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Sample records for effect unveils inter-head

  1. Unveiling the truth: warnings reduce the repetition-based truth effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarevic, Lena; Aßfalg, André

    2017-07-01

    Typically, people are more likely to consider a previously seen or heard statement as true compared to a novel statement. This repetition-based "truth effect" is thought to rely on fluency-truth attributions as the underlying cognitive mechanism. In two experiments, we tested the nature of the fluency-attribution mechanism by means of warning instructions, which informed participants about the truth effect and asked them to prevent it. In Experiment 1, we instructed warned participants to consider whether a statement had already been presented in the experiment to avoid the truth effect. However, warnings did not significantly reduce the truth effect. In Experiment 2, we introduced control questions and reminders to ensure that participants understood the warning instruction. This time, warning reduced, but did not eliminate the truth effect. Assuming that the truth effect relies on fluency-truth attributions, this finding suggests that warned participants could control their attributions but did not disregard fluency altogether when making truth judgments. Further, we found no evidence that participants overdiscount the influence of fluency on their truth judgments.

  2. Games Uniforms Unveiled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda

    2008-01-01

    The uniforms for Beijing Olympics’ workers, technical staff and volunteers have been unveiled to mark the 200-day countdown to the Games. The uniforms feature the key element of the clouds of promise and will be in three colors:red for Beijing Olympic Games Committee staff, blue

  3. Unveiling the Effects of Citizen Journalism Practice on College Students' Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nah, Seungahn; Namkoong, Kang; Van Stee, Stephanie K.; Record, Rachael A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of citizen journalism practices on social capital concerning nonprofit and voluntary organizations (i.e., satisfaction, trust, and engagement). Through a quasi-experimental design, the analyses revealed that students in the treatment group, in which participants engaged in citizen journalism practice, had greater…

  4. Lord Shiva Statue Unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 18 June, CERN unveiled an unusual new landmark, a 2m tall statue of the Indian deity Lord Shiva. The Director-General and Dr. Kakodkar watch as Mr.Chandrasekhar signs the Guest Book. The statue is a gift from India, celebrating CERN's long association with India which started in the 1960's and continues strongly today. It was unveiled by the Director General, Dr Robert Aymar, His Excellency Mr K. M. Chandrasekhar, Ambassador (WTO-Geneva) and Dr Anil Kakodkar, Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Dept of Atomic Energy, India. In the Hindu religion, this form of the dancing Lord Shiva is known as the Nataraj and symbolises Shakti, or life force. As a plaque alongside the statue explains, the belief is that Lord Shiva danced the Universe into existence, motivates it, and will eventually extinguish it. Carl Sagan drew the metaphor between the cosmic dance of the Nataraj and the modern study of the 'cosmic dance' of subatomic particles. The statue was made in India. The original sculpture was...

  5. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribuffo, Diego; Lo Torto, Federico [Department of Plastic Surgery, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Giannitelli, Sara M. [Tissue Engineering Unit, Department of Engineering, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome (Italy); Urbini, Marco; Tortora, Luca [Surface Analysis Laboratory, Department of Mathematics and Physics, University “Roma Tre”, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); INFN — National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Section of Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); Mozetic, Pamela; Trombetta, Marcella [Tissue Engineering Unit, Department of Engineering, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome (Italy); Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia [Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00173 Rome (Italy); Tombolini, Vincenzo [Department of Radiation Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Spencer-Lorillard Foundation, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome (Italy); Cassese, Raffaele [Department of Radiation Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Scuderi, Nicolò [Department of Plastic Surgery, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); and others

    2015-12-01

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. - Highlights: • The debate continues whether to perform breast reconstruction before or after PMRT. • Radiation therapy may alter implant material, concurring to capsular contracture. • In this work, irradiated implants were investigated by a multi-technique approach. • Radiation-induced alterations could be evidenced by ATR/FTIR and ToF-SIMS. • Reported alteration might represent a co-factor underlying capsular contracture.

  6. Communication, Reasoning, and Planned Behaviors: Unveiling the Effect of Interactive Communication in an Anti-Smoking Social Media Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, Kang; Nah, Seungahn; Record, Rachael A; Van Stee, Stephanie K

    2017-01-01

    This study examines direct and indirect effects of interactive communication in an antismoking social media campaign. To that end, we pose a multitheoretical framework that integrates communication mediation models and the Theory of Planned Behavior. To test the theorized model, we conducted an experiment using a two-group pretest-posttest design. Participants (N = 201) were randomly assigned into two experimental conditions: "campaign message reception only" as a control group and "message reception and social interaction" as a treatment group, in which the participants contributed to the antismoking campaign by posting their own campaign ideas and information they found through mediated and interpersonal communication. The findings show that interactive communication catalyzes the participants' information searching behaviors through diverse communication channels. In turn, increased media use plays a crucial role in changing their attitudes and perceived social norms about smoking behaviors, and eventually reducing smoking intention. This study affirms that the theory of planned behavior is effective in predicting behavioral intention and demonstrates the usefulness of a multitheoretical approach in interactive campaign research on social media.

  7. Unveiling the decoherence effect of noise on the entropic uncertainty relation and its control by partially collapsed operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Nan; Sun, Wen-Yang; Huang, Ai-Jun; Ming, Fei; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relations under open systems, and how to steer the uncertainty under different types of decoherence. Specifically, we develop the dynamical behaviors of the uncertainty of interest under two typical categories of noise; bit flipping and depolarizing channels. It has been shown that the measurement uncertainty firstly increases and then decreases with the growth of the decoherence strength in bit flipping channels. In contrast, the uncertainty monotonically increases with the increase of the decoherence strength in depolarizing channels. Notably, and to a large degree, it is shown that the uncertainty depends on both the systematic quantum correlation and the minimal conditional entropy of the observed subsystem. Moreover, we present a possible physical interpretation for these distinctive behaviors of the uncertainty within such scenarios. Furthermore, we propose a simple and effective strategy to reduce the entropic uncertainty by means of a partially collapsed operation—quantum weak measurement. Therefore, our investigations might offer an insight into the dynamics of the measurment uncertainty under decoherence, and be of importance to quantum precision measurement in open systems.

  8. Unveiling the stimulatory effects of tartrazine on human and bovine serum albumin fibrillogenesis: Spectroscopic and microscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabib, Nasser Abdulatif; Khan, Javed Masood; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A.; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M.; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Khan, Mohammad Rashid; Naseem, Mohammad; Sen, Priyankar; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2018-02-01

    Amyloid fibrils are playing key role in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Generally anionic molecules are known to induce amyloid fibril in several proteins. In this work, we have studied the effect of anionic food additive dye i.e., tartrazine (TZ) on the amyloid fibril formation of human serum albumins (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pHs 7.4 and 3.5. We have employed various biophysical methods like, turbidity measurements, Rayleigh Light Scattering (RLS), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), intrinsic fluorescence, Congo red assay, far-UV CD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to decipher the mechanism of TZ-induce amyloid fibril formation in both the serum albumins at pHs 7.4 and 3.5. The obtained results suggest that both the albumins forms amyloid-like aggregates in the presence of 1.0 to 15.0 mM of TZ at pH 3.5, but no amyloid fibril were seen at pH 7.4. The possible cause of TZ-induced amyloid fibril formation is electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction because sulfate group of TZ may have interacted electrostatically with positively charged amino acids of the albumins at pH 3.5 and increased protein-protein and protein-TZ interactions leading to amyloid fibril formation. The TEM, RLS and DLS results are suggesting that BSA forms bigger size amyloids compared to HSA, may be due to high surface hydrophobicity of BSA.

  9. France: the programme of festivities is unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The programme of events to be held in the local French area in honour of CERN's fiftieth anniversary was unveiled in the CMS hall on 26 April at a ceremony attended by many local authority representatives.

  10. Georges Charpak street sign unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Paola Catapano

    2011-01-01

    While it might not be the only French street named in honour of the late Georges Charpak, who passed away in September 2010 at the age of 87, the street chosen by the mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly is certainly the only one located directly opposite the CERN "campus". The road overlooks buildings on the CERN Meyrin site, where Georges Charpak spent most of his career as a physicist, conducting the research that won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1992.   From left to right: Sigurd Lettow, Dominique Charpak and the mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly. The unveiling took place on 17 October and was organised by the mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly. George Charpak’s wife, Dominique, and Sigurd Lettow, CERN Director of Administration and General Infrastructure, attended what was an intimate and touching ceremony. The mayor’s speech at the event praised Georges’ commitment to scientific education. The highlight of the event, however, was a witty and humorous ...

  11. Germany unveils €18bn research plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-07-01

    The German government has unveiled an ambitious plan to inject a total of €18bn into teaching and research over the next decade. The German chancellor Angela Merkel, who has a degree in physics, announced that she was releasing the funds despite concerns from her social-democrat coalition partners that financing the package could be difficult in the economic downturn.

  12. Cash boost to Great British science unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary, Patricia Hewitt today unveiled new plans for the DTI's record science budget over the next three years, to keep Britain at the forefront of world science. The plans include funding to develop life saving new health techniques, to seek alternative energy sources, to help our rural economy, to develop the computers of tomorrow and boost business with the next generation of leading edge technologies" (1 page).

  13. Unveiling Cebuano Traditional Healing Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZachiaRaiza Joy S. Berdon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the features of Cebuano’s traditional healing practices. Specifically, it also answers the following objectives: analyze traditional healing in Cebuano’s perspectives, explain the traditional healing process practiced in terms of the traditional healers’ belief, and extrapolate perceptions of medical practitioners toward traditional healing. This study made use of qualitative approach, among five traditional healers who performed healing for not less than ten years, in the mountain barangays of Cebu City. These healers served as the primary informants who were selected because of their popularity in healing. The use of open-ended interview in local dialect and naturalistic observation provided a free listing of their verbatim accounts were noted and as primary narratives. Participation in the study was voluntary and participants were interviewed privately after obtaining their consent. The Cebuano traditional healing practices or “panambal” comprise the use of “himolso” (pulse-checking, “palakaw” (petition, “pasubay” (determining what causes the sickness and its possible means of healing, “pangalap” (searching of medicinal plants for “palina” (fumigation, “tayhop” (gentle-blowing, “tutho” (saliva-blowing,“tuob” (boiling, “orasyon” (mystical prayers, “hilot” (massage, and “barang” (sorcery. Though traditional with medical science disapproval, it contributes to a mystical identity of Cebuano healers, as a manifestation of folk Catholicism belief, in order to do a good legacy to the community that needs help. For further study, researchers may conduct further the studies on the: curative effects of medicinal plants in Cebu, psychological effect pulsechecking healed persons by the mananambal, and unmasking the other features of traditional healing.

  14. Unveiling aerosol-cloud interactions - Part 2: Minimising the effects of aerosol swelling and wet scavenging in ECHAM6-HAM2 for comparison to satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, David; Christensen, Matthew W.; Poulsen, Caroline A.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-11-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACIs) are uncertain and the estimates of the ACI effective radiative forcing (ERFaci) magnitude show a large variability. Within the Aerosol_cci project the susceptibility of cloud properties to changes in aerosol properties is derived from the high-resolution AATSR (Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) data set using the Cloud-Aerosol Pairing Algorithm (CAPA) (as described in our companion paper) and compared to susceptibilities from the global aerosol climate model ECHAM6-HAM2 and MODIS-CERES (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) data. For ECHAM6-HAM2 the dry aerosol is analysed to mimic the effect of CAPA. Furthermore the analysis is done for different environmental regimes. The aerosol-liquid water path relationship in ECHAM6-HAM2 is systematically stronger than in AATSR-CAPA data and cannot be explained by an overestimation of autoconversion when using diagnostic precipitation but rather by aerosol swelling in regions where humidity is high and clouds are present. When aerosol water is removed from the analysis in ECHAM6-HAM2 the strength of the susceptibilities of liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo as well as ERFaci agree much better with those of AATSR-CAPA or MODIS-CERES. When comparing satellite-derived to model-derived susceptibilities, this study finds it more appropriate to use dry aerosol in the computation of model susceptibilities. We further find that the statistical relationships inferred from different satellite sensors (AATSR-CAPA vs. MODIS-CERES) as well as from ECHAM6-HAM2 are not always of the same sign for the tested environmental conditions. In particular the susceptibility of the liquid water path is negative in non-raining scenes for MODIS-CERES but positive for AATSR-CAPA and ECHAM6-HAM2. Feedback processes like cloud-top entrainment that are missing or not well represented in the model are therefore not well

  15. Unveiling DNA structural properties of promoter regions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya Kumar

    Unveiling DNA structural properties of promoter regions of prokaryotic transcriptome and their role in gene expression. Aditya Kumar. Assistant Professor. Molecular Biology & Biotechnology. Tezpur University. Tezpur – 784028, Assam ...

  16. Unveiling Reality of the Mind: Cultural Arbitrary of Consumerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su-Jin

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the cultural arbitrary of consumerism by focusing on a personal realm. That is, I discuss what consumerism appeals to and how it flourishes in relation to our minds. I argue that we need to unveil reality of the mind, be aware of ourselves in relation to the perpetuation of consumerism, in order to critically intervene in the…

  17. Book review: Unveiling the Whale: Discourses on Whales and Whaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Schelhas

    2012-01-01

    Whaling represents one of the most internationally controversial and highly polarized environmental issues of recent times. Arne Kalland, in Unveiling the Whale: Discourses on Whales and Whaling, examines the whaling issue from the perspective of a pro-whaling country with an emphasis on analysis of discourse in international arenas, primarily the International Whaling...

  18. Proofpoint unveils the industry's most advanced anti-spam laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Proofpoint, Inc., the leader in large enterprise anti-spam solutions, today unveiled its Anti-Spam Laboratory, the world's most advanced center for spam research and analysis, and the first to be based on advanced Machine Learning science" (1 page).

  19. First National Picture of Trends in the Humanities Is Unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to hard data about what they do, policy makers and educators in the humanities have been mostly left out in the cold, forced to rely on isolated statistics that do not give an overview of the field. That changed this month, as the American Academy of Arts and Sciences unveiled the prototype of its long-awaited Humanities Indicators…

  20. Data analysis unveils a new stylized fact in foreign currency markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacher, J. C.; Ochiai, T.

    2012-09-01

    The search for stylized facts (i.e., simplified empirical facts) is of capital importance in econophysics because the stylized facts constitute the experimental empirical body on which theories and models should be tested. At the moment they are too few and this is an important limitation to the progress in the field. In this work, we unveil a new stylized fact, which consists of resistance effect and breaking-acceleration effect that implicitly requires a long memory feature in price movement. By analyzing a vast amount of historical data, we demonstrate that the financial market tends to exceed a past (historical) extreme price less often than expected by a classic short-memory model (e.g., Black-Scholes model). We call it resistance effect. However, when the market does it, we predict that the average volatility at that time point will be much higher (accelerates more). It means, in average, volatility accelerates more when the price breaks the highest (lowest) value. We refer to this as breaking-acceleration effect. These observed empirical facts are actually an effect which may arise from technical trading and psychological effects. Taken together, these results indicate that, beyond the predictive capability of this unveiled stylized fact, traditional short-memory models do not faithfully capture the market dynamics.

  1. Universe unveiled the cosmos in my bubble bath

    CERN Document Server

    Vishveshwara, C V

    2015-01-01

    The bubbles were swirling all around me, massaging my body. As I luxuriated in this fantastic bath, I gasped realizing that those bubbles carried with them miniature galaxies bringing the entire Cosmos into my bathtub... Alfie is back. And so are George and other characters from the author’s previous book Einstein’s Enigma or Black Holes in My Bubble Bath. While the present book, Universe Unveiled - The Cosmos in My Bubble Bath, is completely independent, its storyline can be considered a sequel to the previous one. The scientific content spanning ancient world models to the most recent mysteries of cosmology is presented in an entirely nontechnical and descriptive style through the discussions between Alfie, the enlightened learner, and George, professor of astrophysics. Fantasies, based on these discussions that cover the scientific facts, are created by the magical bubble baths taken by Alfie. Universe Unveiled blends accurate science with philosophy, drama, humour, and fantasy to create an exciting co...

  2. ESA Unveils Its New Comet Chaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The objective is to study one of these primordial objects at close quarters by placing a lander on its surface and chasing, with an orbiter, the comet for millions of kilometres through space. Comets - among the oldest (4.6 billion years!) and last altered objects in the solar system - are regarded as the building blocks from which the planets formed. Thus the Rosetta's discoveries will allow the scientists to learn more about birth and evolution of the planets and about the origin of life on the Earth. The final design of the Rosetta orbiter will be revealed for the first time at the Royal Society in London on 1 July when a 1:4 scale model will be unveiled by ESA's Director of Science, Prof.. Roger Bonnet. (The full size version of the spacecraft is 32 metres across, so large that it would stretch the entire width of a football pitch. Almost 90 of this is accounted for by the giant solar panels which are needed to provide electrical power in the dark depths of the Solar System). "Rosetta is a mission of major scientific importance," said Prof. Bonnet. "It will build on the discoveries made by Giotto and confirm ESA's leading role in the exploration of the Solar System and the Universe as a whole." The timing of this event has been chosen to coincide with the London meeting of the Rosetta Science Working Team and the second Earth flyby of the now non-operational Giotto spacecraft. In addition, the opening of the British Museum's 'Cracking Codes' Exhibition, for which the Rosetta Stone is the centrepiece, is set to take place on 10 July. The Rosetta mission. Rosetta is the third Cornerstone in ESA's 'Horizon 2000' long-term scientific programme. It will be launched by Ariane 5 rocket from Kourou spaceport in French Guiana in January 2003. In order to gain sufficient speed to reach the distant comet, Rosetta will require gravity assists from the Earth (twice) and Mars. After swinging around Mars in May 2005, Rosetta will return to Earth's vicinity in October 2005 and

  3. Expectations and satisfaction of pregnant women: unveiling prenatal care in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecida Maciel Cardelli, Alexandrina; Li Marrero, Tai; Aparecida Pimenta Ferrari, Rosângela; Trevisan Martins, Júlia; Serafim, Deise

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the perception of primiparous women about prenatal care in Basic Health Units in a municipality in southern Brazil. This is a qualitative research from the perspective of Social Representation Theory, from the following question: How has been the pre-natal care for you? Eighteen pregnant women were interviewed. The analysis resulted in three categories: Expectation representation about prenatal care; Rescuing the care offered in prenatal consultation; Unveiling the (dis) satisfaction with prenatal consultation. The prenatal care was apprehended as an essential moment for safe pregnancy, although centered on the doctor's figure and guarantee access to early laboratory and imaging tests. On the other hand, dissatisfaction was revealed from the reception at the entrance to the health unit to the consultations access, although some statements suggest timely satisfaction. Prenatal care did not meet the specific expectations of the study group and unveiled that the nurse did not supply it, as a member of the multidisciplinary team. The organization of the nursing work process in primary care, related to prenatal care, needs to be revisited to promote the effectiveness of its actions.

  4. Expectations and satisfaction of pregnant women: unveiling prenatal care in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel Cardelli

    Full Text Available Objective.To analyze the perception of primiparous women about prenatal care in Basic Health Units in a municipality in southern Brazil. Methods. This is a qualitative research from the perspective of Social Representation Theory, from the following question: How has been the pre-natal care for you? Eighteen pregnant women were interviewed. Results. The analysis resulted in three categories: Expectation representation about prenatal care; Rescuing the care offered in prenatal consultation; Unveiling the (dis satisfaction with prenatal consultation. The prenatal care was apprehended as an essential moment for safe pregnancy, although centered on the doctor's figure and guarantee access to early laboratory and imaging tests. On the other hand, dissatisfaction was revealed from the reception at the entrance to the health unit to the consultations access, although some statements suggest timely satisfaction. Conclusion. Prenatal care did not meet the specific expectations of the study group and unveiled that the nurse did not supply it, as a member of the multidisciplinary team. The organization of the nursing work process in primary care, related to prenatal care, needs to be revisited to promote the effectiveness of its actions.

  5. Unveiling the Higgs mechanism to students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we outline a lecture given to undergraduate students to explain why physicists are so interested in the Higgs boson. The lecture was conceived for students not yet familiar with advanced physics and is suitable for those studying several other disciplines. The Higgs mechanism is introduced through semi-classical arguments mimicking basic field-theory concepts, assuming the validity of a symmetry principle in the expression of the energy of particles in a classical field. The lecture is divided into two parts. The first, suitable even for high-school students, shows how the mass of a particle results from a dynamical effect caused by interaction between a massless particle and a field (as in the Higgs mechanism). The audience for the second, much more technical part consists mainly of teachers and university students from disciplines other than physics. (paper)

  6. 'THE UNVEILED HEART' a teaching program in cardiovascular nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, Roland; Merabet, Yasmina; Roca, Ramona; Bontemps, Laurence; Itti, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    The functional investigation of cardiac diseases using nuclear techniques involves several variables, such as myocardial perfusion, cellular viability or mechanical contraction. The combined, topographical and quantitative assessment of these variables can characterize the functional state of the heart in terms of normal myocardium, ischemia, hibernation or necrosis. The teaching program, 'The Unveiled Heart', has been designed in order to help nuclear physicians or cardiologists approaching these concepts and their implications for diagnosis of coronary artery disease, optimization of therapeutic strategies and prognosis evaluation. Anatomical correlations with coronary angiographic results obtained during balloon occlusion at the time of coronary angioplasty demonstrate the complementary role of imaging techniques and highlight the patient to patient variability of risk areas. A sectorial model derived from a polar projection of the myocardium presents for each sector the probability of involvement of a given coronary artery

  7. Photonic integrated circuits unveil crisis-induced intermittency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsaklian Dal Bosco, Andreas; Akizawa, Yasuhiro; Kanno, Kazutaka; Uchida, Atsushi; Harayama, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-19

    We experimentally investigate an intermittent route to chaos in a photonic integrated circuit consisting of a semiconductor laser with time-delayed optical feedback from a short external cavity. The transition from a period-doubling dynamics to a fully-developed chaos reveals a stage intermittently exhibiting these two dynamics. We unveil the bifurcation mechanism underlying this route to chaos by using the Lang-Kobayashi model and demonstrate that the process is based on a phenomenon of attractor expansion initiated by a particular distribution of the local Lyapunov exponents. We emphasize on the crucial importance of the distribution of the steady-state solutions introduced by the time-delayed feedback on the existence of this intermittent dynamics.

  8. Traditional Islamic cities unveiled: the quest for urban design regularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Correia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Islamic cities have generally gathered orientalized gazes and perspectives, picking up from misconceptions and stereotypes that during the second half af the 19th century andwere perpectuated by colonialism. More recent scholarship has shed light on the urban organizationand composition of such tissues; most of them confined to old quarters or historical centres ofthriving contemporary cities within the Arab-Muslim world. In fact, one of the most striking featureshas been the unveiling of layered urban assemblages where exterior agents have somehowlaunched or interrupted an apparent islamicized continuum. Primarly, this paper wishes to search forexternal political factors that have designed regularly geometrized patterns in medium-sized Arabtowns. For that, two case studies from different geographies - Maghreb and the Near East - will bemorphologically analysed through updated urban surveys. Whereas Nablus (Palestine ows the urbanmatrix of its old town to its Roman past, in Azemmour’s medina (Morocco it is still possible to trackthe thin European early-modern colonial stratum. However, both cases show how regularity patternschallenge Western concepts of geometrical design to embrace levels of rationality related to tradionalIslamic urban forms, societal configurations and built environment. Urban morphology becomes afundamental tool for articulating the history with me processes of sedimentation and evolution in orderto read current urban prints and dynamics. Thus, the paper will also interpret alternative logics ofrational urban display in Azemmour and Nablus, linked to ways of living within the Islamic sphere.

  9. Tempo and mode of genomic mutations unveil human evolutionary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Mutations that have occurred in human genomes provide insight into various aspects of evolutionary history such as speciation events and degrees of natural selection. Comparing genome sequences between human and great apes or among humans is a feasible approach for inferring human evolutionary history. Recent advances in high-throughput or so-called 'next-generation' DNA sequencing technologies have enabled the sequencing of thousands of individual human genomes, as well as a variety of reference genomes of hominids, many of which are publicly available. These sequence data can help to unveil the detailed demographic history of the lineage leading to humans as well as the explosion of modern human population size in the last several thousand years. In addition, high-throughput sequencing illustrates the tempo and mode of de novo mutations, which are producing human genetic variation at this moment. Pedigree-based human genome sequencing has shown that mutation rates vary significantly across the human genome. These studies have also provided an improved timescale of human evolution, because the mutation rate estimated from pedigree analysis is half that estimated from traditional analyses based on molecular phylogeny. Because of the dramatic reduction in sequencing cost, sequencing on-demand samples designed for specific studies is now also becoming popular. To produce data of sufficient quality to meet the requirements of the study, it is necessary to set an explicit sequencing plan that includes the choice of sample collection methods, sequencing platforms, and number of sequence reads.

  10. Hidden temporal order unveiled in stock market volatility variance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shapira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available When analyzed by standard statistical methods, the time series of the daily return of financial indices appear to behave as Markov random series with no apparent temporal order or memory. This empirical result seems to be counter intuitive since investor are influenced by both short and long term past market behaviors. Consequently much effort has been devoted to unveil hidden temporal order in the market dynamics. Here we show that temporal order is hidden in the series of the variance of the stocks volatility. First we show that the correlation between the variances of the daily returns and means of segments of these time series is very large and thus cannot be the output of random series, unless it has some temporal order in it. Next we show that while the temporal order does not show in the series of the daily return, rather in the variation of the corresponding volatility series. More specifically, we found that the behavior of the shuffled time series is equivalent to that of a random time series, while that of the original time series have large deviations from the expected random behavior, which is the result of temporal structure. We found the same generic behavior in 10 different stock markets from 7 different countries. We also present analysis of specially constructed sequences in order to better understand the origin of the observed temporal order in the market sequences. Each sequence was constructed from segments with equal number of elements taken from algebraic distributions of three different slopes.

  11. Unveiling protein functions through the dynamics of the interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sendiña-Nadal

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks have become a tool to study biological processes, either for predicting molecular functions or for designing proper new drugs to regulate the main biological interactions. Furthermore, such networks are known to be organized in sub-networks of proteins contributing to the same cellular function. However, the protein function prediction is not accurate and each protein has traditionally been assigned to only one function by the network formalism. By considering the network of the physical interactions between proteins of the yeast together with a manual and single functional classification scheme, we introduce a method able to reveal important information on protein function, at both micro- and macro-scale. In particular, the inspection of the properties of oscillatory dynamics on top of the protein interaction network leads to the identification of misclassification problems in protein function assignments, as well as to unveil correct identification of protein functions. We also demonstrate that our approach can give a network representation of the meta-organization of biological processes by unraveling the interactions between different functional classes.

  12. Called to respond: The potential of unveiling hiddens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L Black

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interested in exploring how personal stories and aesthetic modes of representing experiences can nudge open academic and educational spaces, this article/collection of particles seeks to document our encounters of being affected and called to respond to things the other has written and represented. As a way of engaging with questions about what research and research data might be and become, our attention has been drawn to stories and images from our lives that we have not shaken off – and to how, as we have opened these to the other, making once private moments public, our hiddens have morphed tenderly into a shared knowing and being. As we have acted on the call we have felt to respond we have found ourselves entering spaces of collaboration, communion, contemplation, and conversation – spaces illuminated by what we have not been able to – and cannot – set aside. Using visual and poetic materials we explore heartfelt and heartbroken aspects of our educational worlds and lives, to be present with each other and our (reemerging personal and professional meanings. We see the shared body (of work, of writing, of image that develops from the taking of brave steps and the risky slipping off of academic masks and language, as a manifestation of the trusted and nurturing spaces that can be generated through collaborative opportunities to gather together. These steps towards unveiling hiddens are producing in us and of us a friendship, fluency, and fluidity as we write new ways of becoming. In turn, we hope the uncovering and revealing of our dialogue in the public gathering of this journal might supports readers’ telling of their own life stories through what calls them to respond.

  13. Dilemmas in the (un)veiling of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: walking an ethical and professional tight rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Werner, Perla; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Eidelman, Shmuel

    2007-08-01

    To enhance the understanding and effect of physician's difficulties, attitudes and communication styles on the disclosure of the diagnosis of AD in practice. Qualitative, phenomenological study, combining pre-encounter interviews with physicians, observations of actual encounters of diagnosis disclosure of AD, and post-encounter interviews. There were various ways or tactics to (un)veil the bad news that may be perceived as different ways of dulling the impact and avoiding full and therefore problematic statements. In the actual encounters this was accomplished by keeping encounters short, avoiding elaboration, confirmation of comprehension and explicit terminology and using fractured sentences. The present study's findings highlight the difficulties encountered in breaking the news about AD, in the way it is actually done, and the problems that may arise from this way of un/veiling the news. The main problem is that the reluctance to make a candid disclosure of the diagnosis as was demonstrated in this study may violate basic moral and legal rights and may also deprive patients and caregivers of some of the benefits of early disclosure of diagnosis. There is a need for assisting physicians to cope with their personal difficulties, problems and pitfalls in breaking the news.

  14. Unveiling the development of intracranial injury using dynamic brain EIT: an evaluation of current reconstruction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoting; Chen, Rongqing; Xu, Canhua; Liu, Benyuan; Tang, Mengxing; Yang, Lin; Dong, Xiuzhen; Fu, Feng

    2017-08-21

    Dynamic brain electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a promising technique for continuously monitoring the development of cerebral injury. While there are many reconstruction algorithms available for brain EIT, there is still a lack of study to compare their performance in the context of dynamic brain monitoring. To address this problem, we develop a framework for evaluating different current algorithms with their ability to correctly identify small intracranial conductivity changes. Firstly, a simulation 3D head phantom with realistic layered structure and impedance distribution is developed. Next several reconstructing algorithms, such as back projection (BP), damped least-square (DLS), Bayesian, split Bregman (SB) and GREIT are introduced. We investigate their temporal response, noise performance, location and shape error with respect to different noise levels on the simulation phantom. The results show that the SB algorithm demonstrates superior performance in reducing image error. To further improve the location accuracy, we optimize SB by incorporating the brain structure-based conductivity distribution priors, in which differences of the conductivities between different brain tissues and the inhomogeneous conductivity distribution of the skull are considered. We compare this novel algorithm (called SB-IBCD) with SB and DLS using anatomically correct head shaped phantoms with spatial varying skull conductivity. Main results and Significance: The results showed that SB-IBCD is the most effective in unveiling small intracranial conductivity changes, where it can reduce the image error by an average of 30.0% compared to DLS.

  15. Nasa Unveils Cosmic Images Book in Braille for Blind Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    BALTIMORE - At a Tuesday ceremony at the National Federation of the Blind, NASA unveiled a new book that brings majestic images taken by its Great Observatories to the fingertips of the blind. "Touch the Invisible Sky" is a 60-page book with color images of nebulae, stars, galaxies and some of the telescopes that captured the original pictures. Each image is embossed with lines, bumps and other textures. These raised patterns translate colors, shapes and other intricate details of the cosmic objects, allowing visually impaired people to experience them. Braille and large-print descriptions accompany each of the book's 28 photographs, making the book's design accessible to readers of all visual abilities. Sample page Sample page The book contains spectacular images from the Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope and powerful ground-based telescopes. The celestial objects are presented as they appear through visible-light telescopes and different spectral regions invisible to the naked eye, from radio to infrared, visible, ultraviolet and X-ray light. The book introduces the concept of light and the spectrum and explains how the different observatories complement each others' findings. Readers take a cosmic journey beginning with images of the sun, and travel out into the galaxy to visit relics of exploding and dying stars, as well as the Whirlpool galaxy and colliding Antennae galaxies. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Action Replay of Powerful Stellar Explosion Black Holes Are The Rhythm at The Heart of Galaxies "Touch the Invisible Sky" was written by astronomy educator and accessibility specialist Noreen Grice of You Can Do Astronomy LLC and the Museum of Science, Boston, with authors Simon Steel, an astronomer with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and Doris Daou, an astronomer

  16. Old Wine in New Wine Skins: Tombstone Unveiling as a Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reflects on the practice of Tombstone Unveiling, a recent phenomenon among Shona Christians in Zimbabwe, as a case of religious change. Historically, many church doctrines and practices have been negative towards African Traditional Religions (ATRs). Shona Christians have reacted by trying to ...

  17. Atomic Force Microscopy - A Tool to Unveil the Mystery of Biological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Atomic Force Microscopy - A Tool to Unveil the Mystery of Biological Systems ... Transcription and Disease Laboratory, Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 ...

  18. Wukong Sharpens Its Eyes and Unveils the Nature of Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Kun-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Dark matter does not emit light or reflect electromagnetic radiation, but its existence can be inferred from the effects of measurements such as gravity and mass. Unveiling the nature of dark matter is one of the biggest mysteries of modern science. Exploration of dark matter could give scientists a clearer understanding of the past and future of galaxies and the universe. Chinese scientists have been engaged actively in dark matter research in recent years, and made some significant achievements in theoretical studies, numerical simulations, and experimental investigation. The Dark Matter Particles Explorer Satellite (DAMPE) was launched by LM launch vehicle on 17th December 2015. It was constructed as a scientific satellite that has four major parts - a plastic scintillator array detector, a silicon array detector, a BGO calorimeter and a neutron detector - together comprising about 76,000 minor detectors. The main scientific purpose of DAMPE is to investigate dark matter particle from deep space, via high resolution observation of gamma-rays and electrons spectra, and its space distribution. It will also help scientists study the transportation and acceleration of cosmic rays in the galaxy by measuring the energy spectra of heavy ions. DAMPE was dubbed Wukong after the Monkey King character from the Chinese classic legend Journey to the West. "Wu" means becoming aware of through the senses, and "Kong" refers to the space. The figurative meaning of "Wukong" is to know and comprehend the nature of the space. DAMPE is the most sensitive and accurate detectors designed for dark matter with the highest performance among the similar explorers. It will find the evidence that can certify the existence of dark matter.

  19. Unveiled Risks in a Telecoupled Arena Dependent on Agricultural Commodity Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistella, M.; Silva, R. F. B. D.; Liu, J.; Moran, E. F.; Torres, S.; Dou, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In less than five years, a new field of interdisciplinary research has been widely developed within the coupled human-natural systems (CHANS) community. Based on well-known concepts acting over long distances, such as teleconnections for biophysical sciences and globalization for human sciences, the telecoupling framework states that long distant CHANS may be integrated through flows of capital, information, and matter, shaping environmental and socioeconomic changes within local systems. An international project including researchers from Brazil, China, United Kingdom (UK), and United States of America (USA) is using such a framework to study the flows of agricultural commodities between sending systems such as Brazil and the USA, and receiving systems such as China with soybean trade as a case in point. Many findings have already shown that these dynamics are intrinsically connected and changes in environmental conditions in one system may affect economic conditions in other systems. In the case of the double-crop practice (i.e., soybean followed by maize, two crops year round) used in some regions of Brazil, maize production is strongly connected with soybean production through the supply chain, logistics, producer regions, and farmers. Consequently, maize has been displaced to second-crop status, making it more vulnerable to rain shortfalls. The use of the telecoupling framework has also unveiled a possible threat for soybean production in the long run if it only relies on international demand and inputs. The telecoupled soybean production system has put some Brazilian farmers at economic risk, and is pushing them towards diversification and alternative production practices (e.g., non-GMO crops, biological control, in-farm seed production) to reduce their risk. This, in turn, may affect the demand-consumption relationship among traditional trading partners. With this paper, we also highlight the role of cascading effects and spillover systems of telecoupling in

  20. THE UNVEILING OF LIFE : LITURGY AND THE LURE OF KITSCH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-09-01

    Sep 1, 2010 ... To reach an understanding of theological aesthetics proves to be an even more difficult task, given its ..... something. The performance (graceful effect) of the Gospel then .... revelations that lift us up and above the mundane.

  1. Stressed lungs: unveiling the role of circulating stress ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone, a major component of smog generated through the interaction of light and anthropogenic emissions, induces adverse pulmonary, cardiovascular, and systemic health effects upon inhalation. It is generally accepted that ozone-induced lung injury is mediated by its interaction with lung lining components causing local oxidative changes, which then leads to cell damage and recruitment of inflammatory cells. It is postulated that the spillover of reactive intermediates and pro-inflammatory molecules from lung to systemic circulation mediates extra-pulmonary effects. However, recent work from our laboratory supports an alternative hypothesis that circulating stress hormones, such as epinephrine and corticosterone/cortisol, are involved in mediating ozone pulmonary effects. We have shown in rats and humans that ozone increases the levels of circulating stress hormones through activation of the hypothalamus- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis before any measurable effects are observed in the lung. The surgical removal of adrenals diminishes circulating stress hormones and at the same time, the pulmonary effects of ozone suggesting a significant contribution of these hormones in ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation. While ozone effects in the lung have been extensively studied, the contribution of central nervous system -mediated hormonal stress response has not been examined. In order to understand the signaling pathways that might be involved in ozone-induced lun

  2. Unveiling the UHE Universe from space: the JEM-EUSO mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santangelo, A.; Fenu, F. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Sand 1, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Ebisuzaki, T.; Shinozaki, K. [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    The Extreme Universe Space Observatory onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EUSO) is an international mission designed to explore the origin and nature of the of ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR), with energies E>5.5x10{sup 19} eV, aiming at an integrated exposure of {approx}10{sup 6} km{sup 2} sr yr at E>10{sup 20} eV. Consisting of a near-UV 2.65 m diameter telescope with a field of view of 60{sup o}, JEM-EUSO looks down from space, monitoring the dark side of the Earth, to detect the fluorescence and Cherenkov light emitted along the linear track generated by a cosmic particle traversing the atmosphere. The energy and the arrival direction of each particle will be measured while the all 4{pi} sky is monitored. The primary science goal of the mission is to identify the sources of the highest energy particles, and to measure their flux and spectrum, to unveil the mechanisms for the production, acceleration, and in situ propagation of these extreme particles. Other exploratory objectives of the mission include the study of the galactic and local extragalactic magnetic field; the detection of high-energy gamma rays and neutrinos, and tests of relativity and quantum gravity effects at extreme energies. Other aspects of fundamental physics that will be studied include the top-down models and the behavior of the neutrino cross sections at extreme energies. JEM-EUSO is also expected to conduct a systematic survey of the not yet well known energetic phenomena of the Earth's atmosphere. The mission is currently in the phase A study by JAXA and has been included in the ELIPS research pool of the European Space Agency. JEM-EUSO will be launched by an H2B rocket in the Japanese fiscal year 2016 and will be transferred to the ISS by an H2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV). It will be attached to the external experiment platform of the Japanese 'KIBO' module of the ISS. In this paper we summarize the science case, the science objectives, the technological and

  3. Unveiling adaptation using high-resolution lineage tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Jamie; Levy, Sasha; Fisher, Daniel; Petrov, Dmitri; Sherlock, Gavin

    2013-03-01

    Human diseases such as cancer and microbial infections are adaptive processes inside the human body with enormous population sizes: between 106 -1012 cells. In spite of this our understanding of adaptation in large populations is limited. The key problem is the difficulty in identifying anything more than a handful of rare, large-effect beneficial mutations. The development and use of molecular barcodes allows us to uniquely tag hundreds of thousands of cells and enable us to track tens of thousands of adaptive mutations in large yeast populations. We use this system to test some of the key theories on which our understanding of adaptation in large populations is based. We (i) measure the fitness distribution in an evolving population at different times, (ii) identify when an appreciable fraction of clones in the population have at most a single adaptive mutation and isolate a large number of clones with independent single adaptive mutations, and (iii) use this clone collection to determine the distribution of fitness effects of single beneficial mutations.

  4. Unveiling Leadership–Employee Performance Links: Perspective of Young Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehmina Fiaz Qazi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the impact of leadership style practiced by managers on their subordinates’ job performance. Emotional Intelligence of the employees has been considered as a moderator to the leadership-performance relationship. Self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted from convenient sampled 100 young employees of telecom and banking sector. They were asked to respond about their perception regarding their manager’s leadership style, job performance and their perceived level of emotional intelligence. 77 out of 100 distributed questionnaires were received back completely filled that yield response rate of 77%. Current research concluded that the style of leadership exhibited by a manager is significantly associated with the subordinates’ job performance while emotional intelligence of employees has no moderating effect on this leadership- performance relationship

  5. Hopping in the Crowd to Unveil Network Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllani, Malbor; Carletti, Timoteo; Di Patti, Francesca; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a nonlinear operator to model diffusion on a complex undirected network under crowded conditions. We show that the asymptotic distribution of diffusing agents is a nonlinear function of the nodes' degree and saturates to a constant value for sufficiently large connectivities, at variance with standard diffusion in the absence of excluded-volume effects. Building on this observation, we define and solve an inverse problem, aimed at reconstructing the a priori unknown connectivity distribution. The method gathers all the necessary information by repeating a limited number of independent measurements of the asymptotic density at a single node, which can be chosen randomly. The technique is successfully tested against both synthetic and real data and is also shown to estimate with great accuracy the total number of nodes.

  6. Magnetic seismology of interstellar gas clouds: Unveiling a hidden dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritsis, Aris; Tassis, Konstantinos

    2018-05-11

    Stars and planets are formed inside dense interstellar molecular clouds by processes imprinted on the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the clouds. Determining the 3D structure of interstellar clouds remains challenging because of projection effects and difficulties measuring the extent of the clouds along the line of sight. We report the detection of normal vibrational modes in the isolated interstellar cloud Musca, allowing determination of the 3D physical dimensions of the cloud. We found that Musca is vibrating globally, with the characteristic modes of a sheet viewed edge on, not the characteristics of a filament as previously supposed. We reconstructed the physical properties of Musca through 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations, reproducing the observed normal modes and confirming a sheetlike morphology. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. UNVEILING THE UNIVERSALITY OF I-LOVE-Q RELATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sham, Y.-H.; Lin, L.-M.; Leung, P. T. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Chan, T. K., E-mail: yhsham@phy.cuhk.edu.hk, E-mail: chantsangkeung@gmail.com, E-mail: lmlin@phy.cuhk.edu.hk, E-mail: ptleung@phy.cuhk.edu.hk [Present address: Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. (United States)

    2015-01-10

    The recent discovery of the universal I-Love-Q relations connecting the moment of inertia, tidal deformability, and the spin-induced quadrupole moment of compact stars is intriguing and totally unexpected. In this paper, we provide numerical evidence showing that the universality can be attributed to the incompressible limit of the I-Love-Q relations. The fact that modern equations of state are stiff, with an effective adiabatic index larger than about two, above the nuclear density range is the key to establishing the universality for neutron stars and quark stars with typical compactness from about 0.1 to 0.3. On the other hand, the I-Love-Q relations of low-mass neutron stars near the minimum mass limit depend more sensitively on the underlying equation of state because these stars are composed mainly of softer matter at low densities. However, the I-Love-Q relations for low-mass quark stars can still be represented accurately by the incompressible limit. We also study the I-Love relation connecting the moment of inertia and tidal deformability analytically in Newtonian gravity and show why the I-Love-Q relation is weakly dependent on the underlying equation of state and can be attributed to its incompressible limit.

  8. Unveiling the Universality of I-Love-Q Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Y.-H.; Chan, T. K.; Lin, L.-M.; Leung, P. T.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of the universal I-Love-Q relations connecting the moment of inertia, tidal deformability, and the spin-induced quadrupole moment of compact stars is intriguing and totally unexpected. In this paper, we provide numerical evidence showing that the universality can be attributed to the incompressible limit of the I-Love-Q relations. The fact that modern equations of state are stiff, with an effective adiabatic index larger than about two, above the nuclear density range is the key to establishing the universality for neutron stars and quark stars with typical compactness from about 0.1 to 0.3. On the other hand, the I-Love-Q relations of low-mass neutron stars near the minimum mass limit depend more sensitively on the underlying equation of state because these stars are composed mainly of softer matter at low densities. However, the I-Love-Q relations for low-mass quark stars can still be represented accurately by the incompressible limit. We also study the I-Love relation connecting the moment of inertia and tidal deformability analytically in Newtonian gravity and show why the I-Love-Q relation is weakly dependent on the underlying equation of state and can be attributed to its incompressible limit.

  9. Unveiling the Role of Galactic Rotation on Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utreras, José; Becerra, Fernando; Escala, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    We study the star formation process at galactic scales and the role of rotation through numerical simulations of spiral and starburst galaxies using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We focus on the study of three integrated star formation laws found in the literature: the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) and Silk-Elmegreen (SE) laws, and the dimensionally homogeneous equation proposed by Escala {{{Σ }}}{SFR}\\propto \\sqrt{G/L}{{{Σ }}}{gas}1.5. We show that using the last we take into account the effects of the integration along the line of sight and find a unique regime of star formation for both types of galaxies, suppressing the observed bi-modality of the KS law. We find that the efficiencies displayed by our simulations are anti-correlated with the angular velocity of the disk Ω for the three laws studied in this work. Finally, we show that the dimensionless efficiency of star formation is well represented by an exponentially decreasing function of -1.9{{Ω }}{t}{ff}{ini}, where {t}{ff}{ini} is the initial free-fall time. This leads to a unique galactic star formation relation which reduces the scatter of the bi-modal KS, SE, and Escala relations by 43%, 43%, and 35%, respectively.

  10. UNVEILING THE UNIVERSALITY OF I-LOVE-Q RELATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sham, Y.-H.; Lin, L.-M.; Leung, P. T.; Chan, T. K.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of the universal I-Love-Q relations connecting the moment of inertia, tidal deformability, and the spin-induced quadrupole moment of compact stars is intriguing and totally unexpected. In this paper, we provide numerical evidence showing that the universality can be attributed to the incompressible limit of the I-Love-Q relations. The fact that modern equations of state are stiff, with an effective adiabatic index larger than about two, above the nuclear density range is the key to establishing the universality for neutron stars and quark stars with typical compactness from about 0.1 to 0.3. On the other hand, the I-Love-Q relations of low-mass neutron stars near the minimum mass limit depend more sensitively on the underlying equation of state because these stars are composed mainly of softer matter at low densities. However, the I-Love-Q relations for low-mass quark stars can still be represented accurately by the incompressible limit. We also study the I-Love relation connecting the moment of inertia and tidal deformability analytically in Newtonian gravity and show why the I-Love-Q relation is weakly dependent on the underlying equation of state and can be attributed to its incompressible limit

  11. Europe Unveils 20-Year Plan for Brilliant Future in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Astronomy is enjoying a golden age of fundamental, exciting discoveries. Europe is at the forefront, thanks to 50 years of progress in cooperation. To remain ahead over the next two to three decades, Europe must prioritise and coordinate the investment of its financial and human resources even more closely. The ASTRONET network, backed by the entire European scientific community, supported by the European Commission, and coordinated by the CNRS, today presents its Roadmap for a brilliant future for European astronomy. ESO's European Extremely Large Telescope is ranked as one of two top-priority large ground-based projects. Astronet and the E-ELT ESO PR Photo 43a/08 The E-ELT Europe is a leader in astronomy today, with the world's most successful optical observatory, ESO's Very Large Telescope, and cutting-edge facilities in radio astronomy and in space. In an unprecedented effort demonstrating the potential of European scientific cooperation, all of European astronomy is now joining forces to define the scientific challenges for the future and construct a common plan to address them in a cost-effective manner. In 2007, a top-level Science Vision was prepared to assess the most burning scientific questions over the next quarter century, ranging from dark energy to life on other planets. European astronomy now presents its Infrastructure Roadmap, a comprehensive 20-year plan to coordinate national and community investments to meet these challenges in a cost-effective manner. The Roadmap not only prioritises the necessary new frontline research facilities from radio telescopes to planetary probes, in space and on the ground, but also considers such key issues as existing facilities, human resources, ICT infrastructure, education and outreach, and cost -- of operations as well as construction. This bold new initiative -- ASTRONET -- was created by the major European funding agencies with support from the European Commission and is coordinated by the National Institute

  12. Unveiling EFL and Self-Contained Teachers’ Discourses on Bilingualism Within the Context of Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer Paola Camargo Cely

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout time, the predominant use of certain languages has allowed some nations to take control over others and assure for them a privileged position. This study unveiled how certain practices and ideologies in regard to bilingualism have influenced teachers’ professional development. Data were collected through discussion group sessions, reflective journals, and protocols from five teachers from a private K-11 school in Bogota. Analysis indicated participants’ discourses drew on hegemonic, colonial, and manipulative ideas. Nevertheless, when dialoguing and peer coaching, a discourse of resistance was constituted. The study suggested further research into teachers’ professional growth, bilingualism, and bilingual education in monolingual contexts as the Colombian one.

  13. Uzbekistan unveiled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurkevich, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    Through centuries of revolution, war and strife, the people of Uzbekistan have built a reputation as skilled and tenacious merchants. Since antiquity, when the Silk Road from China turned toward Europe at Smarakand, they have been master traders of such valuable commodities as cotton, fruits, vegetables, spices and gold. Now, they're about to introduce another of their specialties to the world: Uranium. Uranium mining in the country is controlled by a new, independent company, the Kizilkumredmetzoloto, parent of the Navoi Mining ampersand Metallurgy Combine [NMMC]. Established in 1958 at the height of the Cold War, when uranium mining for military stockpiles got started in earnest, Navoi was wholly owned by the USSR's Ministry of Medium Machine Building. Up until 1991, virtually all of Navoi's uranium production, strictly in the form of uranium concentrates, was used for either military purposes or for nuclear power plants within the former Soviet Union. The republic exerted no control over the final destination of its uranium. All production and operating decisions for Navoi's mines were dictated by the Soviet Union's Ministry of Atomic Power ampersand Industry [MAPI], which developed annual quotas for uranium production in each republic of the country. Uranium from the republics was sold to Techsnabexport [Tenex], the distribution and marketing arm of MAPI. Exports to other countries were handled strictly by Tenex

  14. From Multilatina to Global Latina: Unveiling the corporate-level international strategy choices of Grupo Nutresa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA A DE VILLA

    Full Text Available Research on Multilatinas has underexplored multinationals from Colombia and their corporate-level international strategy choices to develop into Global Latinas. Building on interviews, documents, and archival data about Grupo Nutresa -Colombia's most international firm in manufactured goods-, this study unveils and discusses this firm's corporate-level international strategy choices between 1960 and 2014. A prevailing notion is that most multinationals from Latin America continue to target international operations to focus mainly on their home region through an export, multidomestic or transnational corporate-level international strategy. In contrast, data show that Grupo Nutresa chose to evolve through a sequential approach from an export to a transnational corporate-level international strategy while its international operations were able to transcend its home region to reach North America, Asia, Europe, Africa, and Oceania. These results add to international business research on emergent market multinational companies (EMNCs from Latin America by unveiling the corporate-level international strategy choices of a Colombian origin Multilatina that transformed into a Global Latina.

  15. NASA's Great Observatories Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy With a National Unveiling of Spectacular Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    In 1609, Galileo first turned his telescope to the heavens and gave birth to modern astronomy. To commemorate four hundred years of exploring the universe, 2009 is designated the International Year of Astronomy. NASA's Great Observatories - the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory - are marking the occasion with the release of a suite of images at over 100 planetariums, museums, nature centers, and schools across the country in conjunction with Galileo's birthday on February 15. The selected sites will unveil a large 9-square-foot print of the spiral galaxy Messier 101 that combines the optical view of Hubble, the infrared view of Spitzer, and the X-ray view of Chandra into one multi-wavelength picture. "It's like using your eyes, night vision goggles, and X-ray vision all at the same time," says Dr. Hashima Hasan, lead scientist for the International Year of Astronomy at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Cas A animation Chandra X-ray Image of M101 Participating institutions also will display a matched trio of Hubble, Spitzer, and Chandra images of Messier 101. Each image shows a different wavelength view of the galaxy that illustrates not only the different science uncovered by each observatory, but also just how far astronomy has come since Galileo. Messier 101 is a face-on spiral galaxy about 22 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It is in many ways similar to, but larger than, our own Milky Way galaxy. Hubble's visible light view shows off the swirls of bright stars and glowing gas that give the galaxy its nickname the Pinwheel Galaxy. In contrast, Spitzer's infrared-light image sees into the spiral arms and reveals the glow of dust lanes where dense clouds can collapse to form new stars. Chandra's X-ray picture uncovers the high-energy features in the galaxy, such as remnants of exploded stars or matter zooming around black holes. The juxtaposition of observations from these three telescopes

  16. Unveiling the Aggregation of Lycopene in Vitro and in Vivo: UV-Vis, Resonance Raman, and Raman Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Mika; Meksiarun, Phiranuphon; Kitahama, Yasutaka; Zhang, Leilei; Hashimoto, Hideki; Genkawa, Takuma; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-08-31

    The present study investigates the structure of lycopene aggregates both in vitro and in vivo using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Raman spectroscopies. The electronic absorption bands of the J- and H-aggregates in vitro shift to lower and higher energies, respectively, compared to that of the lycopene monomer. Along with these results, the frequencies of the ν 1 Raman bands were shifted to lower and higher frequencies, respectively. By plotting the frequencies of the ν 1 Raman band against the S 0 → S 2 transition energy, a linear relationship between the data set with different aggregation conformations can be obtained. Therefore, the band positions depending on the different conformations can be explained based on the idea that the effective conjugated C═C chain lengths within lycopene molecules are different due to the environmental effect (site-shift effect) caused by the aggregation conformation. Applying this knowledge to the in vivo measurement of a tomato fruit sample, the relationship between the aggregation conformation of lycopene and the spectral patterns observed in the UV-vis as well as Raman spectra in different parts of tomato fruits was discussed in detail. The results showed that the concentration of lycopene (particularly that of the J-aggregate) specifically increased, whereas that of chlorophyll decreased, with ripening. Furthermore, Raman imaging indicated that lycopene with different aggregate conformations was distributed inhomogeneously, even within one sample. The layer formation in tomato tissues with high concentrations of J- and H-aggregates was successfully visualized. In this manner, the presence of lycopene distributions with different aggregate conformations was unveiled in vivo.

  17. White House Unveils America's College Promise Proposal: Tuition-Free Community College for Responsible Students. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The White House, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In January, 2015, the President unveiled the America's College Promise proposal, which would make two years of community college free for responsible students, letting students earn the first half of a bachelor's degree and earn skills needed in the workforce at no cost. This proposal will require everyone to do their part: community colleges must…

  18. Unveiling EFL and Self-Contained Teachers' Discourses on Bilingualism within the Context of Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo Cely, Jennyfer Paola

    2018-01-01

    Throughout time, the predominant use of certain languages has allowed some nations to take control over others and assure for them a privileged position. This study unveiled how certain practices and ideologies in regard to bilingualism have influenced teachers' professional development. Data were collected through discussion group sessions,…

  19. Unveiling non-stationary coupling between Amazon and ocean during recent extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Antônio M. de T.; Zou, Yong; de Oliveira, Gilvan Sampaio; Kurths, Jürgen; Macau, Elbert E. N.

