Chen, Chun; Li, Lin

    2017-10-01

    BACKGROUND The median effective dose (ED50) of a drug gives the amount or dose of drug needed to produce effective therapeutic response or desired effect in at least 50% of the population taking it. Our study focused on determining the ED50 required for effective motor block using hyperbaric and plain bupivacaine, and evaluated the influence of baricity on the ED50 required for motor block. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 38 patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups according to the baricity of bupivacaine: group P received plain bupivacaine and group H received hyperbaric bupivacaine. The patients were administered 0.5% plain or hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally. The dosage of anesthetics in each patient was calculated according to the standard up-down sequential allocation method of Dixon. The first patient in each group received a dose of 7.5 mg bupivacaine, and a dose of 1.0 mg was used as the testing interval. The dose was increased or decreased by 1.0 mg for each patient according to the estimated score of motor block. RESULTS The ED50 required for effective motor block in spinal anesthesia was 7.20 and 10.05 mg in groups H and P, respectively. Their relative motor blocking potency ratio was found to be 0.72. CONCLUSIONS The ED50 for motor block was significantly decreased using hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally compared with plain bupivacaine, and the baricity of bupivacaine obviously affected the ED50 for the motor block.

  2. Dose-related Effects of Salvinorin A in Humans: Dissociative, Hallucinogenic, and Memory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Katherine A.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Reissig, Chad J.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the plant Salvia divinorum, which has increased in popularity as a recreational drug over the past decade. Few human studies have examined salvinorin A. Objective This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the dose-related effects of inhaled salvinorin A in individuals with histories of hallucinogen use. Methods Eight healthy hallucinogen-using adults inhaled up to 16 doses of salvinorin A (0.375 - 21 μg/kg) in ascending order. Physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min after administration. Qualitative subjective effects were assessed retrospectively via questionnaires at the end of sessions. Persisting effects were assessed 1 month later. Results Orderly dose-related effects peaked at 2 min and then rapidly dissipated, replicating previous findings. Subjective effects were intense, with maximal drug strength ratings or unresponsiveness frequently observed at high doses. Questionnaires assessing qualitative effects (Hallucinogen Rating Scale, Pharmacological Class Questionnaire) suggested some overlap with serotonergically mediated classic hallucinogens. Salvinorin A also produced dose-related dissociative effects and impairments in recall/recognition memory. At 1-month follow-up, there was no evidence of persisting adverse effects. Participants reported salvinorin A effects were qualitatively different from other drugs. Conclusions Salvinorin A produces a unique profile of subjective and cognitive effects, including strong dissociative effects and memory impairment, which only partially overlap with classic hallucinogen effects. Along with nonhuman studies of salvinorin A, these results are important for understanding the neurobiology of the kappa opioid system and may ultimately have important therapeutic applications. PMID:23135605

  3. Evaluation of acute toxicity and the effect of single injected doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-12

    Jul 12, 2010 ... The animals were observed continuously for clinical change and mortality. Next, zerumbone was injected in ... evaluate the effect of single doses of zerumbone on the extent of tissue damages of liver and .... Rats serum kidney markers quantified following injected dose of cisplatin and single injected doses ...

  4. Effect of different doses of urea on the uptake of cadmium from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present investigation was conducted to study the effect of different doses of urea on cadmium uptake by canola (Brassica napus L.) applied in full and split doses. Nine different treatments of urea used were: 0 (control), 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg/ha applied to soil as full doses before sowing, and 60, 90, 120, and 150 kg/ha ...

  5. Effect of different doses of urea on the uptake of cadmium from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... The present investigation was conducted to study the effect of different doses of urea on cadmium uptake by canola (Brassica napus L.) applied in full and split doses. Nine different treatments of urea used were: 0 (control), 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg/ha applied to soil as full doses before sowing, and 60, 90,.

  6. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Té

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. METH...

  7. Effects of a moderate evening alcohol dose. I: sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Tracy L; Acebo, Christine; Van Reen, Eliza; Carskadon, Mary A

    2007-08-01

    Few studies examining alcohol's effects consider prior sleep/wake history and circadian timing. We examined introspective and physiological sleepiness on nights with and without moderate alcohol consumption in well-rested young adults at a known circadian phase. Twenty-nine adults (males=9), ages 21 to 25 years (M=22.6, SD=1.2), spent 1 week on an at-home stabilized sleep schedule (8.5 or 9 hours), followed by 3 in-lab nights: adaptation, placebo, and alcohol. Alcohol (vodka; 0.54 g/kg for men; 0.49 g/kg for women) or placebo beverage was consumed over 30 minutes ending 1 hour before stabilized bedtime. In addition to baseline, 3 sleep latency tests (SLTs) occurred after alcohol/placebo ingestion (15, 16.5, and 18 hours after waking). Stanford Sleepiness Scales (SSS) and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) of sleepiness were completed before each SLT and approximately every 30 minutes. The Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) was administered a total of 4 times (baseline, 5, 60, and 90 minutes postalcohol/placebo). Subjects' circadian phase was determined from melatonin levels in saliva samples taken at approximately 30-minute intervals. All sleepiness and sedation measures increased with time awake. Only SSS and BAES sedation measures showed higher levels of sleepiness and sedation after alcohol compared with placebo. The mean circadian phase was the same for assessments at both conditions. Alcohol did not increase physiological sleepiness compared with placebo nor was residual sedation evident under these conditions. We conclude that the effects on sleepiness of a moderate dose of alcohol are masked when sleep-wake homeostatic and circadian timing influences promote high levels of sleepiness.

  8. Dedicated breast CT: effect of adaptive filtration on dose distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the work was experimental investigations of the breast dose distributions with adaptive filtration. Adaptive filtration reduces detector dynamic range and improves image quality. The adaptive filter with predetermined shape is placed at the x-ray beam such that the x-ray intensity at the detector surface is flat. However, adaptive filter alters the mean dose to the breast, as well as volume distribution of the dose. Methods: The dose was measured using a 14 cm diameter cylindrical acrylic breast phantom. An acrylic adaptive filter was fabricated to match the 14 cm diameter of the phantom. The dose was measured using ion chamber inserted into holes distributed along the radius of the phantom from the center to the edge. The radial distribution of dose was measured and fitted by an analytical function and the volume distribution and mean value of dose was calculated. The measurements were performed at 40, 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages and 6.6 mGy air kerma. Results: The adaptive filt...

  9. Appropriate Use of Effective Dose in Radiation Protection and Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Darrell R; Fahey, Frederic H

    2017-08-01

    Effective dose was introduced by the ICRP for the single, over-arching purpose of setting limits for radiation protection. Effective dose is a derived quantity or mathematical construct and not a physical, measurable quantity. The formula for calculating effective dose to a reference model incorporates terms to account for all radiation types, organ and tissue radiosensitivities, population groups, and multiple biological endpoints. The properties and appropriate applications of effective dose are not well understood by many within and outside the health physics profession; no other quantity in radiation protection has been more confusing or misunderstood. According to ICRP Publication 103, effective dose is to be used for "prospective dose assessment for planning and optimization in radiological protection, and retrospective demonstration of compliance for regulatory purposes." In practice, effective dose has been applied incorrectly to predict cancer risk among exposed persons. The concept of effective dose applies generally to reference models only and not to individual subjects. While conceived to represent a measure of cancer risk or heritable detrimental effects, effective dose is not predictive of future cancer risk. The formula for calculating effective dose incorporates committee-selected weighting factors for radiation quality and organ sensitivity; however, the organ weighting factors are averaged across all ages and both genders and thus do not apply to any specific individual or radiosensitive subpopulations such as children and young women. Further, it is not appropriate to apply effective dose to individual medical patients because patient-specific parameters may vary substantially from the assumptions used in generalized models. Also, effective dose is not applicable to therapeutic uses of radiation, as its mathematical underpinnings pertain only to observed late (stochastic) effects of radiation exposure and do not account for short-term adverse

  10. Effective electron recombination coefficient in ionospheric D-region during the relaxation regime after solar flare from February 18, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nina, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Cadez, V. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Sulic, D., E-mail: dsulic@ipb.ac.rs [Faculty of Ecology and Environmental Protection, Union - Nikola Tesla University, Cara Dusana 62, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sreckovic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Zigman, V. [University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 13, Rona Dolina, SI-5000 Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a model for determination of a weakly time dependent effective recombination coefficient for the perturbed terrestrial ionospheric D-region plasma. We study consequences of a class M1.0 X-ray solar flare, recorded by GOES-15 satellite on February 18, 2011 between 14:00 and 14:15 UT, by analyzing the amplitude and phase real time variations of very low frequency (VLF) radio waves emitted by transmitter DHO (located in Germany) at frequency 23.4 kHz and recorded by the AWESOME receiver in Belgrade (Serbia). Our analysis is limited to ionospheric perturbations localized at altitudes around 70 km where the dominant electron gain and electron loss processes are the photo-ionization and recombination, respectively.

