WorldWideScience

Sample records for effective beam width

  1. Combined effect of high curing temperature and crack width on chloride migration in reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkedrouci, L.; Diao, B.; Pang, S.; Li, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is a serious concern in the construction engineering, largely due to chloride induced corrosion of reinforcement. Chloride penetration is markedly influenced by one or several major factors at the same time such as cuing in combination with different crack widths which have spectacular effect on reinforced concrete structures. This research presents the results of an experimental investigation involving reinforced concrete beams with three different crack widths ranging from 0 to 0.2mm, curing temperatures of 20°C or 40°C and water-to-cement of 0.5. Chloride content profiles were determined under non-steady state diffusion at 20°C. Based on the obtained results, higher chloride content was obtained under condition of high curing temperature in combination with large crack more than 0.1mm and there are no significant differences between narrow crack width (less than 0.1 mm) and beams without crack (0 mm).

  2. Beam-width spreading of vortex beams in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Li, Jinhong; Duan, Meiling

    2018-01-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function, the analytical expression for the beam-width spreading of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beams in free space are derived, and used to study the influence of beam parameters on the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams. With the increment of the propagation distance, the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams will increase; the bigger the topological charge, spatial correlation length, wavelength and waist width are, the smaller the beam-width spreading is.

  3. Combined Effect of Initial Curing Temperature and Crack Width on Chloride Penetration in Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkedrouci Lotfi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete (RC structures are gradually being degraded all over the world, largely due to corrosion of the embedded steel bars caused by an attack of chloride penetration. Initial curing would be regarded as one factor influencing chloride diffusion in concrete in combination with cover cracking that is also of great attention for reinforced structures. In this study, a non-steady state diffusion test of chloride ion involving RC beam specimens with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.5, initial curing temperatures of 5°C or 20°C and three types of crack widths ranging from 0 to 0.2mm was performed. Chloride content at 5°C or was determined. The results show that the higher chloride content was obtained in condition of crack width large than 0.1mm with low initial curing temperature and there are no obvious differences in chloride content when the crack width was not larger than 0.1mm.

  4. Effect of length/width ratio of tapered beams on the performance of piezoelectric energy harvesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matova, S P; Renaud, M; Jambunathan, M; Goedbloed, M; Van Schaijk, R

    2013-01-01

    Tapering of the beams as a way to increase the generated output power of cantilever piezoelectric energy harvesters has gained popularity in recent years. The tapering increases the average strain in the beam and consequently the charge generated by the piezoelectric material. Different authors claim an improvement of up to 30% in the generated output power. We have investigated the possibility of using tapered beams in MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters. Numerical simulations did not suggest any increase in the generated output power and the lack of improvement was confirmed in practice. With the help of the numerical simulations it was further found that the tapering does work but only for certain design configurations, namely for cantilevers with long slender beams. For cantilevers with short wide beams, the tapering has no significant effect on the output power of the harvester. (paper)

  5. Research of Effective Width of FRP U-shaped Hoop Reinforcement Properties of Concrete Beams by Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Baokun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste fiber reinforced composite material (hereinafter referred to as FRP U-shaped hoop of reinforced concrete beams interfacial debonding is an important reinforcement technology research. For the effective width of the CFRP U-shaped hoop reinforcement, it is still a lack of in-depth research, only relying on the test research huge workload, this article (ANSYS and the numerical simulation in the whole process of the shear load release properties of finite element calculation software. According to the results of finite element analysis, the author studied the CFRP U-shaped hoop to increase the width of the shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams by the impact.

  6. Level width broadening effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingshang

    2003-01-01

    In file-6 for double-differential cross sections, the level width broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg' uncertainty. Besides level width broadening effect, the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in fitting measurement procedure. In general, the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed. However, to do so in this way the energy balance could not be held. For this reason, the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced, with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could be held exactly in the analytical form. (author)

  7. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    The widths of spaces between the thoracolumbar processi spinosi (interspinous spaces) are frequently assessed using radiography in sports horses; however effects of varying X-ray beam angles and geometric distortion have not been previously described. The aim of this prospective, observational...... study was to determine whether X-ray beam angle has an effect on apparent widths of interspinous spaces. Thoracolumbar spine specimens were collected from six equine cadavers and left-right lateral radiographs and sagittal and dorsal reconstructed computed tomographic (CT) images were acquired...... measurements. Effect of geometric distortion was evaluated by comparing the interspinous space in radiographs with sagittal and dorsal reconstructed CT images. A total of 49 interspinous spaces were sampled, yielding 274 measurements. X-ray beam angle significantly affected measured width of interspinous...

  8. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  9. Beam manipulating by metallic nano-slits with variant widths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haofei; Wang, Changtao; Du, Chunlei; Luo, Xiangang; Dong, Xiaochun; Gao, Hongtao

    2005-09-05

    A novel method is proposed to manipulate beam by modulating light phase through a metallic film with arrayed nano-slits, which have constant depth but variant widths. The slits transport electro-magnetic energy in the form of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in nanometric waveguides and provide desired phase retardations of beam manipulating with variant phase propagation constant. Numerical simulation of an illustrative lens design example is performed through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and shows agreement with theory analysis result. In addition, extraordinary optical transmission of SPPs through sub-wavelength metallic slits is observed in the simulation and helps to improve elements' energy using factor.

  10. Dynamics of optical beams with finite beam width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Ximing

    1993-01-01

    A postulation of the pseudo-polarization energy was introduced to the electromagnetic field in the free space. The angular momentum, velocity of the energy flow, static mass density, diffracted divergence, generalization of the principle of Fermat etc. of the electromagnetic field can be described satisfactorily by using this postulation. In the authors research on the transmission of optical beams for more than ten years, the movement of the electromagnetic field has been divided to an orbital motion and an intrinsic motion, and these motions have been described by only a single cartesian coordinate and its first-order partial differential. In this paper, on the basis of past results, the author uses the energy density of the field to replace the single cartesian coordinate component to make the description more precise and complete. On the other hand, as a basic postulation, a pseudo-polarization energy density is introduced to make the description and analysis of the field movement more abstract, deeper, and clearer. 3 refs

  11. Dosimetric consequences of pencil beam width variations in scanned beam particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanrion, M A; Ammazzalorso, F; Wittig, A; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Jelen, U

    2013-01-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery enables the highest degree of target dose conformation attainable in external beam radiotherapy. Nominal pencil beam widths (spot sizes) are recorded during treatment planning system commissioning. Due to changes in the beam-line optics, the actual spot sizes may differ from these commissioning values, leading to differences between planned and delivered dose. The purpose of this study was to analyse the dosimetric consequences of spot size variations in particle therapy treatment plans. For 12 patients with skull base tumours and 12 patients with prostate carcinoma, scanned-beam carbon ion and proton treatment plans were prepared and recomputed simulating spot size changes of (1) ±10% to simulate the typical magnitude of fluctuations, (2) ±25% representing the worst-case scenario and (3) ±50% as a part of a risk analysis in case of fault conditions. The primary effect of the spot size variation was a dose deterioration affecting the target edge: loss of target coverage and broadening of the lateral penumbra (increased spot size) or overdosage and contraction of the lateral penumbra (reduced spot size). For changes ⩽25%, the resulting planning target volume mean 95%-isodose line coverage (CI-95%) deterioration was ranging from negligible to moderate. In some cases changes in the dose to adjoining critical structures were observed. (paper)

  12. The optimization of pencil beam widths for use in an electron pencil beam algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, Brian J.; Cunningham, John R.; Woo, Milton K.

    1988-01-01

    Pencil beam algorithms for the calculation of electron beam dose distributions have come into widespread use. These algorithms, however, have generally exhibited difficulties in reproducing dose distributions for small field dimensions or, more specifically, for those conditions in which lateral scatter equilibrium does not exist. The work described here has determined that this difficulty can arise from the manner in which the width of the pencil beam is calculated. A unique approach for determining the pencil beam widths required to accurately reproduce small field dose distributions in a homogeneous phantom is described and compared with measurements and the results of other calculations. This method has also been extended to calculate electron beam dose distributions in heterogeneous media and the results of this work are presented. Suggestions for further improvements are discussed.

  13. Effect of step width manipulation on tibial stress during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Derrick, Timothy R

    2014-08-22

    Narrow step width has been linked to variables associated with tibial stress fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of step width on bone stresses using a standardized model of the tibia. 15 runners ran at their preferred 5k running velocity in three running conditions, preferred step width (PSW) and PSW±5% of leg length. 10 successful trials of force and 3-D motion data were collected. A combination of inverse dynamics, musculoskeletal modeling and beam theory was used to estimate stresses applied to the tibia using subject-specific anthropometrics and motion data. The tibia was modeled as a hollow ellipse. Multivariate analysis revealed that tibial stresses at the distal 1/3 of the tibia differed with step width manipulation (p=0.002). Compression on the posterior and medial aspect of the tibia was inversely related to step width such that as step width increased, compression on the surface of tibia decreased (linear trend p=0.036 and 0.003). Similarly, tension on the anterior surface of the tibia decreased as step width increased (linear trend p=0.029). Widening step width linearly reduced shear stress at all 4 sites (pstresses experienced by the tibia during running were influenced by step width when using a standardized model of the tibia. Wider step widths were generally associated with reduced loading of the tibia and may benefit runners at risk of or experiencing stress injury at the tibia, especially if they present with a crossover running style. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V. G., E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.ru [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gitman, D. M., E-mail: gitman@if.usp.br [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A. D., E-mail: alevin@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A. S.; Saprykin, A. D. [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-25

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory.

  15. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Gitman, D. M.; Levin, A. D.; Loginov, A. S.; Saprykin, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory

  16. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); SB RAS, Institute of High Current Electronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gitman, D.M. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A.D. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A.S.; Saprykin, A.D. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory. (orig.)

  17. E-plane Beam Width Reconfigurable Dipole Antenna with Tunable Parasitic Strip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Shuai; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2018-01-01

    A 3-dB E-plane beam width (EPBW) reconfig- urable dipole antenna is proposed in this paper. By introducing a tunable C-shape strip, the EPBW of the dipole antenna can switch in three different modes: narrow, middle and wide. Three pairs of PIN diodes are used for controlling. The beam width tuning...

  18. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  19. Angular beam width of a slit-diffracted wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, Edwin H

    2012-01-01

    Taking magnetostatic surface wave diffraction as an example, this paper theoretically investigates the 2D diffraction pattern arising in the far-field region of a ferrite slab in the case of a plane wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities incident on a wide, arbitrarily oriented slit in an opaque screen. A universal analytical formula for the angular width of a diffracted beam is derived, which is valid for magnetostatic and other types of waves in anisotropic media and structures (including metamaterials) in 2D geometries. It is shown that the angular width of a diffracted beam in an anisotropic medium can not only take values greater or less than λ 0 /D (where λ 0 is the incident wavelength, and D is the slit width), but can also be zero under certain conditions. (methodological notes)

  20. Nuclear structure effects on alpha reduced widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, K.S.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.A.; Kim, H.J.; McConnell, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A review of α widths for s-wave transitions is presented together with a discussion of the following topics: (1) a new determination of the 218 Ra half-life and its relation to reflection asymmetry in nuclei near N = 130, (2) a measurement of the 194 Pb α-decay rate and the influence of the Z = 82 gap on neutron-deficient Pb nuclei, and (3) an up-date of α-decay-rate systematics for isotopes in the rare earth and medium-weight mass regions. 16 refs., 6 figs

  1. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul; Castel, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied

  2. Stream water responses to timber harvest: Riparian buffer width effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Vegetated riparian buffers are critical for protecting aquatic and terrestrial processes and habitats in southern Appalachian ecosystems. In this case study, we examined the effect of riparian buffer width on stream water quality following upland forest management activities in four headwater catchments. Three riparian buffer widths were delineated prior to cutting; 0m...

  3. Coherent beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Keil, E.

    1979-06-01

    The stability of the coherent beam-beam effect between rigid bunches is studied analytically and numerically for a linear force by evaluating eigenvalues. For a realistic force, the stability is investigated by following the bunches for many revolutions. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Study on the E-beam pulse width scaling for a 25-kilojoule KrF amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    The KrF laser is being considered as an ICF driver candidate. Since this laser is not an energy storing system, the output energy of an amplifier is delivered over the entire pulse width of the excitation source. E-beam pumping is preferred for large energy systems. The e-beam pulse width is constrained to a few hundred nanoseconds by laser operation and pulsed power considerations. The target requires pulses of a few nanoseconds. Angular multiplexing of probe beams through the amplifier is a preferred scheme for bridging this difference in timing requirements. Progressively shorter target irradiation times may be obtained by using shorter pulse probe beams and by either increasing the number of angular multiplexed beams or by decreasing the e-beam pulse width. This report documents results of a study on the consequences of following the latter approach

  5. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  6. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn, R; Feigenbaum, E

    2016-06-01

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. The second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  7. Effects of injection nozzle exit width on rotating detonation engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Shijie; Lin, Zhiyong; Cai, Jianhua

    2017-11-01

    A series of numerical simulations of RDE modeling real injection nozzles with different exit widths are performed in this paper. The effects of nozzle exit width on chamber inlet state, plenum flowfield and detonation propagation are analyzed. The results are compared with that using an ideal injection model. Although the ideal injection model is a good approximation method to model RDE inlet, the two-dimensional effects of real nozzles are ignored in the ideal injection model so that some complicated phenomena such as the reflected waves caused by the nozzle walls and the reversed flow into the nozzles can not be modeled accurately. Additionally, the ideal injection model overpredicts the block ratio. In all the cases that stabilize at one-wave mode, the block ratio increases as the nozzle exit width gets smaller. The dual-wave mode case also has a relatively high block ratio. A pressure oscillation in the plenum with the same main frequency with the rotating detonation wave is observed. A parameter σ is applied to describe the non-uniformity in the plenum. σ increases as the nozzle exit width gets larger. Under some condition, the heat release on the interface of fresh premixed gas layer and detonation products can be strong enough to induce a new detonation wave. A spontaneous mode-transition process is observed for the smallest exit width case. Due to the detonation products existing in the premixed gas layer before the detonation wave, the detonation wave will propagate through reactants and products alternately, and therefore its strength will vary with time, especially near the chamber inlet. This tendency gets weaker as the injection nozzle exit width increases.

  8. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian Morten

    2012-01-01

    Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received littl...

  9. Single event effects in pulse width modulation controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzin, S.H.; Crain, W.R.; Crawford, K.B.; Hansel, S.J.; Kirshman, J.F.; Koga, R.

    1996-01-01

    SEE testing was performed on pulse width modulation (PWM) controllers which are commonly used in switching mode power supply systems. The devices are designed using both Set-Reset (SR) flip-flops and Toggle (T) flip-flops which are vulnerable to single event upset (SEU) in a radiation environment. Depending on the implementation of the different devices the effect can be significant in spaceflight hardware

  10. Effect of Pulse Width on Oxygen-fed Ozonizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Sho; Wang, Douyan; Namihira, Takao; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori

    Though general ozonizers based on silent discharge (barrier discharge) have been used to supply ozone at many industrial situations, there is still some problem, such as improvements of ozone yield. In this work, ozone was generated by pulsed discharge in order to improve the characteristics of ozone generation. It is known that a pulse width gives strong effect to the improvement of energy efficiency in exhaust gas processing. In this paper, the effect of pulse duration on ozone generation by pulsed discharge in oxygen would be reported.

  11. The effects of lane width, shoulder width, and road cross-sectional reallocation on drivers' behavioral adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecheri, Sami; Rosey, Florence; Lobjois, Régis

    2017-07-01

    Previous research has shown that lane-width reduction makes drivers operate vehicles closer to the center of the road whereas hard-shoulder widening induces a position farther away from the road's center. The goal of the present driving-simulator study was twofold. First, it was aimed at further investigating the respective effects of lane and shoulder width on in-lane positioning strategies, by examining vehicle distance from the center of the lane. The second aim was to assess the impact on safety of three possible cross-sectional reallocations of the width of the road (i.e., three lane-width reductions with concomitant shoulder widening at a fixed cross-sectional width) as compared to a control road. The results confirmed that lane-width reduction made participants drive closer to the road's center. However, in-lane position was affected differently by lane narrowing, depending on the traffic situation. In the absence of oncoming traffic, lane narrowing gave rise to significant shifts in the car's distance from the lane's center toward the edge line, whereas this distance remained similar across lane widths during traffic periods. When the shoulders were at least 0.50m wide, participants drove farther away from both the road center and the lane center. Road reallocation operations resulted in vehicles positioned farther away from the edge of the road and less swerving behavior, without generating higher driving speeds. Finally, it is argued that road-space reallocation may serve as a good low-cost tool for providing a recovery area for steering errors, without impairing drivers' behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis Of The Effect Of Flow Channel Width On The Performance Of PEMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Eker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, it was analysed the effect of different channel width on performance of PEM fuel cell. Current density were measured on the single cells of parallel flow fields that has 25 cm² active layer, using three different kinds of channel width. The cell width and the channel height remain constant.The results show that increasing the channel width while the cell width remains constant decreases the current density.

  13. Time-dependent Second Order Scattering Theory for Weather Radar with a Finite Beam Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Ito, Shigeo; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering effects from spherical water particles of uniform diameter are studied for a W-band pulsed radar. The Gaussian transverse beam-profile and the rectangular pulse-duration are used for calculation. An second-order analytical solution is derived for a single layer structure, based on a time-dependent radiative transfer theory as described in the authors' companion paper. When the range resolution is fixed, increase in footprint radius leads to increase in the second order reflectivity that is defined as the ratio of the second order return to the first order one. This feature becomes more serious as the range increases. Since the spaceborne millimeter-wavelength radar has a large footprint radius that is competitive to the mean free path, the multiple scattering effect must be taken into account for analysis.

  14. Effect of heating scheme on SOL width in DIII-D and EAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Joint DIII-D/EAST experiments in the radio-frequency (RF heated H-mode scheme with comparison to that of neutral beam (NB heated H-mode scheme were carried out on DIII-D and EAST under similar conditions to examine the effect of heating scheme on scrape-off layer (SOL width in H-mode plasmas for application to ITER. A dimensionally similar plasma equilibrium was used to match the EAST shape parameters. The divertor heat flux and SOL widths were measured with infra-red camera in DIII-D, while with divertor Langmuir probe array in EAST. It has been demonstrated on both DIII-D and EAST that RF-heated plasma has a broader SOL than NB-heated plasma when the edge electrons are effectively heated in low plasma current and low density regime with low edge collisionality. Detailed edge and pedestal profile analysis on DIII-D suggests that the low edge collisionality and ion orbit loss effect may account for the observed broadening. The joint experiment in DIII-D has also demonstrated the strong inverse dependence of SOL width on the plasma current in electron cyclotron heated (ECH H-mode plasmas.

  15. The effect of scattering interference term on the practical width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins do Amaral, C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The practical width Γ p has an important application in the characterization of the resonance type for the calculation of neutron average cross sections. Previous treatments ignore the interference term χζ,x for the Doppler broadening function in the practical width calculation. In the present paper, a rational approximation for the χζ,x function is derived, using a modified asymptotic Pade method. A new approximation for Γ p is obtained. The results which are presented here provide evidence that the practical width as a function of temperature varies considerably with the inclusion of the interference term χζ,x

  16. The effect of spectral width on Goos–Hanchen and Imbert–Fedorov shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajapati, Chandravati; Ranganathan, D

    2013-01-01

    We study the Goos–Hanchen and Imbert–Fedorov shifts for quasi-monochromatic Gaussian beams near the Brewster angle, when the reflection is from a denser to a rarer medium. This is the case of interest in the usual experiments on reflectometry, etc. We have incorporated the effects of the finite linewidth of the quasi-monochromatic light and treated the cases of a Lorentzian and a Gaussian lineshape of the input light spectrum. This study of light with a finite spectral width was carried out for the more frequently studied case, namely reflection from a dense to a rare medium. We found that the shift is increased as compared to the monochromatic Gaussian beam, and is zero at the Brewster angle for a p polarized beam. The shift variation with angle of incidence near the Brewster and critical angles at different values of refractive index ratios is found. We also studied the shift variation for Hermite–Gauss beams around the Brewster angle when the reflection is from a rarer to a denser medium and compare this with our earlier results for the case when the reflection was from a denser to a rarer medium. (paper)

  17. Sub-Pixel Accuracy Crack Width Determination on Concrete Beams in Load Tests by Triangle Mesh Geometry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebold, F.; Maas, H.-G.

    2018-05-01

    This paper deals with the determination of crack widths of concrete beams during load tests from monocular image sequences. The procedure starts in a reference image of the probe with suitable surface texture under zero load, where a large number of points is defined by an interest operator. Then a triangulated irregular network is established to connect the points. Image sequences are recorded during load tests with the load increasing continuously or stepwise, or at intermittently changing load. The vertices of the triangles are tracked through the consecutive images of the sequence with sub-pixel accuracy by least squares matching. All triangles are then analyzed for changes by principal strain calculation. For each triangle showing significant strain, a crack width is computed by a thorough geometric analysis of the relative movement of the vertices.

  18. Vespertilionid bats control the width of their biosonar sound beam dynamically during prey pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    Animals using sound for communication emit directional signals, focusing most acoustic energy in one direction. Echolocating bats are listening for soft echoes from insects. Therefore, a directional biosonar sound beam greatly increases detection probability in the forward direction and decreases...

  19. Binary moving-blocker-based scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography with width-truncated projections: proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a binary moving-blocker (BMB)-based technique for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In concept, a beam blocker consisting of lead strips, mounted in front of the x-ray tube, moves rapidly in and out of the beam during a single gantry rotation. The projections are acquired in alternating phases of blocked and unblocked cone beams, where the blocked phase results in a stripe pattern in the width direction. To derive the scatter map from the blocked projections, 1D B-Spline interpolation/extrapolation is applied by using the detected information in the shaded regions. The scatter map of the unblocked projections is corrected by averaging two scatter maps that correspond to their adjacent blocked projections. The scatter-corrected projections are obtained by subtracting the corresponding scatter maps from the projection data and are utilized to generate the CBCT image by a compressed-sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction algorithm. Catphan504 and pelvis phantoms were used to evaluate the method’s performance. The proposed BMB-based technique provided an effective method to enhance the image quality by suppressing scatter-induced artifacts, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area. Compared to CBCT without a blocker, the spatial nonuniformity was reduced from 9.1% to 3.1%. The root-mean-square error of the CT numbers in the regions of interest (ROIs) was reduced from 30.2 HU to 3.8 HU. In addition to high resolution, comparable to that of the benchmark image, the CS-based reconstruction also led to a better contrast-to-noise ratio in seven ROIs. The proposed technique enables complete scatter-corrected CBCT imaging with width-truncated projections and allows reducing the acquisition time to approximately half. This work may have significant implications for image-guided or adaptive radiation therapy, where CBCT is often used.

  20. Rounded leaf end effect of multileaf collimator on penumbra width and radiation field offset: an analytical and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2015-01-01

    Penumbra characteristics play a significant role in dose delivery accuracy for radiation therapy. For treatment planning, penumbra width and radiation field offset strongly influence target dose conformity and organ at risk sparing. In this study, we present an analytical and numerical approach for evaluation of the rounded leaf end effect on penumbra characteristics. Based on the rule of half-value layer, algorithms for leaf position calculation and radiation field offset correction were developed, which were advantageous particularly in dealing with large radius leaf end. Computer simulation was performed based on the Monte Carlo codes of EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, with groups of leaf end radii and source sizes. Data processing technique of curve fitting was employed for deriving penumbra width and radiation field offset. Results showed that penumbra width increased with source size. Penumbra width curves for large radius leaf end were U-shaped. This observation was probably related to the fact that radiation beams penetrated through the proximal and distal leaf sides. In contrast, source size had negligible impact on radiation field offset. Radiation field offsets were found to be constant both for analytical method and numerical simulation. However, the overall resulting values of radiation field offset obtained by analytical method were slightly smaller compared with Monte Carlo simulation. The method we proposed could provide insight into the investigation of rounded leaf end effects on penumbra characteristics. Penumbra width and radiation field offset calibration should be carefully performed to commission multileaf collimator for intensity modulated radiotherapy

  1. A study to assess whether fixed-width beam walking provides sufficient challenge to assess balance ability across lower limb prosthesis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Andrew; Hafner, Brian J

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of fixed-width beam walking for assessing balance in lower limb prosthesis users. Cross-sectional. Laboratory. Lower limb prosthesis users. Participants attempted 10 walking trials on three fixed-width beams (18.6, 8.60, and 4.01 wide; 5.5 m long; 3.8 cm high). Beam-walking performance was quantified using the distance walked to balance failure. Heuristic rules applied to each participant's beam-walking distance to classify each beam as "too easy," "too hard," or "appropriately challenging" and determine whether any single beam provided an appropriate challenge to all participants. The number of trials needed to achieve stable beam-walking performance was quantified for appropriately challenging beams by identifying the last inflection point in the slope of each participant's trial-by-trial cumulative performance record. In all, 30 unilateral lower limb prosthesis users participated in the study. Each of the fixed-width beams was either too easy or too hard for at least 33% of the sample. Thus, no single beam was appropriately challenging for all participants. Beam-walking performance was stable by trial 8 for all participants and by trial 6 for 90% of participants. There was no significant difference in the number of trials needed to achieve stable performance among beams ( P = 0.74). Results suggest that a clinical beam-walking test would require multiple beams to evaluate balance across a range of lower limb prosthesis users, emphasizing the need for adaptive or progressively challenging balance tests. While the administrative burden of a multiple-beam balance test may limit clinical feasibility, alternatives to ease this administrative burden are proposed.

  2. Active control of annular flow-induced vibration of axisymmetric elastic beam by the local gap width control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Shintani, Atsuhiko; Ito, Tomohiro; Fujita, Katsuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration may occur in the structures such as elastic beams subjected to annular flow in the narrow passage. Once the flow-induced vibration occurs, vibration amplitude becomes larger, consequently it causes a lot of troubles such as fatigue or failure in mechanical structures. In this paper, for the purpose to avoid these troubles, the active control of vibration of an axisymmetric elastic beam subjected to annular flow is investigated. An air-pressured actuator is attached on the surface of the circular cylinder for the vibrational control. As the shape of the actuator changes by control, the gap width in narrow passage changes, which causes the change of the fluid pressure. Therefore, the vibration of the fluid-structure coupled system can be suppressed. The fluid-structure coupled equation based on the Euler-Bernoulli type of partial differential equation and the Navier-Stokes equations is analytically derived including control terms. By applying the optimal control law to the coupled system, the unstable behavior is stabilized. The stability of the coupled system is investigated by eigenvalue analyses of controlled coupled equations. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the efficiency of the proposed control method. (author)

  3. If Frisch is true - impacts of varying beam width, resolution, frequency combinations and beam overlap when retrieving liquid water content profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, N.; Kneifel, S.; Kollias, P.; Loehnert, U.

    2017-12-01

    Cumulus and stratocumulus clouds strongly affect the Earth's radiation budget and are a major uncertainty source in weather and climate prediction models. To improve and evaluate models, a comprehensive understanding of cloud processes is necessary and references are needed. Therefore active and passive microwave remote sensing of clouds can be used to derive cloud properties such as liquid water path and liquid water content (LWC), which can serve as a reference for model evaluation. However, both the measurements and the assumptions when retrieving physical quantities from the measurements involve uncertainty sources. Frisch et al. (1998) combined radar and radiometer observations to derive LWC profiles. Assuming their assumptions are correct, there will be still uncertainties regarding the measurement setup. We investigate how varying beam width, temporal and vertical resolutions, frequency combinations, and beam overlap of and between the two instruments influence the retrieval of LWC profiles. Especially, we discuss the benefit of combining vertically, high resolved radar and radiometer measurements using the same antenna, i.e. having ideal beam overlap. Frisch, A. S., G. Feingold, C. W. Fairall, T. Uttal, and J. B. Snider, 1998: On cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud liquid water profiles. J. Geophys. Res.: Atmos., 103 (18), 23 195-23 197, doi:0148-0227/98/98JD-01827509.00.

  4. Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1λ. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

  5. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes. These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes.

  6. Dependence of effective spectrum width of synchrotron radiation on particle energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D.M. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A.D. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A.S.; Saprykin, A.D. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    In the classical theory of synchrotron radiation, for the exact quantitative characterization of spectral properties, the concept of effective spectral width is introduced. In the first part of our work, published in EJPC 75 (2015), the effective spectral width as a function of the energy E of the radiating particle was obtained only in the ultra-relativistic approximation. In this article, which can be considered as a natural continuation of this work, a complete investigation is presented of the dependence of the effective width of the synchrotron radiation spectrum on energy for any values of E and for all the polarization components of the radiation. Numerical calculations were carried out for an effective width not exceeding 100 harmonics. (orig.)

  7. Clinically insubstantial cognitive side effects of bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy at 0.5 msec pulse width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnell, Ronald L; Swartz, Conrad M; Thomson, Alice

    2011-11-01

    We measured cognitive side effects from bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) using stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width 900 milliamperes (mA). Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-21) were rated within 36 hours before and 36 hours after a series of 6 bitemporal ECT sessions on 15 patients age ≥45. MMSE remained high after ECT (pre-ECT mean 29, standard deviation [SD] 1.60, post-ECT mean 28.53, SD 1.36) with no significant change. The mean HRSD-21 fell from 27.5 to 16.3. Post-ECT MMSE was significantly and markedly higher than in previous studies of bitemporal ECT; all had used ECT stimuli of pulse width at least 1 msec. With stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA, 6 bitemporal ECTs did not decrease MMSE score. This result leaves no opportunity for further decrease in basic cognitive side effects, and complements published reports of stronger physiological effects with stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA. ECT stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA are more desirable than wider pulse widths. Six bitemporal ECT sessions using these stimuli generally will not have more cognitive side effects than treatments with other placements, allowing maintenance of full efficacy with clinically insubstantial side effects.

  8. Quark-mixing renormalization effects on the W-boson partial decay widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almasy, A.A.; Kniehl, B.A.; Sirlin, A.

    2008-10-01

    We briefly review existing proposals for the renormalization of the Cabibbo- Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and study their numerical effects on the W-boson partial decay widths. The differences between the decay widths predicted by the various renormalization schemes are generally negligible, while their deviations from the MS results are very small, except for W + → u anti b and W + →c anti b, where they reach approximately 4%. (orig.)

  9. Effects of Pulse Width and Electrode Placement on the Efficacy and Cognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackeim, Harold A.; Prudic, Joan; Nobler, Mitchell S.; Fitzsimons, Linda; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Payne, Nancy; Berman, Robert M.; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Perera, Tarique; Devanand, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression is effective, cognitive effects limit its use. Reducing the width of the electrical pulse and using the right unilateral electrode placement may decrease adverse cognitive effects, while preserving efficacy. METHODS In a double-masked study, we randomly assigned 90 depressed patients to right unilateral ECT at 6 times seizure threshold or bilateral ECT at 2.5 times seizure threshold, using either a traditional brief pulse (1.5 ms) or an ultrabrief pulse (0.3 ms). Depressive symptoms and cognition were assessed before, during, and immediately, two, and six months after therapy. Patients who responded were followed for a one-year period. RESULTS The final remission rate for ultrabrief bilateral ECT was 35 percent, compared with 73 percent for ultrabrief unilateral ECT, 65 percent for standard pulse width bilateral ECT, and 59 percent for standard pulse width unilateral ECT (all P’stherapy. Both the ultrabrief stimulus and right unilateral electrode placement produced less short- and long-term retrograde amnesia. Patients rated their memory deficits as less severe following ultrabrief right unilateral ECT compared to each of the other three conditions (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The use of an ultrabrief stimulus markedly reduces adverse cognitive effects, and when coupled with markedly suprathreshold right unilateral ECT, also preserves efficacy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00487500.) PMID:19756236

  10. Observations of beam-beam effects in the LHC 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W.; Alemany, R.; Buffat, X.; Calaga, R.; Giachino, R.; Papotti, G.; Pieloni, T.; Trad, G.; Schaumann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported on the first studies of beam-beam effects in the LHC with high intensity, high brightness beams and can summarize the results as follows. The effect of the beam-beam interaction on the beam dynamics is clearly established. The LHC allows very large head-on tune shifts above nominal. The effect of long range interactions on the beam lifetime and losses (dynamic aperture) is clearly visible. The number of head-on and/or long range interactions important for losses and all predicted PACMAN effects have been observed. All observations are in good agreement with the expectations

  11. Beam-beam-induced orbit effects at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaumann, M; Fernandez, R Alemany

    2014-01-01

    For high bunch intensities the long-range beam-beam interactions are strong enough to provoke effects on the orbit. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are presented in this paper

  12. Stochastic Mixed-Effects Parameters Bertalanffy Process, with Applications to Tree Crown Width Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras Rupšys

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic modeling approach based on the Bertalanffy law gained interest due to its ability to produce more accurate results than the deterministic approaches. We examine tree crown width dynamic with the Bertalanffy type stochastic differential equation (SDE and mixed-effects parameters. In this study, we demonstrate how this simple model can be used to calculate predictions of crown width. We propose a parameter estimation method and computational guidelines. The primary goal of the study was to estimate the parameters by considering discrete sampling of the diameter at breast height and crown width and by using maximum likelihood procedure. Performance statistics for the crown width equation include statistical indexes and analysis of residuals. We use data provided by the Lithuanian National Forest Inventory from Scots pine trees to illustrate issues of our modeling technique. Comparison of the predicted crown width values of mixed-effects parameters model with those obtained using fixed-effects parameters model demonstrates the predictive power of the stochastic differential equations model with mixed-effects parameters. All results were implemented in a symbolic algebra system MAPLE.

  13. On the exploration of effect of critical beam power on the propagation of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urunkar, T. U.; Valkunde, A. T.; Vhanmore, B. D.; Gavade, K. M.; Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2018-05-01

    It is quite known that critical power of the laser plays vital role in the propagation of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma. The nonlinearity in dielectric constant considered herein is due to the ponderomotive force. In the present analysis, the interval of critical beam power has been explored to sustain the competition between diffraction and self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam during propagation in collisionless magnetized plasma. Differential equation for beam-width parameter has been established by using WKB and paraxial approximations under parabolic equation approach. The effect of critical power on the propagation of Gaussian laser beam has been presented graphically and discussed.

  14. Experimental study of heating scheme effect on the inner divertor power footprint widths in EAST lower single null discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, G. Z.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. J.; Liu, J. B.; Zhang, H.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Yan, N.; Feng, W.; Liu, H.; Xia, T. Y.; Zhang, B.; Shao, L. M.; Ming, T. F.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Gao, X.; Wang, L.

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive work of the effects of plasma current and heating schemes on divertor power footprint widths is carried out in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The divertor power footprint widths, i.e., the scrape-off layer heat flux decay length λ q and the heat spreading S, are crucial physical and engineering parameters for fusion reactors. Strong inverse scaling of λ q and S with plasma current have been demonstrated for both neutral beam (NB) and lower hybrid wave (LHW) heated L-mode and H-mode plasmas at the inner divertor target. For plasmas heated by the combination of the two kinds of auxiliary heating schemes (NB and LHW), the divertor power widths tend to be larger in plasmas with higher ratio of LHW power. Comparison between experimental heat flux profiles at outer mid-plane (OMP) and divertor target for NB heated and LHW heated L-mode plasmas reveals that the magnetic topology changes induced by LHW may be the main reason to the wider divertor power widths in LHW heated discharges. The effect of heating schemes on divertor peak heat flux has also been investigated, and it is found that LHW heated discharges tend to have a lower divertor peak heat flux compared with NB heated discharges under similar input power. All these findings seem to suggest that plasmas with LHW auxiliary heating scheme are better heat exhaust scenarios for fusion reactors and should be the priorities for the design of next-step fusion reactors like China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor.

  15. Observed Orbit Effects during Long Range Beam-Beam Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Hemelsoet, GH; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Poyer, M; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2012-01-01

    Possible limitations due to long range beam-beam effects at the LHC have been studied and are presented in this note. With a larger number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, the crossing angles were reduced to enhance long range beam-beam effects. The analysis of the effects on the dynamic aperture and losses are documented in [1]. This note concentrates on the bunch-by-bunch orbit effects observed during the experiment.

  16. Beam-beam effects under the influence of external noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K

    2014-01-01

    Fast external noise, which gives fluctuation into the beam orbit, is discussed in connection with beam-beam effects. Phase noise from crab cavities and detection devices (position monitor) and kicker noise from the bunch by bunch feedback system are the sources. Beam-beam collisions with fast orbit fluctuations with turn by turn or multi-turn correlations, cause emittance growth and luminosity degradation. We discuss the tolerance of the noise amplitude for LHC and HL-LHC

  17. Ionospheric propagation effects on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vallières

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available SuperDARN HF radars provide a global survey of the large-scale convection transversely to the Earth's magnetic field in the high-latitude ionosphere. In addition to the mean plasma velocity, this network also provides measurements of spectral widths which are related to the level of turbulence of the sounded plasma. There is an increasing interest in using spectral widths in geophysical studies, since they are used to monitor the footprints of several magnetospheric regions. In the present paper, we show the effect of radio wave propagation through a typical turbulent ionosphere on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN radars. This effect has already been evidenced experimentally in a previous paper. Here, we model the effects of meso-scale structures on a radar wave front and study their impact on a typical measurement. Numerical simulations reproduce the effect evidenced experimentally and show the role of meso-scale structures (1-10km in the systematic bias that affects spectral width values. As in experimental data, this effect is shown to be increasing with decreasing radar frequency.

  18. Ionospheric propagation effects on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vallières

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available SuperDARN HF radars provide a global survey of the large-scale convection transversely to the Earth's magnetic field in the high-latitude ionosphere. In addition to the mean plasma velocity, this network also provides measurements of spectral widths which are related to the level of turbulence of the sounded plasma. There is an increasing interest in using spectral widths in geophysical studies, since they are used to monitor the footprints of several magnetospheric regions. In the present paper, we show the effect of radio wave propagation through a typical turbulent ionosphere on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN radars. This effect has already been evidenced experimentally in a previous paper. Here, we model the effects of meso-scale structures on a radar wave front and study their impact on a typical measurement. Numerical simulations reproduce the effect evidenced experimentally and show the role of meso-scale structures (1-10km in the systematic bias that affects spectral width values. As in experimental data, this effect is shown to be increasing with decreasing radar frequency.

  19. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of buffer width, vegetation, and season

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  20. Effects of excitation spectral width on decay profile of weakly confined excitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, O.; Isu, T.; Ishi-Hayase, J.; Kanno, A.; Katouf, R.; Sasaki, M.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the effect due to a simultaneous excitation of several exciton states on the radiative decay profiles on the basis of the nonlocal response of weakly confined excitons in GaAs thin films. In the case of excitation of single exciton state, the transient grating signal has two decay components. The fast decay component comes from nonlocal response, and the long-lived component is attributed to free exciton decay. With an increase of excitation spectral width, the nonlocal component becomes small in comparison with the long-lived component, and disappears under irradiation of a femtosecond-pulse laser with broader spectral width. The transient grating spectra clearly indicates the contribution of the weakly confined excitons to the signal, and the exciton line width hardly changes by excitation spectral width. From these results, we concluded that the change of decay profile is attributed not to the many-body effect but to the effect of simultaneous excitation of several exciton states

  1. Beam-beam effect and luminosity in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1980-01-01

    Many measurements on the beam-beam limit in SPEAR have been performed over the past years. The goal for these measurements was to find the proper parameterization of the beam-beam effect. All measurements presented were done with both beams equally blown up by control of the flip-flop phenomenon. Colliding beam measurements were made at energies as low as 600 MeV and together with earlier measurements the author presents the scaling of some relevant storage ring parameters from 600 MeV up to almost 4 GeV. (Auth.)

  2. Hydromorphodynamic effects of the width ratio and local tributary widening on discordant confluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén-Ludeña, S.; Franca, M. J.; Alegria, F.; Schleiss, A. J.; Cardoso, A. H.

    2017-09-01

    River training works performed in the last couple of centuries constrained the natural dynamics of channel networks in locations that include the confluences between tributaries and main channels. As a result, the dynamics of these confluences are currently characterized by homogeneous flow depths, flow velocities, and morphologic conditions, which are associated with impoverished ecosystems. The widening of river reaches is seen as a useful measure for river restoration, as it enhances the heterogeneity in flow depths, flow velocities, sediment transport, and bed substrates. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of local widening of the tributary mouth as well as the effects of the ratio between the width of the tributary and that of the main channel on the flow dynamics and bed morphology of river confluences. For that purpose, 12 experiments were conducted in a 70° laboratory confluence. In these experiments, three unit-discharge ratios were tested (qr = 0.37, 0.50, and 0.77) with two width ratios and two tributary configurations. The unit-discharge ratio is defined as the unit discharge in the tributary divided by that of the main channel, measured upstream of the confluence. The width ratio, which is defined as the width of the tributary divided by that of the main channel, was modified by changing the width of the main channel from 0.50 to 1.00 m (corresponding to Br = 0.30 and 0.15 respectively). The tributary configurations consisted of (i) a straight reach with a constant width (the so-called reference configuration) and (ii) a straight reach with a local widening at the downstream end (the so-called widened configuration). During the experiments, a uniform sediment mixture was continuously supplied to both channels. This experimental setup is novel among existing experimental studies on confluence dynamics, as it addresses new confluence configurations and includes a continuous sediment supply to both channels. The experiments were run

  3. Effects of Door Width and Human Body Size on Walking Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetthumrong Siwalee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Door width is one of the important factors to concern in layout or facilities design because it affects directly to traffic speed and overall traffic time simultaneously. Nowadays, common assessment method is computer simulation which is still not realistic due to the unchanged speed of model while walking through a door. This research aims to study an effect of door width to individual walking speed. Sixty subjects participated in the experiment and performed task by walking through the door that is set the width as 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 centimetres. The optical motion capture system was used to determine walking speed. The results showed that Fitts’ law was applied to the participants with high weight. Door width below 70 centimetres significantly affected to changing speed at 0-0.5 m. before the door. Additionally, human size also affected changing speed. The factors include shoulder breadth, weight and interaction between shoulder breadth and weight were found to be significant. These factors explained 54.2% of changing speed.

  4. Study of finite-orbit-width effect on neoclassical transport in tokamak core region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Shinsuke; Okamoto, Masao

    2004-01-01

    Neoclassical transport simulation using the δf Monte-Carlo method is carried out to investigate the finite-orbit-width (FOW) effect on the transport near the magnetic axis. The time evolution of the radial electric field to maintain the ambipolarity of the flux is calculated simultaneously. It is found that, in the near-axis region, the ion heat flux decreases from the value predicted by the standard neoclassical theory both in the banana and plateau regimes. Though the radial transport shows a strong dependence on the FOW effect, the ambipolar electric field profile at the steady state is similar to that calculated in the small-orbit-width limit approximation. (author)

  5. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  6. Effect of configuration widths on the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    We present the extension of the supertransition-array (STA) theory to include configuration widths in the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) plasmas. Exact analytic expressions for the moments of a STA are given, accounting for the detailed contributions of individual levels within the configurations that belong to a STA. The STA average energy is shifted and an additional term appears in its variance. Various cases are presented, demonstrating the effect of these corrections on the LTE spectrum

  7. Study of Beam-Beam Effects at PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narsky, I

    2004-01-01

    Using a self-consistent three-dimensional simulation running on parallel supercomputers, we have modeled the beam-beam interaction at the PEP-II asymmetric e + e - collider. To provide guidance for luminosity improvement, we scanned the tunes and currents in both rings and computed their impact on the luminosity and transverse beam sizes. We also studied the effects of colliding the beams with a small crossing angle. Where possible, the code was benchmarked against experimental measurements of luminosity and beam sizes, yielding an acceptable agreement

  8. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgari, P.; Signer, A.; Zuerich Univ.

    2013-03-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of Γ X /m X , with Γ X and m X the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting ∝Γ t /m t ∝1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  9. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  10. Chromospheric scaling laws, width-luminosity correlations, and the Wilson-Bappu effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    Simple scaling laws are developed to explain the thickness and mean electron density of late-type stellar chromospheres in an effort to understand why the emission cores of effectively thick resonance lines such as Ca II H and K broaden with increasing stellar luminosity (the Wilson-Bappu effect). It is shown that stellar chromospheres become thicker in mass column density as stellar gravity g decreases and that the mean chromospheric electric density n/sub e/ decreases if the chromospheric heating dF/dm is constant with height and if the total heating F/sup tot/ is independent of g. It is also shown that chromospheres becomes thicker and the mean electron density becomes larger than the total chromospheric heating increases. The predicted behavior of the K 1 minimum separation and full width at half-maximum of the Ca II emission core (W 0 ) based on the derived scaling laws agree quantitatively with the observed correlations of these widths with fundamental stellar parameters, particularly surface gravity. In addition, the predicted behavior of the K 2 peak separation and base emission width with increasing chromospheric heating is consistent with the behavior of the Ca II emission core shapes in solar plages. The analytical arguments suggest that the Wilson-Bappu effect is largely a consequence of hydrostatic equilibrium rather than chromospheric dynamics

  11. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Meng; Wang, Ning-Li; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Di-Ya; Li, Zhen; Cao, Yi-Wen

    2018-02-01

    In accordance with the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference theory, decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference can relieve glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Increased intracranial pressure can also reduce optic nerve damage in glaucoma patients, and a safe, effective and noninvasive way to achieve this is by increasing the intra-abdominal pressure. The purpose of this study was to observe the changes in orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure at elevated intra-abdominal pressure. An inflatable abdominal belt was tied to each of 15 healthy volunteers, aged 22-30 years (12 females and 3 males), at the navel level, without applying pressure to the abdomen, before they laid in the magnetic resonance imaging machine. The baseline orbital subarachnoid space width around the optic nerve was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe. The abdominal belt was inflated to increase the pressure to 40 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), then the orbital subarachnoid space width was measured every 10 minutes for 2 hours. After removal of the pressure, the measurement was repeated 10 and 20 minutes later. In a separate trial, the intraocular pressure was measured for all the subjects at the same time points, before, during and after elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Results showed that the baseline mean orbital subarachnoid space width was 0.88 ± 0.1 mm (range: 0.77-1.05 mm), 0.77 ± 0.11 mm (range: 0.60-0.94 mm), 0.70 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.62-0.80 mm), and 0.68 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.57-0.77 mm) at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe, respectively. During the elevated intra-abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width increased from the baseline and dilation of the optic nerve sheath was significant at 1, 3 and 9 mm behind the globe. After decompression of the abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width normalized and returned to the baseline value. There was no significant difference in the

  12. Characterization of the range effect in synthetic aperture radar images of concrete specimens for width estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzeyadi, Ahmed; Yu, Tzuyang

    2018-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is an indispensable approach for the sustainability of critical civil infrastructure systems such as bridges and buildings. Recently, microwave/radar sensors are widely used for assessing the condition of concrete structures. Among existing imaging techniques in microwave/radar sensors, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging enables researchers to conduct surface and subsurface inspection of concrete structures in the range-cross-range representation of SAR images. The objective of this paper is to investigate the range effect of concrete specimens in SAR images at various ranges (15 cm, 50 cm, 75 cm, 100 cm, and 200 cm). One concrete panel specimen (water-to-cement ratio = 0.45) of 30-cm-by-30-cm-by-5-cm was manufactured and scanned by a 10 GHz SAR imaging radar sensor inside an anechoic chamber. Scatterers in SAR images representing two corners of the concrete panel were used to estimate the width of the panel. It was found that the range-dependent pattern of corner scatters can be used to predict the width of concrete panels. Also, the maximum SAR amplitude decreases when the range increases. An empirical model was also proposed for width estimation of concrete panels.