    2018-02-01

    The interplay between extreme events in the Amazon's precipitation and the anomaly in the temperature of the surrounding oceans is not fully understood, especially its causal relations. In this paper, we investigate the climatic interaction between these regions from 1999 until 2012 using modern tools of complex system science. We identify the time scale of the coupling quantitatively and unveil the non-stationary influence of the ocean's temperature. The findings show consistently the distinctions between the coupling in the recent major extreme events in Amazonia, such as the two droughts that happened in 2005 and 2010 and the three floods during 1999, 2009 and 2012. Interestingly, the results also reveal the influence over the anomalous precipitation of Southwest Amazon has become increasingly lagged. The analysis can shed light on the underlying dynamics of the climate network system and consequently can improve predictions of extreme rainfall events.

  20. Unveiling the molecular bipolar outflow of the peculiar red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Claussen, Mark J.; Lim, Jeremy; Dinh-van-Trung; Tsuboi, Masato

    2003-04-01

    We carried out polarimetric spectral-line imaging of the molecular outflow of the peculiar red supergiant VY Canis Majoris in SiO J=1-0 line in the ground vibrational state, which contains highly linearly-polarized velocity components, using the Very Large Array. We succeeded in unveiling the highly linearly polarized bipolar outflow for the first time at subarcsecond spatial resolution. The results clearly show that the direction of linear polarization of the brightest maser components is parallel to the outflow axis. The results strongly suggest that the linear polarization of the SiO maser is closely related to the outflow phenomena of the star. Furthermore, the results indicate that the linear polarization observed in the optical and infrared also occur due to the outflow phenomena.

  1. The Green Bank Ammonia Survey: Unveiling the Dynamics of the Barnard 59 Star-forming Clump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, E.; Alves, F. O.; Caselli, P.; Pineda, J. E.; Friesen, R. K.; Chacón-Tanarro, A.; Matzner, C. D.; Ginsburg, A.; Rosolowsky, E.; Keown, J.; Offner, S. S. R.; Di Francesco, J.; Kirk, H.; Myers, P. C.; Hacar, A.; Cimatti, A.; Chen, H. H.; Chen, M. C.; Lee, K. I.; Seo, Y. M.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the early stages of star formation is a research field of ongoing development, both theoretically and observationally. In this context, molecular data have been continuously providing observational constraints on the gas dynamics at different excitation conditions and depths in the sources. We have investigated the Barnard 59 core, the only active site of star formation in the Pipe Nebula, to achieve a comprehensive view of the kinematic properties of the source. This information was derived by simultaneously fitting ammonia inversion transition lines (1, 1) and (2, 2). Our analysis unveils the imprint of protostellar feedback, such as increasing line widths, temperature, and turbulent motions in our molecular data. Combined with complementary observations of dust thermal emission, we estimate that the core is gravitationally bound following a virial analysis. If the core is not contracting, another source of internal pressure, most likely the magnetic field, is supporting it against gravitational collapse and limits its star formation efficiency.

  2. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-06-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes.

  3. The caregiver burden in lupus: findings from UNVEIL, a national online lupus survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sawah, S; Daly, R P; Foster, S A; Naegeli, A N; Benjamin, K; Doll, H; Bond, G; Moshkovich, O; Alarcón, G S

    2017-01-01

    Lupus imposes a substantial burden on patients; however, little is known about its impact on those caring for patients with the disease. In this study, we examined the impact 'caring for patients with lupus' has on caregivers from their own perspective. UNVEIL was a one-time online national cross-sectional survey developed in partnership with the Lupus Foundation of America and fielded targeting the US Lupus Foundation of America constituents in 2014. Eligible caregivers were adults who self-identified as unpaid caregivers of patients with lupus. Eligible caregivers had to complete a series of sociodemographic questions as well as a series of well established outcome measures, such as the Short Form 12v2 Health Survey, the Work Productivity and Activity Index, the Caregiver Burden Inventory, and the Perceived Benefits of Caregiving Scale. A total of 253 caregivers completed the survey. The majority of caregivers (90.1%) were aged 60 years or younger, more than half (54.2%) were men, and more than half (59.7%) identified themselves as either a spouse or a partner to the patient with lupus they were caring for. Overall health-related quality of life was close to the norm mean of the general US population. Caregivers who were employed missed an average of 12.8% of paid work time due to caregiving responsibilities and reported a 33.5% reduction in on-the-job effectiveness. Nearly half of the caregivers surveyed (49.4%) indicated that their caregiving responsibilities impacted their ability to socialize with friends, and almost all caregivers (97.6%) reported experiencing increased anxiety and stress in relation to their caregiving role. Caregiving for patients with lupus has a substantial impact on the work productivity and the social and emotional functioning of caregivers. Healthcare professionals and policymakers should continually assess the impact of healthcare decisions on the well-being of those caring for patients with lupus. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Body Covering and Body Image: A Comparison of Veiled and Unveiled Muslim Women, Christian Women, and Atheist Women Regarding Body Checking, Body Dissatisfaction, and Eating Disorder Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Leonie; Hartmann, Andrea S; Becker, Julia C; Kişi, Melahat; Waldorf, Manuel; Vocks, Silja

    2018-02-21

    Although Islam is the fastest growing religion worldwide, only few studies have investigated body image in Muslim women, and no study has investigated body checking. Therefore, the present study examined whether body image, body checking, and disordered eating differ between veiled and unveiled Muslim women, Christian women, and atheist women. While the groups did not differ regarding body dissatisfaction, unveiled Muslim women reported more checking than veiled Muslim and Christian women, and higher bulimia scores than Christian. Thus, prevention against eating disorders should integrate all women, irrespective of religious affiliation or veiling, with a particular focus on unveiled Muslim women.

  5. Codon-triplet context unveils unique features of the Candida albicans protein coding genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira José L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary forces that determine the arrangement of synonymous codons within open reading frames and fine tune mRNA translation efficiency are not yet understood. In order to tackle this question we have carried out a large scale study of codon-triplet contexts in 11 fungal species to unravel associations or relationships between codons present at the ribosome A-, P- and E-sites during each decoding cycle. Results Our analysis unveiled high bias within the context of codon-triplets, in particular strong preference for triplets of identical codons. We have also identified a surprisingly large number of codon-triplet combinations that vanished from fungal ORFeomes. Candida albicans exacerbated these features, showed an unbalanced tRNA population for decoding its pool of codons and used near-cognate decoding for a large set of codons, suggesting that unique evolutionary forces shaped the evolution of its ORFeome. Conclusion We have developed bioinformatics tools for large-scale analysis of codon-triplet contexts. These algorithms identified codon-triplets context biases, allowed for large scale comparative codon-triplet analysis, and identified rules governing codon-triplet context. They could also detect alterations to the standard genetic code.

  6. A strategy to unveil transient sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takami Hajime

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transient generation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs has been motivated from promising candidates of UHECR sources such as gamma-ray bursts, flares of active galactic nuclei, and newly born neutron stars and magnetars. Here we propose a strategy to unveil transient sources of UHECRs from UHECR experiments. We demonstrate that the rate of UHECR bursts and/or flares is related to the apparent number density of UHECR sources, which is the number density estimated on the assumption of steady sources, and the time-profile spread of the bursts produced by cosmic magnetic fields. The apparent number density strongly depends on UHECR energies under a given rate of the bursts, which becomes observational evidence of transient sources. It is saturated at the number density of host galaxies of UHECR sources. We also derive constraints on the UHECR burst rate and/or energy budget of UHECRs per source as a function of the apparent source number density by using models of cosmic magnetic fields. In order to obtain a precise constraint of the UHECR burst rate, high event statistics above ∼ 1020 eV for evaluating the apparent source number density at the highest energies and better knowledge on cosmic magnetic fields by future observations and/or simulations to better estimate the time-profile spread of UHECR bursts are required. The estimated rate allows us to constrain transient UHECR sources by being compared with the occurrence rates of known energetic transient phenomena.

  7. Surprisal analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) microRNA dynamics unveils tumor specific phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Francoise; Levine, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer -specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal and GBM patients tumors, surprisal analysis characterizes a miRNA system response capable of distinguishing GBM samples from normal tissue biopsy samples. We indicate that the miRNAs contributing to this system behavior is a disease phenotypic state specific to GBM and is therefore a unique GBM-specific thermodynamic signature. MiRNAs implicated in the regulation of stochastic signaling processes crucial in the hallmarks of human cancer, dominate this GBM-cancer phenotypic state. With this theory, we were able to distinguish with high fidelity GBM patients solely by monitoring the dynamics of miRNAs present in patients' biopsy samples. We anticipate that the GBM-specific thermodynamic signature will provide a critical translational tool in better characterizing cancer types and in the development of future therapeutics for GBM.

  8. Unveiling the biotransformation mechanism of indole in a Cupriavidus sp. strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiao; Liu, Ziyan; Wang, Weiwei; Tang, Hongzhi; Zhou, Jiti; Xu, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Indole, an important signaling molecule as well as a typical N-heterocyclic aromatic pollutant, is widespread in nature. However, the biotransformation mechanisms of indole are still poorly studied. Here, we sought to unlock the genetic determinants of indole biotransformation in strain Cupriavidus sp. SHE based on genomics, proteomics and functional studies. A total of 177 proteins were notably altered (118 up- and 59 downregulated) in cells grown in indole mineral salt medium when compared with that in sodium citrate medium. RT-qPCR and gene knockout assays demonstrated that an indole oxygenase gene cluster was responsible for the indole upstream metabolism. A functional indole oxygenase, termed IndA, was identified in the cluster, and its catalytic efficiency was higher than those of previously reported indole oxidation enzymes. Furthermore, the indole downstream metabolism was found to proceed via the atypical CoA-thioester pathway rather than conventional gentisate and salicylate pathways. This unusual pathway was catalyzed by a conserved 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA gene cluster, among which the 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA ligase initiated anthranilate transformation. This study unveils the genetic determinants of indole biotransformation and will provide new insights into our understanding of indole biodegradation in natural environments and its functional studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Unveiling the water-associated conformational mobility in the active site of ascorbate peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Lin, Li-Ju; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Han; Chen, Yi-Ting; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2018-03-01

    We carried out comprehensive spectroscopic studies of wild type and mutants of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) to gain understanding of the conformational mobility of the active site. In this approach, three unnatural tryptophans were applied to replace the distal tryptophan (W41) in an aim to probe polarity/water environment near the edge of the heme-containing active site. 7-azatryptophan ((7-aza)Trp) is sensitive to environment polarity, while 2,7-azatryptophan ((2,7-aza)Trp) and 2,6-diazatryptophan ((2,6-aza)Trp) undergo excited-state water-catalyzed double and triple proton transfer, respectively, and are sensitive to the water network. The combination of their absorption, emission bands and the associated relaxation dynamics of these fluorescence probes, together with the Soret-band difference absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, lead us to unveil the water associated conformational mobility in the active site of APX. The results are suggestive of the existence of equilibrium between two different environments surrounding W41 in APX, i.e., the water-rich and water-scant forms with distinct fluorescence relaxation. Our results thus demonstrate for the first time the power of integrating multiple sensors (7-aza)Trp, (2,7-aza)Trp and (2,6-aza)Trp in probing the water environment of a specifically targeted Trp in proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cellular therapies for heart disease: unveiling the ethical and public policy challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Amish N; Kamp, Timothy J; Hogle, Linda F

    2008-10-01

    Cellular therapies have emerged as a potential revolutionary treatment for cardiovascular disease. Promising preclinical results have resulted in a flurry of basic research activity and spawned multiple clinical trials worldwide. However, the optimal cell type and delivery mode have not been determined for target patient populations. Nor have the mechanisms of benefit for the range of cellular interventions been clearly defined. Experiences to date have unveiled a myriad of ethical and public policy challenges which will affect the way researchers and clinicians make decisions for both basic and clinical research. Stem cells derived from embryos are at the forefront of the ethical and political debate, raising issues of which derivation methods are morally and socially permissible to pursue, as much as which are technically feasible. Adult stem cells are less controversial; however, important challenges exist in determining study design, cell processing, delivery mode, and target patient population. Pathways to successful commercialization and hence broad accessibility of cellular therapies for heart disease are only beginning to be explored. Comprehensive, multi-disciplinary and collaborative networks involving basic researchers, clinicians, regulatory officials and policymakers are required to share information, develop research, regulatory and policy standards and enable rational and ethical cell-based treatment approaches.

  11. Unveiling the geography of historical patents in the United States from 1836 to 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, Sergio; Balland, Pierre-Alexandre; Rigby, David L.

    2016-01-01

    It is clear that technology is a key driver of economic growth. Much less clear is where new technologies are produced and how the geography of U.S. invention has changed over the last two hundred years. Patent data report the geography, history, and technological characteristics of invention. However, those data have only recently become available in digital form and at the present time there exists no comprehensive dataset on the geography of knowledge production in the United States prior to 1975. The database presented in this paper unveils the geography of historical patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) from 1836 to 1975. This historical dataset, HistPat, is constructed using digitalized records of original patent documents that are publicly available. We describe a methodological procedure that allows recovery of geographical information on patents from the digital records. HistPat can be used in different disciplines ranging from geography, economics, history, network science, and science and technology studies. Additionally, it is easily merged with post-1975 USPTO digital patent data to extend it until today. PMID:27576103

  12. The effective theory of quintessence: the w < −1 side unveiled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creminelli, Paolo; Vernizzi, Filippo; D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    We study generic single-field dark energy models, by a parametrization of the most general theory of their perturbations around a given background, including higher derivative terms. In appropriate limits this approach reproduces standard quintessence, k-essence and ghost condensation. We find no general pathology associated to an equation of state w Q Q = −1. Stability requires that the w Q Q Q ) vs. speed of sound squared

  13. ERP Response Unveils Effect of Second Language Manipulation on First Language Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Khachatryan

    Full Text Available Lexical access in bilinguals has been considered either selective or non-selective and evidence exists in favor of both hypotheses. We conducted a linguistic experiment to assess whether a bilingual's language mode influences the processing of first language information. We recorded event related potentials during a semantic priming paradigm with a covert manipulation of the second language (L2 using two types of stimulus presentations (short and long. We observed a significant facilitation of word pairs related in L2 in the short version reflected by a decrease in N400 amplitude in response to target words related to the English meaning of an inter-lingual homograph (homograph-unrelated group. This was absent in the long version, as the N400 amplitude for this group was similar to the one for the control-unrelated group. We also interviewed the participants whether they were aware of the importance of L2 in the experiment. We conclude that subjects participating in the long and short versions were in different language modes: closer to monolingual mode for the long and closer to bilingual mode for the short version; and that awareness about covert manipulation of L2 can influence the language mode, which in its turn influences the processing of the first language.

  14. "Is political behavior a viable coping strategy to perceived organizational politics? Unveiling the underlying resource dynamics": Correction to Sun and Chen (2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Reports an error in "Is Political Behavior a Viable Coping Strategy to Perceived Organizational Politics? Unveiling the Underlying Resource Dynamics" by Shuhua Sun and Huaizhong Chen ( Journal of Applied Psychology , Advanced Online Publication, May 22, 2017, np). In the article, Table 1 contained a formatting error. Correlation coefficient values in the last four cells of column 6 were misplaced with correlation coefficient values in the last four cells of column 7. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2017-22542-001.) We conduct a theory-driven empirical investigation on whether political behavior, as a coping strategy to perceived organizational politics, creates resource trade-offs in moderating the relationship between perceived organizational politics and task performance. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we hypothesize that political behavior mitigates the adverse effect of perceived organizational politics on task performance via psychological empowerment, yet exacerbates its adverse effect on task performance via emotional exhaustion. Three-wave multisource data from a sample of 222 employees and their 75 supervisors were collected for hypothesis testing. Findings supported our hypotheses. Our study enhances understandings of the complex resource dynamics of using political behavior to cope with perceived organizational politics and highlights the need to move stress-coping research from a focus on the stress-buffering effect of coping on outcomes to a focus on the underlying competing resource dynamics. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Microevolution analysis of Bacillus coahuilensis unveils differences in phosphorus acquisition strategies and their regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulema eGómez-Lunar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genomes undergo numerous events of gene losses and gains that generate genome variability among strains of the same species (microevolution. Our aim was to compare the genomes and relevant phenotypes of three Bacillus coahuilensis strains from two oligotrophic hydrological systems in the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (México, to unveil the environmental challenges that this species cope with, and the microevolutionary differences in these genotypes. Since the strains were isolated from a low P environment, we placed emphasis on the search of different phosphorus acquisition strategies. The three B. coahuilensis strains exhibited similar numbers of coding DNA sequences, of which 82% (2, 893 constituted the core genome, and 18% corresponded to accessory genes. Most of the genes in this last group were associated with mobile genetic elements or were annotated as hypothetical proteins. Ten percent of the pangenome consisted of strain-specific genes. Alignment of the three B. coahuilensis genomes indicated a high level of synteny and revealed the presence of several genomic islands. Unexpectedly, one of these islands contained genes that encode the 2-keto-3-deoxymannooctulosonic acid (Kdo biosynthesis enzymes, a feature associated to cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria. Some microevolutionary changes were clearly associated with mobile genetic elements. Our analysis revealed inconsistencies between phenotype and genotype, which we suggest result from the impossibility to map regulatory features to genome analysis. Experimental results revealed variability in the types and numbers of auxotrophies between the strains that could not consistently be explained by in silico metabolic models. Several intraspecific differences in preferences for carbohydrate and phosphorus utilization were observed. Regarding phosphorus recycling, scavenging, and storage, variations were found between the three genomes. The three strains exhibited differences regarding

  16. Unveiling topographical changes using LiDAR mapping capability: case study of Belaga in Sarawak, East-Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganendra, T. R.; Khan, N. M.; Razak, W. J.; Kouame, Y.; Mobarakeh, E. T.

    2016-06-01

    The use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing technology to scan and map landscapes has proven to be one of the most popular techniques to accurately map topography. Thus, LiDAR technology is the ultimate method of unveiling the surface feature under dense vegetation, and, this paper intends to emphasize the diverse techniques that can be utilized to elucidate topographical changes over the study area, using multi-temporal airborne full waveform LiDAR datasets collected in 2012 and 2014. Full waveform LiDAR data offers access to an almost unlimited number of returns per shot, which enables the user to explore in detail topographical changes, such as vegetation growth measurement. The study also found out topography changes at the study area due to earthwork activities contributing to soil consolidation, soil erosion and runoff, requiring cautious monitoring. The implications of this study not only concurs with numerous investigations undertaken by prominent researchers to improve decision making, but also corroborates once again that investigations employing multi-temporal LiDAR data to unveil topography changes in vegetated terrains, produce more detailed and accurate results than most other remote sensing data.

  17. IEEE Milestone at CERN - W Cleon Anderson (right), president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, unveils the Milestone plaque at CERN, together with Georges Charpak

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    At a ceremony on 26 September at CERN, W Cleon Anderson, president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), formally dedicated a "Milestone" plaque in recognition of the invention of electronic particle detectors at CERN. The plaque was unveiled by Anderson and Georges Charpak, the Nobel-prize winning inventor of wire-chamber technology at CERN.

  18. Enhancer Analysis Unveils Genetic Interactions between TLX and SOX2 in Neural Stem Cells and In Vivo Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed M; Smith, Derek K; Niu, Wenze; Fang, Sanhua; Iqbal, Nida; Sun, Guoqiang; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-11-10

    The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a master regulator of postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and neurogenesis; however, it remains unclear how TLX expression is precisely regulated in these tissue-specific stem cells. Here, we show that a highly conserved cis-element within the Tlx locus functions to drive gene expression in NSCs. We demonstrate that the transcription factors SOX2 and MYT1 specifically interact with this genomic element to directly regulate Tlx enhancer activity in vivo. Knockdown experiments further reveal that SOX2 dominantly controls endogenous expression of TLX, whereas MYT1 only plays a modulatory role. Importantly, TLX is essential for SOX2-mediated in vivo reprogramming of astrocytes and itself is also sufficient to induce neurogenesis in the adult striatum. Together, these findings unveil functional genetic interactions among transcription factors that are critical to NSCs and in vivo cell reprogramming.

  19. Enhancer Analysis Unveils Genetic Interactions between TLX and SOX2 in Neural Stem Cells and In Vivo Reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed M.; Smith, Derek K.; Niu, Wenze; Fang, Sanhua; Iqbal, Nida; Sun, Guoqiang; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Summary The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a master regulator of postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and neurogenesis; however, it remains unclear how TLX expression is precisely regulated in these tissue-specific stem cells. Here, we show that a highly conserved cis-element within the Tlx locus functions to drive gene expression in NSCs. We demonstrate that the transcription factors SOX2 and MYT1 specifically interact with this genomic element to directly regulate Tlx enhancer activity in vivo. Knockdown experiments further reveal that SOX2 dominantly controls endogenous expression of TLX, whereas MYT1 only plays a modulatory role. Importantly, TLX is essential for SOX2-mediated in vivo reprogramming of astrocytes and itself is also sufficient to induce neurogenesis in the adult striatum. Together, these findings unveil functional genetic interactions among transcription factors that are critical to NSCs and in vivo cell reprogramming. PMID:26607952

  20. Enhancer Analysis Unveils Genetic Interactions between TLX and SOX2 in Neural Stem Cells and In Vivo Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Islam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a master regulator of postnatal neural stem cell (NSC self-renewal and neurogenesis; however, it remains unclear how TLX expression is precisely regulated in these tissue-specific stem cells. Here, we show that a highly conserved cis-element within the Tlx locus functions to drive gene expression in NSCs. We demonstrate that the transcription factors SOX2 and MYT1 specifically interact with this genomic element to directly regulate Tlx enhancer activity in vivo. Knockdown experiments further reveal that SOX2 dominantly controls endogenous expression of TLX, whereas MYT1 only plays a modulatory role. Importantly, TLX is essential for SOX2-mediated in vivo reprogramming of astrocytes and itself is also sufficient to induce neurogenesis in the adult striatum. Together, these findings unveil functional genetic interactions among transcription factors that are critical to NSCs and in vivo cell reprogramming.

  1. Unveiling the strangeness secrets: low-energy kaon-nucleon/nuclei interactions studies at DAΦNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curceanu C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The DAΦNE electron-positron collider at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of INFN, Italy has made available a unique quality low-energy negatively charged kaons “beam”, which is used to unveil the secrets of the kaon-nucleon/nuclei interactions at low energies by the SIDDHARTA-2 and AMADEUS experiments. SIDDHARTA has already performed unprecedented precision measurements of kaonic atoms, and is being presently upgraded, as SIDDHARTA-2, to approach new frontiers. The AMADEUS experiment plans to perform in the coming years precision measurements on kaon-nuclei interactions at low-energies, to study the possible formation of kaonic nuclei, of the Λ(1405 and of many other processes involving strangeness.

  2. Social Networking Sites in the Classroom: Unveiling New Roles for Teachers and New Approaches to Online Course Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Pineda Hoyos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 tools in general and social networking sites in particular are very popular today in everyday life. However, their use in education has not been explored. This paper reports the findings of the implementation of a web 2.0 tool namely a social networking site as a web support for a face-to-face course. The findings show that the implementation of a web-based environment in a face-to-face course can be viewed from 5 different managerial areas: (1 logistics management, (2 information/knowledge management, (3 communication management, (4 class work extension management and (5 web-based environment easiness of accessibility. The conclusions of the study show that the implementation of the web-based environment unveils new roles for teachers and new approaches to design online or blended courses.

  3. Systems biology and genome-wide approaches to unveil the molecular players involved in the pre-germinative metabolism: implications on seed technology traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, Anca; Pagano, Andrea; Leonetti, Paola; Carbonera, Daniela; Balestrazzi, Alma; Araújo, Susana S

    2017-05-01

    The pre-germinative metabolism is among the most fascinating aspects of seed biology. The early seed germination phase, or pre-germination, is characterized by rapid water uptake (imbibition), which directs a series of dynamic biochemical events. Among those are enzyme activation, DNA damage and repair, and use of reserve storage compounds, such as lipids, carbohydrates and proteins. Industrial seedling production and intensive agricultural production systems require seed stocks with high rate of synchronized germination and low dormancy. Consequently, seed dormancy, a quantitative trait related to the activation of the pre-germinative metabolism, is probably the most studied seed trait in model species and crops. Single omics, systems biology, QTLs and GWAS mapping approaches have unveiled a list of molecules and regulatory mechanisms acting at transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. Most of the identified candidate genes encode for regulatory proteins targeting ROS, phytohormone and primary metabolisms, corroborating the data obtained from simple molecular biology approaches. Emerging evidences show that epigenetic regulation plays a crucial role in the regulation of these mentioned processes, constituting a still unexploited strategy to modulate seed traits. The present review will provide an up-date of the current knowledge on seed pre-germinative metabolism, gathering the most relevant results from physiological, genetics, and omics studies conducted in model and crop plants. The effects exerted by the biotic and abiotic stresses and priming are also addressed. The possible implications derived from the modulation of pre-germinative metabolism will be discussed from the point of view of seed quality and technology.

  4. Her Excellency Mrs Sarah Gillett Her Majesty's Ambassador to the Swiss Confederation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on the occasion of the Antony Gormley sculpture unveiling ceremony Wednesday 7th December 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Her Excellency Mrs Sarah Gillett Her Majesty's Ambassador to the Swiss Confederation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on the occasion of the Antony Gormley sculpture unveiling ceremony Wednesday 7th December 2011

  5. A novel pathogenic aviadenovirus from red-bellied parrots (Poicephalus rufiventris) unveils deep recombination events among avian host lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Shubhagata; Fearnside, Kathleen; Sarker, Subir; Forwood, Jade K.; Raidal, Shane R.

    2017-01-01

    Competing roles of coevolution, selective pressure and recombination are an emerging interest in virus evolution. We report a novel aviadenovirus from captive red-bellied parrots (Poicephalus rufiventris) that uncovers evidence of deep recombination among aviadenoviruses. The sequence identity of the virus was most closely related to Turkey adenovirus D (42% similarity) and other adenoviruses in chickens, turkeys and pigeons. Sequencing and comparative analysis showed that the genome comprised 40,930 nucleotides containing 42 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) 19 of which had strong similarity with genes from other adenovirus species. The new genome unveiled a lineage that likely participated in deep recombination events across the genus Aviadenovirus accounting for an ancient evolutionary relationship. We hypothesize frequent host switch events and recombination among adenovirus progenitors in Galloanserae hosts caused the radiation of extant aviadenoviruses and the newly assembled Poicephalus adenovirus genome points to a potentially broader host range of these viruses among birds. - Highlights: •Shows how a single new genome can change overall phylogeny. •Reveals host switch events among adenovirus progenitors in Galloanserae hosts. •Points to a potentially broader host range of adenoviruses among birds and wildlife .

  6. A novel pathogenic aviadenovirus from red-bellied parrots (Poicephalus rufiventris) unveils deep recombination events among avian host lineages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Shubhagata, E-mail: sdas@csu.edu.au [School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Fearnside, Kathleen, E-mail: kathyfearnside@exemail.com.au [Hills District Veterinary Hospital, Unit 1, 276 New Line Road, Dural, NSW 2158 (Australia); Sarker, Subir, E-mail: S.Sarker@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086 (Australia); Forwood, Jade K., E-mail: jforwood@csu.edu.au [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650 (Australia); Raidal, Shane R., E-mail: shraidal@csu.edu.au [School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, New South Wales 2678 (Australia)

    2017-02-15

    Competing roles of coevolution, selective pressure and recombination are an emerging interest in virus evolution. We report a novel aviadenovirus from captive red-bellied parrots (Poicephalus rufiventris) that uncovers evidence of deep recombination among aviadenoviruses. The sequence identity of the virus was most closely related to Turkey adenovirus D (42% similarity) and other adenoviruses in chickens, turkeys and pigeons. Sequencing and comparative analysis showed that the genome comprised 40,930 nucleotides containing 42 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) 19 of which had strong similarity with genes from other adenovirus species. The new genome unveiled a lineage that likely participated in deep recombination events across the genus Aviadenovirus accounting for an ancient evolutionary relationship. We hypothesize frequent host switch events and recombination among adenovirus progenitors in Galloanserae hosts caused the radiation of extant aviadenoviruses and the newly assembled Poicephalus adenovirus genome points to a potentially broader host range of these viruses among birds. - Highlights: •Shows how a single new genome can change overall phylogeny. •Reveals host switch events among adenovirus progenitors in Galloanserae hosts. •Points to a potentially broader host range of adenoviruses among birds and wildlife .

  7. TU-CD-303-05: Unveiling Tumor Heterogeneity by Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  8. TU-CD-303-05: Unveiling Tumor Heterogeneity by Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeraj, R. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  9. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Diego M; Ogara, M Florencia; Stortz, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation wi...

  10. Vulnerabilities in Yersinia pestis caf operon are unveiled by a Salmonella vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Jun, SangMu; Thornburg, Theresa; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-01-01

    During infection, Yersinia pestis uses its F1 capsule to enhance survival and cause virulence to mammalian host. Since F1 is produced in large quantities and secreted into the host tissues, it also serves as a major immune target. To hold this detrimental effect under proper control, Y. pestis expresses the caf operon (encoding the F1 capsule) in a temperature-dependent manner. However, additional properties of the caf operon limit its expression. By overexpressing the caf operon in wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under a potent promoter, virulence of Salmonella was greatly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, expression of the caf operon under the regulation of its native promoter exhibited negligible impairment of Salmonellae virulence. In-depth investigation revealed all individual genes in the caf operon attenuated Salmonella when overexpressed. The deleterious effects of caf operon and the caf individual genes were further confirmed when they were overexpressed in Y. pestis KIM6+. This study suggests that by using a weak inducible promoter, the detrimental effects of the caf operon are minimally manifested in Y. pestis. Thus, through tight regulation of the caf operon, Y. pestis precisely balances its capsular anti-phagocytic properties with the detrimental effects of caf during interaction with mammalian host.

  11. Genetics of PCOS: A systematic bioinformatics approach to unveil the proteins responsible for PCOS

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, Pritam Kumar; Rane, Riya; Ravichandran, Rahul; Singh, Shrinkhla; Panchal, Hetalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal imbalance in women, which causes problems during menstrual cycle and in pregnancy that sometimes results in fatality. Though the genetics of PCOS is not fully understood, early diagnosis and treatment can prevent long-term effects. In this study, we have studied the proteins involved in PCOS and the structural aspects of the proteins that are taken into consideration using computational tools. The proteins involved are modeled using Modeller 9v14...

  12. Unveiling the Incidence of Interfirm Collaboration: Evidence from Research and Development Companies in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan, Zurina; Johari, Johanim; Abdullah, Hazman Shah; Ahmad, Jasmine

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, interfirm collaboration has become an increasingly popular strategy among many organizations in various industries, in order to remain competitive. Based on the contingency theory, this paper examines the moderating effect of interfirm collaboration on the relationship between Human Resource Management (HRM) practices and organizational performance. Interfirm collaboration refers to the collaboration strategies undertaken by R&D companies, with other companies in similar or diverse ...

  13. Is political behavior a viable coping strategy to perceived organizational politics? Unveiling the underlying resource dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuhua; Chen, Huaizhong

    2017-10-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 102(10) of Journal of Applied Psychology (see record 2017-34254-001). In the article, Table 1 contained a formatting error. Correlation coefficient values in the last four cells of column 6 were misplaced with correlation coefficient values in the last four cells of column 7. All versions of this article have been corrected.] We conduct a theory-driven empirical investigation on whether political behavior, as a coping strategy to perceived organizational politics, creates resource trade-offs in moderating the relationship between perceived organizational politics and task performance. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we hypothesize that political behavior mitigates the adverse effect of perceived organizational politics on task performance via psychological empowerment, yet exacerbates its adverse effect on task performance via emotional exhaustion. Three-wave multisource data from a sample of 222 employees and their 75 supervisors were collected for hypothesis testing. Findings supported our hypotheses. Our study enhances understandings of the complex resource dynamics of using political behavior to cope with perceived organizational politics and highlights the need to move stress-coping research from a focus on the stress-buffering effect of coping on outcomes to a focus on the underlying competing resource dynamics. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. The crystal structures of the tryparedoxin-tryparedoxin peroxidase couple unveil the structural determinants of Leishmania detoxification pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Fiorillo

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease caused by Leishmania, an intracellular protozoan parasite which possesses a unique thiol metabolism based on trypanothione. Trypanothione is used as a source of electrons by the tryparedoxin/tryparedoxin peroxidase system (TXN/TXNPx to reduce the hydroperoxides produced by macrophages during infection. This detoxification pathway is not only unique to the parasite but is also essential for its survival; therefore, it constitutes a most attractive drug target. Several forms of TXNPx, with very high sequence identity to one another, have been found in Leishmania strains, one of which has been used as a component of a potential anti-leishmanial polyprotein vaccine. The structures of cytosolic TXN and TXNPx from L. major (LmTXN and LmTXNPx offer a unique opportunity to study peroxide reduction in Leishmania parasites at a molecular level, and may provide new tools for multienzyme inhibition-based drug discovery. Structural analyses bring out key structural features to elucidate LmTXN and LmTXNPx function. LmTXN displays an unusual N-terminal α-helix which allows the formation of a stable domain-swapped dimer. In LmTXNPx, crystallized in reducing condition, both the locally unfolded (LU and fully folded (FF conformations, typical of the oxidized and reduced protein respectively, are populated. The structural analysis presented here points to a high flexibility of the loop that includes the peroxidatic cysteine which facilitates Cys52 to form an inter-chain disulfide bond with the resolving cysteine (Cys173, thereby preventing over-oxidation which would inactivate the enzyme. Analysis of the electrostatic surface potentials of both LmTXN and LmTXNPx unveils the structural elements at the basis of functionally relevant interaction between the two proteins. Finally, the structural analysis of TXNPx allows us to identify the position of the epitopes that make the protein antigenic and therefore potentially suitable

  15. Unveiling the Structural Origin of the High Carrier Mobility of a Molecular Monolayer on Boron Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Rui; He, Daowei; Zhang, Yuhan; Wu, Bing; Liu, Fengyuan; Meng, Lan; Liu, Jun-Fang; Wu, Qisheng; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jinlan; Nie, Jia-Cai; Wang, Xinran; He, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Very recently, it was demonstrated that the carrier mobility of a molecular monolayer dioctylbenzothienobenzothiophene (C8-BTBT) on boron nitride can reach 10 cm2/Vs, the highest among the previously reported monolayer molecular field-effect transistors. Here we show that the high-quality single crystal of the C8-BTBT monolayer may be the key origin of the record-high carrier mobility. We discover that the C8-BTBT molecules prefer layer-by-layer growth on both hexagonal boron nitride and grap...

  16. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M Presman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation within the GR DNA-binding domain (GRdim mutant has been reported as crucial for receptor dimerization and DNA binding, this assumption has recently been challenged. Here we have analyzed the GR oligomerization state in vivo using the number and brightness assay. Our results suggest a complete, reversible, and DNA-independent ligand-induced model for GR dimerization. We demonstrate that the GRdim forms dimers in vivo whereas adding another mutation in the ligand-binding domain (I634A severely compromises homodimer formation. Contrary to dogma, no correlation between the GR monomeric/dimeric state and transcriptional activity was observed. Finally, the state of dimerization affected DNA binding only to a subset of GR binding sites. These results have major implications on future searches for therapeutic glucocorticoids with reduced side effects.

  17. Proteomics unveil corticoid-induced S100A11 shuttling in keratinocyte differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezitter, Xavier; Hammoudi, Fatma; Belverge, Nicolas; Deloulme, Jean-Christophe; Drobecq, Herve; Masselot, Bernadette; Formstecher, Pierre; Mendy, Denise; Idziorek, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Unlike classical protein extraction techniques, proteomic mapping using a selective subcellular extraction kit revealed S100A11 as a new member of the S100 protein family modulated by glucocorticoids in keratinocytes. Glucocorticoids (GC)-induced S100A11 redistribution in the 'organelles and membranes' compartment. Microscopic examination indicated that glucocorticoids specifically routed cytoplasmic S100A11 toward perinuclear compartment. Calcium, a key component of skin terminal differentiation, directed S100A11 to the plasma membrane as previously reported. When calcium was added to glucocorticoids, minor change was observed at the proteomic level while confocal microscopy revealed a rapid and dramatic translocation of S100A11 toward plasma membrane. This effect was accompanied by strong nuclear condensation, loss of mitochondrial potential and DNA content, and increased high molecular weight S100A11 immunoreactivity, suggesting corticoids accelerate calcium-induced terminal differentiation. Finally, our results suggest GC-induced S100A11 relocalization could be a key step in both keratinocyte homeostasis and glucocorticoids side effects in human epidermis

  18. Sri Lankan livelihoods after the tsunami: searching for entrepreneurs, unveiling relations of power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the performance of aid-funded livelihoods recovery efforts in Sri Lanka following the Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004, with special attention paid to the effects on the rural poor. It argues that successful livelihoods recovery was hampered by an excessive focus by aid agencies on entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship, and by the lack of a politically informed understanding of the economy. Based on ethnographic and survey-based research, the study demonstrates that the category of 'entrepreneur' is misleading for large parts of the economy. Indeed, the desire to build an entrepreneurial economy actually hampered successful livelihoods recovery in Sri Lanka and, in some cases, reinforced inequitable relations of power. The paper concludes that for livelihoods recovery programmes to be effective, they must be founded on an understanding of the relations of power that constitute the economy; these relations operate across scales, and are historically and geographically specific. © 2014 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2014.

  19. On the mobility of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles towards unveiling cathode degradation in water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciok, Paul; Schalenbach, Maximilian; Carmo, Marcelo; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) overpotential on the mobility of carbon-supported platinum particles. The migration of the platinum over the carbon support was analyzed by means of identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM). While at potentials of 0.1 and 0 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), no changes to the Pt/C material were observed. With a decrease of the overpotential to -0.1 V vs. RHE, an increase in the quantity of migrating platinum particles took place. At -0.2 V vs. RHE, a further rise in the particle migration was observed. The effect of the overpotential on the migration was explained by a higher hydrogen generation rate, the formation of a hydrogen monolayer on the platinum and the resulting changes of the platinum support distance. The mechanisms revealed in this study could describe a relevant source of degradation of PEM water electrolyzers.

  20. Innovative method for optimizing Side-Scan Sonar mapping: The blind band unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergent, Gérard; Monnier, Briac; Clabaut, Philippe; Gascon, Gilles; Pergent-Martini, Christine; Valette-Sansevin, Audrey

    2017-07-01

    Over the past few years, the mapping of Mediterranean marine habitats has become a priority for scientists, environment managers and stakeholders, in particular in order to comply with European directives (Water Framework Directive and Marine Strategy Framework Directive) and to implement legislation to ensure their conservation. Side-scan sonar (SSS) is recognised as one of the most effective tool for underwater mapping. However, interpretation of acoustic data (sonograms) requires extensive field calibration and the ground-truthing process remains essential. Several techniques are commonly used, with sampling methods involving grabs, scuba diving observations or Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) underwater video recordings. All these techniques are time consuming, expensive and only provide sporadic informations. In the present study, the possibility of coupling a camera with a SSS and acquiring underwater videos in a continuous way has been tested. During the 'PosidCorse' oceanographic survey carried out along the eastern coast of Corsica, optical and acoustic data were respectively obtained using a GoPro™ camera and a Klein 3000™ SSS. Thereby, five profiles were performed between 10 and 50 m depth, corresponding to more than 20 km of data acquisition. The vertical images recorded with the camera fixed under the SSS and positioned facing downwards provided photo mosaics of very good quality corresponding to the entire sonograms's blind band. From the photo mosaics, 94% of the different bottom types and main habitats have been identified; specific structures linked to hydrodynamics conditions, anthropic and biological activities have also been observed as well as the substrate on which the Posidonia oceanica meadow grows. The association between acoustic data and underwater videos has proved to be a non-destructive and cost-effective method for ground-truthing in marine habitats mapping. Nevertheless, in order to optimize the results over the next surveys

  1. Unveiling the participation of avian kinin ornithokinin and its receptors in the chicken inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Garrido, Damien; Bailleul, Geoffrey; Trotereau, Angélina; Pinaud, Mélanie; Lalmanach, Anne-Christine; Chanteloup, Nathalie K; Schouler, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    Vasoactive peptides are key early mediators of inflammation released through activation of different enzymatic systems. The mammalian kinin-kallikrein (K-KLK) system produces bradykinin (BK) through proteolytic cleavage of a kininogen precursor by enzymes named kallikreins. BK acts through specific ubiquitous G-protein coupled receptors (B1R and B2R) to participate in physiological processes and inflammatory responses, such as activation of mononuclear phagocytes. In chickens, the BK-like nonapeptide ornithokinin (OK) has been shown to promote intracellular calcium increase in embryonic fibroblasts and to be vasodilatory in vivo. Also, one of its receptors (B2R) was already cloned. However, the participation of chicken K-KLK system components in the inflammatory response remains unknown and was therefore investigated. We first showed that B1R, B2R and kininogen 1 (KNG1) are expressed in unstimulated chicken tissues and macrophages. We next showed that chicken B1R and B2R are expressed at transcript and protein levels in chicken macrophages and are upregulated by E. coli LPS or avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) infection. Interestingly, exogenous OK induced internalization and degradation of OK receptors protein, notably B2R. Also, OK induced intracellular calcium increase and potentiated zymosan-induced ROS production and Dextran-FITC endocytosis by chicken macrophages. Exogenous OK itself did not promote APEC killing and had no pro-inflammatory effect. However, when combined with LPS or APEC, OK upregulated cytokine/chemokine gene expression and NO production by chicken macrophages. This effect was not blocked by canonical non-peptide B1R or B2R receptor antagonists but was GPCR- and PI3K/Akt-dependent. In vivo, pulmonary colibacillosis led to upregulation of OK receptors expression in chicken lungs and liver. Also, colibacillosis led to significant upregulation of OK precursor KNG1 expression in liver and in cultured hepatocytes (LMH). We therefore provide hitherto

  2. Unveiling hidden properties of young star clusters: differential reddening, star-formation spread, and binary fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatto, C.; Lima, E. F.; Bica, E.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Usually, important parameters of young, low-mass star clusters are very difficult to obtain by means of photometry, especially when differential reddening and/or binaries occur in large amounts. Aims: We present a semi-analytical approach (ASAmin) that, when applied to the Hess diagram of a young star cluster, is able to retrieve the values of mass, age, star-formation spread, distance modulus, foreground and differential reddening, and binary fraction. Methods: The global optimisation method known as adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) is used to minimise the residuals between the observed and simulated Hess diagrams of a star cluster. The simulations are realistic and take the most relevant parameters of young clusters into account. Important features of the simulations are a normal (Gaussian) differential reddening distribution, a time-decreasing star-formation rate, the unresolved binaries, and the smearing effect produced by photometric uncertainties on Hess diagrams. Free parameters are cluster mass, age, distance modulus, star-formation spread, foreground and differential reddening, and binary fraction. Results: Tests with model clusters built with parameters spanning a broad range of values show that ASAmin retrieves the input values with a high precision for cluster mass, distance modulus, and foreground reddening, but they are somewhat lower for the remaining parameters. Given the statistical nature of the simulations, several runs should be performed to obtain significant convergence patterns. Specifically, we find that the retrieved (absolute minimum) parameters converge to mean values with a low dispersion as the Hess residuals decrease. When applied to actual young clusters, the retrieved parameters follow convergence patterns similar to the models. We show how the stochasticity associated with the early phases may affect the results, especially in low-mass clusters. This effect can be minimised by averaging out several twin clusters in the

  3. Unveiling common responses of Medicago truncatula to appropriate and inappropriate rust species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota; Rubiales, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of effective defense mechanisms in legumes to pathogens of remotely related plant species. Some rust species are among pathogens with broad host range causing dramatic losses in various crop plants. To understand and compare the different host and nonhost resistance (NHR) responses of legume species against rusts, we characterized the reaction of the model legume Medicago truncatula to one appropriate (Uromyces striatus) and two inappropriate (U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus) rusts. We found that similar pre and post-haustorial mechanisms of resistance appear to be operative in M. truncatula against appropriate and inappropriate rust fungus. The appropriate U. striatus germinated better on M. truncatula accessions then the inappropriate U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus, but once germinated, germ tubes of the three rusts had a similar level of success in finding stomata and forming an appressoria over a stoma. However, responses to different inappropriate rust species also showed some specificity, suggesting a combination of non-specific and specific responses underlying this legume NHR to rust fungi. Further genetic and expression analysis studies will contribute to the development of the necessary molecular tools to use the present information on host and NHR mechanisms to breed for broad-spectrum resistance to rust in legume species. PMID:25426128

  4. Novel epigenetic changes unveiled by monozygotic twins discordant for smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allione, Alessandra; Marcon, Francesca; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Siniscalchi, Ester; Zijno, Andrea; Crebelli, Riccardo; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoking affects the epigenome and could increase the risk of developing diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Changes in DNA methylation associated with smoking may help to identify molecular pathways that contribute to disease etiology. Previous studies are not completely concordant in the identification of differentially methylated regions in the DNA of smokers. We performed an epigenome-wide DNA methylation study in a group of monozygotic (MZ) twins discordant for smoking habits to determine the effect of smoking on DNA methylation. As MZ twins are considered genetically identical, this model allowed us to identify smoking-related DNA methylation changes independent from genetic components. We investigated the whole blood genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in 20 MZ twin pairs discordant for smoking habits by using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. We identified 22 CpG sites that were differentially methylated between smoker and non-smoker MZ twins by intra-pair analysis. We confirmed eight loci already described by other groups, located in AHRR, F2RL3, MYOG1 genes, at 2q37.1 and 6p21.33 regions, and also identified several new loci. Moreover, pathway analysis showed an enrichment of genes involved in GTPase regulatory activity. Our study confirmed the evidence of smoking-related DNA methylation changes, emphasizing that well-designed MZ twin models can aid the discovery of novel DNA methylation signals, even in a limited sample population.

  5. CUVE - Cubesat UV Experiment: Unveil Venus' UV Absorber with Cubesat UV Mapping Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Aslam, S.; D'Aversa, E.; Glaze, L.; Gorius, N.; Hewagama, T.; Ignatiev, N.; Piccioni, G.

    2017-09-01

    Our Venus mission concept Cubesat UV Experiment (CUVE) is one of ten proposals selected for funding by the NASA PSDS3 Program - Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies. CUVE concept is to insert a CubeSat spacecraft into a Venusian orbit and perform remote sensing of the UV spectral region using a high spectral resolution point spectrometer to resolve UV molecular bands, observe nightglow, and characterize the unidentified main UV absorber. The UV spectrometer is complemented by an imaging UV camera with multiple bands in the UV absorber main band range for contextual imaging. CUVE Science Objectives are: the nature of the "Unknown" UV-absorber; the abundances and distributions of SO2 and SO at and above Venus's cloud tops and their correlation with the UV absorber; the atmospheric dynamics at the cloud tops, structure of upper clouds and wind measurements from cloud-tracking; the nightglow emissions: NO, CO, O2. This mission will therefore be an excellent platform to study Venus' cloud top atmospheric properties where the UV absorption drives the planet's energy balance. CUVE would complement past, current and future Venus missions with conventional spacecraft, and address critical science questions cost effectively.

  6. Genetics of PCOS: A systematic bioinformatics approach to unveil the proteins responsible for PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Pritam Kumar; Rane, Riya; Ravichandran, Rahul; Singh, Shrinkhla; Panchal, Hetalkumar

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal imbalance in women, which causes problems during menstrual cycle and in pregnancy that sometimes results in fatality. Though the genetics of PCOS is not fully understood, early diagnosis and treatment can prevent long-term effects. In this study, we have studied the proteins involved in PCOS and the structural aspects of the proteins that are taken into consideration using computational tools. The proteins involved are modeled using Modeller 9v14 and Ab-initio programs. All the 43 proteins responsible for PCOS were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to identify the relatedness of the proteins. Further, microarray data analysis of PCOS datasets was analyzed that was downloaded from GEO datasets to find the significant protein-coding genes responsible for PCOS, which is an addition to the reported protein-coding genes. Various statistical analyses were done using R programming to get an insight into the structural aspects of PCOS that can be used as drug targets to treat PCOS and other related reproductive diseases.

  7. Traversing Urban Social Spaces: How Online Research Helps Unveil Offline Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Julie-Anne; Foth, Marcus; Adkins, Barbara

    This article presents a discussion of methodological considerations in urban informatics research. As an exemplar, we examine a health communication research blog set up to produce insights into the choices made by residents of a master-planned development affecting their health and well-being. It served both as a repository for collection and a tool for the strategic selection and analysis of internet research data. We reflect on the nature of the online data contributed by an urban demographic about their physical activity practices within this particular neighbourhood. The blog provided a forum for detailed responses which allowed participants to reflect on their answers over a period of time, and write with the privacy and protection effects provided by the anonymity of contributions, coupled with the advantage of being able to view the contributions made by other residents. Opinions, stories and discussions were instigated by questions and photographs posted on the blog about residents' levels of engagement with the neighbourhood for staying active and healthy. Residents reported on the social and physical aspects of the new urban environment that either encouraged or inhibited them from leading active and healthy lifestyles. In this context the blog provided insights into the role of both the planning rhetoric associated with a new urban village and the meanings attached to the lifeworld of the residents in their health practices. A total of 214 contributions to the blog were made by the residents, with the analysis and findings highlighting implications for urban design and health promotion research and practice.

  8. Unveiling the nucleon tensor charge at Jefferson Lab: A study of the SoLID case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhihong; Sato, Nobuo; Allada, Kalyan; Liu, Tianbo; Chen, Jian-Ping; Gao, Haiyan; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Prokudin, Alexei; Sun, Peng; Yuan, Feng

    2017-04-01

    © 2017 The Authors Future experiments at the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, in particular, the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID), aim at a very precise data set in the region where the partonic structure of the nucleon is dominated by the valence quarks. One of the main goals is to constrain the quark transversity distributions. We apply recent theoretical advances of the global QCD extraction of the transversity distributions to study the impact of future experimental data from the SoLID experiments. Especially, we develop a simple strategy based on the Hessian matrix analysis that allows one to estimate the uncertainties of the transversity quark distributions and their tensor charges extracted from SoLID data simulation. We find that the SoLID measurements with the proton and the effective neutron targets can improve the precision of the u- and d-quark transversity distributions up to one order of magnitude in the range 0.05 < x < 0.6.

  9. Unveiling common responses of Medicago truncatula to appropriate and inappropriate rust species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carlota eVaz Patto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the nature of effective defense mechanisms in legumes to pathogens of remotely related plant species. Some rust species are among pathogens with broad host range causing dramatic losses in various crop plants. To understand and compare the different host and nonhost resistance responses of legume species against rusts, we characterized the reaction of the model legume Medicago truncatula to one appropriate (Uromyces striatus and two inappropriate (U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus rusts. We found that similar pre and post-haustorial mechanisms of resistance appear to be operative in M. truncatula against appropriate and inappropriate rust fungus. The appropriate U. striatus germinated better on M. truncatula accessions then the inappropriate U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus, but once germinated, germ tubes of the three rusts had a similar level of success in finding stomata and forming an appressoria over a stoma. However responses to different inappropriate rust species also showed some specificity, suggesting a combination of non specific and specific responses underlying this legume nonhost resistance to rust fungi. Further genetic and expression analysis studies will contribute to the development of the necessary molecular tools to use the present information on host and nonhost resistance mechanisms to breed for broad-spectrum resistance to rust in legume species.

  10. Gas-rich galaxy pair unveiled in the lensed quasar 0957+561

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planesas; Martin-Pintado; Neri; Colina

    1999-12-24

    Molecular gas in the host galaxy of the lensed quasar 0957+561 (QSO 0957+561) at the redshift of 1.41 has been detected in the carbon monoxide (CO) line. This detection shows the extended nature of the molecular gas distribution in the host galaxy and the pronounced lensing effects due to the differentially magnified CO luminosity at different velocities. The estimated mass of molecular gas is about 4 x 10(9) solar masses, a molecular gas mass typical of a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. A second, weaker component of CO is interpreted as arising from a close companion galaxy that is rich in molecular gas and has remained undetected so far. Its estimated molecular gas mass is 1.4 x 10(9) solar masses, and its velocity relative to the main galaxy is 660 kilometers per second. The ability to probe the molecular gas distribution and kinematics of galaxies associated with high-redshift lensed quasars can be used to improve the determination of the Hubble constant H(0).

  11. Gr and hp-1 tomato mutants unveil unprecedented interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialva, Matteo; Zouari, Inès; Salvioli, Alessandra; Novero, Mara; Vrebalov, Julia; Giovannoni, James J; Bonfante, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Systemic responses to an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus reveal opposite phenological patterns in two tomato ripening mutants depending whether ethylene or light reception is involved. The availability of tomato ripening mutants has revealed many aspects of the genetics behind fleshy fruit ripening, plant hormones and light signal reception. Since previous analyses revealed that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences tomato berry ripening, we wanted to test the hypothesis that an interplay might occur between root symbiosis and fruit ripening. With this aim, we screened seven tomato mutants affected in the ripening process for their responsiveness to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae. Following their phenological responses we selected two mutants for a deeper analysis: Green ripe (Gr), deficient in fruit ethylene perception and high-pigment-1 (hp-1), displaying enhanced light signal perception throughout the plant. We investigated the putative interactions between ripening processes, mycorrhizal establishment and systemic effects using biochemical and gene expression tools. Our experiments showed that both mutants, notwithstanding a normal mycorrhizal phenotype at root level, exhibit altered arbuscule functionality. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type, mycorrhization did not lead to a higher phosphate concentration in berries of both mutants. These results suggest that the mutations considered interfere with arbuscular mycorrhiza inducing systemic changes in plant phenology and fruits metabolism. We hypothesize a cross talk mechanism between AM and ripening processes that involves genes related to ethylene and light signaling.