  11. Additional effective dose by patients undergoing NAI-131 capsules therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, M.; Jovanovic, M.; Spasic Jokic, V.; Cuknic, O.; Ilic, Z.; Vranjes Djuric, S. [VINCA - Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2006-07-01

    Capsules or solutions containing Na{sup 131}I are indicated for the therapy of some thyroid carcinomas such as functioning metastatic papillary or follicular carcinoma of the thyroid; and for the treatment of hyperthyroidism (diffuse toxic goiter and single or multiple toxic nodular goiter). The recommended dosage ranges of Na{sup 131}I capsules or solution for the therapy of the average patient (70 kg) are: (3.7-5.55) GBq for ablation of normal thyroid tissue; (3.7-7.4) GBq for subsequent treatments; a (148-370) MBq for hyperthyroidism. The purpose of this paper is to calculate effective dose as a result of iodine-131 capsules remaining in stomach before absorption starts. This result can determine the disadvantage of capsule versus solution containing sodium iodine-131 (Na{sup 131}I) in radionuclide therapy application from radiation protection point of view. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4b was used to model transport of gamma and beta particles emitted by radionuclide {sup 131}I treated as a point source at the bottom of stomach. Absorbed energy per unit transformation in stomach and surrounding organs has been calculated. (authors)

  12. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  13. Cumulative effective dose associated with radiography and CT of adolescents with spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemburg, Stefan P; Peters, Soeren A; Roggenland, Daniela; Nicolas, Volkmar; Heyer, Christoph M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the quantity and distribution of cumulative effective doses in diagnostic imaging of adolescents with spinal injuries. At a level 1 trauma center from July 2003 through June 2009, imaging procedures during initial evaluation and hospitalization and after discharge of all patients 10-20 years old with spinal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative effective doses for all imaging studies were calculated, and the doses to patients with spinal injuries who had multiple traumatic injuries were compared with the doses to patients with spinal injuries but without multiple injuries. The significance level was set at 5%. Imaging studies of 72 patients (32 with multiple injuries; average age, 17.5 years) entailed a median cumulative effective dose of 18.89 mSv. Patients with multiple injuries had a significantly higher total cumulative effective dose (29.70 versus 10.86 mSv, p cumulative effective dose to multiple injury patients during the initial evaluation (18.39 versus 2.83 mSv, p cumulative effective dose. Adolescents with spinal injuries receive a cumulative effective dose equal to that of adult trauma patients and nearly three times that of pediatric trauma patients. Areas of focus in lowering cumulative effective dose should be appropriate initial estimation of trauma severity and careful selection of CT scan parameters.

  14. Antisecretory effect and oral pharmacokinetics following low dose omeprazole in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, C W; Forrest, J A; Meredith, P A; Reid, J L

    1985-01-01

    The effects of single and repeated doses of omeprazole 10 mg on gastric secretion were studied in a group of six healthy subjects. Single doses had no significant effect on basal or stimulated acid output. After 7 days of treatment, there was a 93.1% reduction in basal acid output (P less than 0.02) and a 66.5% reduction in stimulated output (P less than 0.01). Pepsin output was not affected. Systemic availability of omeprazole, as reflected in the AUC, increased significantly (P less than 0.05) with repeated dosing. Low doses of omeprazole can produce substantial reductions in acid output after repeated dosing. PMID:3929808

  15. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J.; Poulsen, P.; Kuncic, Z.; Keall, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2-10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT cone beam computed tomography pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy.

  16. Morphine sparing effect of low dose ketamine during patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCIA) of low dose morphine plus ketamine with morphine. Design: Double blind case control study. Setting: Academic hospital. Patients: Thirty-six patients scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy were randomly divided into two groups to ...

  17. Effective Dose of Positioning Scans for Five CBCT Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    became apparent that some patients received multiple full scans as well as multiple previews, and these events were counted as well for the...Dentofacial Orthopedics 2013;143(6):784-792. 5. Qu XM, Li G, Sanderink GCH, Zhang ZY, Ma XC. Dose reduction of cone beam CT scanning for the entire oral...Dentofacial Orthopedics 2013;144(6):802-817. 15. Wang AS, Stayman JW, Otake Y, Vogt S, Kleinszig G, Khanna AJ, Gallia GL, Siewerdsen JH. Low-dose

  18. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in-situ measurement of indoor and outdoor radiation dose rate at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching hospital was done using well calibrated radiation meter (Radalert-100). The minimum and maximum indoor gamma dose rate were found to be 121.8 ±4.02 nGyh-1 and 200.1±5.06 nGyh-1 respectively while the ...

  19. Effects of monthly dose and regular dosing of intravenous active vitamin D use on mortality among patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Peter, Wendy L; Li, Shuling; Liu, Jiannong; Gilbertson, David T; Arneson, Thomas J; Collins, Allan J

    2009-02-01

    To determine if apparent protective mortality benefits of intravenous active vitamin D in patients undergoing hemodialysis extend across all groups defined by dialysis duration; if higher monthly dose and dosing regularity are associated with reduced mortality; and if intravenous active vitamin D use is associated with reduced cardiovascular, infectious, and cancer-related mortality. Retrospective cohort study. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services End-Stage Renal Disease database. A total of 193,830 patients undergoing hemodialysis during 1999-2000, of whom 94,208 (48.6%) were taking intravenous active vitamin D in the baseline period. Time-varying Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effects of monthly vitamin D dose and dosing regularity over 3-month intervals on risk of all-cause and cause-specific death, by dialysis duration groups (or=5 yrs from dialysis initiation). Models were adjusted for baseline characteristics, time-varying hospital days, monthly epoetin alfa dose, mean hemoglobin level, and urea reduction ratio in the 3-month intervals. Maximum follow-up time was 5.25 years. Adjusted all-cause mortality risk was reduced 7-17% among patients receiving vitamin D each month of the 3-month interval, with the highest reduction among patients with shorter dialysis duration. However, regular vitamin D dosing did not show consistent benefit across dialysis duration groups for cardiovascular, infectious, cancer, or other (all deaths not attributable to cardiovascular disease, infection, or cancer) mortality. Mortality benefits of intravenous vitamin D cannot be easily explained by currently proposed biologic mechanisms. Randomized controlled trials are needed to show definitively whether intravenous vitamin D can reduce all-cause and cause-specific mortality in patients undergoing dialysis compared with placebo.

  20. The effect of inbreeding rate on fitness, inbreeding depression and heterosis over a range of inbreeding coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkala, Nina; Knott, K Emily; Kotiaho, Janne S; Nissinen, Kari; Puurtinen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of inbreeding and genetic drift within populations and hybridization between genetically differentiated populations is important for many basic and applied questions in ecology and evolutionary biology. The magnitudes and even the directions of these effects can be influenced by various factors, especially by the current and historical population size (i.e. inbreeding rate). Using Drosophila littoralis as a model species, we studied the effect of inbreeding rate over a range of inbreeding levels on (i) mean fitness of a population (relative to that of an outbred control population), (ii) within-population inbreeding depression (reduction in fitness of offspring from inbred versus random mating within a population) and (iii) heterosis (increase in fitness of offspring from interpopulation versus within-population random mating). Inbreeding rate was manipulated by using three population sizes (2, 10 and 40), and fitness was measured as offspring survival and fecundity. Fast inbreeding (smaller effective population size) resulted in greater reduction in population mean fitness than slow inbreeding, when populations were compared over similar inbreeding coefficients. Correspondingly, populations with faster inbreeding expressed more heterosis upon interpopulation hybridization. Inbreeding depression within the populations did not have a clear relationship with either the rate or the level of inbreeding. PMID:25553071

  1. Effects of Adopting Different Kinds of Collecting Method for Years on Film Residual Coefficient and Maize Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Wen-xue

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wide usage of mulching technology has increased crop yields, but the large amounts of mulching film residue resulting from widespread use of plastic film in China has brought about a series of pollution hazards. Based on a 4-year (2011-2014 long-term experiment, the effects of different kinds of collecting mothod (zero plastic film residues, conventional plastic film residues, whole plastic film residues remainded on plastic film residues, residual coefficient and maize yield were explored. Plastic film residues mainly remained in 0~10 cm, 10~20 cm soil layers. In 0~30 cm soil layers, the two types of mulch residues (>25 cm2, 4~25 cm2 under zero plastic film residues treatment were much less than conventional plastic film residues and whole plastic film residues remainded treatments, no significant differences were observed in the mulch residues (2 among 3 treatments. After maize harvest, the amount of plastic film residues under zero plastic film residues, conventional plastic film residues and whole plastic film residues remainded treatments were 52.71, 80.85 kg·hm-2 and 152.65 kg·hm-2, respectively, the residual coefficient for zero plastic film residues, conventional plastic film residues and whole plastic film residues remainded treatments were -9.45%, 8.53% and 54.42%, respectively. The stem diameter, ear length, ear width, ear row number, grain number per row and 100-grain weight of maize decreased with the increase of residual film amount. Compared with the conventional plastic film residues, the mean grain yield of whole plastic film residues remainded treatment decreased by 15.08%, whereas the zero plastic film residues treatment increased by 4.70%. The plastic film residues, residual coefficient and maize yield were comprehensively analyzed, the conventional plastic film residues practice should be adopted currently without appropriate plastic film residues collector. But from the long-term development, we should speed up the

  2. Results of the Austrian CT dose study 2010. Typical effective doses of the most frequent CT examinations; Ergebnisse der Oesterreichischen CT-Dosisstudie 2010. Effektive Dosen der haeufigsten CT-Untersuchungen und Unterschiede zwischen Anwendern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homolka, Peter; Leithner, Robert; Billinger, Jochen [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Zentrum fuer Medizinische Physik und Biomedizinische Technik; Gruber, Michael [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To determine typical doses from common CT examinations of standard sized adult patients and their variability between CT operators for common CT indications. Materials and Methods: In a nationwide Austrian CT dose survey doses from approx. 10,000 common CT examinations of adults during 2009 and 2010 were collected and 'typical' radiation doses to the 'average patient', which turned out to have 75.6 kg body mass, calculated. Conversion coefficients from DLP to effective dose were determined and effective doses calculated according to ICRP 103. Variations of typically applied doses to the 'average patient' were expressed as ratios between 90{sup th} and 10{sup th} percentile (inter-percentile width, IPW90/10), 1st and 3{sup rd} quartile (IPW75/25), and Maximum/Minimum. Results: Median effective doses to the average patients for standard head and neck scans were 1.8 mSv (cervical spine), 1.9 mSv (brain: trauma/bleeding, stroke) to 2.2 mSv (brain: masses) with typical variation between facilities of a factor 2.5 (IPW90/10) and 1.7 (IPW75/25). In the thorax region doses were 6.4 to 6.8 mSv (pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and inflammation, oncologic scans), the variation between facilities was by a factor of 2.1 (IPW90/10) and 1.5 (IPW75/25), respectively. In the abdominal region median effective doses from 6.5 mSv (kidney stone search) to 22 mSv (liver lesions) were found (acute abdomen, staging/metastases, lumbar spine: 9-12 mSv; oncologic abdomen plus chest 16 mSv; renal tumor 20 mSv). Variation factors between facilities were on average for abdominal scans 2.7 (IPW90/10) and 1.8 (IPW75/25). Conclusion: Variations between CT operators are generally moderate for most operators, but in some indications the ratio between the minimum and the maximum of average dose to the typical standard patients exceeds a factor of 4 or even 5. Therefore, comparing average doses to Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) and optimizing protocols need to

  3. Total ionizing dose effects in multiple-gate field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillardin, Marc; Marcandella, Claude; Martinez, Martial; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Richard, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    This paper focuses on total ionizing dose (TID) effects induced in multiple-gate field-effect transistors. The impact of device architecture, geometry and scaling on the TID response of multiple-gate transistors is reviewed in both bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. These innovating devices exhibit specific ionizing dose responses which strongly depend on their three-dimensional nature. Their TID responses may look like the one usually observed in planar two-dimensional bulk or SOI transistors, but multiple-gate devices can also behave like any other CMOS device.