  13. Smartphone form factors: Effects of width and bottom bezel on touch performance, workload, and physical demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Chan; Cha, Min Chul; Hwangbo, Hwan; Mo, Sookhee; Ji, Yong Gu

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of two smartphone form factors (width and bottom bezel) on touch behaviors with one-handed interaction. User experiments on tapping tasks were conducted for four widths (67, 70, 72, and 74 mm) and five bottom bezel levels (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, and 12.5 mm). Task performance, electromyography, and subjective workload data were collected to examine the touch behavior. The success rate and task completion time were collected as task performance measures. The NASA-TLX method was used to observe the subjective workload. The electromyogram signals of two thumb muscles, namely the first dorsal interosseous and abductor pollicis brevis, were observed. The task performances deteriorated with increasing width level. The subjective workload and electromyography data showed similar patterns with the task performances. The task performances of the bottom bezel devices were analyzed by using three different evaluation criteria. The results from these criteria indicated that tasks became increasingly difficult as the bottom bezel level decreased. The results of this study provide insights into the optimal range of smartphone form factors for one-handed interaction, which could contribute to the design of new smartphones. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Simulation of beam-beam effects in tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.; Assadi, S.; Talman, R.

    1995-08-01

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of an upgrade plan Fermilab III. In the last phase of this upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron will increase by at least one order of magnitude. In order to keep the number of interactions per crossing manageable for experiments, the number of bunches will be increased from 6 x 6 to 36 x 36 and finally to ∼100 x 100 bunches. The beam dynamics of the Tevatron has been studied from Beam-Beam effect point of view in a ''Strong-Weak'' representation with a single particle being tracked in presence of other beam. This paper describes the beam-beam effect in 6 x 6 operation of Tevatron

  15. Report of the group on beam-beam effects in circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We present a summary of the discussions and conclusions of the working group on beam-beam effects for circular colliders. This group was part of the larger beam-beam dynamics group at the 7th ICFA Workshop on Beam Dynamics, on the subject ''Beam-Beam and Beam-Radiation Interactions,'' held at UCLA, May 13--16, 1991. 15 refs

  16. Finite-orbit-width effect and the radial electric field in neoclassical transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, S.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Beidler, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    Modeling and detailed simulation of neoclassical transport phenomena both in 2D and 3D toroidal configurations are shown. The emphasis is put on the effect of finiteness of the drift-orbit width, which brings a non-local nature to neoclassical transport phenomena. Evolution of the self-consistent radial electric field in the framework of neoclassical transport is also investigated. The combination of Monte-Carlo calculation for ion transport and numerical solver of ripple-averaged kinetic equation for electrons makes it possible to calculate neoclassical fluxes and the time evolution of the radial electric field in the whole plasma region, including the finite-orbit-width (FOW) effects and global evolution of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The simulation results show that the heat conductivity around the magnetic axis is smaller than that obtained from standard neoclassical theory and that the evolution of GAM oscillation on each flux surface is coupled with other surfaces if the FOW effect is significant. A global simulation of radial electric field evolution in a non-axisymmetric plasma is also shown. (author)

  17. Single beam stability, incoherent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.; Bassetti, M.; Faugeras, P.; Hilaire, A.; Montague, B.; Potaux, D.; Scandale, W.; Vos, L.; Zyngier, H.

    1980-01-01

    The group first realized that it was difficult in the available time to make an overall review of the many subjects implied by the group's heading. It therefore restricted itself to a few separate topics, which are: 1. Working point. 2. Non-linear coupling. 3. Effect of octupoles. 4. Chromaticity correction and tracking. 5. Vertical dispersion. 6. Beam separation. 7. Remark on non-linear lens experiments. (orig.)

  18. Beam Angular Divergence Effects in Ion Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsky, T. N.; Hahto, S. K.; Bilbrough, D. G.; Jacobson, D. C.; Krull, W. A.; Goldberg, R. D.; Current, M. I.; Hamamoto, N.; Umisedo, S.

    2008-01-01

    An important difference between monomer ion beams and heavy molecular beams is a significant reduction in beam angular divergence and increased on-wafer angular accuracy for molecular beams. This advantage in beam quality stems from a reduction in space-charge effects within the beam. Such improved angular accuracy has been shown to have a significant impact on the quality and yield of transistor devices [1,12]. In this study, B 18 H x + beam current and angular divergence data collected on a hybrid scanned beam line that magnetically scans the beam across the wafer is presented. Angular divergence is kept below 0.5 deg from an effective boron energy of 200 eV to 3000 eV. Under these conditions, the beam current is shown analytically to be limited by space charge below about 1 keV, but by the matching of the beam emittance to the acceptance of the beam line above 1 keV. In addition, results of a beam transport model which includes variable space charge compensation are presented, in which a drift mode B 18 H x + beam is compared to an otherwise identical boron beam after deceleration. Deceleration is shown to introduce significant space-charge blow up resulting in a large on-wafer angular divergence. The divergence effects introduced by wafer charging are also discussed.

  19. Effect of pulse width on near-infrared supercontinuum generation in nonlinear fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Lei, Cheng-Min; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Wang, Ze-Feng; Hou, Jing

    2015-08-01

    The effect of pulse width on near-infrared supercontinuum generation in nonlinear fiber amplifier is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and adaptive split-step Fourier method are used to simulate the propagation of pulses with different pulse widths in the fiber amplifier, and the results show that a longer pulse is more profitable in near-infrared supercontinuum generation if the central wavelength of the input laser lies in the normal dispersion region of the gain fiber. A four-stage master oscillator power amplifier configuration is adopted and the output spectra under picosecond and nanosecond input pulses are compared with each other. The experimental results are in good accordance with the simulations which can provide some guidance for further optimization of the system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11404404 and 11274385) and the Outstanding Youth Fund Project of Hunan Province and the Fund of Innovation of National University of Defense Technology, China (Grant No. B120701).

  20. Effects of ultra-thin Si-fin body widths upon SOI PMOS FinFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Yue-Gie; Chen, Chii-Wen; Liao, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Mu-Chun; Zou, Xuecheng

    2018-05-01

    Nano-node tri-gate FinFET devices have been developed after integrating a 14 Å nitrided gate oxide upon the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers established on an advanced CMOS logic platform. These vertical double gate (FinFET) devices with ultra-thin silicon fin (Si-fin) widths ranging from 27 nm to 17 nm and gate length down to 30 nm have been successfully developed with a 193 nm scanner lithography tool. Combining the cobalt fully silicidation and the CESL strain technology beneficial for PMOS FinFETs was incorporated into this work. Detailed analyses of Id-Vg characteristics, threshold voltage (Vt), and drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) illustrate that the thinnest 17 nm Si-fin width FinFET exhibits the best gate controllability due to its better suppression of short channel effect (SCE). However, higher source/drain resistance (RSD), channel mobility degradation due to dry etch steps, or “current crowding effect” will slightly limit its transconductance (Gm) and drive current.

  1. Effects of microwave pulse-width damage on a bipolar transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhen-Yang; Chai Chang-Chun; Ren Xing-Rong; Yang Yin-Tang; Chen Bin; Zhao Ying-Bo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the pulse-width effects on the damage process of a typical bipolar transistor caused by high power microwaves (HPMs) through the injection approach. The dependences of the microwave damage power, P, and the absorbed energy, E, required to cause the device failure on the pulse width τ are obtained in the nanosecond region by utilizing the curve fitting method. A comparison of the microwave pulse damage data and the existing dc pulse damage data for the same transistor is carried out. By means of a two-dimensional simulator, ISE-TCAD, the internal damage processes of the device caused by microwave voltage signals and dc pulse voltage signals are analyzed comparatively. The simulation results suggest that the temperature-rising positions of the device induced by the microwaves in the negative and positive half periods are different, while only one hot spot exists under the injection of dc pulses. The results demonstrate that the microwave damage power threshold and the absorbed energy must exceed the dc pulse power threshold and the absorbed energy, respectively. The dc pulse damage data may be useful as a lower bound for microwave pulse damage data. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  2. Effect of finite cavity width on flow oscillation in a low-Mach-number cavity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ke; Naguib, Ahmed M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The current study is focused on examining the effect of the cavity width and side walls on the self-sustained oscillation in a low Mach number cavity flow with a turbulent boundary layer at separation. An axisymmetric cavity geometry is employed in order to provide a reference condition that is free from any side-wall influence, which is not possible to obtain with a rectangular cavity. The cavity could then be partially filled to form finite-width geometry. The unsteady surface pressure is measured using microphone arrays that are deployed on the cavity floor along the streamwise direction and on the downstream wall along the azimuthal direction. In addition, velocity measurements using two-component Laser Doppler Anemometer are performed simultaneously with the array measurements in different azimuthal planes. The compiled data sets are used to investigate the evolution of the coherent structures generating the pressure oscillation in the cavity using linear stochastic estimation of the velocity field based on the wall-pressure signature on the cavity end wall. The results lead to the discovery of pronounced harmonic pressure oscillations near the cavity's side walls. These oscillations, which are absent in the axisymmetric cavity, are linked to the establishment of a secondary mean streamwise circulating flow pattern near the side walls and the interaction of this secondary flow with the shear layer above the cavity. (orig.)

  3. The ratio of effective building height to street width governs dispersion of local vehicle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Nico; Tan, Si; Venkatram, Akula

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of data collected in street canyons located in Hanover, Germany and Los Angeles, USA, suggests that street-level concentrations of vehicle-related pollutants can be estimated with a model that assumes that vertical turbulent transport of emissions dominates the governing processes. The dispersion model relates surface concentrations to traffic flow rate, the effective aspect ratio of the street, and roof level turbulence. The dispersion model indicates that magnification of concentrations relative to those in the absence of buildings is most sensitive to the aspect ratio of the street, which is the ratio of the effective height of the buildings on the street to the width of the street. This result can be useful in the design of transit oriented developments that increase building density to reduce emissions from transportation.

  4. Dosimetric effect of multileaf collimator leaf width on volumetric modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy for spine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoush, Ahmad, E-mail: aamoush@augusta.edu [Augusta University, 1120 15th St, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States); Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Long, Huang [University of Utah, 1950 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Subedi, Laxmi [Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44115 (United States); Qi, Peng; Djemil, Toufik; Xia, Ping [Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This work aimed to study the dosimetric effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths in treatment plans for patients receiving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Thirteen patients treated with spine SBRT were retrospectively selected for this study. The patients were treated following the protocol of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631 (RTOG 0631) for spine metastasis. The prescription dose was 16 Gy in 1 fraction to 90% of the target volume (V16 > 90%). The maximum spinal cord dose of 14 Gy and 10% of the spinal cord receiving < 10 Gy (V10) were the acceptable tolerance doses. For the purpose of this study, 2 dual-arc VMAT plans were created for each patient using 3 different MLC leaf widths: 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm. The compliance with the RTOG 0631 protocol, conformity index (CI), dose gradient index (DGI), and number of monitor units (MUs) were compared. The average V16Gy of the targets was 91.8 ± 1.2%, 92.2 ± 2.1%, and 91.7 ± 2.3% for 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm leaf widths, respectively (p = 0.78). Accordingly, the average CI was 1.45 ± 0.4, 1.47 ± 0.29, and 1.47 ± 0.31 (p = 0.98), respectively. The average DGI was 0.22 ± 0.04, 0.20 ± 0.06, and 0.22 ± 0.05, respectively (p = 0.77). The average maximum dose to the spinal cord was 12.45 ± 1.0 Gy, 12.80 ± 1.0 Gy, and 12.48 ± 1.1 (p = 0.62) and V10% of the spinal cord was 3.6 ± 2.1%, 5.6 ± 2.8%, and 5.5 ± 3.0% (p = 0.11) for 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm leaf widths, respectively. Accordingly, the average number of MUs was 4341 ± 500 MU, 5019 ± 834 MU, and 4606 ± 691 MU, respectively (p = 0.053). The use of 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm MLCs achieved similar VMAT plan quality as recommended by the RTOG 0631. The dosimetric parameters were also comparable for the 3 MLCs. In general, any of these leaf widths can be used for spine

  5. The effect of aberrated recording beams on reflecting Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    SeGall, Marc; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of aberrations present in the recording beams of a holographic setup is discussed regarding the period and spectral response of a reflecting volume Bragg grating. Imperfect recording beams result in spatially varying resonant wavelengths and the side lobes of the spectrum are washed out. Asymmetrical spectra, spectral broadening, and a reduction in peak diffraction efficiency may also be present, though these effects are less significant for gratings with wider spectral widths. Reflecting Bragg gratings (RBGs) are used as elements in a variety of applications including spectral beam combining1,2, mode locking3,4, longitudinal and transverse mode selection in lasers5,6, and sensing7,8. For applications requiring narrow spectral selectivity9, or large apertures10, these gratings must have a uniform period throughout the length of the recording medium, which may be on the order of millimeters. However, when using typical recording techniques such as two-beam interference for large aperture gratings and phase-mask recording of fiber gratings, aberrations from the optical elements in the system result in an imperfect grating structure11-13. In this paper we consider the effects of aberrations on large aperture gratings recorded in thick media using the two-beam interference technique. Previous works in analyzing the effects of aberrations have considered the effects of aberrations in a single recording plane where the beams perfectly overlap. Such an approach is valid for thin media (on the order of tens of microns), but for thick recording media (on the order of several millimeters) there will be a significant shift in the positions of the beams relative to each other as they traverse the recording medium. Therefore, the fringe pattern produced will not be constant throughout the grating if one or both beams have a non-uniform wavefront. Such non-uniform gratings may have a wider spectral width, a shifted resonant wavelength, or other problems. It is

  6. Beam loading effects for two-beam ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lanfa; Lin Yuzheng; Tong Dechun

    1999-01-01

    An analytic treatment of multi-bunch potential well distortion for a two-beam storage ring is presented. The longitudinal wake effects are separated into: the mode loss, the synchrotron tune shift (both due to potential well distortion) and the coherent multi-bunch coupling. Here, only the first two effects are studied. Resulting simple analytic formulas describe the mode loss and the synchrotron tune shift experienced by a given bunch within the two-beam, as a function of the high order mode's parameters. One can get immediately a simple quantitative answer in term of the mode loss and the synchrotron tune shift experienced by each bunch from these formulas, so the authors can know how to modify the existing configuration of parasitic cavity resonance (via frequency tuning) so that the resulting potential well distortion effects are minimized. When the RF cavities are symmetrically distributed about the interaction points, the two beams will have same beam loading effects, so the authors can compensate the phase shift of the two beam using the same method as in one beam case

  7. The effect of interaural-time-difference fluctuations on apparent source width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käsbach, Johannes; May, Tobias; Oskarsdottir, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    For the perception of spaciousness, the temporal fluctuations of the interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) provide important binaural cues. One major characteristic of spatial perception is apparent source width (ASW), which describes the perceived width of a ...

  8. Ponderomotive and weakly relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in plasma: Effect of light absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, S. D., E-mail: sdpatilphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Devchand College, Arjunnagar, Dist.: Kolhapur 591 237 (India); Takale, M. V. [Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004 (India)

    2016-05-06

    This paper presents an influence of light absorption on self-focusing of laser beam propagation in plasma. The differential equation for beam-width parameter is obtained using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and paraxial approximations through parabolic equation approach. The nonlinearity in dielectric function is assumed to be aroused due to the combined effect of weakly relativistic and ponderomotive regime. To highlight the nature of propagation, behavior of beam-width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation is presented graphically and discussed. The present work is helpful to understand issues related to the beam propagation in laser plasma interaction experiments where light absorption plays a vital role.

  9. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-01-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D y is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10 10 particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 μm horizontally and 0.55 μm vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H D of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit

  10. Analysis of drift effects on the tokamak power scrape-off width using SOLPS-ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, E. T.; Goldston, R. J.; Kaveeva, E. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Mordijck, S.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Senichenkov, I. Yu; Voskoboynikov, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    SOLPS-ITER, a comprehensive 2D scrape-off layer modeling package, is used to examine the physical mechanisms that set the scrape-off width ({λq} ) for inter-ELM power exhaust. Guided by Goldston’s heuristic drift (HD) model, which shows remarkable quantitative agreement with experimental data, this research examines drift effects on {λq} in a DIII-D H-mode magnetic equilibrium. As a numerical expedient, a low target recycling coefficient of 0.9 is used in the simulations, resulting in outer target plasma that is sheath limited instead of conduction limited as in the experiment. Scrape-off layer (SOL) particle diffusivity (D SOL) is scanned from 1 to 0.1 m2 s-1. Across this diffusivity range, outer divertor heat flux is dominated by a narrow (˜3-4 mm when mapped to the outer midplane) electron convection channel associated with thermoelectric current through the SOL from outer to inner divertor. An order-unity up-down ion pressure asymmetry allows net ion drift flux across the separatrix, facilitated by an artificial mechanism that mimics the anomalous electron transport required for overall ambipolarity in the HD model. At {{D}\\text{SOL}}=0.1 m2 s-1, the density fall-off length is similar to the electron temperature fall-off length, as predicted by the HD model and as seen experimentally. This research represents a step toward a deeper understanding of the power scrape-off width, and serves as a basis for extending fluid modeling to more experimentally relevant, high-collisionality regimes.

  11. Simulating Transient Effects of Pulsed Beams on Beam Intercepting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Herta; Noah Messomo, Etam

    2011-01-01

    The development in the physics community towards higher beam power through the possibilities of particle accelerators lead to challenges for the developers of elements which are exposed to effect of particle beams (beam intercepting devices = BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases - their highly pulsed nature has to be taken into account. The physics requirements are sometimes opposed to the current state of the art. As one possibility of many in combining the different aspects for these ambitious demands, two highly developed computer programs, namely FLUKA and ANSYS AUTODYN, were joined for this dissertation. The former is a widely enhanced Monte-Carlo-code which specializes on the interaction of particles with static matter, while the latter is a versatile explicit code for the simulation of highly dynamic processes. Both computer programs were developed intensively over years and are still continuously enhanced in o...

  12. Space charge effect in an accelerated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stupakov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually assumed that the space charge effects in relativistic beams scale with the energy of the beam as γ^{-2}, where γ is the relativistic factor. We show that for a beam accelerated in the longitudinal direction there is an additional space charge effect in free space that scales as E/γ, where E is the accelerating field. This field has the same origin as the “electromagnetic mass of the electron” discussed in textbooks on electrodynamics. It keeps the balance between the kinetic energy of the beam and the energy of the electromagnetic field of the beam. We then consider the effect of this field on a beam generated in an rf gun and calculate the energy spread produced by this field in the beam.

  13. Effect of MLC leaf width on the planning and delivery of SMLC IMRT using the CORVUS inverse treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmeister, Jay; McDermott, Patrick N.; Bossenberger, Todd; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Levin, Kenneth; Forman, Jeffrey D.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans delivered via the segmented multileaf collimator (SMLC) technique. IMRT plans were calculated using the Corvus treatment planning system for three brain, three prostate, and three pancreas cases using leaf widths of 0.5 and 1 cm. Resulting differences in plan quality and complexity are presented here. Plans calculated using a 1 cm leaf width were chosen over the 0.5 cm leaf width plans in seven out of nine cases based on clinical judgment. Conversely, optimization results revealed a superior objective function result for the 0.5 cm leaf width plans in seven out of the nine comparisons. The 1 cm leaf width objective function result was superior only for very large target volumes, indicating that expanding the solution space for plan optimization by using narrower leaves may result in a decreased probability of finding the global minimum. In the remaining cases, we can conclude that we are often not utilizing the objective function as proficiently as possible to meet our clinical goals. There was often no apparent clinically significant difference between the two plans, and in such cases the issue becomes one of plan complexity. A comparison of plan complexity revealed that the average 1 cm leaf width plan required roughly 60% fewer segments and over 40% fewer monitor units than required by 0.5 cm leaf width plans. This allows a significant decrease in whole body dose and total treatment time. For very complex IMRT plans, the treatment delivery time may affect the biologically effective dose. A clinically significant improvement in plan quality from using narrower leaves was evident only in cases with very small target volumes or those with concavities that are small with respect to the MLC leaf width. For the remaining cases investigated in this study, there was no clinical advantage to reducing the MLC leaf width from 1 to 0.5 cm. In

  14. On bandlimited signals with minimal product of effective spatial and spectral widths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Venkatesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that signals (which could be functions of space or time belonging to 𝕃2-space cannot be localized simultaneously in space/time and frequency domains. Alternatively, signals have a positive lower bound on the product of their effective spatial andeffective spectral widths, for simplicity, hereafter called the effective space-bandwidthproduct (ESBP. This is the classical uncertainty inequality (UI, attributed to many, but, from a signal processing perspective, to Gabor who, in his seminal paper, established the uncertainty relation and proposed a joint time-frequency representation in which the basis functions have minimal ESBP. It is found that the Gaussian function is the only signal that has the lowest ESBP. Since the Gaussian function is not bandlimited, no bandlimited signal can have the lowest ESBP. We deal with the problem of determining finite-energy, bandlimited signals which have the lowest ESBP. The main result is as follows. By choosing the convolution product of a Gaussian signal (with σ as the variance parameter and a bandlimited filter with a continuous spectrum, we demonstrate that there exists a finite-energy, bandlimited signal whose ESBP can be made to be arbitrarily close (dependent on the choice of σ to the optimal value specified by the UI.

  15. The effect of crack width on the service life of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hung, Nguyen; Viet Hung, Vu; Viet, Tran Bao

    2018-04-01

    Reinforced concrete has become a widely used construction material around the world. Nowadays, the assessment of deterioration and life expectancy of reinforced concrete structure is very important and necessary as concrete is a complex material with brittle failure. Under the effect of load and over time, cracks occur in the structure, significantly reducing its performance and durability. Therefore, a number of models for predicting the penetration of chloride ions into the concrete were proposed to assess the durability of the structure. In the study performed by T B Viet (2016) [1], the author proposed a new theoretical model, especially considering the effects of macro and micro cracking on the diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in the cracked concrete. The following experimental results, in term of electrical indication of concrete’s ability to resist chloride ion penetration, are used to calculate the lifespan of a reinforced concrete structure according to Dura Crete approach [8] with different crack widths to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the above model in the range of concrete compressive strength of 30-70MPa.

  16. Interference effects of neutral MSSM Higgs bosons with a generalised narrow-width approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Elina

    2014-11-01

    Mixing effects in the MSSM Higgs sector can give rise to a sizeable interference between the neutral Higgs bosons. On the other hand, factorising a more complicated process into production and decay parts by means of the narrow-width approximation (NWA) simplifies the calculation. The standard NWA, however, does not account for interference terms. Therefore, we introduce a generalisation of the NWA (gNWA) which allows for a consistent treatment of interference effects between nearly mass-degenerate particles. Furthermore, we apply the gNWA at the tree and 1-loop level to an example process where the neutral Higgs bosons h and H are produced in the decay of a heavy neutralino and subsequently decay into a fermion pair. The h-H propagator mixing is found to agree well with the approximation of Breit-Wigner propagators times finite wave-function normalisation factors, both leading to a significant interference contribution. The factorisation of the interference term based on on-shell matrix elements reproduces the full interference result within a precision of better than 1% for the considered process. The gNWA also enables the inclusion of contributions beyond the 1-loop order into the most precise prediction.

  17. Effect of channel-width and chirality on graphene field-effect transistor based real-time biomolecule sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letian Lyu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET hold promise in biomolecule sensing due to the outstanding properties of graphene materials. Charges in biomolecules are transduced into a change in the GFET current, which allows real-time monitoring of the biomolecule concentrations. Here we theoretically evaluate the performance of GFET based real-time biomolecule sensing, aiming to better understand the width-scaling limit in GFET based biosensors. In particular, we study the effect of the channel-width and the chirality on FET sensitivity by taking the percentage change of the FET current per unit charge density as the sensing signal. Firstly, GFETs made of graphene nanoribbons (GNR and graphene sheets (GS show comparable sensing signals to each other when gated at 1011 – 1012 cm-2 carrier densities. Sensing signals in GNRs are enhanced when gated near the sub-band thresholds, and increase their values in wider GNRs due to the change in device conductance and quantum capacitance. Secondly, the GNR chirality is found to fine tune the sensing signals. Armchair GNRs with smaller energy bandgaps appear to have an enhanced sensing signal close to 1011 cm-2 carrier densities. These results may help understand the scaling limit in GFET based biosensors along the width direction, and shed light on forming all-electrical bio-arrays.

  18. Effect of channel-width and chirality on graphene field-effect transistor based real-time biomolecule sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Letian; Jaswal, Perveshwer; Xu, Guangyu

    2018-03-01

    Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) hold promise in biomolecule sensing due to the outstanding properties of graphene materials. Charges in biomolecules are transduced into a change in the GFET current, which allows real-time monitoring of the biomolecule concentrations. Here we theoretically evaluate the performance of GFET based real-time biomolecule sensing, aiming to better understand the width-scaling limit in GFET based biosensors. In particular, we study the effect of the channel-width and the chirality on FET sensitivity by taking the percentage change of the FET current per unit charge density as the sensing signal. Firstly, GFETs made of graphene nanoribbons (GNR) and graphene sheets (GS) show comparable sensing signals to each other when gated at 1011 - 1012 cm-2 carrier densities. Sensing signals in GNRs are enhanced when gated near the sub-band thresholds, and increase their values in wider GNRs due to the change in device conductance and quantum capacitance. Secondly, the GNR chirality is found to fine tune the sensing signals. Armchair GNRs with smaller energy bandgaps appear to have an enhanced sensing signal close to 1011 cm-2 carrier densities. These results may help understand the scaling limit in GFET based biosensors along the width direction, and shed light on forming all-electrical bio-arrays.

  19. Prototype heel effect compensation filter for cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Ohno, Mari; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Tsujita, Kazuhiko; Saito, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    The prototype cone-beam CT (CBCT) has a larger beam width than the conventional multi-detector row CT (MDCT). This causes a non-uniform angular distribution of the x-ray beam intensity known as the heel effect. Scan conditions for CBCT tube current are adjusted on the anode side to obtain an acceptable clinical image quality. However, as the dose is greater on the cathode side than on the anode side, the signal-to-noise ratio on the cathode side is excessively high, resulting in an unnecessary dose amount. To compensate for the heel effect, we developed a heel effect compensation (HEC) filter. The HEC filter rendered the dose distribution uniform and reduced the dose by an average of 25% for free air and by 20% for CTDI phantoms compared to doses with the conventional filter. In addition, its effect in rendering the effective energy uniform resulted in an improvement in image quality. This new HEC filter may be useful in cone-beam CT studies. (note)

  20. The effect of pulse width and contact configuration on paresthesia coverage in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsheimer, Jan; Buitenweg, Jan R; Das, John; de Sutter, Paul; Manola, Ljubomir; Nuttin, Bart

    2011-05-01

    In spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic, intractable pain, a satisfactory analgesic effect can be obtained only when the stimulation-induced paresthesias cover all painful body areas completely or partially. To investigate the effect of stimulus pulse width (PW) and contact configuration (CC) on the area of paresthesia (PA), perception threshold (VPT), discomfort threshold (VDT), and usage range (UR) in spinal cord stimulation. Chronic pain patients were tested during a follow-up visit. They were stimulated monopolarly and with the CC giving each patient the best analgesia. VPT, VDT, and UR were determined for PWs of 90, 210, and 450 microseconds. The paresthesia contours at VDT were drawn on a body map and digitized; PA was calculated; and its anatomic composition was described. The effects of PW and CC on PA, VPT, VDT, and UR were tested statistically. Twenty-four of 31 tests with low thoracic stimulation and 8 of 9 tests with cervical stimulation gave a significant extension of PA at increasing PW. In 14 of 18 tests (low thoracic), a caudal extension was obtained (primarily in L5-S2). In cervical stimulation the extension was predominantly caudal as well. In contrast to VPT and VDT, UR is not significantly different when stimulating with any CC. PA extends caudally with increasing PW. The mechanism includes that the larger and smaller dorsal column fibers have a different mediolateral distribution and that smaller dorsal column fibers have a smaller UR and can be activated only when PW is sufficiently large. A similar effect of CC on PA is unlikely as long as electrodes with a large intercontact distance are applied.

  1. Determination of optimum parameters effect on kerf width of 316L stainless steel tube in Nd:YAG laser cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J.M.; Kim, T.H. [Dept. of Metallurgical System Engineering, YONSEI Univ., Seoul (Korea); Kim, H.Y. [Korea Environment and Merchandise Testing Inst., Seoul (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    The effects of following four factors, which are laser power, assist gas pressure, cooling rate and scanning speed on the quality characteristics of laser cut 316L stainless steel tubes have been studied. 2{sup 4} full factorial design and central composite design were used to evaluate optimum condition of process parameters. Regression analysis was used to develop empirical models for the combined effects of the independent process parameters on laser cut quality. As the results, it was observed that laser power, assist gas pressure and scanning speeds did the major effects on kerf width. The smallest kerf width was obtained with the condition of low laser power, assist gas pressure, scanning speed and moderate cooling rate. Calculated regression model was kerf width = 64.47 + 0.91W + 1.25P + 0.41S + 0.41C{sup 2} - 0.45P{sup 2}. (orig.)

  2. Effects of walking speed on the step-by-step control of step width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Katy H; Heitkamp, Lauren N; Horne, Joscelyn S; Dean, Jesse C

    2018-02-08

    Young, healthy adults walking at typical preferred speeds use step-by-step adjustments of step width to appropriately redirect their center of mass motion and ensure mediolateral stability. However, it is presently unclear whether this control strategy is retained when walking at the slower speeds preferred by many clinical populations. We investigated whether the typical stabilization strategy is influenced by walking speed. Twelve young, neurologically intact participants walked on a treadmill at a range of prescribed speeds (0.2-1.2 m/s). The mediolateral stabilization strategy was quantified as the proportion of step width variance predicted by the mechanical state of the pelvis throughout a step (calculated as R 2 magnitude from a multiple linear regression). Our ability to accurately predict the upcoming step width increased over the course of a step. The strength of the relationship between step width and pelvis mechanics at the start of a step was reduced at slower speeds. However, these speed-dependent differences largely disappeared by the end of a step, other than at the slowest walking speed (0.2 m/s). These results suggest that mechanics-dependent adjustments in step width are a consistent component of healthy gait across speeds and contexts. However, slower walking speeds may ease this control by allowing mediolateral repositioning of the swing leg to occur later in a step, thus encouraging slower walking among clinical populations with limited sensorimotor control. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The effects of grip width on sticking region in bench press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomo, Olav; Van Den Tillaar, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of the sticking region by examining how three different grip widths affect the sticking region in powerlifters' bench press performance. It was hypothesised that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width, indicating a poor mechanical region for vertical force production at these joint angles. Twelve male experienced powerlifters (age 27.7 ± 8.8 years, mass 91.9 ± 15.4 kg) were tested in one repetition maximum (1-RM) bench press with a narrow, medium and wide grip. Joint kinematics, timing, bar position and velocity were measured with a 3D motion capture system. All participants showed a clear sticking region with all three grip widths, but this sticking region was not found to occur at the same joint angles in all three grip widths, thereby rejecting the hypothesis that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width. It is suggested that, due to the differences in moment arm of the barbell about the elbow joint in the sticking region, there still might be a poor mechanical region for total force production that is joint angle-specific.

  4. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; MONTAG, C.; PEGGS, S.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far

  5. Numerical Analysis of Through Transmission Pulsed Eddy Current Testing and Effects of Pulse Width Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Kil; Choi, Dong Myung

    2007-01-01

    By using numerical analysis methods, through transmission type pulsed eddy current (PEC) testing is modeled and PEC signal responses due to varying material conductivity, permeability, thickness, lift-off and pulse width are investigated. Results show that the peak amplitude of PEC signal gets reduced and the time to reach the peak amplitude is increased as the material conductivity, permeability, and specimen thickness increase. Also, they indicate that the pulse width needs to be shorter when evaluating the material conductivity and the plate thickness using the peak amplitude, and when the pulse width is long, the peak time is found to be more useful. Other results related to lift-off variation are reported as well

  6. Investigation of beam effect on porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotai, E. E-mail: kotai@rmki.kfki.hu; Paszti, F.; Szilagyi, E

    2000-03-01

    When performing Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) measurements combined with channeling on 'columnar' porous silicon (PS) samples with beam aligned to the direction of the pores, a strong beam effect was observed. The minimum yield as a function of the beam dose for different porous samples was compared with the yield measured on single crystal silicon. It was demonstrated that the beam effect strongly depends on the porosity of the sample. Bombardment in the random direction caused about 10% higher change in the minimum yield than in the channel direction.

  7. Investigation of beam effect on porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotai, E.; Paszti, F.; Szilagyi, E.

    2000-01-01

    When performing Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) measurements combined with channeling on 'columnar' porous silicon (PS) samples with beam aligned to the direction of the pores, a strong beam effect was observed. The minimum yield as a function of the beam dose for different porous samples was compared with the yield measured on single crystal silicon. It was demonstrated that the beam effect strongly depends on the porosity of the sample. Bombardment in the random direction caused about 10% higher change in the minimum yield than in the channel direction

  8. Radiation effects of ion beams on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the radiation effects of ion beams on polymers are reviewed briefly. Our recent work on the radiation effects of ion beams on polystyrene thin films on silicon wafers and time resolved emission studies on polymers are described. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of the effects of red blood cell distribution width on survival in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : Data are available indicating that red blood cell distribution width (RDW is higher in cancer patients compared to healthy individuals or benign events. In our study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different RDW levels on survival in lung cancer patients. Material and methods: Clinical and laboratory data from 146 patients with lung cancer and 40 healthy subjects were retrospectively studied. RDW was recorded before the application of any treatment. Patients were categorised according to four different RDW cut-off values (median RDW, RDW determined by ROC curve analysis, the upper limit at the automatic blood count device, and RDW cut of value which used in previous studies. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to examine the effect of RDW on survival for each cut-off level. Results : The median age of patients was 56.5 years (range: 26–83 years. The difference in median RDW between patients and the control group was statistically significant (14.0 and 13.8, respectively, p = 0.04. There was no difference with regard to overall survival when patients with RDW ≥ 14.0 were compared to those with RDW < 14.0 (p = 0.70; however, overall survival was 3.0 months shorter in low values of its own group in each of the following cut-off values: ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.34, ≥ 14.5 (p = 0.25, ≥ 15 (p = 0.59, although no results were statistically significant. Discussion : We consider that the difference between low and high RDW values according to certain cut-off values may reflect the statistics of larger studies although there is a statistically negative correlation between RDW level and survival.

  10. Evaluation of the effects of red blood cell distribution width on survival in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Mehmet; Hocazade, Cemil; Kos, F Tugba; Uncu, Dogan; Karakas, Esra; Dogan, Mutlu; Uncu, Hikmet G; Ozdemir, Nuriye; Zengin, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Data are available indicating that red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is higher in cancer patients compared to healthy individuals or benign events. In our study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different RDW levels on survival in lung cancer patients. Clinical and laboratory data from 146 patients with lung cancer and 40 healthy subjects were retrospectively studied. RDW was recorded before the application of any treatment. Patients were categorised according to four different RDW cut-off values (median RDW, RDW determined by ROC curve analysis, the upper limit at the automatic blood count device, and RDW cut of value which used in previous studies). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to examine the effect of RDW on survival for each cut-off level. The median age of patients was 56.5 years (range: 26-83 years). The difference in median RDW between patients and the control group was statistically significant (14.0 and 13.8, respectively, p = 0.04). There was no difference with regard to overall survival when patients with RDW ≥ 14.0 were compared to those with RDW < 14.0 (p = 0.70); however, overall survival was 3.0 months shorter in low values of its own group in each of the following cut-off values: ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.34), ≥ 14.5 (p = 0.25), ≥ 15 (p = 0.59), although no results were statistically significant. We consider that the difference between low and high RDW values according to certain cut-off values may reflect the statistics of larger studies although there is a statistically negative correlation between RDW level and survival.

  11. The Analysis of the Effect of Coolant Channel Width on Fuel Loading of the RSG-GAS Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surbakti; Tukiran

    2004-01-01

    The RGS-GAS using uranium silicide fuel, plate type and 250 g U of loading is planned to increase the fuel loading to 300 g U even to 400 g U. The silicide fuel has advantages when increase the fuel loading in the same volume. Because of that case, it is necessary to analyze the effect of coolant channel width on fuel loading of the RSG-GAS core. Analyzing the effect the work which done is to generate cell and core calculation using WIMSD/4 and Batan-2DIFF codes. The WIMSD/4 code is used to generate cross section of core material and Batan-2DIFF is used to calculate the effective multiplication factor. The model that used in this calculation there are three kind of fuel loading namely, 250 g U, 300 g U and 400 g U. The coolant channel width is simulated from 1.75 mm to 2.55 mm. From that fuel loadings, it is analyzed which coolant channel width gave the best effective multiplication factor. From result of analysis showed that the best effective multiplication factor is on the coolant channel width of 2.55 mm for third of fuel loadings. (author)

  12. Determining effective riparian buffer width for nonnative plant exclusion and habitat enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin Ferris; Vincent D' Amico; Christopher K. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Nonnative plants threaten native biodiversity in landscapes where habitats are fragmented. Unfortunately, in developed areas, much of the remaining forested habitat occurs in fragmented riparian corridors. Because forested corridors of sufficient width may allow forest interior specializing native species to retain competitive advantage over edge specialist and...

  13. The effect of gap width on viscous stresses within the leakage across a bileaflet valve pivot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Brandon R; Andersen, Morten E; Fründ, Ernst Torben

    2008-01-01

    reported within the pivots in previous studies. Velocities measured experimentally were even larger than those estimated computationally. CONCLUSION: These experiments suggest that viscous stresses in leakage flow across a bileaflet mitral valve increase with gap width, and may contribute more to blood...

  14. Effects of riparian buffer width on wood loading in headwater streams after repeated forest thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia I. Burton; Deanna H. Olson; Klaus J. Puettmann

    2016-01-01

    Forested riparian buffer zones are used in conjunction with upland forest management, in part, to provide for the recruitment for large wood to streams. Small headwater streams account for the majority of stream networks in many forested regions. Yet, our understanding of how riparian buffer width influences wood dynamics in headwater streams is relatively less...

  15. Equalization of Skin Effect Loss Dominated Channels using Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) Pre-Emphasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, J.H.R.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Visschers, J.L.; Nauta, Bram

    2005-01-01

    A digital transmitter pre-emphasis technique is presented that is based on pulse-width modulation, instead of finite impulse response (FIR) filtering. The technique fits well to future high-speed low-voltage CMOS processes. A 0.13μm CMOS transmitter achieves more than 5Gb/s (2-PAM) over 25m of

  16. Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis: effect of bin width on the probability of linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slager, S L; Juo, S H; Durner, M; Hodge, S E

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed part of the Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data using Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods that are implemented in the computer program Loki. The MCMC method reports the "probability of linkage" (PL) across the chromosomal regions of interest. The point of maximum PL can then be taken as a "location estimate" for the location of the quantitative trait locus (QTL). However, Loki does not provide a formal statistical test of linkage. In this paper, we explore how the bin width used in the calculations affects the max PL and the location estimate. We analyzed age at onset (AO) and quantitative trait number 5, Q5, from 26 replicates of the general simulated data in one region where we knew a major gene, MG5, is located. For each trait, we found the max PL and the corresponding location estimate, using four different bin widths. We found that bin width, as expected, does affect the max PL and the location estimate, and we recommend that users of Loki explore how their results vary with different bin widths.

  17. Effect of MLC Leaf Width and PTV Margin on the Treatment Planning of Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Radiosurgery (IMSRS) or Radiotherapy (IMSRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Jenghwa; Yenice, Kamil M.; Jiang Kailiu; Hunt, Margie; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of MLC (multileaf collimator) leaf width and PTV (planning target volume) margin on treatment planning of intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS) or radiotherapy (IMSRT). Twelve patients previously treated with IMSRS/IMSRT were retrospectively planned with 5- and 3-mm MLC leaf widths and 3- and 2-mm PTV margins using the already contoured clinical target volume and critical structures. The same beam arrangement, planning parameters, and optimization method were used in each of the 4 plans for a given patient. Each plan was normalized so that the prescription dose covered at least 99% of the PTV. Plan indices - D mean (mean dose), conformity index (CI), V 70 (volume receiving ≥ 70% of the prescription dose), and V 50 (volume receiving ≥ 50% of the prescription dose) - were calculated from the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the PTV, normal tissue, and organs at risk (OARs). Hypothesis testing was performed on the mean ratios of plan indices to determine the statistical significance of the relative differences. The PTV was well covered for all plans, as no significant differences were observed for D 95 , V 95 , D max , D min , and D mean of the PTV. The irradiated volume was ∼23% smaller when 2-mm instead of 3-mm PTV margin was used, but it was only reduced by ∼6% when the MLC leaf width was reduced from 5 mm to 3 mm. For normal tissue and brainstem, V 70 , V 50 , and D mean were reduced more effectively by a decrease in MLC width, while D mean of optic nerve and chiasm were more sensitive to a change in PTV margin. The DVH statistics for the PTV and normal structures from the treatment plan with 5-mm MLC and 2-mm PTV margin were equal to those with 3-mm MLC and 3-mm PTV margin. PTV margin reduction is more effective in sparing the normal tissue and OARs than a reduction in MLC leaf width. For IMSRS, where highly accurate setup and small PTV margins are routinely employed, the use of 5-mm MLC is therefore less desirable.

  18. Effects of curved midline and varying width on the description of the effective diffusivity of Brownian particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Yoshua; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2018-05-01

    Axial diffusion in channels and tubes of smoothly-varying geometry can be approximately described as one-dimensional diffusion in the entropy potential with a position-dependent effective diffusion coefficient, by means of the modified Fick–Jacobs equation. In this work, we derive analytical expressions for the position-dependent effective diffusivity for two-dimensional asymmetric varying-width channels, and for three-dimensional curved midline tubes, formed by straight walls. To this end, we use a recently developed theoretical framework using the Frenet–Serret moving frame as the coordinate system (2016 J. Chem. Phys. 145 074105). For narrow tubes and channels, an effective one-dimensional description reducing the diffusion equation to a Fick–Jacobs-like equation in general coordinates is used. From this last equation, one can calculate the effective diffusion coefficient applying Neumann boundary conditions.

  19. Effect of smectic A temperature width on the soft mode in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, A.; Kaur, S.; Prakash, J.; Sreenivas, K.; Bawa, S. S.; Biradar, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    The behavior of soft mode range with respect to the temperature width of smectic A (Sm A) phase has been studied in four different ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) materials in the frequency range 10Hz-10MHz. The studies have been carried out in a planarly well aligned cells at different temperatures and different bias fields in Sm C* and Sm A phases. Dielectric studies of these FLCs near Sm C*-Sm A phase transition show that the temperature range of soft mode relaxation frequency phenomenon varies with the temperature width of Sm A phase. The dependence of tilt angle on temperature shows the nature of the order of transition at Sm C*-Sm A phase. The coupling between order parameters of Sm C* and Sm A phase influences the soft mode and phase transition in Sm C* and Sm A phases.

  20. Effects of finite pulse width on two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhichun; Crepeau, Richard H; Freed, Jack H

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ESR techniques, such as 2D-ELDOR, have considerably improved the resolution of ESR in studies of molecular dynamics in complex fluids such as liquid crystals and membrane vesicles and in spin labeled polymers and peptides. A well-developed theory based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) has been successfully employed to analyze these experiments. However, one fundamental assumption has been utilized to simplify the complex analysis, viz. the pulses have been treated as ideal non-selective ones, which therefore provide uniform irradiation of the whole spectrum. In actual experiments, the pulses are of finite width causing deviations from the theoretical predictions, a problem that is exacerbated by experiments performed at higher frequencies. In the present paper we provide a method to deal with the full SLE including the explicit role of the molecular dynamics, the spin Hamiltonian and the radiation field during the pulse. The computations are rendered more manageable by utilizing the Trotter formula, which is adapted to handle this SLE in what we call a "Split Super-Operator" method. Examples are given for different motional regimes, which show how 2D-ELDOR spectra are affected by the finite pulse widths. The theory shows good agreement with 2D-ELDOR experiments performed as a function of pulse width.

  1. The Effect of Crack Width on Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Steel in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When subjected to loading or thermal shrinkage, reinforced concrete structures usually behave in a cracking state, which raises the risk of bar corrosion from the working environment. The influence of cover cracking on chloride-induced corrosion was experimentally investigated through a 654-day laboratory test on cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride solution. The concrete specimens have a dimension of 100 mm × 100 mm × 400 mm and a single prefabricated crack at the midspan. When the percentage concentration of chloride ion (0.6%, 1.2%, 2.1%, 3.0%, and 6.0% and crack width (uncracked, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mm are taken as variables, the experimental results showed that the corrosion rates for cracked specimens increased with increasing percentage concentration of chloride and increasing crack width. This study also showed the interrelationship between crack width and percentage concentration of chloride on the corrosion rate. In addition, an empirical model, incorporating the influence of the cover cracking and chloride concentration, was developed to predict the corrosion rate. This model allows the prediction of the maximum allowable wcr based on the given percentage concentration of chloride in the exposure condition.

  2. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  3. Effect of Pulse Width on Microstructure and Hardness of FeSiB Coatings by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GONG Yu-bing

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-density coating with FeSiB amorphous ribbons as cladding materials on the surface of mild steel was fabricated by laser cladding. The effect of different pulse widths on formability, microstructure and microhardness of the coatings was analyzed by optical microscope(OM, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM and microhardness tester. The results show that with the increase of the pulse width, the coating dilute rate rises; the tendency of crack increases and the crack originates from surface to the interface; the degree of crystallization increases and crystallization phases are α-Fe, Fe2B and Fe3Si, fusion zone width increases and the trend of columnar crystals along the epitaxial growth becomes bigger and bigger; the microhardness firstly increases and then decreases. When pulse width is 3.2ms, the structure of the coating is compact, no hole defects, the interface exhibits a good metallurgical combination and the dilute rate is low about 23.2%. Average microhardness of the coating reaches 1192HV, which is about 10 times as much as the substrate.

  4. Numerical study on the effect of width of single curtain on the performance of Savonius wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwono Triyogi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a preliminary results of the flow around the Savonius wind turbine with installing curtain plate in front of the returning blade turbine. It was investigated numerically in a uniform flow at Reynolds number of 30,000 and 90,000. The velocity vector and pressure distribution around the turbine were simulate by varying the width of curtain plate relative to the diameter of rotor blade (S/D of = 1.00, 1.02, 1.03, 1.15, 1.41, and 2.00, using STAR CCM++ Software. The k-ɛ realizable as turbulence model was used to visualize the flow phenomena occurred around the turbine, and where in this simulation, the rotor turbine was set static. The results show that it seems the width of the curtain installed in front of the returning blade of the turbine plays an important role in the performance of the turbine. In general, the installing of the curtain in front of the returning blade of the turbine is more effective to improve the turbine performance. This is not necessarily, but depends on the width of the curtain and the number of Reynolds (Re. For the width of the large curtain of S/D = 2 at Re = 90,000, the performance of the turbine is estimated lower than when the turbine without the curtain.