  12. DOUBLE HORIZONTAL BRANCHES IN NGC 6440 AND NGC 6569 UNVEILED BY THE VVV SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauro, Francesco; Bidin, Christian Moni; Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Chené, André-Nicolas; Villanova, Sandro; Minniti, Dante; Catelan, Marcio

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of a peculiar horizontal branch (HB) in NGC 6440 and NGC 6569, two massive and metal-rich Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located in the Galactic bulge, within 4 kpc from the Galactic center. In both clusters, two distinct clumps are detected at the level of the cluster HB, separated by only ∼0.1 mag in the K s band. They were detected with IR photometric data collected with the 'VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea' Survey, and confirmed in independent IR catalogs available in the literature and Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry. Our analysis demonstrates that these clumps are real cluster features, not a product of field contamination or interstellar reddening. The observed split HBs could be a signature of two stellar sub-populations with different chemical composition and/or age, as recently found in Terzan 5, but it cannot be excluded that they are caused by evolutionary effects, in particular for NGC 6440. This interpretation, however, requires an anomalously high helium content (Y > 0.30). Our discovery suggests that such a peculiar HB morphology could be a common feature of massive, metal-rich bulge GGCs.

  13. Metabolomic unveiling of a diverse range of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites dependent on geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Bum-Jin; Chung, Jin-Oh; Kim, Hak-Nam; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Sungheuk; Lee, Hyosang; Lee, Sang-Jun; Hong, Young-Shick

    2015-05-01

    Numerous factors such as geographical origin, cultivar, climate, cultural practices, and manufacturing processes influence the chemical compositions of tea, in the same way as growing conditions and grape variety affect wine quality. However, the relationships between these factors and tea chemical compositions are not well understood. In this study, a new approach for non-targeted or global analysis, i.e., metabolomics, which is highly reproducible and statistically effective in analysing a diverse range of compounds, was used to better understand the metabolome of Camellia sinensis and determine the influence of environmental factors, including geography, climate, and cultural practices, on tea-making. We found a strong correlation between environmental factors and the metabolome of green, white, and oolong teas from China, Japan, and South Korea. In particular, multivariate statistical analysis revealed strong inter-country and inter-city relationships in the levels of theanine and catechin derivatives found in green and white teas. This information might be useful for assessing tea quality or producing distinct tea products across different locations, and highlights simultaneous identification of diverse tea metabolites through an NMR-based metabolomics approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unveiling the oxidative metabolism of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) experimentally exposed to entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Tunholi Alves, Victor Menezes; da Silva, Jairo Pinheiro; Nora Castro, Rosane; Salgueiro, Fernanda Barbosa; Perinotto, Wendell Marcelo de Souza; Gôlo, Patrícia Silva; Camargo, Mariana Guedes; Angelo, Isabele da Costa; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro

    2016-10-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an important tick in tropical regions due to the high economic losses caused by its parasitism. Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana are well-known entomopathogenic fungi that can afflict R. microplus ticks. The development of new targets and strategies to control this parasite can be driven by studies of this tick's physiology. Recently, it was reported that when exposed to adverse physiological conditions, ticks can activate fermentative pathways, indicating transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism by which entomopathogenic fungi influence R. microplus metabolism has not been clarified, limiting understanding of the tick-fungus association. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of infection of ticks by M. anisopliae and B. bassiana on the amount of selected carboxylic acids present in the hemolymph, enabling increased understanding of changes previously reported. The results showed preservation in the concentrations of oxalic, lactic, and pyruvic acids in the hemolymph 24 and 48 h after dropping from cattle; while there were variations in the concentration of these carboxylic acids after infection of female ticks to M. anisopliae and B. bassiana. Significant increases were observed in the concentration of oxalic and lactic acids and significant reduction of pyruvic acid for both observation times (24 and 48 h) after infection by entomopathogenic fungi. These results indicate that B. bassiana and M. anisopliae infection alters the basal metabolism of R. microplus females, resulting in the activation of fermentative pathways.

  15. Shigella entry unveils a calcium/calpain-dependent mechanism for inhibiting sumoylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhocine, Nouara; Andrieux, Alexandra; Nigro, Giulia; Mounier, Joëlle

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of the sumoylation/desumoylation equilibrium is associated with several disease states such as cancer and infections, however the mechanisms regulating the global SUMO balance remain poorly defined. Here, we show that infection by Shigella flexneri, the causative agent of human bacillary dysentery, switches off host sumoylation during epithelial cell infection in vitro and in vivo and that this effect is mainly mediated by a calcium/calpain-induced cleavage of the SUMO E1 enzyme SAE2, thus leading to sumoylation inhibition. Furthermore, we describe a mechanism by which Shigella promotes its own invasion by altering the sumoylation state of RhoGDIα, a master negative regulator of RhoGTPase activity and actin polymerization. Together, our data suggest that SUMO modification is essential to restrain pathogenic bacterial entry by limiting cytoskeletal rearrangement induced by bacterial effectors. Moreover, these findings identify calcium-activated calpains as powerful modulators of cellular sumoylation levels with potentially broad implications in several physiological and pathological situations. PMID:29231810

  16. Pharmacological induction of skin pigmentation unveils the neuroendocrine circuit regulated by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolesi, Gabriel E; Vazhappilly, Sherene T; Hehr, Carrie L; McFarlane, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Light-regulated skin colour change is an important physiological process in invertebrates and lower vertebrates, and includes daily circadian variation and camouflage (i.e. background adaptation). The photoactivation of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) in the eye initiates an uncharacterized neuroendocrine circuit that regulates melanin dispersion/aggregation through the secretion of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH). We developed experimental models of normal or enucleated Xenopus embryos, as well as in situ cultures of skin of isolated dorsal head and tails, to analyse pharmacological induction of skin pigmentation and α-MSH synthesis. Both processes are triggered by a melanopsin inhibitor, AA92593, as well as chloride channel modulators. The AA9253 effect is eye-dependent, while functional data in vivo point to GABAA receptors expressed on pituitary melanotrope cells as the chloride channel blocker target. Based on the pharmacological data, we suggest a neuroendocrine circuit linking mRGCs with α-MSH secretion, which is used normally during background adaptation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Myocarditis in Paediatric Patients: Unveiling the Progression to Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Teixeira Farinha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis is a challenging and potentially life-threatening disease associated with high morbidity in some paediatric patients, due to its ability to present as an acute and fulminant disease and to ultimately progress to dilated cardiomyopathy. It has been described as an inflammatory disease of the myocardium caused by diverse aetiologies. Viral infection is the most frequent cause of myocarditis in developed countries, but bacterial and protozoal infections or drug hypersensitivity may also be causative agents. The prompt diagnosis in paediatric patients is difficult, as the spectrum of clinical manifestation can range from no myocardial dysfunction to sudden cardiac death. Recent studies on myocarditis pathogenesis have revealed a triphasic nature of this disease, which influences the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to adopt in each patient. Endomyocardial biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosing myocarditis, and several non-invasive diagnostic tools can be used to support the diagnosis. Intravenous immunoglobulin has become part of routine practice in the treatment of myocarditis in paediatric patients at many centres, but its true effect on the cardiac function has been the target of many studies. The aim of this review is to approach the recently discovered facets of paediatric myocarditis regarding its progression to dilated cardiomyopathy.

  18. Unveiling the Incidence of Interfirm Collaboration: Evidence from Research and Development Companies in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurina Adnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, interfirm collaboration has become an increasingly popular strategy among many organizations in various industries, in order to remain competitive. Based on the contingency theory, this paper examines the moderating effect of interfirm collaboration on the relationship between Human Resource Management (HRM practices and organizational performance. Interfirm collaboration refers to the collaboration strategies undertaken by R&D companies, with other companies in similar or diverse functional areas, including R&D, marketing, or manufacturing, to enhance performance.  Using data from 64 R&D companies, the hierarchical regression analyses showed that only collaboration in R&D and functional collaboration in manufacturing significantly moderated the relationship between HRM practices and organizational performance. Overall, the results provided partial support in the domain of the contingency theory. These results, however, are limited by the small sample size, which might have produced non-significant findings. Therefore, the generalization should be taken cautiously. Future research with a larger sample size is needed to confirm the findings.

  19. Ectopic Bone Matrix Mineralization: Unveiling the Osteoinductive Nature of Crab Cuticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omokanwaye, Tiffany Suella

    NP stability. In contrast to aggregated CeO2 NPs, dispersed CeO 2 NPs showed toxicity to the yeast. However, dispersant supplementation decreased the inhibition caused by Mn2O3 NPs at low concentrations, which could indicate that dispersant association with the particles may have an impact on the interaction between the NPs and the cells. The proven toxicity of some NPs raises concerns about their environmental fate. Municipal and industrial wastewaters are considered primary sources of NPs to the environment. However, information on the behavior and impact of NPs on wastewater treatment processes is very limited. A third objective of this dissertation was to evaluate the fate and long-term effect of ZnO and CuO NPs during wastewater treatment in high-rate anaerobic bioreactors. Laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors were fed with synthetic wastewater containing NPs for extended periods of time (> 90 d). Extensive removal (62-82%) of ZnO and CuO NPs was observed during wastewater treatment in the UASB reactors. Scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis confirmed that NPs were associated with the anaerobic sludge. While short-term exposure to low levels of ZnO and CuO NPs only caused minor inhibition to methanogenesis, extended exposure to NPs accumulated in the sludge bed led to a gradual and partial inhibitory response in the reactors. The inhibitory effect was also evident in the decline in the acetoclastic methanogenic activity of the biomass.

  20. Different Evolutionary History for Basque Diaspora Populations in USA and Argentina Unveiled by Mitochondrial DNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeta, Miriam; Núñez, Carolina; Cardoso, Sergio; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Piñeiro-Hermida, Sergio; Arriba-Barredo, Miren; Villanueva-Millán, María Jesús; M de Pancorbo, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The Basque Diaspora in Western USA and Argentina represents two populations which have maintained strong Basque cultural and social roots in a completely different geographic context. Hence, they provide an exceptional opportunity to study the maternal genetic legacy from the ancestral Basque population and assess the degree of genetic introgression from the host populations in two of the largest Basque communities outside the Basque Country. For this purpose, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial DNA control region of Basque descendants living in Western USA (n = 175) and in Argentina (n = 194). The Diaspora populations studied here displayed a genetic diversity in their European maternal input which was similar to that of the Basque source populations, indicating that not important founder effects would have occurred. Actually, the genetic legacy of the Basque population still prevailed in their present-day maternal pools, by means of a haplogroup distribution similar to the source population characterized by the presence of autochthonous Basque lineages, such as U5b1f1a and J1c5c1. However, introgression of non-Basque lineages, mostly Native American, has been observed in the Diaspora populations, particularly in Argentina, where the quick assimilation of the newcomers would have favored a wider admixture with host populations. In contrast, a longer isolation of the Diaspora groups in USA, because of language and cultural differences, would have limited the introgression of local lineages. This study reveals important differences in the maternal evolutionary histories of these Basque Diaspora populations, which have to be taken into consideration in forensic and medical genetic studies.

  1. Non-invasive Prenatal Testing and the Unveiling of an Impaired Translation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Blake; Ravitsky, Vardit; Ogbogu, Ubaka; Ali-Khan, Sarah; Bertier, Gabrielle; Birko, Stanislav; Bubela, Tania; De Beer, Jeremy; Dupras, Charles; Ellis, Meika; Granados Moreno, Palmira; Joly, Yann; Kamenova, Kalina; Master, Zubin; Marcon, Alessandro; Paulden, Mike; Rousseau, François; Caulfield, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is an exciting technology with the potential to provide a variety of clinical benefits, including a reduction in miscarriages, via a decline in invasive testing. However, there is also concern that the economic and near-future clinical benefits of NIPT have been overstated and the potential limitations and harms underplayed. NIPT, therefore, presents an opportunity to explore the ways in which a range of social pressures and policies can influence the translation, implementation, and use of a health care innovation. NIPT is often framed as a potential first tier screen that should be offered to all pregnant women, despite concerns over cost-effectiveness. Multiple forces have contributed to a problematic translational environment in Canada, creating pressure towards first tier implementation. Governments have contributed to commercialization pressure by framing the publicly funded research sector as a potential engine of economic growth. Members of industry have an incentive to frame clinical value as beneficial to the broadest possible cohort in order to maximize market size. Many studies of NIPT were directly funded and performed by private industry in laboratories lacking strong independent oversight. Physicians' fear of potential liability for failing to recommend NIPT may further drive widespread uptake. Broad social endorsement, when combined with these translation pressures, could result in the "routinization" of NIPT, thereby adversely affecting women's reproductive autonomy. Policymakers should demand robust independent evidence of clinical and public health utility relevant to their respective jurisdictions before making decisions regarding public funding for NIPT. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac troponin and tropomyosin: structural and cellular perspectives to unveil the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra de A. Marques

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inherited myopathies affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle and are commonly associated with genetic dysfunctions, leading to the production of anomalous proteins. In cardiomyopathies, mutations frequently occur in sarcomeric genes, but the cause-effect scenario between genetic alterations and pathological processes remains elusive. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM was the first cardiac disease associated with a genetic background. Since the discovery of the first mutation in the β-myosin heavy chain, more than 1,400 new mutations in 11 sarcomeric genes have been reported, awarding HCM the title of the disease of the sarcomere. The most common macroscopic phenotypes are left ventricle and interventricular septal thickening, but because the clinical profile of this disease is quite heterogeneous, these phenotypes are not suitable for an accurate diagnosis. The development of genomic approaches for clinical investigation allows for diagnostic progress and understanding at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate in vivo models to better comprehend the cellular events triggered by this pathology has become a challenge. Notwithstanding, the imbalance of Ca2+ concentrations, altered signaling pathways, induction of apoptotic factors, and heart remodeling leading to abnormal anatomy have already been reported. Of note, a misbalance of signaling biomolecules, such as kinases and tumor suppressors (e.g., Akt and p53, seems to participate in apoptotic and fibrotic events. In HCM, structural and cellular information about defective sarcomeric proteins and their altered interactome is emerging but still represents a bottleneck for developing new concepts in basic research and for future therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the structural and cellular alterations triggered by HCM-causing mutations in troponin and tropomyosin proteins and how structural biology can aid in the discovery of new platforms for therapeutics. We

  3. Identification of Arx targets unveils new candidates for controlling cortical interneuron migration and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle M Friocourt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor ARX have been found to be responsible for a wide spectrum of disorders extending from phenotypes with severe neuronal migration defects, such as lissencephaly, to mild forms of intellectual disabilities without apparent brain abnormalities, but with associated features of dystonia and epilepsy. Arx expression is mainly restricted to populations of GABA-containing neurons. Studies of the effects of ARX loss of function, either in humans or mutant mice, revealed varying defects, suggesting multiple roles of this gene in brain patterning, neuronal proliferation and migration, cell maturation and differentiation, as well as axonal outgrowth and connectivity. However, to date, little is known about how Arx functions as a transcription factor or which genes it binds and regulates. Recently, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation and mRNA expression with microarray analysis and identified approximately 1000 gene promoters bound by Arx in transfected neuroblastoma N2a cells and mouse embryonic brain. To narrow the analysis of Arx targets to those most likely to control cortical interneuron migration and/or differentiation, we compare here our data to previously published studies searching for genes enriched or down-regulated in cortical interneurons between E13.5 and E15.5. We thus identified 14 Arx-target genes enriched (Cxcr7, Meis1, Ppap2a, Slc12a5, Ets2, Phlda1, Zif268, Igf1, Lmo3, Sema6, Lgi1, Alk, Tgfb3, Napb and 5 genes specifically down-regulated (Hmgn3, Lmo1, Ebf3, Rasgef1b and Slit2 in cortical migrating neurons. In this review, we present these genes and discuss how their possible regulation by Arx may lead to the dysfunction of GABAergic neurons, resulting in mental retardation and epilepsy.

  4. Tailoring the Crystal Structure of Nanoclusters Unveiled High Photoluminescence via Ion Pairing

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2018-03-26

    The lack of structurally distinct nanoclusters (NCs) of identical size and composition prevented the mechanistic understanding of their structural effects on ion pairing and concomitant optical properties. To produce such highly sought NCs, we designed a new monothiolate-for-dithiolate exchange strategy that enabled the selective transformation of the structure of a NC without affecting its metal atomicity or composition. Through this method, a bimetallic [PtAg28(BDT)12(PPh3)4]4– NC (1) was successfully synthesized from [PtAg28(S-Adm)18(PPh3)4]2+ NC (2) (S-Adm, 1-adamantanethiolate; BDT, 1,3-benzenedithiolate; PPh3, triphenylphosphine). The determined X-ray crystal structure of 1 showed a PtAg12 icosahedron core and a partially exposed surface, which are distinct from a face-centered cubic PtAg12 core and a fully covered surface of 2. We reveal through mass spectrometry (MS) that 1 forms ion pairs with counterions attracted by the core charge of the cluster, which is in line with density functional simulations. The MS data for 1, 2, and other NCs suggested that such attraction is facilitated by the exposed surface of 1. The formation of ion pairs increases the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield of 1 up to 17.6% depending on the bulkiness of the counterion. Unlike small counterions, larger ones are calculated to occupy ≤90% of the volume near the exposed cluster surface and to make the ligand shell of 1 more rigid, which is observed to increase the PL. Thus, the developed synthesis strategy for structurally different NCs of the same size and composition allows us to probe the structure–property relationship for ion pairing and concomitant PL enhancement.

  5. Two-dimensional spectroscopy of a molecular dimer unveils the effects of vibronic coupling on exciton coherences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, Alexei; Johnson, Philip J. M.; Tempelaar, Roel; Murphy, R. Scott; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    The observation of persistent oscillatory signals in multidimensional spectra of protein-pigment complexes has spurred a debate on the role of coherence-assisted electronic energy transfer as a key operating principle in photosynthesis. Vibronic coupling has recently been proposed as an explanation

  6. Does Kepler unveil the mystery of the Blazhko effect? First detection of period doubling in Kepler Blazhko RR Lyrae stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabó, R.; Kollath, Z.; Molnár, L.

    2010-01-01

    -doubling bifurcation in our non-linear RR Lyrae models computed by the Florida-Budapest hydrocode. This enabled us to trace the origin of this instability in RR Lyrae stars to a resonance, namely a 9:2 resonance between the fundamental mode and a high-order (ninth) radial overtone showing strange-mode characteristics...

  7. Unveiling the secrets of geology, from the Earth to your daily life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    extensive description of minerals, along with stunning images. The book explains that most, if not all objects around us, contain crucial minerals. Through one adventurous day of the cartoon protagonist, Norman, it is possible find out the minerals used in very common objects of our everyday life, from paper to shampoo, or from a bike to a television. Fifty-one top expert geologists contributed to describe the fascinating qualities of each mineral, for a total of thirty minerals. Whatever curiosities you may have about minerals, "Minerals in your life" satisfies them with an approach that it is as scientifically precise as entertaining. In following these basic principles geologists will be able to effectively communicate to the entire world that geology is a science that will contribute to the building of a better world of tomorrow.

  8. Eyeball Pressure Stimulation Unveils Subtle Autonomic Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Persons with a History of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilz, Max J; Aurnhammer, Felix; Flanagan, Steven R; Intravooth, Tassanai; Wang, Ruihao; Hösl, Katharina M; Pauli, Elisabeth; Koehn, Julia

    2015-11-15

    After mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), patients have increased long-term mortality rates, persisting even beyond 13 years. Pathophysiology is unclear. Yet, central autonomic network dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular dysregulation and increased mortality. Purely parasympathetic cardiovascular challenge by eyeball pressure stimulation (EP), might unveil subtle autonomic dysfunction in post-mTBI patients. We investigated whether mild EP shows autonomic cardiovascular dysregulation in post-mTBI patients. In 24 patients (34 ± 12 years; 5-86 months post-injury) and 27 controls (30 ± 11 years), we monitored respiration, electrocardiographic RR intervals (RRI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BPsys, BPdia) before and during 2 min of 30 mm Hg EP, applied by an ophthalmologic ocular pressure device (Okulopressor(®)). We calculated spectral powers of RRI in the mainly sympathetic low frequency (LF; 0.04-0.15 Hz) and parasympathetic high frequency (HF; 0.15-0.5 Hz) ranges, and of BP in the sympathetic LF range, the RRI-LF/HF ratio as index of the sympathetic-parasympathetic balance, normalized (nu) RRI-LF- and HF-powers, and LF- and HF-powers after natural logarithmic transformation (ln). Parameters before and during EP in post-mTBI patients and controls were compared by repeated measurement analysis of variance with post hoc analysis (p < 0.05). During EP, BPsys and BPdia increased in post-mTBI patients. Only in controls but not in post-mTBI patients, EP increased RRI-HFnu-powers and decreased RRI-LF-powers, RRI-LFnu-powers, BPsys-LF-powers, BPsys-lnLF-powers and BPdia-lnLF-powers. RRI-LF/HF ratios slightly increased in post-mTBI patients but slightly decreased in controls upon EP. Even with only mild EP, our controls showed normal EP responses and shifted sympathetic-parasympathetic balance towards parasympathetic predominance. In contrast, our post-mTBI patients could not increase parasympathetic heart rate modulation but

  9. Uncertainty analysis in Titan ionospheric simulated ion mass spectra: unveiling a set of issues for models accuracy improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébrard, Eric; Carrasco, Nathalie; Dobrijevic, Michel; Pernot, Pascal

    present semi-coupled model of Titan's ionosphere. We will eventually unveil a set of different issues limiting the current accuracy and, as one can expect, the predictivity of Titan photochemical models.

  10. Unveiling the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensson, Pall; Rokkjær, Ole; Nørgaard, Bente

    by the EU Leonardo da Vinci Partnership program. The project had two objectives. The first objective was to use the European Qualification Framework (EQF) as a benchmark against the National Qualification Framework (NQF) of the partner countries and the IE educations offered by the partner institutions...

  11. LHCb unveils new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration announces the observation of four “exotic” particles from its analysis of the LHC data.   The LHCb experimental cavern. On 28 June, the LHCb collaboration reported the observation of three new "exotic" particles and confirmation of the existence of a fourth one in data from the LHC. These particles each appear to be formed by four quarks (the fundamental constituents of the matter inside all the atoms of the universe): two quarks and two antiquarks (that is, a tetraquark). Due to their non-standard quark content, the newly observed particles have been included in the broad category of so-called exotic particles, although their exact theoretical interpretation is still under study.            The quark model, proposed by Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1964, is considered to be the most valid scheme for the classification of hadrons (all the composite particles) that has been fou...

  12. Indian gift unveiled at CERN: the statue of the Indian deity Shiva was unveiled by His Excellency K M Chandrasekhar, ambassador (WTO Geneva), shown above signing the visitors' book, Anil Kakodkar, chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission and secretary of the Indian Department of Energy, and CERN's director-general, Robert Aymar.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    On 18 June CERN unveiled an unusual new landmark - a statue of the Indian deity Shiva. The statue is a gift from CERN's Indian collaborators to celebrate CERN's long association with India, which began in the 1960s. The statue was made in India in the traditional style. The original sculpture was a wax model, around which a soil mould was made. Melting the wax left a hollow into which liquid metal was poured, and once cooled the mould was split and the statue polished and given its antique finish.

  13. Modification of digestive system microbiome of lactating dairy cows by feeding Bovamine: effect on ruminal fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the immune modulatory effects as well as effects on productivity of Bovamine® (Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 and Probionibacterium freudenreichii) on the digestive system microbiome of dairy cattle during late lactation (average DIM = 202). To unveil the underlying mechanisms, ...

  14. Large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis unveils general rules that fine-tune evolution of mRNA primary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Moura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon usage and codon-pair context are important gene primary structure features that influence mRNA decoding fidelity. In order to identify general rules that shape codon-pair context and minimize mRNA decoding error, we have carried out a large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis of 119 fully sequenced genomes. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed mathematical and software tools for large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis. These methodologies unveiled general and species specific codon-pair context rules that govern evolution of mRNAs in the 3 domains of life. We show that evolution of bacterial and archeal mRNA primary structure is mainly dependent on constraints imposed by the translational machinery, while in eukaryotes DNA methylation and tri-nucleotide repeats impose strong biases on codon-pair context. CONCLUSIONS: The data highlight fundamental differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decoding rules, which are partially independent of codon usage.

  15. Probiotics cultures in animal feed: Effects on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the effects of probiotics included in dairy cattle and mice feed on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to Johne’s disease. To unveil the underlying mechanisms, dairy cattle were either fed Bovamine (1.04 x 10**9 cfu of Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 plus 2.04 x 10**...

  16. Criteria for accurate determination of the magnon relaxation length from the nonlocal spin Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Juan; Cornelissen, Ludo Johannes; Liu, Jing; Ben Youssef, J.; Liang, Lei; van Wees, Bart

    2017-01-01

    The nonlocal transport of thermally generated magnons not only unveils the underlying mechanism of the spin Seebeck effect, but also allows for the extraction of the magnon relaxation length (λm) in a magnetic material, the average distance over which thermal magnons can propagate. In this study, we

  17. Stressed lungs: unveiling the role of circulating stress hormones in ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our recent work demonstrated that circulating stress hormones, epinephrine and corticosterone/cortisol, are involved in mediating ozone pulmonary effects through the activation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Adrenalectomy in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats diminished circu...

  18. Micro-CT unveils the secret life of the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera, Curculionidae: Scolytinae) inside coffee berries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari); Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is the most important insect pest of coffee worldwide, and due to the cryptic life habit of the insect inside coffee berries, effective pest management strategies have been difficult to develop. In this pap...

  19. Exploring the oxidation and iron binding profile of a cyclodextrin encapsulated quercetin complex unveiled a controlled complex dissociation through a chemical stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, Dimitrios A; Ramesova, Sarka; Chatzigiannis, Christos M; Degano, Ilaria; Gerogianni, Paraskevi S; Karadima, Constantina; Perikleous, Sonia; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Galaris, Dimitrios; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Valsami, Georgia; Sokolova, Romana; Tzakos, Andreas G

    2018-06-07

    Flavonoids possess a rich polypharmacological profile and their biological role is linked to their oxidation state protecting DNA from oxidative stress damage. However, their bioavailability is hampered due to their poor aqueous solubility. This can be surpassed through encapsulation to supramolecular carriers as cyclodextrin (CD). A quercetin- 2HP-β-CD complex has been formerly reported by us. However, once the flavonoid is in its 2HP-β-CD encapsulated state its oxidation potential, its decomplexation mechanism, its potential to protect DNA damage from oxidative stress remained elusive. To unveil this, an array of biophysical techniques was used. The quercetin-2HP-β-CD complex was evaluated through solubility and dissolution experiments, electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies (Cyclic Voltammetry) UV-Vis spectroscopy, HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and HPLC-DAD, fluorescence spectroscopy, NMR Spectroscopy, theoretical calculations (density functional theory (DFT)) and biological evaluation of the protection offered against H 2 O 2 -induced DNA damage. Encapsulation of quercetin inside the supramolecule's cavity enhanced its solubility and oxidation profile is retained in its encapsulated state. Although the protective ability of the quercetin-2HP-β-CD complex against H 2 O 2 was diminished, iron serves as a chemical stimulus to dissociate the complex and release quercetin. We found that in a quercetin-2HP-β-CD inclusion complex quercetin retains its oxidation profile similarly to its native state, while iron can operate as a chemical stimulus to release quercetin from its host cavity. The oxidation profile of a natural product once it is encapsulated in a supramolecular cyclodextrin carrier as also it was discovered that decomplexation can be triggered by a chemical stimulus. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Surface Induced Dissociation Coupled with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Unveils Heterogeneity of a 211 kDa Multicopper Oxidase Protein Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mowei; Yan, Jing; Romano, Christine A.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2018-01-01

    Manganese oxidation is an important biogeochemical process that is largely regulated by bacteria through enzymatic reactions. However, the detailed mechanism is poorly understood due to challenges in isolating and characterizing these unknown enzymes. A manganese oxidase, Mnx, from Bacillus sp. PL-12 has been successfully overexpressed in active form as a protein complex with a molecular mass of 211 kDa. We have recently used surface induced dissociation (SID) and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to release and detect folded subcomplexes for determining subunit connectivity and quaternary structure. The data from the native mass spectrometry experiments led to a plausible structural model of this multicopper oxidase, which has been difficult to study by conventional structural biology methods. It was also revealed that each Mnx subunit binds a variable number of copper ions. Becasue of the heterogeneity of the protein and limited mass resolution, ambiguities in assigning some of the observed peaks remained as a barrier to fully understanding the role of metals and potential unknown ligands in Mnx. In this study, we performed SID in a modified Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. The high mass accuracy and resolution offered by FTICR unveiled unexpected artificial modifications on the protein that had been previously thought to be iron bound species based on lower resolution spectra. Additionally, isotopically resolved spectra of the released subcomplexes revealed the metal binding stoichiometry at different structural levels. This method holds great potential for in-depth characterization of metalloproteins and protein-ligand complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Interannual abundance changes of gelatinous carnivore zooplankton unveil climate-driven hydrographic variations in the Iberian Peninsula, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Mariaelena; Molinero, Juan C; Azeiteiro, Ulisses M; Pardal, Miguel A; Primo, Ana L; Nyitrai, Daniel; Marques, Sónia C

    2016-09-01

    The persistent massive blooms of gelatinous zooplankton recorded during recent decades may be indicative of marine ecosystem changes. In this study, we investigated the potential influence of the North Atlantic climate (NAO) variability on decadal abundance changes of gelatinous carnivore zooplankton in the Mondego estuary, Portugal, over the period 2003-2013. During the 11-year study, the community of gelatinous carnivores encompassed a larger diversity of hydromedusae than siphonophores; the former dominated by Obelia spp., Lizzia blondina, Clythia hemisphaerica, Liriope tetraphylla and Solmaris corona, while the latter dominated by Muggiaea atlantica. Gelatinous carnivore zooplankton displayed marked interannual variability and mounting species richness over the period examined. Their pattern of abundance shifted towards larger abundances ca. 2007 and significant phenological changes. The latter included a shift in the mean annual pattern (from unimodal to bimodal peak, prior and after 2007 respectively) and an earlier timing of the first annual peak concurrent with enhanced temperatures. These changes were concurrent with the climate-driven environmental variability mainly controlled by the NAO, which displayed larger variance after 2007 along with an enhanced upwelling activity. Structural equation modelling allowed depicting cascading effects derived from the NAO influence on regional climate and upwelling variability further shaping water temperature. Such cascading effect percolated the structure and dynamics of the community of gelatinous carnivore zooplankton in the Mondego estuary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Unveiling the transformation and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter in contrasting hydrothermal vents using fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyang; Zhuang, Wan-E; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Wang, Bing-Jye; Kuo, Fu-Wen

    2017-03-15

    The submarine hydrothermal systems are extreme environments where active cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may occur. However, little is known about the optical properties and bioavailability of hydrothermal DOM, which could provide valuable insights into its transformation processes and biogeochemical reactivity. The quantity, quality, and bioavailability of DOM were investigated for four very different hydrothermal vents east of Taiwan, using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). The DOC and absorption coefficient a 280 were both lower in the two hydrothermal vents off the Orchid Island and on the Green Island than in the surrounding seawater and the two vents off the Kueishantao Island, indicating effective removals of DOM in the former two hydrothermal systems owing to possible adsorption/co-precipitation and thermal degradation respectively. The four hydrothermal DOM showed notable differences in the absorption spectral slope S 275-295 , humification index HIX, biological index BIX, EEM spectra, and the relative distributions of seven PARAFAC components. The results demonstrated a high diversity of chemical composition and transformation history of DOM under contrasting hydrothermal conditions. The little change in the hydrothermal DOC after 28-day microbial incubations indicated a low bioavailability of the bulk DOM, and different PARAFAC components showed contrasting bioavailability. The results have profound implications for understanding the biogeochemical cycling and environmental effects of hydrothermal DOM in the marine environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Unveiling the neurotoxicity of methylmercury in fish (Diplodus sargus) through a regional morphometric analysis of brain and swimming behavior assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Sónia; Pereira, Patrícia; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Mann, Erin; Barata, Marisa; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Canário, João; Almeida, Armando; Pacheco, Mário

    2016-11-01

    The current study aims to shed light on the neurotoxicity of MeHg in fish (white seabream - Diplodus sargus) by the combined assessment of: (i) MeHg toxicokinetics in the brain, (ii) brain morphometry (volume and number of neurons plus glial cells in specific brain regions) and (iii) fish swimming behavior (endpoints associated with the motor performance and the fear/anxiety-like status). Fish were surveyed for all the components after 7 (E7) and 14 (E14) days of dietary exposure to MeHg (8.7μgg -1 ), as well as after a post-exposure period of 28days (PE28). MeHg was accumulated in the brain of D. sargus after a short time (E7) and reached a maximum at the end of the exposure period (E14), suggesting an efficient transport of this toxicant into fish brain. Divalent inorganic Hg was also detected in fish brain along the experiment (indicating demethylation reactions), although levels were 100-200 times lower than MeHg, which pinpoints the organic counterpart as the great liable for the recorded effects. In this regard, a decreased number of cells in medial pallium and optic tectum, as well as an increased hypothalamic volume, occurred at E7. Such morphometric alterations were followed by an impairment of fish motor condition as evidenced by a decrease in the total swimming time, while the fear/anxiety-like status was not altered. Moreover, at E14 fish swam a greater distance, although no morphometric alterations were found in any of the brain areas, probably due to compensatory mechanisms. Additionally, although MeHg decreased almost two-fold in the brain during post-exposure, the levels were still high and led to a loss of cells in the optic tectum at PE28. This is an interesting result that highlights the optic tectum as particularly vulnerable to MeHg exposure in fish. Despite the morphometric alterations reported in the optic tectum at PE28, no significant changes were found in fish behavior. Globally, the effects of MeHg followed a multiphasic profile, where

  4. Parp-1 genetic ablation in Ela-myc mice unveils novel roles for Parp-1 in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bosch, Neus; Iglesias, Mar; Munné-Collado, Jessica; Martínez-Cáceres, Carlos; Moreno, Mireia; Guerra, Carmen; Yélamos, Jose; Navarro, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. The inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1), the major protein responsible for poly(ADP-ribosy)lation in response to DNA damage, has emerged as a promising treatment for several tumour types. Here we aimed to elucidate the involvement of Parp-1 in pancreatic tumour progression. We assessed Parp-1 protein expression in normal, preneoplastic and pancreatic tumour samples from humans and from K-Ras- and c-myc-driven mouse models of pancreatic cancer. Parp-1 was highly expressed in acinar cells in normal and cancer tissues. In contrast, ductal cells expressed very low or undetectable levels of this protein, both in a normal and in a tumour context. The Parp-1 expression pattern was similar in human and mouse samples, thereby validating the use of animal models for further studies. To determine the in vivo effects of Parp-1 depletion on pancreatic cancer progression, Ela-myc-driven pancreatic tumour development was analysed in a Parp-1 knock-out background. Loss of Parp-1 resulted in increased tumour necrosis and decreased proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Interestingly, Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice displayed fewer ductal tumours than their Ela-myc:Parp-1(+/+) counterparts, suggesting that Parp-1 participates in promoting acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a key event in pancreatic cancer initiation. Moreover, impaired macrophage recruitment can be responsible for the ADM blockade found in the Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice. Finally, molecular analysis revealed that Parp-1 modulates ADM downstream of the Stat3-MMP7 axis and is also involved in transcriptional up-regulation of the MDM2, VEGFR1 and MMP28 cancer-related genes. In conclusion, the expression pattern of Parp-1 in normal and cancer tissue and the in vivo functional effects of Parp-1 depletion point to a novel role for this protein in pancreatic carcinogenesis and shed light

  5. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Stellar angular momentum of about 2300 galaxies: unveiling the bimodality of massive galaxy properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark T.; Cappellari, Michele; Li, Hongyu; Mao, Shude; Bershady, Matthew; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Law, David R.; Pan, Kaike; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Yan, Renbin

    2018-03-01

    We measure λ _{R_e}, a proxy for galaxy specific stellar angular momentum within one effective radius, and the ellipticity, ɛ, for about 2300 galaxies of all morphological types observed with integral field spectroscopy as part of the MaNGA survey, the largest such sample to date. We use the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram to separate early-type galaxies into fast and slow rotators. We also visually classify each galaxy according to its optical morphology and two-dimensional stellar velocity field. Comparing these classifications to quantitative λ _{R_e} measurements reveals tight relationships between angular momentum and galaxy structure. In order to account for atmospheric seeing, we use realistic models of galaxy kinematics to derive a general approximate analytic correction for λ _{R_e}. Thanks to the size of the sample and the large number of massive galaxies, we unambiguously detect a clear bimodality in the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram which may result from fundamental differences in galaxy assembly history. There is a sharp secondary density peak inside the region of the diagram with low λ _{R_e} and ɛ their distribution of the misalignments between the photometric and kinematic position angles. We confirm that genuine slow rotators start appearing above M ≥ 2 × 1011M⊙ where a significant number of high-mass fast rotators also exist.

  6. Unveiling health attitudes and creating good-for-you foods: the genomics metaphor, consumer innovative web-based technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, H R; German, J B; Saguy, I S

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an integrated analysis of three emerging knowledge bases in the nutrition and consumer products industries, and how they may effect the food industry. These knowledge bases produce new vistas for corporate product development, especially with respect to those foods that are positioned as 'good for you.' Couched within the current thinking of state-of-the-art knowledge and information, this article highlights how today's thinking about accelerated product development can be introduced into the food and health industries to complement these three research areas. The 3 knowledge bases are: the genomics revolution, which has opened new insights into understanding the interactions of personal needs of individual consumers with nutritionally relevant components of the foods; the investigation of food choice by scientific studies; the development of large scale databases (mega-studies) about the consumer mind. These knowledge bases, combined with new methods to understand the consumer through research, make possible a more focused development. The confluence of trends outlined in this article provides the corporation with the beginnings of a new path to a knowledge-based, principles-grounded product-development system. The approaches hold the potential to create foods based upon people's nutritional requirements combined with their individual preferences. Integrating these emerging knowledge areas with new consumer research techniques may well reshape how the food industry develops new products to satisfy consumer needs and wants.

  7. X-ray study of a sample of FR0 radio galaxies: unveiling the nature of the central engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, E.; Grandi, P.; Capetti, A.; Baldi, R. D.; Giovannini, G.

    2018-06-01

    Fanaroff-Riley type 0 radio galaxies (FR0s) are compact radio sources that represent the bulk of the radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) population, but they are still poorly understood. Pilot studies on these sources have been already performed at radio and optical wavelengths: here we present the first X-ray study of a sample of 19 FR0 radio galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey/NRAO VLA Sky Survey/Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm sample of Best & Heckman, with redshift ≤0.15, radio size ≤10 kpc, and optically classified as low-excitation galaxies. The X-ray spectra are modelled with a power-law component absorbed by Galactic column density with, in some cases, a contribution from thermal extended gas. The X-ray photons are likely produced by the jet as attested by the observed correlation between X-ray (2-10 keV) and radio (5 GHz) luminosities, similar to Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies (FRIs). The estimated Eddington-scaled luminosities indicate a low accretion rate. Overall, we find that the X-ray properties of FR0s are indistinguishable from those of FRIs, thus adding another similarity between AGN associated with compact and extended radio sources. A comparison between FR0s and low-luminosity BL Lacs rules out important beaming effects in the X-ray emission of the compact radio galaxies. FR0s have different X-ray properties with respect to young radio sources (e.g. gigahertz-peaked spectrum/compact steep spectrum sources), generally characterized by higher X-ray luminosities and more complex spectra. In conclusion, the paucity of extended radio emission in FR0s is probably related to the intrinsic properties of their jets that prevent the formation of extended structures, and/or to intermittent activity of their engines.

  8. Genetic targeting of NRXN2 in mice unveils role in excitatory cortical synapse function and social behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesche eBorn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human genetics has identified rare copy number variations and deleterious mutations for all neurexin genes (NRXN1-3 in patients with neurodevelopmental diseases, and electrophysiological recordings in animal brains have shown that Nrxns are important for synaptic transmission. While several mouse models for Nrxn1α inactivation have previously been studied for behavioral changes, very little information is available for other variants. Here, we validate that mice lacking Nrxn2α exhibit behavioral abnormalities, characterized by social interaction deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior, which partially overlap, partially differ from Nrxn1α mutant behaviors. Using patch-clamp recordings in Nrxn2α knockout brains, we observe reduced spontaneous transmitter release at excitatory synapses in the neocortex. We also analyse at this cellular level a novel NRXN2 mouse model that carries a combined deletion of Nrxn2α and Nrxn2β. Electrophysiological analysis of this Nrxn2-mutant mouse shows surprisingly similar defects of excitatory release to Nrxn2α, indicating that the β-variant of Nrxn2 has no strong function in basic transmission at these synapses. Inhibitory transmission as well as synapse densities and ultrastructure remain unchanged in the neocortex of both models. Furthermore, at Nrxn2α and Nrxn2-mutant excitatory synapses we find an altered facilitation and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR function because NMDAR-dependent decay time and NMDAR-mediated responses are reduced. As Nrxn can indirectly be linked to NMDAR via neuroligin and PSD-95, the trans-synaptic nature of this complex may help to explain occurrence of presynaptic and postsynaptic effects. Since excitatory/inhibitory imbalances and impairment of NMDAR function are alledged to have a role in autism and schizophrenia, our results support the idea of a related pathomechanism in these disorders.

  9. Species distribution and introgressive hybridization of two Avicennia species from the Western Hemisphere unveiled by phylogeographic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Gustavo M; Zucchi, Maria I; Sampaio, Iracilda; Souza, Anete P

    2015-04-10

    Mangrove plants grow in the intertidal zone in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The global latitudinal distribution of the mangrove is mainly influenced by climatic and oceanographic features. Because of current climate changes, poleward range expansions have been reported for the major biogeographic regions of mangrove forests in the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. There is evidence that mangrove forests also responded similarly after the last glaciation by expanding their ranges. In this context, the use of genetic tools is an informative approach for understanding how historical processes and factors impact the distribution of mangrove species. We investigated the phylogeographic patterns of two Avicennia species, A. germinans and A. schaueriana, from the Western Hemisphere using nuclear and chloroplast DNA markers. Our results indicate that, although Avicennia bicolor, A. germinans and A. schaueriana are independent lineages, hybridization between A. schaueriana and A. germinans is a relevant evolutionary process. Our findings also reinforce the role of long-distance dispersal in widespread mangrove species such as A. germinans, for which we observed signs of transatlantic dispersal, a process that has, most likely, contributed to the breadth of the distribution of A. germinans. However, along the southern coast of South America, A. schaueriana is the only representative of the genus. The distribution patterns of A. germinans and A. schaueriana are explained by their different responses to past climate changes and by the unequal historical effectiveness of relative gene flow by propagules and pollen. We observed that A. bicolor, A. germinans and A. schaueriana are three evolutionary lineages that present historical and ongoing hybridization on the American continent. We also inferred a new evidence of transatlantic dispersal for A. germinans, which may have contributed to its widespread distribution. Despite the generally wider distribution of A

  10. Unveiling the role of PAK2 in CD44 mediated inhibition of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in AML cells

    KAUST Repository

    Aldehaiman, Mansour M.

    2018-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by the accumulation of immature nonfunctional highly proliferative hematopoietic cells in the blood, due to a blockage in myeloid differentiation at various stages. Since the success of the differentiation agent, All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), much effort has gone into trying to find agents that are able to differentiate AML cells and specifically the leukemic stem cell (LSC). CD44 is a cell surface receptor that is over-expressed on AML cells. When bound to anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), this differentiation block is relieved in AML cells and their proliferation is reduced. The molecular mechanisms that AML cells undergo to achieve this reversal of their apparent phenotype is not fully understood. To this end, we designed a study using quantitative phosphoproteomics approaches aimed at identifying differences in phosphorylation found on proteins involved in signaling pathways post-treatment with CD44-mAbs. The Rho family of GTPases emerged as one of the most transformed pathways following the treatment with CD44-mAbs. The P21 activated kinase 2(PAK2), a target of the Rho family of GTPases, was found to be differentially phosphorylated in AML cells post-treatment with CD44-mAbs. This protein has been found to possess a role similar to that of a switch that determines whether the cell survives or undergoes apoptosis. Beyond confirming these results by various biochemical approaches, our study aimed to determine the effect of knock down of PAK2 on AML cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, over-expression of PAK2 mutants using plasmid cloning was also explored to fully understand how levels of PAK2 as well as the alteration of specific phospohorylation sites could alter AML cell responses to CD44-mAbs. Results from this study will be important in determining whether PAK2 could be used as a potential therapeutic target

  11. Unveiling the Antarctic subglacial landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Roland; Roberts, Jason

    2010-05-01

    Better knowledge of the subglacial landscape of Antarctica is vital to reducing uncertainties regarding prediction of the evolution of the ice sheet. These uncertainties are associated with bedrock geometry for ice sheet dynamics, including possible marine ice sheet instabilities and subglacial hydrological pathways (e.g. Wright et al., 2008). Major collaborative aerogeophysics surveys motivated by the International Polar Year (e.g. ICECAP and AGAP), and continuing large scale radar echo sounding campaigns (ICECAP and NASA Ice Bridge) are significantly improving the coverage. However, the vast size of Antarctica and logistic difficulties mean that data gaps persist, and ice thickness data remains spatially inhomogeneous. The physics governing large scale ice sheet flow enables ice thickness, and hence bedrock topography, to be inferred from knowledge of ice sheet surface topography and considerations of ice sheet mass balance, even in areas with sparse ice thickness measurements (Warner and Budd, 2000). We have developed a robust physically motivated interpolation scheme, based on these methods, and used it to generate a comprehensive map of Antarctic bedrock topography, using along-track ice thickness data assembled for the BEDMAP project (Lythe et al., 2001). This approach reduces ice thickness biases, compared to traditional inverse distance interpolation schemes which ignore the information available from considerations of ice sheet flow. In addition, the use of improved balance fluxes, calculated using a Lagrangian scheme, eliminates the grid orientation biases in ice fluxes associated with finite difference methods (Budd and Warner, 1996, Le Brocq et al., 2006). The present map was generated using a recent surface DEM (Bamber et al., 2009, Griggs and Bamber, 2009) and accumulation distribution (van de Berg et al., 2006). Comparing our results with recent high resolution regional surveys gives confidence that all major subglacial topographic features are revealed by this approach, and we advocate its consideration in future ice thickness data syntheses. REFERENCES Budd, W.F., and R.C. Warner, 1996. A computer scheme for rapid calculations of balance-flux distributions. Annals of Glaciology 23, 21-27. Bamber, J.L., J.L. Gomez Dans and J.A. Griggs, 2009. A new 1 km digital elevation model of the Antarctic derived from combined satellite radar and laser data. Part I: Data and methods. The Cryosphere 3 (2), 101-111. Griggs, J.A., and J.L. Bamber, 2009. A new digital elevation model of Antarctica derived from combined radar and laser altimetry data. Part II: Validation and error estimates, The Cryosphere, 3(2), 113-123. Le Brocq, A.M., A.J. Payne and M.J. Siegert, 2006. West Antarctic balance calculations: Impact of flux-routing algorithm, smoothing algorithm and topography. Computers and Geosciences 23(10): 1780-1795. Lythe, M. B., D.G. Vaughan, and the BEDMAP Consortium 2001, BEDMAP: A new ice thickness and subglacial topographic model of Antarctica, J. of Geophys. Res., 106(B6),11,335-11,351. van de Berg, W.J., M.R. van den Broeke, C.H. Reijmer, and E. van Meijgaard, 2006. Reassessment of the Antarctic surface mass balance using calibrated output of a regional atmospheric climate model, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D11104,doi:10.1029/2005JD006495. Warner, R.C., and W.F. Budd, 2000. Derivation of ice thickness and bedrock topography in data-gap regions over Antarctica, Annals of Glaciology, 31, 191-197. Wright, A.P., M.J. Siegert, A.M. Le Brocq, and D.B. Gore, 2008. High sensitivity of subglacial hydrological pathways in Antarctica to small ice-sheet changes, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L17504, doi:10.1029/2008GL034937.

  12. Unveiling the dynamics of reading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posner, M.; Abdullaev, Y.

    1996-01-01

    What happens in our brain when we read isolated words? Are some particular areas of cortex stimulated when these words make sense? Does the reading practice induce others areas? And what about the new senses research? Some studies carried out for a century show that two regions of the left cerebral hemisphere: the Broca and the Wernicke areas are involved. By visualizing in vivo an elementary thought as what is for instance the function of a hammer, the functional cerebral imagery (positron computed tomography, NMR imaging, electro-encephalography) allows to deepen and to explain the analysis. It reveals an areas network called semantic, in the right hemisphere too. Their activation would take place according to a very fast sequence in order to direct the eye movements during the reading. (O.M.)

  13. Ireland unveils petroleum tax measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Ireland's government has introduced detailed petroleum tax legislation designed to boost offshore exploration and development. The petroleum tax measures, published last week and included in the government's omnibus finance bill for 1992, will provide Ireland for the first time a comprehensive petroleum tax regime. They include elements which, in tax terms, will make Ireland a most attractive location for oil and gas exploration and development, the Irish Energy Minister Robert Molloy. He the, Exploration companies will now have the benefit of the certainty of a detailed tax framework and attractive tax rates. Debate on the finance bill has begun in the Irish Dail (parliament). Under Ireland's constitution, the budget bill must be approved and signed by the president by the end of May. Failure to approve a budget bill within that time would mean the current government's collapse

  14. Unveiling the Secrets of Archimedes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Manisha

    2008-01-01

    Progress has been made at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) toward deciphering the remaining 10-20% of ancient Greek text contained in the Archimedes palimpsest. The text is known to contain valuable works by the mathematician, including the Method of Mechanical Theorems, the Equilibrium of Planes, On Floating Bodies, and several diagrams. The only surviving copy of the text was recycled into a prayer book in the Middle Ages. The ink used to write on the goat skin parchment is partly composed of iron, which is visible by x-ray radiation. To image the palimpsest pages, the parchment was framed and placed in a stage that moved according to the raster method. When an x-ray beam was incident upon the parchment the iron in the ink was detected by a germanium detector. The resultant signal was converted to a gray-scale image. It was extremely important that each line of data was well aligned with the line that came before it. The objectives of this experiment were to determine the best parameters for producing well-aligned images and to reduce the scanning time. Imaging half a page of parchment during previous beam time for this project was achieved in thirty hours. Equations were produced to evaluate count time, shutter time, and the number of pixels in this experiment. On Beamline 6-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), actual scanning time was reduced by one fourth. The remaining pages were successfully imaged and sent to ancient Greek experts for translation

  15. Unveiling Privilege to Broaden Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Robertson, Amy D.

    2017-10-01

    The underrepresentation of women and people of color in physics has been attributed to a wide variety of factors ranging from society-wide conditions such as income inequality and sparse role models, to daily interpersonal interactions that disadvantage or discourage women and people of color from pursuing physics. These factors may be seen as manifestations of White and/or male privilege: social, economic, educational, or political advantages that are made available to Whites and males on the basis of their social identity. White male privilege pervades the discipline of physics as well as the classrooms in which physics is taught and learned. For example, physics is portrayed in textbooks as the product of individual great men, independent of all social or political contexts, rather than as being shaped by the culture of the European Enlightenment (among other cultures) or the conditions during specific international conflicts.

  16. Unveiling the Mobile Learning Paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A mobile learning paradox exists in Australian healthcare settings. Although it is increasingly acknowledged that timely, easy, and convenient access to health information using mobile learning technologies can enhance care and improve patient outcomes, currently there is an inability for nurses to access information at the point of care. Rapid growth in the use of mobile technology has created challenges for learning and teaching in the workplace. Easy access to educational resources via mobile devices challenges traditional strategies of knowledge and skill acquisition. Redesign of learning and teaching in the undergraduate curriculum and the development of policies to support the use of mobile learning at point of care is overdue. This study explored mobile learning opportunities used by clinical supervisors in tertiary and community-based facilities in two Australian States. Individual, organisation and systems level governance were sub-themes of professionalism that emerged as the main theme and impacts on learning and teaching in situ in healthcare environments. It is imperative healthcare work redesign includes learning and teaching that supports professional identity formation of students during work integrated learning.

  17. Astronomers Unveiling Life's Cosmic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Processes that laid the foundation for life on Earth -- star and planet formation and the production of complex organic molecules in interstellar space -- are yielding their secrets to astronomers armed with powerful new research tools, and even better tools soon will be available. Astronomers described three important developments at a symposium on the "Cosmic Cradle of Life" at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago, IL. Chemistry Cycle The Cosmic Chemistry Cycle CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Full Size Image Files Chemical Cycle Graphic (above image, JPEG, 129K) Graphic With Text Blocks (JPEG, 165K) High-Res TIFF (44.2M) High-Res TIFF With Text Blocks (44.2M) In one development, a team of astrochemists released a major new resource for seeking complex interstellar molecules that are the precursors to life. The chemical data released by Anthony Remijan of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and his university colleagues is part of the Prebiotic Interstellar Molecule Survey, or PRIMOS, a project studying a star-forming region near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. PRIMOS is an effort of the National Science Foundation's Center for Chemistry of the Universe, started at the University of Virginia (UVa) in October 2008, and led by UVa Professor Brooks H. Pate. The data, produced by the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, came from more than 45 individual observations totalling more than nine GigaBytes of data and over 1.4 million individual frequency channels. Scientists can search the GBT data for specific radio frequencies, called spectral lines -- telltale "fingerprints" -- naturally emitted by molecules in interstellar space. "We've identified more than 720 spectral lines in this collection, and about 240 of those are from unknown molecules," Remijan said. He added, "We're making available to all scientists the best collection of data below 50 GHz ever produced for the study of interstellar chemistry," Remijan said. Astronomers have already identified more than 150 molecules in interstellar space in the past 40 years, including complex organic compounds such as sugars and alcohols. "This is a major change in how we search for molecules in space," Remijan explained. "Before, people decided beforehand which molecules they were looking for, then searched in a very narrow band of radio frequencies emitted by those molecules. In this GBT survey, we've observed a wide range of frequencies, collected the data and immediately made it publicly available. Scientists anywhere can 'mine' this resource to find new molecules," he said. Another key development, presented by Crystal Brogan of the NRAO, showed that highly-detailed images of "protoclusters" of massive young stars reveal a complex mix of stars in different stages of formation, complicated gas motions, and numerous chemical clues to the physical conditions in such stellar nurseries. "We saw a much more complex picture than we had expected and now have new questions to answer," she said. Using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Submillimeter Array (SMA) in Hawaii, Brogan and her colleagues studied a nebula 5,500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Scorpius where stars significantly more massive than our Sun are forming. "It's essential to understand what's going on in systems like this because most stars, Sun-like stars included, form in clusters," Brogan said. "The most massive stars in the cluster have a tremendous impact on the formation and environment of the rest of the cluster, including the less-massive stars and their planets," Brogan said, adding that "if we want to understand how solar systems that could support life form and evolve, we need to know how these giant stars affect their environment." Also, Brogan said, the massive young stars are surrounded by "hot cores" that include copious organic material that later may be spewed into interstellar space by stellar winds and other processes. This can help "seed" star-forming regions with some of the chemicals found by the GBT and other telescopes. Narrowing in on the problem of how planets form around young stars, David Wilner of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics presented observations with the SMA that revealed new details of solar systems in the earliest stages of their formation. Wilner and his colleagues studied nine dusty disks surrounding young stars in a region in the constellation Ophiuchus. "These are the most detailed images of such disks made at these wavelengths," Wilner said. The images show the distribution of material on the same size scale as our own Solar System, and indicate that these disks are capable of producing planetary systems. Two of the disks show large central cavities where young planets may already have swept out the material from their neighborhoods. "Before, we knew that such disks have enough material to form solar systems. These new images tell us that material is in the right places to form solar systems. We're getting a tantalizing peek at the very earliest stages of planet formation," said Sean Andrews, a Hubble Fellow at the CfA. All three areas of study are poised for major advances with the impending arrival of powerful new radio-telescope facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), and new capabilities for the GBT. Studies of protoplanetary disks and young solar systems will benefit greatly from the groundbreaking new capabilities of ALMA, Wilner said. "While we've been able to study a few of these objects so far, ALMA will be able to give us highly-detailed images of many more that we can't study today," he said. Wilner added that ALMA also will likely provide new information on the chemicals in those still-forming planetary systems. The complex motions and chemistry of Brogan's protoclusters of young, massive stars, also will become much clearer with ALMA. "Both the detail of the images and the ability to find molecular spectral lines will improve by a factor of at least 25 with ALMA," she said. In addition, the increased power of the EVLA will give astronomers a far better look into the inner regions of the disks around young stars -- regions obscured to telescopes operating at shorter wavelengths. "We know that complex chemicals exist in interstellar space before stars and planets form. With the new research tools coming in the next few years, we're on the verge of learning how the chemistry of the interstellar clouds, the young stars and their environments, and the disks from which planets are formed is all linked together to provide the chemical basis for life on those planets," Remijan explained. Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson of the American Museum of Natural History noted, "Like no other science, astrophysics cross-pollinates the expertise of chemists, biologists, geologists and physicists, all to discover the past, present, and future of the cosmos -- and our humble place within it."