  4. Investigation of hygroscopic growth effect on aerosol scattering coefficient at a rural site in the southern North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunfei; Wang, Xiaojia; Yan, Peng; Zhang, Leiming; Tao, Jun; Liu, Xinyu; Tian, Ping; Han, Zhiwei; Zhang, Renjian

    2017-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties and the effect of hygroscopic growth on the scattering coefficients at a rural site in the southern North China Plain were investigated based on a two-month observation conducted in the summer of 2014. The scattering coefficient of dry aerosols was high, with a mean (±standard deviation) of 338.8±209.9Mm-1 (520nm) during the observation period. A noticeable enhancement in aerosol scattering due to hygroscopic growth was observed, e.g., by a factor of 2.28±0.69 at RH of 80% (referred to as f(RH=80%)) and 3.39±1.14 at RH of 85% (f(RH=85%)). The high content of water-soluble secondary inorganic aerosols (SIAs), accounting for 53.1% of fine particulate matter (i.e., PM2.5) on average, was mainly responsible for the high hygroscopicity. f(RH=80%) increased with increasing SIA mass fraction in PM2.5. This was especially the case when SIAs were mainly in finer particulate matter, i.e., PM1. A number of considerably low f(RH=80%) values was observed due to relatively low mass fraction of SIAs in PM1 despite high fraction in PM2.5. Particle size distributions, especially those of SIAs, also played a remarkable role in the hygroscopicity of ambient aerosols. No significant difference in hygroscopicity was found between different pollution episodes due to the dominance of SIAs in all the cases. Slightly higher hygroscopic growth factors were observed during the clean episode, which were attributed to the smaller particle sizes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  6. Dose-effect relationships for individual pelvic floor muscles and anorectal complaints after prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Hopman, Wim P M; van Lin, Emile N J Th; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2012-06-01

    To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: ≤ 30 Gy to the IAS; ≤ 10 Gy to the EAS; ≤ 50 Gy to the PRM; and ≤ 40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are excluded. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan, E-mail: r.smeenk@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Aswin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hopman, Wim P.M. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  8. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-14

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or

  9. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy(-1)) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was risk ratio of 1.06 (95% CI 0.30, 1.83) for solid cancer mortality and 0.58 (95% CI 0.10, 1.06) for mortality + incidence data. The

  10. Effect of fluctuations of the linear feedback coefficient on the frequency spectrum of averaged temperature in a simple energy balance climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Using the stochastic approach, we analyze the effect of fluctuations of the linear feedback coefficient in a simple zero-dimensional energy balance climate model on the frequency spectrum of averaged temperature. An expression is obtained for the model spectrum in the weak noise approximation. Its features are investigated in two cases: when the frequency spectrum of the feedback coefficient is a constant (white noise) and when the spectrum contains one resonant frequency and has a Lorentz form. We consider the issue whether the feedback coefficient fluctuations can be an independent mechanism for a qualitative change in the spectrum of the climate system.

  11. Estimating effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing interventional radiology procedures using anthropomorphic phantoms and MOSFET dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, Nelson; Gordon, Christopher L; Thomas, Karen; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective doses received by pediatric patients during interventional radiology procedures and to present those doses in "look-up tables" standardized according to minute of fluoroscopy and frame of digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Organ doses were measured with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters inserted within three anthropomorphic phantoms, representing children at ages 1, 5, and 10 years, at locations corresponding to radiosensitive organs. The phantoms were exposed to mock interventional radiology procedures of the head, chest, and abdomen using posteroanterior and lateral geometries, varying magnification, and fluoroscopy or DSA exposures. Effective doses were calculated from organ doses recorded by the MOSFET dosimeters and are presented in look-up tables according to the different age groups. The largest effective dose burden for fluoroscopy was recorded for posteroanterior and lateral abdominal procedures (0.2-1.1 mSv/min of fluoroscopy), whereas procedures of the head resulted in the lowest effective doses (0.02-0.08 mSv/min of fluoroscopy). DSA exposures of the abdomen imparted higher doses (0.02-0.07 mSv/DSA frame) than did those involving the head and chest. Patient doses during interventional procedures vary significantly depending on the type of procedure. User-friendly look-up tables may provide a helpful tool for health care providers in estimating effective doses for an individual procedure.

  12. The conversion of exposures due to radon into the effective dose: the epidemiological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, T.R. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The risks and dose conversion coefficients for residential and occupational exposures due to radon were determined with applying the epidemiological risk models to ICRP representative populations. The dose conversion coefficient for residential radon was estimated with a value of 1.6 mSv year{sup -1} per 100 Bq m{sup -3} (3.6 mSv per WLM), which is significantly lower than the corresponding value derived from the biokinetic and dosimetric models. The dose conversion coefficient for occupational exposures with applying the risk models for miners was estimated with a value of 14 mSv per WLM, which is in good accordance with the results of the dosimetric models. To resolve the discrepancy regarding residential radon, the ICRP approaches for the determination of risks and doses were reviewed. It could be shown that ICRP overestimates the risk for lung cancer caused by residential radon. This can be attributed to a wrong population weighting of the radon-induced risks in its epidemiological approach. With the approach in this work, the average risks for lung cancer were determined, taking into account the age-specific risk contributions of all individuals in the population. As a result, a lower risk coefficient for residential radon was obtained. The results from the ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models for both, the occupationally exposed working age population and the whole population exposed to residential radon, can be brought in better accordance with the corresponding results of the epidemiological approach, if the respective relative radiation detriments and a radiation-weighting factor for alpha particles of about ten are used. (orig.)

  13. Confidence Intervals and "F" Tests for Intraclass Correlation Coefficients Based on Three-Way Mixed Effects Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Muellerleile, Paige; Ingram, Debra; Wong, Seok P.

    2011-01-01

    Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) are commonly used in behavioral measurement and psychometrics when a researcher is interested in the relationship among variables of a common class. The formulas for deriving ICCs, or generalizability coefficients, vary depending on which models are specified. This article gives the equations for…

  14. Effects of High-Dose Capsaicin on TMD Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B.K.; Fillingim, R.B.; Lee, S.; Brao, R.; Price, D.D.; Neubert, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is a complex musculoskeletal disorder that presents with pain, limited jaw opening, and abnormal noises in the temporomandibular joint. Despite the significant impact that TMD has in terms of suffering and financial burden, relatively few new treatments have emerged; therefore, development of novel treatments to treat TMD pain remains a high priority. The rationale of this study was to use a double-blind, vehicle-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a high-concentration (8%) capsaicin cream on TMD. This is based on the hypothesis that targeting TRP vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) for pain control may provide a novel method for pain relief in TMD patients. TRPV1 is primarily expressed on a population of nociceptive-specific neurons and provides a candidate target for the development of pain treatments. Capsaicin is the primary agonist for TRPV1 and has been used previously in relatively low doses (0.025% to 0.075%) as a therapeutic for a variety of pain disorders, including postherpetic neuralgia and osteoarthritis; however, analgesic efficacy remains equivocal. TMD and healthy control subjects were assigned to either an active capsaicin or vehicle control group. The treatments were applied for 2 h and then removed. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) was completed prior to drug application (baseline), 2 h after drug application, and 1 wk later. Perceived pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) following capsaicin or vehicle cream application. Significantly lower pain was reported in the week after application in the capsaicin-treated TMD subjects. For QST measures, there was a decreased thermal pain threshold 2 h after capsaicin application for both the control and TMD groups, but this resolved within a week. Capsaicin had no effect on pressure pain threshold or mechanical sensitivity in both TMD and healthy individuals. This study demonstrates that 8% topical capsaicin therapy is a

  15. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  16. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  17. Experimental and Numerical Study on Effects of Airflow and Aqueous Ammonium Temperature on Ammonia Mass Transfer Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-01-01

    to investigate the surface concentration distribution and mass transfer coefficient at different temperatures and velocities for which the Reynolds number is from 1.36 × 104 to 5.43 × 104 (based on wind tunnel length). The surface concentration increases as velocity decreases and varies...... greatly along the airflow direction on the emission surface. The average mass transfer coefficient increases with higher velocity and turbulence intensity. However, the mass transfer coefficient estimated by CFD simulation is consistently larger than the calculated one by the method using dissociation...... constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under...

  18. Effect of various nitrogen doses on copper and zinc accumulation in yellow lupine biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysokiński Andrzej

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments determined copper and zinc content and accumulation in yellow lupine roots, stems, leaves, flowers, pods and seeds. The test factors included development stages (BBCH 65 and BBCH 90 at which harvest was performed as well as nitrogen doses (0, 30, and 120 kg·ha−1 introduced to the soil prior to sowing. A higher copper content (by an average of 20.9% and zinc content (by 53.7% were obtained in the whole mass of lupine harvested at the flowering stage compared to that at the full maturity stage. Yellow lupine fertilised with 120 kg N·ha−1 contained and took up more copper and zinc than both lupine cultivated without nitrogen fertilization and fertilised with 30 kg N·ha−1. The application of different nitrogen doses had no significant effect on the contents of the micronutrients in the seeds of the test plant. The amount of copper and zinc accumulated in the seeds was the largest following the application of 120 kg N·ha−1. Lupine accumulated the largest amounts of both elements in the leaves irrespective of the development stage at which the harvest was carried out. The bioaccumulation factor for copper and zinc was higher in the lupine harvested at the flowering stage than in the lupine harvested at full maturity, but it was not significantly determined by the applied nitrogen fertilization. The values of translocation coefficient for the tested heavy metals, usually higher than 1, indicate significant potential for their accumulation in yellow lupine biomass. Under conditions of an increased zinc content in the soil, lupine green matter harvested at the flowering stage contained an above-standard amount of this heavy metal and could not be used for animal feed.