  5. Effects of large floods on channel width: recent insights from Italian rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Righini, Margherita; Amponsah, William; Crema, Stefano; Ciccarese, Giuseppe; Nardi, Laura; Zoccatelli, Davide; Borga, Marco; Cavalli, Marco; Comiti, Francesco; Corsini, Alessandro; Marchi, Lorenzo; Rinaldi, Massimo; Surian, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Variations of channel morphology occurring during large flood events (recurrence interval > 50-100 years.) are very often the cause of damages to buildings and infrastructures, as well as of casualties. However, our knowledge of such processes remains poor, as is our capability to predict them. Post-event campaigns documenting channel changes and linking them to hydrological and morphological factors thus bear an enormous value for both the scientific community and river management agencies. We present the results of an analysis on the geomorphic response associated to 4 large floods that occurred between October 2011 and September 2015, affecting several catchments in Northern Italy (Magra-Vara, Trebbia, Nure rivers) and Sardinia (Posada and Mannu di Bitti rivers), characterized by different climatic, lithological and geomorphological settings. The analysis considered more than 400 channel reaches characterized by a drainage area ranging from 39 to 1,100 km2 and featuring a wide range of lateral confinement, mostly within the partly- and unconfined conditions. The approach to flood analysis encompassed: (i) hydrological and hydraulic analysis; (ii) analysis of sediment delivery by landslides to the channel network; (iii) GIS-based and field assessment of morphological channel modifications. For the Nure River flood event (September 2015) a quantitative assessment on average bed level variations was also carried out. Return period for maximum hourly rainfall intensities and peak water discharges exceeded in all basins 100 yr, in some cases even 300 yr. Very high unit peak discharges were estimated, reaching 8.8 m3 s-1km-2 in the Nure River (205 km2) and up to 30 m3 s-1km-2in few Magra River tributaries (5-10 km2). Notable channel widening (post-flood width / pre-flood width > 1.1) occurred in 83% of studied reaches, and it was found more relevant in the channels with narrower initial width, i.e. along the relatively steep tributaries. For these tributaries, the

  6. Visual illusions and plate design: the effects of plate rim widths and rim coloring on perceived food portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, A D; van den Bos, W; Matheson, D; Desai, M; McClure, S M; Robinson, T N

    2014-05-01

    The Delboeuf Illusion affects perceptions of the relative sizes of concentric shapes. This study was designed to extend research on the application of the Delboeuf illusion to food on a plate by testing whether a plate's rim width and coloring influence perceptual bias to affect perceived food portion size. Within-subjects experimental design. Experiment 1 tested the effect of rim width on perceived food portion size. Experiment 2 tested the effect of rim coloring on perceived food portion size. In both experiments, participants observed a series of photographic images of paired, side-by-side plates varying in designs and amounts of food. From each pair, participants were asked to select the plate that contained more food. Multilevel logistic regression examined the effects of rim width and coloring on perceived food portion size. Experiment 1: participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 5% and the visual area of food portions by 10% on plates with wider rims compared with plates with very thin rims (Pfood portion sizes. Experiment 2: participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 1.5% and the visual area of food portions by 3% on plates with rim coloring compared with plates with no coloring (P=0.01). The effect of rim coloring was greater with smaller food portion sizes. The Delboeuf illusion applies to food on a plate. Participants overestimated food portion size on plates with wider and colored rims. These findings may help design plates to influence perceptions of food portion sizes.

  7. Linear mixed-effects models to describe individual tree crown width for China-fir in Fujian Province, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xu; Yujun, Sun; Xinjie, Wang; Jin, Wang; Yao, Fu

    2015-01-01

    A multiple linear model was developed for individual tree crown width of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook in Fujian province, southeast China. Data were obtained from 55 sample plots of pure China-fir plantation stands. An Ordinary Linear Least Squares (OLS) regression was used to establish the crown width model. To adjust for correlations between observations from the same sample plots, we developed one level linear mixed-effects (LME) models based on the multiple linear model, which take into account the random effects of plots. The best random effects combinations for the LME models were determined by the Akaike's information criterion, the Bayesian information criterion and the -2logarithm likelihood. Heteroscedasticity was reduced by three residual variance functions: the power function, the exponential function and the constant plus power function. The spatial correlation was modeled by three correlation structures: the first-order autoregressive structure [AR(1)], a combination of first-order autoregressive and moving average structures [ARMA(1,1)], and the compound symmetry structure (CS). Then, the LME model was compared to the multiple linear model using the absolute mean residual (AMR), the root mean square error (RMSE), and the adjusted coefficient of determination (adj-R2). For individual tree crown width models, the one level LME model showed the best performance. An independent dataset was used to test the performance of the models and to demonstrate the advantage of calibrating LME models.

  8. Impact of Spectral Notch Width on Neurophysiological Plasticity and Clinical Effectiveness of the Tailor-Made Notched Music Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wunderlich

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the ringing in the ears that is unrelated to any external source, causes a significant loss in quality of life, involving sleep disturbance and depression for 1 to 3% of the general population. While in the first place tinnitus may be triggered by damage to the inner ear cells, the neural generators of subjective tinnitus are located in central regions of the nervous system. A loss of lateral inhibition, tonotopical reorganization and a gain-increase in response to the sensory deprivation result in hypersensitivity and hyperactivity in certain regions of the auditory cortex. In the tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT patients listen to music from which the frequency spectrum of the tinnitus has been removed. This evokes strong lateral inhibition from neurons tuned to adjacent frequencies onto the neurons involved in the tinnitus percept. A reduction of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related neural activity was achieved with TMNMT in previous studies. As the effect of lateral inhibition depends on the bandwidth of the notch, in the current study we altered the notch width to find the most effective notch width for TMNMT. We compared 1-octave notch width with ½-octave and ¼-octave. Participants chose their favorite music for the training that included three month of two hours daily listening. The outcome was measured by means of standardized questionnaires and magnetoencephalography. We found a general reduction of tinnitus distress in all administered tinnitus questionnaires after the training. Additionally, tinnitus-related neural activity was reduced after the training. Nevertheless, notch width did not have an influence on the behavioral or neural effects of TMNMT. This could be due to a non-linear resolution of lateral inhibition in high frequencies.

  9. Effect of different methods of pulse width modulation on power losses in an induction motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, Alexander; Fokin, Dmitrii; Shuharev, Sergey; Ten, Evgenii

    2017-10-01

    We consider the calculation of modulation power losses in a system “induction motor-inverter” for various pulse width modulation (PWM) methods of the supply voltage. Presented values of modulation power losses are the result of modeling a system “DC link - two-level three-phase voltage inverter - induction motor - load”. In this study the power losses in a system “induction motor - inverter” are computed, as well as losses caused by higher harmonics of PWM supply voltage, followed by definition of active power consumed by the DC link for a specified value mechanical power on the induction motor shaft. Mechanical power was determined by the rotation speed and the torque on the motor shaft in various quasi-sinusoidal supply voltage PWM modes. These calculations reveal the best coefficient of performance (COP) in a system of a variable frequency drive (VFD) with independent voltage inverter controlled by induction motor PWM.

  10. Effects of ρ-meson width on pion distributions in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Huovinen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the finite width of ρ meson on the pion momentum distribution is studied quantitatively in the framework of the S-matrix approach combined with a blast-wave model to describe particle emissions from an expanding fireball. We find that the proper treatment of resonances which accounts for their production dynamics encoded in data for partial wave scattering amplitudes can substantially modify spectra of daughter particles originating in their two body decays. In particular, it results in an enhancement of the low-pT pions from the decays of ρ mesons which improves the quantitative description of the pion spectra in heavy ion collisions obtained by the ALICE collaboration at the LHC energy.

  11. Study on conditional probability of surface rupture: effect of fault dip and width of seismogenic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N.

    2017-12-01

    The conditional probability of surface ruptures is affected by various factors, such as shallow material properties, process of earthquakes, ground motions and so on. Toda (2013) pointed out difference of the conditional probability of strike and reverse fault by considering the fault dip and width of seismogenic layer. This study evaluated conditional probability of surface rupture based on following procedures. Fault geometry was determined from the randomly generated magnitude based on The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion (2017) method. If the defined fault plane was not saturated in the assumed width of the seismogenic layer, the fault plane depth was randomly provided within the seismogenic layer. The logistic analysis was performed to two data sets: surface displacement calculated by dislocation methods (Wang et al., 2003) from the defined source fault, the depth of top of the defined source fault. The estimated conditional probability from surface displacement indicated higher probability of reverse faults than that of strike faults, and this result coincides to previous similar studies (i.e. Kagawa et al., 2004; Kataoka and Kusakabe, 2005). On the contrary, the probability estimated from the depth of the source fault indicated higher probability of thrust faults than that of strike and reverse faults, and this trend is similar to the conditional probability of PFDHA results (Youngs et al., 2003; Moss and Ross, 2011). The probability of combined simulated results of thrust and reverse also shows low probability. The worldwide compiled reverse fault data include low fault dip angle earthquake. On the other hand, in the case of Japanese reverse fault, there is possibility that the conditional probability of reverse faults with less low dip angle earthquake shows low probability and indicates similar probability of strike fault (i.e. Takao et al., 2013). In the future, numerical simulation by considering failure condition of surface by the source

  12. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimbault, C [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Bambade, P [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Moenig, K [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Schulte, D [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  13. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbault, C; Mönig, K; Schulte, D

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  14. Effects of beam, target and substrate potentials in ion beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam etching and deposition are normally carried out with beam, target and substrate potentials near ground potential. In this paper, the effects of intentional or unintentional changes in these potentials are described. Examples include beam neutralization, a single extraction grid, substrate bias, and target bias. Each example is described in terms of beam plasma parameters. (Auth.)

  15. Effects of interventions on normalizing step width during self-paced dual-belt treadmill walking with virtual reality, a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Lansink, I L B; van Kouwenhove, L; Dijkstra, P U; Postema, K; Hijmans, J M

    2017-10-01

    Step width is increased during dual-belt treadmill walking, in self-paced mode with virtual reality. Generally a familiarization period is thought to be necessary to normalize step width. The aim of this randomised study was to analyze the effects of two interventions on step width, to reduce the familiarization period. We used the GRAIL (Gait Real-time Analysis Interactive Lab), a dual-belt treadmill with virtual reality in the self-paced mode. Thirty healthy young adults were randomly allocated to three groups and asked to walk at their preferred speed for 5min. In the first session, the control-group received no intervention, the 'walk-on-the-line'-group was instructed to walk on a line, projected on the between-belt gap of the treadmill and the feedback-group received feedback about their current step width and were asked to reduce it. Interventions started after 1min and lasted 1min. During the second session, 7-10days later, no interventions were given. Linear mixed modeling showed that interventions did not have an effect on step width after the intervention period in session 1. Initial step width (second 30s) of session 1 was larger than initial step width of session 2. Step width normalized after 2min and variation in step width stabilized after 1min. Interventions do not reduce step width after intervention period. A 2-min familiarization period is sufficient to normalize and stabilize step width, in healthy young adults, regardless of interventions. A standardized intervention to normalize step width is not necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Beam-beam effects for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Eden, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    We present a summary of a fairly extensive study of beam-beam issues that arise in the design of PEP-II. Most of these studies are carried out with ''strong-strong'' multiparticle tracking simulations. We focus on: choice of nominal beam-beam parameter, strength of the parasitic collisions, injection issues, performance and tradeoffs with unequal beam-beam parameters. We comment only briefly on beam lifetime. We conclude that: the beams are sufficiently well separated so that the parasitic collisions are effectively weak; that small inequalities in the beam-beam parameters may imply more comfortable performance margins; and that vertical injection with vertical beam separation is more comfortable than horizontal

  17. Running-coupling effects in the triple-differential charmless semileptonic decay width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambino, Paolo; Gardi, Einan; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    We compute the fully-differential B-bar →X u lν-bar decay width to all orders in perturbation theory in the large-β 0 limit. Each of the five structure functions that build the hadronic tensor is expressed as a Borel integral, summing up O(C F β 0 n-1 α s n ) corrections for any n. We derive analytic expressions for the Borel transforms of both real and virtual diagrams with a single dressed gluon, and perform an all-order infrared subtraction, where the Borel parameter serves also as an infrared regulator. Expanding the result we recover the known triple-differential NLO coefficient, and obtain an explicit expression for the O(C F β 0 α s 2 ) triple-differential NNLO correction. This result can be used to improve the determination of V ub from inclusive B-bar →X u lν-bar measurements at the B factories with a variety of kinematic cuts

  18. Evaluation of tension stiffening effect on the crack width calculation of flexural RC members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said M. Allam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Building codes consider the tension stiffening when calculating the crack width of the flexural members. A simple analytical procedure is proposed for the determination of forces, stresses and strains acting on a reinforced concrete section subjected to flexure considering the concrete contribution in tension up to tensile concrete strain corresponding to the cracking strength of concrete. This analytical method gives the minimum value (lower bound of tension stiffening. Also, a commercial Finite Element Program (ABAQUS 2007 was used to perform non-linear analysis in order to evaluate the total contribution of the tensioned concrete in carrying loads which may be considered as the upper bound of tension stiffening. In addition, a comparison is carried out among the different codes using four reinforced concrete rectangular models to compare and evaluate the tension stiffening with proposed analytical lower bound tension stiffening and upper bound as obtained by ABAQUS. The models include different percentages of flexural steel ratio. The comparison revealed that the codes’ equations always consider tension stiffening lying between lower and upper bound of tension stiffening proposed in this study. Also, the study showed that the tension stiffening decreases with the increase of the percentage of the flexural reinforcement ratio.

  19. The effect of shift work on red blood cell distribution width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2015-04-01

    Limited research demonstrates that shift work (e.g., evening shift, night shift, rotating shift) increases the risk of certain health outcomes, such as hypertriglyceridemia and metabolic syndrome. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW), which is commonly assessed and reported by physicians, is a novel biomarker of cardiovascular disease. However, no study has examined the association of shift work on RDW, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 2005-2010 NHANES were used. RDW was assessed from a blood sample; shift work was assessed from a questionnaire, and various demographic, behavioral/psychological, occupational, and biological parameters were included as covariates. The fully adjusted model showed that the odds of having an elevated RDW for women on rotating shift vs. day shift increased by 46% (OR=1.46; 95% CI: 1.03-2.08). Women on a rotating shift had increased odds of having an elevated RDW, which is concerning as elevated RDW increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Health care professionals are encouraged to include questions about organization of work schedules and their tolerance of such schedules during the patient's consultation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Photoelectric effect photon beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is of critical importance at the NSLS. Many experimenters utilizing the NSLS photon beams can take full advantage of the small transverse dimensions of the source only if the electron orbit variation is kept below 10 to 20% of the transverse electron bunch size. Clearly the first step in a program to stabilize the orbit is to develop position monitors with the required sensitivity, reliability and dynamic range. Of great importance are monitors detecting the photon beams themselves, and also monitors measuring the position of the electron beam. In this section the authors discuss photon beam position monitors utilizing the photoelectric effects, and in the following section the use of capacitively coupled pick-up electrodes to detect electron beam position will be described. In what follows they shall proceed to consider two generic types of monitor geometries (1) Gap monitors, which are designed with the idea that the fringes of the synchrotron radiation will be measured, and the hot or fundamental beam will pass through the monitor unimpeded. (2) Area monitors, which are comprised of two triangular elements nested together similar to the electrodes of a split ion chamber or the diodes described by Siddons and Kraner or Mitsuhashi et al

  1. Effect of web openings on the structural behavior of RC beams subjected to pure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdo Taha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the construction of modern buildings, the presence of openings became a necessity nowadays in order to accommodate the many pipes and ducts required for the different services. On the other hand, the presence of these openings in RC beams affects their structural behavior. One important behavior that needs further study would be torsion. Currently, there are no guide lines available to analyze or design RC beams with web openings under pure torsion. Thus, the main objective of this research is to investigate the behavior of simply supported RC beams with openings subjected to pure torsion. In the first part of this paper, an experimental study is conducted on seven beams subjected to pure torsion loading in order to investigate the effect of the number of openings, the spacing between stirrups, and beam depth. All beams have a constant clear span length of 1800 mm and a constant beam width of 150 mm. The beams have varying opening number and stirrups arrangement as well as varying beam depth in order to investigate the effect of these parameters on the behavior of the beams. Systematic measurements such as the cracking torque, the ultimate torque, the angle of rotation of the beam at cracking, and the angle of rotation of the beam at the ultimate load are conducted for further understanding of the beam behavior under torsion. In the second part of the paper, the experimental results are compared with the numerical results obtained using the non-linear finite element analysis program, ANSYS. Good agreement between the experimental and numerical results is found.

  2. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A method to evaluate chemical element concentrations in samples by generating an effective polychromatic beam using as initial input real monochromatic beam data is presented. There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s)

  3. Electron trajectory evaluation in laser-plasma interaction for effective output beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobdeh, P.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Afarideh, H.

    2010-06-01

    Using the ellipsoidal cavity model, the quasi-monoenergetic electron output beam in laser-plasma interaction is described. By the cavity regime the quality of electron beam is improved in comparison with those generated from other methods such as periodic plasma wave field, spheroidal cavity regime and plasma channel guided acceleration. Trajectory of electron motion is described as hyperbolic, parabolic or elliptic paths. We find that the self-generated electron bunch has a smaller energy width and more effective gain in energy spectrum. Initial condition for the ellipsoidal cavity is determined by laser-plasma parameters. The electron trajectory is influenced by its position, energy and cavity electrostatic potential.

  4. Beam-beam effect and luminosity in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Measurements performed at SPEAR have been discussed and scaling laws for the maximum luminosity and the maximum linear tune shift parameter with energy are shown. There are two distinct regimes, one below 2 GeV where the linear tune shift parameter scales like xi/sub y/ approx. E 2 4 and the other regime where this parameter is constant xi/sub y/ approx. = 0.05 to 0.06. In the lower energy regime the limit is reached when the vertical beam size is blown up to the acceptance of the storage ring. A significant (< 10%) horizontal beam blow up is not observed and the value of the horizontal linear tune shift parameter xi/sub x/ does not seem to be related to the beam-beam limit

  5. Beam profile effects on NPB [neutral particle beam] performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClaire, R.J. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    A comparison of neutral particle beam brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts. 2 refs., 6 figs

  6. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  7. Quantum confinement effect in Bi anti-dot thin films with tailored pore wall widths and thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.; Hirose, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Nakao, S.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated quantum confinement effects in Bi anti-dot thin films grown on anodized aluminium oxide templates. The pore wall widths (w Bi ) and thickness (t) of the films were tailored to have values longer or shorter than Fermi wavelength of Bi (λ F  = ∼40 nm). Magnetoresistance measurements revealed a well-defined weak antilocalization effect below 10 K. Coherence lengths (L ϕ ) as functions of temperature were derived from the magnetoresistance vs field curves by assuming the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model. The anti-dot thin film with w Bi and t smaller than λ F showed low dimensional electronic behavior at low temperatures where L ϕ (T) exceed w Bi or t

  8. Quantum confinement effect in Bi anti-dot thin films with tailored pore wall widths and thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y., E-mail: youngok@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirose, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Hasegawa, T. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, JST, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakao, S. [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, JST, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Xu, J. [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2014-01-13

    We investigated quantum confinement effects in Bi anti-dot thin films grown on anodized aluminium oxide templates. The pore wall widths (w{sub Bi}) and thickness (t) of the films were tailored to have values longer or shorter than Fermi wavelength of Bi (λ{sub F} = ∼40 nm). Magnetoresistance measurements revealed a well-defined weak antilocalization effect below 10 K. Coherence lengths (L{sub ϕ}) as functions of temperature were derived from the magnetoresistance vs field curves by assuming the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model. The anti-dot thin film with w{sub Bi} and t smaller than λ{sub F} showed low dimensional electronic behavior at low temperatures where L{sub ϕ}(T) exceed w{sub Bi} or t.

  9. The effect of pulse width and contact configuration on paresthesia coverage in spinal cord stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Das, John; de Sutter, Paul; Manola, L.; Nuttin, Bart

    Objective. To investigate the effect of stimulus pulsewidth (PW) and contact configuration (CC) on the area of paresthesia (PA), perception threshold (VPT), discomfort threshold (VDT) and usage range (UR) in spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Methods. Chronic pain patients were tested during a follow-up

  10. Dissipative effects in the beam-beam interaction of intersecting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.; Vivaldi, F.

    1982-01-01

    This proposal seeks continuing support for an ongoing research investigation of various dynamical instabilities which arise in high energy intersecting storage rings due to the beam-beam interaction. Although the dissipative effect of radiation in beam-beam machines is anticipated to be a dominant feature affecting stability in the dynamics of colliding beams of heavy particles, almost nothing is known regarding the stability problem in many-dimensional dissipative systems. The work proposed here will extend the earlier computations on weak instabilities in many-dimensional beam-beam models to include the effect of dissipation. The object of this research is to obtain conditions for global beam stability over long time scales as a function of the machine parameters

  11. The effect of line-broadening on the overall width of transition arrays in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoarty, D.J.; Bentley, C.D.; Crowley, B.J.B.; Davidson, S.J.; Gales, S.G.; Graham, P.; Harris, J.W.O.; Iglesias, C.A.; James, S.F.; Smith, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have been performed, using the HELEN laser, to measure absorption spectra in the temperature range 20-60 eV and density range 0.5-3 g/cm 3 . K-shell spectra of aluminium were studied to investigate the effect of the plasma environment on the absorption spectrum. The experiments show the effect, at high-density, of array broadening and the merging of high series lines. Comparisons of the experimental absorption data to different opacity models are discussed. The experimental data are compared to calculations of the CASSANDRA opacity model, with and without the inclusion of electron impact broadening. The CASSANDRA code is in better agreement with experiment with electron impact broadening included. The data were also compared to the OPAL detailed term accounting model with reasonable agreement

  12. Barrier widths, barrier heights, and the origins of anomalous kinetic H/D isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, S.; Hoz, Shmaryahu; Kim, Chankyung; Yang, Kiyull

    1990-01-01

    Proton transfer between MeO - and HOMe has been studied using ab initio molecular orbital theory. At the highest level employed (MP2/6-31+G(d)//6-31G(d)+ZPE), -ΔH 298 and -ΔG 298 for the formation of the ion-molecule complex MeO - hor-ellipsis HOMe from the separated reactants are 26.3 and 15.2 kcal/mol, respectively. At the 6-31G(d)//6-31G(d) level of theory, the (MeO-H-OMe) - transition structure is 2.19 kcal/mol higher in energy than the ion-molecule complex (ΔE double-dagger = 2.19), but this barrier disappears when zero-point energies are taken into account. The performance of AM1 on this system is quantitatively different (-ΔH 298 = 13.3; -ΔG 298 = 6.9; ΔE double-dagger = 4.91; k H /k D = 5.13, increasing to 5.79 when quantum mechanical tunneling is invoked) but appears to be acceptable for the research envisaged in the title. The effect of an enforced separation of the heavy atoms upon proton transfer barriers and isotope effects (which simulates steric effects) has been studied briefly at the 6-31G(d) level and in some detail using AM1

  13. Beam-Beam Effects in the SPS Proton-Anti Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cornelis, K.

    2014-01-01

    During the proton-anti proton collider run several experiments were carried out in order to understand the effect of the beam-beam interaction on backgrounds and lifetimes. In this talk a selection of these experiments will be presented. From these experiments, the importance of relative beam sizes and tune ripple could be demonstrated.

  14. The Effect of the Width of an Aluminum Plate on a Bouncing Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hathaway

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the distance between clamping supports of an aluminum alloy plate on the coefficient of restitution of a bouncing steel ball was investigated. The plate was supported on two wooden blocks with a meter stick secured on either side. A steel ball was dropped from a constant height and a motion detector was used to find the coefficient of restitution. Measurements were made with the wooden blocks at a range of distances. It was found that as the distance between the wooden blocks increased, the coefficient of restitution decreased linearly

  15. Effect of second harmonic in pulse-width-modulation-based DAC for feedback of digital fluxgate magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyayev, Serhiy; Ivchenko, Nickolay

    2018-04-01

    Digital fluxgate magnetometers employ processing of the measured pickup signal to produce the value of the compensation current. Using pulse-width modulation with filtering for digital to analog conversion is a convenient approach, but it can introduce an intrinsic source of nonlinearity, which we discuss in this design note. A code shift of one least significant bit changes the second harmonic content of the pulse train, which feeds into the pick-up signal chain despite the heavy filtering. This effect produces a code-dependent nonlinearity. This nonlinearity can be overcome by the specific design of the timing of the pulse train signal. The second harmonic is suppressed if the first and third quarters of the excitation period pulse train are repeated in the second and fourth quarters. We demonstrate this principle on a digital magnetometer, achieving a magnetometer noise level corresponding to that of the sensor itself.

  16. Smoothing effect of the thermal interface material on the temperature distribution in a stepwise varying width microchannel cooling device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Sara; Barrau, Jérôme; Rosell, Joan I.; Fréchette, Luc G.; Omri, Mohamed; Vilarrubí, Montse; Laguna, Gerard

    2017-09-01

    The impact of the thermal interface material (TIM) layer on the performance of a stepwise varying width microchannel cooling device is analysed. A numerical model shows that the TIM layer, besides its well known negative impact on the temperature, also generates a smoothing effect on the temperature distribution. In this study, an analytical model is used to define a nondimensional parameter, called Smoothing Resistance ratio, as the quotient between the origin of the temperature non uniformities and the TIM thermal resistance that flatten the temperature distribution. The relationship between the temperature uniformity of the cooled device, expressed through the temperature standard deviation, and the Smoothing Resistance ratio is shown to be linear. These results lead to the definition of a new design procedure for this kind of cooling device, which aims to reduce the Smoothing Resistance ratio. Two solutions are identified and their drawbacks are analysed.

  17. Effect of the Detector Width and Gas Pressure on the Frequency Response of a Micromachined Thermal Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Courteaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the design and the environmental conditions of a micromachined thermal accelerometer, based on convection effect, are discussed and studied in order to understand the behavior of the frequency response evolution of the sensor. It has been theoretically and experimentally studied with different detector widths, pressure and gas nature. Although this type of sensor has already been intensively examined, little information concerning the frequency response modeling is currently available and very few experimental results about the frequency response are reported in the literature. In some particular conditions, our measurements show a cut-off frequency at −3 dB greater than 200 Hz. By using simple cylindrical and planar models of the thermal accelerometer and an equivalent electrical circuit, a good agreement with the experimental results has been demonstrated.

  18. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  19. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation for HL-LHC - Effects on the Beam Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Bruce, R. [CERN; Papotti, G [CERN; Redaelli, S. [CERN; Valentino, G. [Malta U.; Valentino, G. [CERN; Valuch, D. [CERN; Xu, C. [CERN

    2017-06-13

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). To ensure the successful operation of the hollow beam collimator the unwanted effects on the beam core, which might arise from the operation with a pulsed electron beam, must be minimized. This paper gives a summary of the effect of hollow electron lenses on the beam core in terms of sources, provides estimates for HL-LHC and discusses the possible mitigation methods.

  20. The Effects of Ridge Axis Width on Mantle Melting at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L.; Magni, V.; Gaina, C.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle upwelling in response to plate divergence produces melt at mid-ocean ridges. Melt starts when the solidus is crossed and stops when conductive cooling overcomes heat advection associated with the upwelling. Most mid-ocean ridge models assume that divergence takes place only in a narrow zone that defines the ridge axis, resulting in a single upwelling. However, more complex patterns of divergence are occasionally observed. The rift axis can be 20 km wide at ultraslow spreading center. Overlapping spreading center contain two parallel axes. Rifting in backarc basins is sometimes organized as a series of parallel spreading centers. Distributing plate divergence over several rifts reduces the intensity of upwelling and limits melting. Can this have a significant effect on the expected crustal thickness and on the mode of melt delivery at the seafloor? We address this question by modeling mantle flow and melting underneath two spreading centers separated by a rigid block. We adopt a non-linear rheology that includes dislocation creep, diffusion creep and yielding and include hydrothermal cooling by enhancing thermal conductivity where yielding takes place. The crustal thickness decreases if the rifts are separated by 30 km or more but only if the half spreading rate is between 1 and 2 cm/yr. At melting depth, a single upwelling remains the norm until the separation of the rifts exceeds a critical value ranging from 15 km in the fastest ridges to more than 50 km at ultraslow spreading centers. The stability of the central upwelling is due to hydrothermal cooling, which prevents hot mantle from reaching the surface at each spreading center. When hydrothermal cooling is suppressed, or the spreading centers are sufficiently separated, the rigid block becomes extremely cold and separates two distinct, highly asymmetric upwellings that may focus melt beyond the spreading center. In that case, melt delivery might drive further and further the divergence centers, whereas

  1. The effect of the negative binomial distribution on the line-width of the micromaser cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremid, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of negative binomial distribution (NBD) on the line-width of the negative binomial distribution (NBD) on the line-width of the micromaser is considered. The threshold of the micromaser is shifted towards higher values of the pumping parameter q. Moreover the line-width exhibits sharp dips 'resonances' when the cavity temperature reduces to a very low value. These dips are very clear evidence for the occurrence of the so-called trapping states regime in the micromaser. This statistics prevents the appearance of these trapping states, namely by increasing the negative binomial parameter q these dips wash out and the line-width becomes more broadening. For small values of the parameter q the line-width at large values of q randomly oscillates around its transition line. As q becomes large this oscillatory behavior occurs at rarely values of q. (author)

  2. Investigating the effect of electron emission pattern on RF gun beam quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabi, A. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B., E-mail: b-shokri@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-11

    Thermionic radio frequency gun is one of the most promising choices to gain a high quality electron beam, used in the infrared free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation injectors. To study the quality of the beam in a compact electron source, the emission pattern effect on the beam dynamics should be investigated. In the presented work, we developed a 3D simulation code to model the real process of thermionic emission and to investigate the effect of emission pattern, by considering geometrical constraints, on the beam dynamics. According to the results, the electron bunch emittance varies considerably with the emission pattern. Simulation results have been validated via comparison with the well-known simulation codes such as ASTRA simulation code and CST microwave studio, as well as other simulation results in the literature. It was also demonstrated that by using a continuous wave laser beam for heating the cathode, the emission pattern full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transverse emission distribution is proportional to FWHM of the Gaussian profile for the laser beam. Additionally, by using the developed code, the effect of wall structure around the cathode on the back bombardment effect has been studied. According to the results, for a stable operation of the RF gun, one should consider the nose cone in vicinity of the cathode surface to reduce the back-bombardment effect. - Highlights: • We developed a 3D code to simulate the beam dynamics of thermionic RF gun. • Te impact of the emission pattern on the beam dynamic was investigated. • Different emission pattern results different emittance in the gun exit. • Using a nosecone around the cathode adjacent wall reduces back bombardment effect.

  3. Analysis of beam envelope by transverse space charge effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Shin'ichi

    1997-09-01

    It is important for high current accelerators to estimate the contribution of the space charge effect to keep the beam off its beak up. The application of an envelope equation is examined in previous report in which the beam is just coasting beam (non accelerating). The analysis of space charge effect is necessary for the comparison in coming accelerator test in PNC. In order to evaluate the beam behavior in high current, the beam dynamics and beam parameters which are input to the equation for the evaluation are developed and make it ready to estimate the beam transverse dynamics by the space charge. The estimate needs to have enough accuracy for advanced code calculation. After the preparation of the analytic expression of transverse motion, the non-linear differential equation of beam dynamics is solved by a numerical method on a personal computer. The beam envelope from the equation is estimated by means of the beam emittance, current and energy. The result from the analysis shows that the transverse beam broadening is scarecely small around the beam current value of PNC design. The contribution to the beam broadening of PNC linac comes from its beam emittance. The beam broadening in 100 MeV case is almost negligible in the view of transverse space charge effect. Therefore, the electron beam is stable up to 10 A order in PNC linac design. Of course, the problem for RF supply is out of consideration here. It is important to estimate other longitudinal effect such as beam bunch effect which is lasting unevaluated. (author)

  4. Electron cloud effects in hadron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Weiland, Thomas [TU-Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder,Schlossgartenstr. 8 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Accelerators operating with intense positively charged beams can suffer from the electron cloud phenomenon. For example, it is the intensity limiting factor in CERN LHC and SPS. In past decades a lot of progress in understanding the electron cloud effects was made worldwide. Methods to suppress or weaken the electron cloud phenomenon were proposed. Theories governing the bunch stability in presence of the electron cloud were developed. Recently the theory was introduced to describe the bunch energy loss due to the electron cloud. However, most of the publications concern the single bunch electron cloud effects. In reality bunches are packed into trains. A disturbance of the cloud caused by the bunch in the beginning of the train affects the subsequent bunches. We present a further investigation of single-bunch electron cloud effects and planned activities to study the phenomenon in case of multiple bunches.

  5. Effect of exponential density transition on self-focusing of q-Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkunde, Amol T.; Vhanmore, Bandopant D.; Urunkar, Trupti U.; Gavade, Kusum M.; Patil, Sandip D.; Takale, Mansing V.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, nonlinear aspects of a high intensity q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in collisionless plasma having upward density ramp of exponential profiles is studied. We have employed the nonlinearity in dielectric function of plasma by considering ponderomotive nonlinearity. The differential equation governing the dimensionless beam width parameter is achieved by using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) and paraxial approximations and solved it numerically by using Runge-Kutta fourth order method. Effect of exponential density ramp profile on self-focusing of q-Gaussian laser beam for various values of q is systematically carried out and compared with results Gaussian laser beam propagating in collisionless plasma having uniform density. It is found that exponential plasma density ramp causes the laser beam to become more focused and gives reasonably interesting results.

  6. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Soo Bak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of red cell distribution width on the development of acute renal failure in patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Veysel Kara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical entity that is known to increase mortality in patients with sepsis. Erythrocyte maturation and proliferation are inhibited by pro-inflammatory cytokines; these cytokines exert effects on red cell distribution width (RDW well. Based on this knowledge; our aim in this study was to evaluate the impact of RDW on acute kidney injury in patients with sepsis. Methods: 120 patients diagnosed with sepsis and admitted to intesive care unit (ICU and treated between 2009-2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups as follows: group 1 (RDW≥16.8 and group 2 (RDW<16.8. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between RDW and AKI and mortality. Results: There was a statistically significant relationship between AKI and RDW (p<0.001, OR=11.52 but there were no statistically significant relationship between AKI and sex, age, serum lactate levels as well as SOFA score. Also, there were statistically significant relationship between mortality and RDW (p=0.044, OR=5, serum lactate levels (p=0.030 and SOFA score (p<0.001. RDW was found associated with both AKI and mortality. Conclusions: Results suggest that RDW is an important parameter for predicting development of AKI and mortality in ICU patients with sepsis.

  8. A Simplified Analysis of the Brazier Effect in Composite Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Lund, B.

    2009-01-01

    In the design of windturbine blades composite beams are often used as the load bearing element. The beam is primarily subjected to bending moments, and the deformations are relatively large. The large displacements result in a kind of ovalization of the beam section, the so-called Brazier effect...

  9. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzic, Balsa; Zhang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  10. Disruption effects from the collision of quasi-flat beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pisin.

    1993-04-01

    The disruption effects from the collision of round beams and flat beams in linear colliders have been studied in the past, and has by now been well understood. In practice, however, in the current SLC running condition and in several designs of the next generation linear colliders, the quasi-flat beam geometries are expected. Namely, the beam aspect ratio R ≡ σ x /σ y > 1, but not infinitely large. In this regime the disruption effects in both x and y dimensions should be carefully included in order to properly describe the beam-beam interaction phenomena. In this paper we investigate two major disruption effects for the quasi-flat beam regime: The luminosity enhancement factor and the effective beamstrahlung. Computer simulations are employed and simple scaling laws are deduced

  11. Ion beam irradiation effects on aromatic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukushima, Satoshi; Ueno, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    We studied the optical and thermal properties of aromatic polymer films which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H + , H 2 + and He + ions. The examined aromatic polymers were polyetherether ketone(PEEK), polyetherimide(PEI), polyether sulfon(PES), polysulfon(PSF), and polyphenylene sulfide(PPS). The optical densities at 300nm of PES and PSF greatly increased after the irradiation. The optical densities at 400nm of all the examined polymer lineally increased with the irradiation dose. The PEEK film which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H + was not deformed above melting point. This demonstrates that cross-linking occurs in PEEK films by ion beam irradiation. As for the effects, depending on the mass of the irradiated ions, it was found that the ions with a high mass induced larger effects on the aromatic polymers for the same absorption energy. (author)

  12. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  13. Analyzing the effectiveness of flare dispensing programs against pulse width modulation seekers using self-organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Š.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared guided missile seekers utilizing pulse width modulation in target tracking is one of the threats against air platforms. To be able to achieve a "soft-kill" protection of own platform against these type of threats, one needs to examine carefully the seeker operating principle with its special electronic counter-counter measure (ECCM) capability. One of the cost-effective ways of soft kill protection is to use flare decoys in accordance with an optimized dispensing program. Such an optimization requires a good understanding of the threat seeker, capabilities of the air platform and engagement scenario information between them. Modeling and simulation is very powerful tool to achieve a valuable insight and understand the underlying phenomenology. A careful interpretation of simulation results is crucial to infer valuable conclusions from the data. In such an interpretation there are lots of factors (features) which affect the results. Therefore, powerful statistical tools and pattern recognition algorithms are of special interest in the analysis. In this paper, we show how self-organizing maps (SOMs), which is one of those powerful tools, can be used in analyzing the effectiveness of various flare dispensing programs against a PWM seeker. We perform several Monte Carlo runs for a typical engagement scenario in a MATLAB-based simulation environment. In each run, we randomly change the flare dispending program and obtain corresponding class: "successful" or "unsuccessful", depending on whether the corresponding flare dispensing program deceives the seeker or not, respectively. Then, in the analysis phase, we use SOMs to interpret and visualize the results.

  14. TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING EFFECTS IN RF SYSTEMS IN JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed electron bunch trains generated from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) linac to inject into the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) e-ring will produce transient beam loading effects in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) systems that, if not mitigated, could cause unacceptably large beam energy deviation in the injection capture, or exceed the energy acceptance of CEBAF’s recirculating arcs. In the electron storage ring, the beam abort or ion clearing gaps or uneven bucket filling can cause large beam phase transients in the (S)RF cavity control systems and even beam loss due to Robinson instability. We have first analysed the beam stability criteria in steady state and estimated the transient effect in Feedforward and Feedback RF controls. Initial analytical models for these effects are shown for the design of the JLEIC e-ring from 3GeV to 12GeV.

  15. Effects of spot parameters in pencil beam scanning treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Aafke Christine; Depauw, Nicolas; Clasie, Ben; Giunta, Marina; Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M

    2018-01-01

    Spot size σ (in air at isocenter), interspot spacing d, and spot charge q influence dose delivery efficiency and plan quality in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) treatment planning. The choice and range of parameters varies among different manufacturers. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the influence of the spot parameters on dose quality and delivery in IMPT treatment plans, to show their interdependence, and to make practitioners aware of the spot parameter values for a certain facility. Our study could help as a guideline to make the trade-off between treatment quality and time in existing PBS centers and in future systems. We created plans for seven patients and a phantom, with different tumor sites and volumes, and compared the effect of small-, medium-, and large-spot widths (σ = 2.5, 5, and 10 mm) and interspot distances (1σ, 1.5σ, and 1.75σ) on dose, spot charge, and treatment time. Moreover, we quantified how postplanning charge threshold cuts affect plan quality and the total number of spots to deliver, for different spot widths and interspot distances. We show the effect of a minimum charge (or MU) cutoff value for a given proton delivery system. Spot size had a strong influence on dose: larger spots resulted in more protons delivered outside the target region. We observed dose differences of 2-13 Gy (RBE) between 2.5 mm and 10 mm spots, where the amount of extra dose was due to dose penumbra around the target region. Interspot distance had little influence on dose quality for our patient group. Both parameters strongly influence spot charge in the plans and thus the possible impact of postplanning charge threshold cuts. If such charge thresholds are not included in the treatment planning system (TPS), it is important that the practitioner validates that a given combination of lower charge threshold, interspot spacing, and spot size does not result in a plan degradation. Low average spot charge occurs for small spots, small interspot

  16. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  17. The effect of beam inclination on the performance of a passive vibration isolator using buckled beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, H; Waters, T; Saotome, N; Nagamine, T; Sato, Y

    2016-01-01

    Passive vibration isolators are desired to have both high static stiffness to support large static load and low local stiffness to reduce the displacement transmissibility at frequencies greater than resonance. Utilization of a vertical buckled beam as a spring component is one way to realize such a stiffness characteristic since it exhibits a smaller ratio of local stiffness to static stiffness than that of a linear spring. This paper investigates the behaviour of a vibration isolator using inclined beams as well as vertical ones and examines the effect of beam inclination for the purpose of improving the isolation performance. The experimental system investigated has an isolated mass which is supported by a combination of two types of beams: buckled beams and constraining beams. The buckled beams can be inclined from the vertical by attachment devices, and the constraining beams are employed to prevent off-axis motion of the isolated mass. The results demonstrate that the inclination of the buckled beams reduces the resonance frequency and improves the displacement transmissibility at frequencies greater than resonance. (paper)

  18. Wide Band and Wide Azimuth Beam Effect on High-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar Radiometric Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Passive corner reflectors and active transponders are often used as man-made reference targets in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR radiometric calibration, With the emergence of new radar systems and the increasing demand for greater accuracy, wide-band and wide-beam radars challenge the hypothesis that the Radar Cross Section (RCS of reference targets is constant. In this study, the FEKO electromagnetic simulation software is used to obtain the change curve of the target RCS as a function of frequency and aspect angle while incorporating high-resolution point-target SAR simulation, and quantitatively analyzing the effect of the modulation effect on SAR images. The simulation results suggest that the abovementioned factors affect the SAR calibration by more than 0.2 dB within a fractional bandwidth greater than 10% or azimuth beam width of more than 20°, which must be corrected in the data processing.

  19. Beam-beam instability driven by wakefield effects in linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The vertical beam profile distortions induced by wakefield effects in linear colliders (the so-called ``banana effect'') generate a beam-beam instability at the collision point when the vertical disruption parameter is large. We illustrate this effect in the case of the TESLA linear collider project. We specify the tolerance on the associated emittance growth, which translates into tolerances on injection jitter and, for a given tuning procedure, on structure misalignments. We look for possible cures based on fast orbit correction at the interaction point and using a fast luminosity monitor.

  20. Effects of word width and word length on optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eTeramoto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether word width and length affect the optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words, using reading speed as a measure. In Experiment 1, three Japanese words, each consisting of 4 Hiragana characters, sequentially scrolled on a display screen from right to left. Participants, all Japanese native speakers, were instructed to read the words aloud as accurately as possible, irrespective of their order within the sequence. To quantitatively measure their reading performance, we used rapid serial visual presentation paradigm, where the scrolling rate was increased until the participants began to make mistakes. Thus, the highest scrolling rate at which the participants’ performance exceeded 88.9% correct rate was calculated for each character size (0.3, 0.6, 1.0, and 3.0° and scroll window size (5 or 10 character spaces. Results showed that the reading performance was highest in the range of 0.6° to 1.0°, irrespective of the scroll window size. Experiment 2 investigated whether the optimal character size observed in Experiment 1 was applicable for any word width and word length (i.e., the number of characters in a word. Results showed that reading speeds were slower for longer than shorter words and the word width of 3.6° was optimal among the word lengths tested (3, 4, and 6 character words. Considering that character size varied depending on word width and word length in the present study, this means that the optimal character size can be changed by word width and word length.

  1. Effects of Word Width and Word Length on Optimal Character Size for Reading of Horizontally Scrolling Japanese Words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Wataru; Nakazaki, Takuyuki; Sekiyama, Kaoru; Mori, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated, whether word width and length affect the optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words, using reading speed as a measure. In Experiment 1, three Japanese words, each consisting of four Hiragana characters, sequentially scrolled on a display screen from right to left. Participants, all Japanese native speakers, were instructed to read the words aloud as accurately as possible, irrespective of their order within the sequence. To quantitatively measure their reading performance, we used rapid serial visual presentation paradigm, where the scrolling rate was increased until the participants began to make mistakes. Thus, the highest scrolling rate at which the participants' performance exceeded 88.9% correct rate was calculated for each character size (0.3°, 0.6°, 1.0°, and 3.0°) and scroll window size (5 or 10 character spaces). Results showed that the reading performance was highest in the range of 0.6° to 1.0°, irrespective of the scroll window size. Experiment 2 investigated whether the optimal character size observed in Experiment 1 was applicable for any word width and word length (i.e., the number of characters in a word). Results showed that reading speeds were slower for longer than shorter words and the word width of 3.6° was optimal among the word lengths tested (three, four, and six character words). Considering that character size varied depending on word width and word length in the present study, this means that the optimal character size can be changed by word width and word length in scrolling Japanese words.

  2. A correction for emittance-measurement errors caused by finite slit and collector widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    One method of measuring the transverse phase-space distribution of a particle beam is to intercept the beam with a slit and measure the angular distribution of the beam passing through the slit using a parallel-strip collector. Together the finite widths of the slit and each collector strip form an acceptance window in phase space whose size and orientation are determined by the slit width, the strip width, and the slit-collector distance. If a beam is measured using a detector with a finite-size phase-space window, the measured distribution is different from the true distribution. The calculated emittance is larger than the true emittance, and the error depends both on the dimensions of the detector and on the Courant-Snyder parameters of the beam. Specifically, the error gets larger as the beam drifts farther from a waist. This can be important for measurements made on high-brightness beams, since power density considerations require that the beam be intercepted far from a waist. In this paper we calculate the measurement error and we show how the calculated emittance and Courant-Snyder parameters can be corrected for the effects of finite sizes of slit and collector. (Author) 5 figs., 3 refs

  3. Transverse Periodic Beam Loading Effects in a Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Byrd, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uneven beam fill patterns in storage rings, such as gaps in the fill patterns, leads to periodic, or transient loading of the modes of the RF cavities. We show that an analogous effect can occur in the loading of a dipole cavity mode when the beam passes off the electrical center of the cavity mode. Although this effect is small, it results in a variation of the transverse offset of the beam along the bunch train. For ultralow emittance beams, such as optimized third generation light sources and damping rings, this effect results in a larger projected emittance of the beam compared with the single bunch emittance. The effect is particularly strong for the case when a strong dipole mode has been purposely added to the ring, such as a deflecting, or 'crab' cavity. We derive an approximate analytic solution for the variation of the beam-induced deflecting voltage along the bunch train.

  4. Wakefield effects in the SLC beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napoly, O.

    1996-06-01

    Wakefield effects occurring in the SLC after the LI28 emittance measurement station could be responsible for part of all of the observed discrepancy between the expected vertical spot sizes at the IP and the measured ones. The strongest wakefields are generated by the parts of the beam chamber which are the closest to the beam, like collimators. In this note we review the effect of the following wakefield sources: geometric wakefields from final focus fixed and movable collimators, geometric and resistive wakefields from linac collimators jaws, resistive wakefields from the beam pipe at the sextupole and final transformer locations. We mostly concentrate on the transverse dipole and quadrupole wakefield effects, although the longitudinal wakefields are briefly studied at the end. We limit ourselves to the vertical beam dynamics and to the lowest (mainly linear) order of the wakefield expansion with respect to the beam offset, which excludes the near wall effect on the beam. (author)

  5. Second-order multiple-scattering theory associated with backscattering enhancement for a millimeter wavelength weather radar with a finite beam width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood

    2005-01-01

    Effects of multiple scattering on reflectivity are studied for millimeter wavelength weather radars. A time-independent vector theory, including up to second-order scattering, is derived for a single layer of hydrometeors of a uniform density and a uniform diameter. In this theory, spherical waves with a Gaussian antenna pattern are used to calculate ladder and cross terms in the analytical scattering theory. The former terms represent the conventional multiple scattering, while the latter terms cause backscattering enhancement in both the copolarized and cross-polarized components. As the optical thickness of the hydrometeor layer increases, the differences from the conventional plane wave theory become more significant, and essentially, the reflectivity of multiple scattering depends on the ratio of mean free path to radar footprint radius. These results must be taken into account when analyzing radar reflectivity for use in remote sensing.