  18. Unveiling the Knowledge Sharing Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that organisation culture affects how knowledge processes such as knowledge-sharing evolve. Despite the growing attention to the aspects of culture, the knowledge management debate has not paid systematic attention to the assessment or measurement of a knowledge-sharing

  19. Unveiling the Direct Effect of Corporate Entrepreneurship’s Dimensions on the Business Performance: A Case of Big Five Banks in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umrani Waheed Ali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ground aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between individual factors of corporate entrepreneurship and business performance. This investigation was expected to bring in un-revealed results as the past literature does not provide any sufficient evidence for the proposed model. The study used survey method to collect data from the big five banks in Pakistan. For this reason a total of 256 responses were collected from the bank branch managers on the topic, using stratified random sampling technique. Through using PLS structural Equation Modeling, the study employed the use of SmartPLS 3.0 for executing tests pertaining to reliability and validity, this was ensured by evaluating measurement model. Next, the study assessed structure model, under which the research has revealed that out of the 5 mentioned dimensions of corporate entrepreneurship only three have resulted in a significant relationship with business performance; this was followed by assessment of r-squared values and predictive relevance of the model keeping in view the recommendations from the popular literature. Implications for further research and management professionals are mentioned in detail.

  20. The Czech Equity Market - Its Effectiveness and Macroeconomic Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Horská

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines features of the Czech stock market’s development from 1997 to 2003 and attempts to unveil the macroeconomic consequences of stock-price development. The analysis of the stock market’s behavior supports a cautionary stance on the hypothesis of the efficient-market theory, even in its weak form. Another finding, as regards the macroeconomic consequences of stock-price development, undermined the assumption of the positive wealth effect of rising stocks. In relation to GDP gr...

  1. From the Icy Satellites to Small Moons and Rings: Spectral Indicators by Cassini-VIMS Unveil Compositional Trends in the Saturnian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Buratti, B. B.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Brown, R. H.

    2017-01-01

    flat reflectance in the visible, making them remarkably different with respect to the other small moons. Moreover, we have observed that the two Tethys' lagrangian moons appear spectrally different, with Calypso characterized by more intense water ice bands than Telesto. Conversely, at visible wavelengths Polydeuces, Telesto and Methone are in absolute the more blue objects in the Saturn's system. The red slopes measured in the visible range on disk-integrated spectral data, showing varying degrees on all of the satellites, could be caused more by exogenic processes than by geologic and endogenic events which are operating on more localized scales. The principal exogenic processes active in the Saturn's system [11] which alter the satellites and rings surfaces are the E ring particles bombardment, the interaction with corotating plasma and energetic particles, the bombardment of exogenic dark material [12] and the water ice photolysis. A discussion about the correlations between these processes and the o bserved spectral classes is given. With the approaching of the Cassini "Gran Finale" orbits, VIMS will unveil with unprecedented spatial resolution the spectral properties of many small moons and rings. These data will be extremely valuable to improve our classification of the Saturn's satellites and rings.

  2. Males unveiling the different forms of conjugal violence Hombres develando las formas de la violencia conyugal Homens desvelando as formas da violência conjugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadirlene Pereira Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify the forms of unveiling violence from the discourse of a male group that perform violent acts against their partners. METHODS: Qualitative approach study. Seven males were interviewed and they beat their partners, residing in the outskirts of Salvador, BA. The subjects speeches were analyzed by means of content analysis. RESULTS: The study showed that the males interviewed experienced conjugal violence, which is revealed psychologically, sexually, morally and physically. CONCLUSION: The conjugal relationship is marked by an asymmetrical relation between males and females. When males feel they are being threatened, they use some means to control their partners, resorting to physical violence, inclusive. It is imperative to implement public policies that guarantee interventions with males and females, leading them to understand the social construction of gender identity.OBJETIVOS: Identificar las formas de develamiento de la violencia a partir del discurso de un grupo de hombres que practican actos violentos contra sus compañeras. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio de abordaje cualitativo. Fueron entrevistados siete hombres que cometían actos violentos contra sus compañeras, residentes en la periferie de Salvador-BA. Las narrativas de los sujetos fueron analizadas por medio del análisis de contenido. RESULTADOS: El estudio mostró que los hombres entrevistados vivencian la violencia conyugal, la cual se devela bajo las formas psicológica, sexual, moral y física. CONCLUSIÓN: El relacionamiento conyugal está marcado por una relación asimétrica entre hombres y mujeres, de modo que, al sentir que su poder está siendo amenazado, el hombre utiliza algunos medios para controlar a sus compañeras, haciendo uso, inclusive, de la violencia física. Se hace necesaria la implementación de políticas públicas que garanticen intervenciones junto a hombres y mujeres que conduzcan a unos y otros a la comprensión de la construcci

  3. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  4. BRITE-Constellation high-precision time-dependent photometry of the early O-type supergiant ζ Puppis unveils the photospheric drivers of its small- and large-scale wind structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Harmon, Robert; Ignace, Richard; St-Louis, Nicole; Vanbeveren, Dany; Shenar, Tomer; Pablo, Herbert; Richardson, Noel D.; Howarth, Ian D.; Stevens, Ian R.; Piaulet, Caroline; St-Jean, Lucas; Eversberg, Thomas; Pigulski, Andrzej; Popowicz, Adam; Kuschnig, Rainer; Zocłońska, Elżbieta; Buysschaert, Bram; Handler, Gerald; Weiss, Werner W.; Wade, Gregg A.; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Zwintz, Konstanze; Luckas, Paul; Heathcote, Bernard; Cacella, Paulo; Powles, Jonathan; Locke, Malcolm; Bohlsen, Terry; Chené, André-Nicolas; Miszalski, Brent; Waldron, Wayne L.; Kotze, Marissa M.; Kotze, Enrico J.; Böhm, Torsten

    2018-02-01

    From 5.5 months of dual-band optical photometric monitoring at the 1 mmag level, BRITE-Constellation has revealed two simultaneous types of variability in the O4I(n)fp star ζ Puppis: one single periodic non-sinusoidal component superimposed on a stochastic component. The monoperiodic component is the 1.78-d signal previously detected by Coriolis/Solar Mass Ejection Imager, but this time along with a prominent first harmonic. The shape of this signal changes over time, a behaviour that is incompatible with stellar oscillations but consistent with rotational modulation arising from evolving bright surface inhomogeneities. By means of a constrained non-linear light-curve inversion algorithm, we mapped the locations of the bright surface spots and traced their evolution. Our simultaneous ground-based multisite spectroscopic monitoring of the star unveiled cyclical modulation of its He II λ4686 wind emission line with the 1.78-d rotation period, showing signatures of corotating interaction regions that turn out to be driven by the bright photospheric spots observed by BRITE. Traces of wind clumps are also observed in the He II λ4686 line and are correlated with the amplitudes of the stochastic component of the light variations probed by BRITE at the photosphere, suggesting that the BRITE observations additionally unveiled the photospheric drivers of wind clumps in ζ Pup and that the clumping phenomenon starts at the very base of the wind. The origins of both the bright surface inhomogeneities and the stochastic light variations remain unknown, but a subsurface convective zone might play an important role in the generation of these two types of photospheric variability.

  5. EL CUERPO DEL HÉROE: EL DESCUBRIMIENTO DEL BUSTO DE UN SOLDADO CAÍDO EN LA GUERRA DE MALVINAS / The Hero's Body: the Unveiling of the Bust of a Soldier Fallen in the Malvinas War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Marina Panizo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo veremos de qué manera el descubrimiento del busto del soldado caído en la Guerra de Malvinas, Elbio Aaujo, expresa un marco simbólico de interpretación de la muerte en la guerra de un grupo particular, y deviene para los familiares en un escenario de dramatización de la muerte que por la falta del cuerpo no pudo enfrentarse a través de sus formas habituales. Observaré al ritual desde el punto de vista de la performance, ya que nos permite ver de qué manera estamos refiriéndonos a experiencias vivenciadas en escenarios determinados, a través de los cuales es habitada la muerte de una persona, y significada de una manera particular. Así, veremos que a través del descubrimiento del busto, se sustituye la presencia del cuerpo ausente por otra materialidad y la puesta en escena actúa no sólo como un canal de comunicación a través del cual los deudos expresan al resto de la sociedad sus experiencias y los sentidos dados a la muerte en la guerra, sino que deviene también, para los familiares involucrados, en una práctica transformadora en cuanto a la reflexividad que propone sobre la condición social del muerto. Abstract In this paper we will show how the unveiling of the bust of Elbio Aaujo, a soldier fallen in the Malvinas War, expresses the symbolic framework for interpretation of death in battle of a particular group, at the same time becoming for his relatives the stage for dramatization of a death that could not be dealt with in the usual manner due to the lack of a body. We will deal with the ritual from the point of view of performance, since it allows us to see the ways experiences are lived in specific scenes, through which the death of a person is inhabited and signified in a particular way. Therefore, we will show that through the unveiling of the bust, the lack of the body is replaced by a different materiality and that the performance acts not only as a communication channel through which the bereaved

  6. Unveiling the pan-genome of the SXT/R391 family of ICEs: molecular characterisation of new variable regions of SXT/R391-like ICEs detected in Pseudoalteromonas sp. and Vibrio scophthalmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Blanco, Arturo; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

    2016-08-01

    Integrating conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family have been identified in fish-isolated bacterial strains collected from marine aquaculture environments of the northwestern Iberian Peninsula. Here we analysed the variable regions of two ICEs, one preliminarily characterised in a previous study (ICEVscSpa3) and one newly identified (ICEPspSpa1). Bacterial strains harboring these ICEs were phylogenetically assigned to Vibrio scophthalmi and Pseudoalteromonas sp., thus constituting the first evidence of SXT/R391-like ICEs in the genus Pseudoalteromonas to date. Variable DNA regions, which confer element-specific properties to ICEs of this family, were characterised. Interestingly, the two ICEs contained 29 genes not found in variable DNA insertions of previously described ICEs. Most notably, variable gene content for ICEVscSpa3 showed similarity to genes potentially involved in housekeeping functions of replication, nucleotide metabolism and transcription. For these genes, closest homologues were found clustered in the genome of Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19, suggesting a transfer as a block to ICEVscSpa3. Genes encoding antibiotic resistance, restriction modification systems and toxin/antitoxin systems were absent from hotspots of ICEVscSpa3. In contrast, the variable gene content of ICEPspSpa1 included genes involved in restriction/modification functions in two different hotspots and genes related to ICE maintenance. The present study unveils a relatively large number of novel genes in SXT/R391-ICEs, and demonstrates the major role of ICE elements as contributors to horizontal gene transfer.

  7. A NEW SCALING RELATION FOR H II REGIONS IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: UNVEILING THE TRUE NATURE OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Díaz, A. I.; Sánchez, S. F.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Mast, D.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Husemann, B.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of a local mass, metallicity, star formation relation using spatially resolved optical spectroscopy of H II regions in the local universe. One of the projections of this distribution—the local mass-metallicity relation—extends over a wide range in this parameter space: three orders of magnitude in mass and a factor of eight in metallicity. We explain the new relation as the combined effect of the differential distributions of mass and metallicity in the disks of galaxies, and a selective star formation efficiency. We use this local relation to reproduce—with a noticeable agreement—the mass-metallicity relation seen in galaxies, and conclude that the latter is a scale-up integrated effect of a local relation, supporting the inside-out growth and downsizing scenarios of galaxy evolution.

  8. A NEW SCALING RELATION FOR H II REGIONS IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: UNVEILING THE TRUE NATURE OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Diaz, A. I. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, S. F.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Vilchez, J. M.; Mast, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Camino Bajo de Huetor s/n, Aptdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Husemann, B., E-mail: frosales@cantab.net [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate the existence of a local mass, metallicity, star formation relation using spatially resolved optical spectroscopy of H II regions in the local universe. One of the projections of this distribution-the local mass-metallicity relation-extends over a wide range in this parameter space: three orders of magnitude in mass and a factor of eight in metallicity. We explain the new relation as the combined effect of the differential distributions of mass and metallicity in the disks of galaxies, and a selective star formation efficiency. We use this local relation to reproduce-with a noticeable agreement-the mass-metallicity relation seen in galaxies, and conclude that the latter is a scale-up integrated effect of a local relation, supporting the inside-out growth and downsizing scenarios of galaxy evolution.

  9. ­Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Undabarrena

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes. Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes, oxidative stress (69 genes and antibiotic resistance (97 genes. This study revealed that the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 bacterium has the capability to tolerate a diverse set of heavy metals such as copper, cobalt, mercury, chromate and nickel; as well as the highly toxic tellurite, a feature first time described for Streptomyces. In addition, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 possesses a major resistance towards oxidative stress, in comparison to the soil reference strain Streptomyces violaceoruber A3(2. Moreover, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 showed resistance to 88% of the antibiotics tested, indicating overall, a strong response to several abiotic stressors. The combination of these biological traits confirms the metabolic versatility of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a genetically well-prepared microorganism with the ability to confront the dynamics of the fjord-unique marine environment.

  10. The signature of atmospheric tides in sub-daily variations of Earth rotation as unveiled by globally-gridded atmospheric angular momentum functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelegger, M.; Böhm, J.; Salstein, D. A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermally-driven atmospheric tides provide a small but distinct contribution to shortperiod variations of Earth rotation parameters (ERP). The effect of diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, commonly denoted as S1 and S2, respectively, is in the range of 2 - 10 uas for polar motion and 2 - 10 uas for changes in length-of-day (LOD). Even though ocean tides represent a much more dominant driving agent for ERP fluctuations at short time scales, high-frequency atmospheric effects are non-negligible, particularly given the prospective measurement accuracy of space geodetic techniques. However, previous studies, such as Brzezinski et al. (2002), de Viron et al. (2005) or Schindelegger et al. (2011), have been noticeably inconclusive on the exact amplitude and phase values of S1 and S2 atmospheric excitation signals. This study aims at shedding light on the origin of these uncertainties with respect to the axial component of Earth's rotation vector by investigating times series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) functions that are given on global grids and computed from three-hourly meteorological data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The signature of diurnal and semi-diurnal atmospheric tides is clearly visible in the gridded axial AAM functions, revealing a distinct spatial and temporal phase difference between pressure and wind tidal constituents of about ± π. It is shown that due to this counterbalance and the explicit axisymmetric spatial structure of S1 and S2, the net effect in sub-diurnal AAM (which is calculated from the global sum of gridded AAM functions) is always a small quantity, particularly sensitive to minor differences between the analysis fields of numerical weather models.

  11. Unveiling the nature of black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) venom through venomics and antivenom immunoprofiling: Identification of key toxin targets for antivenom development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lomonte, Bruno; Lohse, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The venom proteome of the black mamba, Dendroaspis polylepis, from Eastern Africa, was, for the first time, characterized. Forty- different proteins and one nucleoside were identified or assigned to protein families. The most abundant proteins were Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors, which include...... the unique mamba venom components ‘dendrotoxins’, and α-neurotoxins and other representatives of the three-finger toxin family. In addition, the venom contains lower percentages of proteins from other families, including metalloproteinase, hyaluronidase, prokineticin, nerve growth factor, vascular...... to toxicity by influencing the toxin biodistribution. ELISA immunoprofiling and preclinical assessment of neutralization showed that polyspecific antivenoms manufactured in South Africa and India were effective in the neutralization of D. polylepis venom, albeit showing different potencies. Antivenoms had...

  12. Epitope mapping of imidazolium cations in ionic liquid-protein interactions unveils the balance between hydrophobicity and electrostatics towards protein destabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Micael; Figueiredo, Angelo Miguel; Cabrita, Eurico J

    2014-11-14

    We investigated imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) to discern the level of cation interactions towards protein stability. STD-NMR spectroscopy was used to observe the imidazolium IL protons involved in direct binding and to identify the interactions responsible for changes in Tm as accessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Cations influence protein stability less than anions but still significantly. It was found that longer alkyl side chains of imidazolium-based ILs (more hydrophobic) are associated with a higher destabilisation effect on HSA than short-alkyl groups (less hydrophobic). The reason for such destabilisation lies on the increased surface contact area of the cation with the protein, particularly on the hydrophobic contacts promoted by the terminus of the alkyl chain. The relevance of the hydrophobic contacts is clearly demonstrated by the introduction of a polar moiety in the alkyl chain: a methoxy or alcohol group. Such structural modification reduces the degree of hydrophobic contacts with HSA explaining the lesser extent of protein destabilisation when compared to longer alkyl side chain groups: above [C2mim](+). Competition STD-NMR experiments using [C2mim](+), [C4mim](+) and [C2OHmim](+) also validate the importance of the hydrophobic interactions. The combined effect of cation and anion interactions was explored using (35)Cl NMR. Such experiments show that the nature of the cation has no influence on the anion-protein contacts, still the nature of the anion modulates the cation-protein interaction. Herein we propose that more destabilising anions are likely to be a result of a partial contribution from the cation as a direct consequence of the different levels of interaction (cation-anion pair and cation-protein).

  13. The Incomplete Conditional Stellar Mass Function: Unveiling the Stellar Mass Functions of Galaxies at 0.1 < Z < 0.8 from BOSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Yang, Xiaohu; Lu, Yi

    2018-05-01

    We propose a novel method to constrain the missing fraction of galaxies using galaxy clustering measurements in the galaxy conditional stellar mass function (CSMF) framework, which is applicable to surveys that suffer significantly from sample selection effects. The clustering measurements, which are not sensitive to the random sampling (missing fraction) of galaxies, are widely used to constrain the stellar–halo mass relation (SHMR). By incorporating a missing fraction (incompleteness) component into the CSMF model (ICSMF), we use the incomplete stellar mass function and galaxy clustering to simultaneously constrain the missing fractions and the SHMRs. Tests based on mock galaxy catalogs with a few typical missing fraction models show that this method can accurately recover the missing fraction and the galaxy SHMR, hence providing us with reliable measurements of the galaxy stellar mass functions. We then apply it to the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over the redshift range of 0.1 1011 M ⊙. We find that the sample completeness for BOSS is over 80% at z account, we provide accurate measurements of the stellar mass functions for galaxies with {10}11 {M}ȯ < {M}* < {10}12 {M}ȯ , as well as the SHMRs, over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.8 in this largest galaxy redshift survey.

  14. A comparative analysis of terrestrial arthropod assemblages from a relict forest unveils historical extinctions and colonization differences between two oceanic islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas J.; Rego, Carla; Crespo, Luis; Aguiar, Carlos A. S.; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, François; Silva, Isamberto; Pereira, Fernando; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Serrano, Artur R. M.

    2018-01-01

    During the last few centuries oceanic island biodiversity has been drastically modified by human-mediated activities. These changes have led to the increased homogenization of island biota and to a high number of extinctions lending support to the recognition of oceanic islands as major threatspots worldwide. Here, we investigate the impact of habitat changes on the spider and ground beetle assemblages of the native forests of Madeira (Madeira archipelago) and Terceira (Azores archipelago) and evaluate its effects on the relative contribution of rare endemics and introduced species to island biodiversity patterns. We found that the native laurel forest of Madeira supported higher species richness of spiders and ground beetles compared with Terceira, including a much larger proportion of indigenous species, particularly endemics. In Terceira, introduced species are well-represented in both terrestrial arthropod taxa and seem to thrive in native forests as shown by the analysis of species abundance distributions (SAD) and occupancy frequency distributions (OFD). Low abundance range-restricted species in Terceira are mostly introduced species dispersing from neighbouring man-made habitats while in Madeira a large number of true rare endemic species can still be found in the native laurel forest. Further, our comparative analysis shows striking differences in species richness and composition that are due to the geographical and geological particularities of the two islands, but also seem to reflect the differences in the severity of human-mediated impacts between them. The high proportion of introduced species, the virtual absence of rare native species and the finding that the SADs and OFDs of introduced species match the pattern of native species in Terceira suggest the role of man as an important driver of species diversity in oceanic islands and add evidence for an extensive and severe human-induced species loss in the native forests of Terceira. PMID:29694360

  15. Unveiling the Dual Role of the Dopaminergic System on Locomotion and the Innate Value for an Aversive Olfactory Stimulus in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida-Uribe, Nicolás; Campusano, Jorge M

    2018-02-10

    The communication between sensory systems and the specific brain centers that process this information is crucial to develop adequate behavioral responses. Modulatory systems, including dopaminergic circuits, regulate this communication to finely tune the behavioral response associated to any given stimulus. For instance, the Mushroom Body (MB), an insect brain integration center that receives and processes several sensory stimuli and organizes the execution of motor programs, communicates with MB output neurons (MBONs) to develop behavioral responses associated to olfactory stimuli. This communication is modulated by dopaminergic neural systems. Here we show that silencing dopaminergic neurons increases the aversive response observed in adult flies exposed to Benzaldehyde (Bz) or octanol. We studied the contribution of two dopaminergic clusters that innervate different zones of MB, Protocerebral anterior medial (PAM) and Protocerebral posterior lateral 1 (PPL1), on the innate value to the aversive stimulus and the associated locomotor behavior. In order to do this, we manipulated the synaptic transmission of these neural clusters through the expression of Tetanus toxin, Kir2.1 and Transient receptor potential cation channel A1 (TrpA1) channels. Our results show that neurons in PPL1 and PAM differentially modulate the innate value to Bz in adult flies. On the other hand, blocking neurotransmission or genetic silencing of PAM neurons results in decreased locomotor behavior in flies, an effect not observed when silencing PPL1. Our results suggest that as in mammals, specific dopaminergic pathways differentially modulate locomotor behavior and the innate value for an odorant, a limbic-like response in Drosophila. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Swimming versus swinging effects in spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueron, Eduardo; Maia, Clovis A. S.; Matsas, George E. A.

    2006-01-01

    Wisdom has recently unveiled a new relativistic effect, called 'spacetime swimming', where quasirigid free bodies in curved spacetimes can 'speed up', 'slow down' or 'deviate' their falls by performing local cyclic shape deformations. We show here that for fast enough cycles this effect dominates over a nonrelativistic related one, named here 'space swinging', where the fall is altered through nonlocal cyclic deformations in Newtonian gravitational fields. We expect, therefore, to clarify the distinction between both effects leaving no room to controversy. Moreover, the leading contribution to the swimming effect predicted by Wisdom is enriched with a higher order term and the whole result is generalized to be applicable in cases where the tripod is in large redshift regions

  17. Unveiling the formation and evolution of comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Botet, R.; Coradini, A.; Desanctis, M. C.; Kofman, W.

    2007-08-01

    Comet nuclei are considered as the most pristine bodies of the solar system and consequently their study sheds an important light on the processes occurring during the initial stages of the solar system formation. The analysis of the porosity and bulk density of such primordial bodies is especially important to understand their capacity to retain volatile components (organics and ices) present in the early solar nebula. Typical tensile strengths deduced for comet nuclei range from below 102N.m-2 from the Deep Impact mission [1] up to 104N.m-2 from the study of comet C/1999 S4 LINEAR breakup [2] and meteoroids [3]. A bulk density of about 350 kg/m3 has been obtained for 9P/Tempel 1 from the Deep Impact mission [4]. Moreover the properties of dust released from the comets strongly confirm such values. Instruments flying-by comet 1P/Halley had discovered the presence of organics, and pointed out the dust low albedo and extremely low density while analyses of Interplanetary Dust Particles collected in the stratosphere and remote spectroscopic observations have indicated that cometary dust consists of an un-equilibrated heterogeneous mixture of organic refractory materials and of amorphous and crystalline silicate minerals [5], as recently confirmed by Stardust [6]. Observations of the solar scattered light, together with elaborate simulations, give an estimation of the mass ratio between silicates and absorbing organics, the size distribution and the structure of the dust particles, suggesting that a fair amount consists in fluffy aggregates built up from submicronic grains [7,8], as recently confirmed by the analysis of dust craters and aerogel tracks on Stardust collector showing for some large particles (up to 100 μm) an extraordinary fluffy structure [9]. Simulations have been developed in our teams to describe the aspects of comet aggregation and evolution that have not been thoroughly explained yet. Particle aggregation simulations taking into account cohesive energy of the cometesimals and their probable re-accretion after collision events in the Kuiper Belt can be used to interpret the typical layered structure observed for comet 9P/Tempel 1 [10] and evaluate the tensile strengths inside the nucleus. Thermal evolution models of comet nuclei explain the current comet observations with the presence of primordial volatiles [11]. A quasi-3D approach (for non-spherically shaped comet nuclei) is used to interpret the current activity of comets in terms of initial characteristics, and to predict shape and internal stratification evolution of the nucleus. Tensile strength indications and activity predictions from such simulations will provide vital clues for the international Rosetta mission landing on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. During the Rosetta rendezvous, the CONSERT experiment will investigate the deep interior of the nucleus from measurements of the propagation delay of long wavelength radio waves [12]. The analysis and 3D reconstruction of the waves passing through the nucleus will put constraints on the materials constituting the comet and the inhomogeneities within the nucleus. While it is now established that nuclei have low densities and are significantly fragile, it will then be possible to better constrain their formation process and their evolution. [1] A'Hearn et al., Science 310, 258 (2005) [2] Samarasinha, Icarus 154, 540 (2001) [3] Trigo-Rodriguez and Llorca, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 372, 655 (2006) [4] A'Hearn and Combi, Icarus 187, 1 (2007) [5] Hanner and Bradley, In: Comets II, Festou, Keller, Weaver (eds), pp 555 (2004) [6] Brownlee et al., Science 314, 1711 (2006) [7] Lasue and Levasseur-Regourd, J. Quant. Spectros. Radiat. Transfer 100, 220-236 (2006) [8]Levasseur-Regourd et al., (2007), Planet Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2006.11.014 in press. [9] Hörz et al., Science 314, 1716 (2006) [10] Belton et al., Icarus 187, 332 (2007) [11] DeSanctis et al., Astron. Astrophys. 444, 605 (2005) [12] Kofman et al., (2007), Space Sci. Rev., doi: 10.1007/s11214-006-9034-9 in press.

  18. Anaesthesia practice and reproductive outcomes: Facts unveiled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrutha Bindu Nagella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Anaesthetic practice is associated with a risk of chronic exposure to anaesthetic agents. With the advent of newer inhalational agents and changing anaesthetic practices, the risks for anaesthesiologists with regard to adverse reproductive outcomes is unknown. Hence, a nationwide online survey was conducted to study the anaesthetic practices prevalent in India and their association, if any, with poor reproductive outcomes. Methods: The online survey involved 9974 anaesthesiologists. A questionnaire soliciting information regarding anaesthetic practice techniques, reproductive outcomes and perinatal outcomes was designed. All the anaesthesiologists in the ISA National database were mailed a link to the above questionnaire. Results: Female anaesthesiologists and spouses of male anaesthesiologists had a higher incidence of first trimester spontaneous abortions than the general population. Female anaesthesiologists when compared with spouses of male anaesthesiologists faced more difficulty with conception (P = 0.015. Female anaesthesiologists who worked in the operating room (OR in their first trimester of gestation had a higher incidence of spontaneous abortions than those who did not work in the OR (P = 0.05. Longer hours of general anaesthesia conducted in the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of birth defects in their progeny (P = 0.05. Conclusion: Spontaneous abortions and birth defects were higher in female anaesthesiologists who worked in the OR in the first trimester of gestation. Both female anaesthesiologists and spouses of male anaesthesiologists had a greater risk for a first trimester miscarriage than the general population.

  19. The Quantum World Unveiled by Electron Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira Tonomura

    1998-08-01

    This book emphasizes the experimental aspects of the author's own laboratory. Instead of merely presenting a dry collection of knowledge, the author unfolds to the readers his vivid experiences of enthusiasm, sheer pleasure, and yet frustrations in the course of his own research. In this way, the book aims to arouse the reader's curiosity in the strange behaviors of electrons in the microscopic world, which differ significantly from our common sense and daily experiences of the macroscopic world. The fields of physics explored in the book are quantum mechanics, superconductivity, electron microscopy, holography, magnetism, and unified theory - areas of the author's study using electron waves. A world-renowned expert in electron holography, the author promises the interested reader a fascinating ride through the quantum world of electron waves, accompanied by many colorful illustrations that delight the senses and captivate the imagination

  20. Unveiling the Sweet Conformations of Ketohexoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, C.; Pena, I.; Cabezas, C.; Daly, A. M.; Mata, S.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    The conformational behavior of ketohexoses D-Fructose, L-Sorbose, D-Tagatose and D-Psicose has been revealed from their rotational spectra. A broadband microwave spectrometer (CP-FTMW) has been used to rapidly acquire the rotational spectra in the 6 to 12 GHz frequency range. All observed species are stabilized by complicated intramolecular hydrogen-bonding networks. Structural motifs related to the sweetness of ketohexoses are revealed. G. G. Brown, B. C. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman, B. H. Pate, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2008, 79, 053103. S. Mata, I. Peña, C. Cabezas, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 2012, 280, 91.

  1. Unveiling China's impact on African environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, Kelvin S.-H.; Eyal, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    China's economic involvement in Africa has recently attracted unprecedented global attention. Chinese interest in the oil, gas and other natural resources on the continent entails - it is alleged - more harm than good for Africa's environment. Yet much of the discussion about China's role in Africa is conducted in the absence of the most basic information and raw data. We believe that despite all the obvious informational obstacles, the secrecy veil on the China's African involvement can be lifted. And this, in turn, could produce a more accurate picture of the real impact on the Africa's environment.

  2. How to unveil a T Tauri star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartigan, P.; Hartmann, L.; Kenyon, S.; Hewett, R.; Stauffer, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for separating the 'veiling' continuum often present in T Tauri stars from the underlying photospheric spectrum is described. Echelle observations from 5100 to 6800 A of the partially veiled T Tauri star BP Tau were analyzed to determine the shape of the veiling spectrum. The residuals of the fit indicate the deviation of the veiling spectrum from a simple continuum and identify the location and strength of any emission-line components. It is shown, by means of goodness-of-fit tests, that the spectrum of BP Tau can be decomposed into a normal stellar spectrum plus a smooth veiling continuum with only a few emission lines superposed. The continuum dominates the veiling spectrum in this spectral region; the veiling does not arise from numerous deep photospheric absorption lines that are filled in by weak emission. 36 refs

  3. Greenland unveils terms for offshore licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Greenland has spelled out terms for its first round of offshore licensing. The action off western Greenland could lead to the first oil and gas exploration there since an unsuccessful campaign in the 1970s. The Mineral Resources Administration (MRA) for Greenland pegged exploration license terms on 133 blocks, all south of the 66th parallel, at 10 years with options for 2 year extensions to a maximum of 6 more years. The license can cover as many as six blocks. In the first 3 year period companies will have only a seismic obligation of 1,588 km per six blocks. For the second 3 year period there will be a one well obligation and one well in each subsequent 2 year periods

  4. Unveiling the Mystical Lucban Pahiyas Festival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufina C. Rosaroso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is an ethnographic study which described the local knowledge of the Lucbanin on Pahiyas. The generation of information on the local knowledge as described by the Lucbanin unfolded the natives‘ meanings in celebrating Philippine festivities such as Pahiyas Festival. Further, their cultural practices and beliefs, handed down from generation to generation served as contributory factors in the acquisition of local knowledge on Pahiyas, revealing its priceless and transcendent beauty. Triangulation was used in the study to analyze and interpret field notes based on participant observations, interviews and document/s analyses. Theme analysis was conducted concurrently with data gathering. Coding was used to classify and identify emerging themes/categories which provided extensive analysis of the data. Results revealed that oral traditions played significant contributions in the acquisition of local knowledge of the Lucbanins in the preparations and celebration of Pahiyas Festival .Oral traditions coupled with direct and participants’ observations, formal and informal education as well as folklore served as mystical instruments in the preservation and promotion of Lucbanins’ cultural and spiritual values and beliefs, keeping Pahiyas Festival as a moving and dynamic legacy throughout the years. The role of oral traditions as rooted in Lucbanins’ local history is a symbol of a true and genuine Lucbanin, entirely different from other locals in the country.

  5. Unveiling the Dynamics of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Avelino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We explore the dynamics and evolution of the Universe at early and late times, focusing on both dark energy and extended gravity models and their astrophysical and cosmological consequences. Modified theories of gravity not only provide an alternative explanation for the recent expansion history of the universe, but they also offer a paradigm fundamentally distinct from the simplest dark energy models of cosmic acceleration. In this review, we perform a detailed theoretical and phenomenological analysis of different modified gravity models and investigate their consistency. We also consider the cosmological implications of well motivated physical models of the early universe with a particular emphasis on inflation and topological defects. Astrophysical and cosmological tests over a wide range of scales, from the solar system to the observable horizon, severely restrict the allowed models of the Universe. Here, we review several observational probes—including gravitational lensing, galaxy clusters, cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization, supernova and baryon acoustic oscillations measurements—and their relevance in constraining our cosmological description of the Universe.

  6. Unveiling the Microfoundations of Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    2017-01-01

    to absorptive capacity at the organizational level and that this relationship is mediated through a microlevel process. The findings reveal that knowledge workers’ cognitive process of perspective taking and their creative behavior are important microfoundations of absorptive capacity. Moreover, the results...... emphasize the critical role of key employees in explaining firm-level heterogeneity in building organizational capabilities....

  7. Unveiling information on opportunity costs in REDD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delacote, Philip; Palmer, Charles; Bakkegaard, Riyong Kim

    2014-01-01

    Improving information about individual opportunity costs of deforestation agents has the potential to increase the efficiency of REDD when it takes the form of a payment for environmental services scheme. However, objectives pursued in REDD projects may vary across policy makers. Within a theoret......Improving information about individual opportunity costs of deforestation agents has the potential to increase the efficiency of REDD when it takes the form of a payment for environmental services scheme. However, objectives pursued in REDD projects may vary across policy makers. Within...... objectives in REDD-affected communities, having full information makes no difference to overall welfare as rents remain with agents. The amount of deforestation avoided will at least be as high as under asymmetric information. These results are illustrated with data collected on opportunity costs in Amazonas...

  8. Biggest bets in the universe unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Jamieson, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Betting on the greatest unsolved problems in the universe is no longer the preserve of academic superstars such as Stephen Hawking. From Thursday, anyone will be able to place bets on whether the biggest physics experiments in the world will come good before 2010

  9. Unveiling Music Structure Via PLSA Similarity Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Meng, Anders; Petersen, Kaare Brandt

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing interest in developing methods for building music recommendation systems. In order to get a satisfactory performance from such a system, one needs to incorporate as much information about songs similarity as possible; however, how to do so is not obvious. In this p......Nowadays there is an increasing interest in developing methods for building music recommendation systems. In order to get a satisfactory performance from such a system, one needs to incorporate as much information about songs similarity as possible; however, how to do so is not obvious...... observed similarities can be satisfactorily explained using the latent semantics. Additionally, this approach significantly simplifies the song retrieval phase, leading to a more practical system implementation. The suitability of the PLSA model for representing music structure is studied in a simplified...

  10. Ettore Majorana unveiled genius and endless mysteries

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    This biography sheds new light on the life and work of physicist Ettore Majorana (including unpublished contributions), as well as on his mysterious disappearance in March 1938. Majorana is held by many, including Nobel Laureate, Enrico Fermi, to have been a genius of the rank of Galilei and Newton. In this intriguing story, the author, himself a leading expert on the work of Majorana, supplements the existing literature with new insights, anecdotes and personal accounts of contemporaries of Majorana.

  11. Rotational Spectroscopy Unveils Eleven Conformers of Adrenaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, C.; Cortijo, V.; Mata, S.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Recent improvements in our LA-MB-FTMW instrumentation have allowed the characterization of eleven and eight conformers for the neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline respectively. The observation of this rich conformational behavior is in accordance with the recent observation of seven conformers for dopamine and in sharp contrast with the conformational reduction proposed for catecholamines. C. Cabezas, I. Peña, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 486. H. Mitsuda, M. Miyazaki, I. B. Nielsen, P. Carcabal,C. Dedonder, C. Jouvet, S. Ishiuchi, M. Fujii J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 1130.

  12. Dubbing SAGA unveils new epigenetic crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnappel, W W M Pim; Timmers, H Th Marc

    2008-02-01

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, two independent studies (Zhang et al., 2008; Zhao et al., 2008) provide compelling evidence that targeted deubiquitylation of histones is intimately linked to transcription activation, epigenetic regulation, and cancer progression.

  13. Characterizing critical phenomena via the Purcell effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, M. B.; Szilard, D.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Farina, C.; Pinheiro, F. A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the role of phase transitions into the spontaneous-emission rate of a single quantum emitter embedded in a critical medium. Using a Landau-Ginzburg approach, we find that in the broken symmetry phase, the emission rate is reduced, or even suppressed, due to the photon mass generated by the Higgs mechanism. Remarkably, its sensitivity to the critical exponents of the phase transition allows for an optical determination of universality classes. When applied to the cases of superconductivity and superfluidity, we show that the Purcell effect also provides valuable information on spectroscopic and thermodynamic quantities, such as the size of the superconducting gap and the discontinuity in the specific heat at the transition. By unveiling that a deeper connection between the Purcell effect and phase transitions exists, we demonstrate that the former is an efficient optical probe of distinct critical phenomena and their associated observables.

  14. Effect of Wearing Style on Vitamin D and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Osteoporotic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim Gökçe Kutsal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Vitamin D deficiency is one of the most important public health problems as a result of osteomalacia, osteoporosis, muscle pain disease, muscle weakness and increased risk of falls and fracture. Outfitting style effects the synthesis and blood levels of vitamin D. The aim of our study is to investigate the effect of outfitting style on blood vitamin D and bone mineral density in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five female patients who were diagnosed with osteoporosis were included in our study. These women were divided into two groups according to their clothing habits as veiled and unveiled. Data of all patients about menopause, exposure to sun light, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry results, blood calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and osteoporosis treatment were recorded. Results: We found 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was significantly low in women with veiled dressing style (17,0±7,9 ng/ml in veiled and 33.9±22.0 ng/ml in unveiled patients, p<0.001. There was statistically significant correlations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and femur neck Z-scores, femur total bone mineral density, femur total T-score L1-L4 bone mineral density, femur neck bone mineral density for different seasons (p<0.05. Conclusion: Postmenopausal osteoporotic veiled women are more prone to vitamin D deficiency than unveiled women. Low concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is accompanying further decrease in bone mineral density. Despite low concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in veiled postmenopausal osteoporotic women, there is not direct correlation between wearing style and bone mineral density. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2011;17:85-8

  15. Desvelamento crítico da pessoa estomizada: em ação o programa de educação permanente em saúde Develamiento crítico de la persona ostomizada: programa de educación permanente en salud en acción Critical unveiling of people with stomas: the continuing health education program in action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Ribeiro Cunha

    2012-01-01

    en la Atención a la persona ostomizada. CONCLUSIÓN: El develamiento propuesto constituyó una vivencia para que esas personas ostomizadas estén habilitadas para "leer el mundo" y, así, conozcan y caminen rumbo a la transformación de su realidad.OBJECTIVE: To present the critical unveiling of the Itinerary of Freirean Research in the care of people with stoma. METHODS: A qualitative study in health linked to the methodological framework of Freire, which includes obtaining and analysis of data in dialogical circles, comprising three dialectical moments, intertwined in an interdisciplinary manner: thematic research, coding and decoding, and critical unveiling. This occurred in the period between April 2009 and February 2010, with an irregular number of participants, in the auditorium of the President Vargas Specialized Reference Unit, in the city of Belém / PA (Brazil. RESULTS: Inadequate training of health professionals was one of the most relevant topics generated, and unveiled the necessity of implementing a program of continuing education on the care of people with stoma. CONCLUSION: The proposed unveiling constituted a life experience so that these people with stomas were enabled to "read the world" and thus know and walk towards the transformation of their reality.

  16. The Relationship between Authoritarian Leadership and Employees’ Deviant Workplace Behaviors: The Mediating Effects of Psychological Contract Violation and Organizational Cynicism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyan; Chen, Yang; Sun, Peizhen; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employees’ deviant workplace behaviors (DWB), as well as the mediating effects of psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 391 manufacturing workers in a northern city of China. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the theory-driven models. The results showed that the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employees’ DWB was mediated by organizational cynicism. Moreover, this relationship was also sequentially mediated by psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism. This research unveiled psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism as underlying mechanism that explained the link between authoritarian leadership and employees’ DWB. PMID:28536550

  17. The Relationship between Authoritarian Leadership and Employees' Deviant Workplace Behaviors: The Mediating Effects of Psychological Contract Violation and Organizational Cynicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyan; Chen, Yang; Sun, Peizhen; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employees' deviant workplace behaviors (DWB), as well as the mediating effects of psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 391 manufacturing workers in a northern city of China. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the theory-driven models. The results showed that the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employees' DWB was mediated by organizational cynicism. Moreover, this relationship was also sequentially mediated by psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism. This research unveiled psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism as underlying mechanism that explained the link between authoritarian leadership and employees' DWB.

  18. The Relationship between Authoritarian Leadership and Employees’ Deviant Workplace Behaviors: The Mediating Effects of Psychological Contract Violation and Organizational Cynicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employees’ deviant workplace behaviors (DWB, as well as the mediating effects of psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 391 manufacturing workers in a northern city of China. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the theory-driven models. The results showed that the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employees’ DWB was mediated by organizational cynicism. Moreover, this relationship was also sequentially mediated by psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism. This research unveiled psychological contract violation and organizational cynicism as underlying mechanism that explained the link between authoritarian leadership and employees’ DWB.

  19. The interactive effects of soil transplant into colder regions and cropping on soil microbiology and biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Xue, Kai; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Yuguang; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-03-01

    Soil transplant into warmer regions has been shown to alter soil microbiology. In contrast, little is known about the effects of soil transplant into colder regions, albeit that climate cooling has solicited attention in recent years. To address this question, we transplanted bare fallow soil over large transects from southern China (subtropical climate zone) to central (warm temperate climate zone) and northern China (cold temperate climate zone). After an adaptation period of 4 years, soil nitrogen components, microbial biomass and community structures were altered. However, the effects of soil transplant on microbial communities were dampened by maize cropping, unveiling a negative interaction between cropping and transplant. Further statistical analyses with Canonical correspondence analysis and Mantel tests unveiled annual average temperature, relative humidity, aboveground biomass, soil pH and NH4 (+) -N content as environmental attributes closely correlated with microbial functional structures. In addition, average abundances of amoA-AOA (ammonia-oxidizing archaea) and amoA-AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) genes were significantly (P Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Hydrodynamical analysis of the effect of fish fins morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azwadi Che Sidik, Nor; Yen, Tey Wah

    2013-12-01

    The previous works on the biomechanics of fishes focuses on the locomotion effect of the fish bodies. However, there is quite a insufficiency in unveiling the respective function of fins when the fishes pose statics and exposed to fluid flow. Accordingly, this paper's focus is to investigate the hydrodynamic effect of the fins configuration to the fluid flow of shark-shaped-inspired structure. The drag and lift coefficient is computed for different cases of fish fins addition and configuration. The k-epsilon turbulence model is deployed using finite volume method with the aid of commercial software ANSYS CFX. The finding will demystify some of the functions of the fish's fins in term of their contribution to the hydrodynamic flow around the fishes.

  1. Strong field-matching effects in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-δ films with vortex energy landscapes engineered via masked ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiecicki, I.; Ulysse, C.; Wolf, T.; Bernard, R.; Bergeal, N.; Briatico, J.; Faini, G.; Lesueur, J.; Villegas, Javier E.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a masked ion irradiation technique to engineer the energy landscape for vortices in oxide superconductors. This approach associates the possibility to design the landscape geometry at the nanoscale with the unique capability to adjust the depth of the energy wells for vortices. This enabled us to unveil the key role of vortex channeling in modulating the amplitude of the field matching effects with the artificial energy landscape, and to make the latter govern flux dynamics over an unusually wide range of temperatures and applied fields for high-temperature superconducting films.

  2. Finite-size effects on current correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shunda; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jiao; Zhao, Hong

    2014-02-01

    We study why the calculation of current correlation functions (CCFs) still suffers from finite-size effects even when the periodic boundary condition is taken. Two important one-dimensional, momentum-conserving systems are investigated as examples. Intriguingly, it is found that the state of a system recurs in the sense of microcanonical ensemble average, and such recurrence may result in oscillations in CCFs. Meanwhile, we find that the sound mode collisions induce an extra time decay in a current so that its correlation function decays faster (slower) in a smaller (larger) system. Based on these two unveiled mechanisms, a procedure for correctly evaluating the decay rate of a CCF is proposed, with which our analysis suggests that the global energy CCF decays as ˜t-2/3 in the diatomic hard-core gas model and in a manner close to ˜t-1/2 in the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β model.

  3. Value Effect in Indonesian Stock Returns: The Implications for the Equity Mutual Fund Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Kristianto Utomo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We extend the persistence and pervasiveness of the presence of value effect to Indonesian stock returns in the last two decades by utilizing data set that is relatively free of survivor bias and selection bias. Our finding shows that value portfolios have been able to outperform growth portfolios. Furthermore, the presence of the effect as an asset pricing factor, along with the size effect, can significantly explain the returns of the aggregate equity mutual funds in Indonesia and unveil that the equity mutual fund industry does not provide sufficient risk-adjusted return to cover trading costs and fund expenses. Our proposition is that the equity mutual fund valuation will be better off to apply simpler model shown in this paper to capture the value premium as opposed to the general application of traditional valuation method.

  4. Causality analysis detects the regulatory role of maternal effect genes in the early Drosophila embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Ghodsi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In developmental studies, inferring regulatory interactions of segmentation genetic network play a vital role in unveiling the mechanism of pattern formation. As such, there exists an opportune demand for theoretical developments and new mathematical models which can result in a more accurate illustration of this genetic network. Accordingly, this paper seeks to extract the meaningful regulatory role of the maternal effect genes using a variety of causality detection techniques and to explore whether these methods can suggest a new analytical view to the gene regulatory networks. We evaluate the use of three different powerful and widely-used models representing time and frequency domain Granger causality and convergent cross mapping technique with the results being thoroughly evaluated for statistical significance. Our findings show that the regulatory role of maternal effect genes is detectable in different time classes and thereby the method is applicable to infer the possible regulatory interactions present among the other genes of this network.

  5. Energy minibands degeneration induced by magnetic field effects in graphene superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Villagrana, R. A.; Carrera-Escobedo, V. H.; Suárez-López, J. R.; Madrigal-Melchor, J.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I.

    2017-12-01

    Energy minibands are a basic feature of practically any superlattice. In this regard graphene superlattices are not the exception and recently miniband transport has been reported through magneto-transport measurements. In this work, we compute the energy miniband and transport characteristics for graphene superlattices in which the energy barriers are generated by magnetic and electric fields. The transfer matrix approach and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism have been implemented to calculate the energy minibands and the linear-regime conductance. We find that energy minibands are very sensitive to the magnetic field and become degenerate by rising it. We were also able to correlate the evolution of the energy minibands as a function of the magnetic field with the transport characteristics, finding that miniband transport can be destroyed by magnetic field effects. Here, it is important to remark that although magnetic field effects have been a key element to unveil miniband transport, they can also destroy it.

  6. Semantic priming effects of synonyms, antonyms, frame, implication and verb-object categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Skënderi-Rakipllari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Semantic priming has been a major subject of interest for psycholinguists, whose aim is to discover how lexical memory is structured and organized. The facilitation process of word retrieval through semantic priming has long been studied. The present research is aimed to reveal which semantic category has the best priming effect. Through a lexical decision task experiment we compared the reaction times of masked primed pairs and unprimed pairs. In addition, we analyzed the reaction times and priming effect of connected semantic relations: antonymy, frame, synonymy, implication and verb-object. The data collected and interpreted unveiled that the mean reaction times of primed pairs were shorter than those of unprimed pairs. As to semantic priming, the most significantly primed pairs were those of implications and verb- objects, and not those of synonymy or antonymy as it might be expected.

  7. Coherence and spin effects in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumoto, S

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on experiments on coherent transport through quantum dot systems. The most important quantity obtained in coherent transport is the phase shift through the dots, which gives complementary information to the scattering amplitude (i.e. the conductance). However, two-terminal devices have a particular difficulty, called 'phase rigidity', in obtaining the phase shift. There are two representative ways to avoid this problem: one is to adopt a multi-terminal configuration and another is to use resonance in the interferometer. This review mainly reviews the latter approaches. Such resonance in the whole interferometer often joins with local resonance inside the interferometer and appears as the Fano effect, which is a powerful tool for investigating the phase shift problem with the aid of theories. In addition to such resonances of single-electron states, electron spin causes a kind of many-body resonance, that is, the Kondo effect. Combination of these resonances is the Fano-Kondo effect. Experiments on the Fano-Kondo effect, which unveil the nature of the Kondo resonance, are also reviewed. (topical review)

  8. TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 4 signalling, unveils similarities and differences in lipopolysaccharide- and lipid-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Sophie E; Liang, Hanyu; Costford, Sheila R; Klip, Amira; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Sanchez-Avila, Alicia; Ely, Brian; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-11-30

    Emerging evidence suggests that TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4 and downstream pathways [MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases) and NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)] play an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and saturated NEFA (non-esterified fatty acids) activate TLR4, and plasma concentrations of these TLR4 ligands are elevated in obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Our goals were to define the role of TLR4 on the insulin resistance caused by LPS and saturated NEFA, and to dissect the independent contribution of LPS and NEFA to the activation of TLR4-driven pathways by employing TAK-242, a specific inhibitor of TLR4. LPS caused robust activation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways in L6 myotubes, along with impaired insulin signalling and glucose transport. TAK-242 completely prevented the inflammatory response (MAPK and NF-κB activation) caused by LPS, and, in turn, improved LPS-induced insulin resistance. Similar to LPS, stearate strongly activated MAPKs, although stimulation of the NF-κB axis was modest. As seen with LPS, the inflammatory response caused by stearate was accompanied by impaired insulin action. TAK-242 also blunted stearate-induced inflammation; yet, the protective effect conferred by TAK-242 was partial and observed only on MAPKs. Consequently, the insulin resistance caused by stearate was only partially improved by TAK-242. In summary, TAK-242 provides complete and partial protection against LPS- and NEFA-induced inflammation and insulin resistance, respectively. Thus, LPS-induced insulin resistance depends entirely on TLR4, whereas NEFA works through TLR4-dependent and -independent mechanisms to impair insulin action.

  9. TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 4 signalling, unveils similarities and differences in lipopolysaccharide- and lipidinduced inflammation and insulin resistance in muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Sophie E.; Liang, Hanyu; Costford, Sheila R.; Klip, Amira; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Avila, Alicia; Ely, Brian; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4 and downstream pathways [MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases) and NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)] play an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and saturated NEFA (non-esterified fatty acids) activate TLR4, and plasma concentrations of these TLR4 ligands are elevated in obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Our goals were to define the role of TLR4 on the insulin resistance caused by LPS and saturated NEFA, and to dissect the independent contribution of LPS and NEFA to the activation of TLR4-driven pathways by employing TAK-242, a specific inhibitor of TLR4. LPS caused robust activation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways in L6 myotubes, along with impaired insulin signalling and glucose transport. TAK-242 completely prevented the inflammatory response (MAPK and NF-κB activation) caused by LPS, and, in turn, improved LPS-induced insulin resistance. Similar to LPS, stearate strongly activated MAPKs, although stimulation of the NF-κB axis was modest. As seen with LPS, the inflammatory response caused by stearate was accompanied by impaired insulin action. TAK-242 also blunted stearate-induced inflammation; yet, the protective effect conferred by TAK-242 was partial and observed only on MAPKs. Consequently, the insulin resistance caused by stearate was only partially improved by TAK-242. In summary, TAK-242 provides complete and partial protection against LPS- and NEFA-induced inflammation and insulin resistance, respectively. Thus, LPS-induced insulin resistance depends entirely on TLR4, whereas NEFA works through TLR4-dependent and -independent mechanisms to impair insulin action. PMID:23050932

  10. Covariant Conservation Laws and the Spin Hall Effect in Dirac-Rashba Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milletarı, Mirco; Offidani, Manuel; Ferreira, Aires; Raimondi, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of two-dimensional Dirac-Rashba systems in the presence of disorder and external perturbations. We unveil a set of exact symmetry relations (Ward identities) that impose strong constraints on the spin dynamics of Dirac fermions subject to proximity-induced interactions. This allows us to demonstrate that an arbitrary dilute concentration of scalar impurities results in the total suppression of nonequilibrium spin Hall currents when only Rashba spin-orbit coupling is present. Remarkably, a finite spin Hall conductivity is restored when the minimal Dirac-Rashba model is supplemented with a spin-valley interaction. The Ward identities provide a systematic way to predict the emergence of the spin Hall effect in a wider class of Dirac-Rashba systems of experimental relevance and represent an important benchmark for testing the validity of numerical methodologies.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics of Silicon Nanowire Resonator Considering Nonlocal Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Leisheng; Li, Lijie

    2017-12-01

    In this work, nonlinear dynamics of silicon nanowire resonator considering nonlocal effect has been investigated. For the first time, dynamical parameters (e.g., resonant frequency, Duffing coefficient, and the damping ratio) that directly influence the nonlinear dynamics of the nanostructure have been derived. Subsequently, by calculating their response with the varied nonlocal coefficient, it is unveiled that the nonlocal effect makes more obvious impacts at the starting range (from zero to a small value), while the impact of nonlocal effect becomes weaker when the nonlocal term reaches to a certain threshold value. Furthermore, to characterize the role played by nonlocal effect in exerting influence on nonlinear behaviors such as bifurcation and chaos (typical phenomena in nonlinear dynamics of nanoscale devices), we have calculated the Lyapunov exponents and bifurcation diagram with and without nonlocal effect, and results shows the nonlocal effect causes the most significant effect as the device is at resonance. This work advances the development of nanowire resonators that are working beyond linear regime.