  19. Effects of low dose gamma radiation on the early growth of red pepper and the resistance to subsquent high dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Red pepper (capsicum annuum L. cv. Jokwang and cv. Johong) seeds were irradiated with the dose of 0{approx}50 Gy to investigated the effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation. The effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequenct high dose of radiation were enhanced in Johong cultivar but not in Jokwang cultivar. Germination rate and early growth of Johong cultivar were noticeably increased at 4 Gy-, 8 Gy- and 20 Gy irradiation group. Resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at almost all of the low dose irradiation group. Especially it was highest at 4 Gy irradiation group. The carotenoid contents and enzyme activity on the resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at the 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group.

  20. A Challenge to Scientific Risk Estimation on Health Effects of Low Dose Radiation - An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ono

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Although experimental as well as epidemiological studies have revealed the health effects of ionizing radiation, most of our knowledge is for high doses of radiation, while little is known for low doses. For practical purposes, we estimate the risk of low dose radiation by extrapolating the effects at high doses to low doses in a linear relationship. However, several lines of evidence have accumulated in recent years that suggest this linear extrapolation is not necessarily correct and needs further scientific evaluation. Today, many scientists in the field are striving to understand the biological responses to low dose radiation. This work will provide new and perhaps convincing data which are necessary for risk estimation of low dose radiation. Here, I overview the background of the issue.

  1. The therapeutic effect of high-dose esomeprazole on stress ulcer bleeding in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li-Hong; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yan, Zhi-Hui; He, Xing; Gong, San-Dong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of different doses of intravenous esomeprazole on treating trauma patients with stress ulcer bleeding. A total of 102 trauma patients with stress ulcer bleeding were randomly divided into 2 groups: 52 patients were assigned to the high-dose group who received 80 mg intravenous esomeprazole, and then 8 mg/h continuous infusion for 3 days; 50 patients were assigned to the conventional dose group who received 40 mg intravenous esomeprazole sodium once every 12 h for 72 h. Compared with the conventional dose group, the total efficiency of the high-dose group and conventional dose group was 98.08% and 86.00%, respectively (p esomeprazole have good hemostatic effects on stress ulcer bleeding in trauma patients. The high-dose esomeprazole is better for hemostasis.

  2. Effect of design specifications in dose-finding trials for combination therapies in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Gosho, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    Model-based dose-finding methods for a combination therapy involving two agents in phase I oncology trials typically include four design aspects namely, size of the patient cohort, three-parameter dose-toxicity model, choice of start-up rule, and whether or not to include a restriction on dose-level skipping. The effect of each design aspect on the operating characteristics of the dose-finding method has not been adequately studied. However, some studies compared the performance of rival dose-finding methods using design aspects outlined by the original studies. In this study, we featured the well-known four design aspects and evaluated the impact of each independent effect on the operating characteristics of the dose-finding method including these aspects. We performed simulation studies to examine the effect of these design aspects on the determination of the true maximum tolerated dose combinations as well as exposure to unacceptable toxic dose combinations. The results demonstrated that the selection rates of maximum tolerated dose combinations and UTDCs vary depending on the patient cohort size and restrictions on dose-level skipping However, the three-parameter dose-toxicity models and start-up rules did not affect these parameters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  4. Two separate dose-dependent effects of paroxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anette Green; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Nøhr-Jensen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate paroxetine's putative dose-dependent impact on pupil reaction and inhibition of the O-demethylation of tramadol. METHODS: Twelve healthy CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers participated in this double-blinded randomized five-way placebo controlled cross-over study; they received...... placebo, 10, 20, 30, and 50 mg paroxetine as single oral doses at bedtime. Next morning the pupil was measured followed by oral intake of 50 mg of tramadol, and urine was collected for 8 h. Three hours after ingestion of tramadol a second measurement of the pupil was performed. Enantioselective urine...... concentrations of (+/-)-tramadol and (+/-)-O-desmethyltramadol (M1) were determined. RESULTS: With placebo, the median maximum pupil diameter was 6.43 mm (range 5.45-7.75 mm) before tramadol and 6.22 mm (4.35-7.65 mm) after 50 mg of tramadol (P = 0.4935). Paroxetine resulted in a statistically significant, dose...

  5. Radiation dose measurements and effective dose calculations around the patients administered radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejiri, Kazutaka; Minami, Kazuyuki; Orito, Takeo [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). Health Science; Suzuki, Kasuo; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Naito, Aiko; Shimura, Masami; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koga, Sukehiko

    1999-05-01

    In order to estimate the effective dose (E) of a person who may come into close contact to the {sup 99m}Tc-GSA patients. Radiation dose rates around 21 adult patients (male: 14, female: 7) were measured with three ionization surveymeters (Aloka, ICS-301) at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m from the patients. Measurements were carried out at 0.75, 3.0, 6.0 and 24.0 h after the administrations of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA. Surveymeters were set up to the first cervical vertebrae (Level I), xiphoid process (Level II) and anterior superior iliac spine (Level III) of the patients with their standing erect. The maximum dose equivalent (H{sub 1cm}) rate of 64.98 {mu}Svh{sup -1} per 185 MBq was recorded in the level II. Effective half life of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA was 5.8 h. Total E around the patients were calculated by the initial H{sub 1cm} rates and the effective half life. Total E were 285, 62, 23 and 13 {mu}Sv per 185 MBq at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m, respectively. E for the first 24 h was corresponding to 94.3% of the total E. (author)

  6. Radiation dose measurements and effective dose calculations around the patients administered radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejiri, Kazutaka; Minami, Kazuyuki; Orito, Takeo [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Health Sciences; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Naito, Aiko; Shimura, Masami; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koga, Sukehiko

    1999-05-01

    In order to estimate the effective dose (E) of a person who may come into close contact to the {sup 99m}Tc-GSA patients. Radiation dose rates around 21 adult patients (male: 14, female: 7) were measured with three ionization surveymeters (Aloka, ICS-301) at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m from the patients. Measurements were carried out at 0.75, 3.0, 6.0 and 24.0 h after the administrations of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA. Surveymeters were set up to the first cervical vertebrae (Level I), xiphoid process (Level II) and anterior superior iliac spine (Level III) of the patients with their standing erect. The maximum dose equivalent (H{sup 1cm}) rate of 64.98 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} per 185 MBq was recorded in the Level II. Effective half life of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA was 5.8 h. Total E around the patients were calculated by the initial H{sup 1cm} rates and the effective half life. Total E were 285, 62, 23 and 13 {mu}Sv per 185 MBq at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m, respectively. E for the first 24 h was corresponding to 94.3% of the total E. (author)

  7. Radiation dose measurements and effective dose calculations around the patients administered radiopharmaceuticals of [sup 99m]Tc-GSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejiri, Kazutaka; Minami, Kazuyuki; Orito, Takeo (Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). Health Science); Suzuki, Kasuo; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Naito, Aiko; Shimura, Masami; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koga, Sukehiko

    1999-05-01

    In order to estimate the effective dose (E) of a person who may come into close contact to the [sup 99m]Tc-GSA patients. Radiation dose rates around 21 adult patients (male: 14, female: 7) were measured with three ionization surveymeters (Aloka, ICS-301) at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m from the patients. Measurements were carried out at 0.75, 3.0, 6.0 and 24.0 h after the administrations of [sup 99m]Tc-GSA. Surveymeters were set up to the first cervical vertebrae (Level I), xiphoid process (Level II) and anterior superior iliac spine (Level III) of the patients with their standing erect. The maximum dose equivalent (H[sub 1cm]) rate of 64.98 [mu]Svh[sup -1] per 185 MBq was recorded in the level II. Effective half life of [sup 99m]Tc-GSA was 5.8 h. Total E around the patients were calculated by the initial H[sub 1cm] rates and the effective half life. Total E were 285, 62, 23 and 13 [mu]Sv per 185 MBq at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m, respectively. E for the first 24 h was corresponding to 94.3% of the total E. (author)

  8. Effect of americium-241 alpha-particles on the dose-response of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquinero, J F; Stephan, G; Schmid, E

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate by the fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique the dose-response and intercellular distribution of alpha-particle-induced chromosome aberrations. In particular, the validity of using the yield of characteristic types of chromosome abnormalities in stable cells as quantitative indicators for retrospective dose reconstruction has been evaluated. Monolayers of human peripheral lymphocytes were exposed at doses from 0.02 to 1 Gy to alpha-particles emitted from a source of americium-241. The most probable energy of the alpha-particles entering the cells was 2.7 MeV. FISH painting was performed using DNA probes for chromosomes 2, 4 and 8 in combination with a pan-centromeric probe. In complete first-division cells, identified by harlequin staining, aberrations involving painted target chromosomal material were recorded as well as aberrations involving only unpainted chromosomal material. In total, the percentage of complex aberrations was about 35% and no dose dependence was observed. When complex-type exchanges were reduced to simple base types, the different cell distributions were clearly over-dispersed, and the linear coefficients of the dose-effect curves for translocations were significantly higher than for dicentrics. For past dose reconstruction, only a few complex aberrations were in stable cells. The linear coefficient obtained for transmissible aberrations in stable cells was more than seven times lower than that obtained in all analysed cells, i.e. including unstable cells. FISH-based analysis of complex rearrangements allows discrimination between partial-body exposures to low-linear energy transfer radiation and high-linear energy transfer exposures. In assessing past or chronic exposure to alpha-particles, the use of a dose-effect curve obtained by FISH-based translocation data, which had not excluded data determined in unstable cells, would underestimate the dose. Insertions are ineffective biomarkers because their frequency is too

  9. Effects of chain length, chlorination degree, and structure on the octanol-water partition coefficients of polychlorinated n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Bettina; Fromme, Hermann; Völkel, Wolfgang; Coelhan, Mehmet

    2011-04-01

    Log octanol-water partition coefficients (log Kow) of 40 synthesized polychlorinated n-alkanes (PCAs) with different chlorination degrees were determined using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). In addition, log Kow values of a technical mixture namely Cereclor 63L as well as 15 individual in house synthesized C10, C11, and C12 chloroalkanes with known chlorine positions were estimated. Based on these results, the effects of chain length, chlorination degree, and structure were explored. The estimated log Kow values ranged from 4.10 (polychlorinated n-decanes with 50.2% chlorine content) to 11.34 (polychlorinated n-octacosanes with 54.8% chlorine content) for PCAs and from 3.82 (1,2,5,6,9,10-hexachlorodecane) to 7.75 (1,1,1,3,9,11,11,11-octachlorododecane) for the individual chloroalkanes studied. The results showed that log Kow value was influenced linearly at a given chlorine content by chain length, while a polynominal effect was observed in dependence on the chlorination degree of an alkane chain. Chlorine substitution pattern influenced markedly the log Kow value of chloroalkanes.