  6. Clinical evaluation of the effect of gingival thickness on increasing the width of keratinized and attached gingiva with and without preserving periosteum in an animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ebrahimi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The present study was performed in order to assess the effect of gingival thickness on amount of gingival augmentation with and without preserving periosteum. METHODS: The study was conducted on 8 ecotype dogs aged 1-5 years. At the beginning, clinical probing depth and keratinized and attached gingiva width were measured. Totally, 64 sites were operated in this study. Periosteal fenestration and denuded beds were randomly created on opposite sides of upper and lower jaws (4 sites each side. The thickness of gingiva was measured in mucogingival junction after preparation of the beds. The clinical parameters were evaluated 2 months after the surgery. The data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon, and Pearson correlation tests. RESULTS: The results showed the average increased width of keratinized and attached gingiva was 1.8 mm and 2 mm in periosteal fenestration sites and 1.9 mm and 2.3 mm in denudation sites, respectively at 2 months post-surgery. The difference between the width of keratinized gingiva and attached gingiva before and 2 months after operation was significant in both groups (P < 0.001. However, no significant difference was shown between the two groups in terms of attached and keratinized gingival width (P = 0.100 and P = 0.720, respectively. There was no correlation between the thickness of gingiva and the amount of increased width of keratinized and attached gingiva. CONCLUSION: A gingival thickness of 0.8 to 2 mm does not affect the increment of the attached and keratinized gingival width with and without preserving periosteum.

  7. Effect of tension lap splice on the behavior of high strength concrete (HSC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-Azab

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many research efforts have been carried out on the bond strength between normal strength concrete (NSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. Many codes gave a minimum splice length for tension and compression reinforcement as a factor of the bar diameter depending on many parameters such as concrete strength, steel yield stress, shape of bar end, shape of bar surface and also bar location. Also, codes gave another restriction about the percentage of total reinforcement to be spliced at the same time. Comparatively limited attention has been directed toward the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. HSC has high modulus of elasticity, high density and long-term durability. This research presents an experimental study on the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. It reports the influence of several parameters on bond in splices. The parameters covered are casting position, splice length as a factor of bar diameter, bar diameter and reinforcement ratio. The research involved tests on sixteen simply-supported beams of 1800 mm span, 200 mm width and 400 mm thickness made of HSC. In each beam, the total tensile steel bars were spliced in the constant moment zone. Crack pattern, crack propagation, cracking load, failure load and mi span deflection were recorded and analyzed to study the mentioned parameters effect.

  8. Beam-Beam effects at the CMS BRIL van-der-Meer scans

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is devoted to the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS Experiment at CERN. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors, compatible with the high luminosity experimental environments at the LHC. BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. The detectors are calibrated using van-der-Meer scans to measure the luminosity that is a fundamental quantity of the LHC beam. In van-der-Meer scans the count rate in a detector is measured as a function of the distance between beams in the plane perpendicular to beam direction, to extract the underlying beam overlap area. The goal of the van-der-Meer scans is to obtain the calibration constant for each luminometer to be used at calibration then in physics data taking runs. The note presents the overview of beam-beam effects at the van-der-Meer scan and the corresponding corrections that sh...

  9. Edge effect correction using ion beam figuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Xie, Xuhui; Li, Furen; Zhou, Lin

    2017-11-10

    The edge effect is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues for fabricating large primary mirrors, as it can greatly reduce the key performance of the optical system. Ion beam figuring (IBF) has the advantage of no edge effect, so we can use it to remove high points on the edge and improve surface accuracy. The edge local correction method (ELCM) of IBF processes only the surface edge zone, and is very different from the current full caliber figuring method (FCFM). Therefore, it is necessary to study the ELCM of IBF. In this paper, the key factors of ELCM are analyzed, such as dwell time algorithm, edge data extension methods, and the outward dimension of the starting figuring point. At the same time, the distinctions between ELCM and FCFM are compared. Finally, a 142 mm diameter fused silica mirror is fabricated to verify the validity of the theoretical of ELCM. The experimental results indicate that the figuring precision and efficiency can be obviously improved by ELCM.

  10. Beam splash effects on ATLAS silicon microstrip detectors evaluated using 1-w Nd YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, K; Kohriki, T; Kuwano, T; Moorhead, G F; Terada, S; Unno, Y

    2005-01-01

    On an incident of accelerator beam loss, the tracking detector located close to the beam line is subjected to receive intensive radiation in a short period. We used a 1-W focused Nd: YAG laser and simulated the effects on the ATLAS microstrip detector. The laser corresponds to intensity of up to 1 multiplied by 109mips/pulse with a pulse width of about 10 ns. We observed breaks on Al strips on extreme conditions, depending on the laser intensity and bias voltage applied to the silicon sensor. The break can be interpreted as the oxide breakdown due to a large voltage locally created across the oxide by the intensive signal charges. The robustness of the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) module including readout ASICs is also evaluated.

  11. Effect of Anode Magnetic Shield on Magnetic Field and Ion Beam in Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jie; Wang Shiqing; Liu Jian; Xu Li; Tang Deli; Geng Shaofei

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the effect of the anode magnetic shielding on the magnetic field and ion beam in a cylindrical Hall thruster is presented. The results show that after the anode is shielded by the magnetic shield, the magnetic field lines near the anode surface are obviously convex curved, the ratio of the magnetic mirror is enhanced, the width of the positive magnetic field gradient becomes larger than that without the anode magnetic shielding, the radial magnetic field component is enhanced, and the discharge plasma turbulence is reduced as a result of keeping the original saddle field profile and the important role the other two saddle field profiles play in restricting electrons. The results of the particle in cell (PIC) numerical simulation show that both the ion number and the energy of the ion beam increase after the anode is shielded by the magnetic shield. In other words, the specific impulse of the cylindrical Hall thruster is enhanced.

  12. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  13. Effects of prestressing on impact resistance of concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, H.; Kishi, N.; Matsuoka, K.G.; Mikami, T.; Nomachi, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of prestressing on impact resistance of concrete beams using two types of prestressed concrete (PC) tendons are discussed based on experimental results. Aramids Fiber Reinforced Plastic rods and PC steel strand were used as PC tendons. To clarify the effects of prestressing on concrete beam impact resistance, dynamic behavior of prestressed and/or non-prestressed concrete beams with different PC tendon arrangements were considered. Impact test were performed using a 200 kg f free falling steel weight on to the center of beam. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Analytical treatment of the nonlinear electron cloud effect and the combined effects with beam-beam and space charge nonlinear forces in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we treat first some nonlinear beam dynamics problems in storage rings, such as beam dynamic apertures due to magnetic multipoles, wiggles, beam-beam effects, nonlinear space charge effect, and then nonlinear electron cloud effect combined with beam-beam and space charge effects, analytically. This analytical treatment is applied to BEPC II. The corresponding analytical expressions developed in this paper are useful both in understanding the physics behind these problems and also in making practical quick hand estimations. (author)

  15. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  16. A clinical and histologic evaluation of gingival fibroblasts seeding on a chitosan-based scaffold and its effect on the width of keratinized gingiva in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ghogha; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mofid, Rasoul; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Ghanavati, Farzin; Bagheban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Shariati, Ramin Pajoum

    2011-09-01

    Finding biocompatible matrix materials capable of enhancing the procedures of gingival augmentation is a major concern in periodontal research. This has prompted the investigation of a safe grafting technique by means of synthetic or natural polymers. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of a gingival fibroblast cultured on a naturally derived (i.e., chitosan-based) scaffold on the width of keratinized gingiva in dogs. Gingival fibroblasts were cultured from a small portion of hard palates of five dogs. A bilayered chitosan scaffold was seeded with the gingival fibroblasts and transferred to dogs. Surgery was performed bilaterally, and the regions were randomly divided into two groups: chitosan only (control site) and chitosan + fibroblast (test site). Periodontal parameters, including probing depth and width of keratinized and attached gingiva, were measured at baseline and 3 months after surgery. A histologic evaluation was also performed on the healed grafted sites. Comparison of width of keratinized and attached gingiva in control and test sites showed that the mean width of keratinized and attached gingiva increased in each group after surgery. However, the difference between control and test groups was not statistically significant. Concerning the existence of the keratinized epithelium, exocytosis, and epithelium thickness, no significant difference was observed in test and control sites. The difference was significant in relation to rete ridge formation. The tissue-engineered graft consisting of chitosan + fibroblast was applied to gingival augmentation procedures and generated keratinized tissue without any complications usually associated with donor-site surgery.

  17. Grasp and index finger reach zone during one-handed smartphone rear interaction: effects of task type, phone width and hand length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Songil; Kyung, Gyouhyung; Lee, Jungyong; Moon, Seung Ki; Park, Kyoung Jong

    2016-11-01

    Recently, some smartphones have introduced index finger interaction functions on the rear surface. The current study investigated the effects of task type, phone width, and hand length on grasp, index finger reach zone, discomfort, and muscle activation during such interaction. We considered five interaction tasks (neutral, comfortable, maximum, vertical, and horizontal strokes), two device widths (60 and 90 mm) and three hand lengths. Horizontal (vertical) strokes deviated from the horizontal axis in the range from -10.8° to -13.5° (81.6-88.4°). Maximum strokes appeared to be excessive as these caused 43.8% greater discomfort than did neutral strokes. The 90-mm width also appeared to be excessive as it resulted in 12.3% increased discomfort relative to the 60-mm width. The small-hand group reported 11.9-18.2% higher discomfort ratings, and the percent maximum voluntary exertion of their flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, pertaining to index finger flexion, was also 6.4% higher. These findings should be considered to make smartphone rear interaction more comfortable. Practitioner Summary: Among neutral, comfortable, maximum, horizontal, and vertical index finger strokes on smartphone rear surfaces, maximum vs. neutral strokes caused 43.8% greater discomfort. Horizontal (vertical) strokes deviated from the horizontal (vertical) axis. Discomfort increased by 12.3% with 90-mm- vs. 60-mm-wide devices. Rear interaction regions of five commercialised smartphones should be lowered 20 to 30 mm for more comfortable rear interaction.

  18. Size effects on free vibration of heterogeneous beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanati Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of microstructure on the free vibration of geometrically similar heterogeneous beams with free-free boundary conditions was numerically investigated by detailed finite element analysis (FEA to identify and quantify any effect of beam size on transverse modal frequencies when the microstructural scale is comparable to the overall size. ANSYS Mechanical APDL was used to generate specific unit cells at the microstructural scale comprised of two isotropic materials with different material properties. Unit cell variants containing voids and inclusions were considered. At the macroscopic scale, four beam sizes consisting of one, two, three or four layers of defined unit cells were represented by repeatedly regenerating the unit cell as necessary. In all four beam sizes the aspect ratio was kept constant. Changes to the volume fractions of each material were introduced while keeping the homogenized properties of the beam fixed. The influence of the beam surface morphology on the results was also investigated. The ANSYS results were compared with the analytical results from solution to Timoshenko beam and nonlocal Timoshenko beam as well as numerical results for a Micropolar beam. In nonlocal Timoshenko beams the Eringen’s small length scale coefficients were estimated for some of the studied models. Numerical analyses based on Micropolar theory were carried out to study the modal frequencies and a method was suggested to estimate characteristic length in bending and coupling number via transverse vibration which verifies the use of Micropolar elasticity theory in dynamic analysis.

  19. Future e+e- linear colliders and beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-05-01

    Numerous concepts, ranging from conventional to highly exotic, hae been proposed for the acceleration of electrons and positrons to very high energies. For any such concept to be viable, it must be possible to produce from it a set of consistent parameters for one of these ''benchmark'' machines. Attention is directed to the choice of parameters for a collider in the 300 GeV energy range, operating at a gradient on the order of 200 MV/m, using X-band power sources to drive a conventional disk-loaded accelerating structure. These rf power sources, while not completely conventional represent a reasonable extrapolation from present technology. The choice of linac parameters is strongly coupled to various beam-beam effects which take place when the electron and positron bunches collide. We summarize these beam-beam effects, and then return to the rf design of a 650 GeV center-of-mass collider. 14 refs

  20. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  1. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  2. Effects of parasitic beam-beam interaction during the injection process at the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.

    1992-06-01

    This paper is concerned with beam-beam effects during the injection process at the proposed asymmetric SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-Factory, PEP-II. It is shown that the parasitic beam-beam interaction can lead to a significant blowup in the vertical size of the injected beam. Simulation results for the horizontal and the vertical injection schemes are presented, and their performances are studied

  3. Effect of Dynamic Reheating Controlled by the Weaving Width on the Microstructure of GTA Bead-On-Pipe Weld Metal of 25% Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Joon Sung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW with three different heat inputs controlled by the weaving width was performed to understand their effects on the microstructural changes during bead-on-pipe welding of super duplex stainless steel. The microstructure of the weld metals was categorized into three different types of zones: non-reheated, reheated type, and reheating-free zone. Even though single-pass welding with different weaving widths was employed, a reheated microstructure was detected, which has been previously observed with multiple pass welding. This phenomenon was called “dynamic reheating”, because it was produced by the weaving operation during welding regardless of the weaving width. The categorized area fraction varied with the weaving width change. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD results at the edge (the area near the fusion line of the low-heat-input condition indicated a higher austenite volume fraction and a lower Cr2N fraction than that of the medium heat input condition. Thus, it described an inverse relationship, because higher heat input provided a lower austenite fraction. In addition, it was observed clearly that the austenite fraction at the medium heat input condition was dramatically increased by reheating, while the Cr2N fraction was reduced. Regardless of the weaving width, reheating contributed to the increase of the austenite fraction, further reducing the Cr2N quantity. The edge areas in the map showed an inverse relationship in the reheated area fraction between low heat input and medium heat input. For this reason, the austenite fraction on the weld metal was determined not only by the heat input, but also by the amount of reheating.

  4. Effect of electron beam on in vitro cultured orchid organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jaihyunk; Bae, Seho; Bae, Changhyu [Sunchon National Univ., Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Suk; Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Ionizing radiations have been effective mutagen sources to overcome the limitation of the useful genetic resources in natural environment. The study was conducted to investigate an effect of electron beam on organogenesis, growth patterns and genetic variation in the irradiated orchid organs. The in utero cultured rhizomes of orchids were irradiated with the electron beam in the dose range of 15Gy to 2240Gy under the condition of various beam energy and beam current. Significant decreases in survival, growth and organogenesis were observed by increase of intensity of electron beam irradiation. The irradiation intensity of lethal dose 50 of the in utero cultured orchid was estimated as approximately 500Gy to 1000Gy under 10MeV/n, and 1000Gy was optimal for growth and organogenesis of the cultures under 10MeV/n with 0.05mA treatment, and 15Gy {approx} 48Gy under 2MeV/n and 0.5mA electron beam condition. RAPD and ISSR analyses for the electron beam irradiated organs were performed to analyze genetic variation under the electron beam condition. Both of RAPD and ISSR analyses showed higher polymorphic rate in the electron-beam irradiated C. gangrene and C. Kaner.

  5. THI: goal reached with a carbon beam, and some results of beam tests and theoretical studies related to longitudinal space charge effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    During the first semester of this year, two tests were devoted to high intensity beams: 1) trying to reach the ultimate goal with a carbon beam and 2) going further into the study of perturbing phenomena. A 1.3 x 10 13 pps 13 C beam was successfully extracted from SSC2 and sustained for 13 hours with an excellent stability. Then, the current was increased to 2 x 10 13 pps with no major problem. Therefore, it is possible from now on to bombard the 2 kW target which is prepared for the production of helium isotopes and subsequent acceleration in the new cyclotron CIME. Both experimental and simulation studies were carried in parallel, in the frame of the last year expertise, in order to get a better knowledge and control of the effect of longitudinal space charge forces. It appears that these effects affect the beam width mostly in SSC2, while a discrepancy between computer simulations and measurements seems to show up concerning the effect of neighbouring bunches. (author)

  6. Phase Diagram of the ν=5/2 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: Effects of Landau-Level Mixing and Nonzero Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiryl Pakrouski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Interesting non-Abelian states, e.g., the Moore-Read Pfaffian and the anti-Pfaffian, offer candidate descriptions of the ν=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state. But, the significant controversy surrounding the nature of the ν=5/2 state has been hampered by the fact that the competition between these and other states is affected by small parameter changes. To study the phase diagram of the ν=5/2 state, we numerically diagonalize a comprehensive effective Hamiltonian describing the fractional quantum Hall effect of electrons under realistic conditions in GaAs semiconductors. The effective Hamiltonian takes Landau-level mixing into account to lowest order perturbatively in κ, the ratio of the Coulomb energy scale to the cyclotron gap. We also incorporate the nonzero width w of the quantum-well and subband mixing. We find the ground state in both the torus and spherical geometries as a function of κ and w. To sort out the nontrivial competition between candidate ground states, we analyze the following four criteria: its overlap with trial wave functions, the magnitude of energy gaps, the sign of the expectation value of an order parameter for particle-hole symmetry breaking, and the entanglement spectrum. We conclude that the ground state is in the universality class of the Moore-Read Pfaffian state, rather than the anti-Pfaffian, for κ<κ_{c}(w, where κ_{c}(w is a w-dependent critical value 0.6≲κ_{c}(w≲1. We observe that both Landau-level mixing and nonzero width suppress the excitation gap, but Landau-level mixing has a larger effect in this regard. Our findings have important implications for the identification of non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall states.

  7. Effect of ABCD transformations on beam paraxiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2011-12-19

    The limits of the paraxial approximation for a laser beam under ABCD transformations is established through the relationship between a parameter concerning the beam paraxiality, the paraxial estimator, and the beam second-order moments. The applicability of such an estimator is extended to an optical system composed by optical elements as mirrors and lenses and sections of free space, what completes the analysis early performed for free-space propagation solely. As an example, the paraxiality of a system composed by free space and a spherical thin lens under the propagation of Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss modes is established. The results show that the the paraxial approximation fails for a certain feasible range of values of main parameters. In this sense, the paraxial estimator is an useful tool to monitor the limits of the paraxial optics theory under ABCD transformations.

  8. Evaluation of the BEAM--BEAM effect in PEP using Myer's simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, A.

    1982-09-01

    The program BEAM BEAM written by Steve Myers for the LEP machine at CERN has given encouraging results in the simulation of the beam-beam effect in electron-positron storage rings. It therefore seemed worthwhile to apply the program to PEP with two main intentions. Firstly, to confirm the validity of the program by comparison with experimental data from previous PEP runs and secondly, to search for an improvement in the operating conditions of PEP. Clearly a successful prediction would also enhance the credibility of the program. The program itself has been extensively described in the literature and will not be repeated here, except for some comments of direct relevance to the present simulation. 14 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Effect of e-beam irradiation on graphene layer grown by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.; Kumar Singh, Arun; Iqbal, M. W.; Seo, Sunae; Eom, Jonghwa

    2012-01-01

    We have grown graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred it onto Si/SiO 2 substrates to make tens of micron scale devices for Raman spectroscopy study. The effect of electron beam (e-beam) irradiation of various doses (600 to 12 000 μC/cm 2 ) on CVD grown graphene has been examined by using Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the radiation exposures result in the appearance of the strong disorder D band attributed the damage to the lattice. The evolution of peak frequencies, intensities, and widths of the main Raman bands of CVD graphene is analyzed as a function of defect created by e-beam irradiation. Especially, the D and G peak evolution with increasing radiation dose follows the amorphization trajectory, which suggests transformation of graphene to the nanocrystalline and then to amorphous form. We have also estimated the strain induced by e-beam irradiation in CVD graphene. These results obtained for CVD graphene are in line with previous findings reported for the mechanically exfoliated graphene [D. Teweldebrhan and A. A. Balandin, Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 013101 (2009)]. The results have important implications for CVD graphene characterization and device fabrication, which rely on the electron microscopy.

  10. Electron beam effects on gelatin polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Souza, Clecia de M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Mastro, Nelida L. del, E-mail: patyoko@yahoo.co [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Colombo, Maria A., E-mail: mascolombo@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Tecnologia da Zona Leste, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The main field of electron-beam radiation processing applications is the modification of polymeric material. Polymer development includes new pathways to produce natural polymers with better mechanical and barrier properties and thermal stability. The aim of this paper was to investigate the behavior of a gelatin/acrylamide polymer treated by electron-beam radiation. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen, a fibrous insoluble protein, which is widely found in nature as the major constituent of skin, bones and connective tissue. Hydrolyzed collagen is composed of a unique sequence of amino acids, characterized particularly by the high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Among biomaterials, gelatin is an interesting material because is a partially crystalline polymer and has a relatively low melting point. Samples of gelatin together with glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer were irradiated with doses of 10 kGy and 40 kGy, using an electron beam accelerator, dose rate 22.41kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. After irradiation, some preliminary analyses were done like viscometry, texture analyses and colorimetry. The results of the diverse tests showed changes that can be ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. The electron-beam processed acrylamide-gelatin polymer using glycerin as plasticizer must be first extensively characterized before to be used for general applications. (author)

  11. Electron beam effects on gelatin polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Souza, Clecia de M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Mastro, Nelida L. del; Colombo, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    The main field of electron-beam radiation processing applications is the modification of polymeric material. Polymer development includes new pathways to produce natural polymers with better mechanical and barrier properties and thermal stability. The aim of this paper was to investigate the behavior of a gelatin/acrylamide polymer treated by electron-beam radiation. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen, a fibrous insoluble protein, which is widely found in nature as the major constituent of skin, bones and connective tissue. Hydrolyzed collagen is composed of a unique sequence of amino acids, characterized particularly by the high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Among biomaterials, gelatin is an interesting material because is a partially crystalline polymer and has a relatively low melting point. Samples of gelatin together with glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer were irradiated with doses of 10 kGy and 40 kGy, using an electron beam accelerator, dose rate 22.41kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. After irradiation, some preliminary analyses were done like viscometry, texture analyses and colorimetry. The results of the diverse tests showed changes that can be ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. The electron-beam processed acrylamide-gelatin polymer using glycerin as plasticizer must be first extensively characterized before to be used for general applications. (author)

  12. Step dynamics and terrace-width distribution on flame-annealed gold films: The effect of step-step interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoni, Nira; Ayal, Shai; Millo, Oded

    2000-01-01

    Dynamics of atomic steps and the terrace-width distribution within step bunches on flame-annealed gold films are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. The distribution is narrower than commonly observed for vicinal planes and has a Gaussian shape, indicating a short-range repulsive interaction between the steps, with an apparently large interaction constant. The dynamics of the atomic steps, on the other hand, appear to be influenced, in addition to these short-range interactions, also by a longer-range attraction of steps towards step bunches. Both types of interactions promote self-ordering of terrace structures on the surface. When current is driven through the films a step-fingering instability sets in, reminiscent of the Bales-Zangwill instability

  13. Effects of the edge shape and the width on the structural and electronic properties of silicene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuling; Zhang Yan; Zhang Jianmin; Lu Daobang

    2010-01-01

    Under the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), the structural and electronic properties are studied for H-terminated silicene nanoribbons (SiNRs) with either zigzag edge (ZSiNRs) or armchair edge (ASiNRs) by using the first-principles projector-augmented wave potential within the density function theory (DFT) framework. The results show that the length of the Si-H bond is always 1.50 A, but the edge Si-Si bonds are shorter than the inner ones with identical orientation, implying a contraction relaxation of edge Si atoms. An edge state appears at the Fermi level E F in broader ZSiNRs, but does not appear in all ASiNRs due to their dimer Si-Si bond at edge. With increasing width of ASiNRs, the direct band gaps exhibit not only an oscillation behavior, but also a periodic feature of Δ 3n > Δ 3n+1 > Δ 3n+2 for a certain integer n. The charge density contours analysis shows that the Si-H bond is an ionic bond due to a relative larger electronegativity of H atom. However, all kinds of the Si-Si bonds display a typical covalent bonding feature, although their strength depends on not only the bond orientation but also the bond position. That is, the larger deviation of the Si-Si bond orientation from the nanoribbon axis as well as the closer of the Si-Si bond to the nanoribbon edge, the stronger strength of the Si-Si bond. Besides the contraction of the nanoribbon is mainly in its width direction especially near edge, the addition contribution from the terminated H atoms may be the other reason.

  14. Beam-beam effects in high energy e+e- storage rings: resonant amplification of vertical dimensions for flat beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.

    1984-06-01

    In this thesis, we present a phenomenological study of the beam-beam effect in e + e - storage rings. We are in particular interested in the blow-up of the vertical dimension observed in this kind of accelerator. A detailed analysis of the electromagnetic field generated by the very flat bunches stored, and seen by the counter-rotating particles shows that two-dimensional non-linear resonances, which couple vertical and horizontal betatron oscillations, play a very important role. Moreover, the ''weak beam-strong beam'' approximation holds rather well in the case of very flat bunches. Perturbative analysis enables us to predict the effects from the strongest coupling resonance: 20sub(x)-20sub(y) = integer. We find that mainly the tails of the vertical distribution are affected, and we give a criterion concerning the optimal distance to this resonance in the case of a storage ring such as LEP. Finally, the results and in particular the validity of the single resonance approximation are checked through a numerical simulation [fr

  15. Investigation the effect of lattice angle on the band gap width in 3D phononic crystals with rhombohedral(I) lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Aryadoust, M.; Shoushtari, M. Zargar

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystal of 3D with rhombohedral(I) lattice is studied theoretically. The crystal composite constituted of nickel spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and density of states are performed with the plane wave expansion method in the irreducible part of Brillouin zone. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of lattice angle on the band structure and width of the band gap rhombohedral(I) lattice in the irreducible part of the first Brillouin zone and its planes separately. The results show that more than one complete band gape are formed in the four planes of the irreducible part. The most complete band gaps are formed in the (111) plane and the widest complete band gap in (443) with an angle greater than 80. So, if the sound passes through the (111) and (443) planes for the lattice angle close to 90, the crystal phononic displays the excellent insulation behavior. Moreover, in the other planes, the lattice angle does not affect on the width and the number of band gaps. Also, for the filling fraction 5 %, the widest complete band gap is formed. These results are consistent with the effect of symmetry on the band gap width, because the (111) plane has the most symmetry.

  16. Effect of beam-attenuation modulation on fluctuation measurements by heavy-ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.; Sloan, M.L.; Wootton, A.J.

    1991-03-01

    Beam-attenuation modulation arising from density fluctuations along the orbit of the heavy-ion beam probe can distort the local amplitude, coherence, and phase derived from one- and two-point correlation measurements. Path-integral expressions for these effects are derived and applications to TEXT data are discussed. The effects depend critically on the ratio of the average fluctuation amplitude, n e , along the beam path to the local n e at the sample volume. Because the fluctuation amplitude is small in the core and rises sharply toward the plasma edge, the contamination effect is negligible in a radial zone near the edge but rises sharply to the interior of a critical radius. With increasing average plasma density, bar n e , the interior contamination increases strongly and the critical radius moves outward. 16 refs., 12 figs

  17. Beam-beam interaction and Pacman effects in the SSC with random nonlinear multipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goderre, G.P.; Ohnuma, S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to find the combined effects of beam-beam interaction (head-on and long-range) and random nonlinear multipoles in dipole magnets, transverse tunes and smears have been calculated as a function of oscillation amplitudes. Two types of particles, ''regular'' and ''Pacman,'' have been investigated using a modified version of tracking code TEAPOT. Regular particles experience beam-beam interactions in all four interaction regions (IR's), both head-on and long range, while pacman particles interact with bunches of the other beam in one medium-beta and one low-beta IR's only. The model for the beam-beam interaction is of weak-strong type and the strong beam is assumed to have a round Gaussian charge distribution. Furthermore, it is assumed that the vertical closed orbit deviation arising from the finite crossing angle of 70 μrad is perfectly compensated for regular particles. The same compensation applied to pacman particles creates a closed orbit distortion. Linear tunes are adjusted for regular particles to the design values but there are no nonlinear corrections except for chromaticity correcting sextupoles in two families. Results obtained in this study do not show any reduction of dynamic or linear aperture for pacman particles but some doubts exist regarding the validity of defining the linear aperture from the smear alone. Preliminary results are given for regular particles when (Δp/p) is modulated by the synchrotron oscillation. For these, fifty oscillations corresponding to 26,350 revolutions have been tracked. A very slow increase in the horizontal amplitude, /approximately/4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4//oscillation (relative), is a possibility but this should be confirmed by trackings of larger number of revolutions. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Stokes line width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiskov, A.I.; Ritus, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of Stokes line width is introduced for the asymptotic expansions of functions near an essential singularity. Explicit expressions are found for functions (switching functions) that switch on the exponentially small terms for the Dawson integral, Airy function, and the gamma function. A different, more natural representation of a function, not associated with expansion in an asymptotic series, in the form of dominant and recessive terms is obtained by a special division of the contour integral which represents the function into contributions of higher and lower saddle points. This division leads to a narrower, natural Stokes line width and a switching function of an argument that depends on the topology of the lines of steepest descent from the saddle point

  19. Nonlinear space charge effect of bunched beam in linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yinbao

    1992-02-01

    The nonlinear space charge effect due to the nonuniform particle density distribution in bunched beam of a linac is discussed. The formulae of nonlinear space charge effect and nonlinear focusing forces were derived for the bunched beam with Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) distribution, waterbag (WB) distribution, parabolic (PA) distribution, and Gauss (GA) distribution in both of the space charge disk model and space charge cylinder model in the waveguide of a linac

  20. Effect of temperature and ridge-width on the lasing characteristics of InAs/InP quantum-dash lasers: A thermal analysis view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhazraji, E.; Khan, M. T. A.; Ragheb, A. M.; Fathallah, H.; Qureshi, K. K.; Alshebeili, S.; Khan, M. Z. M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the thermal characteristics of multi-stack chirped barrier thickness InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum-dash-in-a-well lasers of different ridge widths 2, 3, 4 and 15 μm. The effect of varying this geometrical parameter on the extracted thermal resistance and characteristic temperature, and their stability with temperature are examined. The results show an inverse relation of ridge-width with junction temperature with 2 μm device exhibiting the largest junction temperature buildup owing to an associated high thermal resistance of ∼45 °C/W. Under the light of this thermal analysis, lasing behavior of different ridge-width quantum-dash (Qdash) lasers with injection currents and operating temperatures, is investigated. Thermionic carrier escape and phonon-assisted tunneling are found to be the dominant carrier transport mechanisms resulting in wide thermal spread of carriers across the available transition states of the chirped active region. An emission coverage of ∼75 nm and 3 dB bandwidth of ∼55 nm is exhibited by the 2 μm device, thus possibly exploiting the inhomogeneous optical transitions to the fullest. Furthermore, successful external modulation of a single Qdash Fabry-Perot laser mode via injection locking is demonstrated with eye diagrams at bit rates of 2-12 Gbit/s incorporating various modulation schemes. These devices are being considered as potential light sources for future high-speed wavelength-division multiplexed optical communication systems.

  1. Muscle shortening maneuver and not topical anti-inflammatory therapy is effective in reducing the width of subacromial-subdeltoid bursa in shoulder impingement syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Lippi, Paolo; Marchi, Alberto; Maresca, Marco; Bravi, Riccardo; Eros, Quarta; Lazzerini, Patrizia; Bagni, Maria Angela

    2018-04-01

    Aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of a muscle shortening maneuver (MSM) with the efficacy of a topical NSAID (flurbiprofen) in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). The effects of these therapies were evaluated by sonographic exam (US). SIS was diagnosed by US in 78 patients with painful shoulder. Thirty patients (first group) were treated with topical flurbiprofen for 15 days. Forty-eight patients (second group) were treated with MSM, which was performed once. The shoulder was analyzed in all patients by US before and after treatment. Before treatment and 15 days after treatment, pain by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), range of motion (ROM) and Neer's Test were evaluated. Pain was decreased by both treatments. In only 8 patients of the first group, the encroachment of acromion into the rotator cuff was no more detectable by US after the treatment; ROM increased (> 45°) only in 11 patients (36%) and the width of subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (SSB) was not significantly reduced. At variance with the results obtained in the first group, in all patients of the second group the encroachment of acromion was no more detectable by US, ROM increased (> 45°) and the width of SSB was significantly reduced after the maneuver. Both topical flurbiprofen and MSM were helpful in pain control, but better results, with decrease of width of SSB assessed by US, were obtained by MSM.

  2. Effects of the intrinsic layer width on the band-to-band tunneling current in p-i-n GaN-based avalanche photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ling; Bao, Xichang; Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Chao; Yuan, Yonggang; Xu, Jintong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2009-01-01

    Dark current is critical for GaN-based avalanche photodiodes because it significantly increases the noise current and limits the multiplication factor. It has been found that the band-to-band tunneling current is the dominant origin of the dark current for avalanche photodiodes at the onset of breakdown voltage. Experimentally, for GaN-based avalanche photodiodes with a thinner intrinsic layer, the dark current increases nearly exponentially with the applied voltage even at a lower bias voltage. In this paper, the intrinsic layer (i-layer) width of GaN-based avalanche photodiodes has been varied to study its effect on the band-to-band tunneling current. A widely used equation was used to calculate the band-to-band tunneling current of avalanche photodiodes with different i-layer widths (i-layer 0.1 µm, 0.2 µm and 0.4 µm). At −40 V, the band-to-band tunneling current significantly reduces by a magnitude of 10 −15 A with an increase in the i-layer width from 0.1 µm to 0.2 µm, and a magnitude of 10 −29 A with an increase in the i-layer width from 0.2 µm to 0.4 µm. Then, GaN-based avalanche photodiodes (i-layer 0.1 µm, 0.2 µm and 0.4 µm) with different-sized mesa were fabricated. Also, the measurement of dark current of all three different structures was performed, and their multiplication factors were given

  3. Transverse wakefield effects in the two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selph, F.; Sessler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse wakefield effects in the high-gradient accelerating structure of the two-beam accelerator (TBA) are analyzed theoretically using three different models. The first is a very simple two-particle model, the second is for a beam with uniform charge distribution, constant betatron wavelength, and a linear wake approximation. Both of these models give analytic scaling laws. The third model has a Gaussian beam (represented by 11 superparticles), energy variation across the bunch, acceleration, variation of betatron focusing with energy, and variation of the wakefield from linearity. The three models are compared, and the third model is used to explore the wakefield effects when accelerator parameters such as energy, energy spread, injection energy, accelerating gradient, and betatron wavelength are varied. Also explored are the sensitivity of the beam to the wakefield profile to the longitudinal charge distribution. Finally, in consideration of wakefield effects, possible parameters of a TBA are presented. (orig./HSI)

  4. Beam-beam effects in the high-pile-up tests of the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trad, G

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the beam-beam limit in the LHC is of great importance, since identifying its source is crucial for the luminosity optimization scenario. Several experiments were carried out to search for this limit and check whether it is dominated by the head-on (HO) or the long-range (LR) interactions. In this paper only the HO collision effects will be considered, tracking the evolution of the maximum tune shift achieved during the dedicated machine developments and the special high pile-up fills

  5. Beam-beam effects in the high-pile-up tests of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Trad, G.

    2014-07-17

    Investigating the beam-beam limit in the LHC is of great importance, since identifying its source is crucial for the luminosity optimization scenario. Several experiments were carried out to search for this limit and check whether it is dominated by the head-on (HO) or the long-range (LR) interactions. In this paper only the HO collision effects will be considered, tracking the evolution of the maximum tune shift achieved during the dedicated machine developments and the special high pile-up fills.

  6. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation For HL-LHC - Effect On The Beam Core

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, M; Valishev, A; Bruce, R; Papadopoulou, S; Papotti, G; Pellegrini, D; Redaelli, S; Valuch, D; Wagner, J F

    2017-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams or lenses (HEL) is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in HL-LHC. In previous studies it has been shown that the halo can be efficiently removed with a hollow electron lens. Equally important as an efficient removal of the halo, is also to demonstrate that the core stays unperturbed. In this paper, we present a summary of the experiment at the LHC and simulations in view of the effect of the HEL on the beam core in case of a pulsed operation.

  7. Effect of acute intraocular pressure elevation on the minimum rim width in normal, ocular hypertensive and glaucoma eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sourabh; Tun, Tin A; Baskaran, Mani; Atalay, Eray; Thakku, Sri Gowtham; Liang, Zhang; Milea, Dan; Strouthidis, Nicholas G; Aung, Tin; Girard, Michael Ja

    2018-01-01

    To estimate and compare changes in the Bruch's membrane opening-minimum rim width (BMO-MRW) and area in normal, ocular hypertensive and glaucoma eyes following acute elevations in intraocular pressure (IOP). The optic nerve heads (ONHs) of 104 subjects (31 normals, 20 ocular hypertension (OHT) and 53 with primary glaucoma) were imaged using Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT; Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Germany). IOP was raised twice by applying a force (0.64 n then 0.9 n) to the anterior sclera using an ophthalmo-dynamometer. After each IOP increment, IOP was held constant, measured with a Tonopen (AVIA applanation tonometer, Reichert, Depew, New York, USA), and ONH was rescanned with OCT. In each OCT volume, BMO-MRW and area were calculated and at each IOP increment. The baseline MRW was significantly smaller in glaucoma subjects (174.3±54.3 µm) compared with normal (287.4±42.2 µm, pglaucoma subjects was significantly thinner at the first and second IOP elevations than that at baseline (both p0.05). Acute IOP elevation leads to compression of the nerve fibre layers of neuroretinal rim in glaucoma subjects only without changing ONH size. This suggests that the neural and connective tissues at ONH level in glaucoma subjects are more susceptible to acute IOP episodes than OHT or normal controls. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Pulse-width discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budyashov, Yu.G.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Zinov, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    A pulse duration discriminator is described which is intended for processing signals from multilayer scintillators. The basic elements of the scintillator are: an input gate, a current generator, an integrating capacitor, a Schmidt trigger and an anticoincidence circuit. The basic circuit of the discriminator and its time diagrams explaining its operating are given. The discriminator is based on microcircuits. Pulse duration discrimination threshold changes continuously from 20 to 100 ns, while its amplitude threshold changes within 20 to 100 mV. The temperature instability of discrimination thresholds (both in pulse width and in amplitude) is better than 0.1 per cent/deg C

  9. Effects of magnetic non-linearities on a stored proton beam and their implications for superconducting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.; Evans, L.

    1985-06-01

    A nonlinear lens may be used to study the effect of high-order multipolar field imperfections on a stored proton beam. Such a nonlinear lens is particulary suitable to simulate field imperfections of the types encountered in coil dominated superconducting magnets. We have studied experimentally at the SPS the effect of high order (5th and 8th) single isolated resonances driven by the nonlinear lens. The width of these resonances is of the order one expects to be caused by field errors in superconducting magnets of the SSC type. The experiment shows that, in absence of tune modulation, these resonances are harmless. Slow crossings of the resonance, on the other hand, have destructive effects on the beam, much more so than fast crossings caused by synchrotron oscillations. In the design of future storage rings, sources of low-frequency tune modulation should be avoided as a way to reduce the harmful effects of high order multipolar field imperfection

  10. The effect of the signal-to-noise ratio and window width on image information in intravenous DSA of various vascular regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Ertel, R.; Siemens A.G., Erlangen

    1986-01-01

    The diagnostic quality of DSA images depends on numerous factors related to the apparatus and the technique of examination. An improvement in image can be brought about by correct choice of the mask and injected frames, by subsequent correct manipulation of the images and by the choice of the signal-to-noise ratio and window width. In the present study, the effect of these factors was demonstrated on image quality of venous DSA studies in various vascular regions. Practical advice is given for the examination of particular regions and for various diagnostic problems. (orig.)

  11. Beam-strahlung effects in e-p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.

    1982-09-01

    The electromagnetic fields produced by one beam in an interaction point of a colliding-beam facility cause to the emission of synchrotron radiation by the other beam. This effect, the beam strahlung, for the e+e - colliders has been considered by several authors, and they have pointed out that the effect is very important consideration at very-high-energy e+e - colliders. At the first glance, the beam-strahlung effect can play an important role in the e-p collision due to the fact that the circulating currents in the collider are much higher than those of the e+e - machine. However the detailed study shows that is not the case because of the collision geometry involved. What follows in this note is the beam-strahlung derivations using the method previously used by Hofmann and Keil. The difference between this note and that of Hofman and Keil is that in the case of e+e - collider, equal mass particles are involved in the consideration and, in the e-p case, the electrons radiate and the protons provide the electromagnetic fields

  12. Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160109; Støvneng, Jon Andreas

    2017-08-15

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strength of the beam-beam interactions will be higher after the upgrade to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, and also in the next generation of machines, as the Future Circular Hadron Collider. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and drives resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. For this thesis, a new code named CABIN (Cuda-Accelerated Beam-beam Interaction) has been developed to study the limitations caused by the impact of strong beam-beam interactions. In particular, the evolution of the beam emittance and beam intensity has been monitored to study the impact quantitatively...

  13. Single beam collective effects in FCC-ee due to beam coupling impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, Eleonora; Persichelli, Serena; Zobov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider study, hosted by CERN to design post-LHC particle accelerator options in a worldwide context, is focused on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-luminosity frontier machines. This new accelerator complex represents a great challenge under several aspects, which involve R&D on beam dynamics and new technologies. One very critical point in this context is represented by collective effects, generated by the interaction of the beam with self-induced electromagnetic fields, called wake fields, which could produce beam instabilities, thus reducing the machines performance and limiting the maximum stored current. It is therefore very important to be able to predict these effects and to study in detail potential solutions to counteract them. In this paper the resistive wall and some other important geometrical sources of impedance for the FCC electron-positron accelerator are identified and evaluated, and their impact on the beam dynamics, which in some cases could lea...

  14. Single beam collective effects in FCC-ee due to beam coupling impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider study, hosted by CERN to design post-LHC particle accelerator options in a worldwide context, is focused on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-luminosity frontier machines. This new accelerator complex represents a great challenge under several aspects, which involve R&D on beam dynamics and new technologies. One very critical point in this context is represented by collective effects, generated by the interaction of the beam with self-induced electromagnetic fields, called wake fields, which could produce beam instabilities, thus reducing the machines performance and limiting the maximum stored current. It is therefore very important to be able to predict these effects and to study in detail potential solutions to counteract them. In this paper the resistive wall and some other important geometrical sources of impedance for the FCC electron-positron accelera- tor are identified and evaluated, and their impact on the beam dynamics, which in some cases could l...

  15. Beam loading effects in a standing wave accelerator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeaki; Katayama, Takeshi; Tojyo, Eiki; Yoshida, Katsuhide.

    1978-11-01

    The steady-state beam loading effects on the accelerating field in the disk-loaded structure of a standing wave type have been systematically studied. The electron bunch from a 15 MeV electron linac is injected at arbitrary phase of the external driving field in the test structure. The change of the phase shift of the accelerating field and that of the stored energy are measured as a function of the phase on which the bunch rides. The former shows drastic change when the bunch is around the crest of the driving field and when the beam loading is heavy, whereas the latter varies sinusoidally for any beam loading. The resonant frequency shift of the structure due to beam loading is estimated by using the measured results. All the experimental results are well explained by the normal mode analysis of the microwave cavity theory. (author)

  16. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P wall , P stem , and P cel ) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude of

  17. An inter-hemispheric, statistical study of nightside spectral width distributions from coherent HF scatter radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the Doppler spectral width parameter routinely observed by HF coherent radars has been conducted between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the nightside ionosphere. Data from the SuperDARN radars at Thykkvibær, Iceland and Syowa East, Antarctica have been employed for this purpose. Both radars frequently observe regions of high (>200 ms-1 spectral width polewards of low (<200 ms-1 spectral width. Three years of data from both radars have been analysed both for the spectral width and line of sight velocity. The pointing direction of these two radars is such that the flow reversal boundary may be estimated from the velocity data, and therefore, we have an estimate of the open/closed field line boundary location for comparison with the high spectral widths. Five key observations regarding the behaviour of the spectral width on the nightside have been made. These are (i the two radars observe similar characteristics on a statistical basis; (ii a latitudinal dependence related to magnetic local time is found in both hemispheres; (iii a seasonal dependence of the spectral width is observed by both radars, which shows a marked absence of latitudinal dependence during the summer months; (iv in general, the Syowa East spectral width tends to be larger than that from Iceland East, and (v the highest spectral widths seem to appear on both open and closed field lines. Points (i and (ii indicate that the cause of high spectral width is magnetospheric in origin. Point (iii suggests that either the propagation of the HF radio waves to regions of high spectral width or the generating mechanism(s for high spectral width is affected by solar illumination or other seasonal effects. Point (iv suggests that the radar beams from each of the radars are subject either to different instrumental or propagation effects, or different geophysical conditions due to their locations, although we suggest that this result is more likely to

  18. Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma: effects of electron temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiongping; Qin Zhen; Xu Bin; Cai Zebin

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma are investigated, using the wave and dielectric function equations, for their dependence on the electron temperature. Simulation results show that, due to the influence of the ponderomotive force there is a nonlinear variation of electron temperature in an underdense collisional plasma, and this leads to a complicated and interesting nonlinear variation of dielectric constant; this nonlinear variation of dielectric constant directly affects the beam propagation and gives rise to laser beam self-focusing in some spatial-temporal regions; in particular, the beam width and the beam intensity present an oscillatory variation in the self-focusing region. The influence of several parameters on the dielectric function and beam self-focusing is discussed.

  19. Moessbauer Effect applications using intense radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Moessbauer Effect is reviewed as a promising tool for a number of new solid state studies when used in combination with radioactive beam/implantation facilities. The usual Moessbauer Effect involves long-lived radioactive parents (days to years) that populate low-lying nuclear excited states that subsequently decay to the ground state. Resonant emission/absorption of recoil-free gamma rays from these states provide information on a number of properties of the host materials. Radioactive ion beams (RIB) produced on-line allow new Moessbauer nuclei to be studied where there is no suitable parent. The technique allows useful sources to be made having extremely low local concentrations. The ability to separate the beams in both Z and A should provide high specific activity ''conventional'' sources, a feature important in some applications such as Moessbauer studies in diamond anvil high pressure cells. Exotic chemistry is proposed using RIB and certain Krypton and Xenon Moessbauer isotopes

  20. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gostishchev, Vitaly

    2008-06-01

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  1. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gostishchev, Vitaly

    2008-06-15

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  2. Beam-beam interaction and pacman effects in the SSC with momentum oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahale, N.K.; Ohnuma, S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to find the combined effects of beam-beam interaction (head-on and long-range) and random nonlinear multipoles in dipole magnets, the transverse oscillations of ''regular'' as well as ''pacman'' particles are traced for 256 synchrotron oscillation periods (corresponding to 135K revolutions) in the proposed SSC. Results obtained in this study do not show any obvious reduction of dynamic or linear apertures for pacman particles when compared with regular particles for (Δp/p) = 0. There are some indications of possible sudden or gradual increases in the oscillation amplitude, for pacman as well as regular particles, when the amplitude of momentum oscillation is as large as 3σ. 4 refs., 7 figs

  3. Measurement of the mass and width of the W boson

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    The mass and width of the W boson are measured using e+e- -> W+W- events from the data sample collected by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 170 GeV and 209 GeV. The mass (mw) and width (gw) are determined using direct reconstruction of the kinematics of W+W- -> qqbarlv and W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. When combined with previous OPAL measurements using W+W- -> lvlv events and the dependence on mw of the WW production cross-section at threshold, the results are determined to be mw = 80.415 +- 0.042 +- 0.030 +- 0.009 GeV gw = 1.996 +- 0.096 +- 0.102 +- 0.003 GeV where the first error is statistical, the second systematic and the third due to uncertainties in the value of the LEP beam energy. By measuring mw with several different jet algorithms in the qqbarqqbar channel, a limit is also obtained on possible final-state interactions due to colour reconnection effects in W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. The consistency of the results for the W mass and width with those inferred from other ele...