  12. ESA unveils Spanish antenna for unique space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The newly refurbished antenna, which is located at the Villafranca del Castillo Satellite Tracking Station site (VILSPA) near Madrid, has been selected as the prime communication link with the Cluster II spacecraft. The VIL-1 antenna will play a vital role in ESA's Cluster mission by monitoring and controlling the four spacecraft and by receiving the vast amounts of data that will be returned to Earth during two years of operations. Scheduled for launch in summer 2000, the Cluster quartet will complete the most detailed investigation ever made into the interaction between our pl0anet's magnetosphere - the region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field - and the continuous stream of charged particles emitted by the Sun - the solar wind. This exciting venture is now well under way, following completion of the satellite assembly and test programme and two successful verification flights by the newly developed Soyuz-Fregat launch vehicle. The ESA Flight Acceptance Review Board has accordingly given the go-ahead for final launch preparations at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. VILSPA, ESA and Cluster II Built in 1975, after an international agreement between the European Space Agency and the Spanish government, VILSPA is part of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) Tracking Station Network (ESTRACK). In the last 25 years, VILSPA has supported many ESA and international satellite programmes, including the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), EXOSAT and the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). In addition to supporting the Cluster II mission, it has been designated as the Science Operations Centre for ESA's XMM Newton mission and for the Far-Infrared Space Telescope (FIRST), which is due to launch in 2007. There are now more than half a dozen large dish antennae installed at VILSPA. One of these is the VIL-1 antenna, a 15 metre diameter dish which operates in the S-band radio frequency (1.8 - 2.7 GHz). This antenna has been modernised recently in order to support the forthcoming Cluster II mission. As a result, VILSPA now has two fully upgraded 15 metre S-band antennae, which should enable the facility to enter the new millennium confident in its ability to support future space programmes. Modernisation of VIL-1 included the replacement of the 60 dish panels, the subreflector, the antenna equipment room and other parts of the main structure. One of the most significant modifications has been the replacement of the Servo and tracking systems, since the Cluster II satellites will move in a highly elliptical orbit and require high speed tracking. Into Orbit The Cluster II mission will be launched by two Soyuz rockets provided by the French-Russian Starsem consortium. After two engine burns by the Fregat upper stage, the spacecraft will separate and use their own propulsion systems to reach their final orbits. Travelling in close formation, the four Cluster spacecraft will swoop to within 19,000 km of the Earth's surface and then retreat to 119,000 km - almost one third of the way to the Moon. The four satellites will be visible for an average of about 10 hours per day from the VILSPA ground station. However, only one satellite at a time can be in communication with the ground, which reduces the available time each day to around two and a half hours per satellite. Further challenges arise from the need to send new instructions to the 11 scientific instruments on each spacecraft, and from the vast amount of data to be returned each day from the 44 experiments. Over two years of operations, this adds up to 580 Gigabytes (580,000,000,000 bytes!) of data - equivalent to 290 million pages of printed text. VILSPA will be just one link in the overall Cluster II communications network. The day-to-day operation of the four spacecraft will be handled by the Operations Control Centre at ESOC (Darmstadt, Germany). All of the Cluster II data exchange between VILSPA and ESOC will be handled by dedicated communication lines. European Teamwork. Industrial enterprises in almost all of the 14 ESA member states and the United States have provided hardware for Cluster II, and several Spanish companies have made important contributions to the project. SENER in Bilbao has designed and built the communication and experiment booms for the spacecraft, while Alcatel Espacio in Tres Cantos (Madrid) has provided on-board transponders and high power amplifiers for the spacecraft. Construction of the eight Cluster / Cluster II spacecraft has been a major undertaking for European industry. Built into each 550 kg satellite are six propellant tanks, two pressure tanks, eight thrusters, 80 metres of pipework, about 5 km of wiring, 380 connectors and more than 14,000 electrical contacts. All of the spacecraft have been assembled at the Friedrichshafen (Germany) plant of prime contractor Dornier Satellitensysteme, and then sent to IABG in Ottobrunn, near Munich, for intensive vibration, thermal, vacuum and magnetic testing. Various companies have also participated in the relocation and upgrading of the VIL-1 antenna hardware. MAN (Germany) was responsible for the dismantling of the Odenwald antenna and installation of the dish at VILSPA, while VITROCISET (Italy) handled the transfer of the antenna 'back-end' equipment, which included the computers to process the satellite telemetry and telecommunications signals. These companies were supported by Spanish contractors and local industry.

  13. Limited communication capacity unveils strategies for human interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Cebrian, Manuel; Moro, Esteban

    2013-06-01

    Connectivity is the key process that characterizes the structural and functional properties of social networks. However, the bursty activity of dyadic interactions may hinder the discrimination of inactive ties from large interevent times in active ones. We develop a principled method to detect tie de-activation and apply it to a large longitudinal, cross-sectional communication dataset (~19 months, ~20 million people). Contrary to the perception of ever-growing connectivity, we observe that individuals exhibit a finite communication capacity, which limits the number of ties they can maintain active in time. On average men display higher capacity than women, and this capacity decreases for both genders over their lifespan. Separating communication capacity from activity reveals a diverse range of tie activation strategies, from stable to exploratory. This allows us to draw novel relationships between individual strategies for human interaction and the evolution of social networks at global scale.

  14. Metabolomics to unveil and understand phenotypic diversity between pathogen populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben t'Kindt

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a debilitating disease caused by the parasite Leishmania. There is extensive clinical polymorphism, including variable responsiveness to treatment. We study Leishmania donovani parasites isolated from visceral leishmaniasis patients in Nepal that responded differently to antimonial treatment due to differing intrinsic drug sensitivity of the parasites. Here, we present a proof-of-principle study in which we applied a metabolomics pipeline specifically developed for L. donovani to characterize the global metabolic differences between antimonial-sensitive and antimonial-resistant L. donovani isolates. Clones of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant parasite isolates from clinical samples were cultured in vitro and harvested for metabolomics analysis. The relative abundance of 340 metabolites was determined by ZIC-HILIC chromatography coupled to LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Our measurements cover approximately 20% of the predicted core metabolome of Leishmania and additionally detected a large number of lipids. Drug-sensitive and drug-resistant parasites showed distinct metabolic profiles, and unsupervised clustering and principal component analysis clearly distinguished the two phenotypes. For 100 metabolites, the detected intensity differed more than three-fold between the 2 phenotypes. Many of these were in specific areas of lipid metabolism, suggesting that the membrane composition of the drug-resistant parasites is extensively modified. Untargeted metabolomics has been applied on clinical Leishmania isolates to uncover major metabolic differences between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant isolates. The identified major differences provide novel insights into the mechanisms involved in resistance to antimonial drugs, and facilitate investigations using targeted approaches to unravel the key changes mediating drug resistance.

  15. Amazing structure of respirasome: unveiling the secrets of cell respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Runyu; Gu, Jinke; Wu, Meng; Yang, Maojun

    2016-12-01

    Respirasome, a huge molecular machine that carries out cellular respiration, has gained growing attention since its discovery, because respiration is the most indispensable biological process in almost all living creatures. The concept of respirasome has renewed our understanding of the respiratory chain organization, and most recently, the structure of respirasome solved by Yang's group from Tsinghua University (Gu et al. Nature 237(7622):639-643, 2016) firstly presented the detailed interactions within this huge molecular machine, and provided important information for drug design and screening. However, the study of cellular respiration went through a long history. Here, we briefly showed the detoured history of respiratory chain investigation, and then described the amazing structure of respirasome.

  16. Unveiling the Hidden Bat Diversity of a Neotropical Montane Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloriana Chaverri

    Full Text Available Mountain environments, characterized by high levels of endemism, are at risk of experiencing significant biodiversity loss due to current trends in global warming. While many acknowledge their importance and vulnerability, these ecosystems still remain poorly studied, particularly for taxa that are difficult to sample such as bats. Aiming to estimate the amount of cryptic diversity among bats of a Neotropical montane cloud forest in Talamanca Range-south-east Central America-, we performed a 15-night sampling campaign, which resulted in 90 captured bats belonging to 8 species. We sequenced their mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and screened their inter- and intraspecific genetic variation. Phylogenetic relations with conspecifics and closely related species from other geographic regions were established using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference methods, as well as median-joining haplotype networks. Mitochondrial lineages highly divergent from hitherto characterized populations (> 9% COI dissimilarity were found in Myotis oxyotus and Hylonycteris underwoodi. Sturnira burtonlimi and M. keaysi also showed distinct mitochondrial structure with sibling species and/or populations. These results suggest that mountains in the region hold a high degree of endemicity potential that has previously been ignored in bats. They also warn of the high extinction risk montane bats may be facing due to climatic change, particularly in isolated mountain systems like Talamanca Range.

  17. Health Canada unveils plan to distribute marijuana for medical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaczuk, Derek

    2003-08-01

    Under pressure from the courts, Health Canada reluctantly comes up with a distribution plan to provide dried cannabis and seeds to patients using medical marijuana. The plan has been greeted with considerable criticism

  18. Unveiling the curtain of superposition: Recent gedanken and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, E.; Elitzur, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    What is the true meaning of quantum superposition? Can a particle genuinely reside in several places simultaneously? These questions lie at the heart of this paper which presents an updated survey of some important stages in the evolution of the three-boxes paradox, as well as novel conclusions drawn from it. We begin with the original thought experiment of Aharonov and Vaidman, and proceed to its non-counterfactual version. The latter was recently realized by Okamoto and Takeuchi using a quantum router. We then outline a dynamic version of this experiment, where a particle is shown to “disappear” and “re-appear” during the time evolution of the system. This surprising prediction based on self-cancellation of weak values is directly related to our notion of Quantum Oblivion. Finally, we present the non-counterfactual version of this disappearing-reappearing experiment. Within the near future, this last version of the experiment is likely to be realized in the lab, proving the existence of exotic hitherto unknown forms of superposition. With the aid of Bell’s theorem, we prove the inherent nonlocality and nontemporality underlying such pre- and post-selected systems, rendering anomalous weak values ontologically real.

  19. Unveiling the top secrets with the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierici, R.

    2013-12-01

    Top quark physics is one of the pillars of fundamental research in the field of high energy physics. It not only gives access to precision measurements for constraining the Standard Model of particles and interactions but also it represents a privileged domain for new physics searches. This contribution summarizes the main results in top quark physics obtained with the two general-purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS during the first two years of operations of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It covers the 2010 and 2011 data taking periods, where the LHC ran at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV.

  20. Unveiling the top secrets with the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chierici, R

    2013-01-01

    Top quark physics is one of the pillars of fundamental research in the field of high energy physics. It not only gives access to precision measurements for constraining the Standard Model of particles and interactions but also it represents a privileged domain for new physics searches. This contribution summarizes the main results in top quark physics obtained with the two general-purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS during the first two years of operations of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It covers the 2010 and 2011 data taking periods, where the LHC ran at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. (paper)

  1. Structural evolution of calcite at high temperatures: Phase V unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Nobuo; Setoguchi, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi

    2013-01-01

    The calcite form of calcium carbonate CaCO3 undergoes a reversible phase transition between Rc and Rm at ~1240 K under a CO2 atmosphere of ~0.4 MPa. The joint probability density function obtained from the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed that the oxygen triangles of the CO3 group in the high temperature form (Phase V) do not sit still at specified positions in the space group Rm, but migrate along the undulated circular orbital about carbon. The present study also shows how the room temperature form (Phase I) develops into Phase V through an intermediate form (Phase IV) in the temperature range between ~985 K and ~1240 K. PMID:24084871

  2. Unveiling the checkered fortunes of the Ottoman Empire

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    The Ottoman Empire has been predominantly viewed as the ćSick Man of Europe.ć The question arises, however, how this perceived inefficiency can be reconciled with the long existence and prosperity of the Empire. I argue that the Ottoman system could have been efficient subject to constraints. More specifically, I explore the role of the technology of predation and the adherence to the law in determining relative changes in the social order and the power of the Sultan, which in turn led to the...

  3. Hidden symmetries of the Principal Chiral Model unveiled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devchand, C.; Schiff, J.

    1996-12-01

    By relating the two-dimensional U(N) Principal Chiral Model to a Simple linear system we obtain a free-field parametrization of solutions. Obvious symmetry transformations on the free-field data give symmetries of the model. In this way all known 'hidden symmetries' and Baecklund transformations, as well as a host of new symmetries, arise. (author). 21 refs

  4. Unveiling galaxies the role of images in astronomical discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Jean-René

    2017-01-01

    Galaxies are known as the building blocks of the universe, but arriving at this understanding has been a thousand-year odyssey. This journey is told through the lens of the evolving use of images as investigative tools. Initial chapters explore how early insights developed in line with new methods of scientific imaging, particularly photography. The volume then explores the impact of optical, radio and x-ray imaging techniques. The final part of the story discusses the importance of atlases of galaxies; how astronomers organised images in ways that educated, promoted ideas and pushed for new knowledge. Images that created confusion as well as advanced knowledge are included to demonstrate the challenges faced by astronomers and the long road to understanding galaxies. By examining developments in imaging, this text places the study of galaxies in its broader historical context, contributing to both astronomy and the history of science.

  5. Gingival enlargement unveiling sarcoidosis: Report of a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabeeha Abbas Kadiwala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is classified as an acquired systemic granulomatous disease. Because of the fact that sarcoidosis affects multiple tissues and organs, it is characterized by many potential signs and symptoms, as well as by the presence of non-caseating granulomas in the organs involved. Although oral sarcoidosis is relatively rare, it may however, present in the oral cavity. This report presents a rare case of sarcoidosis with the initial presenting symptom as severe generalized gingival enlargement. The gingival enlargement was treated by gingivectomy. After histopathological examination of gingival biopsy and certain special investigations, a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made.

  6. Challenging Google, Microsoft Unveils a Search Tool for Scholarly Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Microsoft has introduced a new search tool to help people find scholarly articles online. The service, which includes journal articles from prominent academic societies and publishers, puts Microsoft in direct competition with Google Scholar. The new free search tool, which should work on most Web browsers, is called Windows Live Academic Search…

  7. Multiple jaw cysts-unveiling the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Manjima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is a comparatively rare syndrome characterized by basal cell nevi, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based on the major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria. Dentist plays a major role in the diagnosis of this disease due to the oral and maxillofacial manifestations of the syndrome. In some cases, jaw cysts are diagnosed by routine radiographs advised by the dentists. Odontogenic keratocysts in such syndromic patients will be multiple and extensive and in some cases results in cortical expansion and facial disfigurement. Thorough clinical examination and investigations prompt an early confirmation of the syndrome, which is very essential to avoid morbidity associated with the syndrome. Here, we report a case of multiple odontogenic cysts in a 16-year-old patient which later was diagnosed as a case of Gorlin Goltz syndrome.

  8. Multiple jaw cysts-unveiling the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjima, S; Naik, Zameera; Keluskar, Vaishali; Bagewadi, Anjana

    2015-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is a comparatively rare syndrome characterized by basal cell nevi, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based on the major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria. Dentist plays a major role in the diagnosis of this disease due to the oral and maxillofacial manifestations of the syndrome. In some cases, jaw cysts are diagnosed by routine radiographs advised by the dentists. Odontogenic keratocysts in such syndromic patients will be multiple and extensive and in some cases results in cortical expansion and facial disfigurement. Thorough clinical examination and investigations prompt an early confirmation of the syndrome, which is very essential to avoid morbidity associated with the syndrome. Here, we report a case of multiple odontogenic cysts in a 16-year-old patient which later was diagnosed as a case of Gorlin Goltz syndrome.

  9. Transcription factor profiling unveils the oncogenes involved in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... responsible for the progression of different kinds of cancer. .... one cell type was hybridized to the c-DNA library of another cell type ..... why intravenous application of As2O3 in a 1 -10 uM .... tion by ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

  10. Affective Man-Machine Interface: Unveiling human emotions through biosignals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Lisy, Viliam; Janssen, Joris H.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Schut, Marleen H.; Tuinenbreijer, Kees; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2010-01-01

    As is known for centuries, humans exhibit an electrical profile. This profile is altered through various psychological and physiological processes, which can be measured through biosignals; e.g., electromyography (EMG) and electrodermal activity (EDA). These biosignals can reveal our emotions and,

  11. Unveiling social awareness through literacy practices in an EFL class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzmel Alexánder Pérez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study addresses issues of verbal and physical aggression among tenth grade students in a public school. Through a pedagogical intervention the participants worked collaboratively to reflect on social issues in their English language classes. Inquiry was a fundamental element in this study as it allowed students to explore, read, compare, and then reflect on issues that come from their own context and experiences (Giroux, 1988. Students’ reflections were collected through questionnaires, artifacts, and audio recorded interviews in order to gather information to reveal students’ social awareness of physical and verbal aggression in their school context.  The findings revealed that students see violence as a need to avoid their partners´ abuse. Students´ reflections showed that students considered that parents and teachers paid more attention to academic concerns, rather than personal growth. The study demonstrated that inquiry along with writing about social issues in English allowed students to develop rationality and sensitivity towards violent acts, furthermore, inquiry about their social problems encouraged students to work collaboratively, to reflect about their social conditions and to apply the use of the English language in contextualized situations.

  12. Mud banks of Kerala: Mystery yet to be unveiled!

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.

    -ships of those days could therefore anchor right in the sea, and remain as safely as in a pond. Devoid of waves, the ships were free from the thrust and pull normally experienced in the open sea. Consequently the big vessels remained in the sea...

  13. Unveiling the Biometric Potential of Finger-Based ECG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, André; Silva, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The ECG signal has been shown to contain relevant information for human identification. Even though results validate the potential of these signals, data acquisition methods and apparatus explored so far compromise user acceptability, requiring the acquisition of ECG at the chest. In this paper, we propose a finger-based ECG biometric system, that uses signals collected at the fingers, through a minimally intrusive 1-lead ECG setup recurring to Ag/AgCl electrodes without gel as interface with the skin. The collected signal is significantly more noisy than the ECG acquired at the chest, motivating the application of feature extraction and signal processing techniques to the problem. Time domain ECG signal processing is performed, which comprises the usual steps of filtering, peak detection, heartbeat waveform segmentation, and amplitude normalization, plus an additional step of time normalization. Through a simple minimum distance criterion between the test patterns and the enrollment database, results have revealed this to be a promising technique for biometric applications. PMID:21837235

  14. [Evolutionary process unveiled by the maximum genetic diversity hypothesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Xia, Meng-Ying; Huang, Shi

    2013-05-01

    As two major popular theories to explain evolutionary facts, the neutral theory and Neo-Darwinism, despite their proven virtues in certain areas, still fail to offer comprehensive explanations to such fundamental evolutionary phenomena as the genetic equidistance result, abundant overlap sites, increase in complexity over time, incomplete understanding of genetic diversity, and inconsistencies with fossil and archaeological records. Maximum genetic diversity hypothesis (MGD), however, constructs a more complete evolutionary genetics theory that incorporates all of the proven virtues of existing theories and adds to them the novel concept of a maximum or optimum limit on genetic distance or diversity. It has yet to meet a contradiction and explained for the first time the half-century old Genetic Equidistance phenomenon as well as most other major evolutionary facts. It provides practical and quantitative ways of studying complexity. Molecular interpretation using MGD-based methods reveal novel insights on the origins of humans and other primates that are consistent with fossil evidence and common sense, and reestablished the important role of China in the evolution of humans. MGD theory has also uncovered an important genetic mechanism in the construction of complex traits and the pathogenesis of complex diseases. We here made a series of sequence comparisons among yeasts, fishes and primates to illustrate the concept of limit on genetic distance. The idea of limit or optimum is in line with the yin-yang paradigm in the traditional Chinese view of the universal creative law in nature.

  15. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés B Lantos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully soluble form.

  16. Unveiling the Low Surface Brightness Stellar Peripheries of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2018-01-01

    The low surface brightness peripheral regions of galaxies contain a gold mine of information about how minor mergers and accretions have influenced their evolution over cosmic time. Enormous stellar envelopes and copious amounts of faint tidal debris are natural outcomes of the hierarchical assembly process and the search for and study of these features, albeit highly challenging, offers the potential for unrivalled insight into the mechanisms of galaxy growth. Over the last two decades, there has been burgeoning interest in probing galaxy outskirts using resolved stellar populations. Wide-field surveys have uncovered vast tidal debris features and new populations of very remote globular clusters, while deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry has provided exquisite star formation histories back to the earliest epochs. I will highlight some recent results from studies within and beyond the Local Group and conclude by briefly discussing the great potential of future facilities, such as JWST, Euclid, LSST and WFIRST, for major breakthroughs in low surface brightness galaxy periphery science.

  17. German lab unveils plan to build physicists' next collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Abott, A

    2001-01-01

    An international team of physicists are to propose the construction of a major collider. 'TESLA' - the 'Tera electron volt Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator' will be a linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting resonators. It will be based at DESY and cost around three billion US dollars (2 pages).

  18. Plant Physiology: Unveiling the Dark Side of Phloem Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truernit, Elisabeth

    2017-05-08

    Sugars and other macromolecules arrive in heterotrophic plant tissues through the phloem, a long-distance transport system. Owing to a recent study, we now have a better understanding of how these molecules exit the phloem at their final destinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The unveiling of life: Liturgy and the lure of kitsch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Cilliers

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the classic definition of religious aesthetics as related to the notions of beauty, goodness and truth. The phenomenon of kitsch, understood as simulation (or inversion of beauty, goodness and truth, is taken cognisance of, especially in the light of contributions by Milan Kundera, Umberto Eco and Jean Baudrillard. The article briefly reflects on the liturgical consequences when kitsch manifests itself as simulated ‘beauty’, ‘goodness’ and ‘truth’ and concludes with some considerations regarding the characteristics of kitsch.

  20. Unveiling the mystery of visual information processing in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Emanuel

    2008-08-15

    It is generally accepted that human vision is an extremely powerful information processing system that facilitates our interaction with the surrounding world. However, despite extended and extensive research efforts, which encompass many exploration fields, the underlying fundamentals and operational principles of visual information processing in human brain remain unknown. We still are unable to figure out where and how along the path from eyes to the cortex the sensory input perceived by the retina is converted into a meaningful object representation, which can be consciously manipulated by the brain. Studying the vast literature considering the various aspects of brain information processing, I was surprised to learn that the respected scholarly discussion is totally indifferent to the basic keynote question: "What is information?" in general or "What is visual information?" in particular. In the old days, it was assumed that any scientific research approach has first to define its basic departure points. Why was it overlooked in brain information processing research remains a conundrum. In this paper, I am trying to find a remedy for this bizarre situation. I propose an uncommon definition of "information", which can be derived from Kolmogorov's Complexity Theory and Chaitin's notion of Algorithmic Information. Embracing this new definition leads to an inevitable revision of traditional dogmas that shape the state of the art of brain information processing research. I hope this revision would better serve the challenging goal of human visual information processing modeling.

  1. Unveiling the unicorn: a leader's guide to ACO preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The great uncertainty surrounding healthcare reform provides little incentive for action. However, as healthcare leaders wait for final rules and clarity about accountable care organizations (ACOs), inaction is the inappropriate response. Several central themes emerge from research about beginning the ACO process. Leaders should be able to understand and articulate ACO concepts. They should champion embracing cultural change while partnering with physicians. Inventory of skills and capabilities should take place to understand any deficiencies required to implement an ACO. Finally, a plan should be formed by asking strategic questions on each platform needed to ensure performance and strategic goals are at the forefront of decisions regarding structure and function of an ACO. It takes a visionary leader to accept these challenges.

  2. UNVEILING THE DUST NUCLEATION ZONE OF IRC+10216 WITH ALMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Guélin, M.; Agundez, M.; Marcelino, N.; Joblin, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection in IRC+10216 of lines of HNC J = 3 – 2 pertaining to nine excited vibrational states with energies up to ∼5300 K. The spectrum, observed with ALMA, also shows a surprising large number of narrow, unidentified lines that arise in the vicinity of the star. The HNC data are interpreted through a 1D-spherical non-local radiative transfer model, coupled to a chemical model that includes chemistry at thermochemical equilibrium for the innermost regions and reaction kinetics for the external envelope. Although unresolved by the current early ALMA data, the radius inferred for the emitting region is ∼0.''06 (i.e., ≅ 3 stellar radii), similar to the size of the dusty clumps reported by IR studies of the innermost region (r < 0.''3). The derived abundance of HNC relative to H 2 is 10 –8 < χ(HNC) <10 –6 , and drops quickly where the gas density decreases and the gas chemistry is dominated by reaction kinetics. Merging HNC data with that of molecular species present throughout the inner envelope, such as vibrationally excited HCN, SiS, CS, or SiO, should allow us to characterize the physical and chemical conditions in the dust formation zone

  3. Unveiling Hidden Social Design: New Roles for Sociologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Lubomir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper will help foster a more favourable attitude to professional involvement in social design projects and highlight new areas of professional opportunity for sociologists. To overcome the psychological barriers to design engagement and to foster motivation for social design, the authors discuss a case of social design decision making by non-sociologists. The methodology is informed by Activity Theory and Design Theory, and the approach adopted is based on analyzing current best practices, departing from conventional and customary practices. The authors discuss the Fun Palace, which was an innovative architectural project in the 1960s Great Britain, conceived with a fundamental social aim of providing life-long education and professional retooling to working class people in a relaxed and entertaining environment. The paper highlights the sociological nature of decision making in the planning phase of the project as well as the need for sociological knowledge and skills. The explication of the social design activities in the Fun Palace project can inspire sociological practitioners with ideas about entering into various industries and, in particular, in the design of social organizations and buildings.

  4. NASA Unveils First Images From Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Extraordinary first images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory trace the aftermath of a gigantic stellar explosion in such stunning detail that scientists can see evidence of what may be a neutron star or black hole near the center. Another image shows a powerful X-ray jet blasting 200,000 light years into intergalactic space from a distant quasar. Released today, both images confirm that NASA's newest Great Observatory is in excellent health and its instruments and optics are performing up to expectations. Chandra, the world's largest and most sensitive X-ray telescope, is still in its orbital check-out and calibration phase. "When I saw the first image, I knew that the dream had been realized," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra Project Scientist, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL. "This observatory is ready to take its place in the history of spectacular scientific achievements." "We were astounded by these images," said Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X- ray Center, Cambridge, MA. "We see the collision of the debris from the exploded star with the matter around it, we see shock waves rushing into interstellar space at millions of miles per hour, and, as a real bonus, we see for the first time a tantalizing bright point near the center of the remnant that could possibly be a collapsed star associated with the outburst." Chandra's PKS 0637-752 PKS 0637-752 After the telescope's sunshade door was opened last week, one of the first images taken was of the 320-year-old supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, which astronomers believe was produced by the explosion of a massive star. Material blasted into space from the explosion crashed into surrounding material at 10 million miles per hour. This collision caused violent shock waves, like massive sonic booms, creating a vast 50-million degree bubble of X-ray emitting gas. Heavy elements in the hot gas produce X-rays of specific energies. Chandra's ability to precisely measure these X-rays tells how much of each element is present. With this information, astronomers can investigate how the elements necessary for life are created and spread throughout the galaxy by exploding stars. "Chandra will help to confirm one of the most fascinating theories of modern science -- that we came from the stars," said Professor Robert Kirshner of Harvard University. "Its ability to make X-ray images of comparable quality to optical images will have an impact on virtually every area of astronomy." Chandra also imaged a distant and very luminous quasar -- a single star-like object -- sporting a powerful X-ray jet blasting into space. The quasar radiates with the power of 10 trillion suns, energy which scientists believe comes from a supermassive black hole at its center. Chandra's image, combined with radio telescope observations, should provide insight into the process by which supermassive black holes can produce such cosmic jets. "Chandra has allowed NASA to seize the opportunity to put the U.S. back in the lead of observational X-ray astronomy," said Dr. Edward Weiler, Associate Administrator of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. "History teaches us that whenever you develop a telescope 10 times better than what came before, you will revolutionize astronomy. Chandra is poised to do just that." The Chandra X-ray observatory was named in honor of the late Nobel laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. Press: Fact Sheet The first Chandra images will be posted to the Internet at: http://chandra.nasa.gov and http://chandra.harvard.edu NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending an Internet electronic mail message to domo@hq.nasa.gov. In the body of the message (not the subject line) users should type the words "subscribe press-release" (no quotes). The system will reply with a confirmation via E-mail of each subscription. A second automatic message will include additional information on the service. NASA releases also are available via CompuServe using the command GO NASA. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, address an E-mail message to domo@hq.nasa.gov, leave the subject blank, and type only "unsubscribe press-release" (no quotes) in the body of the message.

  5. Pregnancy pragmatics unveiled: on bodies, bellies, and power in Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sijpt, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, anthropologists interested in reproduction have increasingly focused on the relationship between women’s (limited) reproductive agency and (bio)political forces such as patriarchy, medicine, the state, and the global political economy. In their quest for understanding

  6. Affective Man-Machine Interface: Unveiling Human Emotions through Biosignals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Egon L.; Lisý, Viliam; Janssen, Joris H.; Westerink, Joyce H. D. M.; Schut, Marleen H.; Tuinenbreijer, Kees

    As is known for centuries, humans exhibit an electrical profile. This profile is altered through various psychological and physiological proce-sses, which can be measured through biosignals; e.g., electromyography (EMG) and electrodermal activity (EDA). These biosignals can reveal our emotions and, as such, can serve as an advanced man-machine interface (MMI) for empathic consumer products. However, such a MMI requires the correct classification of biosignals to emotion classes. This chapter starts with an introduction on biosignals for emotion detection. Next, a state-of-the-art review is presented on automatic emotion classification. Moreover, guidelines are presented for affective MMI. Subsequently, a research is presented that explores the use of EDA and three facial EMG signals to determine neutral, positive, negative, and mixed emotions, using recordings of 21 people. A range of techniques is tested, which resulted in a generic framework for automated emotion classification with up to 61.31% correct classification of the four emotion classes, without the need of personal profiles. Among various other directives for future research, the results emphasize the need for parallel processing of multiple biosignals.

  7. Unveiling Quasiperiodicity through Nonlinear Wave Mixing in Periodic Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahabad, Alon; Arie, Ady; Voloch, Noa; Bruner, Ariel; Eger, David

    2007-01-01

    Quasiperiodicity is the concept of order without translation symmetry. The discovery of quasiperiodic order in natural materials transformed the way scientists examine and define ordered structure. We show and verify experimentally that quasiperiodicity can be observed by scattering processes from a periodic structure, provided the interaction area is of finite width. This is made through a momentum conservation condition, physically realizing a geometrical method used to model quasiperiodic structures by projecting a periodic structure of a higher dimension

  8. Unveiling Spatial Epidemiology of HIV with Mobile Phone Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Sanja; Gavrić, Katarina; Ćulibrk, Dubravko; Crnojević, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of geo-referenced mobile phone data enables the identification of behavioral patterns, habits and movements of people. With this data, we can extract the knowledge potentially useful for many applications including the one tackled in this study - understanding spatial variation of epidemics. We explored the datasets collected by a cell phone service provider and linked them to spatial HIV prevalence rates estimated from publicly available surveys. For that purpose, 224 features were extracted from mobility and connectivity traces and related to the level of HIV epidemic in 50 Ivory Coast departments. By means of regression models, we evaluated predictive ability of extracted features. Several models predicted HIV prevalence that are highly correlated (>0.7) with actual values. Through contribution analysis we identified key elements that correlate with the rate of infections and could serve as a proxy for epidemic monitoring. Our findings indicate that night connectivity and activity, spatial area covered by users and overall migrations are strongly linked to HIV. By visualizing the communication and mobility flows, we strived to explain the spatial structure of epidemics. We discovered that strong ties and hubs in communication and mobility align with HIV hot spots.

  9. Inclusive Financial System Reforms in Uganda: Unveiling Ambiguity

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoki, Milton

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the financial system reforms in the context of financial sector deepening, and strategy for financial sector development and inclusion in Uganda. Results suggest that the indicators of financial sector development are largely as they were in 1996 and that the actual gains from financial inclusion strategies are small. Evidence suggests a weak link between financial deepening and financial usage by firms and households. It finds the acclaimed success (by policy makers and s...

  10. Unveiling Hidden Dynamics of Hippo Signalling: A Systems Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Young Shin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hippo signalling pathway has recently emerged as an important regulator of cell apoptosis and proliferation with significant implications in human diseases. In mammals, the pathway contains the core kinases MST1/2, which phosphorylate and activate LATS1/2 kinases. The pro-apoptotic function of the MST/LATS signalling axis was previously linked to the Akt and ERK MAPK pathways, demonstrating that the Hippo pathway does not act alone but crosstalks with other signalling pathways to coordinate network dynamics and cellular outcomes. These crosstalks were characterised by a multitude of complex regulatory mechanisms involving competitive protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation mediated feedback loops. However, how these different mechanisms interplay in different cellular contexts to drive the context-specific network dynamics of Hippo-ERK signalling remains elusive. Using mathematical modelling and computational analysis, we uncovered that the Hippo-ERK network can generate highly diverse dynamical profiles that can be clustered into distinct dose-response patterns. For each pattern, we offered mechanistic explanation that defines when and how the observed phenomenon can arise. We demonstrated that Akt displays opposing, dose-dependent functions towards ERK, which are mediated by the balance between the Raf-1/MST2 protein interaction module and the LATS1 mediated feedback regulation. Moreover, Ras displays a multi-functional role and drives biphasic responses of both MST2 and ERK activities; which are critically governed by the competitive protein interaction between MST2 and Raf-1. Our study represents the first in-depth and systematic analysis of the Hippo-ERK network dynamics and provides a concrete foundation for future studies.

  11. Unveiling the Domain Conflict – FOSS vs. IPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Anurika Vaish

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present times the most talked about issues in the knowledge driven economic system are Free and Open Source Software (FOSS and Intellectual Property Right (IPR, both of which exist at poles apart. The question that prevails that is about the relevance of the either and that of the dominance of each one. The paper tries to probe into issues of general and specific relevance of FOSS and IPR as suppliers of certain set of utility and benefit to the user. It will also check the validity of the claim of FOSS and it licensing procedure comparing it with the user ship obligations of IPR protected products and services. The premise to the paper is that both FOSS and IPR have to exist and compliment each other ensuring a strong presence of resources in the public and private domain. The paper would certainly work on the area to validate the existence of conflict between the FOSS and IPR, or it is a mere false caution raised by groups pursuing either cause. Finally the paper would propose to demarcate the areas of dominance of FOSS and IPR and prove the utility at the socio-economic front.

  12. Unveiling the evolutionary phase of B[e] supergiants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muratore, M.F.; Kraus, Michaela; Liermann, A.; Schnurr, O.; Cidale, L.S.; Arias, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, - (2010), s. 123-126 E-ISSN 1669-9521 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : B[e] supergiants * K-band spectra Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  13. Unveiling consumer's privacy paradox behaviour in an economic exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiwalla, Luvai F; Li, Xiao-Bai

    2016-01-01

    Privacy paradox is of great interest to IS researchers and firms gathering personal information. It has been studied from social, behavioural, and economic perspectives independently. However, prior research has not examined the degrees of influence these perspectives contribute to the privacy paradox problem. We combine both economic and behavioural perspectives in our study of the privacy paradox with a price valuation of personal information through an economic experiment combined with a behavioural study on privacy paradox. Our goal is to reveal more insights on the privacy paradox through economic valuation on personal information. Results indicate that general privacy concerns or individual disclosure concerns do not have a significant influence on the price valuation of personal information. Instead, prior disclosure behaviour in specific scenario, like with healthcare providers or social networks, is a better indicator of consumer price valuations.

  14. Unveiling Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Promoters: Sequence Definition and Genomic Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Shana de Souto; Sant'Anna, Fernando Hayashi; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Several Mycoplasma species have had their genome completely sequenced, including four strains of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Nevertheless, little is known about the nucleotide sequences that control transcriptional initiation in these microorganisms. Therefore, with the objective of investigating the promoter sequences of M. hyopneumoniae, 23 transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of distinct genes were mapped. A pattern that resembles the σ70 promoter −10 element was found upstream of the TSSs. However, no −35 element was distinguished. Instead, an AT-rich periodic signal was identified. About half of the experimentally defined promoters contained the motif 5′-TRTGn-3′, which was identical to the −16 element usually found in Gram-positive bacteria. The defined promoters were utilized to build position-specific scoring matrices in order to scan putative promoters upstream of all coding sequences (CDSs) in the M. hyopneumoniae genome. Two hundred and one signals were found associated with 169 CDSs. Most of these sequences were located within 100 nucleotides of the start codons. This study has shown that the number of promoter-like sequences in the M. hyopneumoniae genome is more frequent than expected by chance, indicating that most of the sequences detected are probably biologically functional. PMID:22334569

  15. Unveiling the secrets of the universe Cern's openlab projects

    CERN Multimedia

    Garvey, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    "Upon the 20th anniversary ot the birth of the World Wide Web, the European Union has declared 2009 the European Year of Creativity and Innovation. Cern, and specifically its openlab secor, has already begun to fulfil public expectations of this year of discovery" (2 pages)

  16. Alpha centauri unveiling the secrets of our nearest stellar neighbor

    CERN Document Server

    Beech, Martin

    2015-01-01

    As our closest stellar companion and composed of two Sun-like stars and a third small dwarf star, Alpha Centauri is an ideal testing ground of astrophysical models and has played a central role in the history and development of modern astronomy—from the first guesses at stellar distances to understanding how our own star, the Sun, might have evolved. It is also the host of the nearest known exoplanet, an ultra-hot, Earth-like planet recently discovered. Just 4.4 light years away Alpha Centauri is also the most obvious target for humanity’s first directed interstellar space probe. Such a mission could reveal the small-scale structure of a new planetary system and also represent the first step in what must surely be humanity’s greatest future adventure—exploration of the Milky Way Galaxy itself. For all of its closeness, α Centauri continues to tantalize astronomers with many unresolved mysteries, such as how did it form, how many planets does it contain and where are they, and how might we view its ex...

  17. Unveiling the biometric potential of finger-based ECG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, André; Silva, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The ECG signal has been shown to contain relevant information for human identification. Even though results validate the potential of these signals, data acquisition methods and apparatus explored so far compromise user acceptability, requiring the acquisition of ECG at the chest. In this paper, we propose a finger-based ECG biometric system, that uses signals collected at the fingers, through a minimally intrusive 1-lead ECG setup recurring to Ag/AgCl electrodes without gel as interface with the skin. The collected signal is significantly more noisy than the ECG acquired at the chest, motivating the application of feature extraction and signal processing techniques to the problem. Time domain ECG signal processing is performed, which comprises the usual steps of filtering, peak detection, heartbeat waveform segmentation, and amplitude normalization, plus an additional step of time normalization. Through a simple minimum distance criterion between the test patterns and the enrollment database, results have revealed this to be a promising technique for biometric applications.

  18. [Cell-derived microparticles unveil their fibrinolytic and proteolytic function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeuvre, Loïc; Angles-Cano, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MP) are membrane microvesicles, 0.1-1 microm in size, shed by cells following activation or during apoptosis in a variety of pathological conditions. MPs released by blood cells or by vascular endothelial cells display molecular signatures that allow their identification and functional characterization. In addition, they provide tissue factor (TF) and a procoagulant phospholipid surface. Therefore, at present, the most strongly established applied research on MPs is their procoagulant activity as a determinant of thrombotic risk in various clinical conditions. Previous studies have indicated that MPs derived from malignant cells express matrix metalloproteinases, urokinase and its receptor (uPA/uPAR) that, in the presence of plasminogen, may act in concert to degrade extracellular matrix proteins. Recently, it was shown that MPs from TNFa-stimulated endothelial cells served as a surface for interaction with plasminogen and its conversion into plasmin by the uPA/uPAR system expressed at their surface. This capacity of MPs to promote plasmin generation confers them a new profibrinolytic and proteolytic function that may be of relevance in fibrinolysis, cell migration, angiogenesis, dissemination of malignant cells, cell detachment and apoptosis.

  19. Unveiling the Formation Pathway of Single Crystalline Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xing; Qu, Yongquan; Lin, Yung-Chen; Liao, Lei; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    Porous silicon nanowire is emerging as an interesting material system due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, electronic, and optical properties. To fully understand their formation mechanism is of great importance for controlling the fundamental physical properties and enabling potential applications. Here we present a systematic study to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the formation of porous silicon nanowires in a two-step silver-assisted electroless chemical etching method. It is shown that silicon nanowire arrays with various porosities can be prepared by varying multiple experimental parameters such as the resistivity of the starting silicon wafer, the concentration of oxidant (H2O2) and the amount of silver catalyst. Our study shows a consistent trend that the porosity increases with the increasing wafer conductivity (dopant concentration) and oxidant (H2O2) concentration. We further demonstrate that silver ions, formed by the oxidation of silver, can diffuse upwards and re-nucleate on the sidewalls of nanowires to initiate new etching pathways to produce porous structure. The elucidation of this fundamental formation mechanism opens a rational pathway to the production of wafer-scale single crystalline porous silicon nanowires with tunable surface areas ranging from 370 m2·g−1 to 30 m2·g−1, and can enable exciting opportunities in catalysis, energy harvesting, conversion, storage, as well as biomedical imaging and therapy. PMID:21244020

  20. Unveiling the edge of time black holes, white holes, wormholes

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    1992-01-01

    Acclaimed science writer John Gribbin recounts dramatic stories that have led scientists to believe black holes and their more mysterious kin are not only real, but might actually provide a passage to other universes and travel through time.

  1. Unveiling CO2 heterogeneous freezing plumes during champagne cork popping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Cordier, Daniel; Honvault, Jacques; Cilindre, Clara

    2017-09-14

    Cork popping from clear transparent bottles of champagne stored at different temperatures (namely, 6, 12, and 20 °C) was filmed through high-speed video imaging in the visible light spectrum. During the cork popping process, a plume mainly composed of gaseous CO 2 with traces of water vapour freely expands out of the bottleneck through ambient air. Most interestingly, for the bottles stored at 20 °C, the characteristic grey-white cloud of fog classically observed above the bottlenecks of champagne stored at lower temperatures simply disappeared. It is replaced by a more evanescent plume, surprisingly blue, starting from the bottleneck. We suggest that heterogeneous freezing of CO 2 occurs on ice water clusters homogeneously nucleated in the bottlenecks, depending on the saturation ratio experienced by gas-phase CO 2 after adiabatic expansion (indeed highly bottle temperature dependent). Moreover, and as observed for the bottles stored at 20 °C, we show that the freezing of only a small portion of all the available CO 2 is able to pump the energy released through adiabatic expansion, thus completely inhibiting the condensation of water vapour found in air packages adjacent to the gas volume gushing out of the bottleneck.

  2. UNVEILING THE RESTRICTED AND EXTENDED POSSIBILITIES OF DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Dieronitou

    2014-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to critically examine the opportunities as well as the fragmentations of the distributed leadership discourse and practices. In other words, this paper is both an argument for as well as a critique of the variety of forms of distributed leadership. Focusing mainly on Spillane’s et al form of distributed leadership and Fullan’s ‘System thinkers in action’, this paper has come to locate perspectives to distributed leadership on a spectrum, varying from ‘ex...

  3. UNVEILING THE DUST NUCLEATION ZONE OF IRC+10216 WITH ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; Goicoechea, J. R. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología, CSIC-INTA, Ctra. de Torrejón a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Castro-Carrizo, A.; Guélin, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406, Saint Martin dHères (France); Agundez, M. [Univ. Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270, Floirac (France); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Joblin, C. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France)

    2013-12-01

    We report the detection in IRC+10216 of lines of HNC J = 3 – 2 pertaining to nine excited vibrational states with energies up to ∼5300 K. The spectrum, observed with ALMA, also shows a surprising large number of narrow, unidentified lines that arise in the vicinity of the star. The HNC data are interpreted through a 1D-spherical non-local radiative transfer model, coupled to a chemical model that includes chemistry at thermochemical equilibrium for the innermost regions and reaction kinetics for the external envelope. Although unresolved by the current early ALMA data, the radius inferred for the emitting region is ∼0.''06 (i.e., ≅ 3 stellar radii), similar to the size of the dusty clumps reported by IR studies of the innermost region (r < 0.''3). The derived abundance of HNC relative to H{sub 2} is 10{sup –8} < χ(HNC) <10{sup –6}, and drops quickly where the gas density decreases and the gas chemistry is dominated by reaction kinetics. Merging HNC data with that of molecular species present throughout the inner envelope, such as vibrationally excited HCN, SiS, CS, or SiO, should allow us to characterize the physical and chemical conditions in the dust formation zone.

  4. Aharonov-Casher effect and quantum transport in graphene based nano rings: A self-consistent Born approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderzadeh, A.; Rahbari, S. H. Ebrahimnazhad; Phirouznia, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, Rashba coupling induced Aharonov-Casher effect in a graphene based nano ring is investigated theoretically. The graphene based nano ring is considered as a central device connected to semi-infinite graphene nano ribbons. In the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction, two armchair shaped edge nano ribbons are considered as semi-infinite leads. The non-equilibrium Green's function approach is utilized to obtain the quantum transport characteristics of the system. The relaxation and dephasing mechanisms within the self-consistent Born approximation is scrutinized. The Lopez-Sancho method is also applied to obtain the self-energy of the leads. We unveil that the non-equilibrium current of the system possesses measurable Aharonov-Casher oscillations with respect to the Rashba coupling strength. In addition, we have observed the same oscillations in dilute impurity regimes in which amplitude of the oscillations is shown to be suppressed as a result of the relaxations.

  5. Study of the circular photo-galvanic effect in electrically gated (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu; Pillsbury, Timothy; Richardella, Anthony; Flanagan, Thomas; Samarth, Nitin

    Illumination with circularly polarized light is known to produce a helicity dependent photocurrent in topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 [Nature Nanotech. 7, 96 (2012)]. Symmetry considerations suggest that this ``circular photo-galvanic effect'' (CPGE) arises purely from the surface. However, whether or not the CPGE is directly related to optical excitations from the helical surface states is still under debate. To clarify the origin of the CPGE, we first compare the helicity dependent photocurrent in intrinsic (Bi,Sb)2Te3 to Cr doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films in which the Dirac surface states are perturbed by magnetic coupling. Secondly, we discuss the tunable CPGE in electrically gated (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films excited by optical excitations at different wavelengths. The dependence on the chemical potential and the photon energy of the excitation unveils the origin of the CPGE. Funded by ONR.

  6. A computational mechanistic study of Pd(ii)-catalyzed γ-C(sp3)-H olefination/cyclization of amines: the roles of bicarbonate and ligand effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Biao; Tian, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lu-Lin; Chen, De-Zhan

    2018-04-03

    The detailed mechanism of palladium-catalyzed γ-C(sp3)-H olefination/cyclization of triflyl-protected amines was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The olefinated intermediate was initially formed in the first catalytic cycle involving ligand exchange, bicarbonate-assisted C(sp3)-H bond cleavage, alkene insertion and 'reductive β-hydride elimination'. The following syn-addition and reductive elimination furnish the aza-Wacker product. The first step of reductive elimination is the rate-determining step. The mechanism unveils the important roles of bicarbonate: aiding the C-H activation and abstracting the β-proton in the second step of reductive elimination. The parallel bridging mode in the metal-olefin intermediate facilitates the syn-addition, explaining the experimentally observed stereoselectivity. The effect of the monodentate pyridine-based ligands is also discussed.

  7. Estimation of the ancestral effective population sizes of African great apes under different selection regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-08-01

    Reliable estimates of ancestral effective population sizes are necessary to unveil the population-level phenomena that shaped the phylogeny and molecular evolution of the African great apes. Although several methods have previously been applied to infer ancestral effective population sizes, an analysis of the influence of the selective regime on the estimates of ancestral demography has not been thoroughly conducted. In this study, three independent data sets under different selective regimes were used were composed to tackle this issue. The results showed that selection had a significant impact on the estimates of ancestral effective population sizes of the African great apes. The inference of the ancestral demography of African great apes was affected by the selection regime. The effects, however, were not homogeneous along the ancestral populations of great apes. The effective population size of the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees was more impacted by the selection regime when compared to the same parameter in the ancestor of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Because the selection regime influenced the estimates of ancestral effective population size, it is reasonable to assume that a portion of the discrepancy found in previous studies that inferred the ancestral effective population size may be attributable to the differential action of selection on the genes sampled.

  8. Antidiabetic Effect of Galantamine: Novel Effect for a Known Centrally Acting Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennatallah A Ali

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is one of the putative biochemical pathways that link diabetes with Alzheimer disease. Hence, we aimed to verify the potential antidiabetic effect of galantamine, unveil the possible mechanisms and evaluate its interaction with vildagliptin. The n5-STZ rat model was adopted and the diabetic animals were treated with galantamine and/or vildagliptin for 4 weeks. Galantamine lowered the n5-STZ-induced elevation in body weight, food/water intake, serum levels of glucose, fructosamine, and ALT/AST, as well as AChE in the tested organs. Moreover, it modulated successfully the lipid profile assessed in serum, liver, and muscle, and increased serum insulin level, as well as % β-cell function, in a pattern similar to that of vildagliptin. Additionally, galantamine confirmed its antioxidant (Nrf2, TAC, MDA, anti-inflammatory (NF-κB, TNF-α, visfatin, adiponectin and anti-apoptotic (caspase-3, cytochrome c capabilities by altering the n5-STZ effect on all the aforementioned parameters. On the molecular level, galantamine/vildagliptin have improved the insulin (p-insulin receptor, p-Akt, GLUT4/GLUT2 and Wnt/β-catenin (p-GSK-3β, β-catenin signaling pathways. On almost all parameters, the galantamine effects surpassed that of vildagliptin, while the combination regimen showed the best effects. The present results clearly proved that galantamine modulated glucose/lipid profile possibly through its anti-oxidant, -apoptotic, -inflammatory and -cholinesterase properties. These effects could be attributed partly to the enhancement of insulin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Galantamine can be strongly considered as a potential antidiabetic agent and as an add-on therapy with other oral antidiabetics.

  9. Estimation of effective temperatures in a quantum annealer: Towards deep learning applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realpe-Gómez, John; Benedetti, Marcello; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    Sampling is at the core of deep learning and more general machine learning applications; an increase in its efficiency would have a significant impact across several domains. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up these tasks, but several limitations still bar them from being used effectively. One of the main limitations, and the focus of this work, is that using the device's experimentally accessible temperature as a reference for sampling purposes leads to very poor correlation with the Boltzmann distribution it is programmed to sample from. Based on quantum dynamical arguments, one can expect that if the device indeed happens to be sampling from a Boltzmann-like distribution, it will correspond to one with an instance-dependent effective temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling processes. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the quantum-assisted training of Boltzmann machines, which can serve as a building block for deep learning architectures. This work was supported by NASA Ames Research Center.

  10. Estimation of effective temperatures in quantum annealers for sampling applications: A case study with possible applications in deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Marcello; Realpe-Gómez, John; Biswas, Rupak; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the efficiency of sampling from Boltzmann distributions would have a significant impact on deep learning and other machine-learning applications. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up this task, but several limitations still bar these state-of-the-art technologies from being used effectively. One of the main limitations is that, while the device may indeed sample from a Boltzmann-like distribution, quantum dynamical arguments suggest it will do so with an instance-dependent effective temperature, different from its physical temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the learning of a special class of a restricted Boltzmann machine embedded on quantum hardware, which can serve as a building block for deep-learning architectures. We also provide a comparison to k -step contrastive divergence (CD-k ) with k up to 100. Although assuming a suitable fixed effective temperature also allows us to outperform one-step contrastive divergence (CD-1), only when using an instance-dependent effective temperature do we find a performance close to that of CD-100 for the case studied here.

  11. Reproductive effects of two neonicotinoid insecticides on mouse sperm function and early embryonic development in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hua Gu

    Full Text Available Acetamiprid (ACE and imidacloprid (IMI are two major members in the family of neonicotinoid pesticides, which are synthesized with a higher selectivity to insects. The present study determined and compared in vitro effects of ACE, IMI and nicotine on mammalian reproduction by using an integrated testing strategy for reproductive toxicology, which covered sperm quality, sperm penetration into oocytes and preimplantation embryonic development. Direct chemical exposure (500 µM or 5 mM on spermatozoa during capacitation was performed, and in vitro fertilization (IVF process, zygotes and 2-cell embryos were respectively incubated with chemical-supplemented medium until blastocyst formation to evaluate the reproductive toxicity of these chemicals and monitor the stages mainly affected. Generally, treatment of 500 µM or 5 mM chemicals for 30 min did not change sperm motility and DNA integrity significantly but the fertilization ability in in vitro fertilization (IVF process, indicating that IVF process could detect and distinguish subtle effect of spermatozoa exposed to different chemicals. Culture experiment in the presence of chemicals in medium showed that fertilization process and zygotes are adversely affected by direct exposure of chemicals (PIMI>ACE, whereas developmental progression of 2-cell stage embryos was similar to controls (P>0.05. These findings unveiled the hazardous effects of neonicotinoid pesticides exposure on mammalian sperm fertilization ability as well as embryonic development, raising the concerns that neonicotinoid pesticides may pose reproductive risks on human reproductive health, especially in professional populations.