  10. Effects of flooring on required coefficient of friction: Elderly adult vs. middle-aged adult barefoot gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin Kleiner, Ana Francisca; Galli, Manuela; Araujo do Carmo, Aline; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flooring on barefoot gait according to age and gender. Two groups of healthy subjects were analyzed: the elderly adult group (EA; 10 healthy subjects) and the middle-aged group (MA; 10 healthy subjects). Each participant was asked to walk at his or her preferred speed over two force plates on the following surfaces: 1) homogeneous vinyl (HOV), 2) carpet, 3) heterogeneous vinyl (HTV) and 4) mixed (in which the first half of the pathway was covered by HOV and the second by HTV). Two force plates (Kistler 9286BA) embedded in the data collection room floor measured the ground reaction forces and friction. The required coefficient of friction (RCOF) was analyzed. For the statistical analysis, a linear mixed-effects model for repeated measures was performed. During barefoot gait, there were differences in the RCOF among the flooring types during the heel contact and toe-off phases. Due to better plantar proprioception during barefoot gait, the EA and MA subjects were able to distinguish differences among the flooring types. Moreover, when the EA were compared with the MA subjects, differences could be observed in the RCOF during the toe-off phase, and gender differences in the RCOF could also be observed during the heel contact phase in barefoot gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of porous structure of catalyst layer on effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Gen; Kawase, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    It is important to reduce the oxygen diffusion resistance through PEFC porous electrode, because it is the key to reduce the PEFC cost. However, the gas diffusion coefficient of CL is lower than MPL in spite of framework consisted of same carbon blacks. In this study, in order to understand the reasons of the lower gas diffusion performance of CL, the relationship between a carbon black agglomerate structure and ionomer adhesion condition is evaluated by a numerical analysis with an actual reconstructed structure and a simulated structure. As a result, the gas diffusion property of CL strongly depends on the ionomer adhesion shape. In the case of adhesion shape with the same curvature of ionomer interface, each pore can not be connected enough. So the pore tortuosity increases. Moreover, in the case of existence of inefficient large pores formed by carbon black agglomerate and ununiformly coated ionomer, the gas diffusion performance decrease rapidly. As the measurement values in actual CL are almost equal to that with model structure with inefficient large pores. These characteristics can be confirmed by actual cross-section image obtained by FIB-SEM.

  12. Cardiac-Specific Conversion Factors to Estimate Radiation Effective Dose From Dose-Length Product in Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Halliburton, Sandra; Thompson, Carla M; Xu, Yanping; Chelliah, Anjali; Jambawalikar, Sachin R; Peng, Boyu; Peters, M Robert; Jacobs, Jill E; Ghesani, Munir; Jang, James J; Al-Khalidi, Hussein; Einstein, Andrew J

    2017-08-16

    This study sought to determine updated conversion factors (k-factors) that would enable accurate estimation of radiation effective dose (ED) for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and calcium scoring performed on 12 contemporary scanner models and current clinical cardiac protocols and to compare these methods to the standard chest k-factor of 0.014 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1). Accurate estimation of ED from cardiac CT scans is essential to meaningfully compare the benefits and risks of different cardiac imaging strategies and optimize test and protocol selection. Presently, ED from cardiac CT is generally estimated by multiplying a scanner-reported parameter, the dose-length product, by a k-factor which was determined for noncardiac chest CT, using single-slice scanners and a superseded definition of ED. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor radiation detectors were positioned in organs of anthropomorphic phantoms, which were scanned using all cardiac protocols, 120 clinical protocols in total, on 12 CT scanners representing the spectrum of scanners from 5 manufacturers (GE, Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba). Organ doses were determined for each protocol, and ED was calculated as defined in International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Effective doses and scanner-reported dose-length products were used to determine k-factors for each scanner model and protocol. k-Factors averaged 0.026 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1) (95% confidence interval: 0.0258 to 0.0266) and ranged between 0.020 and 0.035 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1). The standard chest k-factor underestimates ED by an average of 46%, ranging from 30% to 60%, depending on scanner, mode, and tube potential. Factors were higher for prospective axial versus retrospective helical scan modes, calcium scoring versus coronary CTA, and higher (100 to 120 kV) versus lower (80 kV) tube potential and varied among scanner models (range of average k-factors: 0.0229 to 0.0277 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1)). Cardiac

  13. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  14. Effectiveness of 3 doses of Intermittent Preventive Therapy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In 2014, Nigeria scaled up to at least 3 doses of intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (ITPp-SP). While the fact of existing evidence as to the superiority of SP3 over SP2 was shown by WHO back in 2012, the Nigerian Government domesticated it in her Federal Ministry ...

  15. Carbamazepine Poisoning and Effect of Multiple-Dose Activated Charcoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnoush B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carbamazepine is commonly used in a variety of indications. Poisoning by this drug, can lead to coma, seizures, cardiac disorders and respiratory distress. The treatment of poisoning is generally supportive. Method: 68 poisoned patients with carbamazepine, who referred to poisoning ward of Loghman Hospital, from July 2003 to September 2004, were studied. These patients were investigated for demographic details, complications and types of treatment. Patients were grouped into two, receiving either single dose of activated charcoal (30patients or multiple doses of activated charcoal (38patients. Results: 58.8%of patients were female and 41.2% were male, the average age being 24.2 years old. The most obvious clinical symptom was a decreased level of consciousness, in 69% of cases. Therapeutically, those taking multiple doses of charcoal, were about 24 hours faster in recovery from clinical symptoms and leaving the hospital than other patients. Conclusion and Recommendation: The results of this study are compatible with previous ones. Factors like education for suitable management, good care and psychiatric consult have important roles in prevention and treatment. Furthermore, administration of repeated doses of charcoal is therapeutically very important.

  16. Effect of high-dose finasteride combined with transurethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Re-bleeding within 3 months after surgery in the three groups were performed and the patients observed. ... Seven days after surgery, international prostate symptom score (IPSS), serum PSA, and TNF-α and IL-1β in prostatic fluid of the high- and low-dose groups were ...

  17. Chemi-luminescent technique using low dose effect characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, A.I.; Porokhnyak, L.A. [A.V. palladin Institute of Biochemistry, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-03-01

    Some Ukrainian and Belarusian territories are polluted by radioactive elements as Chernobyl AES accident consequence in 1986. Radioactive substances enter to animals and human organism with the food and lead to internal irradiation. The purpose of this work is he changes characteristic for an organism under internal irradiation low dose estimated by means of chemi-luminescent (Chl) techniques. (authors)

  18. Dose-dependent effects of exogenous gonadotrophins on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We compared the serwn levels of oestrogen and progesterone and the endometrial morphology of normal pregnant rats at 5,5 days' gestation with those of pregnant rats given either low (10 IU) or high (20 IU) doses of two gonadotrophins: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and hwnan chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG).

  19. Effective dose estimation in whole-body multislice CT in paediatric trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, Robin D.; Saueressig, Ulrich; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Bley, Thorsten A. [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Strohm, Peter C.; Zwingmann, Joern; Suedkamp, Norbert P. [University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Uhl, Markus [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Paediatric Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    The number of multislice CT (MSCT) scans performed in polytraumatized children has increased rapidly. There is growing concern regarding the radiation dose in MSCT and its long-term consequences, especially in children. To determine the effective dose to polytraumatized children who undergo whole-body MSCT. A total of 51 traumatized children aged 0-16 years underwent a polytrauma protocol CT scan between November 2004 and August 2006 at our institution. The effective dose was calculated retrospectively by a computer program (CT-Expo 1.5, Hannover, Germany). The mean effective dose was 20.8 mSv (range 8.6-48.9 mSv, SD{+-}7.9 mSv). There was no statistically significant difference in the effective dose between male and female patients. Whole-body MSCT is a superior diagnostic tool in polytraumatized children with 20.8 mSv per patient being a justified mean effective dose. In a potentially life-threatening situation whole-body MSCT provides the clinicians with relevant information to initiate life-saving therapy. Radiologists should use special paediatric protocols that include dose-saving mechanisms to keep the effective dose as low as possible. Further studies are needed to examine and advance dose-saving strategies in MSCT, especially in children. (orig.)