  4. E-Beam Effects on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Ook; Jo, Gyu Seong; Kim, Hyeon Daek; Kim, Hyunk Taek; Kim, Jong Yeol; Kim, Chan Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Three different CMOS active pixel structures manufactured in a deep submicron process have been evaluated with electron beam. The devices were exposed to 1 MeV electron beam up to 5kGy. Dark current increased after E-beam irradiation differently at each pixel structure. Dark current change is dependent on CMOS pixel structures. CMOS image sensors are now good candidates in demanding applications such as medical image sensor, particle detection and space remote sensing. In these situations, CISs are exposed to high doses of radiation. In fact radiation is known to generate trapped charge in CMOS oxides. It can lead to threshold voltage shifts and current leakages in MOSFETs and dark current increase in photodiodes. We studied ionizing effects in three types of CMOS APSs fabricated by 0.25 CMOS process. The devices were irradiated by a Co 60 source up to 50kGy. All irradiation took place at room temperature. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. From the above figure, the change of dark current is dependent on the pixel structure. Double junction structure has shown relatively small increase of dark current after electron beam irradiation. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. The contribution of the total ionizing dose to the dark current increase is small here, since the devices were left unbiased during the electron beam irradiation. Radiation hardness in dependent on the pixel structures. Pixel2 is relatively vulnerable to radiation exposure. Pixel3 has radiation hardened structure

  5. Data report of tight-lattice rod bundle thermal-hydraulic tests (2). Gap-width effect test using 37-rod bundle simulated water-cooled breeder reactor (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Liu, Wei; Akimoto, Hajime; Sato, Takashi; Watanabe, Hironori; Ohnuki, Akira

    2006-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been performing tight-lattice rod bundle thermal-hydraulic tests to realize essential technologies for the technological and engineering feasibility of super high burn-up water-cooled breeder reactor featured by a high breeding ratio and super high burn-up by reducing the core water volume in water-cooled reactor. The tests are performing to make clear the fundamental subjects related to the boiling transition (BT) (Subjects: BT criteria under a highly tight-lattice rod bundle, effects of gap-width between rods and of rod-bowing) using 37-rod bundles (Base case test section (1.3mm gap-width), Two parameter effect test sections (Gap-width effect one (1.0mm) and Rod-bowing one)). In the present report, we summarize the test results from the gap-width effect test section. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics were obtained for the critical power under the steady-state and transient conditions, the pressure drop and the wall heat transfer within a wide range of pressure, flow rate, etc. including normal operational conditions of the designed reactor. Then the gap-width effects were also obtained from the comparison between the results using the base case test section and the gap-width effect one. (author)

  6. Measurements of effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energy of continuum beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisao [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Inst. for Atomic Energy

    1998-03-01

    Two practically useful quantities are introduced in this study to characterize a continuum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in field of quantitative neutron radiography: an effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section defined at the monochromatic energy. The effective energy was evaluated by means of energy dependence of ETM cross section. To realize the method a beam quality indicator (BQI) has been proposed recently. Several effective energies were measured for non-filtered, filtered neutron beams, and outputs of neutron guide tubes in world by the BQI. A thermal neutron beam and three beams modulated by Pb filters with different thicknesses are studied to measure ETM cross sections for various materials and summarized in a table. Validity of the effective energy determined by the BQI is discussed relating with ETM cross sections of materials. (author)

  7. Tourniquet pressures: strap width and tensioning system widths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Piper L; Coughlin, Ohmar; Rometti, Mary; Birkholz, Sarah; Gildemaster, Yvonne; Grulke, Lisa; Sahr, Sheryl; Buising, Charisse M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure distribution over tourniquet width is a determinant of pressure needed for arterial occlusion. Different width tensioning systems could result in arterial occlusion pressure differences among nonelastic strap designs of equal width. Ratcheting Medical Tourniquets (RMTs; m2 inc., http://www.ratcheting buckles.com) with a 1.9 cm-wide (Tactical RMT) or 2.3 cm-wide (Mass Casualty RMT) ladder were directly compared (16 recipients, 16 thighs and 16 upper arms for each tourniquetx2). Then, RMTs were retrospectively compared with the windlass Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T ["CAT"], http://combattourniquet.com) with a 2.5 cm-wide internal tensioning strap. Pressure was measured with an air-filled No. 1 neonatal blood pressure cuff under each 3.8 cm-wide tourniquet. RMT circumferential pressure distribution was not uniform. Tactical RMT pressures were not higher, and there were no differences between the RMTs in the effectiveness, ease of use ("97% easy"), or discomfort. However, a difference did occur regarding tooth skipping of the pawl during ratchet advancement: it occurred in 1 of 64 Tactical RMT applications versus 27 of 64 Mass Casualty RMT applications. CAT and RMT occlusion pressures were frequently over 300 mmHg. RMT arm occlusion pressures (175-397 mmHg), however, were lower than RMT thigh occlusion pressures (197-562 mmHg). RMT effectiveness was better with 99% reached occlusion and 1% lost occlusion over 1 minute versus the CAT with 95% reached occlusion and 28% lost occlusion over 1 minute. RMT muscle tension changes (up to 232 mmHg) and pressure losses over 1 minute (24±11 mmHg arm under strap to 40±12 mmHg thigh under ladder) suggest more occlusion losses may have occurred if tourniquet duration was extended. The narrower tensioning system Tactical RMT has better performance characteristics than the Mass Casualty RMT. The 3.8 cm-wide RMTs have some pressure and effectiveness similarities and differences compared with the CAT. Clinically

  8. Investigation of effect of electron beam on various polyethylene blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morshedian, J.; Pourrashidi, A.

    2003-01-01

    With regards to the expanding usage of electron beams irradiation in polymer industries such as sterilization of polymeric disposable medical products; cable manufacturing; pipes, heat shrinkable materials, etc. In this project the effect of electron beam on polyethylene used in manufacturing of pipe and heat shrinkable products was studied. Results showed that by increasing the applied dose on samples; the crosslink density would increase and polymers with tertiary carbon atoms in their backbone structure tend to crosslink more readily. The melting temperature and crystallinity percent decreased and degradation temperature increased. Density in low doses decreased and in high doses increased

  9. Investigation of effect of electron beam on various polyethylene blends

    CERN Document Server

    Morshedian, J

    2003-01-01

    With regards to the expanding usage of electron beams irradiation in polymer industries such as sterilization of polymeric disposable medical products; cable manufacturing; pipes, heat shrinkable materials, etc. In this project the effect of electron beam on polyethylene used in manufacturing of pipe and heat shrinkable products was studied. Results showed that by increasing the applied dose on samples; the crosslink density would increase and polymers with tertiary carbon atoms in their backbone structure tend to crosslink more readily. The melting temperature and crystallinity percent decreased and degradation temperature increased. Density in low doses decreased and in high doses increased.

  10. Effects of ion beam irradiation on semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiyama, Isamu; Hirao, Toshio; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Energetic heavy-ion irradiation apparatus has been developed for single-event effects (SEE) testing. We have applied three irradiation methods such as a scattered-ion irradiation method, a recoiled-atom irradiation method, and a direct-beam irradiation method to perform SEE testing efficiently. (author)

  11. LTRACK: Beam-transport calculation including wakefield effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Cooper, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    LTRACK is a first-order beam-transport code that includes wakefield effects up to quadrupole modes. This paper will introduce the readers to this computer code by describing the history, the method of calculations, and a brief summary of the input/output information. Future plans for the code will also be described

  12. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tin dioxide gas sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    sensitivity increases more rapidly under high doses of irra- diation than under low doses of irradiation. The electron beam irradiation effects were simulated and the mecha- nism was discussed. Acknowledgements. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the MOST 973 program, grant no. 2006CB705604 ...

  13. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation Cu Beam Dump

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Susana; Boles, Jason; Stein, Werner; Wirth, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Within the scope of conceptual R&D activities in support of the Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be not a significant issue. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (dpa) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 dpa, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 100 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks...

  14. Electron emission of cathode holder of vacuum diode of an intense electron-beam accelerator and its effect on the output voltage

    OpenAIRE

    Xin-Bing Cheng; Jin-Liang Liu; Hong-Bo Zhang; Zhi-Qiang Hong; Bao-Liang Qian

    2011-01-01

    The vacuum diode which is used to generate relativistic electron beams is one of the most important parts of a pulsed-power modulator. In this paper, the electron emission of cathode holder of a vacuum diode and its effect on the output voltage is investigated by experiments on an intense electron-beam accelerator with 180 ns full width at half maximum and 200–500 kV output voltage. First, the field emission is analyzed and the electric field of the vacuum chamber is calculated. Then, the fla...

  15. The powerful pulsed electron beam effect on the metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Yuferov, V.B.; Kosik, N.A.; Druj, O.S.; Skibenko, E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of the influence of powerful pulsed electron beams on the surface structure,hardness and corrosion resistance of the Cr18ni10ti steel are presented. The experiments were carried out in the powerful electron accelerators of directional effect VGIK-1 and DIN-2K with an energy up to approx 300 KeV and a power density of 10 9 - 10 11 W/cm 2 for micro- and nanosecond range. The essential influence of the irradiation power density on the material structure was established. Pulsed powerful beam action on metallic surface leads to surface melting,modification of the structure and structure-dependent material properties. The gas emission and mass-spectrometer analysis of the beam-surface interaction were defined

  16. Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghee; Bae, Youngmin [Changwon Univ., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination was investigated in this research. Electron beam of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy was irradiated to the seeds of lettuce, green onion and cucumber, and the irradiated seeds were incubated at 25 .deg. Cn Nitsch medium solidified with 0.2% Phytagel. Germination percentage and the length of the sprouts were determined after 72 hours. Germination percentage of lettuce seeds was greatly reduced by the irradiation, and that of the green onion and cucumber were moderately reduced or unchanged by the irradiation. Although average length of the lettuce sprouts was reduced severely, that of the green onion and cucumber was unchanged or moderately reduced. Conclusively, electron beam irradiation might be a useful way of disinfecting some plant seeds including green onion and cucumber.

  17. Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seunghee; Bae, Youngmin

    2013-01-01

    Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination was investigated in this research. Electron beam of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy was irradiated to the seeds of lettuce, green onion and cucumber, and the irradiated seeds were incubated at 25 .deg. Cn Nitsch medium solidified with 0.2% Phytagel. Germination percentage and the length of the sprouts were determined after 72 hours. Germination percentage of lettuce seeds was greatly reduced by the irradiation, and that of the green onion and cucumber were moderately reduced or unchanged by the irradiation. Although average length of the lettuce sprouts was reduced severely, that of the green onion and cucumber was unchanged or moderately reduced. Conclusively, electron beam irradiation might be a useful way of disinfecting some plant seeds including green onion and cucumber

  18. Inverse Faraday effect with plasmon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S; Mendonca, J T

    2011-01-01

    The angular momentum conservation equation is considered for an electron gas, in the presence of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) plasmons propagating along the z-axis. The LG plasmons carry a finite orbital angular momentum despite longitudinal nature, which can be partly transfered to the electrons. For short timescales, such that ion motion can be neglected, plasmons primarily interact with the electrons, creating an azimuthal electric field and generating an axial magnetic field. This effect can be called an inverse Faraday effect due to plasmons. Numerically, it is found that the magnitude of the magnetic field enhances with the plasmon density or with the energy of the electron plasma waves. A comparison of the magnitudes of the axial magnetic field is made for the inverse Faraday effect excited by both plasmons and transverse photons.

  19. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, S

    2015-01-01

    Three methods for handling beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC are tested and evaluated in this work. The first method represents an optimization of the LEPtype asymmetric selection cuts that reduce the counting biases. The second method uses the experimentally reconstructed shape of the √ s ′ spectrum to determine the Beamstrahlung component of the bias. The last, recently proposed, collision-frame method relies on the reconstruction of the collision-frame velocity to define the selection function in the collision frame both in experiment and in theory. Thus the luminosity expression is insensitive to the difference between the CM frame of the collision and the lab frame. The collision-frame method is independent of the knowledge of the beam parameters, and it allows an accurate reconstruction of the luminosity spectrum above 80% of the nominal CM energy. However, it gives no precise infromation about luminosity below 80% of the nominal CM energy. The compatibility of diverse selection cut...

  20. Simulation of electron cloud effects to heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Fatih; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2011-07-01

    Electron cloud (EC) driven instability can cause beam loss, emittance growth, trajectory change and wake fields. Mentioned crucial effects of EC motivated researchers to understand the EC build up mechanism and the effects of EC to the beam. This motivation also induced the progress of developing new simulation codes. EC simulations can roughly be divided into two classes such as, softwares whose goals are to simulate the build up of the EC during the passage of a bunch train and the codes which model the interaction of a bunch with an EC. The aim of this study is to simulate the effects of electron cloud (EC) on the dynamics of heavy ion beams which are used in heavy ion synchrotron (SIS-18) at GSI. To do this, a 3-D and self-consistent simulation program based on particle in cell (PIC) method is used. In the PIC cycle, accurate solution of the Maxwell equations is obtained by employing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. As a model, we assumed a perfectly conducting beam pipe which was uniformly (or randomly) loaded with the electrons. Then as parallel with the realistic cases in SIS-18, a single bunch consisting of U{sup +73} ions was extracted which could propagate in this pipe. Due to EC-ion bunch interaction, electrons gained energy and their displacements were observed. Electric and magnetic field components and EC charge density were calculated, numerically.

  1. Monte Carlo investigation of the effect of small cutouts on beam profile parameters of 12 and 14 MeV electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Sardari, Dariush; Rabie Mahdavi, Seied; Aslian, Hossein; Dabaghi, Moloud; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Cutouts, which are used as field-shaping shield, affect several electron beam parameters. These effects are more observable for small field sizes and high energy electron beams. Owing to the fact that small fields prevent the lateral scatter equilibrium, at higher energies larger field radius is required for the establishment of lateral equilibrium. The profile curves are derived from circular, triangular, and square cutout shapes and size placed in a 10 × 10 cm 2 electron applicator. These profile curves are obtained using parallel plane type ion chamber at the R 100 , R 90 , R 80 and R 50 depths. Correspondingly, the source surface distance is 100 cm. In this study MCNP Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was used to compare Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and Profile of electron beams. Monte Carlo and measured results showed a good compliance for PDD and beam profile. The measurements and calculations showed that as the field width decreases, the Flatness and Penumbra Ratio also decreases. In other words, flatter plateau was available for larger fields. Also the Coverage Ratio for each of the profiles is presented. The flatness and symmetry values for triangle shapes were greater than the two other shapes. Knowledge of these changes are significant in radiation therapy. Accordingly, a comparison between the Monte Carlo data and the measured results can be beneficial for treatment simulation and development of treatment planning systems. - Highlights: ► Mesh Tally 1 and pedep keyword were used to calculate the PDD and profile values. ► In measurement the coverage for larger fields and fewer doses are better. ► By increasing the depth, the flatness and symmetry values were increased. ► The worst flatness and symmetry (between 3 compared shapes) belonged to triangle. ► The given Penumbra and Coverage Ratio can be helpful for PTV margin and coverage

  2. Effects of V2O3 buffer layers on sputtered VO2 smart windows: Improved thermochromic properties, tunable width of hysteresis loops and enhanced durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Shiwei; Cao, Xun; Sun, Guangyao; Li, Ning; Chang, Tianci; Shao, Zewei; Jin, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is one of the most well-known thermochromic materials, which exhibits a notable optical change from transparent to reflecting in the infrared region upon a metal-insulator phase transition. For practical applications, VO2 thin films should be in high crystalline quality to obtain a strong solar modulation ability (ΔTsol). Meanwhile, narrow hysteresis loops and robust ambient durability are also indispensable for sensitivity and long-lived utilization, respectively. In this work, a series of high-quality V2O3/VO2 bilayer structures were grown on quartz glass substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. Basically, the bottom V2O3 acts as the buffer layer to improve the crystallinity of the top VO2, while the VO2 serves as the thermochromic layer to guarantee the solar modulation ability for energy-saving. We observed an obvious increase in ΔTsol of 76% (from 7.5% to 13.2%) for VO2 films after introducing V2O3 buffer layers. Simultaneously, a remarkable reduction by 79% (from 21.9 °C to 4.7 °C) in width of hysteresis loop was obtained when embedding 60 nm V2O3 buffer for 60 nm VO2. In addition, VO2 with non-stoichiometry of V2O3±x buffer demonstrates a broadening hysteresis loops width, which is derived from the lattice distortion caused by lattice imperfection. Finally, durability of VO2 has been significantly improved due to positive effects of V2O3 buffer layer. Our results lead to a comprehensive enhancement in crystallinity of VO2 and shed new light on the promotion of thermochromic property by homologous oxides for VO2.

  3. SU-F-T-402: The Effect of Extremely Narrow MLC Leaf Width On the Plan Quality of VMAT for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J; Park, S; Kim, J; Choi, C; Park, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) with leaf width of 1.25 mm on the plan quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer. Methods: A total of 20 patients with prostate cancer were retrospectively selected. Using a high definition MLC (HD MLC), primary and boost VMAT plans with two full arcs were generated for each patient (original plan). After that, by shifting patient CT images by 1.25 mm in the cranio-caudal direction between the 1st and the 2nd arc, we simulated fluences made with MLCs with leaf width of 1.25 mm. After shifting, primary and boost plans were generated for each patient (shifted plan). A sum plan was generated by summation of the primary and boost plan for each patient. Dose-volumetric parameters were calculated and compared. Results: Both homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) of the shifted plans were better than those of the original plans in primary plans (HI = 0.044 vs. 0.040 with p < 0.001 and CI = 1.056 vs. 1.044 with p = 0.006). Similarly, the shifted plans for boost target volume showed better homogeneity and conformity than did the original plans (HI = 0.042 vs. 0.037 with p = 0.006 and CI = 1.015 vs. 1.009 with p < 0.001). The total body volumes of the original plans irradiated by the prescription dose were larger than those of the shifted plans in sum plans (60.9 cc vs. 49.0 cc with p = 0.007). Conclusion: Use of extremely narrow MLCs could increase dose homogeneity and conformity of the target volume for prostate VMAT. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2015R1C1A1A02036331).

  4. Unexpected finite size effects in interfacial systems: Why bigger is not always better—Increase in uncertainty of surface tension with bulk phase width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longford, Francis G. J.; Essex, Jonathan W.; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Frey, Jeremy G.

    2018-06-01

    We present an unexpected finite size effect affecting interfacial molecular simulations that is proportional to the width-to-surface-area ratio of the bulk phase Ll/A. This finite size effect has a significant impact on the variance of surface tension values calculated using the virial summation method. A theoretical derivation of the origin of the effect is proposed, giving a new insight into the importance of optimising system dimensions in interfacial simulations. We demonstrate the consequences of this finite size effect via a new way to estimate the surface energetic and entropic properties of simulated air-liquid interfaces. Our method is based on macroscopic thermodynamic theory and involves comparing the internal energies of systems with varying dimensions. We present the testing of these methods using simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water forcefield and a Lennard-Jones fluid model of argon. Finally, we provide suggestions of additional situations, in which this finite size effect is expected to be significant, as well as possible ways to avoid its impact.

  5. Effects of beam-beam collisions on storage-ring performance - a pedagogical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schonfeld, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the experimental and theoretical literature on colliding-beam effects in both leptonic and hadronic storage rings. For the most part, this literature is rather technical and, to the novice, both obscurely written and hard to locate. Although there have already been several symposia on the subject, as well as a number of reviews for specialists there has up till now been no unified and pedagogical exposition. The present work represents an attempt to fill this gap. The material is grouped into four major areas: observational phenomenology, computer simulation, mathematical background, and theoretical models. 113 references, 36 figures

  6. Effect of Proton Beam on Cancer Progressive and Metastatic Enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Y. H.; Nam, K. S.; Oh, Y. H.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, M. Y.; Jang, J. S.

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of proton beam on enzymes for promotion/progression of carcinogenesis and metastasis of malignant tumor cells to clarify proton beam-specific biological effects. The changes of cancer chemopreventive enzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells irradiated with proton beams were tested by measuring the activities of quinine reductase (QR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), glutathione (GSH) levels, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We also examined the effect of proton beam on the ODC activity and expression of COX-2 in human breast cancer cell. We then assessed the metastatic capabilities of HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cells irradiated with proton beam by measuring the invasiveness of cells through Matrigel-coated membrane and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. QR activity of irradiated HT-29 cells was slightly increased. Proton irradiation at dose of 32 Gy in HT-29 cells increased GST activity by 1.23-fold. In addition GSH levels in HT-29 cells was significantly increased 1.23- (p<0.05), 1.32- (p<0.01) and 1.34-fold (p<0.01) with the proton irradiation at doses of 8, 16 and 32 Gy, respectively. These results suggest that colon cancer chemopreventive activity was increased with the proton irradiation by increasing QR and GST activities and GSH levels and inhibiting ODC activity. Proton ion irradiation decreased the invasiveness of TPA-treated HT-29 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells through Matrigel-coated membrane. Proton ion irradiation pretreatment decreased TPA-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. Further studies are necessary to investigate if these findings could be translated to in vivo situations

  7. Effects of laser beam propagation in a multilevel photoionization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Y.; Nomaru, K.; Chen, Y. W.

    1995-01-01

    When the intense laser pulse propagates in the atomic vapor over a long distance, the laser pulse shape, the carrier frequency and the propagating velocity are greatly modified during the propagation by the resonant and/or the near-resonant interactions with atoms. We have been investigating these effects on the laser beam propagation experimentally and analytically. The simulation code named CEALIS-P has been developed, which employs the coupled three- level Bloch-Maxwell equations to study the atomic excitation and laser beam propagation simultaneously. Several features of the resonant and near-resonant effects based on the the self-induced transparency, the self-phase modulation and the nonlinear group velocity dispersion are described and the influences of such effects on the photoionization efficiency are analyzed.

  8. Effective source size, yield and beam profile from multi-layered bremsstrahlung targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, R.; Brahme, A.

    1996-01-01

    Modern conformal radiotherapy benefits from heterogeneous dose delivery using scanned narrow bremsstrahlung beams of high energy in combination with dynamic double focused multi-leaf collimation and purging magnets. When using a purging magnet to remove electrons and positrons the target space is limited and unorthodox thin multi-layered targets are needed. A computational technique has therefore been developed to determine the forward yield and the angular distributions of the bremsstrahlung beam as well as the size and location of the effective and the virtual photon point source for arbitrary multi-layer bremsstrahlung targets. The Gaussian approximation of the diffusion equation for the electrons has been used and convolved with the bremsstrahlung production process. For electrons with arbitrary emittance impinging on targets of any multi-layer and atomic number combination, the model is well applicable, at least for energies in the range 1-100 MeV. The intrinsic bremsstrahlung photon profile has been determined accurately by deconvolving the electron multiple scattering process from thin experimental beryllium target profiles. For electron pencil beams incident on a target of high density and atomic number such as tungsten, the size of the effective photon source stays at around a tenth of a millimetre. The effective photon source for low-Z materials such as Be, C and Al is located at depths from 3-7 mm in the target, decreasing with increasing atomic number. The effective photon source at off-axis positions then moves out considerably from the central axis, which should be considered when aligning collimators. For high-Z materials such as tungsten, the location of the effective photon source is at a few tenths of a millimetre deep. The virtual photon point source is located only a few tenths of a millimetre upstream of the effective photon source both for high- and low-Z materials. For 50 MeV electrons incident on multi-layered full range targets the radial

  9. Selected topics on surface effects in fusion devices: neutral-beam injectors and beam-direct converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.

    1978-01-01

    Neutral-beam injectors are being used for the heating and fueling of plasmas in existing devices such as PLT (Princeton), ISX (Oak Ridge) and 2XIIB (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory) and will be used in devices such as TFTR (Princeton), MX (Livermore) and Doublet III (Gulf Atomic). For example, TFTR has been designed to receive a total of 20 MW of 120-keV deuterium atoms in pulses of 0.5-sec duration from 12 neutral beam injectors; for the MX experiment it is planned to inject a total of 750A (equivalent) of deuterium atoms with a mean energy of 56 keV in 0.5-sec pulses. The interaction of energetic deuterium atoms with exposed surfaces of device components such as beam dumps, beam-direct-convertors collectors, beam calorimeters, and armor plates, cause a variety of surface effects which affect deleteriously the operation of such devices. Some of the major effects will be discussed

  10. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  11. Effects of dipole magnet inhomogeneities on the beam ellipsoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Colman, J.; Levine, M.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Ward, T.; Grand, P.

    1986-01-01

    The RAYTRACE computer code has been modified to accept magnetic fields measured in the median plane of a dipole magnet. This modification allows one to study the effects of a non-ideal dipole magnet on the beam ellipsoid (as defined by the TRANSPORT code manual). The effects on the beam ellipsoid are due to: field inhomogeneities in the interior region of the dipole, and discrepancies from design conditions of the magnetic field values in the fringe field region. The results of the RAYTRACE code calculations based on experimentally measured fields will be compared with the results derived using both an ideal (no inhomogeneities) dipole with SCOFF boundaries and an ideal dipole with perfect (according to design) fringe fields

  12. Effect of heat treatment on properties of HfO2 film deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huasong; Jiang, Yugang; Wang, Lishuan; Li, Shida; Yang, Xiao; Jiang, Chenghui; Liu, Dandan; Ji, Yiqin; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Deying

    2017-11-01

    The effects of atmosphere heat treatment on optical, stress, and microstructure properties of an HfO2 film deposited by ion-beam sputtering were systematically researched. The relationships among annealing temperature and refractive index, extinction coefficient, physical thickness, forbidden-band width, tape trailer width, Urbach energy, crystal phase structure, and stress were assessed. The results showed that 400 °C is the transformation point, and the microstructure of the HfO2 film changed from an amorphous into mixed-phase structure. Multistage phonons appeared on the HfO2 film, and the trends of the refractive index, extinction coefficient, forbidden-band width change, and Urbach energy shifted from decrease to increase. With the elevation of the annealing temperature, the film thickness increased monotonously, the compressive stress gradually turned to tensile stress, and the transformation temperature point for the stress was between 200 °C and 300 °C. Therefore, the change in the stress is the primary cause for the shifts in thin-film thickness.

  13. Electron beam irradiation effect on nanostructured molecular sieve catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhongyong; Zhou Wuzong; Parvulescu, Viorica; Su Baolian

    2003-01-01

    Electron impact can induce chemical changes on particle surfaces of zeolites and molecular sieve catalysts. Some experimental observations of electron irradiation effect on molecular sieve catalysts are presented, e.g., electron-beam-induced growth of bare silver nanowires from zeolite crystallites, formation of vesicles in calcium phosphate, migration of microdomains in iron-oxide doped mesoporous silicas, structural transformation from mesostructured MCM-41 to microporous ZSM-5, etc. The formation mechanisms of the surface structures are discussed

  14. Experimental verification of secondary effects of prestressed beam at ULS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pažma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with secondary effects of prestressing at ultimate limit state when statically indeterminate structure has changed its structural form due to development of plastic hinges in critical cross-sections. The article presents results of an experimental program which was carried out at Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava on two span continuous beams post-tensioned by two single-strand tendons subjected to experimental load which has changed structural system into kinematic mechanism.

  15. Resistive-wall Wake Effect in the Beam Delivery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Jefferson Lab; Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; SLAC; Wang, Jiunn-Ming; BNL, NSLS

    2005-01-01

    General formulae for resistive-wall induced beam dilution are presented and then applied to the final beam delivery system of linear colliders. Criteria for the design of final beam delivery systems are discussed

  16. Investigation of the flip-flop beam-beam effect in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.H.R.; Paterson, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    When colliding electron and positron bunches in SPEAR at high values of the beam-beam tune shift parameter Δν, it had been observed that sometimes one of the equal intensity beams would blow up in the vertical plane more than the other beam. It was subsequently found that a small adjustment to the phase difference between the RF accelerating cavities would make the beam flip the other way. The results of the investigation of this phenomenon are presented in this paper

  17. Investigation of the flip-flop beam--beam effect in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.H.R.; Paterson, J.M.

    1979-03-01

    When colliding electron and positron bunches in SPEAR at high values of the beam--beam tune shift parameter Δν, it had been observed that sometimes one of the equal intensity beams would blow up in the vertical plane more than the other beam. It was subsequently found that a small adjustment to the phase difference between the RF accelerating cavities would make the beam flip the other way. The results of the investigation of this phenomenon are presented in this paper

  18. Dose-rate effects in external beam radiotherapy redux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C. Clifton; Gerweck, Leo E.; Zaider, Marco; Yorke, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in external beam radiotherapy, both in technical advances and in clinical approaches, have prompted renewed discussions on the potential influence of dose-rate on radio-response in certain treatment scenarios. We consider the multiple factors that influence the dose-rate effect, e.g. radical recombination, the kinetics of sublethal damage repair for tumors and normal tissues, the difference in α/β ratio for early and late reacting tissues, and perform a comprehensive literature review. Based on radiobiological considerations and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model we estimate the influence of overall treatment time on radio-response for specific clinical situations. As the influence of dose-rate applies to both the tumor and normal tissues, in oligo-fractionated treatment using large doses per fraction, the influence of delivery prolongation is likely important, with late reacting normal tissues being generally more sensitive to the dose-rate effect than tumors and early reacting tissues. In conventional fractionated treatment using 1.8-2 Gy per fraction and treatment times of 2-10 min, the influence of dose-rate is relatively small. Lastly, the dose-rate effect in external beam radiotherapy is governed by the overall beam-on-time, not by the average linac dose-rate, nor by the instantaneous dose-rate within individual linac pulses which could be as high as 3 x 10 6 MU/min.

  19. Effect of beam density and of higher harmonics on beam-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacina, J.; Krlin, L.; Koerbel, S.

    1974-10-01

    The interaction in a cold electron beam-plasma system is investigated numerically in a density ratio region of nsub(B)/nsub(P) = 2 x 10 -3 to 2 x 10 -2 . The one-dimensional model of a collisionless plasma is used. The time development of the wave with maximal growing rate and its spatial harmonics is studied. The plasma effect is simulated by direct computation of plasma particle trajectories (this being different from the usual plasma simulation by means of a dielectric). The calculations show the following effects of the finite parameter (nsub(B)/nsub(P))sup(1/3): the ratio of the plasma energy to the electric field energy is increased, the damping character of the field and macroscopic amplitudes reveals, and the influence of the second harmonic is not negligible for nsub(B)/nsub(P) >= 10 -2 . (author)

  20. Effects of toe-in and toe-in with wider step width on level walking knee biomechanics in varus, valgus, and neutral knee alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Hunter J; Shen, Guangping; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2017-12-01

    Increased peak external knee adduction moments exist for individuals with knee osteoarthritis and varus knee alignments, compared to healthy and neutrally aligned counterparts. Walking with increased toe-in or increased step width have been individually utilized to successfully reduce 1st and 2nd peak knee adduction moments, respectfully, but have not previously been combined or tested among all alignment groups. The purpose of this study was to compare toe-in only and toe-in with wider step width gait modifications in individuals with neutral, valgus, and varus alignments. Thirty-eight healthy participants with confirmed varus, neutral, or valgus frontal-plane knee alignment through anteroposterior radiographs, performed level walking in normal, toe-in, and toe-in with wider step width gaits. A 3×3 (group×intervention) mixed model repeated measures ANOVA compared alignment groups and gait interventions (pstep width compared to normal gait. The 2nd peak adduction moment was increased in toe-in compared to normal and toe-in with wider step width. The adduction impulse was also reduced in toe-in and toe-in with wider step width compared to normal gait. Peak knee flexion and external rotation moments were increased in toe-in and toe-in with wider step width compared to normal gait. Although the toe-in with wider step width gait seems to be a viable option to reduce peak adduction moments for varus alignments, sagittal, and transverse knee loadings should be monitored when implementing this gait modification strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluka Studies of the Asynchronous Beam Dump Effects on LHC Point 6 for a 7 TeV beam

    CERN Document Server

    VERSACI, R; GODDARD, B; MEREGHETTI, A; SCHMIDT, R; VLACHOUDIS, V

    2012-01-01

    The LHC is a record-breaking machine for beam energy and intensity. An intense effort has therefore been deployed in simulating critical operational scenarios of energy deposition. Using FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the effects of an asynchronous beam dump at the LHC Point 6 where beams, with a stored energy of 360 MJ, can instantaneously release up to a few J cm^{-3} in the cryogenic magnets which have a quench limit of the order of the mJ cm^{-3}. In the present paper we will describe the simulation approach, and discuss the evaluated maximum energy release onto the superconducting magnets during an asynchronous beam dump of a 7 TeV beam. We will then analyze the shielding provided by collimators installed in the area and discuss safety limits for the operation of the LHC.

  2. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H 2 gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10 4 in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter η = (P beam /F rev )·(dF rev /dP beam ). These two measurement techniques are described in this report

  3. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center_dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  4. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  5. A deterministic width function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Puente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of a deterministic fractal-multifractal (FM geometric method to model width functions of natural river networks, as derived distributions of simple multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions, is reported. It is first demonstrated that the FM procedure may be used to simulate natural width functions, preserving their most relevant features like their overall shape and texture and their observed power-law scaling on their power spectra. It is then shown, via two natural river networks (Racoon and Brushy creeks in the United States, that the FM approach may also be used to closely approximate existing width functions.

  6. Confinement Effect on Material Properties of RC Beams Under Flexure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sumant; Shiyekar, Mukund Ramchandra; Shiyekar, Sandip Mukund

    2017-12-01

    In structural analysis, especially in indeterminate structures, it becomes essential to know the material and geometrical properties of members. The codal provisions recommend elastic properties of concrete and steel and these are fairly accurate enough. The stress-strain curve for concrete cylinder or a cube specimen is plotted. The slope of this curve is modulus of elasticity of plain concrete. Another method of determining modulus of elasticity of concrete is by flexural test of a beam specimen. The modulus of elasticity most commonly used for concrete is secant modulus. The modulus of elasticity of steel is obtained by performing a tension test of steel bar. While performing analysis by any software for high rise building, cross area of plain concrete is taken into consideration whereas effects of reinforcement bars and concrete confined by stirrups are neglected. Present aim of study is to determine elastic properties of reinforced cement concrete beam. Two important stiffness properties such as AE and EI play important role in analysis of high rise RCC building idealized as plane frame. The experimental program consists of testing of beams (model size 150 × 150 × 700 mm) with percentage of reinforcement varying from 0.54 to 1.63% which commensurate with existing Codal provisions of IS:456-2000 for flexural member. The effect of confinement is considered in this study. The experimental results are verified by using 3D finite element techniques.

  7. Effects on focused ion beam irradiation on MOS transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A.N.; Peterson, K.A.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Soden, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of irradiation from a focused ion beam (FIB) system on MOS transistors are reported systematically for the first time. Three MOS transistor technologies, with 0.5, 1, and 3 μm minimum feature sizes and with gate oxide thicknesses ranging from 11 to 50 nm, were analyzed. Significant shifts in transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, transconductance, and mobility) were observed following irradiation with a 30 keV Ga + focused ion beam with ion doses varying by over 5 orders of magnitude. The apparent damage mechanism (which involved the creation of interface traps, oxide trapped charge, or both) and extent of damage were different for each of the three technologies investigated

  8. Effects of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.

    1986-08-01

    Synchrotron light facilities are making ever increasing use of wigglers and undulators, to the extent that these devices are becoming a significant part of the beam optical system of the storage ring itself. This paper presents a theoretical formulation for investigating the effect of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics in the approximation that the wiggler parameter, K, divided by γ is a small number and that the number of wiggler periods in one device is large. In addition to the linear forces which must be taken into account when tuning and matching the ring, nonlinear stop bends are created, with even orders more serious than odd orders. Some numerical examples are given for devices similar to those proposed for the 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  9. Effects of electron beam irradiation on cut flowers and mites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohino, Toshiyuki; Tanabe, Kazuo

    1994-01-01

    Two spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae KOCH were irradiated with electron beams (2.5MeV) to develop an alternative quarantine treatment for imported cut flowers. The tolerance of eggs increased with age (1-5-day-old). Immature stages (larva-teleiochrysalis) irradiated at 0.4-0.8kGy increased tolerance with their development. Mated mature females irradiated at 0.4kGy or higher did not produce viable eggs, although temporary recovery was observed at 0.2kGy. Adult males were sterilized at 0.4kGy because non-irradiated virgin females mated with yielded female progeny malformed and sterilized. Various effects of electron beam irradiation were observed when nine species of cut flowers were irradiated in 5MeV Dynamitron accelerator. Chrysanthemum and rose were most sensitive among cut flowers. (author)

  10. Effect of flexural crack on plain concrete beam failure mechanism A numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoullah Namdar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The flexural failure of plain concrete beam occurs along with development of flexural crack on beam. In this paper by using ABAQUS, mechanism failure of plain concrete beam under three steps have been simulated. The cracking moment has been analytically calculated and applied on the both sides of the fixed beam, and flexural crack has been simulated on beam. Displacement, von Mises, load reaction, displacementcrack length, von Mises-crack length and von Mises-displacement of beams have been graphical depicted. Results indicated that, the flexural crack governs beam mechanism failure and its effects on beam resistance failure. It has been found that the flexural crack in initial stage it developed slowly and changes to be fast at the final stage of collapsing beam due to reduction of the flexural resistance of beam. Increasing mechanical properties of concrete, collapse displacement is reduced.

  11. Structural Effects of Reinforced Concrete Beam Due to Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Idris, Nur'ain; Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Sarpin, Norliana; Zainal, Rozlin; Kasim, Narimah

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the main issues among construction stakeholders. The main consequences of steel corrosion include loss of cross section of steel area, generation of expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between the steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorating the strength of the structure. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural effects of corrosion damage on the performance of reinforced concrete beam. A series of corroded reinforced concrete beam with a corrosion rate of 0%, 20% and 40% of rebar corrosion is used in parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion rate to the structural performance. As a result, the used of interface element in the finite element modelling predicted the worst case of corrosion analysis since cracks is induced and generate at this surface. On the other hand, a positive linear relationship was sketched between the increase of expansive pressure and the corrosion rate. Meanwhile, the gradient of the graph is decreased with the increase of steel bar diameter. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is a significant effect on the load bearing capacity of the structure where the higher corrosion rate generates a higher stress concentration at the mid span of the beam. This study could predict the residual strength of reinforced concrete beam under the corrosion using the finite element analysis. The experimental validation is needed on the next stage to investigate the quantitative relation between the corrosion rate and its influence on the mechanical properties.

  12. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  13. Comparison of Biological Effectiveness of Carbon-Ion Beams in Japan and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Akiko; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Takai, Nobuhiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Scholz, Michael; Elsaesser, Thilo; Peschke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the biological effectiveness of 290 MeV/amu carbon-ion beams in Chiba, Japan and in Darmstadt, Germany, given that different methods for beam delivery are used for each. Methods and Materials: Murine small intestine and human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells exponentially growing in vitro were irradiated with 6-cm width of spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) adjusted to achieve nearly identical beam depth-dose profiles at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, and the SchwerIonen Synchrotron in Darmstadt. Cell kill efficiencies of carbon ions were measured by colony formation for HSG cells and jejunum crypts survival in mice. Cobalt-60 γ rays were used as the reference radiation. Isoeffective doses at given survivals were used for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations and interinstitutional comparisons. Results: Isoeffective D 10 doses (mean ± standard deviation) of HSG cells ranged from 2.37 ± 0.14 Gy to 3.47 ± 0.19 Gy for Chiba and from 2.31 ± 0.11 Gy to 3.66 ± 0.17 Gy for Darmstadt. Isoeffective D 10 doses of gut crypts after single doses ranged from 8.25 ± 0.17 Gy to 10.32 ± 0.14 Gy for Chiba and from 8.27 ± 0.10 Gy to 10.27 ± 0.27 Gy for Darmstadt, whereas isoeffective D 30 doses after three fractionated doses were 9.89 ± 0.17 Gy through 13.70 ± 0.54 Gy and 10.14 ± 0.20 Gy through 13.30 ± 0.41 Gy for Chiba and Darmstadt, respectively. Overall difference of RBE between the two facilities was 0-5% or 3-7% for gut crypt survival or HSG cell kill, respectively. Conclusion: The carbon-ion beams at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany are biologically identical after single and daily fractionated irradiation.

  14. Finite geometry effects on the stability of a charged beam propagating through a relativistic annular electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    Finite geometry effects on the stability properties of a charged beam propagating through an intense relativistic annular electron beam have been studied. The stability of the system under transverse oscillation has been examined in detail in a parameter domain pertinent to the collective particle accelerator, currently under development at the Naval Research Laboratory. Both the normal mode and the convective aspects of this instability have been investigated. Despite a substantial temporal growth rate as predicted by the normal mode approach, this instability does not prevent successful acceleration of a portion of the axial beam. Thus the transverse oscillation is not fatal to the collective particle accelerator operation

  15. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  16. The effect of CFRP on retrofitting of damaged HSRC beams using AE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffian Noor, M. S.; Noorsuhada, M. N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the effect of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) on retrofitted high strength reinforced concrete (HSRC) beams using acoustic emission (AE) technique. Two RC beam parameters were prepared. The first was the control beam which was undamaged HSRC beam. The second was the damaged HSRC beam retrofitted with CFRP on the soffit. The main objective of this study is to assess the crack modes of HSRC beams using AE signal strength. The relationship between signal strength, load and time were analysed and discussed. The crack pattern observed from the visual observation was also investigated. HSRC beam retrofitted with CFRP produced high signal strength compared to control beam. It demonstrates the effect of the AE signal strength for interpretation and prediction of failure modes that might occur in the beam specimens.

  17. Temperature dependence of giant dipole resonance width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    The quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model extended to finite temperature within the framework of the thermo field dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ d own of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 12S n and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that the width Γ d own increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones existing in the literature

  18. Relativistic beaming and orientation effects in core-dominated quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubachukwu, A.A.; Chukwude, A.E.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relativistic beaming effects in a well-defined sample of core- dominated quasars using the correlation between the relative prominence of the core with respect to the extended emission (defined as the ratio of the core- to the lobe- flux density measured in the rest frame of the source) and the projected linear size as an indicator of relativistic beaming and source orientation. Based on the orientation-dependent relativistic beaming and unification paradigm for high luminosity sources in which the Fanaroff-Riley class-ll radio galaxies form the unbeamed parent population of both the lobe- and core-dominated quasars which are expected to lie at successively smaller angles to the line of sight, we find that the flows in the cores of these core-dominated quasars are highly relativistic, with optimum bulk Lorentz factor, γ opt ∼6-16, and also highly anisotropic, with an average viewing angle, ∼ 9 deg. - 16 deg. Furthermore, the largest boosting occurs within a critical cone angle of ∼ 4 deg. - 10 deg. The results suggest that relativistic bulk flow appears to extend to kilo-parsec scales in these sources. (author)

  19. The effects of magnetic fringe fields on beam dynamics in a beam transport line of a terahertz FEL source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Han [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Xiong, Yongqian, E-mail: yqxiong@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Pei, Yuanji [National Synchrotron Radiation laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, Anhui (China)

    2014-11-11

    The transport line used in a terahertz FEL device has to transport electron beam through the entire system efficiently and meet the requirements of the beam parameters at the undulator entrance. Due to space limitations, the size of the magnets (five quadrupoles and two bending magnets) employed in the transport line was limited, and some devices were densely packed. In this paper, analyses of the effect of fringe fields and magnetic interference of magnets are presented. 3D models of these magnets are built and their linear optical properties are compared with those obtained by hard edge models. The results indicated that the effects of these factors are significant and they would cause a mismatch of the beam at the exit of the transport line under the preliminary lattice design. To solve this problem, the beam was re-matched using the particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  20. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  1. Lens effect of unipolar electrostatic steerers on low-energy ion beams and its effective reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asozu, Takuhiro; Matsuda, Makoto; Kutsukake, Kenichi

    2010-08-01

    The JAEA-Tokai tandem accelerator has two ion injectors, one is the negative ion injector placed on the ground and the other is the positive ion injector in the high voltage terminal. The electrostatic steerers in the high voltage terminal are used for ion beams from the both injectors. Because the beams from the negative ion injector gain high energy at the 20MV terminal, the electrodes of the electrostatic steerers are designed to be supplied several ten kV. The high voltages are supplied by two unipolar DC power supplies and they are controlled as the sum of the voltages keeps constant. The high electric potential between the electrodes affects the beam trajectory as an electrostatic lens. The potential must be too high for the low energy ion beams from the positive ion injector on the 100kV deck. We simulated the beam trajectory by calculation and evaluated the strength of the lens effects. The results showed that the focal distances were too short to control the beam form positive ion injector using optical devices in the downstream. If we reduce the voltages to one tenth in simulation, then the focusing effects were much less significant. We installed a multiplying factor circuit to make the voltages variable and much lower. The results of beam-handling tests using the circuit actually showed significant increase of the ion beam current. (author)

  2. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins: effect of alcohols on cationic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable ... generate ionic species, free radicals, and/or molecules in .... bisphenol A) and the effect of presence of different OH.

  3. Theoretical insights into the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation over stepped Ni surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuiwei; Zhang, Minhua; Yu, Yingzhe

    2017-07-21

    Vicinal surfaces of Ni are model catalysts of general interest and great importance in computational catalysis. Here we report a comprehensive study conducted with density functional theory on Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n = 2, 3 and 4) surfaces to explore the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation, a probe reaction relevant to many industrial processes. The coordination numbers (CN), the generalized coordination numbers and the d band partial density of states (d-PDOS) of Ni are identified as descriptors to faithfully reflect the difference of the step edge region for Ni[n(111) × (100)]. Based on analysis of the energy diagrams for CO activation and dissociation as well as the structural features of the Ni(311), Ni(211) and Ni(533) surfaces, Ni(211) (n = 3) is proposed as a model of adequate representativeness for Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n≥ 3) surface groups in investigating small molecule activation over such stepped structures. Further, a series of Ni(211) surfaces with the step edge coverage ranging from 1/4 to 1 monolayer (ML) were utilized to assess their effect on CO activation. The results show that CO adsorption is not sensitive to the step edge coverage, which could readily approach 1 ML under a CO-rich atmosphere. In contrast, CO dissociation manifests strong coverage dependence when the coverage exceeds 1/2 ML, indicating that significant adsorbate-adsorbate interactions emerge. These results are conducive to theoretical studies of metal-catalyzed surface processes where the defects play a vital role.

  4. SU-F-J-205: Effect of Cone Beam Factor On Cone Beam CT Number Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, W; Hua, C; Farr, J; Brady, S; Merchant, T [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the suitability of a Catphan™ 700 phantom for image quality QA of a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system deployed for proton therapy. Methods: Catphan phantoms, particularly Catphan™ 504, are commonly used in image quality QA for CBCT. As a newer product, Catphan™ 700 offers more tissue equivalent inserts which may be useful for generating the electron density – CT number curve for CBCT based treatment planning. The sensitometry-and-geometry module used in Catphan™ 700 is located at the end of the phantom and after the resolution line pair module. In Catphan™ 504 the line pair module is located at the end of the phantom and after the sensitometry-and-geometry module. To investigate the effect of difference in location on CT number accuracy due to the cone beam factor, we scanned the Catphan™ 700 with the central plane of CBCT at the center of the phantom, line pair and sensitometry-andgeometry modules of the phantom, respectively. The protocol head and thorax scan modes were used. For each position, scans were repeated 4 times. Results: For the head scan mode, the standard deviation (SD) of the CT numbers of each insert under 4 repeated scans was up to 20 HU, 11 HU, and 11 HU, respectively, for the central plane of CBCT located at the center of the phantom, line pair, and sensitometry-and-geometry modules of the phantom. The mean of the SD was 9.9 HU, 5.7 HU, and 5.9 HU, respectively. For the thorax mode, the mean of the SD was 4.5 HU, 4.4 HU, and 4.4 HU, respectively. The assessment of image quality based on resolution and spatial linearity was not affected by imaging location changes. Conclusion: When the Catphan™ 700 was aligned to the center of imaging region, the CT number accuracy test may not meet expectations. We recommend reconfiguration of the modules.