  12. Strong mechanically induced effects in DC current-biased suspended Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Thomas; Deng, Hai-Yao; Isacsson, Andreas; Mariani, Eros

    2018-01-01

    Superconductivity is a result of quantum coherence at macroscopic scales. Two superconductors separated by a metallic or insulating weak link exhibit the AC Josephson effect: the conversion of a DC voltage bias into an AC supercurrent. This current may be used to activate mechanical oscillations in a suspended weak link. As the DC-voltage bias condition is remarkably difficult to achieve in experiments, here we analyze theoretically how the Josephson effect can be exploited to activate and detect mechanical oscillations in the experimentally relevant condition with purely DC current bias. We unveil how changing the strength of the electromechanical coupling results in two qualitatively different regimes showing dramatic effects of the oscillations on the DC-voltage characteristic of the device. These include the appearance of Shapiro-type plateaus for weak coupling and a sudden mechanically induced retrapping for strong coupling. Our predictions, measurable in state-of-the-art experimental setups, allow the determination of the frequency and quality factor of the resonator using DC only techniques.

  13. Effects of seawater mixing on the mobility of trace elements in acid phosphogypsum leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaslioti, Evgenia-Maria; Pérez-López, Rafael; Parviainen, Annika; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Nieto, José M; Marchesi, Claudio; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Garrido, Carlos J

    2018-02-01

    This research reports the effects of pH increase on contaminant mobility in phosphogypsum leachates by seawater mixing, as occurs with dumpings on marine environments. Acid leachates from a phosphogypsum stack located in the Estuary of Huelva (Spain) were mixed with seawater to achieve gradually pH7. Concentrations of Al, Fe, Cr, Pb and U in mixed solutions significantly decreased with increasing pH by sorption and/or precipitation processes. Nevertheless, this study provides insight into the high contribution of the phosphogypsum stack to the release of other toxic elements (Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Sb) to the coastal areas, as 80-100% of their initial concentrations behaved conservatively in mixing solutions with no participation in sorption processes. Stable isotopes ruled out connexion between different phosphogypsum-related wastewaters and unveiled possible weathering inputs of estuarine waters to the stack. The urgency of adopting effective restoration measures in the study area is also stressed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of electromagnetic radiations from mobile phone base stations on general health and salivary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kushpal; Nagaraj, Anup; Yousuf, Asif; Ganta, Shravani; Pareek, Sonia; Vishnani, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Cell phones use electromagnetic, nonionizing radiations in the microwave range, which some believe may be harmful to human health. The present study aimed to determine the effect of electromagnetic radiations (EMRs) on unstimulated/stimulated salivary flow rate and other health-related problems between the general populations residing in proximity to and far away from mobile phone base stations. A total of four mobile base stations were randomly selected from four zones of Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Twenty individuals who were residing in proximity to the selected mobile phone towers were taken as the case group and the other 20 individuals (control group) who were living nearly 1 km away in the periphery were selected for salivary analysis. Questions related to sleep disturbances were measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and other health problems were included in the questionnaire. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. It was unveiled that a majority of the subjects who were residing near the mobile base station complained of sleep disturbances, headache, dizziness, irritability, concentration difficulties, and hypertension. A majority of the study subjects had significantly lesser stimulated salivary secretion (P base stations on the health and well-being of the general population cannot be ruled out. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on general health and more specifically on oral health.

  15. Edge effects in vertically-oriented graphene based electric double-layer capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huachao; Yang, Jinyuan; Bo, Zheng; Zhang, Shuo; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2016-08-01

    Vertically-oriented graphenes (VGs) have been demonstrated as a promising active material for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), partially due to their edge-enriched structure. In this work, the 'edge effects', i.e., edges as the promoters of high capacitance, in VG based EDLCs are investigated with experimental research and numerical simulations. VGs with diverse heights (i.e., edge-to-basal ratios) and edge densities are prepared with varying the plasma-enabled growth time and employing different plasma sources. Electrochemical measurements show that the edges play a predominant role on the charge storage behavior of VGs. A simulation is further conducted to unveil the roles of the edges on the separation and adsorption of ions within VG channels. The initial charge distribution of a VG plane is obtained with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which is subsequently applied to a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation system to gain the insights into the microscope EDLC structures. Compared with the basal planes, the edges present higher initial charge density (by 4.2 times), higher ion packing density (by 2.6 times), closer ion packing location (by 0.8 Å), and larger ion separation degree (by 14%). The as-obtained findings will be instructive in designing the morphology and structure of VGs for enhanced capacitive performances.

  16. Environmental effects of nanosilver: impact on castor seed germination, seedling growth, and plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasur, Jyothsna; Rani, Pathipati Usha

    2013-12-01

    Increasing use of nanoparticles in daily products is of great concern today, especially when their positive and negative impact on environment is not known. Hence, in current research, we have studied the impact of silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) application on seed germination, root, and shoot length of castor bean, Ricinus communis L. plant. Silver nanoparticles had no significant effects on seedling growth even at higher concentration of 4,000 mg L(-1), while the silver in bulk form as AgNO3 applied on the castor bean seeds inhibited the seed germination. Silver uptake in seedlings of the castor seeds on treatment with both the forms of silver was confirmed through atomic absorption spectroscopy studies. The silver nanoparticle and silver nitrate application to castor seeds also caused an enhanced enzymatic activity of ROS enzymes and phenolic content in castor seedlings. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of individual phenols indicated enhanced content of parahydroxy benzoic acid. These kinds of studies are of great interest in order to unveil the movement and accumulation of nanoparticles in plant tissues for assessing future applications in the field or laboratory.

  17. FGFR2-Driven Signaling Counteracts Tamoxifen Effect on ERα-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Turczyk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Signaling mediated by growth factors receptors has long been suggested as one of the key factors responsible for failure of endocrine treatment in breast cancer (BCa. Herein we present that in the presence of tamoxifen, FGFs (Fibroblast Growth Factors promote BCa cell growth with the strongest effect being produced by FGF7. FGFR2 was identified as a mediator of FGF7 action and the FGFR2-induced signaling was found to underlie cancer-associated fibroblasts-dependent resistance to tamoxifen. FGF7/FGFR2-triggered pathway was shown to induce ER phosphorylation, ubiquitination and subsequent ER proteasomal degradation which counteracted tamoxifen-promoted ER stabilization. We also identified activation of PI3K/AKT signaling targeting ER-Ser167 and regulation of Bcl-2 expression as a mediator of FGFR2-promoted resistance to tamoxifen. Analysis of tissue samples from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma revealed an inversed correlation between expression of FGFR2 and ER, thus supporting our in vitro data. These results unveil the complexity of ER regulation by FGFR2-mediated signaling likely to be associated with BCa resistance to endocrine therapy.

  18. Leakage and field emission in side-gate graphene field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bartolomeo, A., E-mail: dibant@sa.infn.it; Iemmo, L.; Romeo, F.; Cucolo, A. M. [Physics Department “E.R. Caianiello,” University of Salerno, via G. Paolo II, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); CNR-SPIN Salerno, via G. Paolo II, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Giubileo, F. [CNR-SPIN Salerno, via G. Paolo II, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Russo, S.; Unal, S. [Physics Department, University of Exeter, Stocker Road 6, Exeter, Devon EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Passacantando, M.; Grossi, V. [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67100 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    We fabricate planar graphene field-effect transistors with self-aligned side-gate at 100 nm from the 500 nm wide graphene conductive channel, using a single lithographic step. We demonstrate side-gating below 1 V with conductance modulation of 35% and transconductance up to 0.5 mS/mm at 10 mV drain bias. We measure the planar leakage along the SiO{sub 2}/vacuum gate dielectric over a wide voltage range, reporting rapidly growing current above 15 V. We unveil the microscopic mechanisms driving the leakage, as Frenkel-Poole transport through SiO{sub 2} up to the activation of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling in vacuum, which becomes dominant at higher voltages. We report a field-emission current density as high as 1 μA/μm between graphene flakes. These findings are important for the miniaturization of atomically thin devices.

  19. Effects of Evaporation Pressure and the Variety of Cane on the Quality of Sugar Honey and Panela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Esperanza Prada Forero

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When multi-effect evaporators (EME are implemented at the process of panela —besides of technological adjustment— to maintain the quality of the product is also required. This state unveiled a technolog y gap, and issues such as the contribution of compositional differences in the varieties of cane on panela. To fill part of this technological gap, the objective of this work is to determine the effect of pressure evaporation and the varieties of cane on quality of honey and panela. To achieve this, the evaporation pressure and sugarcane varieties in one experimental design completely randomized with 4x3 factorial arrangement and four replications was implemented: varieties CC 85-46, RD 75-11 andPR 61-632, without flocculant, without coadjuvant and was evaporated with a heat flux of 27,778 kW/m2 and without antifoam. The results showed a similar behavior for the studied sugarcane varieties. So honeys and panelas in the pressurized system presented dark coloration, reddish tone, high turbidity, a glycoside coefficient between 60 % and 70 % and they did not solidified. Honeys and panelas in vacuum systems presented a greater turbidity, clear colorations, yellowish tones, and good solidification and coefficients glycosides under 12 %.

  20. MIXING THE SOLAR WIND PROTON AND ELECTRON SCALES: EFFECTS OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY ON THE OBLIQUE PROTON FIREHOSE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Viñas, A., E-mail: yana.maneva@wis.kuleuven.be [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons, unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma β and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  1. Mixing the Solar Wind Proton and Electron Scales: Effects of Electron Temperature Anisotropy on the Oblique Proton Firehose Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A.; Poedts, S.

    2016-01-01

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons,? unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma ß and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  2. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Unveils the Formation of Gold Nanoparticles in Corn X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Unveils the Formation of Gold Nanoparticles in Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Cruz-Jiménez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se determinó, mediante espectroscopía de absorción de rayos-X, la posible biotransformación de oro en maíz (variedad Golden que se germinó y creció en KAuCl4. Adicionalmente se investigó el efecto de la tiourea y el tiocianato de amonio en la absorción de oro por la planta de maíz. Los resultados indicaron que concentraciones menores a 160 mg Au/L, no afectaron la germinación o el crecimiento de las plántulas. Tanto la tiourea como el tiocianato de amonio incrementaron 6 veces el contenido de oro en las raíces, mientras que la tiourea provocó un incremento de 10 veces la concentración de oro en tallos con respecto a los tratamientos sin este compuesto. El 91% del oro en el maíz se encontró como Au(0 y el resto como Au(III. Los análisis de estructura fi na revelaron que el oro se encontraba con un número de coordinación de 9,5 aproximadamente a 2,86 Å, indicando una esfera de coordinación incompleta, lo cual implica la presencia de una nano-fase. Usando la ecuación de Borowski se determinó que las nanopartículas tenían un tamaño promedio de 10,36 nm.In this study, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the possible gold biotransformation by Zea mays (corn var. Golden, germinated and grown in a medium spikedwith KAuCl4. In addition, the gold uptake capacity of corn assisted by thiourea and ammoniumthiocyanate was investigated. Results showed that up to 160 mg/L, gold did no treduce corn seed germination or plant growth. Both thiourea and ammonium thiocyanateresulted in a 6-fold increase of gold concentration in roots and thiourea promoted a 10-fold increase of gold concentration in shoots. X-ray absorption near edge structure studies demonstrated that approximately 91% of the gold present in plant samples was Au(0. Theremaining 9% was present as Au(III. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fi ne structureresults showed that in corn roots, the gold coordination number was around 9,5 neighboringgold atoms at approximately 2,86 Å, indicating an incomplete fi rst coordination shell,which imply the presence of a nano-phase. The results demonstrated that Z. mays was ableto produce gold nanoparticles with a size of 10,36 nm.

  3. Are Effective Properties Effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ru; Ingber, Marc S.; Hsiao, S.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The effective moduli (effective Young's modulus, effective Poisson's ratio, effective shear modulus, and effective bulk modulus) of dispersed-phase-reinforced composite materials are determined at the mesoscopic level using three-dimensional parallel boundary element simulations. By comparing the mesoscopic BEM results and the macroscopic results based on effective properties, limitations in the effective property approach have been examined

  4. Effective DNA Inhibitors of Cathepsin G by In Vitro Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Barbara; Vianini, Elena; Lucatello, Lorena; Sissi, Claudia; Moltrasio, Danilo; Pescador, Rodolfo; Porta, Roberto; Palumbo, Manlio

    2008-01-01

    Cathepsin G (CatG) is a chymotrypsin-like protease released upon degranulation of neutrophils. In several inflammatory and ischaemic diseases the impaired balance between CatG and its physiological inhibitors leads to tissue destruction and platelet aggregation. Inhibitors of CatG are suitable for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and procoagulant conditions. DNA released upon the death of neutrophils at injury sites binds CatG. Moreover, short DNA fragments are more inhibitory than genomic DNA. Defibrotide, a single stranded polydeoxyribonucleotide with antithrombotic effect is also a potent CatG inhibitor. Given the above experimental evidences we employed a selection protocol to assess whether DNA inhibition of CatG may be ascribed to specific sequences present in defibrotide DNA. A Selex protocol was applied to identify the single-stranded DNA sequences exhibiting the highest affinity for CatG, the diversity of a combinatorial pool of oligodeoxyribonucleotides being a good representation of the complexity found in defibrotide. Biophysical and biochemical studies confirmed that the selected sequences bind tightly to the target enzyme and also efficiently inhibit its catalytic activity. Sequence analysis carried out to unveil a motif responsible for CatG recognition showed a recurrence of alternating TG repeats in the selected CatG binders, adopting an extended conformation that grants maximal interaction with the highly charged protein surface. This unprecedented finding is validated by our results showing high affinity and inhibition of CatG by specific DNA sequences of variable length designed to maximally reduce pairing/folding interactions. PMID:19325843

  5. Effective DNA Inhibitors of Cathepsin G by In Vitro Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manlio Palumbo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G (CatG is a chymotrypsin-like protease released upon degranulation of neutrophils. In several inflammatory and ischaemic diseases the impaired balance between CatG and its physiological inhibitors leads to tissue destruction and platelet aggregation. Inhibitors of CatG are suitable for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and procoagulant conditions. DNA released upon the death of neutrophils at injury sites binds CatG. Moreover, short DNA fragments are more inhibitory than genomic DNA. Defibrotide, a single stranded polydeoxyribonucleotide with antithrombotic effect is also a potent CatG inhibitor. Given the above experimental evidences we employed a selection protocol to assess whether DNA inhibition of CatG may be ascribed to specific sequences present in defibrotide DNA. A Selex protocol was applied to identify the single-stranded DNA sequences exhibiting the highest affinity for CatG, the diversity of a combinatorial pool of oligodeoxyribonucleotides being a good representation of the complexity found in defibrotide. Biophysical and biochemical studies confirmed that the selected sequences bind tightly to the target enzyme and also efficiently inhibit its catalytic activity. Sequence analysis carried out to unveil a motif responsible for CatG recognition showed a recurrence of alternating TG repeats in the selected CatG binders, adopting an extended conformation that grants maximal interaction with the highly charged protein surface. This unprecedented finding is validated by our results showing high affinity and inhibition of CatG by specific DNA sequences of variable length designed to maximally reduce pairing/folding interactions.

  6. Effects of process parameters of various pretreatments on enzymatic hydrolysability of Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. (Kapok) fibre: A response surface methodology study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tye, Ying Ying; Lee, Keat Teong; Wan Abdullah, Wan Nadiah; Leh, Cheu Peng

    2015-01-01

    Kapok fibre is a promising raw material to produce sugar by enzymatic hydrolysis. In this work, effects of water, acid and alkaline pretreatments on the enzymatic sugar yield were studied through response surface methodology (RSM) and supported by the analysis of chemical compositions and physical structure of the fibre. For water pretreatment, reaction temperature and time were the independent variables while chemical concentration was also used as the third independent variable for acid and alkaline pretreatments. For all pretreatments, the enzymatic hydrolysis conditions were kept constant. The structure of pretreated fibre was also examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results showed that water and acid pretreatments effectively dissolved hemicellulose of the fibre with the latter unveiled better results. The alkaline pretreatment resulted in the highest total glucose yield (g/kg of untreated fibre) as compared to water and acid pretreatments. SEM analysis illustrated that water and acid pretreatments led severe destruction of fibre structure; however, both of these pretreatments exhibited lower enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysability of kapok fibre as compared to that observed in alkaline pretreatment. - Highlights: • Effect of pretreatments on sugar yield was studied by response surface methodology. • Glucose yield was highly related to the chemical compositions of pretreated fibers. • Pretreatments altered the physical structure of kapok fibers. • Enzymatic hydrolysability of fibre was improved the most by alkaline treatment. • Over 94% cellulose of the pretreated fibres was converted to glucose

  7. An Interaction Between the Effects of Bilingualism and Cross-linguistic Similarity in Balanced and Unbalanced Bilingual Adults' L2 Mandarin Word-Reading Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Ling

    2017-08-01

    We conducted three experiments investigating in more detail the interaction between the two effects of bilingualism and L1-L2 similarity in the speech performance of balanced and unbalanced bilinguals. In Experiment 1, L1 Mandarin monolinguals and two groups of Hakka and Minnan balanced bilinguals (Hakka: more similar to Mandarin) performed a non-contextual single-character reading task in Mandarin, which required more inhibitory control. The two bilingual groups outperformed the monolinguals, regardless of their L1 background. However, the bilingual advantage was not found in a contextual multi-word task (Experiment 2), but instead the effect of cross-linguistic similarity emerged. Furthermore, in Experiment 3, the Hakka unbalanced bilinguals showed an advantage in the non-contextual task, while their Minnan counterparts did not, and the impact of L1-L2 similarity emerged in both tasks. These results unveiled the way the two effects dynamically interplayed depending on the task contexts and the relative degrees of using L1 and L2.

  8. A Study of the Kepler K2 Variable EPIC 211957146 Exhibiting a Variable O’ Connell Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriram, K.; Malu, S.; Rao, P. Vivekananda [Department of Astronomy, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Choi, C. S., E-mail: astrosriram@yahoo.co.in [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-01

    We present the multi-band photometric and spectroscopic study of an over-contact binary system, EPIC 211957146. The light curves exhibit a variable O’ Connell effect, confirmed from our observational data and the Kepler K2 data. The best photometric solution incorporating a dark spot over the primary component unveils that the system has a low-mass ratio ( q  ∼ 0.17) and a high inclination ( i  ∼ 85°). To confirm the solution and constrain the uncertainty, Monte-Carlo simulations are performed and the results are reported. Based on the O–C diagram analysis, we see that the variable shows a period increase at the rate of dP / dt  ∼ 1.06 × 10{sup −6} days yr{sup −1}, which is higher than the theoretically predicted value. Presence of a third body having a period of ∼16.23 years is evident from the O–C diagram. No filled-in effect is observed in the H α line, while the effect is vividly present in the Na line. From the Kepler K2 data, we found that the primary and secondary minima exhibit an anti-correlated O–C variation followed by an erratic behavior. This is possibly caused by the longitudinal motion of the spot, and hence, we set a lower limit of ∼40 days for the spot modulation. We also observe a possibly associated photometric difference in the primary depth by comparing our light curves with Kepler K2 normalized light curves. This system has a low-mass ratio and a high fill-out factor, and, theoretically, such a physical configuration would lead to a merger.

  9. Panacea seed “Nigella”: A review focusing on regenerative effects for gastric ailments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida A. Khan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa (NS or black cumin is a dark, thin, and crescent-shaped, seeded shrub belonging to the Ranunculaceae family commonly growing on Mediterranean coasts in Saudi Arabia, northern Africa and Asia. They have amazing curative and therapeutic features that make them one of the most popular, safe, non-detrimental, and cytoprotective medicinal plant that can be used for prevention and treatment of many complicated diseases. Originally, N. sativa was used to treat migraines and allergy, and researches have shown its effectiveness in destroying cancer cells as well. The gastro protective effect of NS oil and its constituents has also been reported earlier; however, the complete perception on etiology and pathogenesis of gastric ulcer is not yet clear. Herein, we attempt to unveil some of the potential mechanisms exhibited by NS in preventing problems related to gastric ulcers. Gastric ailments like ulcers and tumors are the most common disorders of the gastro-intestinal tract in the present day life of the industrialized world. Gastric ulcer being a multifaceted problem exhibits complex etiology and is the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality. Drug interactions and toxicity are the main hindrances in chemotherapy. The existing merits and demerits of modern-day drugs make us turn toward the plant kingdom which may provide a valuable resource of novel potent natural compounds for pharmaceuticals or alternately, as dietary supplements. In this context, the revered phytotherapeutic N. sativa comes as a promising savior in today’s times. This review aims to summarize, both the functional and disease-related effects in the area of gastroenterology.

  10. A Study of the Kepler K2 Variable EPIC 211957146 Exhibiting a Variable O’ Connell Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, K.; Malu, S.; Rao, P. Vivekananda; Choi, C. S.

    2017-01-01

    We present the multi-band photometric and spectroscopic study of an over-contact binary system, EPIC 211957146. The light curves exhibit a variable O’ Connell effect, confirmed from our observational data and the Kepler K2 data. The best photometric solution incorporating a dark spot over the primary component unveils that the system has a low-mass ratio ( q  ∼ 0.17) and a high inclination ( i  ∼ 85°). To confirm the solution and constrain the uncertainty, Monte-Carlo simulations are performed and the results are reported. Based on the O–C diagram analysis, we see that the variable shows a period increase at the rate of dP / dt  ∼ 1.06 × 10 −6 days yr −1 , which is higher than the theoretically predicted value. Presence of a third body having a period of ∼16.23 years is evident from the O–C diagram. No filled-in effect is observed in the H α line, while the effect is vividly present in the Na line. From the Kepler K2 data, we found that the primary and secondary minima exhibit an anti-correlated O–C variation followed by an erratic behavior. This is possibly caused by the longitudinal motion of the spot, and hence, we set a lower limit of ∼40 days for the spot modulation. We also observe a possibly associated photometric difference in the primary depth by comparing our light curves with Kepler K2 normalized light curves. This system has a low-mass ratio and a high fill-out factor, and, theoretically, such a physical configuration would lead to a merger.

  11. Hallazgo de antígenos en un tumor murino espontáneo no inmunogénico mediante el uso de una vacuna basada en células dendríticas Unveiling antigens in a non-immunogenic spontaneous murine tumor using a dendritic cell-based vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica L. Reffo

    2008-08-01

    absence of tumor antigens or to the existence of tolerogenic mechanisms preventing such antigens from initiating an antitumor immune response. We have used two murine tumors -a non-immunogenic spontaneous lymphoma (LB and a strongly immunogenic methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma (MC-C- together with a vaccination strategy based on the inoculation of dendritic cells (DC loaded with a tumor lysate. When DC were pulsed with LB lysate (DC+LB, no maturation of DC was achieved in vitro and no protection against LB implants after DC+LB inoculation was observed in vivo. On the other hand, when DC were pulsed with MC-C lysate (DC+MC-C, maturation of DC was observed along with a strong protection against MC-C implants after DC+MC-C inoculaton. Finally, when DC were pulsed with both LB and MC-C lysates (DC+LB+MC-C, maturation of DC and protection against LB implants were achieved. Since no immune cross reaction between MC-C and LB was ever observed, the most likely interpretation is that LB bears specific tumor antigens but lacks other signals to achieve DC maturation. These signals would be provided by MC-C which would enable DC to mature and to initiate an effective anti-LB immune response.

  12. Abundant Topological Outliers in Social Media Data and Their Effect on Spatial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerholt, Rene; Steiger, Enrico; Resch, Bernd; Zipf, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Twitter and related social media feeds have become valuable data sources to many fields of research. Numerous researchers have thereby used social media posts for spatial analysis, since many of them contain explicit geographic locations. However, despite its widespread use within applied research, a thorough understanding of the underlying spatial characteristics of these data is still lacking. In this paper, we investigate how topological outliers influence the outcomes of spatial analyses of social media data. These outliers appear when different users contribute heterogeneous information about different phenomena simultaneously from similar locations. As a consequence, various messages representing different spatial phenomena are captured closely to each other, and are at risk to be falsely related in a spatial analysis. Our results reveal indications for corresponding spurious effects when analyzing Twitter data. Further, we show how the outliers distort the range of outcomes of spatial analysis methods. This has significant influence on the power of spatial inferential techniques, and, more generally, on the validity and interpretability of spatial analysis results. We further investigate how the issues caused by topological outliers are composed in detail. We unveil that multiple disturbing effects are acting simultaneously and that these are related to the geographic scales of the involved overlapping patterns. Our results show that at some scale configurations, the disturbances added through overlap are more severe than at others. Further, their behavior turns into a volatile and almost chaotic fluctuation when the scales of the involved patterns become too different. Overall, our results highlight the critical importance of thoroughly considering the specific characteristics of social media data when analyzing them spatially.

  13. Mechanisms of glacial-to-future atmospheric CO2 effects on plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alex; Pétriacq, Pierre; Schwarzenbacher, Roland E; Beerling, David J; Ton, Jurriaan

    2018-04-01

    The impacts of rising atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant disease have received increasing attention, but with little consensus emerging on the direct mechanisms by which CO 2 shapes plant immunity. Furthermore, the impact of sub-ambient CO 2 concentrations, which plants have experienced repeatedly over the past 800 000 yr, has been largely overlooked. A combination of gene expression analysis, phenotypic characterisation of mutants and mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling was used to determine development-independent effects of sub-ambient CO 2 (saCO 2 ) and elevated CO 2 (eCO 2 ) on Arabidopsis immunity. Resistance to the necrotrophic Plectosphaerella cucumerina (Pc) was repressed at saCO 2 and enhanced at eCO 2 . This CO 2 -dependent resistance was associated with priming of jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent gene expression and required intact JA biosynthesis and signalling. Resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) increased at both eCO 2 and saCO 2 . Although eCO 2 primed salicylic acid (SA)-dependent gene expression, mutations affecting SA signalling only partially suppressed Hpa resistance at eCO 2 , suggesting additional mechanisms are involved. Induced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) at saCO 2 corresponded to a loss of resistance in glycolate oxidase mutants and increased transcription of the peroxisomal catalase gene CAT2, unveiling a mechanism by which photorespiration-derived ROS determined Hpa resistance at saCO 2 . By separating indirect developmental impacts from direct immunological effects, we uncover distinct mechanisms by which CO 2 shapes plant immunity and discuss their evolutionary significance. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Shame veiled and unveiled: the shame affect and its re-emergence in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Mali

    2010-09-01

    The paper examines the psychoanalytic theory of shame and the importance of developmental aspects of the shame affect. In a clinical setting, the discovery of the shame affect, stemming from unconscious and early traumatic situations, is an important and useful approach in helping the patient access painful memories and defenses against them. The defenses disguise the underlying shame affect; furthermore, vision is being bound up with the searing painful affect of shame. The anticipatory dread of scornful gaze of another person, similar to objective self-awareness can cause mortification. Fear of mortification and being exposed emerges in the clinical setting. Through the recognition of enactments in the transference and countertransference interchange, the analyst helps the patient working through them. Several case vignettes demonstrate these important concepts. Finally, the author discusses how shame in certain situations can be a powerful, positive motivator for human interactions.

  15. Social network architecture of human immune cells unveiled by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Jan C; Geiger, Roger; Hornburg, Daniel; Wolf, Tobias; Kveler, Ksenya; Jarrossay, David; Sallusto, Federica; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Mann, Matthias; Meissner, Felix

    2017-05-01

    The immune system is unique in its dynamic interplay between numerous cell types. However, a system-wide view of how immune cells communicate to protect against disease has not yet been established. We applied high-resolution mass-spectrometry-based proteomics to characterize 28 primary human hematopoietic cell populations in steady and activated states at a depth of >10,000 proteins in total. Protein copy numbers revealed a specialization of immune cells for ligand and receptor expression, thereby connecting distinct immune functions. By integrating total and secreted proteomes, we discovered fundamental intercellular communication structures and previously unknown connections between cell types. Our publicly accessible (http://www.immprot.org/) proteomic resource provides a framework for the orchestration of cellular interplay and a reference for altered communication associated with pathology.

  16. Si-BEARING MOLECULES TOWARD IRC+10216: ALMA UNVEILS THE MOLECULAR ENVELOPE OF CWLeo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, L. Velilla; Cernicharo, J.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Agúndez, M.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Guélin, M.; Fonfría, J. P.; Marcelino, N.; Zúñiga, J.; Requena, A.; Bastida, A.; Lique, F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of SiS rotational lines in high-vibrational states as well as SiO and SiC 2 lines in their ground vibrational state toward IRC+10216 during the Atacama Large Millimeter Array Cycle 0. The spatial distribution of these molecules shows compact emission for SiS and a more extended emission for SiO and SiC 2 and also proves the existence of an increase in the SiC 2 emission at the outer shells of the circumstellar envelope (CSE). We analyze the excitation conditions of the vibrationally excited SiS using the population diagram technique, and we use a large velocity gradient model to compare with the observations. We found moderate discrepancies between the observations and the models that could be explained if SiS lines detected are optically thick. Additionally, the line profiles of the detected rotational lines in the high-energy vibrational states show a decreasing linewidth with increasing energy levels. This may be evidence that these lines could be excited only in the inner shells, i.e., the densest and hottest, of the CSE of IRC+10216

  17. Signatures of the Galactic bar on stellar kinematics unveiled by APOGEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palicio, Pedro A.; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Masters, Karen L.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre

    2018-05-01

    Bars are common galactic structures in the local universe that play an important role in the secular evolution of galaxies, including the Milky Way. In particular, the velocity distribution of individual stars in our galaxy is useful to shed light on stellar dynamics, and provides information complementary to that inferred from the integrated light of external galaxies. However, since a wide variety of models reproduce the distribution of velocity and the velocity dispersion observed in the Milky Way, we look for signatures of the bar on higher-order moments of the line-of-sight velocity (V_los) distribution. We make use of two different numerical simulations -one that has developed a bar and one that remains nearly axisymmetric- to compare them with observations in the latest APOGEE data release (SDSS DR14). This comparison reveals three interesting structures that support the notion that the Milky Way is a barred galaxy. A high skewness region found at positive longitudes constrains the orientation angle of the bar, and is incompatible with the orientation of the bar at ℓ = 0° proposed in previous studies. We also analyse the V_los distributions in three regions, and introduce the Hellinger distance to quantify the differences among them. Our results show a strong non-Gaussian distribution both in the data and in the barred model, confirming the qualitative conclusions drawn from the velocity maps. In contrast to earlier work, we conclude it is possible to infer the presence of the bar from the kurtosis distribution.

  18. IRAS 16547–4247: A NEW CANDIDATE OF A PROTOCLUSTER UNVEILED WITH ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Aya E. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Saigo, Kazuya; Chibueze, James O.; Sanhueza, Patricio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takakuwa, Shigehisa [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, PO Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Garay, Guido, E-mail: ahiguchi@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-01-10

    We present the results of continuum and {sup 12}CO(3-2) and CH{sub 3}OH(7-6) line observations of IRAS 16547–4247 made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at an angular resolution of ∼0.''5. The {sup 12}CO(3-2) emission shows two high-velocity outflows whose driving sources are located within the dust continuum peak. The alignment of these outflows does not coincide with that of the wide-angle, large-scale, bipolar outflow detected with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment in previous studies. The CH{sub 3}OH(7-6) line emission traces an hourglass structure associated with the cavity walls created by the outflow lobes. Taking into account our results together with the position of the H{sub 2}O and class I CH{sub 3}OH maser clusters, we discuss two possible scenarios that can explain the hourglass structure observed in IRAS 16547–4247: (1) precession of a biconical jet, (2) multiple, or at least two, driving sources powering intersecting outflows. Combining the available evidence, namely, the presence of two cross-aligned bipolar outflows and two different H{sub 2}O maser groups, we suggest that IRAS 16547–4247 represents an early formation phase of a protocluster.

  19. C14-Crash. The C14-method and dendrochronology, unveiling the illusion. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloess, C.; Niemitz, H.U.

    2000-01-01

    In this second edition of the book, which was published almost three years after the first edition, the authors reiterate and substantiate their doubts as to the basic theories underlying the radiocarbon dating method and the applicability of dendrochronology. (orig/CB) [de

  20. Unveiling the importance of being a preferred customer in order to develop innovations with suppliers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiele, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the paper and literature addressed: The purpose of this research is to understand why early supplier integration in new product development repeatedly fails and how to select the right suppliers to avoid supplier obstructionism. We review the literature on early supplier integration.

  1. Unveiling and Characterizing Early Bilateral Interactions between Biofilm and the Mouse Innate Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Forestier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A very substantial progress has been made in our understanding of infectious diseases caused by invasive bacteria. Under their planktonic forms, bacteria transiently reside in the otherwise sterile mammal body tissues, as the physiological inflammation insures both their clearance and repair of any tissue damage. Yet, the bacteria prone to experience planktonic to biofilm developmental transition still need to be studied. Of note, sessile bacteria not only persist but also concur preventing the effectors and regulators of the physiological inflammation to operate. Thus, it is urgent to design biologically sound experimental approaches aimed to extract, at the earliest stage, immune signatures of mono-bacteria planktonic to biofilm developmental transition in vivo and ex vivo. Indeed, the transition is often the first event to which succeeds the “chronicization” process whereby classical bacteria-targeting therapies are no more efficacious. An in vivo model of micro-injection of Staphylococcus aureus planktonic or biofilm cells in the ear pinna dermis of laboratory transgenic mice with fluorescent immune cells is proposed. It allows visualizing, in real time, the range of the early interactions between the S. aureus and myeloid cell subsets- the resident macrophages and dendritic cells, the recruited neutrophil granulocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils, monocytes otherwise known to differentiate as macrophages or dendritic cells. One main objective is to extract contrasting immune signatures of the modulation of the physiological inflammation with respect to the two bacterial lifestyles.

  2. Novel Fluorescent Microemulsion: Probing Properties, Investigating Mechanism, and Unveiling Potential Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Mengna; Dang, Leping; Liu, Tiankuo; Guo, Yun; Wang, Zhanzhong

    2017-08-09

    Nanoscale microemulsions have been utilized as delivery carriers for nutraceuticals and active biological drugs. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel oil in water (O/W) fluorescent microemulsion based on isoamyl acetate, polyoxyethylene castor oil EL (CrEL), and water. The microemulsion emitted bright blue fluorescence, thus exhibiting its potential for active drug detection with label-free strategy. The microemulsion exhibited excitation-dependent emission and distinct red shift with longer excitation wavelengths. Lifetime and quantum yield of fluorescent microemulsion were 2.831 ns and 5.0%, respectively. An excellent fluorescent stability of the microemulsion was confirmed by altering pH, ionic strength, temperature, and time. Moreover, we proposed a probable mechanism of fluorochromic phenomenon, in connection with the aromatic ring structure of polyoxyethylene ether substituent in CrEL. Based on our findings, we concluded that this new fluorescent microemulsion is a promising drug carrier that can facilitate active drug detection with a label-free strategy. Although further research is required to understand the exact mechanism behind its fluorescence property, this work provided valuable guidance to develop new biosensors based on fluorescent microemulsion.

  3. A mass-spring model unveils the morphogenesis of phototrophic Diatoma biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celler, K.; Hödl, I.; Simone, A.; Battin, T.J.; Picioreanu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms often dominate planktonic communities in the ocean and phototrophic biofilms in streams and rivers, greatly contributing to global biogeochemical fluxes. In pelagic ecosystems, these microscopic algae can form chain-like microcolonies, which seem advantageous for nutrient uptake and protect

  4. Unveiling the First Black Holes With JWST:Multi-wavelength Spectral Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Priyamvada; Pacucci, Fabio; Ferrara, Andrea; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Ricarte, Angelo; Zackrisson, Erik; Cappelluti, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Growing supermassive black holes (˜ {10}9 {M}⊙ ) that power luminous z> 6 quasars from light seeds—the remnants of the first stars—within a Gyr of the Big Bang poses a timing challenge. The formation of massive black hole seeds via direct collapse with initial masses ˜ {10}4{--}{10}5 {M}⊙ alleviates this problem. Viable direct-collapse black hole formation sites, the satellite halos of star-forming galaxies, merge and acquire stars to produce a new, transient class of high-redshift objects, obese black hole galaxies (OBGs). The accretion luminosity outshines that of the stars in OBGs. We predict the multi-wavelength energy output of OBGs and growing Pop III remnants at z = 9 for standard and slim disk accretion, as well as high and low metallicities of the associated stellar population. We derive robust selection criteria for OBGs—a pre-selection to eliminate blue sources, followed by color-color cuts ([{F}090W-{F}220W]> 0;-0.3sift out OBGs from other bright, high- and low-redshift contaminants in the infrared. OBGs with predicted {M}{AB}< 25 are unambiguously detectable by the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), on the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For parameters explored here, growing Pop III remnants with predicted {M}{AB}< 30 will likely be undetectable by JWST. We demonstrate that JWST has the power to discriminate between initial seeding mechanisms.

  5. Unveiling the Secrets of Metallicity and Massive Star Formation Using DLAs Along Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, A.; Fumagalli, M.; Rafelski, M.; Kocevski, D.; Prochaska, J. X.; Cooke, R. J.; Becker, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the largest, publicly available, sample of Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs) along Swift discovered Gamma-ray Bursts (GRB) line of sights in order to investigate the environmental properties of long GRB hosts in the z = 1.8 - 6 redshift range. Compared with the most recent quasar DLAs sample (QSO-DLA), our analysis shows that GRB-DLAs probe a more metal enriched environment at z approximately greater than 3, up to [X/H] approximately -0.5. In the z = 2 - 3 redshift range, despite the large number of lower limits, there are hints that the two populations may be more similar (only at 90% significance level) than at higher redshifts. Also, at high-z, the GRB-DLA average metallicity seems to decline at a shallower rate than the QSO-DLAs: GRB-DLA hosts may be polluted with metals at least as far as approximately 2 kpc from the GRB explosion site, probably due to previous star-formation episodes and/or supernovae explosions. This shallow metallicity trend, extended now up to z approximately 5, confirms previous results that GRB hosts are star-forming and have, on average, higher metallicity than the general QSO-DLA population. Finally, our host metallicity measurements are broadly consistent with the predictions derived from the hypothesis of two channels of GRB progenitors, one of which is mildly affected by a metallicity bias, although more data are needed to constrain the models at z approximately greater than 4.

  6. Environmental Chemical Assessment in Clinical Practice: Unveiling the Elephant in the Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bijlsma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests chemicals present in air, water, soil, food, building materials and household products are toxicants that contribute to the many chronic diseases typically seen in routine medical practice. Yet, despite calls from numerous organisations to provide clinicians with more training and awareness in environmental health, there are multiple barriers to the clinical assessment of toxic environmental exposures. Recent developments in the fields of systems biology, innovative breakthroughs in biomedical research encompassing the “-omics” fields, and advances in mobile sensing, peer-to-peer networks and big data, provide tools that future clinicians can use to assess environmental chemical exposures in their patients. There is also a need for concerted action at all levels, including actions by individual patients, clinicians, medical educators, regulators, government and non-government organisations, corporations and the wider civil society, to understand the “exposome” and minimise the extent of toxic exposures on current and future generations. Clinical environmental chemical risk assessment may provide a bridge between multiple disciplines that uses new technologies to herald in a new era in personalised medicine that unites clinicians, patients and civil society in the quest to understand and master the links between the environment and human health.

  7. Wheat syntenome unveils new evidences of contrasted evolutionary plasticity between paleo- and neoduplicated subgenomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pont, C.; Murat, F.; Bidet, Y.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Fahima, T.; Budak, H.; Feuillet, C.; Salse, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 6 (2013), s. 1030-1044 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : paleogenomics * dominance * partitioning Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.815, year: 2013

  8. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogdt, Carlos G.P.; Bouwman, Lieneke I.; Kik, Marja J.L.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Putten, Van Jos P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in

  9. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogdt, Carlos G P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413535169; Bouwman, Lieneke I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341590797; Kik, Marja J L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/080432565; Wagenaar, Jaap A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126613354; van Putten, Jos P M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069916527

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in

  10. Unveiling skin macrophage dynamics explains both tattoo persistence and strenuous removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranska, Anna; Shawket, Alaa; Jouve, Mabel; Baratin, Myriam; Malosse, Camille; Voluzan, Odessa; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Fiore, Frédéric; Bajénoff, Marc; Benaroch, Philippe; Dalod, Marc; Malissen, Marie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard

    2018-04-02

    Here we describe a new mouse model that exploits the pattern of expression of the high-affinity IgG receptor (CD64) and allows diphtheria toxin (DT)-mediated ablation of tissue-resident macrophages and monocyte-derived cells. We found that the myeloid cells of the ear skin dermis are dominated by DT-sensitive, melanin-laden cells that have been missed in previous studies and correspond to macrophages that have ingested melanosomes from neighboring melanocytes. Those cells have been referred to as melanophages in humans. We also identified melanophages in melanocytic melanoma. Benefiting of our knowledge on melanophage dynamics, we determined the identity, origin, and dynamics of the skin myeloid cells that capture and retain tattoo pigment particles. We showed that they are exclusively made of dermal macrophages. Using the possibility to delete them, we further demonstrated that tattoo pigment particles can undergo successive cycles of capture-release-recapture without any tattoo vanishing. Therefore, congruent with dermal macrophage dynamics, long-term tattoo persistence likely relies on macrophage renewal rather than on macrophage longevity. © 2018 Baranska et al.

  11. Unveiling the climate memory of an Arctic polythermal glacier: a combined radar and thermomechanical modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, C.; Van Liefferinge, B.; Pattyn, F.; Nolan, M.

    2011-12-01

    Based on borehole temperature measurements and radio-echo sounding surveys on McCall Glacier, Alaska (USA) we were able to identify and map the Cold Transition Surface (CTS) marking the limit between cold and warm ice of a polythermal glacier. In the accumulation area, the ice column is observed to be warm throughout, while in the ablation area, the amount of cold ice at the top of the ice column increases downstream, hence lowering the CTS. High englacial temperatures in the accumulation are explained by the latent heat release due to percolating meltwater and precipitation, hence warming the ice column. With increasing atmospheric temperatures and increasing ablation rates, reduction of the perennial snowpack results in surface runoff and ice cooling. Using a transient thermomechanically-coupled higher-order glacier model, the timing of the cooling was determined from which past equilibrium-line altitudes (ELA) were constructed, which are in accord with ELAs measured since the 1950s (IGY). The paper therefore shows that (i) mapping of the CTS allows reconstructing the recent climate history of polythermal glaciers, and (ii) with a warming climate, McCall Glacier tends to cool down in a counterintuitive way.

  12. Unveiling Undercover Cropland Inside Forests Using Landscape Variables: A Supplement to Remote Sensing Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanu, Yohannes; Conrad, Christopher; Jentsch, Anke; Koellner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide demand for food has been increasing due to the rapidly growing global population, and agricultural lands have increased in extent to produce more food crops. The pattern of cropland varies among different regions depending on the traditional knowledge of farmers and availability of uncultivated land. Satellite images can be used to map cropland in open areas but have limitations for detecting undergrowth inside forests. Classification results are often biased and need to be supplemented with field observations. Undercover cropland inside forests in the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia was assessed using field observed percentage cover of land use/land cover classes, and topographic and location parameters. The most influential factors were identified using Boosted Regression Trees and used to map undercover cropland area. Elevation, slope, easterly aspect, distance to settlements, and distance to national park were found to be the most influential factors determining undercover cropland area. When there is very high demand for growing food crops, constrained under restricted rights for clearing forest, cultivation could take place within forests as an undercover. Further research on the impact of undercover cropland on ecosystem services and challenges in sustainable management is thus essential.

  13. Multi-source self-calibration: Unveiling the microJy population of compact radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radcliffe, J. F.; Garrett, M. A.; Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Barthel, P. D.; Deller, A. T.; Middelberg, E.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data are extremely sensitive to the phase stability of the VLBI array. This is especially important when we reach μJy rms sensitivities. Calibration using standard phase-referencing techniques is often used to improve the phase stability of VLBI

  14. The Run-up to Volcanic Eruption Unveiled by Forensic Petrology and Geophysical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, D. J.; Plank, T. A.; Roman, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanoes often warn of impending eruptions. However, one of the greatest challenges in volcano research is translating precursory geophysical signals into physical magmatic processes. Petrology offers powerful tools to study eruption run-up that benefit from direct response to magmatic forcings. Developing these tools, and tying them to geophysical observations, will help us identify eruption triggers (e.g., magmatic recharge, gas build-up, tectonic events) and understand the significance of monitored signals of unrest. We present an overview of petrologic tools used for studying eruption run-up, highlighting results from our study of the 1999 eruption of Shishaldin volcano. Olivine crystals contain chemical gradients, the consequence of diffusion following magma mixing events, which is modeled to determine mixing timescales. Modeled timescales provide strong evidence for at least three mixing events, which were triggered by magmatic recharge. Petrologic barometers indicate these events occurred at very shallow depths (within the volcanic edifice). The first mixing event occurred nine months before eruption, which was signaled by a swarm of deep-long period earthquake. Minor recharge events followed over two months, which are indicated by a second deep-long period earthquake swarm and a change in the local stress orientation measured by shear-wave splitting. Following these events, the system was relatively quiet until a large mixing event occurred 45 days prior to eruption, which was heralded by a large earthquake (M5.2). Following this event, geophysical signals of unrest intensified and became continuous. The final mixing event, beginning roughly a week before eruption, represents the final perturbation to the system before eruption. Our findings point to a relatively long run-up, which was subtle at first and intensified several weeks before eruption. This study highlights the strong link between geophysical signals of volcanic unrest and magmatic events, and helps open the door for the application of forensic petrology to unmonitored eruptions.

  15. Integrative network analysis unveils convergent molecular pathways in Parkinson's disease and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    Shared dysregulated pathways may contribute to Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic diseases that afflict millions of people worldwide. Despite the evidence provided by epidemiological and gene profiling studies, the molecular and functional networks implicated in both diseases, have not been fully explored. In this study, we used an integrated network approach to investigate the extent to which Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes are linked at the molecular level. Using a random walk algorithm within the human functional linkage network we identified a molecular cluster of 478 neighboring genes closely associated with confirmed Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes genes. Biological and functional analysis identified the protein serine-threonine kinase activity, MAPK cascade, activation of the immune response, and insulin receptor and lipid signaling as convergent pathways. Integration of results from microarrays studies identified a blood signature comprising seven genes whose expression is dysregulated in Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes. Among this group of genes, is the amyloid precursor protein (APP), previously associated with neurodegeneration and insulin regulation. Quantification of RNA from whole blood of 192 samples from two independent clinical trials, the Harvard Biomarker Study (HBS) and the Prognostic Biomarker Study (PROBE), revealed that expression of APP is significantly upregulated in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Assessment of biomarker performance revealed that expression of APP could distinguish Parkinson's disease from healthy individuals with a diagnostic accuracy of 80% in both cohorts of patients. These results provide the first evidence that Parkinson's disease and diabetes are strongly linked at the molecular level and that shared molecular networks provide an additional source for identifying highly sensitive biomarkers. Further, these results suggest for the first time that increased expression of APP in blood may modulate the neurodegenerative phenotype in type 2 diabetes patients.

  16. Unveiling the Role of the Magnetic Field at the Smallest Scales of Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Mocz, Philip; Burkhart, Blakesley; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans S/N, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia (Spain); Cortés, Paulo C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Springel, Volker [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Lai, Shih-Ping, E-mail: chat.hull@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, 30013 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-20

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of polarized dust emission from the protostellar source Ser-emb 8 at a linear resolution of 140 au. Assuming models of dust-grain alignment hold, the observed polarization pattern gives a projected view of the magnetic field structure in this source. Contrary to expectations based on models of strongly magnetized star formation, the magnetic field in Ser-emb 8 does not exhibit an hourglass morphology. Combining the new ALMA data with previous observational studies, we can connect magnetic field structure from protostellar core (∼80,000 au) to disk (∼100 au) scales. We compare our observations with four magnetohydrodynamic gravo-turbulence simulations made with the AREPO code that have initial conditions ranging from super-Alfvénic (weakly magnetized) to sub-Alfvénic (strongly magnetized). These simulations achieve the spatial dynamic range necessary to resolve the collapse of protostars from the parsec scale of star-forming clouds down to the ∼100 au scale probed by ALMA. Only in the very strongly magnetized simulation do we see both the preservation of the field direction from cloud to disk scales and an hourglass-shaped field at <1000 au scales. We conduct an analysis of the relative orientation of the magnetic field and the density structure in both the Ser-emb 8 ALMA observations and the synthetic observations of the four AREPO simulations. We conclude that the Ser-emb 8 data are most similar to the weakly magnetized simulations, which exhibit random alignment, in contrast to the strongly magnetized simulation, where the magnetic field plays a role in shaping the density structure in the source. In the weak-field case, it is turbulence—not the magnetic field—that shapes the material that forms the protostar, highlighting the dominant role that turbulence can play across many orders of magnitude in spatial scale.

  17. Solution of Heliospheric Propagation: Unveiling the Local Interstellar Spectra of Cosmic-ray Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschini, M. J.; Torre, S. Della; Gervasi, M.; Grandi, D.; Vacca, G. La; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Tacconi, M. [INFN, Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Jóhannesson, G. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Kachelriess, M. [Institutt for fysikk, NTNU, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Masi, N.; Quadrani, L. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Moskalenko, I. V.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T. A. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ostapchenko, S. S. [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-05-10

    Local interstellar spectra (LIS) for protons, helium, and antiprotons are built using the most recent experimental results combined with state-of-the-art models for propagation in the Galaxy and heliosphere. Two propagation packages, GALPROP and HelMod, are combined to provide a single framework that is run to reproduce direct measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species at different modulation levels and at both polarities of the solar magnetic field. To do so in a self-consistent way, an iterative procedure was developed, where the GALPROP LIS output is fed into HelMod, providing modulated spectra for specific time periods of selected experiments to compare with the data; the HelMod parameter optimization is performed at this stage and looped back to adjust the LIS using the new GALPROP run. The parameters were tuned with the maximum likelihood procedure using an extensive data set of proton spectra from 1997 to 2015. The proposed LIS accommodate both the low-energy interstellar CR spectra measured by Voyager 1 and the high-energy observations by BESS, Pamela, AMS-01, and AMS-02 made from the balloons and near-Earth payloads; it also accounts for Ulysses counting rate features measured out of the ecliptic plane. The found solution is in a good agreement with proton, helium, and antiproton data by AMS-02, BESS, and PAMELA in the whole energy range.

  18. USING MAGNETIC MOMENTS TO UNVEIL THE NUCLEAR STRUCTURE OF LOW-SPIN NUCLEAR STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A. Torres

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study of magnetic moments for nuclear states near the ground state, I ≤ 2, provides a powerful tool to test nuclear structure models. Traditionally, the use of Coulomb excitation reactions has been used to study low spin states, mostly I = 2. The use of alternative reaction channels, such as α transfer, for the production of radioactive species that, otherwise, will be only produced in future radioactive beam facilities has proved to be an alternative to measure not only excited states with I > 2, but to populate and study long-live radioactive nuclei. This contribution will present the experimental tools and challenges for the use of the transient field technique for the measurement of g factors in nuclear states with I ≤ 2, using Coulomb excitation and α-transfer reactions. Recent examples of experimental results near the N = 50 shell closure, and the experimental challenges for future implementations with radioactive beams, will be discussed.

  19. Massive gene losses in Asian cultivated rice unveiled by comparative genome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Takeshi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. With increasing world demand for food crops, there is an urgent need to develop new cultivars that have enhanced performance with regard to yield, disease resistance, and so on. Wild rice is expected to provide useful genetic resources that could improve the present cultivated species. However, the quantity and quality of these unexplored resources remain unclear. Recent accumulation of the genomic information of both cultivated and wild rice species allows for their comparison at the molecular level. Here, we compared the genome sequence of Oryza sativa ssp. japonica with sets of bacterial artificial chromosome end sequences (BESs from two wild rice species, O. rufipogon and O. nivara, and an African rice species, O. glaberrima. Results We found that about four to five percent of the BESs of the two wild rice species and about seven percent of the African rice could not be mapped to the japonica genome, suggesting that a substantial number of genes have been lost in the japonica rice lineage; however, their close relatives still possess their counterpart genes. We estimated that during evolution, O. sativa has lost at least one thousand genes that are still preserved in the genomes of the other species. In addition, our BLASTX searches against the non-redundant protein sequence database showed that disease resistance-related proteins were significantly overrepresented in the close relative-specific genomic portions. In total, 235 unmapped BESs of the three relatives matched 83 non-redundant proteins that contained a disease resistance protein domain, most of which corresponded to an NBS-LRR domain. Conclusion We found that the O. sativa lineage appears to have recently experienced massive gene losses following divergence from its wild ancestor. Our results imply that the domestication process accelerated large-scale genomic deletions in the lineage of Asian cultivated rice and that the close relatives of cultivated rice have the potential to restore the lost traits.

  20. Observational Study Unveils the Extensive Presence of Hazardous Elements in Beached Plastics from Lake Geneva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Filella

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Over 3,000 samples of plastic litter have been retrieved from 12 pebble beaches around the shores of Lake Geneva. The plastic stock consisted of identifiable objects of various size and color, including bottles, bottle tops, cotton buds, pens, toys, and straws, an heterogeneous assortment of fragments whose origin was either discernible or unknown, and pieces or blocks of expanded polymer (polystyrene or polyurethane foam. Analysis of 670 samples by portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF spectrometry revealed high concentrations of hazardous elements or compounds among many plastics. These included Cd, Hg, and Pb (with maximum concentrations of 6,760, 810, and 23,500 ppm, respectively as stabilizers in PVC-based materials and/or brightly-colored sulfide or chromate pigments in primary and secondary plastics, and Br (with a maximum concentration of 27,400 ppm as a proxy for brominated flame retardants (BFRs in both plastics and foams. The abundance of hazardous elements in beached plastics that have been restricted or banned reflect the age and residence time of the plastic stock in the lake, coupled with a relatively high length of shoreline to surface area of the system. The migratability of hazardous elements from the polymeric matrix is likely to determine their environmental impacts and is recommended as a future area of research.