  20. Dose-related effects of dexamethasone on liver damage due to bile duct ligation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eken, Halil; Ozturk, Hayrettin; Ozturk, Hulya; Buyukbayram, Huseyin

    2006-09-07

    To evaluate the effects of dexamethasone on liver damage in rats with bile duct ligation. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 165-205 g, were used in this study. Group 1 (sham-control, n = 10) rats underwent laparotomy alone and the bile duct was just dissected from the surrounding tissue. Group 2 rats (untreated, n = 10) were subjected to bile duct ligation (BDL) and no drug was applied. Group 3 rats (low-dose dexa, n = 10) received a daily dose of dexamethasone by orogastric tube for 14 d after BDL. Group 4 rats (high-dose dexa, n = 10) received a daily dose of dexamethasone by orogastric tube for 14 d after BDL. At the end of the two-week period, biochemical and histological evaluations were processed. The mean serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels significantly decreased, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) values were significantly increased in low-dose dexa and high-dose dexa groups when compared to the untreated group. The histopathological score was significantly less in the low-dose and high-dose dexa groups compared to the untreated rats. In the low-dose dexa group, moderate liver damage was seen, while mild liver damage was observed in the high-dose dexa group. Corticosteroids reduced liver damage produced by bile duct obstruction. However, the histopathological score was not significantly lower in the high-dose corticosteroid group as compared to the low-dose group. Thus, low-dose corticosteroid provides a significant reduction of liver damage without increased side effects, while high dose is associated not with lower fibrosis but with increased side effects.

  1. Vitamin D status and effect of low-dose cholecalciferol and high-dose ergocalciferol supplementation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, G S; Cettomai, D; Baynes, M; Ratchford, J N; Newsome, S; Harrison, D; Kerr, D; Greenberg, B M; Calabresi, P A

    2009-06-01

    Vitamin D is important for bone health and immune regulation, and has been shown to be low in multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought to determine the effect of over the counter low dose cholecalciferol (LDC) and high dose ergocalciferol (HDE) on the vitamin D levels in MS patients. We retrospectively evaluated serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels of 199 patients (CIS, n = 32; RRMS, n = 115; PPMS, n = 10; SPMS, n = 16; Transverse Myelitis (TM), n = 9; other neurological diseases, n = 16) attending our clinic between 2004 and 2008. We examined the change in 25(OH)D levels in 40 MS patients who took either LDC ( or =100 nmol/L) were only achieved in less than 40% of patients. We conclude that large numbers of patients with MS and TM in our cohort are deficient in vitamin D. HDE significantly elevated 25(OH)D levels in MS patients and was more effective at increasing 25(OH)D levels than LDC. Prospective studies are required to determine appropriate dosing regimen to achieve optimal levels in the majority of MS patients and to ascertain the safety, immunological response, and ultimately the clinical efficacy of vitamin D replacement therapy.

  2. In situ protocol for the determination of dose-response effect of low-fluoride dentifrices on enamel remineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Lima AFONSO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No in situ protocol has assessed the dose-response effects of fluoride dentifrices involving low-fluoride formulations. Objective: To assess the ability of an in situ remineralization model in determining dose-response effects of dentifrices containing low fluoride concentrations ([F] on bovine enamel. Material and Methods: Volunteers wore palatal appliances containing demineralized enamel blocks and brushed their teeth and devices with the dentifrices supplied (double-blind, crossover protocol separately for 3 and 7 days. Surface hardness (SH, integrated subsurface hardness (ΔKHN and [F] in enamel were determined. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation (p<0.05. Results: Dose-response relationships were verified between [F] in dentifrices and SH, ΔKHN and enamel [F]. Higher correlation coefficients between enamel [F] and SH and ΔKHN were obtained for the 3-day period. Significant differences in SH and ΔKHN were observed among all groups for the 3-day period, but not between 0-275, 275-550, and 550-1,100 µg F/g dentifrices for the 7-day period, nor between 3- and 7-day periods for the 1,100 µg F/g groups. Conclusions: Considering that the peak remineralization capacity of the conventional dentifrice (1,100 µg F/g was achieved in 3 days, this experimental period could be used in future studies assessing new dentifrice formulations, especially at low-fluoride concentrations.

  3. Effect of Admission Oral Diuretic Dose on Response to Continuous versus Bolus Intravenous Diuretics in Acute Heart Failure: An Analysis from DOSE-AHF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravi V.; McNulty, Steven; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Felker, G. Michael; Braunwald, Eugene; Givertz, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Results from the Diuretic Optimization Strategies in Acute Heart Failure (DOSE-AHF) study suggest that an initial continuous infusion of loop diuretics is not superior to bolus dosing with regard to clinical endpoints in AHF. We hypothesized that outpatient furosemide dose was associated with congestion and poorer renal function, and explored the hypothesis that a continuous infusion may be more effective in patients on higher outpatient diuretic doses. Methods DOSE-AHF randomized 308 patients within 24 hours of admission to high vs. low initial intravenous diuretic dose given as either a continuous infusion or bolus. We compared baseline characteristics and assessed associations between mode of administration (bolus vs. continuous) and outcomes in patients receiving high-dose (≥120 mg furosemide equivalent, n=177) versus low-dose (diuretics. Results Patients on higher doses of furosemide were less frequently on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (P=.01), and had worse renal function and more advanced symptoms. There was a significant interaction between outpatient dose and mode of therapy (P=0.01) with respect to net fluid loss at 72 hours after adjusting for creatinine and intensification strategy. Admission diuretic dose was associated with an increased risk of death or rehospitalization at 60 days (adjusted HR=1.08 per 20-mg increment in dose, 95% CI 1.01–1.16, P=.03). Conclusions In acute HF, patients on higher diuretic doses have greater disease severity, and may benefit from an initial bolus strategy. PMID:23194486

  4. Epidemiological methods for assessing dose-response and dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellström, Tord; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    and their compounds. An entirely new structure and illustrations represent the vast array of advancements made since the last edition. Special emphasis has been placed on the toxic effects in humans with chapters on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of metal poisoning. This up-to-date reference provides easy...... and Toxicity Carcinogenicity of Metal Compounds Immunotoxicology of Metals Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Metals Ecotoxicology of Metals - Sources, Transport, and Effects in the Ecosystem Risk Assessment Diagnosis and Treatment of Metal Poisoning - General Aspects Principles for Prevention...... of the Toxic Effects of Metals Aluminum Antimony Arsenic Barium Beryllium Bismuth Cadmium Chromium Cobalt Copper Gallium and Semiconductor Compounds Germanium Indium Iron Lead Manganese Mercury Molybdenum Nickel Palladium Platinum Selenium Silver Tellurium Thallium Tin Titanium Tungsten Uranium Vanadium Zinc...

  5. Enteric coating can lead to reduced antiplatelet effect of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz Haastrup, Peter; Grønlykke, Thor; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Enteric coated ASA has been developed in order to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. The consequences of enteric coating on pharmacokinetics and antiplatelet effect of ASA have not systematically be....... Therefore, low dose enteric coated ASA might not be bioequivalent to plain ASA, entailing the risk of insufficient cardiovascular prophylaxis....

  6. Can a single dose response predict the effect of montelukast on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Elin T. G.; Akkerman-Nijland, Anne M.; Driessen, Jean M. M.; Diamant, Zuzana; Thio, Bernard J.

    RationaleExercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) can be prevented by a single dose of montelukast (MLK). The effect is variable, similar to the variable responsiveness observed after daily treatment with MLK. We hypothesized that the effect of a single MLK-dose (5 or 10mg) on EIB could predict

  7. Effectiveness of a 6-dose regimen of Artemether-Lumefantrine for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complex dosage schedule could militate against its effectiveness. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of AL prescribed under routine outpatient conditions ... Enrolled children received 6-dose course of AL (20/120mg tablets). The first dose was administered in the health facility and caregivers were instructed on how ...

  8. Evaluation of effective dose with chest digital tomosynthesis system using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system has recently been introduced and studied. This system offers the potential to be a substantial improvement over conventional chest radiography for the lung nodule detection and reduces the radiation dose with limited angles. PC-based Monte Carlo program (PCXMC) simulation toolkit (STUK, Helsinki, Finland) is widely used to evaluate radiation dose in CDT system. However, this toolkit has two significant limits. Although PCXMC is not possible to describe a model for every individual patient and does not describe the accurate X-ray beam spectrum, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation describes the various size of phantom for individual patient and proper X-ray spectrum. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate effective dose in CDT system with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit using GATE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effective dose in virtual infant chest phantom of posterior-anterior (PA) view in CDT system using GATE simulation. We obtained the effective dose at different tube angles by applying dose actor function in GATE simulation which was commonly used to obtain the medical radiation dosimetry. The results indicated that GATE simulation was useful to estimate distribution of absorbed dose. Consequently, we obtained the acceptable distribution of effective dose at each projection. These results indicated that GATE simulation can be alternative method of calculating effective dose in CDT applications.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and effective infrared absorption coefficient in IR semitransparent and semiconducting n-CdMgSe crystals using photothermal radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, M., E-mail: mpawlak@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziądzka 5/7, Toruń (Poland); Maliński, M. [Department of Electronics and Computer Science, Koszalin University of Technology, 2 Śniadeckich St., Koszalin 75-453 (Poland)

    2015-01-10

    Highlights: • The new method of determination of the effective infrared absorption coefficient is presented. • The method can be used for transparent samples for the excitation radiation. • The effect of aluminum foil on the PTR signal in a transmission configuration is discussed. - Abstract: In this paper we propose a new procedure of simultaneous estimation of the effective infrared optical absorption coefficient and the thermal diffusivity of solid state samples using the photothermal infrared radiometry method in the transmission configuration. The proposed procedure relies on the analysis of the frequency dependent signal obtained from the samples covered with thin aluminum foil. This method can be applied for both optically opaque and transparent samples. The proposed method is illustrated with the results of the thermal diffusivity and the effective IR absorption coefficient obtained for several Cd{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}Se crystals.