  5. Effect of tension and compression reinforcements on the serviceability of HSC beams with relatively small shear span to depth ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghsoudi, A.A.; Akbarzadeh, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the serviceability performance of High-Strength Concrete (HSC) beams, 12 beams (L=2m, b=0.2m, h=0.3m and shear span to depth ratio of 1.8) with different ratios of p and p' (percentage of tensile and compressive steel) were cast and tested under bending. During the test, concrete and steel strains, deflections and crack widths were measured at different locations along each beam. Based on experimental readings and observations, the cracked moment of inertia (Icr) of HSC beams was determined and the results were compared with some selective theoretical methods. Also, the flexural crack widths of the beams were measured and the applicability of ACI, BS and CSA code for normal strength concrete (NSC) was verified for HSC beams tested. The experimental (Icr) exp values of HSC beams were lower than the theoretical (Icr) th values from different codes. It was concluded that the serviceability and post serviceability performance of reinforced concrete structures can be improved using high strength concrete. In general, for almost all HSC tested beams at three crack width (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 mm); the use of ACI equation led to predict 50% of the crack width conservatively (the ratio of ((wcr) th / (wcr) exp) is greater than unity) but the results of the BS equation are conservative while compare to the ACI equation. The use of the CSA equation for the beams of higher and lower reinforcement ratio caused a more conservative and a closer value respectively, to limiting values of CSA. The deflection at initial steel horizontal yield plateau is less than 9 mm which is a sign of excellent deflection performance of HSC beams. (author)

  6. Evaluation of fiber’s misorientation effect on compliance and load carry capacity of shaped composite beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polilov, A. N.; Tatus’, N. A.

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this paper is analysis of design methods for composite beams and plates with curvilinear fiber trajectories. The novelty of this approach is determined by the fact that traditional composite materials are typically formed using prepregs with rectilinear fibers only. The results application area is associated with design process for shaped composite structure element by using of biomechanical principles. One of the related problems is the evaluation of fiber’s misorientation effect on stiffness and load carry capacity of shaped composite element with curvilinear fiber trajectories. Equistrong beam with constant cross-section area is considered as example, and it can be produced by unidirectional fiber bunch forming, impregnated with polymer matrix. Effective elastic modulus evaluation methods for structures with curvilinear fiber trajectories are validated. Misorientation angle range (up to 5o) when material with required accuracy can be considered as homogeneous, neglecting fiber misorientation, is determined. It is shown that for the beams with height-to-width ratio small enough it is possible to consider 2D misorientation only.

  7. Effect of a spectrometer magnet on the beam-beam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornacchia, M; Parzen, G

    1981-01-01

    The presence of experimental apparatus in the interaction regions of an intersecting beam accelerator changes the configuration of the crossing beams. This changes the space-charge forces with respect to the standard, magnet-free crossing. The question is: what is the maximum allowable perturbation caused by the spectrometer magnet that can be tolerated from the point of view of the beam dynamics. This paper is limited to the perturbations that the curved trajectories cause the beam-beam space charge nonlinearities. The question has arisen of how one defines the strength of the perturbation. The only solution is to compute the strength of the most important nonlinear resources. In what follows, the computational method used in calculating these resonances is described, and compared with those induced by random orbit errors.

  8. Effect of a spectrometer magnet on the beam-beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.; Parzen, G.

    1981-01-01

    The presence of experimental apparatus in the interaction regions of an intersecting beam accelerator changes the configuration of the crossing beams. This changes the space-charge forces with respect to the standard, magnet-free crossing. The question is: what is the maximum allowable perturbation caused by the spectrometer magnet that can be tolerated from the point of view of the beam dynamics. This paper is limited to the perturbations that the curved trajectories cause the beam-beam space charge nonlinearities. The question has arisen of how one defines the strength of the perturbation. The only solution is to compute the strength of the most important nonlinear resources. In what follows, the computational method used in calculating these resonances is described, and compared with those induced by random orbit errors

  9. The effect of errors in charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Residual errors in a charged particle optical system determine how well the performance of the system conforms to the theory on which it is based. Mathematically possible optical modes can sometimes be eliminated as requiring precisions not attainable. Other plans may require introduction of means of correction for the occurrence of various errors. Error types include misalignments, magnet fabrication precision limitations, and magnet current regulation errors. A thorough analysis of a beam optical system requires computer simulation of all these effects. A unified scheme for the simulation of errors and their correction is discussed

  10. Explicit expression for effective moment of inertia of RC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Patel

    Full Text Available AbstractDeflection is an important design parameter for structures subjected to service load. This paper provides an explicit expression for effective moment of inertia considering cracking, for uniformly distributed loaded reinforced concrete (RC beams. The proposed explicit expression can be used for rapid prediction of short-term deflection at service load. The explicit expression has been obtained from the trained neural network considering concrete cracking, tension stiffening and entire practical range of reinforcement. Three significant structural parameters have been identified that govern the change in effective moment of inertia and therefore deflection. These three parameters are chosen as inputs to train neural network. The training data sets for neural network are generated using finite element software ABAQUS. The explicit expression has been validated for a number of simply supported and continuous beams and it is shown that the predicted deflections have reasonable accuracy for practical purpose. A sensitivity analysis has been performed, which indicates substantial dependence of effective moment of inertia on the selected input parameters.

  11. Study of periodic tune modulation with the beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.; Riddiford, A.; Ruggerio, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    Simulations of weak-strong pp - collisions with a periodic tune modulation show the possiblity of beam blowup at sufficiently strong modulation amplitudes. This beam blowup is associated with the appearance of nonrepeatable ''chaotic'' trajectories and occurs when low order resonances are crossed by the modulation. In this paper the authors report results of an investigation of the dependence of this blowup upon the modulation frequency, with the modulation amplitude fixed. It is determined that if a threshold frequency exists, modulations at frequencies greater than the threshold do not lead to beam blowup

  12. Effect of flexure beam geometry and material on the displacement of piezo actuated diaphragm for micropump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopa, R.; Navin Karanth, P.; Kulkarni, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present a COMSOL analysis of flexure diaphragm for piezo actuated valveless micropump. Diaphragms play an important role in micropumps, till now plane diaphragms are commonly used in micropumps. Use of compliant flexure hinges in diaphragm and other MEMS application is one of the new approach to achieving high deflection in diaphragm at low operating voltage. Flexures hinges in diaphragm acts as simply supported beam. Out-off plane compliance value and stiffness is considered for the selection of proper flexure for diaphragm. Diaphragm material also plays an important role in the diaphragm central deflection. Factor considered for diaphragm material selection is resilience; it is the ratio of yield stress to static modulus. Higher is the resilience will leads to higher deflection generated, it also imparts good compliance. Based on the resilience beryllium copper, stainless steel and brass materials are selected for diaphragm analysis. Simulations have been performed using COMSOL multiphysics. This study reports the effect of flexure hinge geometry and diaphragm material on the central deflection of diaphragms and compared with existing plane diaphragm. Simulation results illustrates that the deflection of three flexure diaphragm with 2mm width and 2mm length flexure is 6.75µm for stainless steel, 10.89 for beryllium copper and 12.10µm for brass, at 140V which is approximately twice that of plane diaphragm deflection. The maximum in both plane and three flexure diaphragm deflection is obtained for brass diaphragm compared to stainless steel and beryllium copper.

  13. Effects of film polarities on InN growth by molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2003-01-01

    Effects of the film polarity on InN growth were investigated in molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). It was found that N-polarity InN could be grown at higher temperatures than In-polarity one. For the In-polarity films, which were grown on Ga-polar GaN template, the highest growth temperature was limited below 500 deg. C, and the surface morphology and crystal quality tended to be poor mainly because of the tolerated low growth temperature. While for the N-polarity InN films, which were grown on MBE-grown N-polar GaN, the growth temperature could be as high as 600 deg. C. The step-flow-like growth morphology was achieved for the InN films grown with N polarity at 580 deg. C. The resulting full widths of half maximum of x-ray rocking curve around InN (002) and (102) reflections were about 200-250 and 950-1100 arc sec, respectively. The photoluminescence of the InN films peaked at 0.697 eV. The recording Hall mobility of InN film grown in N polarity is 1400 cm 2 /V s with a background carrier concentration of 1.56x10 18 cm -3 at room temperature. For both-polarity films, we found N-rich condition was necessary for the stable InN growth

  14. Self magnetic field effects on energy deposition by intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, E.; Peleg, E.; Zinamon, Z.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the penetration of the self magnetic field of an intense relativsistic electron beam on the process of beam-target interaction is calculated. The diffusion of the magnetic field and the hydrodynamic expansion of the target are dynamically taken into account. It is found that at beam intensities of interest for pellet fusion considerable range shortening occurs by magnetic stopping. (author)

  15. Finite geometry effect on the interaction of a hot beam with a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucri, M.M.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of finite geometry on the interaction of a hot low-density beam with a uniform plasma filling a circular waveguide is studied. An expression is derived for the growth rate of the instabilities developing at the harmonic of the beam gyrofrequency, taking the finite beam gyroradius into account. The calculations are done in the quasistatic approximation. (author)

  16. Spherical bodies of constant width

    OpenAIRE

    Lassak, Marek; Musielak, Michał

    2018-01-01

    The intersection $L$ of two different non-opposite hemispheres $G$ and $H$ of a $d$-dimensional sphere $S^d$ is called a lune. By the thickness of $L$ we mean the distance of the centers of the $(d-1)$-dimensional hemispheres bounding $L$. For a hemisphere $G$ supporting a %spherical convex body $C \\subset S^d$ we define ${\\rm width}_G(C)$ as the thickness of the narrowest lune or lunes of the form $G \\cap H$ containing $C$. If ${\\rm width}_G(C) =w$ for every hemisphere $G$ supporting $C$, we...

  17. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  18. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  19. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  20. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RajaKumar, Guttikonda [Tagore Engineering College, Chennai (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ram, G.D. Janaki [Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Chennai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Rao, S.R. Koteswara [SSN College of Engineering, Chennai (India). Mechanical Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  1. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RajaKumar, Guttikonda; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Rao, S.R. Koteswara

    2015-01-01

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  2. Bandwidth broadening effect in a traveling-wave-tube amplifier by using impulse electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sang Wook; Choi, Jin Joo; Kim, Seon Joo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a wideband amplification mechanism involving an impulse electron beam. To prove broadband amplification with the impulse beam, we perform 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (3D PIC) code simulation. An impulse electron beam with a pulse width of 1 ns with electric potential 17.2 kV is injected into an interaction circuit of a coupled-cavity traveling-wave-tube (CCTWT) driven by a continuous-wave (CW) signal of 29.1 GHz. The resulting output bandwidth was 2.96%, and the peak output power of 713 W was the same as that obtained with CW operation at a single frequency. The simulation yielded very similar results with ultra short impulse signal from the simulation.

  3. A study of molecular effects in beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, B.; Veje, E.

    1979-01-01

    Relative populations of ns + nd levels in hydrogen as functions of the principal quantum number n have been measured with beams of H + , H 2 + , and H 3 + impinging on thin carbon foils at 25 keV/amu and 100 keV/amu. Enhancements of 20% and 45% for dimer and trimer clusters are observed uniformly for all levels. A possible explanation in terms of screening of the Coulomb repulsion between the protons inside the foil, thus reducing the effective thickness of the foil, is given. All relative populations closely follow an nsup(P) power law with p = -4.0 and -3.7 at 25 keV/amu and 100 keV/amu, respectively, in perfect analogy with atomic collision experiments. O + /O 2 + -foil excitations at 100 keV and 155 keV show a simular molecular effect, but in reverse with a larger mean charge produced by the dimer. (Auth.)

  4. Effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis by heavy ion beam-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.Y.; Saito, H.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Yoshida, S.; Abe, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Arabidopsis researches frequently include the genetic approach, so efficient, convenient, and safe methods for mutagenesis are required. Currently, the most popular method for in house mutagenesis is application of EMS. Although this method is very effective, its base substitution-type mutations often gives leaky mutants with residual gene functions, leading some difficulty in understanding the corresponding gene functions. Heavy ion beam generated by accelerators gives highest energy transfer rates among known radiation-based mutagenesis methods including X ray, gamma ray, fast neutron, electron and proton irradiation. This feature is thought to give high frequency of the double strand break of genomic DNA and resultant short deletions, resulting frame shift-type mutations. At RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF, http://www.rarf.riken.go.jp/index-e.html), we have optimized conditions for effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis regarding to ion species and irradiation dose, and achieved comparable mutation rates to the method with EMS. (author)

  5. Irradiation effects of Ar cluster ion beams on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Masahiro; Sugahara, Gaku; Takaoka, G.H.; Yamada, Isao

    1993-01-01

    Gas-cluster ion beams can be applied to new surface modification techniques such as surface cleaning, low damage sputtering and shallow junction formation. The effects of energetic Ar cluster impacts on solid surface were studied for cluster energies of 10-30keV. Irradiation effects were studied by RBS. For Si(111) substrates, irradiated with Ar ≥500 clusters to a dose of 1x10 15 ion/cm 2 at acceleration voltage 15kV, 2x10 14 atoms/cm 2 implanted Ar atoms were detected. In this case, the energy per cluster atom was smaller than 30eV; at this energy, no significant implantation occurs in the case of monomer ions. Ar cluster implantation into Si substrates occurred due to the high energy density irradiation. (author)

  6. Neutron beam effects on spin-exchange-polarized 3He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M; Babcock, E; Andersen, K H; Barrón-Palos, L; Becker, M; Boag, S; Chen, W C; Chupp, T E; Danagoulian, A; Gentile, T R; Klein, A; Penttila, S; Petoukhov, A; Soldner, T; Tardiff, E R; Walker, T G; Wilburn, W S

    2008-08-22

    We have observed depolarization effects when high intensity cold neutron beams are incident on alkali-metal spin-exchange-polarized 3He cells used as neutron spin filters. This was first observed as a reduction of the maximum attainable 3He polarization and was attributed to a decrease of alkali-metal polarization, which led us to directly measure alkali-metal polarization and spin relaxation over a range of neutron fluxes at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Institute Laue-Langevin. The data reveal a new alkali-metal spin-relaxation mechanism that approximately scales as sqrt[phi_{n}], where phi_{n} is the neutron capture-flux density incident on the cell. This is consistent with an effect proportional to the concentration of electron-ion pairs but is much larger than expected from earlier work.

  7. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Paul M.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Yoon, Heayoung P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Gaury, Benoit [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However, we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces, we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find that the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells are most consistent with a charged surface and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials.

  8. A new formula for the lifetime of a round beam caused by the Touschek effect in an electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Yoshikazu

    1985-01-01

    The beam lifetime caused by the Touschek effect in an electron storage ring is calculated for a round beam, extending the existing theory for a ribbon beam. The result agrees with the observed lifetime in the SOR-RING. (author)

  9. The effect of lithology on valley width, terrace distribution, and coarse sediment provenance in a tectonically stable catchment with flat-lying stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda Keen-Zebert,; Hudson, Mark R.; Stephanie L. Shepherd,; Evan A. Thaler,

    2017-01-01

    How rock resistance or erodibility affects fluvial landforms and processes is an outstanding question in geomorphology that has recently garnered attention owing to the recognition that the erosion rates of bedrock channels largely set the pace of landscape evolution. In this work, we evaluate valley width, terrace distribution, and sediment provenance in terms of reach scale variation in lithology in the study reach and discuss the implications for landscape evolution in a catchment with relatively flat2

  10. Most Probable Failures in LHC Magnets and Time Constants of their Effects on the Beam.

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez Alonso, Andres

    2006-01-01

    During the LHC operation, energies up to 360 MJ will be stored in each proton beam and over 10 GJ in the main electrical circuits. With such high energies, beam losses can quickly lead to important equipment damage. The Machine Protection Systems have been designed to provide reliable protection of the LHC through detection of the failures leading to beam losses and fast dumping of the beams. In order to determine the protection strategies, it is important to know the time constants of the failure effects on the beam. In this report, we give an estimation of the time constants of quenches and powering failures in LHC magnets. The most critical failures are powering failures in certain normal conducting circuits, leading to relevant effects on the beam in ~1 ms. The failures on super conducting magnets leading to fastest losses are quenches. In this case, the effects on the beam can be signficant ~10 ms after the quench occurs.

  11. Semi-empirical procedures for correcting detector size effect on clinical MV x-ray beam profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Narayan; Kazi, Abdul M.; Hoffman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The measured radiation beam profiles need to be corrected for the detector size effect to derive the real profiles. This paper describes two new semi-empirical procedures to determine the real profiles of high-energy x-ray beams by removing the detector size effect from the measured profiles. Measured profiles are corrected by shifting the position of each measurement point by a specific amount determined from available theoretical and experimental knowledge in the literature. The authors developed two procedures to determine the amount of shift. In the first procedure, which employs the published analytical deconvolution procedure of other investigators, the shift is determined from the comparison of the analytical fit of the measured profile and the corresponding analytical real profile derived from the deconvolution of the fitted measured profile and the Gaussian detector response function. In the second procedure, the amount of shift at any measurement point is considered to be proportional to the value of an analytical function related to the second derivative of the real profile at that point. The constant of proportionality and a parameter in the function are obtained from the values of the shifts at the 90%, 80%, 20%, and 10% dose levels, which are experimentally known from the published results of other investigators to be approximately equal to half of the radius of the detector. These procedures were tested by correcting the profiles of 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams measured by three different ionization chambers and a stereotactic field diode detector with 2.75, 2, 1, and 0.3 mm radii of their respective active cylindrical volumes. The corrected profiles measured by different detectors are found to be in close agreement. The detector size corrected penumbra widths also agree with the expected values based on the results of an earlier investigation. Thus, the authors concluded that the proposed procedures are accurate and can be used to derive the real

  12. Gyrator transform of Gaussian beams with phase difference and generation of hollow beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyu; Xia, Hui; Yu, Tao; Xie, Ding; Xie, Wenke

    2018-03-01

    The optical expression of Gaussian beams with phase difference, which is caused by gyrator transform (GT), has been obtained. The intensity and phase distribution of transform Gaussian beams are analyzed. It is found that the circular hollow vortex beam can be obtained by overlapping two GT Gaussian beams with π phase difference. The effect of parameters on the intensity and phase distributions of the hollow vortex beam are discussed. The results show that the shape of intensity distribution is significantly influenced by GT angle α and propagation distance z. The size of the hollow vortex beam can be adjusted by waist width ω 0. Compared with previously reported results, the work shows that the hollow vortex beam can be obtained without any model conversion of the light source.

  13. Step width alters iliotibial band strain during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Campbell, Samuel; Derrick, Timothy R

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the effect of step width during running on factors related to iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 15 healthy recreational runners during overground running under various step width conditions (preferred and at least +/- 5% of their leg length). Strain and strain rate were estimated from a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. Greater ITB strain and strain rate were found in the narrower step width condition (p running, especially in persons whose running style is characterized by a narrow step width, may be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of running-related ITB syndrome.

  14. Electron beam injection during active experiments. 2. Collisional effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winglee, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-ineuced ionization for the neutral densities considered. This ionization enhances the return current into the spacecraft with the spacecraft potential being reduced well below the beam energy whent he collison period is shorter than the spacecraft charging time. Neutral densities of about 10 11 -10 12 cm -3 are required to produce this reduction in the spacecraft potential for typical ionospheric and beam parameters. At these densities, the beam is able to propagate away from the spacecraft with little distortion except in the case of thruster firings where the beam can be subject to large space-charge oscillations near the boundaries of the neutral cloud. The ionization of neutrals in the beam region also modifies the wave emissions and spatial profile of return currents into the spacecraft, both of which tend to become localized to the beam region in high neutral densities

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of Varian Linac for 6 MV photon beam with BEAMnrc code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Maged; El Bardouni, T.; Chakir, E.; Boukhal, H.; Saeed, M.; Ahmed, Abdul-Aziz

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the initial electron beam parameters on the absorbed dose distribution calculated with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, for 6 MV photon beam. A proposed methodology for benchmarking the BEAMnrc model of Varian Linac has been used. Also, a new photon cross section data based on ENDF/B-VII release 8 evaluation has been employed. The parameters tested include mean energy, radial intensity distribution and angular spread of the initial electron beam. Mean energy and angular spread were tested for a square irradiation field 10 × 10 cm2, whereas beam width of the electron beam was studied for 10 × 10 cm2 at different depths and 30 × 30 cm2 at depth of 10 cm. The results obtained are compared with measurement data to select the optimal electron beam parameters. The differences between MC calculation and measurements data are analyzed using gamma index criteria which fixed within 1% -1 mm accuracy. The obtained results indicated that the depth-dose and dose-profile curves were considerably influenced by the mean energy of the electron beam. The depth-dose curves were unaffected by the beam width of the electron beam, for both irradiation fields. On the contrary, lateral dose-profile curves were affected by the beam width of initial electron beam. Both dose-profile and depth-dose curves were unaffected to the angular spread of the electron beam. A deep depth of 10 × 10 cm2 is very accurate to tune the beam width. Mean energy and beam width must be tuned precisely, to get the MC does distribution with acceptable accuracy.

  16. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelmann, A

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density ({approx} 10{sup 9} protons/cm{sup 3}) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  17. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelmann, A.

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density (∼ 10 9 protons/cm 3 ) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  18. Electron beam irradiation effect on GaN HEMT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Yinhong; Guo Hongxia; Zhang Keying; Wang Yuanming; Zhang Fengqi

    2011-01-01

    In this work, GaN HEMTs (High Electron Mobility Transistor) were irradiated by 0.8 and 1.2 MeV electron beams, and the irradiation effects were investigated. The results show that the device damage caused by 0.8 MeV electrons is more serious than that by 1.2 MeV electrons. Saturation drain current increase and threshold voltage negative shift are due to trapped positive charge from ionization in the AlGaN layer and N, Ga vacancy from non-ionizing energy loss in the GaN layer. Electron traps and trapped positive charges from non-ionizing in the AlGaN layer act as trap-assisted-tunneling centers that increase the gate leakage current.(authors)

  19. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  20. Bench-marking beam-beam simulations using coherent quadrupole effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnagopal, S.; Chin, Y.H.

    1992-06-01

    Computer simulations are used extensively in the study of the beam-beam interaction. The proliferation of such codes raises the important question of their reliability, and motivates the development of a dependable set of bench-marks. We argue that rather than detailed quantitative comparisons, the ability of different codes to predict the same qualitative physics should be used as a criterion for such bench-marks. We use the striking phenomenon of coherent quadrupole oscillations as one such bench-mark, and demonstrate that our codes do indeed observe this behaviour. We also suggest some other tests that could be used as bench-marks

  1. Bench-marking beam-beam simulations using coherent quadrupole effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnagopal, S.; Chin, Y.H.

    1992-01-01

    Computer simulations are used extensively in the study of the beam-beam interaction. The proliferation of such codes raises the important question of their reliability, and motivates the development of a dependable set of bench-marks. We argue that rather than detailed quantitative comparisons, the ability of different codes to predict the same qualitative physics should be used as a criterion for such bench-marks. We use the striking phenomenon of coherent quadrupole oscillations as one such bench-mark, and demonstrate that our codes do indeed observe this behavior. We also suggest some other tests that could be used as bench-marks

  2. Gas injection in EBT-S for assessment of particle loading effects of neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.H.; Glowienka, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have begun to examine the physics of neutral beam injection on EBT-S. Preliminary experiments have been limited to a calibrated gas puffing experiment which simulates the effects of a pulsed beam with zero energy. These experiments begin to address some of the compatibility problems that exist for future beam heating experiments on EBT devices. In particular, neutral beams are to be a significant part of the planned EBT-II experiment which is designed to demonstrate steady-state, reactor-like conditions with both electron cyclotron heating and neutral beam heating

  3. Domain wall width of lithium niobate poled during growth

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, R; Hole, D E; Callejo, D; Bermudez, V; Diéguez, E

    2003-01-01

    Good quality crystals of periodically poled lithium niobate can be generated directly during growth. However, the temperature gradients at the zone boundaries define the width of the regions where the polarity is reversed. Hence, the region influenced the domain transition may be a significant fraction of the overall poling period for material poled during growth. Evidence for the scale of this feature is reported both by chemical etching and by the less common method of ion beam luminescence and the 'domain wall' width approximately 1 mu m for these analyses. The influence of the reversal region may differ for alternative techniques but the relevance to device design for second harmonic generation is noted.

  4. Beam Divergence from an SMF-28 Optical Fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kowalevicz, Jr., Andrew M; Bucholtz, Frank

    2006-01-01

    ...) operating near 1550 nm wavelength. The analysis shows some pitfalls for a common imaging technique for determining beam width and shows good agreement with theory when the beam width measurement is performed using either a knife-edge...

  5. Interaction of the Modulated Electron Beam with Plasma: Kinetic Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, I.O.; Kiyanchuk, M.J.; Soroka, S.V.; Velikanets', D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Evolution of the velocity distribution functions of plasma and beam electrons during modulated electron beam propagation in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas was studied numerically. Velocity distribution function of plasma electrons at the late time moments strongly differs from the initially Maxwellian one. In the regions of strong electric field plasma electrons' bunches are formed. Comparison of distribution functions of beam electrons for modulated and non-modulated beams shows that deep initial modulation suppresses resonant instability development. In the inhomogeneous plasma acceleration of electrons in the plasma resonance point can be observed

  6. On the maximal diphoton width

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into $\\gamma\\gamma$ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  7. Resonant Effects in Neutral beam Moderation at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.; Fuentes, C.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fast ion losses in neutral beam moderation at TJ-II is analysed theoretically, in particular the influence of resonant effects and the radial electric field dependence. The direct losses show strong resonant effects when the ratio of the poloidal and toroidal rotation velocities pass near the values -4/3, -2 or 0. These effects are visible as strong maxima on the loss fractions and also as characteristic trajectory behaviours. The delayed losses present resonant effects also, generally at intermediate energies (5 to 20 KeV for 40 keV injection). Near the resonances the population of passing particles in these losses is very high and the loss fraction can equal or even surpass the direct losses. In these delayed losses the particles concentrate along vertical strips on the loss cone diagrams of roughly constant parallel velocity. This parallel velocity increases with the electric field, the loss maxima are reached usually when the pitch and energy of these strips are near the initial injection values. The trapped particle population in these delayed losses is maximal at null electric and decreases with the field intensity for both potential signs. The corresponding final energies are usually low (1 to 5 keV). Except at extreme potentials, where the -4 resonance can appear, no resonant effects are observed for this population. The resonance ordering is similar for all configurations and follows reasonably the predictions of a simple model. The extreme configurations are dominated by the effects of the 0 and -2 resonances, giving very high loss fractions even for null electric field. In contrast the intermediate configurations, near the Reference one, do not present resonant effects and the losses are moderate at low potentials. Only above 2000 v the resonant effects start to appear. (Author) 11 refs

  8. Narrow widths of old and new resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathy, J.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative measure of the suppression factors involved in the pionic decays of mesons phi(1019) and f'(1514) as compared to their kaonic psi(3100) and psi(3700) decays are explained using the two different approaches, viz., the phenomenological S matrix approach and the field theoretical approach. The importance of the O-Z-I rule is brought out. The partial width GAMMA(phi → 3π) has been calculated using the dual model for the scattering kappa kappa(bar) → rhoπ. The effective coupling psi rho π is evaluated. The partial widths for psi → e + e - and psi → hadrons is calculated on a field theoretical approach. In conclusion, it appears that there are no serious objections to interpreting psi and psi' as cc - states. Most of their properties can be understood in a qualitative and in semi-quantitative way. (A.K.)

  9. Irradiation Effects of Electron Beam on Optical Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hong Gu; Oh, Kyung Hwan [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Ho Jin [Nucron Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The surveillance or monitoring systems used in space station, nuclear power plant and nuclear waste repository, are often equipped with optical fibers to remotely locating expensive camera systems so as to protect them from direct irradiation. Especially in nuclear power plant and nuclear waste repository, irradiation by gamma-ray and beta-ray are most concerned. The effective life-time of such surveillance system may depend on the soundness of the optical fiber because it is the component to be exposed the high intensity of radiation field by purpose. Though the degradation of mechanical properties such as hardness and elasticity may occur but the degradation of the optical property such as spectral transmittance is the most possible cause of the effective life-time limitation. Generally 30 % reduction of light signal transmittance is considered as the life-time threshold point of such optical systems. In this paper, we studied irradiation effects on spectral transparency of various commonly-used optical fibers with high energy electron beam to conveniently simulate the both gamma-ray and beta-ray irradiation situation.

  10. Preservation effect of high energy electron beam on kyoho grape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiufeng; Chen Zhaoliang; Qiao Yongjin; Wang Haihong; Qiao Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    The Kyoho grapes were kept in cold storage of-0.5 degree C ∼ 0.5 degree C, RH 85% ∼ 95% after irradiation of 400, 700, 1000, 1500, 2500 Gy and SO 2 treatment, and the antiseptic effect and storage quality were studied. The result showed that high energy electron beam could control the growth of bacteria, mould, yeast, coliform, alleviate the deterioration of grapes during storage. Irradiation below the dose 1000 Gy can decrease the respiration intensity, prevent the decreasing of titratable acid, ascorbic acid content, and keep higher activity of SOD enzyme. The Vc content was 3.79 mg /100 g after 700 Gy irradiation 90 days, the titratable acid and total soluble sugar content were 0.348%, 11.44%, and the activity of SOD was 14.89 U /g, which was higher than the control significantly (P 2 bleaching spot. Integrate the effects on microorganism control and grape quality, treatment of 700 Gy had the best preservation effect in this study. After preserved for 98 d, the good fruit rate of 700 Gy treatment was 93.33% , significantly higher than other treatments (P < 0.05). (authors)

  11. Duration of Load Effects on Different Sized Timber Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lotte; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report submitted to EC in connection with a project on duration of load. The report contains the results of the experimental work on duration of load for beams and notched beams of LVL and of glulam. The report also contains experimental results from duration of load experiments...

  12. Effective and efficient method of calculating Bessel beam fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bessel beams have gathered much interest of late due to their properties of near diffraction free propagation and self reconstruction after obstacles. Such laser beams have already found applications in fields such as optical tweezers and as pump...

  13. Spot size characterization of focused non-Gaussian X-ray laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalupsky, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Juha, L.; Hajkova, V.; Cihelka, J.; Burian, T.; Vysin, L.; Gaudin, J.; Gleeson, A.; Jurek, M.; Khorsand, A. R.; Klinger, D.; Wabnitz, H.; Sobierajski, R.; Stormer, M.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new technique for the characterization of non-Gaussian laser beams which cannot be described by an analytical formula. As a generalization of the beam spot area we apply and refine the definition of so called effective area (A(eff)) [1] in order to avoid using the full-width at half

  14. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    addition to the well-defined parameter full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The distribution of ... optical side-lobes in the diffraction pattern resulting in steep central maxima [6], reduc- tion of effects of ... and broad central peak. The idea of.

  15. Masses, widths, and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovelock, D.M.J.; Horstkotte, J.E.; Klopfenstein, C.

    1985-01-01

    The masses, total widths, and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb-bar states UPSILON(4S), UPSILON(5S), and UPSILON(6S) are determined from measurements of the e + e - annihilation cross section into hadrons for 10.55< W<11.25 GeV. The resonances are identified from potential model results and their properties are obtained with the help of a simplified coupled-channels calculation. We find M(4S) = 10.577 GeV, GAMMA(4S) = 25 MeV, GAMMA/sub e/e(4S) = 0.28 keV; M(5S) = 10.845 GeV, GAMMA(5S) = 110 MeV, GAMMA/sub e/e(5S) = 0.37 keV; M(6S) = 11.02 GeV, GAMMA(6S) = 90 MeV, GAMMA/sub e/e(6S) = 0.16 keV

  16. Masses, widths and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopfenstein, C.; Lovelock, D.M.J.; Horstkotte, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The masses, total widths and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb-bar states Υ(4S), Υ(5S) and Υ(6S) are determined by unfolding the cross section features observed in the hadronic cross section in the √s region betweeen 10.55 to 11.25 GeV. Both the identification of the resonances and the deduction of their properties rely on the validity of potential models' description of heavy quarkonium states which lie close (<0.6 GeV) to the open flavor threshold. The authors find M(4S) = 10.5774 +- 0.0008 GeV, Γ(4S) = 23 +- 2.3 MeV, Γ/sub ee/(4S) = 0.28 +- 0.04 keV; M(5S) = 10.845 +- 0.02 GeV, Γ(5S) = 110 +- 15 MeV, Γ/sub ee/(5S) = 0.37 +- 0.06 keV; M(6S) = 11.02 +- 0.03 GeV, Γ(6S) = 90 +- 20 MeV, Γ/sub ee/(6S) = 0.16 +- 0.04 keV. All errors are statistical only

  17. The effect of space charge force on beams extracted from ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.Q.

    1989-01-01

    A new 3 dimensional ray tracing code BEAM-3D, with a simple model to calculate the space charge force of multiple ion species, is under development and serves as a theoretical tool to study the ECRIS beam formation. Excellent agreement between the BEAM-3D calculations and beam profile and emittance measurements of the total extracted helium 1+ beam from the RTECR ion source was obtained when a low degree of beam neutralization was assumed in the calculations. The experimental evidence indicates that the positive space charge effects dominate the early RTECR ion source beam formation and beamline optics matching process. A review of important beam characteristics is made, including a conceptual model for the space charge beam blow up. Better beam transport through the RTECR beamline analysis magnet has resulted after an extraction geometry modification in which the space charge force was more correctly matched. This work involved the development of an online beam characteristic measuring apparatus which will also be described

  18. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  19. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  20. Assessment of protocols in cone beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beam using effective dose and Pka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, W. O.; Linhares de O, M. V.; Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2014-08-01

    The cone beam CT is an emerging technology in dental radiology with significant differences the point of view of design technology between the various manufacturers on the world market. This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using TLDs and air kerma - area product (P ka ) as kerma index. Measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain the image the maxilla-mandible in equipment Gendex GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14 cm x 8.5 cm - maxilla / mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5 cm x 8.5 cm - maxillary / mandible). Was used LiF dosimeters (TLD 100) inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom manufactured by Radiology Support Devices. For all protocols evaluated the value of P ka using a meter Diamentor E2 and PTW system Radcal Rapidose. The results obtained for Effective Dose / P ka these measurements were separated by protocol image. Protocol [GX1]: 44.5 μSv/478 mGy cm 2 ; protocol [GX2]: 54.8 μSv/507 mGy cm 2 . These values indicate that the relationship between the diameter of the image acquired in the protocol [GX1] and the diameter of the image in the protocol [GX2] is equal to 1.65, the Effective Dose for the first protocol has lower value at 18%. P ka values reveal very similar results between the two protocols, although, common sense leads to the interpretation that imaging protocols with field of view (Fov) of large diameters imply high values of effective dose when compared to small diameters. However, in this particular case, this is not true due to the asymmetrical beam technology. Conclude that for the cases where the scanner uses asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients with respect to the use of symmetrical beam and / or to Fov images with a smaller diameter. (Author)

  1. Assessment of protocols in cone beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beam using effective dose and P{sub ka}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, W. O.; Linhares de O, M. V. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho, Salvador, 40301015 Bahia (Brazil); Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Departamento de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria Prof. Jose Aloisio de Campos, Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, 49-100000 Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Caldas, L. V. E., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The cone beam CT is an emerging technology in dental radiology with significant differences the point of view of design technology between the various manufacturers on the world market. This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using TLDs and air kerma - area product (P{sub ka}) as kerma index. Measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain the image the maxilla-mandible in equipment Gendex GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14 cm x 8.5 cm - maxilla / mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5 cm x 8.5 cm - maxillary / mandible). Was used LiF dosimeters (TLD 100) inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom manufactured by Radiology Support Devices. For all protocols evaluated the value of P{sub ka} using a meter Diamentor E2 and PTW system Radcal Rapidose. The results obtained for Effective Dose / P{sub ka} these measurements were separated by protocol image. Protocol [GX1]: 44.5 μSv/478 mGy cm{sup 2}; protocol [GX2]: 54.8 μSv/507 mGy cm{sup 2}. These values indicate that the relationship between the diameter of the image acquired in the protocol [GX1] and the diameter of the image in the protocol [GX2] is equal to 1.65, the Effective Dose for the first protocol has lower value at 18%. P{sub ka} values reveal very similar results between the two protocols, although, common sense leads to the interpretation that imaging protocols with field of view (Fov) of large diameters imply high values of effective dose when compared to small diameters. However, in this particular case, this is not true due to the asymmetrical beam technology. Conclude that for the cases where the scanner uses asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients with respect to the use of symmetrical beam and / or to Fov images with a smaller diameter. (Author)

  2. Importance of beam-beam tune spread to collective beam-beam instability in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Lihui; Shi Jicong

    2004-01-01

    In hadron colliders, electron-beam compensation of beam-beam tune spread has been explored for a reduction of beam-beam effects. In this paper, effects of the tune-spread compensation on beam-beam instabilities were studied with a self-consistent beam-beam simulation in model lattices of Tevatron and Large Hodron Collider. It was found that the reduction of the tune spread with the electron-beam compensation could induce a coherent beam-beam instability. The merit of the compensation with different degrees of tune-spread reduction was evaluated based on beam-size growth. When two beams have a same betatron tune, the compensation could do more harm than good to the beams when only beam-beam effects are considered. If a tune split between two beams is large enough, the compensation with a small reduction of the tune spread could benefit beams as Landau damping suppresses the coherent beam-beam instability. The result indicates that nonlinear (nonintegrable) beam-beam effects could dominate beam dynamics and a reduction of beam-beam tune spread by introducing additional beam-beam interactions and reducing Landau damping may not improve the stability of beams

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  4. Meson widths from string worldsheet instantons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, Thomas; Liu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    We show that open strings living on a D-brane which lies outside an AdS black hole can tunnel into the black hole through worldsheet instantons. These instantons have a simple interpretation in terms of thermal quarks in the dual Yang-Mills (YM) theory. As an application we calculate the width of a meson in a strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma which is described holographically as a massless mode on a D7 brane in AdS 5 xS 5 . While the width of the meson is zero to all orders in the 1/√(λ) expansion with λ the 't Hooft coupling, it receives non-perturbative contributions in 1/√(λ) from worldsheet instantons. We find that the width increases quadratically with momentum at large momentum and comment on potential phenomenological implications of this enhancement for heavy ion collisions. We also comment on how this non-perturbative effect has important consequences for the phase structure of the YM theory obtained in the classical gravity limit

  5. Electron temperature effects for an ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uramoto, Joshin.

    1979-05-01

    A hydrogen high temperature plasma up to 200 eV is produced by acceleration of electrons in a hot hollow cathode discharge and is used as an ion beam source. Then, two characteristics are observed: A rate of the atomic ion (H + ) number increases above 70%. A perveance of the ion beam increases above 30 times compared with that of a cold plasma, while a floating potential of an ion acceleration electrode approaches an ion acceleration potential (- 500 V) according as an increment of the electron temperature. Moreover, a neutralized ion beam can be produced by only the negative floating electrode without an external power supply. (author)

  6. Influence of MLC leaf width on biologically adapted IMRT plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedal, Jan; Soevik, Aaste; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: jan.rodal@radiumhospitalet.no

    2010-10-15

    Introduction. High resolution beam delivery may be required for optimal biology-guided adaptive therapy. In this work, we have studied the influence of multi leaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths on the treatment outcome following adapted IMRT of a hypoxic tumour. Material and methods. Dynamic contrast enhanced MR images of a dog with a spontaneous tumour in the nasal region were used to create a tentative hypoxia map following a previously published procedure. The hypoxia map was used as a basis for generating compartmental gross tumour volumes, which were utilised as planning structures in biologically adapted IMRT. Three different MLCs were employed in inverse treatment planning, with leaf widths of 2.5 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm. The number of treatment beams and the degree of step-and-shoot beam modulation were varied. By optimising the tumour control probability (TCP) function, optimal compartmental doses were derived and used as target doses in the inverse planning. Resulting IMRT dose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were exported and analysed, giving estimates of TCP and compartmental equivalent uniform doses (EUDs). The impact of patient setup accuracy was simulated. Results. The MLC with the smallest leaf width (2.5 mm) consistently gave the highest TCPs and compartmental EUDs, assuming no setup error. The difference between this MLC and the 5 mm MLC was rather small, while the MLC with 10 mm leaf width gave considerably lower TCPs. When including random and systematic setup errors, errors larger than 5 mm gave only small differences between the MLC types. For setup errors larger than 7 mm no differences were found between non-uniform and uniform dose distributions. Conclusions. Biologically adapted radiotherapy may require MLCs with leaf widths smaller than 10 mm. However, for a high probability of cure it is crucial that accurate patient setup is ensured.

  7. Study on discrete space charge effects in electron beams and guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Tiantong

    1990-01-01

    The discrete space charge effects in electron beams are studied and a statistical dynamics equation of the ensemble of beam electrons is derived. An approximated analytical solution of this equation is given. This equation has been applied to beam crossover and field-emission and thermal-emission gun problems. The computer calculation results agree on the whole with those of Monte Carlo simulation and experimental data. (orig.)

  8. Stabilizing effect of gas conductivity evolution on the resistive sausage mode of a propagating beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.

    1983-01-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that a highly current-neutralized charged particle beam propagating in a preionized plasma channel of fixed conductivity is subject to a resistive sausage instability. It is shown that the instability is stabilized, for the case of beam propagation into an initially un-ionized gas, when the effect of beam-collisional ionization on the gas conductivity is modeled fully self-consistently

  9. Effect of ion beam irradiation on metal particle doped polymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and converts polymeric structure into hydrogen depleted carbon network. ... Composite materials; ion beam irradiation; dielectric properties; X-ray diffraction. ..... Coat. Technol. 201 8225. Raja V, Sharma A K and Narasimha V V R 2004 Mater.

  10. LET effects of high energy ion beam irradiation on polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Shu; Kanzaki, Kenichi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Yoshida, Yoichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Sugimoto, Masaki; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Shibata, Hiromi

    1997-03-01

    Thin films of poly(di-n-hexylsilane) were irradiated with 2-20 MeV H{sup +} and He{sup +} ion beams. The beams caused heterogeneous reactions of crosslinking and main chain scission in the films. The relative efficiency of the crosslinking was drastically changed in comparison with that of main chain scission. The anomalous change in the molecular weight distribution was analyzed with increasing irradiation fluence, and the ion beam induced reaction radius; track radius was determined for the radiation sources by the function of molecular weight dispersion. Obtained values were 59{+-}15 A and 14{+-}6 A for 2 MeV He{sup +} and 20 MeV H{sup +} ion beams respectively. (author)

  11. PSR experience with beam losses, instabilities and space charge effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Average current from the PSR has been limited to ∼70 μA at 20 Hz by beam losses of 0.4 to 0.5 μA which arise from two principal causes, production of H 0 excited states and stored-beam scattering in the stripper foil. To reduce beam losses, an upgrade from the two-step H 0 injection to direct H - injection is underway and will be completed in 1998. Peak intensity from the PSR is limited by a strong instability that available evidence indicates is the two-stream e-p instability. New evidence for the e-p hypothesis is presented. At operating intensities, the incoherent space charge tune shift depresses both horizontal and vertical tunes past the integer without additional beam loss although some intensity-dependent emittance growth is observed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  12. PSR experience with beam losses, instabilities and space charge effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Average current from the PSR has been limited to ∼70 μA at 20 Hz by beam losses of 0.4 to 0.5 μA which arise from two principal causes, production of H 0 excited states and stored-beam scattering in the stripper foil. To reduce beam losses, an upgrade from the two-step H 0 injection to direct H - injection is underway and will be completed in 1998. Peak intensity from the PSR is limited by a strong instability that available evidence indicates is the two-stream e-p instability. New evidence for the e-p hypothesis is presented. At operating intensities, the incoherent space charge tune shift depresses both horizontal and vertical tunes past the integer without additional beam loss although some intensity-dependent emittance growth is observed

  13. Beam steering effects in turbulent high pressure flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B; Kaeppeli, B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The propagation of a laser beam through a flame is influenced by variations of the optical density. Especially in turbulent high pressure flames this may seriously limit the use of laser diagnostic methods. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  14. ION-BEAM CHANNELING IN A QUASI-CRYSTAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANVOORTHUYSEN, EHD; SMULDERS, PJM; WERKMAN, RD; DEBOER, JL; VANSMAALEN, S

    1992-01-01

    We have observed ion-beam channeling in a quasicrystal. For 1-MeV He-4+ ions in icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe the maximum effect found is 36%. The full width at half maximum of the observed dips is 1.3-degrees. The effect persists up to great depths (> 200 nm), thus showing a high degree of ordering in this

  15. Effect of plasma rotation on sawtooth stabilization by beam ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Nave, M. F. F.; Budny, R.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fu, G. Y.; Hastie, J.; Manickam, J.; Park, W.

    2000-01-01

    The sawtooth period in JET ELM-free H-Mode plasmas is increasing with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) power. For injected power PNBI 12MW no large sawtooth crash is observed during the ELM-free period. However, as the edge stability is improved and external kink modes and ELMs are delayed, a possible sawtooth crash at a high plasma beta becomes a concern. In JET DT experiments, delaying sawteeth was found to be crucial in the quest for high fusion power. Fast particles are known to provide stabilizing effect on sawteeth, however, sawtooth stabilization by NBI ions is not clearly understood, since NBI ions are usually not ''fast'' enough to stabilize the m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode which is believed to cause the crash. In order to understand the observed sawteeth stabilization in tokamak experiments with NBI heating, the internal kink m/n = 1/1 mode stability of JET plasmas was modeled using the NOVA-K code, which is also benchmarked with the nonperturbative version of NOVA and the M3D code. Comparison of m/n = 1/1 mode stabilization by NBI ions in JET and TFTR and application of the nonlinear stabilization criteria is given

  16. Effect of electron beam irradiation on fisheries water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarala Selambakkannu; Khomsaton Abu Bakar; Jamaliah Shariff; Suhairi Alimon

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies about water obtained from fish pond of fisheries research centre. Usual water quality parameters such as pH, COD, Turbidity and Ammonia content were analyzed before and after irradiation. Electron beam irradiation was used to irradiate the water with the dose 100 kGy, 200 kGy and 300 kGy. Only high dose was applied on this water as only a limited amount of samples was supplied. All the parameters indicated a slight increase after irradiation except for the ammonia content, which showed a gradual decrease as irradiation dose increases. Sample condition was changed before irradiation in order to obtain more effective results in the following batch. The water sample from fisheries was diluted with distilled water to the ratio of 1:1.This was followed with irradiation at 100 kGy, 200 kGy and 300 kGy. The results still showed an increase in all parameters after irradiation except for ammonia content. For the following irradiation batch, the pH of the sample was adjusted to pH 4 and pH 8 before irradiation. For this sample the irradiation dose selected was only 100 kGy. A higher value of ammonia was observed for the sample with pH 4 after irradiation. Other parameters were almost the same as the first two batches. (author)

  17. Electron beam irradiation effects on xanthan gum. Rheological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, F.F.; Del Mastro, N.L.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the application of electron beam irradiation to xanthum gum as used as ingredient by the food or cosmetics industry in order to establish their radiosensitivity. The edible powder of xanthum gum samples were irradiated in 1mm thick layers of Petri dishes covered by a transparent PVC of films using an EB accelerator Dynamitron (Radiation Dynamics Inc.) model JOB 188, dose rate 11.17 kGy/s, 0.637 MeV, 1.78 mA, 5 kGy per passage, 3.36 m min -1 with doses of 5, 10, 20 and 50kGy. One % aqueous solutions from irradiated and non-irradiated xanthum gum were prepared and the radiation effects were measured following viscosity changes at 25 deg. C using a Brookfield viscometer; model DVIII, spindel L, with Rheocalc software. Viscosity measurements were performed according to our previous experience and the results are the mean of at least 3 experiments

  18. Estimation of effective dose from limited cone beam X-ray CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazuo; Arai, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2000-12-01

    The limited cone beam X-ray CT (Ortho-CT) was developed on the basis of multi-functional panoramic apparatus, SCANORA (Soredex Co. Helsinki Finland). The imaging intensifier (I.I.) was built in this apparatus as a X-ray detection device instead of X-ray film. The signal provided from I.I. was converted from analog into digital by an analog-digital converter and image reconstitution was done as a three-directional image of the dimensions 3.8 cm of width, 3.0 cm height and 3.8 cm depth with the personal computer. The 3DX Multi image micro CT'' (3DX) was developed along similar lines by MORITA Co., Ltd. (Kyoto, JAPAN). In this study, the stochastic effect on organ and tissue caused by examinations using Ortho-CT and 3DX was measured. The effective dose was estimated according to the recommendation of ICRP60 and was compared with those of panoramic radiography and computed tomography. The irradiation conditions were as follows: 85 kV, 10 mA with the filtration of 3 mmAl and added 1 mmCu for Ortho-CT, and 80 kV, 2 mA and the filtration of 3.1 mmAL for 3DX. The measurement of organ and tissue dose was performed using an anthropomorphic Rando woman phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Co., Stanfora, CN), as well as by using two different type of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD); Panasonic UD-170A (BeO) and UD-110S (CaSO{sub 4}: Tm). The UD-170A was for dose measurement of the inner useful X-ray beams, while the UD-110S was for outer beams. The measured organ and tissue were those recommended with ICRP60 (gonad, breast, bone marrow, lung, thyroid gland, esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, bladder, skin, brain, thymus, adrenal, kidney, spleen, pancrease, upper large intestine, uterus, eyes and major salivary gland). The imaging by Orhto-CT was made in the left maxillary 1st molar, left mandibular 1st molar and temporomandibular joint. 3DX measurement was made in the maxillary incisor region and middle ear regions other than the regions mentioned above. The skin

  19. Evaluation of thermal effects on the beam quality of disk laser with unstable resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Beirami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper thermal effects of the disk active medium and associated effects on the beam quality of laser are investigated. Using Collins integral and iterative method, transverse mode of an unstable resonator including a Yb:YAG active medium in disk geometry is calculated. After that the beam quality of the laser is calculated based on the generalized beam characterization method. Thermal lensing of the disk is calculated based on the OPD (Optical Path Difference) concept. Five factors influencing the OPD including temperature gradient, disk thermal expansion, photo-elastic effect, electronic lens and disk deformation are considered in our calculations. The calculations show that the effect of disk deformation factor on the quality of laser beam in the resonator is strong. However the total effect of all the thermal factors on the internal beam quality is fewer. Also it is shown that thermal effects degrade the output power, beam profile and beam quality of the output laser beam severely. As well the magnitude of each of affecting factors is evaluated distinctly.