  1. Unveiling the Role of CNTs on the Phase Formation of 1D Ferroelectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Mahajan, Amit; Reaney, I. M.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Kingon, Angus I.; Kó nya, Zoltá n; Kukovecz, Akos; Vilarinho, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    nature of MWCNT/PZT synthesised at 500 ºC for 1 h was proved. Although further work is required to prove the concept of 3D capacitor arrays, our result suggests that it is feasible to utilise MWCNTs as templates/electrodes for the formation of 1D PZT nano

  2. Signal Sensing and Transduction by Histidine Kinases as Unveiled through Studies on a Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A; Albanesi, Daniela; Dal Peraro, Matteo; de Mendoza, Diego

    2017-06-20

    Histidine kinases (HK) are the sensory proteins of two-component systems, responsible for a large fraction of bacterial responses to stimuli and environmental changes. Prototypical HKs are membrane-bound proteins that phosphorylate cognate response regulator proteins in the cytoplasm upon signal detection in the membrane or periplasm. HKs stand as potential drug targets but also constitute fascinating systems for studying proteins at work, specifically regarding the chemistry and mechanics of signal detection, transduction through the membrane, and regulation of catalytic outputs. In this Account, we focus on Bacillus subtilis DesK, a membrane-bound HK part of a two-component system that maintains appropriate membrane fluidity at low growth temperatures. Unlike most HKs, DesK has no extracytoplasmic signal-sensing domains; instead, sensing is carried out by 10 transmembrane helices (coming from two protomers) arranged in an unknown structure. The fifth transmembrane helix from each protomer connects, without any of the intermediate domains found in other HKs, into the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain located in the cytoplasm, which is followed by the ATP-binding domains (ABD). Throughout the years, genetic, biochemical, structural, and computational studies on wild-type, mutant, and truncated versions of DesK allowed us to dissect several aspects of DesK's functioning, pushing forward a more general understanding of its own structure/function relationships as well as those of other HKs. We have shown that the sensing mechanism is rooted in temperature-dependent membrane properties, most likely a combination of thickness, fluidity, and water permeability, and we have proposed possible mechanisms by which DesK senses these properties and transduces the signals. X-ray structures and computational models have revealed structural features of TM and cytoplasmic regions in DesK's kinase- and phosphatase-competent states. Biochemical and genetic experiments and molecular simulations further showed that reversible formation of a two-helix coiled coil in the fifth TM segment and the N-terminus of the cytoplasmic domain is essential for the sensing and signal transduction mechanisms. Together with other structural and functional works, the emerging picture suggests that diverse HKs possess distinct sensing and transduction mechanisms but share as rather general features (i) a symmetric phosphatase state and an asymmetric kinase state and (ii) similar functional outputs on the conserved DHp and ABD domains, achieved through different mechanisms that depend on the nature of the initial signal. We here advance (iii) an important role for TM prolines in transducing the initial signals to the cytoplasmic coiled coils, based on simulations of DesK's TM helices and our previous work on a related HK, PhoQ. Lastly, evidence for DesK, PhoQ, BvgS, and DctB HKs shows that (iv) overall catalytic output is tuned by a delicate balance between hydration potentials, coiled coil stability, and exposure of hydrophobic surface patches at their cytoplasmic coiled coils and at the N-terminal and C-terminal sides of their TM helices. This balance is so delicate that small perturbations, either physiological signals or induced by mutations, lead to large remodeling of the underlying conformational landscape achieving clear-cut changes in catalytic output, mirroring the required response speed of these systems for proper biological function.

  3. UNVEILING THE σ-DISCREPANCY IN INFRARED-LUMINOUS MERGERS. I. DUST AND DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothberg, Barry; Fischer, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Mergers in the local universe present a unique opportunity for studying the transformations of galaxies in detail. Presented here are recent results, based on multi-wavelength, high-resolution imaging and medium resolution spectroscopy, which demonstrate how star formation and the presence of red supergiants and/or asymptotic giant branch stars have led to a serious underestimation of the dynamical masses of infrared-bright galaxies. The dominance of a nuclear disk of young stars in the near-infrared bands, where dust obscuration does not block their signatures, can severely bias the global properties measured in a galaxy, including mass. This explains why past studies of gas-rich luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, which have measured dynamical masses using the 1.62 or 2.29 μm CO band heads, have found that these galaxies are forming m m* ellipticals. Moreover, merger remnants, including LIRGs, are placed on the I-band fundamental plane for the first time and appear to be virtually indistinguishable from elliptical galaxies.

  4. Geophysical survey of two rural sites in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain): Unveiling Roman villae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas Florit, Catalina; Cau Ontiveros, Miguel Ángel; Goossens, Lise; Meyer, Cornelius; Sala, Roger; Ortiz, Helena

    2018-03-01

    Two rural sites on the island of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) have been investigated with geophysical methods. A previous archaeological field survey provided surface ceramics that allowed for a first classification of the sites as possible Roman rural settlements, possibly villae. The objective of the investigation was to work towards the identification of architectural remains to better understand the true nature of the sites. Using the 7-probe fluxgate gradiometer array LEA MAX, magnetic measurements were executed on a large area on each site. GPR measurements were subsequently carried out to examine selected areas of interest in detail by means of the IDS GPR system based on the Fast-Wave module. The investigated areas demonstrated excellent surface conditions with a negligible number of sources of disturbance, permitting a detailed interpretation of the geophysical data. The results helped to reveal the presence of architectural remains beneath the soil at both sites.

  5. Unveiling the Galaxy Population at 1.3 < z < 4: the HUDF05 NICMOS Parallel Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Sara M.; deMello, Duilia F.; Wiklind, Tomy; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Mountain, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Using the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (HUDF-NICMOS) UDF05 parallel fields, we cross-matched 301 out of 630 galaxies with the ACS filters V606 and z850, NICMOS filters J110 and H160, and Spitzer IRAC filters at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 , and 8.0 (mu)m. We modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to estimate: photometric redshifts, dust extinction, stellar mass, bolometric luminosity, starburst age and metallicity. To validate the photometric redshifts, comparisons with 16 spectroscopic redshifts give 75% within Delta or approx. 1.3. Based on the robustness of the photometric redshifts, we analyze a subsample of the 301 galaxies at 1.3 < or = z < or = 2 (35 objects) and 3 < or = z < or = 4 (31 objects) and determine that L(BoI) and the star formation rate increase significantly from z approx. 1.5 to 4. The Balmer decrement is indicative of more evolved galaxies, and at high redshifts, they serve as records of some of the first galaxies. Therefore, the galaxies in this sample are great candidates for future surveys with the James Webb Space Telescope and Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  6. Unveiling the nature of the γ-ray emitting active galactic nucleus PKS 0521-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica; Orienti, M.; Tavecchio, F.; Ghisellini, G.

    2015-01-01

    PKS 0521-36 is an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with uncertain classification. Here, we investigate the properties of this source from radio to γ-rays. The broad emission lines in the optical and ultraviolet bands and steep radio spectrum indicate a possible classification as an intermediate object between broad-line radio galaxies (BLRG) and steep spectrum radio quasars (SSRQ). On pc-scales PKS 0521-36 shows a knotty structure similar to misaligned AGN. The core dominance and the γ-ray properties are similar to those estimated for other SSRQ and BLRG detected in γ-rays, suggesting an intermediate viewing angle with respect to the observer. In this context the flaring activity detected from this source by Fermi-Large Area Telescope between 2010 June and 2012 February is very intriguing. We discuss the γ-ray emission of this source in the framework of the structured jet scenario, comparing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the flaring state in 2010 June with that of a low state. We present three alternative models corresponding to three different choices of the viewing angles θv = 6°, 15°, and 20°. We obtain a good fit for the first two cases, but the SED obtained with θv = 15° if observed at a small angle does not resemble that of a typical blazar since the synchrotron emission should dominate by a large factor (~100) the inverse Compton component. This suggests that a viewing angle between 6° and 15° is preferred, with the rapid variability observed during γ-ray flares favouring a smaller angle. However, we cannot rule out that PKS 0521-36 is the misaligned counterpart of a synchrotron-dominated blazar.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Pleistocene jawbone unveils the origin of polar bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Charlotte; Schuster, Stephan C; Sun, Yazhou; Talbot, Sandra L; Qi, Ji; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P; Kasson, Lindsay; Zeyl, Eve; Aars, Jon; Miller, Webb; Ingólfsson, Olafur; Bachmann, Lutz; Wiig, Oystein

    2010-03-16

    The polar bear has become the flagship species in the climate-change discussion. However, little is known about how past climate impacted its evolution and persistence, given an extremely poor fossil record. Although it is undisputed from analyses of mitochondrial (mt) DNA that polar bears constitute a lineage within the genetic diversity of brown bears, timing estimates of their divergence have differed considerably. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we have generated a complete, high-quality mt genome from a stratigraphically validated 130,000- to 110,000-year-old polar bear jawbone. In addition, six mt genomes were generated of extant polar bears from Alaska and brown bears from the Admiralty and Baranof islands of the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska and Kodiak Island. We show that the phylogenetic position of the ancient polar bear lies almost directly at the branching point between polar bears and brown bears, elucidating a unique morphologically and molecularly documented fossil link between living mammal species. Molecular dating and stable isotope analyses also show that by very early in their evolutionary history, polar bears were already inhabitants of the Artic sea ice and had adapted very rapidly to their current and unique ecology at the top of the Arctic marine food chain. As such, polar bears provide an excellent example of evolutionary opportunism within a widespread mammalian lineage.

  8. Unveiling the transcriptional features associated with coccolithovirus infection of natural Emiliania huxleyi blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagarete, António; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Tiwari, Bela; Ogata, Hiroyuki; de Vargas, Colomban; Wilson, William H; Allen, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Lytic viruses have been implicated in the massive cellular lysis observed during algal blooms, through which they assume a prominent role in oceanic carbon and nutrient flows. Despite their impact on biogeochemical cycling, the transcriptional dynamics of these important oceanic events is still poorly understood. Here, we employ an oligonucleotide microarray to monitor host (Emiliania huxleyi) and virus (coccolithovirus) transcriptomic features during the course of E. huxleyi blooms induced in seawater-based mesocosm enclosures. Host bloom development and subsequent coccolithovirus infection was associated with a major shift in transcriptional profile. In addition to the expected metabolic requirements typically associated with viral infection (amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, as well as transcription- and replication-associated functions), the results strongly suggest that the manipulation of lipid metabolism plays a fundamental role during host-virus interaction. The results herein reveal the scale, so far massively underestimated, of the transcriptional domination that occurs during coccolithovirus infection in the natural environment. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Unveil the complexity of the molecular machinery involved in erythrophagocytosis by macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Santarino, Inês Barreira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Erythrophagocytosis is a highly regulated process where sequential events ensure the proper internalization and clearance of red blood cells. However, details on these processes are scarce and not fully understood, making it difficult to modulate and possibly treat associated diseases, such as malaria and sickle-cell disease. After their development in the bone marrow, red blood cells have a life span of approximately 120 days. With time, the plasma membrane of red blood cells under...

  10. Recent progress in genetics, epigenetics and metagenomics unveils the pathophysiology of human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeyre, Marie; Yazdi, Fereshteh T; Kaur, Yuvreet; Meyre, David

    2016-06-01

    In high-, middle- and low-income countries, the rising prevalence of obesity is the underlying cause of numerous health complications and increased mortality. Being a complex and heritable disorder, obesity results from the interplay between genetic susceptibility, epigenetics, metagenomics and the environment. Attempts at understanding the genetic basis of obesity have identified numerous genes associated with syndromic monogenic, non-syndromic monogenic, oligogenic and polygenic obesity. The genetics of leanness are also considered relevant as it mirrors some of obesity's aetiologies. In this report, we summarize ten genetically elucidated obesity syndromes, some of which are involved in ciliary functioning. We comprehensively review 11 monogenic obesity genes identified to date and their role in energy maintenance as part of the leptin-melanocortin pathway. With the emergence of genome-wide association studies over the last decade, 227 genetic variants involved in different biological pathways (central nervous system, food sensing and digestion, adipocyte differentiation, insulin signalling, lipid metabolism, muscle and liver biology, gut microbiota) have been associated with polygenic obesity. Advances in obligatory and facilitated epigenetic variation, and gene-environment interaction studies have partly accounted for the missing heritability of obesity and provided additional insight into its aetiology. The role of gut microbiota in obesity pathophysiology, as well as the 12 genes associated with lipodystrophies is discussed. Furthermore, in an attempt to improve future studies and merge the gap between research and clinical practice, we provide suggestions on how high-throughput '-omic' data can be integrated in order to get closer to the new age of personalized medicine. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. ESO unveils an amazing, interactive, 360-degree panoramic view of the entire night sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The first of three images of ESO's GigaGalaxy Zoom project - a new magnificent 800-million-pixel panorama of the entire sky as seen from ESO's observing sites in Chile - has just been released online. The project allows stargazers to explore and experience the Universe as it is seen with the unaided eye from the darkest and best viewing locations in the world. This 360-degree panoramic image, covering the entire celestial sphere, reveals the cosmic landscape that surrounds our tiny blue planet. This gorgeous starscape serves as the first of three extremely high-resolution images featured in the GigaGalaxy Zoom project, launched by ESO within the framework of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009). GigaGalaxy Zoom features a web tool that allows users to take a breathtaking dive into our Milky Way. With this tool users can learn more about many different and exciting objects in the image, such as multicoloured nebulae and exploding stars, just by clicking on them. In this way, the project seeks to link the sky we can all see with the deep, "hidden" cosmos that astronomers study on a daily basis. The wonderful quality of the images is a testament to the splendour of the night sky at ESO's sites in Chile, which are the most productive astronomical observatories in the world. The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, which we see edge-on from our perspective on Earth, cuts a luminous swath across the image. The projection used in GigaGalaxy Zoom place the viewer in front of our Galaxy with the Galactic Plane running horizontally through the image - almost as if we were looking at the Milky Way from the outside. From this vantage point, the general components of our spiral galaxy come clearly into view, including its disc, marbled with both dark and glowing nebulae, which harbours bright, young stars, as well as the Galaxy's central bulge and its satellite galaxies. The painstaking production of this image came about as a collaboration between ESO, the renowned French writer and astrophotographer Serge Brunier and his fellow Frenchman Frédéric Tapissier. Brunier spent several weeks during the period between August 2008 and February 2009 capturing the sky, mostly from ESO observatories at La Silla and Paranal in Chile. In order to cover the full Milky Way, Brunier also made a week-long trip to La Palma, one of the Canary Islands, to photograph the northern skies [1]. Once the raw photographs were in hand, image processing by Tapissier and ESO experts helped to convey accurately the night sky as our eyes behold it [2]. The resulting image, now available on GigaGalaxy Zoom, is composed of almost 300 fields each individually captured by Brunier four times, adding up to nearly 1200 photos that encompass the entire night sky. "I wanted to show a sky that everyone can relate to - with its constellations, its thousands of stars, with names familiar since childhood, its myths shared by all civilisations since Homo became Sapiens," says Brunier. "The image was therefore made as man sees it, with a regular digital camera under the dark skies in the Atacama Desert and on La Palma." As photographing extended over several months, objects from the Solar System came and went through the star fields, with bright planets such as Venus and Jupiter. A brilliant, emerald-green comet also flew by, although spotting it among a background of tens of millions of stars will be difficult (but rewarding). Overall, the creators of the GigaGalaxy Zoom project hope that these tremendous efforts in bringing the night sky as observed under the best conditions on the planet to stargazers everywhere will inspire awe for the beautiful, immense Universe that we live in. "The vision of the IYA2009 is to help people rediscover their place in the Universe through the day- and night-time sky, and this is exactly what the GigaGalaxy Zoom project is all about," says project coordinator Henri Boffin. The second dramatic GigaGalaxy Zoom image will be revealed next week, on 21 September 2009. Notes [1] During his quest, Brunier used a Nikon D3 digital camera. The apparent motion of the sky caused by Earth's rotation was corrected for using a small, precise equatorial mount moving in the opposite direction, which made a whole circle in 23 hours 56 minutes around the Earth's axis of rotation. Each photo required a six-minute exposure, for a total exposure time of more than 120 hours. [2] The data processing, using software called Autopano Pro Giga, took great care in respecting the colours and "texture" of the Milky Way. Frédéric Tapissier needed about 340 computing hours on a powerful PC to complete the task. More information As part of the IYA2009, ESO is participating in several remarkable outreach activities, in line with its world-leading rank in the field of astronomy. ESO is hosting the IYA2009 Secretariat for the International Astronomical Union, which coordinates the Year globally. ESO is one of the Organisational Associates of IYA2009, and was also closely involved in the resolution submitted to the United Nations (UN) by Italy, which led to the UN's 62nd General Assembly proclaiming 2009 the International Year of Astronomy. In addition to a wide array of activities planned both at the local and international level, ESO is leading three of the twelve global Cornerstone Projects. ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky". Serge Brunier is a French journalist, photographer and writer who specialises in popularising astronomy. He is a regular contributor to Science & Vie magazine, and to the France Info radio station. He has written numerous popular astronomy books, translated into over ten languages, and is a prize-winning photographer, who has captured images of solar eclipses from the most amazing places in the world. A life-long quest for the best skies in the world led him to Chile. This whole sky panorama was presented from 25 August till 13 September 2009 in the exhibition "Un ciel pour la planète" (A sky for the planet) in the Atrium of the Monte-Carlo Casino, Monaco. With a giant print of 12 times 6 metres, the exhibition was under the Patronage of The Prince Albert II of Monaco, and showed with images and videos the making of this unique ESO project.

  12. Comparative analyses of glycerotoxin expression unveil a novel structural organization of the bloodworm venom system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sandy; Helm, Conrad; Meunier, Frederic A; Hering, Lars; Campbell, Lahcen I; Drukewitz, Stephan H; Undheim, Eivind A B; Jenner, Ronald A; Schiavo, Giampietro; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2017-03-04

    We present the first molecular characterization of glycerotoxin (GLTx), a potent neurotoxin found in the venom of the bloodworm Glycera tridactyla (Glyceridae, Annelida). Within the animal kingdom, GLTx shows a unique mode of action as it can specifically up-regulate the activity of Ca v 2.2 channels (N-type) in a reversible manner. The lack of sequence information has so far hampered a detailed understanding of its mode of action. Our analyses reveal three ~3.8 kb GLTx full-length transcripts, show that GLTx represents a multigene family, and suggest it functions as a dimer. An integrative approach using transcriptomics, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry shows that GLTx is highly expressed exclusively in four pharyngeal lobes, a previously unrecognized part of the venom apparatus. Our results overturn a century old textbook view on the glycerid venom system, suggesting that it is anatomically and functionally much more complex than previously thought. The herein presented GLTx sequence information constitutes an important step towards the establishment of GLTx as a versatile tool to understand the mechanism of synaptic function, as well as the mode of action of this novel neurotoxin.

  13. Unveiling Flat Traffic on the Internet: An SSH Attack Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Mattijs; Hofstede, R.J.; Sperotto, Anna; Pras, Aiko

    Many types of brute-force attacks are known to exhibit a characteristic ‘flat’ behavior at the network-level, meaning that connections belonging to an attack feature a similar number of packets and bytes, and duration. Flat traffic usually results from repeating similar application-layer actions,

  14. Unveiled: Interrogating the Use of Applied Drama in Multiple and Specific Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daboo, Jerri

    2007-01-01

    This article examines a view of site through postcolonial feminism to suggest that multiple and contradictory discourses of culture, location, gender and context are all vital in an understanding of a specific site when working with a community. These views are applied to a project undertaken with a group of Asian women in Britain exploring issues…

  15. Supersymmetry squarks, photinos, and the unveiling of the ultimate laws of nature

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Gordon L

    2000-01-01

    The next breakthrough in physics, supersymmetry will unite the fundamental forces of nature and revolutionize our understanding of space and time. . For most of human history, man has been trying to discover just how the universe works. The Standard Model of particle physics, which describes the fundamental constituents and forces of nature, has proved a useful explanation, and recent theories attempting to unify these fundamental forces-such as string theory-have been wonderfully encouraging. Experimental proof, however, has always lagged behind theory. Now, thanks to powerful new tools and the dedication of a handful of pioneers at the frontiers of research, we are approaching the next great leap in understanding: supersymmetry. In this groundbreaking work, renowned physicist Gordon Kane takes us inside both the conceptual framework of supersymmetry and the giant particle accelerators-the atom smashers-where this fascinating discovery should occur. After giving us the basics of the Standard Model, Kane expl...

  16. Unveiling Research Agendas: a study of the influences on research problem selection among academic researchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianco, M.; Sutz, J.

    2016-07-01

    Research problem selection is central to the dynamics of scientific knowledge production. Research agendas result from the selection of research problems and the formulation of individual and/or collective academic strategies to address them. But, why researchers study what they study? This paper presents incipient research focused on the way different factors influence the construction of academic research agendas. It takes a researcher-oriented approach relying on opinions and perspectives of a wide range of researchers in all fields of knowledge. The empirical work is carried out in Uruguay, a country in the periphery of mainstream science, whose academic community struggles in search of a balance between the requirements of the world community of scholars and the demands from different national stakeholders. The methodology and research results from this study may be relevant to other countries, at different peripheries. Further, understanding the interplay of influences that shape research agendas is an important tool for policy analysis and planning everywhere. (Author)

  17. Unveiling novel RecO distant orthologues involved in homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Marsin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a RecA filament on single-stranded DNA is a critical step in homologous recombination. Two main pathways leading to the formation of the nucleofilament have been identified in bacteria, based on the protein complexes mediating RecA loading: RecBCD (AddAB and RecFOR. Many bacterial species seem to lack some of the components involved in these complexes. The current annotation of the Helicobacter pylori genome suggests that this highly diverse bacterial pathogen has a reduced set of recombination mediator proteins. While it is now clear that homologous recombination plays a critical role in generating H. pylori diversity by allowing genomic DNA rearrangements and integration through transformation of exogenous DNA into the chromosome, no complete mediator complex is deduced from the sequence of its genome. Here we show by bioinformatics analysis the presence of a RecO remote orthologue that allowed the identification of a new set of RecO proteins present in all bacterial species where a RecR but not RecO was previously identified. HpRecO shares less than 15% identity with previously characterized homologues. Genetic dissection of recombination pathways shows that this novel RecO and the remote RecB homologue present in H. pylori are functional in repair and in RecA-dependent intrachromosomal recombination, defining two initiation pathways with little overlap. We found, however, that neither RecOR nor RecB contributes to transformation, suggesting the presence of a third, specialized, RecA-dependent pathway responsible for the integration of transforming DNA into the chromosome of this naturally competent bacteria. These results provide insight into the mechanisms that this successful pathogen uses to generate genetic diversity and adapt to changing environments and new hosts.

  18. Synchronization unveils the organization of ecological networks with positive and negative interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, Andrea; Saiz, Hugo; Bacelar, Flora S.; Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Network science has helped to understand the organization principles of the interactions among the constituents of large complex systems. However, recently, the high resolution of the data sets collected has allowed to capture the different types of interactions coexisting within the same system. A particularly important example is that of systems with positive and negative interactions, a usual feature appearing in social, neural, and ecological systems. The interplay of links of opposite sign presents natural difficulties for generalizing typical concepts and tools applied to unsigned networks and, moreover, poses some questions intrinsic to the signed nature of the network, such as how are negative interactions balanced by positive ones so to allow the coexistence and survival of competitors/foes within the same system? Here, we show that synchronization phenomenon is an ideal benchmark for uncovering such balance and, as a byproduct, to assess which nodes play a critical role in the overall organization of the system. We illustrate our findings with the analysis of synthetic and real ecological networks in which facilitation and competitive interactions coexist.

  19. An integrative taxonomy approach unveils unknown and threatened moth species in Amazonian rainforest fragments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamarre, Greg P. A.; Decaëns, T.; Rougerie, R.; Barbut, J.; Dewaard, J. R.; Hebert, P. D. N.; Herbin, D.; Laguerre, M.; Thiaucourt, P.; Martins, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2016), s. 475-479 ISSN 1752-458X EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 669609 - Diversity6continents Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Amazonian forest * Belém center of endemism * centinelan extinction Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.840, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/icad.12187/full

  20. Canine leishmaniosis in the Old and New Worlds: unveiled similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Baneth, Gad; Ribeiro, Vitor Marcio; de Paiva-Cavalcanti, Milena; Otranto, Domenico

    2012-12-01

    Canine leishmaniosis is a potentially life-threatening disease which is spreading geographically in the Old and New Worlds, where different diagnostic procedures, treatments, and control strategies are currently in place. This Opinion article outlines the similarities and differences between canine leishmaniosis in the Old and New Worlds, with emphasis on South America and Europe. Finally, it calls the attention of veterinary and public health authorities to standardize and improve practices for diagnosing, treating, and preventing the disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient perspectives about bariatric surgery unveil experiences, education, satisfaction, and recommendations for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groller, Karen D; Teel, Cynthia; Stegenga, Kristin H; El Chaar, Maher

    2018-02-17

    Following bariatric surgery, up to 35% of patients struggle with strict regimens and experience weight recidivism within 2 years [1-5]. Accredited weight management centers (WMC) must provide educational programs and support patients in lifestyle changes before and after surgery. Educational programs, however, may not be evidence-based or patient-centered and may vary in curriculum, approach, and educator type [6]. To obtain patient descriptions about the weight loss surgery (WLS) experience, including education, satisfaction, and recommendations for improvement. Participants were recruited from a university hospital-based WMC in Pennsylvania. This qualitative descriptive study used purposive sampling and inductive content analysis. A NEW ME-VERSION 2.0, encompassed themes from semistructured interviews with 11 participants (36% male). Theme 1: Programming and Tools, explained how individuals undergoing WLS found support through educational programming. Theme 2: Updates and Upgrades, identified issues surrounding quality of life and challenges before and after surgery. Theme 3: Lessons Learned and Future Considerations, identified satisfaction levels and recommendations for improving the WLS experience. Participants reported positive experiences, acknowledging educational programs and extensive WMC resources, yet also offered recommendations for improving educational programming. Patient narratives provided evidence about the WLS experience. Achievement of weight goals, adherence to rules, and improved health status contributed to perceptions of WLS success. Participants encouraged educators to identify expected outcomes of educational programming, monitor holistic transformations, foster peer support, and use technology in WMC programming. Results also validated the need for the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program's education requirement (standard 5.1). Future educational research could help develop best practices in WLS patient education and assess associations between education and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A characteristic oxygen abundance gradient in galaxy disks unveiled with CALIFA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanchez, S.F.; Rosales-Ortega, F.F.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Molla, M.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Marino, R.A.; Pérez, E.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Gonzalez Delgado, R.; Jungwiert, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 563, March (2014), A49/1-A49/25 ISSN 0004-6361 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100031241; Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100031201 Program:M Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : HII regions * galaxies * ISM: abundances Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  3. Unveiling clusters of RNA transcript pairs associated with markers of Alzheimer's disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shamsul Arefin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One primary goal of transcriptomic studies is identifying gene expression patterns correlating with disease progression. This is usually achieved by considering transcripts that independently pass an arbitrary threshold (e.g. p<0.05. In diseases involving severe perturbations of multiple molecular systems, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, this univariate approach often results in a large list of seemingly unrelated transcripts. We utilised a powerful multivariate clustering approach to identify clusters of RNA biomarkers strongly associated with markers of AD progression. We discuss the value of considering pairs of transcripts which, in contrast to individual transcripts, helps avoid natural human transcriptome variation that can overshadow disease-related changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We re-analysed a dataset of hippocampal transcript levels in nine controls and 22 patients with varying degrees of AD. A large-scale clustering approach determined groups of transcript probe sets that correlate strongly with measures of AD progression, including both clinical and neuropathological measures and quantifiers of the characteristic transcriptome shift from control to severe AD. This enabled identification of restricted groups of highly correlated probe sets from an initial list of 1,372 previously published by our group. We repeated this analysis on an expanded dataset that included all pair-wise combinations of the 1,372 probe sets. As clustering of this massive dataset is unfeasible using standard computational tools, we adapted and re-implemented a clustering algorithm that uses external memory algorithmic approach. This identified various pairs that strongly correlated with markers of AD progression and highlighted important biological pathways potentially involved in AD pathogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses demonstrate that, although there exists a relatively large molecular signature of AD progression, only a small number of transcripts recurrently cluster with different markers of AD progression. Furthermore, considering the relationship between two transcripts can highlight important biological relationships that are missed when considering either transcript in isolation.

  4. Unveiling the Sources of Chromium in Pictorialist Photographs: Gum-Dichromate Process or Paper Sizing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vila, Anna; Centeno, Silvia A; Kennedy, Nora W

    2015-01-01

    For this issue of Hand Papermaking devoted to paper sizing, we offer a review and extension of pertinent results obtained in our investigations of the gum-dichromate photographic process, commonly known as the gum-bichromate process.1 We have published three articles to date on our findings; this...

  5. 3C 273 with NuSTAR: Unveiling the Active Galactic Nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Fürst, Felix; Walton, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a 244 ks NuSTAR observation of 3C 273 obtained during a cross-calibration campaign with the Chandra, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton observatories. We show that the spectrum, when fit with a power-law model using data from all observatories except INTEGRAL over the 1......-78 keV band, leaves significant residuals in the NuSTAR data between 30 and 78 keV. The NuSTAR 3-78 keV spectrum is well. described by an exponentially cutoff power law (Γ = 1.646± 0.006, Ecutoff = 202-34 +51 keV) with a weak reflection component from cold, dense material. There is also evidence......-energy power. law is consistent with the presence of a beamed jet, which begins to dominate over emission from the inner accretion flow at 30-40 keV. Modeling the jet locally (in the NuSTAR + INTEGRAL band) as a power. law, we find that the coronal component is fit by ΓAGN = 1.638 ± 0.045, Ecutoff = 47 ± 15 ke...

  6. Unveiling ν secrets with cosmological data: Neutrino masses and mass hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnozzi, Sunny; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga; Freese, Katherine; Gerbino, Martina; Ho, Shirley; Lattanzi, Massimiliano

    2017-12-01

    Using some of the latest cosmological data sets publicly available, we derive the strongest bounds in the literature on the sum of the three active neutrino masses, Mν, within the assumption of a background flat Λ CDM cosmology. In the most conservative scheme, combining Planck cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) data, as well as the up-to-date constraint on the optical depth to reionization (τ ), the tightest 95% confidence level upper bound we find is Mν0.06 eV from oscillations data would raise the quoted upper bounds by O (0.1 σ ) and would not affect our conclusions.

  7. What Do Diploma Theses Unveil about Academic Public Policy in the Czech Republic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouralová Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although textbooks, conference papers, scientific journals and monographs deal with the research aspects of public policy, only little attention is paid to the way it is taught at universities. In this article we aim to explore academic public policy in the Czech Republic - specifically in terms of teaching outputs - using a unique method: an analysis of diploma theses. In the sample there were diploma theses defended within all the full-time Master’s study programmes having “public policy” in their names in the Czech Republic between 1995 and 2013. We conclude that there are two traditions of academic public policy in the Czech Republic, which enriches previous findings in the area and makes them more accurate. The research design and thoroughly described methodology invite other researchers to conduct international comparison of the features of academic public policy. The findings may also illustrate the trajectory made by the newly established discipline of public policy in the past twenty years in the Czech Republic, which may be of great interest to the newly formed international public policy community.

  8. Unveiling scientific communities about sustainability and innovation. A bibliometric journey around sustainable terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franceschini, Simone; Faria, Lourenco; Jurowetzki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Literature about the relationship between innovation and sustainability has skyrocketed in the last two decades and new terms have appeared. However, only very few bibliometric analyses have reviewed some of these terms (eco-innovation, environmental innovation, green innovation, and sustainable ...

  9. Participatory practices in heritage management in world heritage cities: unveiling the city representatives’ perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosetti, I.

    2018-01-01

    Community engagement is today a goal of heritage management. Participatory practices are generally advocated for matters of authenticity and ethics, but also for the economic, environmental, cultural and social, in short, sustainable development of local communities. However, criticisms and

  10. Temperature induced syllable breaking unveils nonlinearly interacting timescales in birdsong motor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías A Goldin

    Full Text Available The nature of telencephalic control over premotor and motor circuits is debated. Hypotheses range from complete usurping of downstream circuitry to highly interactive mechanisms of control. We show theoretically and experimentally, that telencephalic song motor control in canaries is consistent with a highly interactive strategy. As predicted from a theoretical model of respiratory control, mild cooling of a forebrain nucleus (HVC led to song stretching, but further cooling caused progressive restructuring of song, consistent with the hypothesis that respiratory gestures are subharmonic responses to a timescale present in the output of HVC. This interaction between a life-sustaining motor function (respiration and telencephalic song motor control suggests a more general mechanism of how nonlinear integration of evolutionarily new brain structures into existing circuitry gives rise to diverse, new behavior.

  11. Unveiling Collaborative Group Identities in Social Synthetic Environments from Interaction Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado

    used to simulate aspects of real-life, yet by maintaining a customisable level of control of the phenomena under investigation. Examples of social synthetic environments are theoretical games and cooperative computer games. The proposed framework is composed of two pipelined modules. The first one....... This dissertation successfully leverages on the hypothesis that it is possible to infer the existence of group structures by solely focusing on the ongoing interactions. The limitations of the approach and possible strategies to overcome them are also proposed....

  12. GEMINI/GeMS Observations Unveil the Structure of the Heavily Obscured Globular Cluster Liller 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, S.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Geisler, D.; Mauro, F.; Villanova, S.; Moni Bidin, C.; Miocchi, P.; Massari, D.

    2015-06-01

    By exploiting the exceptional high-resolution capabilities of the near-IR camera GSAOI combined with the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive System at the GEMINI South Telescope, we investigated the structural and physical properties of the heavily obscured globular cluster Liller 1 in the Galactic bulge. We have obtained the deepest and most accurate color-magnitude diagram published so far for this cluster, reaching {{K}s}˜ 19 (below the main-sequence turnoff level). We used these data to redetermine the center of gravity of the system, finding that it is located about 2.″2 southeast from the literature value. We also built new star density and surface brightness profiles for the cluster and rederived its main structural and physical parameters (scale radii, concentration parameter, central mass density, total mass). We find that Liller 1 is significantly less concentrated (concentration parameter c=1.74) and less extended (tidal radius {{r}t}=298\\prime\\prime and core radius {{r}c}=5\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 39) than previously thought. By using these newly determined structural parameters, we estimated the mass of Liller 1 to be {{M}tot}=2.3+0.3-0.1× {{10}6} {{M}⊙ } ({{M}tot}=1.5+0.2-0.1× {{10}6} {{M}⊙ } for a Kroupa initial mass function), which is comparable to that of the most massive clusters in the Galaxy (ω Centari and Terzan 5). Also, Liller 1 has the second-highest collision rate (after Terzan 5) among all star clusters in the Galaxy, thus confirming that it is an ideal environment for the formation of collisional objects (such as millisecond pulsars). Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations gathered with the ESO-VISTA telescope (program ID 179.B-2002).

  13. The Unexpectedly Bright Comet C-2012 F6 (Lemmon) Unveiled at Near-Infrared Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Lucas; Disanti, Michael A.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Gibb, Erika L.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Meech, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    We acquired near-infrared spectra of the Oort cloud comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) at three different heliocentric distances (R h) during the comet's 2013 perihelion passage, providing a comprehensive measure of the outgassing behavior of parent volatiles and cosmogonic indicators. Our observations were performed pre-perihelion at R h = 1.2 AU with CRIRES (on 2013 February 2 and 4), and post-perihelion at R h = 0.75 AU with CSHELL (on March 31 and April 1) and R h = 1.74 AU with NIRSPEC (on June 20). We detected 10 volatile species (H2O, OH* prompt emission, C2H6, CH3OH, H2CO, HCN, CO, CH4, NH3, and NH2), and obtained upper limits for two others (C2H2 and HDO). One-dimensional spatial profiles displayed different distributions for some volatiles, confirming either the existence of polar and apolar ices, or of chemically distinct active vents in the nucleus. The ortho-para ratio for water was 3.31 +/- 0.33 (weighted mean of CRIRES and NIRSPEC results), implying a spin temperature >37 K at the 95% confidence limit. Our (3s) upper limit for HDO corresponds to D/H comet C/2012 F6 as rather depleted in C2H6 and CH3OH, while HCN, CH4, and CO displayed abundances close to their median values found among comets. H2CO was the only volatile showing a relative enhancement. The relative paucity of C2H6 and CH3OH (with respect to H2O) suggests formation within warm regions of the nebula. However, the normal abundance of HCN and hypervolatiles CH4 and CO, and the enhancement of H2CO, may indicate a possible heterogeneous nucleus of comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon), possibly as a result of radial mixing within the protoplanetary disk

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Pleistocene jawbone unveils the origin of polar bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Charlotte; Schuster, Stephan C.; Sun, Yazhou; Talbot, Sandra L.; Qi, Ji; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Kasson, Lindsay; Zeyl, Eve; Aars, Jon; Miller, Webb; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Bachmann, Lutz; Wiig, Øystein

    2010-01-01

    The polar bear has become the flagship species in the climate-change discussion. However, little is known about how past climate impacted its evolution and persistence, given an extremely poor fossil record. Although it is undisputed from analyses of mitochondrial (mt) DNA that polar bears constitute a lineage within the genetic diversity of brown bears, timing estimates of their divergence have differed considerably. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we have generated a complete, high-quality mt genome from a stratigraphically validated 130,000- to 110,000-year-old polar bear jawbone. In addition, six mt genomes were generated of extant polar bears from Alaska and brown bears from the Admiralty and Baranof islands of the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska and Kodiak Island. We show that the phylogenetic position of the ancient polar bear lies almost directly at the branching point between polar bears and brown bears, elucidating a unique morphologically and molecularly documented fossil link between living mammal species. Molecular dating and stable isotope analyses also show that by very early in their evolutionary history, polar bears were already inhabitants of the Artic sea ice and had adapted very rapidly to their current and unique ecology at the top of the Arctic marine food chain. As such, polar bears provide an excellent example of evolutionary opportunism within a widespread mammalian lineage. PMID:20194737

  15. Unveiling the high-activity origin of single-atom iron catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Cheng, Daojian; Xu, Haoxiang; Zeng, Xiaofei; Wan, Xin; Shui, Jianglan; Xiang, Zhonghua; Cao, Dapeng

    2018-06-26

    It is still a grand challenge to develop a highly efficient nonprecious-metal electrocatalyst to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we propose a surfactant-assisted method to synthesize single-atom iron catalysts (SA-Fe/NG). The half-wave potential of SA-Fe/NG is only 30 mV less than 20% Pt/C in acidic medium, while it is 30 mV superior to 20% Pt/C in alkaline medium. Moreover, SA-Fe/NG shows extremely high stability with only 12 mV and 15 mV negative shifts after 5,000 cycles in acidic and alkaline media, respectively. Impressively, the SA-Fe/NG-based acidic proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) exhibits a high power density of 823 mW cm -2 Combining experimental results and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we further reveal that the origin of high-ORR activity of SA-Fe/NG is from the Fe-pyrrolic-N species, because such molecular incorporation is the key, leading to the active site increase in an order of magnitude which successfully clarifies the bottleneck puzzle of why a small amount of iron in the SA-Fe catalysts can exhibit extremely superior ORR activity.

  16. Fifteen Projects Unveiled to Green Local Communities, Create Jobs and Manage Stormwater Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    BALTIMORE - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Chesapeake Bay Trust, in partnership with Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, announced $727,500 in grants to be awarded to 15 organizations through the Green Streets,

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Pleistocene jawbone unveils the origin of polar bear

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, Charlotte; Schuster, Stephan C.; Sun, Yazhou; Talbot, Sandra L.; Qi, Ji; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Kasson, Lindsay; Zeyl, Eve; Aars, Jon; Miller, Webb; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Bachmann, Lutz; Wiig, Øystein

    2010-01-01

    The polar bear has become the flagship species in the climate-change discussion. However, little is known about how past climate impacted its evolution and persistence, given an extremely poor fossil record. Although it is undisputed from analyses of mitochondrial (mt) DNA that polar bears constitute a lineage within the genetic diversity of brown bears, timing estimates of their divergence have differed considerably. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we have generated a complete, ...

  18. Protein-Glycan Quinary Interactions in Crowding Environment Unveiled by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ana; Dias, Jorge S; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Marcelo, Filipa; Cabrita, Eurico J

    2017-09-21

    Protein-glycan interactions as modulators for quinary structures in crowding environments were explored. The interaction between human galectin 3 (Gal-3) and distinct macromolecular crowders, such as bovine and human serum albumin (BSA and HSA), Ficoll 70 and PEG3350, was scrutinized. The molecular recognition event of the specific ligand, lactose, by Gal-3 in crowding conditions was evaluated. Gal-3 interactions were monitored by NMR analysing chemical shift perturbation (CSP) and line broadening of 1 H 15 N-HSQC signals. The intensity of the Gal-3 1 H 15 N-HSQC signals decreased in the presence of all crowders, due to the increase in the solution viscosity and to the formation of large protein complexes. When glycosylated containing samples of BSA and HSA were used, signal broadening was more severe than that observed in the presence of the more viscous solutions of PEG3350 and Ficoll 70. However, for the samples containing glycoproteins, the signal intensity of 1 H 15 N-HSQC recovered upon addition of lactose. We show that serum proteins interact with Gal-3, through their α2,3-linked sialylgalactose moieties exposed at their surfaces, competing with lactose for the same binding site. The quinary interaction between Gal-3 and serum glycoproteins, could help to co-localize Gal-3 at the cell surface, and may play a role in adhesion and signalling functions of this protein. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The Negative Sign and Exponential Expressions: Unveiling Students' Persistent Errors and Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangelosi, Richard; Madrid, Silvia; Cooper, Sandra; Olson, Jo; Hartter, Beverly

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not certain errors made when simplifying exponential expressions persist as students progress through their mathematical studies. College students enrolled in college algebra, pre-calculus, and first- and second-semester calculus mathematics courses were asked to simplify exponential…

  20. Unveiling the relationship between the transaction timing, spending and dropout behavior of customers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glady, N.; Lemmens, A.; Croux, C.

    The customer lifetime value combines into one construct the transaction timing, spending and dropout processes that characterize the purchase behavior of customers. Recently, the potential relationship between these processes, either at the individual customer level (i.e. intra-customer correlation)

  1. Unveiling the fungal mycobiota present throughout the cork stopper manufacturing process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barreto, M.C.; Houbraken, J.; Samson, R.A.; Brito, D.; Gadanho, M.; San Romão, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    A particular fungal population is present in the main stages of the manufacturing process of cork discs. Its diversity was studied using both dependent (isolation) and independent culture methods (denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis and cloning of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region). The mycobiota in the

  2. Unveiling the diversification dynamics of Australasian predaceous diving beetles in the Cenozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Condamine, Fabien L; Hawlitschek, Oliver; Watts, Chris H; Porch, Nick; Hendrich, Lars; Balke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    During the Cenozoic, Australia experienced major climatic shifts that have had dramatic ecological consequences for the modern biota. Mesic tropical ecosystems were progressively restricted to the coasts and replaced by arid-adapted floral and faunal communities. Whilst the role of aridification has been investigated in a wide range of terrestrial lineages, the response of freshwater clades remains poorly investigated. To gain insights into the diversification processes underlying a freshwater radiation, we studied the evolutionary history of the Australasian predaceous diving beetles of the tribe Hydroporini (147 described species). We used an integrative approach including the latest methods in phylogenetics, divergence time estimation, ancestral character state reconstruction, and likelihood-based methods of diversification rate estimation. Phylogenies and dating analyses were reconstructed with molecular data from seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) for 117 species (plus 12 outgroups). Robust and well-resolved phylogenies indicate a late Oligocene origin of Australasian Hydroporini. Biogeographic analyses suggest an origin in the East Coast region of Australia, and a dynamic biogeographic scenario implying dispersal events. The group successfully colonized the tropical coastal regions carved by a rampant desertification, and also colonized groundwater ecosystems in Central Australia. Diversification rate analyses suggest that the ongoing aridification of Australia initiated in the Miocene contributed to a major wave of extinctions since the late Pliocene probably attributable to an increasing aridity, range contractions and seasonally disruptions resulting from Quaternary climatic changes. When comparing subterranean and epigean genera, our results show that contrasting mechanisms drove their diversification and therefore current diversity pattern. The Australasian Hydroporini radiation reflects a combination of processes that promoted both diversification, resulting from new ecological opportunities driven by initial aridification, and a subsequent loss of mesic adapted diversity due to increasing aridity. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A Bayesian inference approach to unveil supply curves in electricity markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitridati, Lesia Marie-Jeanne Mariane; Pinson, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    in the literature on modeling this uncertainty. In this study we introduce a Bayesian inference approach to reveal the aggregate supply curve in a day-ahead electricity market. The proposed algorithm relies on Markov Chain Monte Carlo and Sequential Monte Carlo methods. The major appeal of this approach......With increased competition in wholesale electricity markets, the need for new decision-making tools for strategic producers has arisen. Optimal bidding strategies have traditionally been modeled as stochastic profit maximization problems. However, for producers with non-negligible market power...

  4. The features of the Cosmic Web unveiled by the flip-flop field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2017-07-01

    Currently the dark matter environment is widely accepted as a framework for understanding of the observed structure in the universe. N-body simulations are indispensable for the analysis of the formation and evolution of the dark matter web. Two primary fields - density and velocity fields - are used in most of studies. Dark matter provides two additional fields that are unique for collisionless media only. They are the multistream field in Eulerian space and flip-flop field in Lagrangian space. The flip-flop field represents the number of sign reversals of an elementary volume of each collisionless fluid element. This field can be estimated by counting the sign reversals of the Jacobian at each particle at every time step of the simulation. The Jacobian is evaluated by numerical differentiation of the Lagrangian submanifold, I.e. the three-dimensional dark matter sheet in the six-dimensional space formed by three Lagrangian and three Eulerian coordinates. We present the results of the statistical study of the evolution of the flip-flop field from z = 50 to the present time z = 0. A number of statistical characteristics show that the pattern of the flip-flop field remains remarkably stable from z ≈ 30 to the present time. As a result the flip-flop field evaluated at z = 0 stores a wealth of information about the dynamical history of the dark matter web. In particular one of the most intriguing properties of the flip-flop is a unique capability to preserve the information about the merging history of haloes.

  5. Unveiling the geography of historical patents in the United States from 1836 to 1975

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petralia, Sergio; Balland, Pierre-Alexandre; Rigby, David L

    2016-01-01

    It is clear that technology is a key driver of economic growth. Much less clear is where new technologies are produced and how the geography of U.S. invention has changed over the last two hundred years. Patent data report the geography, history, and technological characteristics of invention.

  6. Integrated bioinformatic analysis unveils significant genes and pathways in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang,Guang-Yu; Li,Ling; Liu,Bo; Han,Xiao; Wang,Chunhua; Wang,Jiwen

    2018-01-01

    Guang-Yu Wang,1,* Ling Li,2,* Bo Liu,1 Xiao Han,1 Chun-Hua Wang,1 Ji-Wen Wang3 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Children’s Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 3Department of Neurology, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Pudong New District, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: This study aimed to explore ...

  7. Integrated bioinformatic analysis unveils significant genes and pathways in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang G; Li L; Liu B; Han X; Wang CH; Wang JW

    2018-01-01

    Guang-Yu Wang,1,* Ling Li,2,* Bo Liu,1 Xiao Han,1 Chun-Hua Wang,1 Ji-Wen Wang3 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Children’s Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 3Department of Neurology, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Pudong New District, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: This study aimed to explore significant gene...

  8. Unveiling HIV dynamics among transgender women: a respondent driven sampling study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Jalil, Emilia Moreira; Monteiro, Laylla; Velasque, Luciane; Moreira, Ronaldo I.; Garcia, Ana Cristina F.; Castro, Cristiane V.; Krüger, Alícia; Luz, Paula M.; Liu, Albert Y.; Farland, Willi Mc; Buchbinder, Susan; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Wilson, Erin C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The burden of HIV in transgender women (transwomen) in Brazil remains unknown. We aimed to estimate HIV prevalence among transwomen, and identify the factors associated with newly diagnosed HIV infections. Methods “Transcender” was a respondent driven sampling study of transwomen in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, conducted from August 2015 to January 2016. Twelve seeds were recruited from social movements and formative phase. Eligibility criteria were: self-identification as transwomen, being 18 years of age or older, living in Rio de Janeiro or metropolitan area, and having a valid peer recruitment coupon. Participants were categorized as HIV-negative, known HIV infected, or newly diagnosed as HIV infected. Predictors of newly diagnosed HIV infections were assessed by comparing the newly diagnosed with the HIV-negative. Population estimates were adjusted using the RDSII estimator. Findings In total, 345 eligible transwomen were enrolled. The study sample was young and diverse on gender identity. Population estimates of no prior HIV testing, HIV-infection and newly diagnosed as HIV-infected were 29·1%, 32·1% and 7·0%, respectively (based on n=60 with no prior testing, n=141 HIV-infected, n=40 newly diagnosed). Syphilis, rectal chlamydia and gonorrhea infection were diagnosed in 28·9%, 14·6%, and 13·5%, respectively. Newly diagnosed HIV infections were associated with black race (22·8; 95%CI 2·9–178·9), travesti (34·1; 95%CI 5·8–200·2) or transsexual woman (41·3; 95%CI 6·3–271·2) gender identity, history of sex work (30·7; 95%CI 3·5–267·3), and history of sniffing cocaine (4·4; 95%CI 1·4–14·1). Interpretation Our results suggest that transwomen bear the largest burden of HIV among any population at risk in Brazil. The high proportion of HIV diagnosis among young participants points to the need for tailored long-term health care and prevention services in order to curb the HIV epidemic and improve the quality-of-life of transwomen in Brazil. Funding This work was supported by Brazilian Research Council (470056/2014-2) and NIAID-NIH (UM1AI069496). PMID:28188030

  9. IC 3639 - A New Bona Fide Compton-Thick AGN Unveiled By NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorman, Peter G.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Annuar, A.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We analyze high-quality NuSTAR observations of the local (z = 0.011) Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) IC 3639, in conjunction with archival Suzaku and Chandra data. This provides the first broadband X-ray spectral analysis of the source, spanning nearly two decades in energy (0.5-30 keV). Previous X-ray observations of the source below 10 keV indicated strong reflection/obscuration on the basis of a pronounced iron fluorescence line at 6.4 keV. The hard X-ray energy coverage of NuSTAR, together with self-consistent toroidal reprocessing models, enables direct broadband constraints on the obscuring column density of the source. We find the source to be heavily Compton-thick (CTK) with an obscuring column in excess of 3.6 x 10(exp 24) cm(exp -2), unconstrained at the upper end. We further find an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of log(sub 10) (L(sub 2-10 keV) [erg s(exp -1)])= 43.4(+0.6/-1.1) to 90% confidence, almost 400 times the observed flux, and consistent with various multiwavelength diagnostics. Such a high ratio of intrinsic to observed flux, in addition to an Fe-K(alpha) fluorescence line equivalent width exceeding 2 keV, is extreme among known bona fide CTK AGNs, which we suggest are both due to the high level of obscuration present around IC 3639. Our study demonstrates that broadband spectroscopic modeling with NuSTAR enables large corrections for obscuration to be carried out robustly and emphasizes the need for improved modeling of AGN tori showing intense iron fluorescence.

  10. IC 3639 - A new bona fide Compton thick AGN unveiled by NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boorman, Peter G.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D.

    2016-01-01

    We analyse high-quality NuSTAR observations of the local (z = 0.011) Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) IC 3639, in conjunction with archival Suzaku and Chandra data. This provides the first broadband X-ray spectral analysis of the source, spanning nearly two decades in energy (0.5 -30 keV)....

  11. Integrative network analysis unveils convergent molecular pathways in Parkinson's disease and diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Santiago

    Full Text Available Shared dysregulated pathways may contribute to Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic diseases that afflict millions of people worldwide. Despite the evidence provided by epidemiological and gene profiling studies, the molecular and functional networks implicated in both diseases, have not been fully explored. In this study, we used an integrated network approach to investigate the extent to which Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes are linked at the molecular level.Using a random walk algorithm within the human functional linkage network we identified a molecular cluster of 478 neighboring genes closely associated with confirmed Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes genes. Biological and functional analysis identified the protein serine-threonine kinase activity, MAPK cascade, activation of the immune response, and insulin receptor and lipid signaling as convergent pathways. Integration of results from microarrays studies identified a blood signature comprising seven genes whose expression is dysregulated in Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes. Among this group of genes, is the amyloid precursor protein (APP, previously associated with neurodegeneration and insulin regulation. Quantification of RNA from whole blood of 192 samples from two independent clinical trials, the Harvard Biomarker Study (HBS and the Prognostic Biomarker Study (PROBE, revealed that expression of APP is significantly upregulated in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Assessment of biomarker performance revealed that expression of APP could distinguish Parkinson's disease from healthy individuals with a diagnostic accuracy of 80% in both cohorts of patients.These results provide the first evidence that Parkinson's disease and diabetes are strongly linked at the molecular level and that shared molecular networks provide an additional source for identifying highly sensitive biomarkers. Further, these results suggest for the first time that increased expression of APP in blood may modulate the neurodegenerative phenotype in type 2 diabetes patients.

  12. Integrative Network Analysis Unveils Convergent Molecular Pathways in Parkinson's Disease and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Jose A.; Potashkin, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Shared dysregulated pathways may contribute to Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic diseases that afflict millions of people worldwide. Despite the evidence provided by epidemiological and gene profiling studies, the molecular and functional networks implicated in both diseases, have not been fully explored. In this study, we used an integrated network approach to investigate the extent to which Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes are linked at the molecular level. ...

  13. THE EXTENDED He IIλ4686-EMITTING REGION IN IZw 18 UNVEILED: CLUES FOR PECULIAR IONIZING SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Bayo, F. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Brinchmann, J. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kunth, D.; Durret, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2015-03-10

    New integral field spectroscopy has been obtained for IZw 18, the nearby lowest-metallicity galaxy considered to be our best local analog of systems forming at high redshift (z). Here we report the spatially resolved spectral map of the nebular He ii λ4686 emission in IZw 18, from which we derived for the first time its total He ii-ionizing flux. Nebular He ii emission implies the existence of a hard radiation field. He ii-emitters are observed to be more frequent among high-z galaxies than for local objects. Therefore, investigating the He ii-ionizing source(s) in IZw 18 may reveal the ionization processes at high z. He ii emission in star-forming galaxies has been suggested to be mainly associated with Wolf–Rayet stars (WRs), but WRs cannot satisfactorily explain the He ii-ionization at all times, particularly at the lowest metallicities. Shocks from supernova remnants, or X-ray binaries, have been proposed as additional potential sources of He ii-ionizing photons. Our data indicate that conventional He ii-ionizing sources (WRs, shocks, X-ray binaries) are not sufficient to explain the observed nebular He iiλ4686 emission in IZw 18. We find that the He ii-ionizing radiation expected from models for either low-metallicity super-massive O stars or rotating metal-free stars could account for the He ii-ionization budget measured, while only the latter models could explain the highest values of He iiλ4686/Hβ observed. The presence of such peculiar stars in IZw 18 is suggestive and further investigation in this regard is needed. This letter highlights that some of the clues of the early universe can be found here in our cosmic backyard.