  10. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitan, J.B.; Bergan, T.D.; Strand, P. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway); Melbye, O.J. [Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    1998-01-01

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-07

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and [Formula: see text]. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of [Formula: see text] were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the spectral method. The

  12. The effect of rare-earth filtration on organ doses in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asako, Satoshi; Satoh, Kenji; Furumoto, Keiichi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-08-01

    Filters of rare-earth elements such as lanthanum (La, Z=57), samarium (Sm, Z=62), gadolinium (Gd, Z=64) and erbium (Er, Z=68) are frequently used in radiography for the purpose of reducing the patient dose by eliminating low-energy and high-energy X-rays which are not involved in imaging. It is useful to evaluate the dose reduction achieved by these rare-earth filters in terms of organ dose, and the effective dose equivalent, which is used for evaluating carcinogenic risks and hereditary effects of X-ray irradiation, for the purpose of optimizing the radiographic technique and radiation protection. Therefore, we calculated the organ dose and effective dose equivalent during intraoral radiography of the maxillary incisor region by simulation using samarium or erbium, typical rare-earth elements, in filtration. We evaluated the effects of these metals in dose reduction. When samarium or erbium, 0.1 mm thick, was used in added filtration at tube voltage of 60, 70, 80 and 90 kV, the time required for radiography almost doubled, respectively. The organ dose at each tube voltage was the largest in the parathyroid and thyroid glands, followed by bone surfaces and the optic lenses, skin, red bone marrow and salivary glands, larynx, and brain, in that order. The organ dose at sites other than the larynx and brain decreased as the quality of the incident X-ray beam was hardened. When samarium or erbium was added at each voltage, the effective dose equivalent was reduced by about 20% to 45%. Erbium was more effective than samarium in reducing the effective dose equivalent, and either of the two elements decreased its effectiveness with an increase in tube voltage. (author) 43 refs.

  13. Using the continual reassessment method to estimate the minimum effective dose in phase II dose-finding studies: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Chevret, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The Continual Reassessment Method typically is presented as the method of choice for the purpose of dose-finding based on a toxicity scale in phase I clinical trials. However, this adaptive statistical approach also can be applied easily to dose-finding experiments in phase II trials. To provide a case study from a real clinical trial to illustrate the use of the Continual Reassessment Method in the context of phase II dose finding. The Continual Reassessment Method was used to model the dose-failure relationship in order to estimate the minimal effective dose. This approach was retrospectively used to determine the minimal effective dose of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood stem cell collection in allografted patients following chemotherapy. After the inclusion of 25 patients, the minimal effective dose was estimated to be the third dose level tested in the study. The main limitation of the Continual Reassessment Method, which is not specific to the method but to the dose-finding setting, is that the empirical choice of the dose range can be either under or over-estimated. The method requires a calibration study prior to trial onset. Assuming that a dose-effect relationship is monotonically increasing, the use of the Continual Reassessment Method in phase II dose-finding studies allows the estimation of the minimum effective dose for further studies. Modeling the dose-failure relationship allows the direct use of available software developed for the Continual Reassessment Method in the context of phase I clinical trials.

  14. Cytogenetic biodosimetry and dose-rate effect after radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostunov, Igor K. [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Saenko, Vladimir A.; Yamashita, Shunichi [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Krylov, Valeri; Rodichev, Andrei [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    This study set out to investigate chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of thyroid cancer patients receiving {sup 131}I for thyroid remnant ablation or treatment of metastatic disease. The observed chromosomal damage was further converted to the estimates of whole-body dose to project the adverse side effects. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in 24 patients treated for the first time or after multiple courses. Blood samples were collected before treatment and 3 or 4 days after administration of 2-4 GBq of {sup 131}I. Both conventional cytogenetic and chromosome 2, 4 and 12 painting assays were used. To account for dose-rate effect, a dose-protraction factor was applied to calculate the whole-body dose. The mean dose was 0.62 Gy (95% CI: 0.44-0.77 Gy) in the subgroup of patients treated one time and 0.67 Gy (95% CI: 0.03-1.00 Gy) in re-treated patients. These dose estimates are about 1.7-fold higher than those disregarding the effect of exposure duration. In re-treated patients, the neglected dose-rate effect can result in underestimation of the cumulative whole-body dose by the factor ranging from 2.6 to 6.8. Elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations observed in re-treated patients before radioiodine therapy allows estimation of a cumulative dose received from all previous treatments. (orig.)

  15. Comparison between effective radiation dose of CBCT and MSCT scanners for dentomaxillofacial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubele, M. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Miet.Loubele@uzleuven.be; Bogaerts, R. [Department of Experimental Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Ria.Bogaerts@med.kuleuven.be; Van Dijck, E. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, R. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: ruben.pauwels@med.kuleuven.be; Vanheusden, S. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Suetens, P. [ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Paul.Suetens@esat.kuleuven.be; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Guy.Marchal@uzleuven.be (and others)

    2009-09-15

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose levels of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for maxillofacial applications with those of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Study design: The effective doses of 3 CBCT scanners were estimated (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, and NewTom 3G) and compared to the dose levels for corresponding image acquisition protocols for 3 MSCT scanners (Somatom VolumeZoom 4, Somatom Sensation 16 and Mx8000 IDT). The effective dose was calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), placed in a Rando Alderson phantom, and expressed according to the ICRP 103 (2007) guidelines (including a separate tissue weighting factor for the salivary glands, as opposed to former ICRP guidelines). Results: Effective dose values ranged from 13 to 82 {mu}Sv for CBCT and from 474 to 1160 {mu}Sv for MSCT. CBCT dose levels were the lowest for the Accuitomo 3D, and highest for the i-CAT. Conclusions: Dose levels for CBCT imaging remained far below those of clinical MSCT protocols, even when a mandibular protocol was applied for the latter, resulting in a smaller field of view compared to various CBCT protocols. Considering this wide dose span, it is of outmost importance to justify the selection of each of the aforementioned techniques, and to optimise the radiation dose while achieving a sufficient image quality. When comparing these results to previous dosimetric studies, a conversion needs to be made using the latest ICRP recommendations.

  16. Effect of Low-Dose (Single-Dose Magnesium Sulfate on Postoperative Analgesia in Hysterectomy Patients Receiving Balanced General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Taheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Aparallel, randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled trial study was designed to assess the efficacy of single low dose of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH pain relief under balanced general anesthesia. Subject and Methods. Forty women undergoing TAH surgery were assigned to two magnesium sulfate (N=20 and normal saline (N=20 groups randomly. The magnesium group received magnesium sulfate 50 mg·kg−1 in 100 mL of normal saline solution i.v as single-dose, just 15 minutes before induction of anesthesia whereas patients in control group received 100 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride solution at the same time. The same balanced general anesthesia was induced for two groups. Pethidine consumption was recorded over 24 hours precisely as postoperative analgesic. Pain score was evaluated with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS at 0, 6, 12, and 24 hours after the surgeries. Results. Postoperative pain score was lower in magnesium group at 6, 12, and 24 hours after the operations significantly (P<0.05. Pethidine requirement was significantly lower in magnesium group throughout 24 hours after the surgeries (P=0.0001. Conclusion. Single dose of magnesium sulfate during balanced general anesthesia could be considered as effective and safe method to reduce postoperative pain and opioid consumption after TAH.

  17. Characterization and prediction of monomer-based dose rate effects in electron-beam polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schissel, Sage M.; Lapin, Stephen C.; Jessop, Julie L. P.

    2017-12-01

    Properties of some materials produced by electron-beam (EB) induced polymerization appear dependent upon the rate at which the initiating dose was delivered. However, the magnitude of these dose rate effects (DREs) can vary greatly with different monomer formulations, suggesting DREs are dependent on chemical structure. The relationship among dose, dose rate, conversion, and the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured material was explored for an acrylate monomer series. A strong correlation was determined between the DRE magnitude and monomer size, and this correlation may be attributed to chain transfer. Using the Tg shift caused by changes in dose, a preliminary predictive relationship was developed to estimate the magnitude of the Tg DRE, enabling scale-up of process variables for polymers prone to dose rate effects.

  18. Towards self-consistent plasma modelisation in presence of neoclassical tearing mode and sawteeth: effects on transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, V.; Huynh, P.; Merle, A.; Nowak, S.; Sauter, O.; Contributors, JET; the EUROfusion-IM Team

    2017-12-01

    The neoclassical tearing modes (NTM) increase the effective heat and particle radial transport inside the plasma, leading to a flattening of the electron and ion temperature and density profiles at a given location depending on the safety factor q rational surface (Hegna and Callen 1997 Phys. Plasmas 4 2940). In burning plasma such as in ITER, this NTM-induced increased transport could reduce significantly the fusion performance and even lead to a disruption. Validating models describing the NTM-induced transport in present experiment is thus important to help quantifying this effect on future devices. In this work, we apply an NTM model to an integrated simulation of current, heat and particle transport on JET discharges using the European transport simulator. In this model, the heat and particle radial transport coefficients are modified by a Gaussian function locally centered at the NTM position and characterized by a full width proportional to the island size through a constant parameter adapted to obtain the best simulations of experimental profiles. In the simulation, the NTM model is turned on at the same time as the mode is triggered in the experiment. The island evolution is itself determined by the modified Rutherford equation, using self-consistent plasma parameters determined by the transport evolution. The achieved simulation reproduces the experimental measurements within the error bars, before and during the NTM. A small discrepancy is observed on the radial location of the island due to a shift of the position of the computed q = 3/2 surface compared to the experimental one. To explain such small shift (up to about 12% with respect to the position observed from the experimental electron temperature profiles), sensitivity studies of the NTM location as a function of the initialization parameters are presented. First results validate both the transport model and the transport modification calculated by the NTM model.

  19. Low-dose alcohol effects on human behavior and performance: a review of post 1984 research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to survey the literature examining alcohol effects on human behavior and performance, especially low alcohol dose effects. Other comprehensive reviews on this topic from 1975 to 1990 found that alcohol could affect all ...

  20. Effects of age and low doses of alcohol on compensatory tracking during angular acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Heightened interest in existing FAA regulations regarding alcohol and flying, with emphasis on the potential effects of low blood alcohol levels on performance, indicated a need for research to help define effects of low doses of alcohol on performan...

  1. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Mi Joo

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells, mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13, and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Total Ionizing Dose Effects on High Resolution (12-/14-bit) Analog-to-Digital Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. I.; Rax, B. G.; Johnson, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports total dose radiation test results for high resolution 12-/14-bit A/D converters. Small changes in internal components can cause these devices to fail their specifications at relatively low total dose levels. Degradation of signal-to-noise ratio becomes increasingly importamt for high accuracy converters. Rebound effects in the thick-oxide MOS devices causes these responses to be different at low and high dose rates, which is a major concern for space applications.