  20. Beam-dynamic effects at the CMS BRIL van der Meer scans

    CERN Document Server

    Babaev, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is responsible for the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS experiment. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors (luminometers), adequate for the experimental conditions associated with high values of instantaneous luminosity delivered by the CERN LHC. BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. Precise and accurate measurements of the delivered luminosity is of paramount importance for the CMS physics program. The absolute calibration of luminosity is achieved by the van der Meer method, which is carried out under specially tailored conditions. This paper presents models used to simulate of beam-dynamic effects arising due to the electromagnetic interaction of colliding bunches. These effects include beam-beam deflection and dynamic-beta effect. Both effects are important to luminosity measurements and influence calibrat...

  1. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  2. Average intensity and spreading of partially coherent model beams propagating in a turbulent biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Qiu; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-01-01

    For Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell-model (LGSM) and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model (BGSM) beams propagating through a biological turbulent tissue, the expression of the spatial coherence radius of a spherical wave propagating in a turbulent biological tissue, and the average intensity and beam spreading for GSM, LGSM and BGSM beams are derived based on the fractal model of power spectrum of refractive-index variations in biological tissue. Effects of partially coherent model and parameters of biological turbulence on such beams are studied in numerical simulations. Our results reveal that the spreading of GSM beams is smaller than LGSM and BGSM beams on the same conditions, and the beam with larger source coherence width has smaller beam spreading than that with smaller coherence width. The results are useful for any applications involved light beam propagation through tissues, especially the cases where the average intensity and spreading properties of the light should be taken into account to evaluate the system performance and investigations in the structures of biological tissue. - Highlights: • Spatial coherence radius of a spherical wave propagating in a turbulent biological tissue is developed. • Expressions of average intensity and beam spreading for GSM, LGSM and BGSM beams in a turbulent biological tissue are derived. • The contrast for the three partially coherent model beams is shown in numerical simulations. • The results are useful for any applications involved light beam propagation through tissues.

  3. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Peng; Pei Shilun; Wang Jiuqing; Li Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper. (authors)

  4. Effect of nonuniform radial density distribution on the space charge dominated beam bunching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S.

    2011-01-01

    Beam dynamics of a space charge dominated beam during the bunch compression is studied self consistently for the case of fixed shape non-uniform bell shape and hollow shape density distributions in the transverse direction. We have used thick slices at different parts of the beam to account for variation in the beam radius in the study of the transverse dynamics. The longitudinal dynamics has been studied using the disc model. The axial variation of the radius of the slices and emittance growth arising from the phase dependence of the transverse rf forces are also included in the simulation. We have modified the beam envelope equation to take into account the longitudinal space charge effect on the transverse motion which arises due to the finite bunch size. To demonstrate the application of the theoretical formulations developed, we have studied a sinusoidal beam bunching system and presented detailed numerical results.

  5. The effect of nonlinear propagation on heating of tissue: A numerical model of diagnostic ultrasound beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Mark D.; Humphrey, Victor F.; Doody, Claire

    2000-07-01

    Thermal safety indices for diagnostic ultrasound beams are calculated under the assumption that the sound propagates under linear conditions. A non-axisymmetric finite difference model is used to solve the KZK equation, and so to model the beam of a diagnostic scanner in pulsed Doppler mode. Beams from both a uniform focused rectangular source and a linear array are considered. Calculations are performed in water, and in attenuating media with tissue-like characteristics. Attenuating media are found to exhibit significant nonlinear effects for finite-amplitude beams. The resulting loss of intensity by the beam is then used as the source term in a model of tissue heating to estimate the maximum temperature rises. These are compared with the thermal indices, derived from the properties of the water-propagated beams.

  6. Effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose patterns in cylinders irradiated by negative pion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.N.; Wright, H.A.; Turner, J.E.

    1975-10-01

    Effects of the presence of inhomogeneities in tissue irradiated by negative pion beams are investigated. Soft-tissue targets are considered with embedded regions of bone and cavities of air. The absorbed dose is calculated as a function of position in the targets for parallel and converging beams and for two parallel beams that enter the target from opposite sides. Isodose contours are calculated and displayed in each case. While these studies show expected trends, they indicate that specific calculations are needed for other beam parameters and target geometries. The contributions of neutrons to the dose contours can be seen from several calculations made both with and without neutrons

  7. Biological effects and application of proton beam (H+) implantation on melon seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xun; Ren Ruixing; Meng Hui; Shi Jinguo; Tang Zhangxiong; Tao Xianping

    2006-01-01

    Various doses and energy of the proton beam (H + ) were used to treat dry seeds of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Results show that, the proton beam irradiation can induced structural variations of chromosomes and abnormal behaviors during mitosis and meiosis. The percentage of cells with chromosomal aberration increased with the increment of energy and dose of the proton. The micronuclei, chromosomal bridge and chromosomal fragments were included in chromosomal aberration. The proton beam was effective in inducing mutants of early maturity. A early maturity line T 63-1-17-8-1-3 was selected from the progenies of the seeds treated with the proton beam. (authors)

  8. Accelerator system for producing two-component beams for studies of interactive surface effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.; Ekern, R.; Hess, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    For studies of interactive surface effects caused by the simultaneous bombardment of targets by both chemically active and inactive ion species (e.g., D + and He + , respectively) a two beam component accelerator facility was placed in operation. One component, consisting of light ions (e.g., H, D, He) is accelerated by a 2-MV Van de Graaff accelerator which provides a mass analyzed and focussed beam for the energy range from approximately 100-keV to 2-MeV (for singly charged ions). The other component is a beam of light ions in the energy range from approximately 10-keV to 100-keV. This is furnished by a 100-kV dc accelerator system which provides a mass analyzed focussed beam. This beam is guided into the beam line of the Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically, and with the aid of beam steerers it is made to be co-axial with the Van de Graaff generated beam. The angle of incidence becomes hereby a free parameter for the interaction of the mixed beams with a surface. For each beam component, current densities of 650 μA cm -2 on target can readily be obtained. In order to reduce carbon contamination of the irradiated targets significantly, stainless steel beam lines have been used together with a combination of turbomolecular pumps and ion-sublimation pumps.A total pressure of 2 to 3 x 10 -8 torr in the beam lines and of 2 x 10 -9 torr in the target chamber can be obtained readily. Experimental results on the surface damage of Ni bombarded simultaneously with He + and D + ions are presented. The importance of such studies of interactive surface effects for the controlled thermonuclear fusion program are discussed

  9. Comparison of Arch Width Changes Following Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-21

    Nov 21, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: The study was conducted with pre- and post-treatment digital models from ... or posterior arch width following orthodontic treatment ..... premolar extraction cases show significant arch width increases in ...

  10. Electron and ion beam degradation effects in AES analysis of silicon nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransen, F.; Vanden Berghe, R.; Vlaeminck, R.; Hinoul, M.; Remmerie, J.; Maes, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Silicon nitride films are currently investigated by AES combined with ion profiling techniques for their stoichiometry and oxygen content. During this analysis, ion beam and primary electron effects were observed. The effect of argon ion bombardment is the preferential sputtering of nitrogen, forming 'covalent' silicon at the surface layer (AES peak at 91 eV). The electron beam irradiation results in a decrease of the covalent silicon peak, either by an electron beam annealing effect in the bulk of the silicon nitride film, or by an ionization enhanced surface diffusion process of the silicon (electromigration). By the electron beam annealing, nitrogen species are liberated in the bulk of the silicon nitride film and migrate towards the surface where they react with the covalent silicon. The ionization enhanced diffusion originates from local charging of the surface, induced by the electron beam. (author)

  11. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  12. Interaction of heavy ion beams with a hydrogen plasma: plasma lens effect and stopping power enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, D.; Bimbot, R.; Della-Negra, S.; Dumail, M.; Kubica, B.; Richard, A.; Rivet, M.F.; Servajean, A.; Deutsch, C.; Maynard, G.

    1988-01-01

    By coupling a hydrogen plasma to a Tandem accelerator, transmission and energy losses of 2 MeV/u carbon and sulfur beams passing through a plasma target have been investigated. Fluctuations in beam transmission have been observed and attributed to a plasma lens effect. Moreover, energy loss measurements indicate an enhanced stopping power of the plasma relative to its cold matter equivalent

  13. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of size of a cooling laser beam in a zig-zag atomic beam collimator on trans- ... resolution spectroscopy, many-body physics, precision measurements, atom lithogra- ..... torr) at a distance of 180 cm from the Kr gas inlet chamber.

  14. The effect of feedback-controlled divertor nitrogen seeding on the boundary plasma and power exhaust channel width in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Kuang, A. Q.; McCarthy, W.; Terry, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    The scrape-off layer (SOL) power channel width, λq, is projected to be 0.5 mm in power reactors, based on multi-machine measurements of divertor target heat fluxes in H-mode at low levels of divertor dissipation. An important question is: does λq change with the level of divertor dissipation? We report results in which feedback controlled nitrogen seeding in the divertor was used to systematically vary divertor dissipation in a series of otherwise identical L-mode plasmas at three plasma currents: 0.55, 0.8 and 1.1 MA. Outer midplane profiles were recorded with a scanning Mirror Langmuir Probe; divertor plasma conditions were monitored with `rail' Langmuir probe and surface thermocouple arrays. Despite an order of magnitude reduction in divertor target heat fluxes (q// 400 MW m-2 to 40 MW m-2) and corresponding change in divertor regime from sheath-limited through high-recycling to near-detached, the upstream electron temperature profile is found to remain unchanged or to become slightly steeper in the near SOL and to drop significantly in the far SOL. Thus heat in the SOL appears to take advantage of this impurity radiation `heat sink' in the divertor by preferentially draining via the narrow (and perhaps an increasingly narrow) λq of the near SOL. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  15. Beam emittance and the effects of the rf, space charge and wake fields: Application to the ATF photoelectron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Laser driven photoelectron guns are of interest for use in new methods of accelerations, future development of Linear Colliders and new experiments such as Free Electron laser (IFEL). Such guns are potential source of low emittance-high current and short bunch length electron beams, where the emitted electrons are accelerated quickly to a relativistic energy by a strong rf, electric field in the cavity. We present a brief overview of the beam dynamic studies, e.g. emittance for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ATF high brightness photocathode radio frequency gun (now in operation), and show the effects of the rf, Space Charge, and Wake fields on the photoelectrons. 4 refs., 7 figs

  16. Electron beam irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced PEEK composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki; Odajima, Tosikazu; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-03-01

    Carbon fiber(CF) reinforced composites, using polyarylether-sulfone (PES) or polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as matrix material, were prepared and their electron beam irradiation effects were studied on the basis of changes in mechanical and dynamic viscoelastic properties and observation of fracture surfaces. The flexural strength of PES-CF composite decreased to 70 % of the initial strength after the irradiation of 3 MGy and 40 % after 15 MGy. The change in the profile of stress-strain (S-S) curves and fractographic observation by electron microscopy indicated that this composite irradiated with over 3 MGy was fractured by delamination caused by to the degradation of matrix polymer. The mechanical properties of PEEK-CF composite were scarcely decreased even after irradiated up to 180 MGy and this composite showed very high radiation resistance. The change in the profile of S-S curves and fractographic observation showed that this composite fractured due to destruction of fiber in the dose range less than 180 MGy, indicating that PEEK was excellent matrix material used in high radiation field. PEEK-PES-CF composite which was composed of the carbon fibers coated with PES solution showed less radiation resistance compared with PEEK-CF composite; the flexural strength decreased to 85 % of the initial value after the irradiation with 90 MGy. It was revealed from the changes in the profile of S-S curve that the specimen irradiated over 120 MGy was fractured due to not only fiber destruction but delamination. Deterioration mechanism of PEEK-PES-CF composite was studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements in connection with the damage on matrix-fiber interface. It was suggested that the deterioration in mechanical properties of this composite was caused by the degradation of PES that coated on the surface of the carbon fibers. (author)

  17. The influence of beam boundaries and velocity reduction on Pierce instability in laboratory plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influences of the beam-plasma boundary and of weak nonlinearities on the Pierce instability are investigated. It is shown that the finite width of the beam has negligible influence on both the stability of the system and growth rate. In the nonlinear regime the wavelength decreases and enhancement of the wave potential close to the beam inlet boundary is observed. The relationship between this effect and the formation of double layers is discussed. (Auth.)

  18. A newly observed Effect affects the LEP Beam Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, G; Galbraith, Peter; Henrichsen, K N; Koratzinos, M; Placidi, Massimo; Puzo, P; Drees, A; Geitz, M A

    1996-01-01

    The LEP magnetic bending field and therefore the beam energy is changed by a current flow over the vacuum chamber. The current is created by trains travelling between the Geneva main station and destinations in France. Some of the rail current leaks into earth and returns to the power station via the LEP tunnel, where the vacuum chamber is one of the conductors. Train leakage currents penetrate LEP at the injection lines from the SPS close to IP1 and between IP5 and IP7, thereby interacting with the magnetic dipole field. The observed changes in B field cause beam energy increases of several MeV.

  19. Influence of electrical sheet width on dynamic magnetic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalier, T; Cornut, B

    2000-01-01

    Effects of the width of electrical steel sheets on dynamic magnetic properties are investigated by solving diffusion equation on the cross-section of the sheet. Linear and non-linear cases are studied, and are compared with measurement on Epstein frame. For the first one an analytical solution is found, while for the second, a 2D finite element simulation is achieved. The influence of width is highlighted for a width thickness ratio lower than 10. It is shown that the behaviour modification in such cases is conditioned by the excitation signal waveform, amplitude and also frequency.

  20. The effect of pre-operative topical anaesthetic cream on the ablative width and coagulative depth of ablative fractional resurfacing laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyaratabandhu, Preawphan; Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Sitthinamsuwan, Panitta; Phothong, Weeranut; Eimpunth, Sasima; Lohsiriwat, Visnu; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2017-02-01

    Topical anaesthetic cream (TAC) is commonly used as a pre-treatment of ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) laser. Most of anaesthetic cream contains distilled water as major component. Therefore, pre-operative TAC may interfere the photothermal reaction in the skin treated with fractional carbon-dioxide (FCO 2 ) laser and fractional erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (FEr:YAG) laser. The objective of the study was to compare the ablative width (AW) and coagulative depth (CD) of AFR laser with and without pre-treatment with TAC. Four Thai females who underwent abdominoplasty were included in the study. The excised skin of each subject was divided into four areas. TAC (eutectic mixture of local anaesthesia; EMLA) with 1-h occlusion was applied only on the first and second areas. The first and third areas were treated with FCO 2 at 15 mj and 5% density. The second and fourth areas were treated with FEr:YAG at 28 J/cm 2 and 5% density. Six biopsied specimens were obtained from each area. A total of 96 specimens (24 specimens from each area) were collected from four patients and examined randomly by two dermatopathologists. The ablative width and coagulative depth from each specimen were determined. In FCO 2 -treated specimens, the mean AW of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 174.86 ± 24.57 and 188.52 ± 41.32 μm. The mean CD of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 594.96 ± 111.72 and 520.03 ± 147.40 μm. There were no significant differences in AW and CD between both groups (p = 0.53 and p = 0.15). In FEr:YAG-treated specimens, the mean AW of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 381.11 ± 48.02 and 423.65 ± 60.16 μm. The mean CD of the specimens that were pre-treated with TAC and control was 86.03 ± 29.44 and 71.59 ± 18.99 μm. There were no significant differences in AW and CD between both groups (p = 0.16 and p = 0.24). The pre

  1. Recent advances in biological effect and molecular mechanism of arabidopsis thaliana irradiated by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dali; Hou Suiwen; Li Wenjian

    2008-01-01

    Newly research progresses were summarized in effect of ion beams on seed surface, biological effect, growth, development, gravitropism and so on. Furthermore, mutation molecular mechanism of Arabidopsis thaliana was discussed, for example, alteration of DNA bases, DNA damage, chromosomal recombination, characteristics of mutant transmissibility, etc. Meanwhile, the achievements of transfer- ring extraneous gene to Arabidopsis thaliana by ion beams were reviewed in the paper. At last, the future prospective are also discussed here in mutation molecular mechanism and the potential application of biological effect of heavy ion beams. (authors)

  2. Effects of vacuum ultraviolet photons, ion energy and substrate temperature on line width roughness and RMS surface roughness of patterned 193 nm photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titus, M J; Graves, D B; Yamaguchi, Y; Hudson, E A

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparison of patterned 193 nm photoresist (PR) line width roughness (LWR) of samples processed in a well characterized argon (Ar) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system to RMS surface roughness and bulk chemical modification of blanket 193 nm PR samples used as control samples. In the ICP system, patterned and blanket PR samples are irradiated with Ar vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV) and Ar ions while sample temperature, photon flux, ion flux and ion energy are controlled and measured. The resulting chemical modifications to bulk 193 nm PR (blanket) and surface roughness are analysed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). LWR of patterned samples are measured with scanning electron microscopy and blanket portions of the patterned PRs are measured with AFM. We demonstrate that with no RF-bias applied to the substrate the LWR of 193 nm PR tends to smooth and correlates with the smoothing of the RMS surface roughness. However, both LWR and RMS surface roughness increases with simultaneous high-energy (≥70 eV) ion bombardment and VUV-irradiation and is a function of exposure time. Both high- and low-frequency LWR correlate well with the RMS surface roughness of the patterned and blanket 193 nm PR samples. LWR, however, does not increase with temperatures ranging from 20 to 80 deg. C, in contrast to the RMS surface roughness which increases monotonically with temperature. It is unclear why LWR remains independent of temperature over this range. However, the fact that blanket roughness and LWR on patterned samples, both scale similarly with VUV fluence and ion energy suggests a similar mechanism is responsible for both types of surface morphology modifications.

  3. Effects of vacuum ultraviolet photons, ion energy and substrate temperature on line width roughness and RMS surface roughness of patterned 193 nm photoresist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titus, M J; Graves, D B [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yamaguchi, Y; Hudson, E A, E-mail: graves@berkeley.edu [Lam Research Corporation, 4400 Cushing Parkway, Freemont, CA 94538 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    We present a comparison of patterned 193 nm photoresist (PR) line width roughness (LWR) of samples processed in a well characterized argon (Ar) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system to RMS surface roughness and bulk chemical modification of blanket 193 nm PR samples used as control samples. In the ICP system, patterned and blanket PR samples are irradiated with Ar vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV) and Ar ions while sample temperature, photon flux, ion flux and ion energy are controlled and measured. The resulting chemical modifications to bulk 193 nm PR (blanket) and surface roughness are analysed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). LWR of patterned samples are measured with scanning electron microscopy and blanket portions of the patterned PRs are measured with AFM. We demonstrate that with no RF-bias applied to the substrate the LWR of 193 nm PR tends to smooth and correlates with the smoothing of the RMS surface roughness. However, both LWR and RMS surface roughness increases with simultaneous high-energy ({>=}70 eV) ion bombardment and VUV-irradiation and is a function of exposure time. Both high- and low-frequency LWR correlate well with the RMS surface roughness of the patterned and blanket 193 nm PR samples. LWR, however, does not increase with temperatures ranging from 20 to 80 deg. C, in contrast to the RMS surface roughness which increases monotonically with temperature. It is unclear why LWR remains independent of temperature over this range. However, the fact that blanket roughness and LWR on patterned samples, both scale similarly with VUV fluence and ion energy suggests a similar mechanism is responsible for both types of surface morphology modifications.

  4. Photorefractive Axicon: Study of Light-induced Effect by Bessel Beam in Photorefractive Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, T A; Gesualdi, M R R; Zamboni-Rached, M; Muramatsu, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present the theoretical and computational study of the original analysis of the light-induced effects by Bessel beams in photorefractive crystals. Modern applications of these beams as: metrological, alignment of optical systems, optical tweezers, non linear optics, optical communication, and others, becoming a very interesting substitute for a Gaussian beam when this is subject to diffraction and dispersion effects to large distance propagation. On the other hand, the photorefractive crystals are very important materials for applications in non-linear optics, holographic storage, interferometry and optical information processing. We perform an analysis of the index refraction modulation generated by Bessel beam in photorefractive medium discussing the possibility this optical material to control and generation of Bessel beam properties.

  5. High precision electron beam diagnostic system for high current long pulse beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y J; Fessenden, T; Holmes, C; Nelson, S D; Selchow, N.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using stripline kicker technology for DARHT II applications, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams (6-40 MeV, 1-4 kA, 2 microseconds) for accurate position control. The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (<20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt measurements performed using capacitive pick-off probes. Likewise, transmission line traveling wave probes have problems with multi-bounce effects due to these longer pulse widths. Finally, the high energy densities experienced in these applications distort typical foil beam position measurements

  6. Finite Orbit Width Features in the CQL3D Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Y. V.; Harvey, R., E-mail: petrov@compxco.com [CompX, Del Mar (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The CQL3D Fokker-Planck equation solver is being upgraded to allow for the Finite-Orbit- Width (FOW) capabilities, which will provide an accurate description for a neoclassical transport, losses to the walls, and transfer of particles, momentum, and heat to the scrape-off layer. Two different options are discussed for implementing the FOW capabilities. In one option, the Fokker-Planck equation is solved for the distribution function of orbits centered around given flux surface; in the other, the equation is solved for the local distribution function at the outer-most point of flux surface at the midplane. Both options use a fast lookup table that allows characterization of orbits without actually tracing them. The lookup table, in effect, performs mapping from the Constants-Of-Motion space onto the (R{sub o}, u{sub o}, {theta}{sub o}) computational space on the midplane. The FOW modifications have been implemented for the formations of neutral beam source, RF quasilinear diffusion operator, particle diagnostics and collisional operator, and internal boundary conditions are being refined. Initial test runs show that in general, the FOW modifications result in a broader profiles of power absorption and RF-driven current, and accurate description of the loss cone. (author)

  7. The effects of electron beam irradiation on sterilization and preservation of chilled pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yanhong; Mao Duobin; Zhao Dianbo; Zhang Xiaoyan; Li Quanshun; Yang Gongming

    2009-01-01

    S The effects of electron beam irradiation on the sterilization and preservation of chilled pork were studied. The aim of this investigation was to provide academic and technical basis for application of electron beam irradiation on meat industry. The response surface analysis was used with electron beam energy(X 1 ) and dose(X 2 ) as factors and colony form unit(Y) as responses. The results have been shown that the model of sterilization of chilled pork by electron beam irradiation can be expressed Y=3.78-0.24X 1 -0.13X 2 -0.16X 1 X 2 -0.18X 1 2 +0.15X 1 2 (R 2 =0.9755). It has been found there is a interaction between electron beam energy and absorbed doses, and the significance sequence of factors is absorbed dose>interaction> electron beam energy. When absorbed doses are in range from 3.23 kGy to 4.0 kGy and electron beam energy is in range from 2.3 MeV to 3.8 MeV, the colony form unit would drop 2 logarithm units. The shelf life of samples treated with electron beam irradiation is longer by about 12 d than that of control samples when the samples are stored at 4 degree C. When the samples are stored at 7∼10 degree C, shelf life of samples treated with electron beam irradiation is longer by about 9 d than that of control samples. The results showed that electron beam irradiation has the effects of sterilization and preservation on chilled pork. This study has been confirmed that the application of electron beam irradiation is very useful for meat industry. (authors)

  8. The Effect of Aquaplast on Surface Dose of Photon Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoon Sik

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effect on surface dose due to Aquaplast used for immobilizing the patients with head and neck cancers in photon beam radiotherapy. Materials and Methods : To assess surface and buildup region dose for 6MV X-ray from linear accelerator(Siemens Mevatron 6740), we measured percent ionization value with the Markus chamber model 30-329 manufactured by PTW Frieburg and Capintec electrometer, model WK92. For measurement of surface ionization value, the chamber was embedded in 25 X 25 X 3 cm 3 acrylic phantom and set on 25 X 25 X 5 cm 3 , polystyrene phantom to allow adequate scattering. The measurements of percent depth ionization were made by placing the polystyrene layers of appropriate thickness over the chamber. The measurements were taken at 10 cm SSD for 5 X 5 cm 2 , 10 X 10 cm 2 , and 15 X 15 cm 2 field sizes, respectively. Placing the layer of Aquaplast over the chamber, the same procedures were repeated. We evaluated two types o Aquaplast: 1.6mm layer of original Aquaplast(manufactured by WFR Aquaplast Corp.) and transformed Aquaplast similar to moulded one for immobilizing the patients practically. We also measured surface ionization values with blocking tray in presence or absence of transformed Aquaplast. In calculating percent depth dose, we used the formula suggested by Gerbi and khan to correct over response of the Markus chamber. Results : The surface doses for open fields of 5 X 5 cm 2 , 10 X 10 cm 2 , 15 X 15 cm 2 were 7.9%, 13.6%, and 18.7% respectively. He original Aquaplast increased the surface doses upto 38.4%, 43.6% and 47.4% respectively. There were little differences in percent depth dose values beyond the depth of Dmax. Increasing field size, the blocking tray caused increase of the surface dose by 0.2%, 1.7%, 3.0% without Aquaplast, 0.2%, 1.9%, 3.7% with transformed Aquaplast, respectively. Conclusion : The original and transformed Aquaplast increased the surface dose moderately. The percent depth doses beyond Dmax

  9. Relativistic Beaming and Orientation Effects in BL Lacertae Objects ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tation paradigm for high peaked and low-peaked BL Lacs (X-ray and radio selected .... consequences of relativistic beaming and geometric projection were studied in high- ... model. If we assume α = 0 (for synchrotron self-absorbed sources) and β ∼ 1, it can .... for RBL and XBL subsamples at confidence level of ∼ 95.0%.

  10. System effects influencing the bending strength of timber beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Källsner, B.

    1998-01-01

    A stochastic model of hierarchical series system type for the bending strength of spruce beams isdefined from the anticipation that the bending failure takes place at a cross-section with a defect cluster formed by knots or grain irregularities. The parameters of the model are estimated from meas...

  11. Size effect in self consolidating concrete beams with and without ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the decrease in nominal stress of notched beam is more when compared with that ... The differences between HPC and SCC is essentially in the use of special .... elements fail in ductile or plastic manner, while large sized elements of the ...

  12. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  13. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  14. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-01-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 μs before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations

  15. Effects of rf breakdown on the beam in the Compact Linear Collider prototype accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Palaia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of rf breakdown in high-gradient accelerator structures on the accelerated beam is an extremely relevant aspect in the development of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC and is one of the main issues addressed at the Two-beam Test Stand at the CLIC Test Facility 3 at CERN. During a rf breakdown high currents are generated causing parasitic magnetic fields that interact with the accelerated beam affecting its orbit. The beam energy is also affected because the power is partly reflected and partly absorbed thus reducing the available energy to accelerate the beam. We discuss here measurements of such effects observed on an electron beam accelerated in a CLIC prototype structure. Measurements of the trajectory of bunch trains on a nanosecond time scale showed fast changes in correspondence of breakdown that we compare with measurements of the relative beam spots on a scintillating screen. We identify different breakdown scenarios for which we offer an explanation based also on measurements of the power at the input and output ports of the accelerator structure. Finally we present the distribution of the magnitude of the observed changes in the beam position and we discuss its correlation with rf power and breakdown location in the accelerator structure.

  16. Influence of diffuse goiter on tracheal width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Sung Mo; Shon, Hyung Sun; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1980-01-01

    The radioisotopic scanning of the thyroid gland is well established method of demonstrating morphology of the thyroid gland and is used to measure the size, area and weight of thyroid gland. The purpose of this investigation is to observe the various effects of goiter to the regional trachea. Both radioisotopic scanning and roentgenogram were taken at the same time to evaluate size, area and weight of the thyroid glands, as well as to measure the width of soft tissue structure of the neck and the regional trachea in normal and goitrous patients. The clinical materials consisted of normal thyroid group for control (46 cases), diffuse simple goiter group (76 cases) and Graves' disease group (59 cases). The results were as follows; 1. The goiter causes some narrowing of the regional trachea to various degree which is not necessarily reflective of the size of goiter. 2. The goiter may increase the width of retrotracheal soft tissue space. 3. The lateral roentgenogram of the neck appear very useful in estimating the thyroid gland three dimensionally and the effect of goiter to the regional trachea

  17. Effect of Maximal Apnoea Easy-Going and Struggle Phases on Subarachnoid Width and Pial Artery Pulsation in Elite Breath-Hold Divers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel J Winklewski

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess changes in subarachnoid space width (sas-TQ, the marker of intracranial pressure (ICP, pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ and cardiac contribution to blood pressure (BP, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations throughout the maximal breath hold in elite apnoea divers. Non-invasive assessment of sas-TQ and cc-TQ became possible due to recently developed method based on infrared radiation, called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS.The experimental group consisted of seven breath-hold divers (six men. During testing, each participant performed a single maximal end-inspiratory breath hold. Apnoea consisted of the easy-going and struggle phases (characterised by involuntary breathing movements (IBMs. Heart rate (HR was determined using a standard ECG. BP was assessed using the photoplethysmography method. SaO2 was monitored continuously with pulse oximetry. A pneumatic chest belt was used to register thoracic and abdominal movements. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV was estimated by a 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasonic probe. sas-TQ and cc-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS. Wavelet transform analysis was performed to assess cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations.Mean BP and CBFV increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and were further augmented by IBMs. cc-TQ increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and remained stable during the IBMs. HR did not change significantly throughout the apnoea, although a trend toward a decrease during the easy phase and recovery during the IBMs was visible. Amplitudes of BP, CBFV and cc-TQ were augmented. sas-TQ and SaO2 decreased at the easy phase of apnoea and further decreased during the IBMs.Apnoea increases intracranial pressure and pial artery pulsation. Pial artery pulsation seems to be stabilised by the IBMs. Cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations does not

  18. The width of the giant dipole resonance at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.

    1992-01-01

    A method is proposed to evaluate the effect of the change of the Fermi sea on the width of the giant dipole resonance at finite temperature. In a schematic model it is found that, indeed, in 208 Pb the width increases very sharply up to about T=4 MeV but shows a much weaker variation for higher temperature. (author) 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using Medipix3RX: With applications from biomaterial science

    CERN Document Server

    Rajendran, K; de Ruiter, N J A; Chernoglazov, A I; Panta, R K; Butler, A P H; Butler, P H; Bell, S T; Anderson, N G; Woodfield, T B F; Tredinnick, S J; Healy, J L; Bateman, C J; Aamir, R; Doesburg, R M N; Renaud, P F; Gieseg, S P; Smithies, D J; Mohr, J L; Mandalika, V B H; Opie, A M T; Cook, N J; Ronaldson, J P; Nik, S J; Atharifard, A; Clyne, M; Bones, P J; Bartneck, C; Grasset, R; Schleich, N; Billinghurst, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects using spectral data for biomaterial applications. A small-animal spectral scanner operating in the diagnostic energy range was used. We investigate the use of photon-processing features of the Medipix3RX ASIC in reducing beam hardening and associated artefacts. A fully operational charge summing mode was used during the imaging routine. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D reconstruction software and volume visualisation using a custom volume rendering software. Narrow high energy acquisition using the photon-processing detector revealed substantial reduction in beam hardening effects and metal artefacts.

  20. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P. [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics, Chemin de Pinchat 22, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F. [Defence R and D Canada Valcartier, 2459 de la Bravoure Blvd., Quebec (Qc) G3J 1X5 (Canada); Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Lionel Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Quebec (Qc) J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  1. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the quality of mackerel (Pneumatophorus japonicus) Meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dongxiao; Yang Wenge; Xu Dalun; Zhou Xingyu; Ou Changrong; Shi Huidong

    2012-01-01

    The effect of 3, 5, 7 kGy electron beam irradiation on the volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) and peroxide value (POV), the contents of histamine and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) in Pneumatophorus japonicus meat with vacuum or ordinary package were measured during refrigeration. The results showed that electron beam treatment could effectively control the contents of histamine and VBN, postpone the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acid in P. japonicus meat. The shelf life of P. japonicus meat could be extended with electron beam irradiation. Before cold storage, it is appropriate that the P. japonicus meat were ordinary packaged and irradiated at the dose of 5 kGy. (authors)

  2. Effect of releasing pretension for Rc Beams Bonded with Prestressed Fr Strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao-yang, Z.; Xue-jun, H.; Xing-guo, W.; Fei-fei, X

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of releasing pretension is theoretically and experimentally investigated for flexural members externally bonded with prestressed FRP laminate or near-surface-mounted with prestressed FRP plate or rod. The stresses of FRP on the interface and at cross sections of a beam are analyzed on the basis of linear elastic theory. The expressions are derived for effective prestress, prestress loss and camber at the midspan of the beam. Tests are performed on two reinforced concrete beams bonded with prestressed GFRP plate. The comparison between the analytical and the measured results shows the analyses in this paper are rational and correct. (author)

  3. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); PEG MedAustron, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the

  4. Study of first harmonic field effects on beam extraction for VEC K500 superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, M.K.; Debnath, J.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    In superconducting cyclotron large momentum compaction at extraction region makes the turn separation very small. The first harmonic effects on the He +1 beam using simulated magnetic field for VEC K500 cyclotron is reported

  5. Effect of electron beam on quality and physiological metabolism of blueberry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Huijuan; Ye Zhengwen; Zhang Xueying; Su Mingshen; Du Jihong; Zhang Minqian

    2013-01-01

    In order to explore safe, simple and effective storage technology, experiment was conducted with 'ai li ao te' blueberry for studying the effect of electron beam on quality and physiological metabolism. Fruit was stored at temperature of (1 ± 0.5)℃, with RH of 80% ∼ 85%, and treated with electron beam of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 kGy. The results showed that the proper dose of electron beam could decline the bad fruit rate and weightlessness, restrain respiration intensity, alleviate the decline of soluble solids, acid and Vc content. Meanwhile it did not have significant negative effects on pulp colour. All these showed that electron beam of 1 kGy treatment could keep the best storage quality of blueberry, keep the sound berry and weightlessness rate at > 90% and < 10% respectively, prolong the effective storage time from 30d to 60d. (authors)

  6. Effect of ion beam bombardment on the carbide in M2 steel modified by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.Y.; Wang, F.J.; Wang, Y.K. (Dept. of Materials Engineering, Dalian Univ. of Technology (China)); Ma, T.C. (National Lab. of Materials Modification by Beam Three, Dalian (China))

    1991-10-30

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the effect of nitrogen ion bombardment with different doses on the carbides in M2 high speed steel as the nitrogen ions penetrated into the nitride films during ion-beam-assisted deposition. With different doses of nitrogen, alterations in the morphological characteristics of the carbide M6C at the interface were observed. With lower doses, knitting-like contrast within the carbide showed subboundary structure defects in M6C. With increasing dose, the substructure defects were broken up into small fragments owing to heavy bombardment. The microstructures of carbides at the interface damaged by nitrogen ions are discussed in detail. (orig.).

  7. The effective synthesis of Insoluble sulfur using electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daejin; Yu, Kookhyun [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Vulcanization is process that formed crosslinking by Insoluble sulfur between linear structure of rubber polymer. Recently, Synthesis of Insoluble sulfur is used Thermal polymerization using about 250 {approx} 300 .deg. C and extraction process is used carbon disulfide(CS2) for separation between soluble sulfur and insoluble sulfur. But this process isn't environmental, economical and safety. This research was focus on developing of insoluble sulfur synthesis process using electron beam. This new process is using under the 140 .deg. C. Because of that, explosion risk is decrease, environmental and economical factor is increased. The sulfur can be melt by increase temperature or made solution using carbon disulfide. And electron beam is irradiated melting sulfur or sulfur solution. After irradiation, The high purity insoluble sulfur can be obtained by separation with carbon disulfide.

  8. Flexural and Thermal Properties of Novel Energy Conservation Slotted Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional solid reinforced concrete (RC beams were modified to slotted beams for consideration as thermal insulation structural components. The slotted beam consisted of an outer and an inner beam, respectively, with a slot located near the middle of the beam along its width direction for filling thermal insulation material. Flexural and thermal behavior of the slotted beams were investigated. Three RC reference solid beams and six slotted beams were fabricated and tested under four-point bending tests. The test results indicated that the failure mode of both slotted beams and the solid beams was flexural failure. However, the damage process of the slotted beams was different from that of the solid beams at the final loading stage. The moment curvature analysis indicated that the tensile reinforcement ratio of the outer and inner beams had an important effect on the flexural behavior, especially the ductility of the slotted beams. Thermal study indicated that the heat transfer coefficient of the slotted beam was greatly reduced and the thermal inertia factor increased a lot, compared with the solid beam. In addition, FE simulation results showed that a new frame structure using slotted beams exhibited obvious and attractive thermal insulation property.

  9. Progress on Beam-Plasma Effect Simulations in Muon Ionization Cooling Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, James [IIT, Chicago; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    New computational tools are essential for accurate modeling and simulation of the next generation of muon-based accelerators. One of the crucial physics processes specific to muon accelerators that has not yet been simulated in detail is beam-induced plasma effect in liquid, solid, and gaseous absorbers. We report here on the progress of developing the required simulation tools and applying them to study the properties of plasma and its effects on the beam in muon ionization cooling channels.

  10. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Nusinovich, G. S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  11. In vitro biological effectiveness of JRR-4 epithermal neutron beam. Experiment under free air beam and in water phantom. Cooperative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Nose, Tadao; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Hori, Naohiko; Torii, Yoshiya; Horiguchi, Yoji

    2002-05-01

    The surviving curve and the biological effectiveness factor of dose components generated in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) were separately determined in neutron beams at Japan Research Reactor No.4. Surviving fraction of V79 Chinese hamster cell with or without 10 B was obtained using an epithermal neutron beam (ENB), a mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam (TNB-1), and a thermal neutron beam (TNB-2), which were used or planned to use for BNCT clinical trial. The cell killing effect of these neutron beams with or without the presence of 10 B depended highly on the neutron beam used, according to the epithermal and fast neutron content in the beam. The biological effectiveness factor values of the boron capture reaction for ENB, TNB-1 and TNB-2 were 3.99±0.24, 3.04±0.19 and 1.43±0.08, respectively. The biological effectiveness factor values of the high-LET dose components based on the hydrogen recoils and the nitrogen capture reaction were 2.50±0.32, 2.34±0.30 and 2.17±0.28 for ENB, TNB-1 and TNB-2, respectively. The biological effectiveness factor values of the neutron and photon components were 1.22±0.16, 1.23±0.16 and 1.21±0.16, respectively. The depth function of biological effectiveness factor in water phantom and the difference in biological effectiveness factor among boron compounds were also determined. The experimental determination of biological effectiveness factor outlined in this paper is applicable to the dose calculation for each dose component of the neutron beams and contribute to an accurate biological effectiveness factor as comparison with a neutron beam at a different facility employed in ongoing and planned BNCT clinical trials. (author)

  12. Effect of pulsed electron beam on cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Santhosh; Joseph, Praveen; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Narayana, Y.; Bhat, N.N.

    2009-01-01

    The extent of repairable and irreparable damage in a living cell produced by ionizing radiation depends on the quality of the radiation. In the case of sparsely ionizing radiation, the dose rate and the pattern of energy deposition of the radiation are the important physical factors which can affect the amount of damage in living cells. In the present study, radio-sensitive and radioresistive bacteria cells were exposed to 8 MeV pulsed electron beam and the efficiency of cell-killing was investigated to evaluate the Do, the mean lethal dose. The dose to the cell was delivered in micro-second pulses at an instantaneous dose rate of 2.6 x 10 5 Gy s -1 . Fricke dosimeter was used to measure the absorbed dose of electron beam. The results were compared with those of gamma rays. The survival curve of radio-resistive Deinococcus-radiodurans (DR) is found to be sigmoidal and the survival response for radio-sensitive Escherichia-coli (E-coli) is found to be exponential without any shoulder. Comparison of Do values indicate that irradiation with pulsed electron beam resulted in more cell-killing than was observed for gamma irradiation. (author)

  13. Enhancement of thermal blooming effect on free space propagation of high power CW laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Tamer M.; Mokhtar, Ayman M.; Ghoniemy, Samy A.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present an enhanced model to predict the effect of thermal blooming and atmospheric turbulence, on high energy laser beams free space propagation. We introduce an implementation technique for the proposed mathematical models describing the effect of thermal blooming and atmospheric turbulence including wind blowing, and how it effect high power laser beam power, far field pattern, phase change effect and beam quality . An investigated model of adaptive optics was introduced to study how to improve the wave front and phase distortion caused by thermal blooming and atmospheric turbulence, the adaptive optics model with Actuator influence spacing 3 cm the that shows observed improvement in the Strehl ratio and in wave front and phase of the beam. These models was implemented using cooperative agents relying on GLAD software package. Without taking in consideration the effect of thermal blooming It was deduced that the beam at the source takes the Gaussian shape with uniform intensity distribution, we found that the beam converge on the required distance 4 km using converging optics, comparing to the laser beam under the effect of thermal blooming the far field pattern shows characteristic secondary blip and "sugar scoop" effect which is characteristic of thermal blooming. It was found that the thermal blooming causes the beam to steer many centimeters and to diverge beyond about 1.8 km than come to a focus at 4 km where the beam assumed to be focused on the required target. We assume that this target is moving at v = (4,-4) m/sec at distance 4 km and the wind is moving at v = (-10,-10) m/sec, it was found that the effect will be strongest when wind and target movement are at the same velocity. GLAD software is used to calculate the attenuation effects of the atmosphere as well as the phase perturbations due to temperature change in the air and effects caused as the beam crosses through the air due to wind and beam steering.

  14. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects due to Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders.

    CERN Document Server

    Furuseth, Sondre

    2017-01-01

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. This report discusses results from an implementation of the weak-strong model, studying the effects of head-on beam-beam interactions. The assumptions has been shown to be valid for configurations where the growth and losses of the beam are small. The tracking has been done using an original code which applies graphic cards to reduce the computation time. The bunches in the beams have been modelled cylindrically symmetrical, based on a Gaussian distribution in three dimensions. This choice fits well with bunches...

  15. Comparative effects of gamma-rays and electron beams on peroxide formation in phosphatidylcholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todoriki, S.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine was irradiated in the state of a film or liposome with gamma-rays or electron beams, and the amount of peroxide was determined to compare the effects of the two types of radiation. The amounts of peroxide formed in both the film and liposome with gamma-rays were significantly larger than those with electron beams, when the samples were irradiated at the same dose. Proteins such as bacteriorhodopsin reduced the degree of peroxide formation in liposome, and the effect of gamma-rays was much larger than that of electron beams, even in the presence of protein. The results of the present investigation indicate that the effects of gamma-rays on peroxide formation in phosphatidylcholine were significantly larger than those of electron beams, irrespective of the state of the lipid

  16. SU-F-T-629: Effect of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) Width On Plan Quality of Single-Isocenter VMAT Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Multiple Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, J; Thomas, E; Wu, X; Fiveash, J; Popple, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Single-isocenter VMAT has been shown able to create high quality plans for complex intracranial multiple metastasis SRS cases. Linacs capable of the technique are typically outfitted with an MLC that consists of a combination of 5 mm and 10 mm leaves (standard) or 2.5 mm and 5 mm leaves (high-definition). In this study, we test the hypothesis that thinner collimator leaves are associated with improved plan quality. Methods: Ten multiple metastasis cases were identified and planned for VMAT SRS using a 10 MV flattening filter free beam. Plans were created for a standard (std) and a high-definition (HD) MLC. Published values for leaf transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were utilized. All other parameters were invariant. Conformity (plan and individual target), moderate isodose spill (V50%), and low isodose spill (mean brain dose) were selected for analysis. Results: Compared to standard MLC, HD-MLC improved overall plan conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD = 0.83, Paddick CI-std = 0.79; p = 0.004 and median: RTOG CI-HD =1.18, RTOG CI-std =1.24; p = 0.01 ), improved individual lesion conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD,i =0.77, Paddick CI-std,i =0.72; p < 0.001 and median: RTOG CI-HD,i = 1.28, RTOG CI-std,i =1.35; p < 0.001), improved moderate isodose spill (median: V50%-HD = 37.0 cc, V50%-std = 45.7 cc; p = 0.002), and improved low dose spill (median: dmean-HD = 2.90 Gy, dmean-std = 3.19 Gy; p = 0.002). Conclusion: For the single-isocenter VMAT SRS of multiple metastasis plans examined, use of HD-MLC modestly improved conformity, moderate isodose, and low isodose spill compared to standard MLC. However, in all cases we were able to generate clinically acceptable plans with the standard MLC. More work is need to further quantify the difference in cases with higher numbers of small targets and to better understand any potential clinical significance. This research was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  17. SU-F-T-629: Effect of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) Width On Plan Quality of Single-Isocenter VMAT Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Multiple Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, J; Thomas, E; Wu, X; Fiveash, J; Popple, R [University Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter VMAT has been shown able to create high quality plans for complex intracranial multiple metastasis SRS cases. Linacs capable of the technique are typically outfitted with an MLC that consists of a combination of 5 mm and 10 mm leaves (standard) or 2.5 mm and 5 mm leaves (high-definition). In this study, we test the hypothesis that thinner collimator leaves are associated with improved plan quality. Methods: Ten multiple metastasis cases were identified and planned for VMAT SRS using a 10 MV flattening filter free beam. Plans were created for a standard (std) and a high-definition (HD) MLC. Published values for leaf transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were utilized. All other parameters were invariant. Conformity (plan and individual target), moderate isodose spill (V50%), and low isodose spill (mean brain dose) were selected for analysis. Results: Compared to standard MLC, HD-MLC improved overall plan conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD = 0.83, Paddick CI-std = 0.79; p = 0.004 and median: RTOG CI-HD =1.18, RTOG CI-std =1.24; p = 0.01 ), improved individual lesion conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD,i =0.77, Paddick CI-std,i =0.72; p < 0.001 and median: RTOG CI-HD,i = 1.28, RTOG CI-std,i =1.35; p < 0.001), improved moderate isodose spill (median: V50%-HD = 37.0 cc, V50%-std = 45.7 cc; p = 0.002), and improved low dose spill (median: dmean-HD = 2.90 Gy, dmean-std = 3.19 Gy; p = 0.002). Conclusion: For the single-isocenter VMAT SRS of multiple metastasis plans examined, use of HD-MLC modestly improved conformity, moderate isodose, and low isodose spill compared to standard MLC. However, in all cases we were able to generate clinically acceptable plans with the standard MLC. More work is need to further quantify the difference in cases with higher numbers of small targets and to better understand any potential clinical significance. This research was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  18. Correlation of microdosimetric measurements with relative biological effectiveness from clinical experience for two neutron therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Horton, J.L. Jr.; Roberts, W.K.

    1986-01-01

    Microdosimetric measurements were made for the neutron therapy beams at the University of Chicago and at the Cleveland Clinic with the same geometry and phantom material using the same tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter and standard techniques. The energy deposition spectra (dose distributions in lineal energy) are compared for these beams and for their scattered components (direct beam blocked). The model of dual radiation action (DRA) of Kellerer and Rossi is employed to interpret these data in terms of biological effectiveness over this limited range of radiation qualities. The site-diameter parameter of the DRA theory is determined for the Cleveland beam by setting the biological effectiveness (relative to 60 Co gamma radiation) equal to the relative biological effectiveness value deduced from radiobiology experiments and clinical experience. The resulting value of this site-diameter parameter is then used to predict the biological effectiveness of the Chicago beam. The prediction agrees with the value deduced from radiobiology and clinical experience. The biological effectiveness of the scattered components of both beams is also estimated using the model

  19. Modeling the biophysical effects in a carbon beam delivery line by using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ilsung; Yoo, SeungHoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    The Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion-beam therapy. In this study, the biological effectiveness of a carbon-ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. A carbon-ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon-ion beam transport into media. An incident energy carbon-ion beam with energy in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model was applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary-gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetration depth in the water phantom along the incident beam's direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE-weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the depth in the water phantom.

  20. The effect of a single blade limiter on energetic neutral beam particles in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, T.W.; Armentrout, C.; Burrell, K.H.; Hino, T.; Kahn, C.; Kim, J.; Lohr, J.; Rottler, L.; Schissel, D.; St John, H.

    1984-01-01

    Energetic beam ion collisions with the main limiter can be a significant power loss process under certain operating conditions in Doublet III. Futhermore, these collisions may cause measurable damage to the limiter itself. Under low current and low toroidal field conditions (e.g., Isub(p) = 290 kA and Bsub(T) = 6.3 kG), 20-38% of the inferred absorbed beam power may be deposited directly on the ion drift side of the limiter by the beam ions. However, for higher plasma current and toroidal fields (e.g., Isub(p) = 480 kA and Bsub(t) = 15 kG), the fraction of inferred absorbed beam power deposited on the limiter is reduced to < 10%. Monte Carlo code simulations show that this loss of beam power is primarily a result of the large poloidal and toroidal gyro-orbits of the energetic beam ions. Other factors which may enhance beam ion losses to the limiter are (1) large separation distances between the primary limiter and the (outboard) vacuum vessel wall, and (2) plasma density buildup near the plasma edge during high gas puff operation. In addition, our data suggests enhanced plasma density and recycling near the limiter. This localized density can cause appreciable premature ionizations of the incoming beam neutrals and thus reduce the effective plasma heating of the beamline which is immediately upcurrent of the limiter. The prematurely-ionized beam particles from this adjacent beamline are responsible for much of the damage to the ion drift side of the limiter. We have found that under certain operating conditions (1) the direct beam heating of the limiter is 50% greater and (2) the stored plasma energy is 10% less when the beamline immediately upcurrent of the limiter heats the plasma. Thus, the relative positions of the limiters to the beamlines are important in designing future tokamaks. (orig.)

  1. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Wada, S; Hatayama, A

    2010-02-01

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  2. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Wada, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  3. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, K. [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan); Wada, S.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  4. The effect of atoms excited by electron beam on metal evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Guo Feng; Ying Chun Tong

    2002-01-01

    In atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), the metal is heated to melt by electron beams. The vapor atoms may be excited by electrons when flying through the electron beam. The excited atoms may be deexcited by inelastic collision during expansion. The electronic energy transfers translational energy. In order to analyse the effect of reaction between atoms and electron beams on vapor physical parameters, such as density, velocity and temperature, direct-simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is used to simulate the 2-D gadolinium evaporation from long and narrow crucible. The simulation results show that the velocity and temperature of vapor increase, and the density decreases

  5. An evaluation testing technique of single event effect using Beam Blanking SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, J; Hada, T; Pesce, A; Akutsu, T; Matsuda, S [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Igarashi, T; Baba, S

    1997-03-01

    Beam Blanking SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) testing technique has been applied to CMOS SRAM devices to evaluate the occurence of soft errors on memory cells. Cross-section versus beam current and LET curves derived from BBSEM and heavy ion testing technique, respectively, have been compared. A linear relation between BBSEM current and heavy ion LET has been found. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the application of focused pulsed electron beam could be a reliable, convenient and inexpensive tool to investigate the effects of heavy ions and high energy particles on memory devices for space application. (author)

  6. Genetic effects of heavy-ion beams on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    Our data suggest that sperm, spermatids, and spermatogonia exhibit different sensitivities to mutation induction by high LET beams. They are, in order of their increasing sensitivities: spermatogonia, sperm, and spermatids. The data suggest that there are differences in the shape of the dose-response curves, carbon and helium being curvilinear and neon being linear. Neon has the highest RBE, especially for the spermatogonial stem cell. Cell killing, measured by a variety of end points, is restricted to radiosensitive spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the doses investigated. A dose-dependent extent and duration of oligospermia is found, but the data suggest that other factors may contribute to a decrease in the fertilization rate

  7. In vitro biological effectiveness of JRR-4 epithermal neutron beam. Experiment under free air beam and in water phantom. Cooperative research

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, T; Horiguchi, Y; Kishi, T; Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Nose, T; Torii, Y; Yamamoto, K

    2002-01-01

    The surviving curve and the biological effectiveness factor of dose components generated in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) were separately determined in neutron beams at Japan Research Reactor No.4. Surviving fraction of V79 Chinese hamster cell with or without sup 1 sup 0 B was obtained using an epithermal neutron beam (ENB), a mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam (TNB-1), and a thermal neutron beam (TNB-2), which were used or planned to use for BNCT clinical trial. The cell killing effect of these neutron beams with or without the presence of sup 1 sup 0 B depended highly on the neutron beam used, according to the epithermal and fast neutron content in the beam. The biological effectiveness factor values of the boron capture reaction for ENB, TNB-1 and TNB-2 were 3.99+-0.24, 3.04+-0.19 and 1.43+-0.08, respectively. The biological effectiveness factor values of the high-LET dose components based on the hydrogen recoils and the nitrogen capture reaction were 2.50+-0.32, 2.34+-0.30 and 2.17+-0.28 for EN...

  8. Sterilizing effect of irradiation for Zuogui powder with electron beam and γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ling; Kong Qiulian; Qi Wenyuan; Bao Yingzi; Chen Zhijun; Yuan Zhongyi

    2012-01-01

    The sterilizing effect of electron beam and γ-rays on Zuogui powder was studied. The D 10 values of electron beam and γ-rays on aerobic bacterial count and mould and yeasts were ascertained by survival microorganism. The results indicated that the D 10 values of electron beam and γ-rays irradiation for aerobic bacterial count were 2.602 kGy and 2.597 kGy, compared to 3.112 kGy and 3.208 kGy for mould and yeasts. The results in the current study suggested that the sterilizing effect of electron beam and γ-rays on Zuogui powder complied with D 10 rules. (authors)

  9. Collisionless effects on beam-return current systems in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical study of the beam-return current system (BRCS) in solar flares shows that the precipitating electrons modify the way in which the return current (RC) is carried by the background plasma. In particular it is found that the RC is not carried by the bulk of the electrons but by a small number of high-velocity electrons. For beam/plasma densities exceeding approximately 0.001, this can reduce the effects of collisions and heating by the RC. For higher-density beams, where the RC could be unstable to current-driven instabilities, the effects of strong turbulence anomalous resistivity prevent the appearance of such instabilities. The main conclusion is that the BRCS is interconnected, and that the beam-generated strong turbulence determines how the RC is carried.

  10. Analysis of mutagenic effects induced by carbon beams at different LET in a red yeast strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Haining; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Lu Dong; Wu Xin; Li Wenjian

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate inactive and mutagenic effects of carbon beam at different LET, the inactivation cross section and mutation cross section induced by carbon beams of different LET values were investigated in a red yeast strain Rhodotorula glutinis AY 91015. It was found that the maximum inactivation cross section of 4.37μm 2 , which was very close to the average nucleus cross section, was at LET of 120.0 keV/μm. The maximum mutation cross section was at LET of 96.0 keV/μm. Meanwhile, the highest mutagenicity of carbon ion was found around 58.2 keV/μm. It implied that the most efficient LET to induce mutation in survival yeasts was 58.2 keV/μm, which corresponded to energy of 35 MeV/u carbon beam. The most effective carbon beam to induce inactivation and mutation located at different energy region. (authors)

  11. Stieltjes-moment-theory technique for calculating resonance width's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, A.U.

    1978-12-01

    A recently developed method for calculating the widths of atomic and molecular resonances is reviewed. The method is based on the golden-rule definition of the resonance width, GAMMA(E). The method uses only square-integrable, L 2 , basis functions to describe both the resonant and the non-resonant parts of the scattering wave function. It employs Stieltjes-moment-theory techniques to extract a continuous approximation for the width discrete representation of the background continuum. Its implementation requires only existing atomic and molecular structure codes. Many-electron effects, such as correlation and polarization, are easily incorporated into the calculation of the width via configuration interaction techniques. Once the width, GAMMA(E), has been determined, the energy shift can be computed by a straightforward evaluation of the required principal-value integral. The main disadvantage of the method is that it provides only the total width of a resonance which decays into more than one channel in a multichannel problem. A review of the various aspects of the theory is given first, and then representative results that have been obtained with this method for several atomic and molecular resonances are discussed. 28 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  12. Effects of the electron beam on InP(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouslama, M.; Jardin, C.; Ghamnia, M.

    1996-01-01

    Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) is performed to monitor the InP(100) surface evolution while it is irradiated by an electron beam of 5 KeV energy and 10 -3 A.cm -2 current density. A charge phenomenon appears during the irradiation of sputter-cleaned InP(100) by Ar + at low energy (500 eV). The deposition of phosphorus or antimony at room temperature on cleaned InP(100) is a good way of preventing this charging problem. This is also achieved by the growth of stoichiometric indium phosphide on InP(100) substrate, from an injection of phosphine and indium trimethyl whose ratio V/III is of 50, in a MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) reactor. The electron beam even acts to stimulate oxidation of the stoichiometric InP(100) surface involving on the top layers, into a well defined oxide such as InPO 4 or a contamination layer composed of carbon and oxygen. The partial pressure in the spectrometer is about 10 -9 Torr. The incident electrons produce breaking of (In-P) chemical bonds so that the resulting indium takes part in the oxidation process. The phosphorus is thought to be desorbed from the surface. (author)

  13. Electron beam radiation effects on recycled polyamide-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, Maria Cecilia; Silva, Leonardo G. de Andrade e

    2001-01-01

    Applications of electron beam processing in the treatment of polymers are commonly used. The interaction of high energy radiation with polymers may cause permanent modifications in the polymer's physicochemical structure. The induced modifications may result in degradation of the polymer or in improvement of its properties (crosslinking), which are simultaneous and competing processes, depending on the radiation dose utilized. Crosslinking occurs more readily in the polymer's amorphous content and this process makes the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the polymers to increase. Successive recycling cycles promote changes in polymers properties, such as breaking of structure, molecular weight reduction, melt index increase and mechanical resistance reduction. The polyamide-6 resin was recycled for three successive recycling cycles and thi polyamide-6 specimens were molded by the process of injection molding. These specimens were irradiated at the Nuclear Energetic Research Institute (IPEN) radiation facility, on a JOB 188 model accelerator, with a 1.5 MeV electron beam, doses of 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 kGy, and dose rate of 22.61 kGy/s. The DMA tests were performed using DMA-983 equipment from TA Instruments and two heatings were adopted in order to eliminate the moisture absorption. The X-ray diffraction analysis wa carried out at the Philips PW 1830 model equipment

  14. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using Medipix3RX: With applications from biomaterial science

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran, K.; Walsh, M. F.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Chernoglazov, A. I.; Panta, R. K.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.; Bell, S. T.; Anderson, N. G.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Tredinnick, S. J.; Healy, J. L.; Bateman, C. J.; Aamir, R.; Doesburg, R. M. N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects using spectral data for biomaterial applications. A small-animal spectral scanner operating in the diagnostic energy range was used. We investigate the use of photon-processing features of the Medipix3RX ASIC in reducing beam hardening and associated artefacts. A fully operational charge summing mode was used during the imaging routine. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D r...

  15. Effect of electron beam irradiation on nutritional ingredient of Tegillarca granosa meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chao; Yang Wenge; Xu Dalun; Ou Changrong; Shi Huidong

    2011-01-01

    The influences of 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 kGy electron beam irradiation on the contents of protein and amino acid and the composition of amino acids and fatty acids in Tegillarca granosa meat were investigated. The results showed that the electron beam had no significant effect on contents of moisture, ash and protein. Fat was sensitive to electron beam irradiation, which decreased with the increasing of irradiation dose. The composition of amino acids remained stable with different doses. The values of EAA/TAA and EAA/NEAA were kept in accordance with FAO/WHO protein model. Besides, electron beam irradiation made no effect on the limiting amino acid (the first and second limiting amino acids were Met + Cys and Val, respectively). The relative content of PUFA increased significantly 1 ∼ 7 kGy irradiation. Electron beam irradiation produced a notable impact on the essential fatty acid, induced the increase of linoleic acid, linolenic acid and arachidonic acid at the doses of 5 ∼ 9 kGy. After the irradiation of 9 kGy, the increments of relative contents of the three essential fatty acids reached 94.61%, 41.37% and 89.91%, respectively. Electron beam irradiation had positive effect on EPA with the doses of 3, 5 and 9 kGy. However, DHA was sensitive to electron beam irradiation, whose relative content decreased with the increasing of irradiation dose and undetected at the dose of 9 kGy. According to the research of decontamination effect, the recommended dose of electron beam irradiation on Tegillarca granosa ws fixed at 3 ∼ 5 kGy. (authors)

  16. Sterilizing effect of irradiation for Zuogui power with electron beam and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ling; Kong Qiulian; Qi Wenyuan; Bao Yingzi; Chen Zhijun; Yuan Zhongyi

    2011-01-01

    The sterilizing effect of irradiation for Zuogui powder with accelerator (electron beam) and a cobalt unit (γ-rays) was studied. The results indicated that the D 10 values of E-beam irradiation and γ-rays irradiation were 2.602 kGy and 2.597 kGy for aerobic bacterial count, while those were 3.112 kGy and 3.208 kGy for mould and yeasts. (authors)

  17. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-01-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances

  18. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  19. Self-focusing of laser beams in magnetized relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, M.H.; Ho, A.Y.; Kuo, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, there is considerable interest in radiation focusing and optical guiding using the resonant interaction between the radiation field and electron beam. The result of radiation focusing has been shown to play a central role in the practical utilization of the FEL. This result allows the device to use longer interaction length for achieving higher output power. Likewise, the possibility of self-focusing of the laser beam in cyclotron resonance with a relativistic electron beam is also an important issue in the laser acceleration concepts for achieving high-gradient electron acceleration. The effectiveness of the acceleration process relies strongly on whether the laser intensity can be maintained at the desired level throughout the interaction. In this work, the authors study the problem concerning the self-focusing of laser beam in the relativistic electron beams under the cyclotron auto-resonance interaction. They assume that there is no electron density perturbation prohibited from the background magnetic field for the time scale of interest. The nonlinearity responsible for self-focusing process is introduced by the energy dependence of the relativistic mass of electrons. The plasma frequency varies with the electron energy which is proportional to the radiation amplitude. They then examine such a relativistic nonlinear effect on the propagation of a Gaussian beam in the electron beam. A parametric study of the dependence of the laser beam width on the axial position for various electron beam density has been performed

  20. Analysis of the width correlation in 54Fe(nγ)55Fe reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knat'ko, V.A.; Shimanovich, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    To find out structural effects manifesting themselves in the form of correlation between widths of different channels of γ decay of levels and violation of Porter-Thomas distribution, calculated are partial widths of levels for 20 high-energy γ transitions in the 54 Fe(nγ) 55 Fe reaction. Calculations are carried out for widths in relation to γ transitions on 8 low p levels of 55 Fe, for 100 sets of partial γ widths (20 widths in a set). Results of analysis of theoretical values of partial γ widths of s resonances are presented in the form of the table. Results, obtained, show that consideration of contributions into γ decay of one-particle-vibrational configurations improve the accordance with experimental data, in comparison with calculations according to the model of valent capture. It is concluded that properties of γ widths of 55 Fe resonances, calculated in studied model, agree satisfactorily with properties of experimental γ widths [ru

  1. Nonlineart theory of relativistic beam-plasma instabilities in the regime of the collective Cherenkov effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobylev, Yu. V. [L.N. Tolstoy Tula State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation); Kuzelev, M. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Rukhadze, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

    2008-02-15

    A general mathematical model is proposed that is based on the Vlasov kinetic equation with a self-consistent field and describes the nonlinear dynamics of the electromagnetic instabilities of a relativistic electron beam in a spatially bounded plasma. Two limiting cases are analyzed, namely, high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) instabilities of a relativistic electron beam, of which the LF instability is a qualitatively new phenomenon in comparison with the known Cherenkov resonance effects. For instabilities in the regime of the collective Cherenkov effect, the equations containing cubic nonlinearities and describing the nonlinear saturation of the instabilities of a relativistic beam in a plasma are derived by using the methods of expansion in small perturbations of the trajectories and momenta of the beam electrons. Analytic expressions for the amplitudes of the interacting beam and plasma waves are obtained. The analytical results are shown to agree well with the exact solutions obtained numerically from the basic general mathematical model of the instabilities in question. The general mathematical model is also used to discuss the effects associated with variation in the constant component of the electron current in a beam-plasma system.

  2. Effect of electron beam irradiation on pollen mother cells of gladiolus 'chaoji'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiwei; Wang Dan; Wen Fangping Zhang Xiaoxue

    2008-01-01

    In order to test the effects of various doses of electron beam on M1 generation pollen mother cells (PMC), the corm of gladiolus 'chaoji' was irradiated by electron beam with 3 MeV energy. Some abnormalities of meiosis of pollen mother cells were studied and the bands of protein subunit were analyzed by SDS-PAGE for the irradiated corm. The genetic damage at meiosis of gladiolus is observed, and the types of chromosomal aberrations are laggard chromosomes, chromosomal bridge, chromosome outside nucleus, unequal separation of chromosome, micronuclei and so on. Some trispores and paraspores are viewed at tetraspore period. The shape and size of the microspores vary in some treated materials, and most of microspores display little volume. The statistic of aberrance types and frequencies in PMCs show that aberrance types are chromosome outside nucleus and micronuclei mostly. The SDS-PAGE result shows that protein expression of M1 generation pollen is obviously changed by electron beam irradiation. Low dose of electron beam has obvious effects, and some special proteins subunit bands are found among varieties of irradiation dosage respectively. The protein bands are absent at the dose more than 160 Gy compared to low dose of electron beam. The results indicate that electron beam irradiation is an effective way for gladiolus breeding. (authors)

  3. Nonlinear hybrid simulation of internal kink with beam ion effects in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fu, G. Y.; Tobias, Benjamin [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Zeeland, Michael Van [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Wang, Feng [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-04-15

    In DIII-D sawteething plasmas, long-lived (1,1) kink modes are often observed between sawtooth crashes. The saturated kink modes have two distinct frequencies. The mode with higher frequency transits to a fishbone-like mode with sufficient on-axis neutral beam power. In this work, hybrid simulations with the global kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K have been carried out to investigate the linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the n = 1 mode with effects of energetic beam ions for a typical DIII-D discharge where both saturated kink mode and fishbone were observed. Linear simulation results show that the n = 1 internal kink mode is unstable in MHD limit. However, with kinetic effects of beam ions, a fishbone-like mode is excited with mode frequency about a few kHz depending on beam pressure profile. The mode frequency is higher at higher beam power and/or narrower radial profile consistent with the experimental observation. Nonlinear simulations have been performed to investigate mode saturation as well as energetic particle transport. The nonlinear MHD simulations show that the unstable kink mode becomes a saturated kink mode after a sawtooth crash. With beam ion effects, the fishbone-like mode can also transit to a saturated kink mode with a small but finite mode frequency. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of saturated kink mode between sawtooth crashes.

  4. Effect of discrete glass fibers on the behavior of R.C. Beams exposed to fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Riad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding discrete glass fibers on the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams under different fire and cooling conditions. Eighteen beams with different concrete compressive strengths were tested to study the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams containing discrete glass fibers when exposed to different fire and cooling conditions. Nine beams were prepared from normal strength concrete (NSC with compressive strength equal to 35 MPa while the other beams were prepared from high strength concrete (HSC with compressive strength equal to 60 MPa. The beams contained different contents of discrete glass fibers. The modes of failure of tested specimens show that the crack patterns change according to fire condition and fiber content. Analysis of test results show that adding discrete glass fibers to NSC increased the residual stiffness of the tested specimens after firing and decreased the rate of the deflection gain during firing. Also adding fibers to concrete has a limited positive effect on the ultimate strength of the specimens compared to the control specimens. Its effect on deflection due to fire is more pronounced. Finally, the recommended optimum ratio of discrete glass fibers is not more than 0.5% of the total concrete weight.

  5. Effects of polymer surface energy on morphology and properties of silver nanowire fabricated via nanoimprint and E-beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Hwang, Soon Hyoung; Jeon, Sohee; Jung, Joo-Yun; Lee, Jihye; Choi, Dae-Geun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Park, Sang-Hu; Jeong, Jun-Ho

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that use of different nanoimprint resins as a polymer pattern has a significant effect on the morphology of silver (Ag) nanowires deposited via an E-beam evaporator. RM-311 and Ormo-stamp resins are chosen as a polymer pattern to form a line with dimensions of width (100 nm) × space (100 nm) × height (120 nm) by using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Their contact angles are then measured to evaluate their surface energies. In order to compare the properties of the Ag nanowires deposited on the various polymer patterns with different surface energies, hydrophobic surface treatment of the polymer pattern surface is implemented using self-assembled monolayers. In addition, gold and aluminum nanowires are fabricated for comparison with the Ag nanowires, with the differences in the nanowire morphologies being determined by the different atomic properties. The monocrystalline and polycrystalline structures of the various Ag nanowire formations are observed using transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the melting temperatures and optical properties of four kinds of Ag nanowire morphologies deposited on various polymer patterns are evaluated using a hot plate and an ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometer, respectively. The results indicate that the morphology of the Ag nanowire determines the melting temperature and the transmission. We believe that these findings will greatly aid the development of NIL, along with physical evaporation and chemical deposition techniques, and will be widely employed in optics, biology, and surface wettability applications.

  6. Problems in nonlinear acoustics: Pulsed finite amplitude sound beams, nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a liquid layer, nonlinear effects in asymmetric cylindrical sound beams, effects of absorption on the interaction of sound beams, and parametric receiving arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark F.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses five projects all of which involve basic theoretical research in nonlinear acoustics: (1) pulsed finite amplitude sound beams are studied with a recently developed time domain computer algorithm that solves the KZK nonlinear parabolic wave equation; (2) nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a liquid layer is a study of harmonic generation and acoustic soliton information in a liquid between a rigid and a free surface; (3) nonlinear effects in asymmetric cylindrical sound beams is a study of source asymmetries and scattering of sound by sound at high intensity; (4) effects of absorption on the interaction of sound beams is a completed study of the role of absorption in second harmonic generation and scattering of sound by sound; and (5) parametric receiving arrays is a completed study of parametric reception in a reverberant environment.

  7. Fast beam radiofrequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipkin, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The combination of a fast atom or ion beam derived from a small accelerator with radiofrequency spectroscopy methods provides a powerful method for measuring the fine structure of atomic and molecular systems. The fast beam makes possible measurements in which two separated oscillatory fields are used to obtain resonance lines whose widths are less than the natural line width due to the lifetimes of the states. The separated oscillatory field lines have, in addition, a number of features which make possible measurements with greater precision and less sensitivity to systematic errors. The fast beam also makes accessible multiple photon radiofrequency transitions whose line width is intrinsically narrower than that of the single photon transitions and which offer great potential for high precision measurements. This report focuses on the techniques and their promise. Recent measurements of the fine structure of H and He + are used as illustrations

  8. Electrostatic beam-position monitor

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1969-01-01

    Electrostatic beam-position monitor installed in its final location (bake-out cover removed). The ISR will contain about 110 of these monitors. Their accuracy is better than 1 mm, their band width about 1 MHz.

  9. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  10. Palindromic widths of nilpotent and wreath products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Palindromic width; commutator width; wreath products; nilpotent product. 2000 Mathematics ... An algorithm of the computation of the commutator length in free non-abelian .... It is clear that A(1)B = A × B is the direct sum. Let us list some ...

  11. Ion beam induced effects on the ferromagnetism in Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Mehta, B. R.; Agarwal, D. C.; Agarwal, Kanika; Kumar, Praveen; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Present study demonstrates the role of metal-insulator interface and ion irradiation induced defects on the ferromagnetic properties of the non-magnetic materials. Magnetic properties of the Pd nanoparticles(NPs) embedded in the a-silica matrix synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique, were determined using SQUID magnetometry measurements which showed that ferromagnetic response of Pd increased by 3.5 times on swift heavy ion(SHI) irradiation. The ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited Pd NPs is due to strain induced by the surrounding matrix and modification in the electronic structure at the Pd-silica interface as revealed by insitu XRD and XPS investigations, respectively. The defects created by the SHI bombardment are responsible for enhancement of the magnetization in the Pd NPs.

  12. Retting effect of kenaf bast fiber by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kangm Hyo Kyoung; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) retting were separated from a kenaf bast fiber by a combination of Electron beam irradiation (EBI) and NaOH solution treatment. The methods were based on a 6% NaOH solution treatment after various doses of EBI. FT-IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the content of lignin and hemicellulose in the retted kenaf fibers decreased as the EBI dose increased. Specifically, the lignin in the retted kenaf fiber treated with 300 kGy of EBI was almost completely removed. The morphology of retted kenaf fibers were characterized by SEM image, and the studies showed that the fibrillated degree of retted kenaf fibers treated with various EBI doses and was increased as EBI dose increased. The retted kenaf fibers treated with the EBI at 300 kGy was uniformly fibrillated with 10 {approx} 30 {mu}m diameters.

  13. Retting effect of kenaf bast fiber by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kangm Hyo Kyoung; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) retting were separated from a kenaf bast fiber by a combination of Electron beam irradiation (EBI) and NaOH solution treatment. The methods were based on a 6% NaOH solution treatment after various doses of EBI. FT-IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the content of lignin and hemicellulose in the retted kenaf fibers decreased as the EBI dose increased. Specifically, the lignin in the retted kenaf fiber treated with 300 kGy of EBI was almost completely removed. The morphology of retted kenaf fibers were characterized by SEM image, and the studies showed that the fibrillated degree of retted kenaf fibers treated with various EBI doses and was increased as EBI dose increased. The retted kenaf fibers treated with the EBI at 300 kGy was uniformly fibrillated with 10 ∼ 30 μm diameters

  14. Laser Beam Melting of Alumina: Effect of Absorber Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniz, Liliana; Colin, Christophe; Bartout, Jean-Dominique; Terki, Karim; Berger, Marie-Hélène

    2018-03-01

    Ceramic laser beam melting offers new manufacturing possibilities for complex refractory structures. Poor absorptivity in near infra-red wavelengths of oxide ceramics is overcome with absorber addition to ceramic powders. Absorbers affect powder bed densities and geometrical stability of melted tracks. Optimum absorber content is defined for Al2O3 by minimizing powder bed porosity, maximizing melting pool geometrical stability and limiting shrinkage. Widest stability fields are obtained with addition of 0.1 wt.% C and 0.5 wt.% β-SiC. Absorption coefficient values of Beer-Lambert law follow stability trends: they increase with C additions, whereas with β-SiC, a maximum is reached for 0.5 wt.%. Powder particle ejections are also identified. Compared to metallic materials, this ejection phenomenon can no longer be neglected when establishing a three-dimensional manufacturing strategy.

  15. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calugaru, V.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment planning in proton therapy uses a generic value for the Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) of 1.1 relative to 60 Co gamma-rays throughout the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). We have studied the variation of the RBE at three positions in the SOBP of the 76 and 201 MeV proton beams used for cancer treatment at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy in Orsay (ICPO) in two human tumor cell lines using clonogenic cell death and the incidence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as measured by pulse-field gel electrophoresis without and with endonuclease treatment to reveal clustered lesions as endpoints.The RBE for induced cell killing by the 76 MeV beam increased with depth in the SOBP. However for the 201 MeV protons it was close to that for 137 Cs gamma-rays and did not vary significantly. The incidence of DSBs and clustered lesions was higher for protons than for 137 Cs g-rays, but did not depend on the proton energy or the position in the SOBP. In the second part of our work, we have shown using cell clones made deficient for known repair genes by stable or transient shRNA transfection, that the D-NHEJ pathway determine the response to protons. The response of DNA damages created in the distal part of the 76 MeV SOBP suggests that those damages belong to the class of DNA 'complex lesions' (LMDS). It also appears that the particle fluence is a major determinant of the outcome of treatment in the distal part of the SOBP. (author)

  16. Fluka studies of the Asynchronous Beam Dump Effects on LHC Point 6

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Goddard, B; Mereghetti, A; Schmidt, R; Vlachoudis, V; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is a record-breaking machine for beam energy and intensity. An intense effort has therefore been deployed in simulating critical operational scenarios of energy deposition. Using FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the effects of an asynchronous beam dump at the LHC Point 6 where beams, with a stored energy of 360 MJ, can instantaneously release up to a few J cm^-3 in the cryogenic magnets which have a quench limit of the order of the mJ cm^-3. In the present paper we will describe the simulation approach, and discuss the evaluated maximum energy release onto the superconducting magnets during an asynchronous beam dump. We will then analyze the shielding provided by collimators installed in the area and discuss safety limits for the operation of the LHC.

  17. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Decelerated ultra-low energy ion beam bombarded naked DNA. • DNA form change induced by ion bombardment was investigated. • N-ion bombardment at 32 eV induced DNA single and double strand breaks. • Ar-ion bombardment at a-few-hundreds eV induced DNA single strand break. - Abstract: Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  18. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Decelerated ultra-low energy ion beam bombarded naked DNA. • DNA form change induced by ion bombardment was investigated. • N-ion bombardment at 32 eV induced DNA single and double strand breaks. • Ar-ion bombardment at a-few-hundreds eV induced DNA single strand break. - Abstract: Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms

  19. Effect of localization states on the electroluminescence spectral width of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China and School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing University of Arts and Sciences, Chongqing 402160 (China); Zhao, De Gang, E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn; Jiang, De Sheng; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zong Shun; Zhu, Jian Jun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Dan Mei [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Jian Ping; Zhang, Shu Ming; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2015-11-15

    The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated. With increasing In content in InGaN well layers, the peak energy redshifts, the emission intensity reduces and the inhomogeneous broadening of the luminescence band increases. In addition, it is found that the EL spectra shrink with increasing injection current at low excitation condition, which may be ascribed to both Coulomb screening of polarization field and carrier transferring from shallower localization states to the deeper ones, while at high currents the state-filling effect in all localization states may become significant and lead to a broadening of EL spectra. However, surprisingly, for the MQW sample with much higher In content, the EL spectral bandwidth can be almost unchanged with increasing current at the high current range, since a large number of carriers may be captured by the nonradiative recombination centers distributed outside the localized potential traps and the state-filling effect in the localization states is suppressed.

  20. Effect of localization states on the electroluminescence spectral width of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, De Gang; Jiang, De Sheng; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zong Shun; Zhu, Jian Jun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Dan Mei; Liu, Jian Ping; Zhang, Shu Ming; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated. With increasing In content in InGaN well layers, the peak energy redshifts, the emission intensity reduces and the inhomogeneous broadening of the luminescence band increases. In addition, it is found that the EL spectra shrink with increasing injection current at low excitation condition, which may be ascribed to both Coulomb screening of polarization field and carrier transferring from shallower localization states to the deeper ones, while at high currents the state-filling effect in all localization states may become significant and lead to a broadening of EL spectra. However, surprisingly, for the MQW sample with much higher In content, the EL spectral bandwidth can be almost unchanged with increasing current at the high current range, since a large number of carriers may be captured by the nonradiative recombination centers distributed outside the localized potential traps and the state-filling effect in the localization states is suppressed

  1. The effects of error augmentation on learning to walk on a narrow balance beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-10-01

    Error augmentation during training has been proposed as a means to facilitate motor learning due to the human nervous system's reliance on performance errors to shape motor commands. We studied the effects of error augmentation on short-term learning of walking on a balance beam to determine whether it had beneficial effects on motor performance. Four groups of able-bodied subjects walked on a treadmill-mounted balance beam (2.5-cm wide) before and after 30 min of training. During training, two groups walked on the beam with a destabilization device that augmented error (Medium and High Destabilization groups). A third group walked on a narrower beam (1.27-cm) to augment error (Narrow). The fourth group practiced walking on the 2.5-cm balance beam (Wide). Subjects in the Wide group had significantly greater improvements after training than the error augmentation groups. The High Destabilization group had significantly less performance gains than the Narrow group in spite of similar failures per minute during training. In a follow-up experiment, a fifth group of subjects (Assisted) practiced with a device that greatly reduced catastrophic errors (i.e., stepping off the beam) but maintained similar pelvic movement variability. Performance gains were significantly greater in the Wide group than the Assisted group, indicating that catastrophic errors were important for short-term learning. We conclude that increasing errors during practice via destabilization and a narrower balance beam did not improve short-term learning of beam walking. In addition, the presence of qualitatively catastrophic errors seems to improve short-term learning of walking balance.

  2. Particle unstable excited states in /sup 9/Be influence of beta recoil and width on delayed particle spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nyman, G H; Jonson, B; Kratz, K L; Larsson, P O; Mattsson, S; Ziegert, W

    1981-01-01

    The light nucleus /sup 9/Be has been studied through the emission of beta-delayed neutrons and alpha particles from /sup 9/Li. The activity is produced at the ISOLDE facility in fragmentation reactions induced either by 600 MeV proton or 910 MeV /sup 3/He beams from the CERN Synchro-cyclotron. After mass separation neutron spectra are recorded using /sup 3/He-filled proportional counters, while surface barrier detectors are used for the spectroscopy of alpha particles. Effects on the spectrum shape induced by recoil and polarization phenomena as well as large widths of the intermediate states are discussed. (14 refs).

  3. Problems in nonlinear acoustics: Scattering of sound by sound, parametric receiving arrays, nonlinear effects in asymmetric sound beams and pulsed finite amplitude sound beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark F.

    1989-08-01

    Four projects are discussed in this annual summary report, all of which involve basic research in nonlinear acoustics: Scattering of Sound by Sound, a theoretical study of two nonconlinear Gaussian beams which interact to produce sum and difference frequency sound; Parametric Receiving Arrays, a theoretical study of parametric reception in a reverberant environment; Nonlinear Effects in Asymmetric Sound Beams, a numerical study of two dimensional finite amplitude sound fields; and Pulsed Finite Amplitude Sound Beams, a numerical time domain solution of the KZK equation.

  4. Ground state energy and width of 7He from 8Li proton knockout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denby, D. H.; DeYoung, P. A.; Hall, C. C.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Spyrou, A.; Breitbach, E.; Howes, R.; Brown, J.; Frank, N.; Gade, A.; Mosby, S. M.; Peters, W. A.; Thoennessen, M.; Hinnefeld, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jenson, R. A.; Luther, B.; Olson, C. W.; Schiller, A.

    2008-01-01

    The ground state energy and width of 7 He has been measured with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and superconducting dipole Sweeper magnet experimental setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. 7 He was produced by proton knockout from a secondary 8 Li beam. The measured decay energy spectrum is compared to simulations based on Breit-Wigner line shape with an energy-dependent width for the resonant state. The energy of the ground state is found to be 400(10) keV with a full-width at half-maximum of 125( -15 +40 ) keV

  5. The effects of fabric type, fabric width and model type on the cost of unit raw material in terms of apparel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, H.; Duru Baykal, P.

    2017-10-01

    The cost of the fabric which is the raw material of apparel constitutes approximately the half of the total product cost. So, it is highly important that the fabric should be used with the greatest productivity. Cost analysis are of great importance in terms of competitiveness of readymade clothing and apparel sector both in national and international markets. The proximity of costs to international average and the average cost of the countries that are competitors of Turkey in clothing market is essential for Turkey to sustain its effect in textile sector. In the contrary case, the sector won’t be able to maintain its competitive capacity sustainably [1].The main cost elements of textile and apparel sector consist of raw material, labor, energy and financing [2].

  6. Propagation of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Rumao; Si, Lei; Ma, Yanxing; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2012-08-10

    The propagation properties of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions through non-Kolmogorov turbulence are studied in detail both analytically and numerically. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the beam width of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions propagating through turbulence are derived based on the combination of statistical optics methods and the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The effect of beam distortions, such as amplitude modulation and phase fluctuation, is studied by numerical examples. The numerical results reveal that phase fluctuations have significant influence on the spreading of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays in non-Kolmogorov turbulence, and the effects of the phase fluctuations can be negligible as long as the phase fluctuations are controlled under a certain level, i.e., a>0.05 for the situation considered in the paper. Furthermore, large phase fluctuations can convert the beam distribution rapidly to a Gaussian form, vary the spreading, weaken the optimum truncation effects, and suppress the dependence of spreading on the parameters of the non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

  7. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effects of different LET radiation in A. oryzae. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced base substitutions, frameshifts, deletions. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced genome-wide large-scale mutations in A. oryzae. ► Some differences in the types and frequencies of mutations were found. ► Our results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae. - Abstract: Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was 12 C 5+ ion beams with an LET of 121 keV/μm. The 12 C 5+ ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2 keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. 12 C 6+ ion beams with an LET of 86 keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to 12 C 6+ ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47 × 10 −3 at 700 Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700 Gy, 12 C 5+ ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67 × 10 −3 ) at 400 Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between 12 C 5+ ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2 bp was generally low

  8. Studies on mass deposition effect and energy effect of biomolecules implanted by N+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Yu Zengliang

    1994-05-01

    By analyzing some spectrum of tyrosine sample implanted by N + ion beam, it is deduced that the implantation N + could react with the tyrosine molecule and substitute =C 5 H- group of benzene ring to produce a N-heterocyclic compound. This compound would notably affect the residual activity of the sample. Moreover, the percentage of the product molecules to the damaged tyrosine molecules is larger than the reciprocal of the proportion of their extinction coefficients. On the other hand, by comparing the release of inorganic phosphate, it is found that the radiation sensibility for four basic nucleotides is 5'-dTMP>5'-CMP>5'-GMP>5'-AMP. to implanted nucleotides, alkali treatment and heat treatment could increase the amount of inorganic phosphate. The amount of inorganic phosphate in the nucleotide samples directly implanted by ions beam is about 60% of the total amount of inorganic phosphate that could be released from the implanted samples heated at 90 degree C for 1.75 hours. Alkali treatment could damage and split the free bases released from the implanted nucleotides, but heat treatment might repair those damaged bases. Above results prove that ions implantation to biomolecules has the mass deposition effects and energy effects

  9. Beam-dynamic effects at the CMS BRIL van der Meer scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, A.

    2018-03-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is responsible for the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS experiment. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors (luminometers), adequate for the experimental conditions associated with high values of instantaneous luminosity delivered by the CERN LHC . BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. Precise and accurate measurements of the delivered luminosity is of paramount importance for the CMS physics program. The absolute calibration of luminosity is achieved by the van der Meer method, which is carried out under specially tailored conditions. This paper presents models used to simulate of beam-dynamic effects arising due to the electromagnetic interaction of colliding bunches. These effects include beam-beam deflection and dynamic-β effect. Both effects are important to luminosity measurements and influence calibration constants at the level of 1-2%. The simulations are carried out based on 2016 CMS van der Meer scan data for proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  10. The combined effects of e-beam irradiation and microwaves on starch, flour and ingredients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdes, O.S.; Martin, D.; Minea, R.; Tirlea, A.; Badea, M.

    1998-01-01

    The influences of both microwave field and electron beam irradiation, separately and combined, mainly on physical parameters of corn starch, wheat flour and black pepper were studied. These treatments have been used to achieve the hygienic and microbiological quality requirements of these materials and for their dehydration. The electron-beam irradiation has been carried out by using an ALIN-7 linear accelerator with the following parameters: electron mean energy 6 MeV, mean bean current 10 μA, pulse period 3.5 μs. repetition frequency 100 Hz. For microwave experiments, a special designed microwave applicator consisting of a special cavity, a power controlled generator with a 2.45 GHz standard frequency CW magnetron of 850 W maximum output power was used. The experiments were carried out in 5 variants: microwave treatment solely; electron beam irradiation solely; microwave treatment followed by electron beam irradiation; electron beam irradiation followed by microwave treatment; simultaneous microwave and electron beam treatment. The samples were treated by microwaves at 4 different power values from 250 W to 550 W for 5 different exposure times. The electron beam irradiation took place within the dose range of 1 - 10 kGy, at the same dose rate of approximately 2 kGy/min. The influence of these two physical fields on some common properties (r.h., pH), spectrophotometric (UV-VIS spectra), viscometric (rheograms) and microbiological (CFU/g) properties of the food materials was evaluated. A direct relationship between the variables was observed. The microwave effects are mainly thermal effects, although a non-thermal effect was also observed. The main microbiocidal action is due to the electron beam effect, although the microwave treatment affects sometimes significantly both the microbial population and its sensitivity to irradiation. The combined treatment indicates the presence of a synergistic effect of microwaves and electron-beams, which is of non

  11. Modelling the widths of fission observables in GEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The widths of the mass distributions of the different fission channels are traced back to the probability distributions of the corresponding quantum oscillators that are coupled to the heat bath, which is formed by the intrinsic degrees of freedom of the fissioning system under the influence of pairing correlations and shell effects. Following conclusion from stochastic calculations of Adeev and Pashkevich, an early freezing due to dynamical effects is assumed. It is shown that the mass width of the fission channels in low-energy fission is strongly influenced by the zero-point motion of the corresponding quantum oscillator. The observed variation of the mass widths of the asymmetric fission channels with excitation energy is attributed to the energy-dependent properties of the heat bath and not to the population of excited states of the corresponding quantum oscillator.

  12. Nonlinear delta f Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hong Qi

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, ...

  13. Effects of physical guidance on short-term learning of walking on a narrow beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Physical guidance is often used in rehabilitation when teaching patients to re-learn movements. However, the effects of guidance on motor learning of complex skills, such as walking balance, are not clear. We tested four groups of healthy subjects that practiced walking on a narrow (1.27 cm) or wide (2.5 cm) treadmill-mounted balance beam, with or without physical guidance. Assistance was given by springs attached to a hip belt that applied restoring forces towards beam center. Subjects were evaluated while walking unassisted before and after training by calculating the number of times subjects stepped off of the beam per minute of successful walking on the beam (Failures per Minute). Subjects in Unassisted groups had greater performance improvements in walking balance from pre to post compared to subjects in Assisted groups. During training, Unassisted groups had more Failures per Minute than Assisted groups. Performance improvements were smaller in Narrow Beam groups than in Wide Beam groups. The Unassisted-Wide and Assisted-Narrow groups had similar Failures per Minute during training, but the Unassisted-Wide group had much greater performance gains after training. These results suggest that physical assistance can hinder motor learning of walking balance, assistance appears less detrimental for more difficult tasks, and task-specific dynamics are important to learning independent of error experience. PMID:19674900

  14. Effects of physical guidance on short-term learning of walking on a narrow beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P

    2009-11-01

    Physical guidance is often used in rehabilitation when teaching patients to re-learn movements. However, the effects of guidance on motor learning of complex skills, such as walking balance, are not clear. We tested four groups of healthy subjects that practiced walking on a narrow (1.27 cm) or wide (2.5 cm) treadmill-mounted balance beam, with or without physical guidance. Assistance was given by springs attached to a hip belt that applied restoring forces towards beam center. Subjects were evaluated while walking unassisted before and after training by calculating the number of times subjects stepped off of the beam per minute of successful walking on the beam (Failures per Minute). Subjects in Unassisted groups had greater performance improvements in walking balance from pre to post compared to subjects in Assisted groups. During training, Unassisted groups had more Failures per Minute than Assisted groups. Performance improvements were smaller in Narrow Beam groups than in Wide Beam groups. The Unassisted-Wide and Assisted-Narrow groups had similar Failures per Minute during training, but the Unassisted-Wide group had much greater performance gains after training. These results suggest that physical assistance can hinder motor learning of walking balance, assistance appears less detrimental for more difficult tasks, and task-specific dynamics are important to learning independent of error experience.

  15. Comparison between TG-51 and TRS-398: electron contamination effect on photon beam-quality specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Antonio Lopez; Teijeiro, Antonio; Salvador, Francisco; Medal, Daniela; Vazquez, Julio; Salgado, Manuel; Carrion, MarIa C

    2004-01-01

    Two dosimetry protocols based on absorbed dose to water have recently been implemented: TG-51 and TRS-398. These protocols use different beam-quality indices. The effect of electron contamination in measurements of %dd(10) x has been proposed as a disadvantage of the TG-51. For actual measurements of %dd(10) x in five clinical beams ) a purging magnet was employed to remove the electron contamination. Also, %dd(10) x was measured in the different ways described in TG-51 for high-energy beams: with a lead foil at 50 cm from the phantom surface, at 30 cm, and for open beam. Moreover, TPR 20,10 was determined. Also, periodic quality-control measurements were used for comparing both quality indices and variation over time, but D 20,10 was used instead of TPR 20,10 and measurements in open beam for the %dd(10) x determination. Considering both protocols, S w,air and k Q were calculated in order to compare the results with the experimental data. Significant differences (0.3% for k Q ) were only found for the two high-energy beams, but when the electron contamination is underestimated by TG-51, the difference in k Q is lower. Differences in the other cases and variations over time were less than 0.1%

  16. Effect of laser beam filamentation on plasma wave localization and stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, Gunjan; Sharma, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser beam filamentation on the localization of electron plasma wave (EPW) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in unmagnitized plasma when both relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are operative. The filamentary dynamics of laser beam is studied and the splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. The localization of electron plasma wave takes place due to nonlinear coupling between the laser beam and EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. The localization of EPW also affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave; consequently, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. The new enhanced damping of the plasma wave has been calculated and it is found that the SRS process gets suppressed due to the localization of plasma wave in laser beam filamentary structures. For typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength λ (=1064 nm), power flux (=10 16 W/cm 2 ) and plasma density (n/n cr ) = 0.2; the SRS back reflectivity is found to be suppressed by a factor of around 5%. (author)

  17. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Sekine, Megumi; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface

  18. Geometrical Optics of Beams with Vortices: Berry Phase and Orbital Angular Momentum Hall Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.

    2006-01-01

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed

  19. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  20. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.