  3. The effects of x-ray beam hardening on detective quantum efficiency and radiation dose

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the effects of x-ray beam hardening on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the radiation dose of an inline x-ray imaging system. The DQE and the average glandular dose were both calculated under the same experimental conditions for a range of beam hardening levels, corresponding to no added beam hardening and two thicknesses each of Rhodium (Rh) and Molybdenum (Mo) filters. The dose calculation results demonstrate a reduction of 15%...

  4. Effective dose evaluation for BNCT treatment in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.N. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)] [Division of Health Physics, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.K. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tsai, W.C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Y.H. [Nuclear Science and Technol. Develop. Center, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Jiang, S.H., E-mail: shjiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    This paper aims to evaluate the effective dose as well as equivalent doses of several organs of an adult hermaphrodite mathematical phantom according to the definition of ICRP Publication 60 for BNCT treatments of brain tumors in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code was used for the calculation of the average absorbed dose of each organ. The effective doses for a typical brain tumor treatment with a tumor treatment dose of 20 Gy-eq were evaluated to be 0.59 and 0.35 Sv for the LLAT and TOP irradiation geometries, respectively. In addition to the stochastic effect, it was found that it is also likely to produce deterministic effects, such as cataracts and depression of haematopoiesis.

  5. Effects of Cross-Sectional Shape, Solidity, and Distribution of Heat-Transfer Coefficient on the Torsional Stiffness of Thin Wings Subjected to Aerodynamic Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Robert G.

    1959-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of varying the shape, solidity, and heat-transfer coefficient of thin wings with regard to their influence on the torsional-stiffness reduction induced by aerodynamic heating. The variations in airfoil shape include blunting, flattening, and combined blunting and flattening of a solid wing of symmetrical double-wedge cross section. Hollow double-wedge wings of constant skin thickness with and without internal webs also are considered. The effects of heat-transfer coefficients appropriate for laminar and turbulent flow are investigated in addition to a step transition along the chord from a lower to a higher constant value of heat-transfer coefficient. From the results given it is concluded that the flattening of a solid double wedge decreases the reduction in torsional stiffness while slight degrees of blunting increase the loss. The influence of chordwise variations in heat-transfer coefficient due to turbulent and laminar boundary-layer flow on the torsional stiffness of solid wings is negligible. The effect of a step transition in heat-transfer coefficient along the chord of a solid wing can, however, become appreciable. The torsional-stiffness reduction of multiweb and hollow double-wedge wings is substantially less than that calculated for a solid wing subjected to the same heating conditions.

  6. A varying coefficient model to measure the effectiveness of mass media anti-smoking campaigns in generating calls to a Quitline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Quang M; Huggins, Richard M; Hwang, Wen-Han; White, Victoria; Erbas, Bircan

    2010-01-01

    Anti-smoking advertisements are an effective population-based smoking reduction strategy. The Quitline telephone service provides a first point of contact for adults considering quitting. Because of data complexity, the relationship between anti-smoking advertising placement, intensity, and time trends in total call volume is poorly understood. In this study we use a recently developed semi-varying coefficient model to elucidate this relationship. Semi-varying coefficient models comprise parametric and nonparametric components. The model is fitted to the daily number of calls to Quitline in Victoria, Australia to estimate a nonparametric long-term trend and parametric terms for day-of-the-week effects and to clarify the relationship with target audience rating points (TARPs) for the Quit and nicotine replacement advertising campaigns. The number of calls to Quitline increased with the TARP value of both the Quit and other smoking cessation advertisement; the TARP values associated with the Quit program were almost twice as effective. The varying coefficient term was statistically significant for peak periods with little or no advertising. Semi-varying coefficient models are useful for modeling public health data when there is little or no information on other factors related to the at-risk population. These models are well suited to modeling call volume to Quitline, because the varying coefficient allowed the underlying time trend to depend on fixed covariates that also vary with time, thereby explaining more of the variation in the call model.

  7. A triazolam/amphetamine dose-effect interaction study: dissociation of effects on memory versus arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzer, Miriam Z; Griffiths, Roland R

    2007-06-01

    In addition to producing robust memory impairment, benzodiazepines also induce marked sedation. Thus, it is possible that the observed amnestic effects are secondary to more global sedative effects and do not reflect a specific primary benzodiazepine effect on memory mechanisms. The objective was to use the nonspecific stimulant d-amphetamine to dissociate the sedative and memory-impairing effects of the benzodiazepine triazolam. Single oral doses of placebo, triazolam alone (0.25, 0.50 mg/70 kg), d-amphetamine sulfate alone (20, 30 mg/70 kg), and triazolam (0.25, 0.50 mg/70 kg) and d-amphetamine sulfate (20, 30 mg/70 kg) conjointly (at all dose combinations) were administered to 18 healthy adult participants across nine sessions in a double-blind, staggered-dosing, crossover design. In addition to standard data analyses, analyses were also conducted on z-score standardized data, enabling effects to be directly compared across measures. Relative to the sedative measures, the memory measures generally exhibited a pattern of less reversal of triazolam's effects by d-amphetamine. The memory measures ranged in degree of reversal such that the most reversal was observed for reaction time on the n-back working memory task, and the least reversal was observed for accuracy on the Sternberg working memory task, with most measures showing an overall pattern of partial reversal. Benzodiazepines have specific effects on memory that are not merely a by-product of the drugs' sedative effects, and the degree to which sedative effects contribute to the amnestic effects varies as a function of the particular memory process being assessed.

  8. The Effect of a Fluorophore Photo-Physics on the Lipid Vesicle Diffusion Coefficient Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Sikorski, Aleksander; Langner, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique, which allows determination of the diffusion coefficient and concentration of fluorescent objects suspended in the solution. The measured parameter is the fluctuation of the fluorescence signal emitted by diffusing molecules. When 100 nm DOPC vesicles labeled with various fluorescent dyes (Fluorescein-PE, NBD-PE, Atto488 DOPE or βBodipy FL) were measured, different values of diffusion coefficients have been obtained. These diffusion coefficients were different from the expected values measured using the dynamic light scattering method (DLS). The FCS was initially developed for solutions containing small fluorescent molecules therefore the observed inconsistency may result from the nature of vesicle suspension itself. The duration of the fluorescence signal may depend on the following factors: the exposure time of the labeled object to the excitation beam, the photo-physical properties (e.g., stability) of a fluorophore, the theoretical model used for the calculations of the diffusion coefficient and optical properties of the vesicle suspension. The diffusion coefficients determined for differently labeled liposomes show that its dependence on vesicle size and quantity of fluorescent probed used for labeling was significant demonstrating that the fluorescence properties of the fluorophore itself (bleaching and/or blinking) were critical factors for a correct outcome of FCS experiment. The new, based on combined FCS and DLS measurements, method for the determination of the focal volume prove itself to be useful for the evaluation of a fluorescence dye with respect to its applicability for FCS experiment.

  9. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Angel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Denham, James W. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  10. Thermal Rate Coefficients and Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reaction OH + CH4→ H2O + CH3on an Ab Initio Based Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2018-02-26

    Thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction and its various isotopologues are computed using a tunneling-corrected transition-state theory on a global potential energy surface recently developed by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points. The calculated rate coefficients are found to agree well with the measured ones in a wide temperature range, validating the accuracy of the potential energy surface. Strong non-Arrhenius effects are found at low temperatures. In addition, the calculations reproduced the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. These results confirm the strong influence of tunneling to this heavy-light-heavy hydrogen abstraction reaction.

  11. Effect of different crop management systems on net primary productivity and relative carbon allocation coefficients for corn (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khorramdel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of different crop management practices on corn (Zea mays L. net primary productivity (NPP and relative carbon allocation coefficients, a field experiment was conducted based on a completely randomized block design with four replications in the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during two growing season 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Treatments including two low input management systems based on application of cow manure and compost municipal made from house-hold waste, a medium input system and a high input system. Application of inputs and management practices were based on a basic assumption made prior to the start of the experiment. On the other words, for each of the management system the particular set of inputs were allocated. In this respect, for low input system 30 t.ha-1 cow manure or 30 t.ha-1 compost municipal made from house-hold waste, twice hand weeding were used. In medium management system, 15 t.ha-1 compost municipal made from house-hold waste, 150 kg.ha-1 urea, two seed bed operations, 1.5 l.ha-1 2, 4-D herbicide applied at five-leaf stage and one time hand weeding were used. In high input system, the inputs were two seed bed operations, 2 l.ha-1 Paraquat herbicide used after seeding and 1.5 l.ha-1 2, 4-D applied at five-leaf stage. Results showed that the effect of different crop management practices on the shoot biomass, seed weight, root biomass, total biomass, shoot biomass: root biomass (S:R, SRL and HI were significant (p≥0.01. High input management system enhanced total biomass and S:R and decreased seed weight, root biomass and SRL. The highest and the lowest total biomass observed in high input (18.3 kg.m-2.yr-1 and low input with using compost (10.3 kg.m-2.yr-1, respectively. The maximum SRL observed in low input based on cow manure application (19.8 cm.cm-3 soil and the minimum SRL was in high input (1.3 cm.cm-3 soil. Range of relative carbon allocation

  12. Effect of population density and dose of nitrogen and potassium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was executed in a split randomized complete block design with three replications. Two plant densities (D), (D1; D2) equal to one plant and two plants per pot and seven fertilizers doses (F), (N0 K0; N1 K0; N1 K1; N2 K0; N2 K2; N0 K1; N0 K2) were investigated. N0, N11 and N2 equal to 0, 0.46, and 0.92 g ...

  13. Pharmacokinetics and effect on the corrected QT interval of single-dose escitalopram in healthy elderly compared with younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyewon; Kim, Anhye; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Park, Sang-In; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Cho, Joo-Youn; Chung, Jae-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Escitalopram is the (S)-enantiomer of citalopram that has a potential QT prolonging effect. In this study, 12 healthy elderly individuals