  14. China’s War by Other Means: Unveiling China’s Quest for Information Dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    of the U.S. Persian Gulf War – delivering the message the “PLA’s capabilities during a crisis would deter any enemy.” In 1995, relations were...Chen, King C. “China’s War Against Vietnam, 1979: A Military Analysis.” Journal of East Asian Affairs 3, no. 1 (Spring/Summer 1983). Accessed May 8

  15. Genome-wide SNP data unveils the globalization of domesticated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Cui, Leilei; Perez-Enciso, Miguel; Traspov, Aleksei; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Zinovieva, Natalia; Schook, Lawrence B; Archibald, Alan; Gatphayak, Kesinee; Knorr, Christophe; Triantafyllidis, Alex; Alexandri, Panoraia; Semiadi, Gono; Hanotte, Olivier; Dias, Deodália; Dovč, Peter; Uimari, Pekka; Iacolina, Laura; Scandura, Massimo; Groenen, Martien A M; Huang, Lusheng; Megens, Hendrik-Jan

    2017-09-21

    Pigs were domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia early during the agricultural revolution, and have since been transported and traded across the globe. Here, we present a worldwide survey on 60K genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for 2093 pigs, including 1839 domestic pigs representing 122 local and commercial breeds, 215 wild boars, and 39 out-group suids, from Asia, Europe, America, Oceania and Africa. The aim of this study was to infer global patterns in pig domestication and diversity related to demography, migration, and selection. A deep phylogeographic division reflects the dichotomy between early domestication centers. In the core Eastern and Western domestication regions, Chinese pigs show differentiation between breeds due to geographic isolation, whereas this is less pronounced in European pigs. The inferred European origin of pigs in the Americas, Africa, and Australia reflects European expansion during the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Human-mediated introgression, which is due, in particular, to importing Chinese pigs into the UK during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, played an important role in the formation of modern pig breeds. Inbreeding levels vary markedly between populations, from almost no runs of homozygosity (ROH) in a number of Asian wild boar populations, to up to 20% of the genome covered by ROH in a number of Southern European breeds. Commercial populations show moderate ROH statistics. For domesticated pigs and wild boars in Asia and Europe, we identified highly differentiated loci that include candidate genes related to muscle and body development, central nervous system, reproduction, and energy balance, which are putatively under artificial selection. Key events related to domestication, dispersal, and mixing of pigs from different regions are reflected in the 60K SNP data, including the globalization that has recently become full circle since Chinese pig breeders in the past decades started selecting Western breeds to improve local Chinese pigs. Furthermore, signatures of ongoing and past selection, acting at different times and on different genetic backgrounds, enhance our insight in the mechanism of domestication and selection. The global diversity statistics presented here highlight concerns for maintaining agrodiversity, but also provide a necessary framework for directing genetic conservation.

  16. Unveiling the role and life strategies of viruses from the surface to the dark ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Lara, Elena; Vaqué , Dolors; Sà , Elisabet Laia; Boras, Julia A.; Gomes, Ana; Borrull, Encarna; Dí ez-Vives, Cristina; Teira, Eva; Pernice, Massimo C.; Garcia, Francisca C.; Forn, Irene; Castillo, Yaiza M.; Peiró , Aida; Salazar, Guillem; Moran, Xose Anxelu G.; Massana, Ramon; Catalá , Teresa S.; Luna, Gian Marco; Agusti, Susana; Estrada, Marta; Gasol, Josep M M; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are a key component of marine ecosystems, but the assessment of their global role in regulating microbial communities and the flux of carbon is precluded by a paucity of data, particularly in the deep ocean. We assessed patterns in viral abundance and production and the role of viral lysis as a driver of prokaryote mortality, from surface to bathypelagic layers, across the tropical and subtropical oceans. Viral abundance showed significant differences between oceans in the epipelagic and mesopelagic, but not in the bathypelagic, and decreased with depth, with an average power-law scaling exponent of −1.03 km−1 from an average of 7.76 × 106 viruses ml−1 in the epipelagic to 0.62 × 106 viruses ml−1 in the bathypelagic layer with an average integrated (0 to 4000 m) viral stock of about 0.004 to 0.044 g C m−2, half of which is found below 775 m. Lysogenic viral production was higher than lytic viral production in surface waters, whereas the opposite was found in the bathypelagic, where prokaryotic mortality due to viruses was estimated to be 60 times higher than grazing. Free viruses had turnover times of 0.1 days in the bathypelagic, revealing that viruses in the bathypelagic are highly dynamic. On the basis of the rates of lysed prokaryotic cells, we estimated that viruses release 145 Gt C year−1 in the global tropical and subtropical oceans. The active viral processes reported here demonstrate the importance of viruses in the production of dissolved organic carbon in the dark ocean, a major pathway in carbon cycling.

  17. Marketing modest fashion or fashioning modesty? HijUp Unveiled at London Fashion Week

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The Indonesians came, they saw and we learned more about their spicy blend of fashion and fun, in the streets of London. Here’s a slice of what’s going on in the emerging global Modest Fashion scene.

  18. Synchronization unveils the organization of ecological networks with positive and negative interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, Andrea; Saiz, Hugo; Bacelar, Flora S; Andrade, Roberto F S; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Network science has helped to understand the organization principles of the interactions among the constituents of large complex systems. However, recently, the high resolution of the data sets collected has allowed to capture the different types of interactions coexisting within the same system. A particularly important example is that of systems with positive and negative interactions, a usual feature appearing in social, neural, and ecological systems. The interplay of links of opposite sign presents natural difficulties for generalizing typical concepts and tools applied to unsigned networks and, moreover, poses some questions intrinsic to the signed nature of the network, such as how are negative interactions balanced by positive ones so to allow the coexistence and survival of competitors/foes within the same system? Here, we show that synchronization phenomenon is an ideal benchmark for uncovering such balance and, as a byproduct, to assess which nodes play a critical role in the overall organization of the system. We illustrate our findings with the analysis of synthetic and real ecological networks in which facilitation and competitive interactions coexist.

  19. Rotation measure synthesis at the 2 m wavelength of the FAN region: unveiling screens and bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobelli, M.; Haverkorn, M.; Katgert, P.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Rotation measure synthesis of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations at λ ~ 2 m of the FAN region at l = 137°, b = +7° shows the morphology of structures in the ionized interstellar medium. Aims: We interpret the diffuse polarized synchrotron emission in terms of coherent structures in the interstellar medium and the properties of the interstellar magnetic field. Methods: We performed statistical analysis of the polarization data cube obtained through rotation measure synthesis. For the first time, cross-correlation is applied to identify and characterize polarized structures in Faraday depth space. Complementary information about the medium are derived from Hα emission, properties of nearby pulsars, and optical polarized starlight measurements. Results: We find an overall asymmetric Faraday dispersion function in a Faraday depth range of [-13, +5] rad m-2, which is peaked around -1 rad m-2. Three morphological patterns are recognized, showing structures on scales from degrees down to the beam size. The first structure is a nearby synchrotron emission component with low Faraday depth, filling the entire field of view. The second pattern is a circular polarization structure with enhanced (negative) Faraday depth, which has the same morphology as a low-emission region within the third component. This third component is interpreted as the background in which the circular structure is embedded. At low Faraday depth values, a low gradient across the imaged field is detected, almost aligned with the Galactic plane. Power spectra of polarized structures in Faraday depth space provide evidence of turbulence. Conclusions: A sign reversal in Faraday depth from the nearby component to the circular component indicates a reversal of the magnetic field component along the line of sight, from towards the observer and nearby to away from the observer at large distances. The distance to the nearby, extended component is estimated as ≲100 pc, which suggests that this structure corresponds to the Local Bubble wall. For the circular component, various physical interpretations are discussed. The most likely explanation is that the circular component seems to be the presence of a nearby (~200 pc away) relic Strömgren sphere, associated with an old unidentified white dwarf star and expanding in a low-density environment. Faraday rotation datacubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A56

  20. Unveiling the oxidative metabolism of Achatina fulica (Mollusca: Gastropoda) experimentally infected to Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Garcia, Juberlan; Mota, Esther Maria; Castro, Rosane Nora; Pontes, Emerson Guedes; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2018-06-01

    For the first time, alterations in the oxidative metabolism of Achatina fulica experimentally infected with different parasite loads of Angiostrongylus cantonensis were determined. For this, the hemolymph activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and hexokinase and the glucose concentrations in the hemolymph, as well as the polysaccharide reserves in the digestive gland and cephalopedal mass, were assessed. Additionally, the contents of some carboxylic acids in the hemolymph of infected and uninfected snails were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), permitting a better understanding of the alterations related to the host's oxidative metabolism. As the main results, activation of oxidative pathways, such as the glycolytic pathway, was demonstrated in response to the increase in the activity of hexokinase. This tendency was confirmed by the decrease in the contents of glucose in the hemolymph of parasitized snails, indicating that the infection by A. cantonensis alters the host's metabolism, and that these changes are strongly influenced by the parasite load. This metabolic scenario was accompanied by activation of the anaerobic fermentative metabolism, indicated not only by an increase in the activity of (LDH), but also by a reduction of the content of pyruvic acid and accumulation of lactic acid in the hemolymph of parasitized snails. In this circumstance, maintenance of the host's redox balance occurs through activation of the fermentative pathways, and LDH plays a central role in this process. Together, the results indicate that A. cantonensis infection induces activation of the anaerobic metabolism of A. fulica, characterized not only by the accumulation of lactic acid, but also by a reduction in the pyruvic acid and oxalic acid contents in the hemolymph of the infected snails.

  1. Comparative fecal metagenomics unveils unique functional capacity of the swine gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinson John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the taxonomic composition and functional capacity within the swine gut microbial consortia is of great importance to animal physiology and health as well as to food and water safety due to the presence of human pathogens in pig feces. Nonetheless, limited information on the functional diversity of the swine gut microbiome is available. Results Analysis of 637, 722 pyrosequencing reads (130 megabases generated from Yorkshire pig fecal DNA extracts was performed to help better understand the microbial diversity and largely unknown functional capacity of the swine gut microbiome. Swine fecal metagenomic sequences were annotated using both MG-RAST and JGI IMG/M-ER pipelines. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic reads indicated that swine fecal microbiomes were dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. At a finer phylogenetic resolution, Prevotella spp. dominated the swine fecal metagenome, while some genes associated with Treponema and Anareovibrio species were found to be exclusively within the pig fecal metagenomic sequences analyzed. Functional analysis revealed that carbohydrate metabolism was the most abundant SEED subsystem, representing 13% of the swine metagenome. Genes associated with stress, virulence, cell wall and cell capsule were also abundant. Virulence factors associated with antibiotic resistance genes with highest sequence homology to genes in Bacteroidetes, Clostridia, and Methanosarcina were numerous within the gene families unique to the swine fecal metagenomes. Other abundant proteins unique to the distal swine gut shared high sequence homology to putative carbohydrate membrane transporters. Conclusions The results from this metagenomic survey demonstrated the presence of genes associated with resistance to antibiotics and carbohydrate metabolism suggesting that the swine gut microbiome may be shaped by husbandry practices.

  2. Unveiling the equation of state of nuclear matter with binary neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeazzi, F.; Rezzolla, L. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2016-11-01

    2015 marked the hundred anniversary of Albert Einstein's lecture at the Prussian Academy of Science in which he introduced, for the first time, the famous field equations which became the core of his theory of general relativity. This masterpiece of 20th century science has proven extremely solid in all its predictions from the precession of the perihelion of Mercury to the observation of gravitational lensing in distant galaxies, to the more mundane time-delay corrections required by the global positioning system. One last piece of the puzzle is although still missing and comprise the direct measurement of the gravitational wave (GW) radiation emitted by any accelerating mass. These ripples in the spacetime fabric are extremely weak even when produced in the most extreme of the conditions as the ones present during the mergers of two black holes or neutron stars. For this reason they have eluded experimental scientists for almost four decades. But things are about to change, last year a new array of advanced gravitational wave detectors, namely advanced LIGO and Virgo came online in late September and they are expected to observe up to 40 events per year involving the mergers of two compact objects. Despite the high sensitivity of this generation of ground base interferometers, it is still necessary to use accurate gravitational waveforms models to extract all the information from the signal produced by the detector. In this project we focus on the merger of two neutron stars which orbit together in a binary system. The nonlinear nature of the Einstein equations coupled with the complex microphysics behind neutron star matter requires the use of sophisticated codes which uses advanced numerical techniques to produce accurate results. By using the GW signals calculated in our numerical simulations we will be able to strongly link the properties of neutron star matter to a precise set of observable frequencies from the detector. This information, together with the electromagnetic counterparts of these events, will shed some light on the engine that powers short gamma ray bursts. The properties of matter at the ultra high densities and low temperatures reached inside neutron stars cannot be observed in a conventional laboratory on Earth and for this reason accurate GW astronomy is a unique opportunity to constraint the current knowledge of the equation of state that describes these regimes. But GWs are not the only observable that can be linked to the equation of state of neutron star matter, during the violent merger of two neutron stars large amount of neutron rich material is ejected leading to the creation of heavy elements. While undergoing radioactive decay, these elements emit in near-infrared and optical bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The characteristics of these emissions are strongly affected by the composition, temperature and total mass of the dynamically ejected material and for this reason we have developed a series of cutting-edge methods to simulate in full general relativity the inspiral, merger and collapse including relativistic hydrodynamics, the use of nuclear finite-temperature equations of state and an approximate treatment of neutrino emission and absorption. Such simulations require the use of computational facilities such as the one at LRZ where we make use of thousands of CPUs every week for each of our simulations and producing several terabytes of data. This data are processed in situ at the LRZ facility and, for a more detailed analysis, transferred to our local cluster in Frankfurt am Main (LOEWE).

  3. Trajectory Analysis Unveils Reelin's Role in the Directed Migration of Granule Cells in the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaobo; Brunne, Bianka; Zhao, Shanting; Chai, Xuejun; Li, Jiawei; Lau, Jeremie; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Zobiak, Bernd; Sibbe, Mirjam; Westbrook, Gary L; Lutz, David; Frotscher, Michael

    2018-01-03

    Reelin controls neuronal migration and layer formation. Previous studies in reeler mice deficient in Reelin focused on the result of the developmental process in fixed tissue sections. It has remained unclear whether Reelin affects the migratory process, migration directionality, or migrating neurons guided by the radial glial scaffold. Moreover, Reelin has been regarded as an attractive signal because newly generated neurons migrate toward the Reelin-containing marginal zone. Conversely, Reelin might be a stop signal because migrating neurons in reeler , but not in wild-type mice, invade the marginal zone. Here, we monitored the migration of newly generated proopiomelanocortin-EGFP -expressing dentate granule cells in slice cultures from reeler , reeler -like mutants and wild-type mice of either sex using real-time microscopy. We discovered that not the actual migratory process and migratory speed, but migration directionality of the granule cells is controlled by Reelin. While wild-type granule cells migrated toward the marginal zone of the dentate gyrus, neurons in cultures from reeler and reeler -like mutants migrated randomly in all directions as revealed by vector analyses of migratory trajectories. Moreover, live imaging of granule cells in reeler slices cocultured to wild-type dentate gyrus showed that the reeler neurons changed their directions and migrated toward the Reelin-containing marginal zone of the wild-type culture, thus forming a compact granule cell layer. In contrast, directed migration was not observed when Reelin was ubiquitously present in the medium of reeler slices. These results indicate that topographically administered Reelin controls the formation of a granule cell layer. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal migration and the various factors controlling its onset, speed, directionality, and arrest are poorly understood. Slice cultures offer a unique model to study the migration of individual neurons in an almost natural environment. In the present study, we took advantage of the expression of proopiomelanocortin-EGFP by newly generated, migrating granule cells to analyze their migratory trajectories in hippocampal slice cultures from wild-type mice and mutants deficient in Reelin signaling. We show that the compartmentalized presence of Reelin is essential for the directionality, but not the actual migratory process or speed, of migrating granule cells leading to their characteristic lamination in the dentate gyrus. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/380137-12$15.00/0.

  4. (Un)Becoming Tourist-Teachers: Unveiling White Racial Identity in Cross-Cultural Teaching Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Gibson, Judith; Gibson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The importance of cross-cultural experiences in teacher education has become more pressing than ever. The composition of schools across Australia is increasingly more diverse, therefore it is pertinent to examine and develop pre-service teachers' worldview and culturally sensitive dispositions critical for teaching in predominantly multicultural…

  5. Unveiled Sentiments: Gendered Islamophobia and Experiences of Veiling among Muslim Girls in a Canadian Islamic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zine, Jasmin

    2006-01-01

    The practice of veiling has made Muslim women subject to dual oppressions--racism and Islamophobia--in society at large and patriarchal oppression and sexism from within their communities. Based on a narrative analysis of the politics of veiling in schools and society, the voices of young Muslim women attending a Canadian Islamic school speak to…

  6. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogdt, Carlos G P; Bouwman, Lieneke I; Kik, Marja J L; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2016-01-07

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions.

  7. Unveiling E-Bike Potential for Commuting Trips from GPS Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel J. Lopez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Common goals of sustainable mobility approaches are to reduce the need for travel, to facilitate modal shifts, to decrease trip distances and to improve energy efficiency in the transportation systems. Among these issues, modal shift plays an important role for the adoption of vehicles with fewer or zero emissions. Nowadays, the electric bike (e-bike is becoming a valid alternative to cars in urban areas. However, to promote modal shift, a better understanding of the mobility behaviour of e-bike users is required. In this paper, we investigate the mobility habits of e-bikers using GPS data collected in Belgium from 2014 to 2015. By analysing more than 10,000 trips, we provide insights about e-bike trip features such as: distance, duration and speed. In addition, we offer a deep look into which routes are preferred by bike owners in terms of their physical characteristics and how weather influences e-bike usage. Results show that trips with higher travel distances are performed during working days and are correlated with higher average speeds. Usage patterns extracted from our data set also indicate that e-bikes are preferred for commuting (home-work and business (work related trips rather than for recreational trips.

  8. Unveiling the Mysteries of Mars with a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Doloboff, I. J.; Jerman, G.

    2017-01-01

    Development of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope that will utilize the martian atmosphere to dissipate charge during analysis continues. This instrument is expected to be used on a future rover or lander to answer fundamental Mars science questions. To identify the most important questions, a survey was taken at the 47th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC). From the gathered information initial topics were identified for a SEM on the martian surface. These priorities are identified and discussed below. Additionally, a concept of operations is provided with the goal of maximizing the science obtained with the minimum amount of communication with the instrument.

  9. Seasonal patterns in Arctic prasinophytes and inferred ecology of Bathycoccus unveiled in an Arctic winter metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joli, Nathalie; Monier, Adam; Logares, Ramiro; Lovejoy, Connie

    2017-06-01

    Prasinophytes occur in all oceans but rarely dominate phytoplankton populations. In contrast, a single ecotype of the prasinophyte Micromonas is frequently the most abundant photosynthetic taxon reported in the Arctic from summer through autumn. However, seasonal dynamics of prasinophytes outside of this period are little known. To address this, we analyzed high-throughput V4 18S rRNA amplicon data collected from November to July in the Amundsen Gulf Region, Beaufort Sea, Arctic. Surprisingly during polar sunset in November and December, we found a high proportion of reads from both DNA and RNA belonging to another prasinophyte, Bathycoccus. We then analyzed a metagenome from a December sample and the resulting Bathycoccus metagenome assembled genome (MAG) covered ~90% of the Bathycoccus Ban7 reference genome. In contrast, only ~20% of a reference Micromonas genome was found in the metagenome. Our phylogenetic analysis of marker genes placed the Arctic Bathycoccus in the B1 coastal clade. In addition, substitution rates of 129 coding DNA sequences were ~1.6% divergent between the Arctic MAG and coastal Chilean upwelling MAGs and 17.3% between it and a South East Atlantic open ocean MAG in the B2 Clade. The metagenomic analysis also revealed a winter viral community highly skewed toward viruses targeting Micromonas, with a much lower diversity of viruses targeting Bathycoccus. Overall a combination of Micromonas being relatively less able to maintain activity under dark winter conditions and viral suppression of Micromonas may have contributed to the success of Bathycoccus in the Amundsen Gulf during winter.

  10. Food-Bridging: A New Network Construction to Unveil the Principles of Cooking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Simas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we propose, analyze, and discuss a possible new principle behind traditional cuisine: the Food-bridging hypothesis and its comparison with the food-pairing hypothesis using the same dataset and graphical models employed in the food-pairing study by Ahn et al. (2011. The Food-bridging hypothesis assumes that if two ingredients do not share a strong molecular or empirical affinity, they may become affine through a chain of pairwise affinities. That is, in a graphical model as employed by Ahn et al., a chain represents a path that joints the two ingredients, the shortest path represents the strongest pairwise chain of affinities between the two ingredients. Food-pairing and Food-bridging are different hypotheses that may describe possible mechanisms behind the recipes of traditional cuisines. Food-pairing intensifies flavor by mixing ingredients in a recipe with similar chemical compounds, and food-bridging smoothes contrast between ingredients. Both food-pairing and food-bridging are observed in traditional cuisines, as shown in this work. We observed four classes of cuisines according to food-pairing and food-bridging: (1 East Asian cuisines, at one extreme, tend to avoid food-pairing as well as food-bridging; and (4 Latin American cuisines, at the other extreme, follow both principles. For the two middle classes: (2 Southeastern Asian cuisines, avoid food-pairing and follow food-bridging; and (3 Western cuisines, follow food-pairing and avoid food-bridging.

  11. Unveiling of a cryptic Dicranomyia (Idiopyga from northern Finland using integrative approach (Diptera, Limoniidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Salmela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The subgenus Idiopyga Savchenko, 1987 is a northern hemisphere group of short-palped crane flies (Diptera, Limoniidae. In the current article we describe a new species, Dicranomyia (I. boreobaltica Salmela sp.n., and redescribe the male and female post-abdomen of a closely related species, D. (I. intricata Alexander. A standard DNA barcoding fragment of 5′ region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene of the new species is presented, whilst the K2P minimum distances between the new species and 10 other species of the subgenus were found to range from 5.1 to 15.7 % (mean 11.2 %. Phylogenetic analyses (parsimony and maximum likelihood based on COI sequences support the identity of the new species and its close relationship with D. (I. intricata and D. (I. esbeni (Nielsen. The new species is known from the northern Baltic area of Finland. The new species has been mostly collected from Baltic coastal meadows but an additional relict population is known from a calcareous rich fen that was estimated to have been at sea level circa 600-700 years ago. Dicranomyia (I. intricata (syn. D. suecica Nielsen is a Holarctic species, occurring in the north boreal and subarctic vegetation zones in Fennoscandia.

  12. Food marketing targeting children: unveiling the ethical perspectives in the discourse on self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Dillian Adelaine Cesar da; Cunha, Antonio Carlos Rodrigues da; Cunha, Thiago Rocha da; Rosaneli, Caroline Filla

    2017-07-01

    When it comes to food marketing, children are one of the major targets. Regulatory actions can play a strategic role in health protection. The objective of this research was to characterize the ethical perspective in the discourse against state regulatory actions on food marketing directed at children, aiming to understand the context of the discourse's production and how it creates meaning. The methodology adopted was qualitative, with documentary analysis and use of concepts and procedures from Discourse Analysis. The work of Hans Jonas, specifically his Responsibility Principle, and Garrafa and Port's Intervention Bioethics oriented the analysis. The self-regulation discourse analysis showed an ethical perspective in which relations of consumption predominate over the children´s vulnerability. The rhetorical excess is constant, as well as the use of resources like naturalization, untruthfulness, ideological dissimulation and euphemism. An erasure of social conflicts takes place, and an ahistorical perspective is present. The discourse does not align with Jonas´ Responsibility Principle, nor those of Intervention Bioethics. Lastly, the ethical perspective of the discourse represents a double paradox, because it is a business discourse that hides its competitive roots and metamorphoses into an ethical one.

  13. NEURON-GLIA INTERACTIONS IN PERIPHERAL VASOPRESSIN AND OXYTOCIN SYSTEMS UNVEILED IN TRANSGENIC RATS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dayanithi, Govindan; Forostyak, Oksana; Forostyak, Serhiy; Arboleda Toro, David; Viero, C.; Strunin, Dmytro; Folková, Dagmar; Syková, Eva; Shibuya, I.; Ueta, Y.; Toescu, E.C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, Supplement 1 (2011), S103-S103 ISSN 0894-1491. [European meeting on Glia l Cells in Health and Disease /10./. 13.09.2011-17.09.2011, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : neuropeptides * nociception * lactation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  14. Unveiling the Role of CNTs on the Phase Formation of 1D Ferroelectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Mahajan, Amit

    2015-05-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to act as templates or bottom electrodes for three dimension (3D) capacitor arrays, which utilise one dimension (1D) ferroelectric nanostructures to increase memory size and density. However, growing a ferroelectric on the surface of CNTs is non-trivial. Here, we demonstrate that multi-walled (MW) CNTs decrease the time and temperature for formation of lead zirconium titanate Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 (PZT) by ~100 ºC commensurate with a decrease in activation energy from 68±15 kJ/mol to 27±2 kJ/mol. As a consequence, monophasic PZT was obtained at 575 ºC for MWCNTs/PZT whereas for pure PZT traces of pyrochlore were still present at 650 ºC, where PZT phase formed due to homogeneous nucleation. The piezoelectric nature of MWCNT/PZT synthesised at 500 ºC for 1 h was proved. Although further work is required to prove the concept of 3D capacitor arrays, our result suggests that it is feasible to utilise MWCNTs as templates/electrodes for the formation of 1D PZT nano ferroelectrics.

  15. UNVEILING THE EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE FROM INFALLING ENVELOPES TO KEPLERIAN DISKS AROUND LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P., E-mail: hwyen@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-20

    We performed Submillimeter Array observations in the C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission line toward six Class 0 and I protostars to study rotational motions of their surrounding envelopes and circumstellar material on 100-1000 AU scales. C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission with intensity peaks located at the protostellar positions is detected toward all six sources. The rotational velocities of the protostellar envelopes as a function of radius were measured from the position-velocity diagrams perpendicular to the outflow directions passing through the protostellar positions. Two Class 0 sources, B335 and NGC 1333 IRAS 4B, show no detectable rotational motion, while L1527 IRS (Class 0/I) and L1448-mm (Class 0) exhibit rotational motions with radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.2} and {proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.1}, respectively. The other Class I sources, TMC-1A and L1489 IRS, exhibit the fastest rotational motions among the sample, and their rotational motions have flatter radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -0.6{+-}0.1} and {proportional_to}r {sup -0.5{+-}0.1}, respectively. The rotational motions with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -1} can be interpreted as rotation with a conserved angular momentum in a dynamically infalling envelope, while those with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -0.5} can be interpreted as Keplerian rotation. These observational results demonstrate categorization of rotational motions from infalling envelopes to Keplerian-disk formation. Models of the inside-out collapse where the angular momentum is conserved are discussed and compared with our observational results.

  16. UNVEILING THE NEW GENERATION OF STARS IN NGC 604 WITH GEMINI-NIRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Cecilia; Bosch, Guillermo L. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo de Bosque S/N (B1900FWA), La Plata (Argentina); Barba, Rodolfo H., E-mail: ceciliaf@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Ciencias Astronomicas, de la Tierra y del Espacio (ICATE-CONICET), Av. Espana Sur 1512 (J5402DSP), San Juan (Argentina)

    2012-02-15

    We present a near-infrared study focused on the detection and characterization of the youngest stellar component of the NGC 604 giant star-forming region in the Triangulum galaxy (M 33). By means of color-color diagrams derived from the photometry of JHK{sub s} images taken with the Gemini Near Infrared Imaging and Spectrometer (NIRI), we have found 68 candidate massive young stellar objects. The spatial distribution of these sources matches the areas where previous studies suggested that star formation might be taking place, and the high spatial resolution of our deep NIRI imaging allows us to pinpoint the star-forming knots. An analysis of the fraction of objects that show infrared excess suggests that the star formation is still active, supporting the presence of a second generation of stars being born, although the evidence for or against sequential star formation does not seem to be conclusive.

  17. Unveiling network-based functional features through integration of gene expression into protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Mahdi; Gebhardt, Tom; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali

    2018-06-01

    Decoding health and disease phenotypes is one of the fundamental objectives in biomedicine. Whereas high-throughput omics approaches are available, it is evident that any single omics approach might not be adequate to capture the complexity of phenotypes. Therefore, integrated multi-omics approaches have been used to unravel genotype-phenotype relationships such as global regulatory mechanisms and complex metabolic networks in different eukaryotic organisms. Some of the progress and challenges associated with integrated omics studies have been reviewed previously in comprehensive studies. In this work, we highlight and review the progress, challenges and advantages associated with emerging approaches, integrating gene expression and protein-protein interaction networks to unravel network-based functional features. This includes identifying disease related genes, gene prioritization, clustering protein interactions, developing the modules, extract active subnetworks and static protein complexes or dynamic/temporal protein complexes. We also discuss how these approaches contribute to our understanding of the biology of complex traits and diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiac adaptations to obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance, edited by Professors Jan F.C. Glatz, Jason R.B. Dyck and Christine Des Rosiers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Unveiling of a Trinuclear Cyclic Peroxidovanadate: A Potential Oxidant in Vanadium-Catalyzed Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krivosudský, Ondřej; Schwendt, P.; Gyepes, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 13 (2015), s. 6306-6311 ISSN 0020-1669 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE * NMR CHEMICAL-SHIFTS * CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.820, year: 2015

  19. Comparative Fecal Metagenomics Unveils Unique Functional Capacity of the Swine Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncovering the taxonomic composition and functional capacity within the swine gut microbial consortia is of great importance to animal physiology and health and to food and water safety due to the presence of human pathogens in pig feces. Limited information on the physiological...

  20. Terrorism in Newsweek: Unveiling the Connection between Language, Ideology, and Powe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Trisno Adi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzes the discourse on terrorism in the Newsweek magazine and exposes how the notion of ideology and power contributes to the hegemonic representations of Muslims and Islam in the post 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Centre (WTC. Two Newsweek articles appeared on the 24th September 2001 were selected. The study employed Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA; this is a five-stage analytical methodology that perceives language within a three-dimensional framework: text, discourse, and society. The representation of discourse on terrorism, as found in the analysis, supports a conception that media coverage is not merely the representation of facts but also that of ideas which has gone through various considerations incorporating the three key notions of text, discourse and society altogether. The elements within the textual level and discourse level were ideologically used to represent terrorism with regard to its actor, process, and goal, constituting a commonsense as to how it should be perceived. The study concluded that the representation of discourse on terrorism in Newsweek during the post 9/11 period was perceived from what Chomsky considers as the propagandistic approach

  1. Integrated bioinformatic analysis unveils significant genes and pathways in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang G

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Guang-Yu Wang,1,* Ling Li,2,* Bo Liu,1 Xiao Han,1 Chun-Hua Wang,1 Ji-Wen Wang3 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Children’s Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 3Department of Neurology, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Pudong New District, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: This study aimed to explore significant genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET. Materials and methods: Gene expression profile of GSE14295 was downloaded from publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened out in primary sPNET samples compared with normal fetal and adult brain reference samples (sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. Pathway enrichment analysis of these DEGs was conducted, followed by protein–protein interaction (PPI network construction and significant module selection. Additionally, transcription factors (TFs regulating the common DEGs in the two comparison groups were identified, and the regulatory network was constructed. Results: In total, 526 DEGs (99 up- and 427 downregulated in sPNET vs fetal brain and 815 DEGs (200 up- and 615 downregulated in sPNET vs adult brain were identified. DEGs in sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain were associated with calcium signaling pathway, cell cycle, and p53 signaling pathway. CDK1, CDC20, BUB1B, and BUB1 were hub nodes in the PPI networks of DEGs in sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. Significant modules were extracted from the PPI networks. In addition, 64 upregulated and 200 downregulated overlapping DEGs were identified in both sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. The genes involved in the regulatory network upon overlapping DEGs and the TFs were correlated with calcium signaling pathway. Conclusion: Calcium signaling pathway and several genes (CDK1, CDC20, BUB1B, and BUB1 may play important roles in the pathogenesis of sPNET. Keywords: primitive neuroectodermal tumor, microarray analysis, protein-protein interaction, transcription factors

  2. SWIM: a computational tool to unveiling crucial nodes in complex biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Paola; Colombo, Teresa; Fiscon, Giulia; Gurtner, Aymone; Pavesi, Giulio; Farina, Lorenzo

    2017-03-20

    SWItchMiner (SWIM) is a wizard-like software implementation of a procedure, previously described, able to extract information contained in complex networks. Specifically, SWIM allows unearthing the existence of a new class of hubs, called "fight-club hubs", characterized by a marked negative correlation with their first nearest neighbors. Among them, a special subset of genes, called "switch genes", appears to be characterized by an unusual pattern of intra- and inter-module connections that confers them a crucial topological role, interestingly mirrored by the evidence of their clinic-biological relevance. Here, we applied SWIM to a large panel of cancer datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas, in order to highlight switch genes that could be critically associated with the drastic changes in the physiological state of cells or tissues induced by the cancer development. We discovered that switch genes are found in all cancers we studied and they encompass protein coding genes and non-coding RNAs, recovering many known key cancer players but also many new potential biomarkers not yet characterized in cancer context. Furthermore, SWIM is amenable to detect switch genes in different organisms and cell conditions, with the potential to uncover important players in biologically relevant scenarios, including but not limited to human cancer.

  3. UNVEILING THE DETAILED DENSITY AND VELOCITY STRUCTURES OF THE PROTOSTELLAR CORE B335

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei, E-mail: yasutaka.kurono@nao.ac.jp [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-10

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r){proportional_to}r {sup -p} and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p Almost-Equal-To 2 for r {approx}> 4000 AU and p Almost-Equal-To 1.5 for r {approx}< 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of {approx}1.0 km s{sup -1} over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, and suggest a small inward velocity, v{sub r{>=}r{sub i{sub n{sub f}}}}{approx}0 km s{sup -1} in the outer core at {approx}> 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  4. Unveiling Exception Handling Bug Hazards in Android Based on GitHub and Google Code Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelho, R.; Almeida, L.; Gousios, G.; Van Deursen, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study mining the exception stack traces included in 159,048 issues reported on Android projects hosted in GitHub (482 projects) and Google Code (157 projects). The goal of this study is to investigate whether stack trace information can reveal bug hazards related to exception

  5. A Herschel view of IC 1396 A: Unveiling the different sequences of star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Roccatagliata, Veronica; Getman, Konstantin; Henning, Thomas; Merín, Bruno; Eiroa, Carlos; Rivière-Marichalar, Pablo; Currie, Thayne

    Context. The IC 1396 A globule, located to the west of the young cluster Tr 37, is known to host many very young stars and protostars, and is also assumed to be a site of triggered star formation. Aims: Our aim is to test the triggering mechanisms and sequences leading to star formation in Tr 37 and

  6. Social Representations Of Violence Against Rural Women: Unveiling Senses In Multiple Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cocco Costa

    Full Text Available We analyze the social representations of violence against women from the perspective of city managers, professionals and health workers in rural settings of the southern half of Rio Grande do Sul. The study has a qualitative approach and adds a theoretical/methodological perspective of social representations. The data were generated by means of the associative method, question-stimulus of words and expressions emergence. The analysis of word association was performed with EVOC software, considering frequency and order of association with inducing terms. Participants recognize violence against women as gender destination that induces consent, resignation, guilt and fear, and results in naturalization and trivialization of this social phenomenon. We highlight the need to produce ruptures in established and traditional forms of health care, in the conservative and stereotypical views of violence, favoring access to friendly service and avoiding the reproduction of gender inequalities.

  7. Social Representations Of Violence Against Rural Women: Unveiling Senses In Multiple Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cocco Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the social representations of violence against women from the perspective of city managers, professionals and health workers in rural settings of the southern half of Rio Grande do Sul. The study has a qualitative approach and adds a theoretical/methodological perspective of social representations. The data were generated by means of the associative method, question-stimulus of words and expressions emergence. The analysis of word association was performed with EVOC software, considering frequency and order of association with inducing terms. Participants recognize violence against women as gender destination that induces consent, resignation, guilt and fear, and results in naturalization and trivialization of this social phenomenon. We highlight the need to produce ruptures in established and traditional forms of health care, in the conservative and stereotypical views of violence, favoring access to friendly service and avoiding the reproduction of gender inequalities.

  8. Study Unveils New Method for Universal Extraction and PCR Amplification of Fungal DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-12

    ubiquitous human fungal pathogen. It is the most commonly seen Aspergillus infection, and it responds to the usual antifungal treatment, amphotericin...600. Besides the tough exterior, some fungi also have melanin in their cell walls, and may contain carbohydrates and other substances that inhibit PCR

  9. Unveiling Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes toward Teaching: The Role of Pedagogical Practicums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Cortés, Yimer Andrés

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a research developed at Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia with a group of pre-service teachers that was immersed in an English teaching practicum. The main purpose of this inquiry was to find out the role that practicum exerted on novice teachers' attitudes towards teaching. Data were collected through…

  10. Satyam’s Manipulative Accounting Methodology Unveiled: An Experience of an Asian Economy

    OpenAIRE

    MADAN LAL BHASIN

    2017-01-01

    Manipulative accounting practices are perennial and such practices have occurred in all eras, in all countries and affected millions of corporations. Unfortunately, there are few loopholes in accounting and auditing standards, which provide leeway and thus motivate accounting professionals to use aggressively manipulation practices. In fact, manipulative accounting (MA) involves the intentional cooking-up of financial records towards a pre-determined target. Every company indeed maneuvers the...

  11. Qualitative ubiquitome unveils the potential significances of protein lysine ubiquitination in hyphal growth of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Ling; Feng, Ming-Guang; Ying, Sheng-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Protein ubiquitination is an evolutionarily conserved post-translational modification process in eukaryotes, and it plays an important role in many biological processes. Aspergillus nidulans, a model filamentous fungus, contributes to our understanding of cellular physiology, metabolism and genetics, but its ubiquitination is not completely revealed. In this study, the ubiquitination sites in the proteome of A. nidulans were identified using a highly sensitive mass spectrometry combined with immuno-affinity enrichment of the ubiquitinated peptides. The 4816 ubiquitination sites were identified in 1913 ubiquitinated proteins, accounting for 18.1% of total proteins in A. nidulans. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that the ubiquitinated proteins associated with a number of biological functions and displayed various sub-cellular localisations. Meanwhile, seven motifs were revealed from the ubiquitinated peptides, and significantly over-presented in the different pathways. Comparison of the enriched functional catalogues indicated that the ubiquitination functions divergently during growth of A. nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, the proteins in A. nidulans-specific sub-category (cell growth/morphogenesis) were subjected to the protein interaction analysis which demonstrated that ubiquitination is involved in the comprehensive protein interactions. This study presents a first proteomic view of ubiquitination in the filamentous fungus, and provides an initial framework for exploring the physiological roles of ubiquitination in A. nidulans.

  12. Bam35 tectivirus intraviral interaction map unveils new function and localization of phage ORFan proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjón-Otero, Mónica; Lechuga, Ana; Mehla, Jitender; Uetz, Peter; Salas, Margarita; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto

    2017-07-26

    Tectiviridae comprises a group of tail-less, icosahedral, membrane-containing bacteriophages that can be divided into two groups by their hosts, either Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. While the first group is composed of PRD1 and nearly identical well characterized lytic viruses, the second one includes more variable temperate phages, like GIL16 or Bam35, whose hosts are Bacillus cereus and related Gram-positive bacteria.In the genome of Bam35, nearly half of the 32 annotated open reading frames (ORFs) have no homologs in databases (ORFans), being putative proteins of unknown function, which hinders the understanding of their biology. With the aim of increasing the knowledge of the viral proteome, we carried out a comprehensive yeast two-hybrid analysis among all the putative proteins encoded by the Bam35 genome. The resulting protein interactome comprises 76 unique interactions among 24 proteins, of which 12 have an unknown function. These results suggested that the P17 protein is the minor capsid protein of Bam35 and P24 is the penton protein, being the latter also supported by iterative threading protein modeling. Moreover, the inner membrane transglycosylase protein P26 could have an additional structural role. We also detected interactions involving non-structural proteins, such as the DNA binding protein P1 and the genome terminal protein (P4), which was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of recombinant proteins. Altogether, our results provide a functional view of the Bam35 viral proteome, with a focus on the composition and organization of the viral particle. IMPORTANCE Tail-less viruses of the family Tectiviridae can infect commensal and pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, they have been proposed to be at the evolutionary origin of several groups of large eukaryotic DNA viruses and self-replicating plasmids. However, due to their ancient origin and complex diversity, many tectiviral proteins are ORFans of unknown function.Comprehensive protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis among viral proteins can eventually disclose biological mechanisms and thus provide new insights into protein function unattainable by studying proteins one by one. Here we comprehensively describe intraviral PPIs among tectivirus Bam35 proteins using multi-vector yeast two-hybrid screening that was further supported by co-immunoprecipitation assays and protein structural models. This approach allowed us to propose new functions for known proteins and hypothesize on the biological role localization within the viral particle of some viral ORFan proteins that will be helpful for understanding the biology of Gram-positive tectivirus. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Unveiling the 'unique bone': a study of the distribution of focal clavicular lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, S.; Saifuddin, A.

    2008-01-01

    Clavicle is a unique bone for many reasons. There is no study discussing the differential diagnosis of clavicular lesions based on the site of occurrence or age at presentation. This study aims to determine whether the distribution of lesions affecting the clavicle and age at presentation aid in the differential diagnosis of focal clavicular lesions. Clinical notes, imaging and histopathological reports of the clavicular lesions between Jan 1999 and Jan 2006 were reviewed. Virtually, all patients had been referred as suspected neoplasm. Fifty-nine patients were identified. Patients 50 years (n=18) had predominantly malignant lesions. The lesions most commonly affected the medial third (n=35) and were predominantly non-neoplastic or benign. The middle third was affected in 15 patients and showed both benign and malignant lesions. The lateral third was least affected with predominance of malignant lesions. The clavicle is not a primary common site for any particular tumour; hence, diagnosis of the lesions can be challenging. Our study has suggested that few factors like age and site of the lesions may be helpful in diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Unveiling the sources of disk heating in spiral galaxies with the CALIFA survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinna, F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martig, M.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Leaman, R.

    The stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) quantifies the amount of velocity dispersion in the vertical, radial and azimuthal directions. Since different disk heating mechanisms (e.g. spiral arms, giant molecular clouds, mergers, etc) affect these components differently, the SVE can constrain the sources

  15. Unveiling the role and life strategies of viruses from the surface to the dark ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Lara, Elena

    2017-09-07

    Viruses are a key component of marine ecosystems, but the assessment of their global role in regulating microbial communities and the flux of carbon is precluded by a paucity of data, particularly in the deep ocean. We assessed patterns in viral abundance and production and the role of viral lysis as a driver of prokaryote mortality, from surface to bathypelagic layers, across the tropical and subtropical oceans. Viral abundance showed significant differences between oceans in the epipelagic and mesopelagic, but not in the bathypelagic, and decreased with depth, with an average power-law scaling exponent of −1.03 km−1 from an average of 7.76 × 106 viruses ml−1 in the epipelagic to 0.62 × 106 viruses ml−1 in the bathypelagic layer with an average integrated (0 to 4000 m) viral stock of about 0.004 to 0.044 g C m−2, half of which is found below 775 m. Lysogenic viral production was higher than lytic viral production in surface waters, whereas the opposite was found in the bathypelagic, where prokaryotic mortality due to viruses was estimated to be 60 times higher than grazing. Free viruses had turnover times of 0.1 days in the bathypelagic, revealing that viruses in the bathypelagic are highly dynamic. On the basis of the rates of lysed prokaryotic cells, we estimated that viruses release 145 Gt C year−1 in the global tropical and subtropical oceans. The active viral processes reported here demonstrate the importance of viruses in the production of dissolved organic carbon in the dark ocean, a major pathway in carbon cycling.

  16. LIPIDS OF BLACK SEA ALGAE: UNVEILING THEIR POTENTIAL FOR PHARMACEUTICAL AND COSMETIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselina Panayotova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bulgarian Black Sea coast is rich in algae, regarding biomass and algal biodiversity. The red algae Gelidium crinale (Rhodophyta and brown algae Cystoseira barbata (Phaeophytes are among the most abundant species along the Bulgarian Black Sea shore. Yet information about their lipid composition is limited. Purpose: Present study was conducted to investigate biologically active substances in two underexplored seaweed lipids. Total lipids, total phospholipids, fat soluble vitamins and carotenoids were analysed. In addition, the specific distribution of fatty acids group among the total lipids and total phospholipids were elucidated. Material/Methods: The saponifiable lipid fraction was derivatized into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs and analysed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS to identify and quantify the fatty acids. The fat soluble non-saponifiable lipids were identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with UV/Vis and fluorescence detectors (HPLC-UV-FL. Results: Results showed that Rhodophyta and Phaeophytes have high concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, particularly from the n-3 series, thereby being a good source of these compounds. They presented a “healthy” n-6/n-3 ratio. Both seaweed species showed considerably high amounts of α-tocopherol, β-carotene and astaxanthin. Conclusions: The study reveals that lipids from Black Sea algae have a high potential as natural sources of biologically active ingredients. They are balanced source of fatty acids and contained beneficial antioxidants, such as α-tocopherol, β-carotene and astaxanthin.

  17. Unveiling 25 Years of Planetary Urbanization with Remote Sensing: Perspectives from the Global Human Settlement Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Melchiorri

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades the magnitude and impacts of planetary urban transformations have become increasingly evident to scientists and policymakers. The ability to understand these processes remained limited in terms of territorial scope and comparative capacity for a long time: data availability and harmonization were among the main constraints. Contemporary technological assets, such as remote sensing and machine learning, allow for analyzing global changes in the settlement process with unprecedented detail. The Global Human Settlement Layer (GHSL project set out to produce detailed datasets to analyze and monitor the spatial footprint of human settlements and their population, which are key indicators for the global policy commitments of the 2030 Development Agenda. In the GHSL, Earth Observation plays a key role in the detection of built-up areas from the Landsat imagery upon which population distribution is modelled. The combination of remote sensing imagery and population modelling allows for generating globally consistent and detailed information about the spatial distribution of built-up areas and population. The GHSL data facilitate a multi-temporal analysis of human settlements with global coverage. The results presented in this article focus on the patterns of development of built-up areas, population and settlements. The article reports about the present status of global urbanization (2015 and its evolution since 1990 by applying to the GHSL the Degree of Urbanisation definition of the European Commission Directorate General for Regional and Urban Policy (DG-Regio and the Statistical Office of the European Communities (EUROSTAT. The analysis portrays urbanization dynamics at a regional level and per country income classes to show disparities and inequalities. This study analyzes how the 6.1 billion urban dwellers are distributed worldwide. Results show the degree of global urbanization (which reached 85% in 2015, the more than 100 countries in which urbanization has increased between 1990 and 2015, and the tens of countries in which urbanization is today above the global average and where urbanization grows the fastest. The paper sheds light on the key role of urban areas for development, on the patterns of urban development across the regions of the world and on the role of a new generation of data to advance urbanization theory and reporting.

  18. Air quality plans unveiled at Toronto's first Smog Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-06-23

    New federal and provincial initiatives to improve air quality were announced at the recent first-ever Toronto Smog Summit. An initial one million dollars have been pledged by the federal Minister of the Environment to support a framework for extending daily air quality forecasting across Canada, to begin within the next year. The funding will be used to increase the information base of existing air quality advisory programs in Ontario, and to create a daily air quality index immediately in other areas of the country most affected by smog. Existing air quality assessment programs will be expanded to include air quality models incorporating measurement and reporting of particulate matter levels. A second federal initiative also announced at the is meeting will be a corporate smog action plan, led by the Ontario regional offices of the federal departments of the Environment, Health Canada, and Public Works and Government Services. This program will include rapid response by federal government departments during Smog Alerts Days and measures to reduce the federal government's contribution to causing smog through encouragement of low or no emission options for employees, educational programs on best practices at home and at the office, reduction of employee travel through flextime and telecommuting, conversion of government vehicles to natural gas and other alternatives, and retrofitting government buildings for greater energy and water efficiency. A federal commitment of at least $200,000 was also announced by the Minister of Transport to support six sustainable transportation projects. The provincial Minister of the Environment announced the membership of the province's Anti-Smog Action Plan, which involves some 50 partners from industry associations, companies, government agencies and non-government organizations to help Ontario to meet its commitment to reduces nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds emissions by 45 per cent by 2015. A strategy for dealing with particulate emissions, with an interim target of 10 per cent in precursor emissions is also part of the Program.

  19. Proteomic analysis of the dysferlin protein complex unveils its importance for sarcolemmal maintenance and integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine de Morrée

    Full Text Available Dysferlin is critical for repair of muscle membranes after damage. Mutations in dysferlin lead to a progressive muscular dystrophy. Recent studies suggest additional roles for dysferlin. We set out to study dysferlin's protein-protein interactions to obtain comprehensive knowledge of dysferlin functionalities in a myogenic context. We developed a robust and reproducible method to isolate dysferlin protein complexes from cells and tissue. We analyzed the composition of these complexes in cultured myoblasts, myotubes and skeletal muscle tissue by mass spectrometry and subsequently inferred potential protein functions through bioinformatics analyses. Our data confirm previously reported interactions and support a function for dysferlin as a vesicle trafficking protein. In addition novel potential functionalities were uncovered, including phagocytosis and focal adhesion. Our data reveal that the dysferlin protein complex has a dynamic composition as a function of myogenic differentiation. We provide additional experimental evidence and show dysferlin localization to, and interaction with the focal adhesion protein vinculin at the sarcolemma. Finally, our studies reveal evidence for cross-talk between dysferlin and its protein family member myoferlin. Together our analyses show that dysferlin is not only a membrane repair protein but also important for muscle membrane maintenance and integrity.

  20. A topological approach unveils system invariances and broken symmetries in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Peters, James F

    2016-05-01

    Symmetries are widespread invariances underscoring countless systems, including the brain. A symmetry break occurs when the symmetry is present at one level of observation but is hidden at another level. In such a general framework, a concept from algebraic topology, namely, the Borsuk-Ulam theorem (BUT), comes into play and sheds new light on the general mechanisms of nervous symmetries. The BUT tells us that we can find, on an n-dimensional sphere, a pair of opposite points that have the same encoding on an n - 1 sphere. This mapping makes it possible to describe both antipodal points with a single real-valued vector on a lower dimensional sphere. Here we argue that this topological approach is useful for the evaluation of hidden nervous symmetries. This means that symmetries can be found when evaluating the brain in a proper dimension, although they disappear (are hidden or broken) when we evaluate the same brain only one dimension lower. In conclusion, we provide a topological methodology for the evaluation of the most general features of brain activity, i.e., the symmetries, cast in a physical/biological fashion that has the potential to be operationalized. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Unveiling Third Space: A Case Study of International Educators in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudelli, Mary Gene

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights one aspect of a case study of international educators at Dubai Women's College (DWC), United Arab Emirates (UAE). It examines perceptions of international educators in third space teaching female Emirati, higher-education students in the UAE. Drawing on third space theory (Bhabha, 1994), this study explored the nature of…

  2. Variation-preserving normalization unveils blind spots in gene expression profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Carlos P.; Gomes, Susana I. L.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-Seq and gene expression microarrays provide comprehensive profiles of gene activity, but lack of reproducibility has hindered their application. A key challenge in the data analysis is the normalization of gene expression levels, which is currently performed following the implicit assumption that most genes are not differentially expressed. Here, we present a mathematical approach to normalization that makes no assumption of this sort. We have found that variation in gene expression is much larger than currently believed, and that it can be measured with available assays. Our results also explain, at least partially, the reproducibility problems encountered in transcriptomics studies. We expect that this improvement in detection will help efforts to realize the full potential of gene expression profiling, especially in analyses of cellular processes involving complex modulations of gene expression. PMID:28276435

  3. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Fahad

    2017-02-23

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5\\'nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5\\'nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually \\'locks\\' protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability.

  4. NuSTAR unveils a compton-thick 2 quasar in MrK 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandhi, P.; Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) 3-40 keV observations of the optically selected Type 2 quasar (QSO2) SDSS J1034+6001 or Mrk 34. The high-quality hard X-ray spectrum and archival XMM-Newton data can be fitted self-consistently with a reflection-dominated continuum...... standard" CT QSO2 and is the nearest non-merging system in this class, in contrast to the other local CT quasar NGC 6240, which is currently undergoing a major merger coupled with strong star formation. For typical X-ray bolometric correction factors, the accretion luminosity of Mrk 34 is high enough...... to potentially power the total infrared luminosity. X-ray spectral fitting also shows that thermal emission related to star formation is unlikely to drive the observed bright soft component below similar to 3 keV, favoring photoionization instead....

  5. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Fahad; Harris, Paul D.; Zaher, Manal S.; Sobhy, Mohamed Abdelmaboud; Joudeh, Luay I; Yan, Chunli; Piwonski, Hubert Marek; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tainer, John A; Habuchi, Satoshi; Hamdan, Samir

    2017-01-01

    that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually 'locks' protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme

  6. Integrative analyses unveil speciation linked to host plant shift in Spialia butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Roldán, Juan L; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dincă, Vlad; Vicente, Juan C; Hornett, Emily A; Šíchová, Jindra; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A; Talavera, Gerard; Vila, Roger

    2016-09-01

    Discovering cryptic species in well-studied areas and taxonomic groups can have profound implications in understanding eco-evolutionary processes and in nature conservation because such groups often involve research models and act as flagship taxa for nature management. In this study, we use an array of techniques to study the butterflies in the Spialia sertorius species group (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae). The integration of genetic, chemical, cytogenetic, morphological, ecological and microbiological data indicates that the sertorius species complex includes at least five species that differentiated during the last three million years. As a result, we propose the restitution of the species status for two taxa often treated as subspecies, Spialia ali (Oberthür, 1881) stat. rest. and Spialia therapne (Rambur, 1832) stat. rest., and describe a new cryptic species Spialia rosae Hernández-Roldán, Dapporto, Dincă, Vicente & Vila sp. nov. Spialia sertorius (Hoffmannsegg, 1804) and S. rosae are sympatric and synmorphic, but show constant differences in mitochondrial DNA, chemical profiles and ecology, suggesting that S. rosae represents a case of ecological speciation involving larval host plant and altitudinal shift, and apparently associated with Wolbachia infection. This study exemplifies how a multidisciplinary approach can reveal elusive cases of hidden diversity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Unveiling the Progenitors of Short-duration Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Wen-Fai

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are relativistic explosions which originate at cosmological distances, and are among the most luminous transients in the universe. Following the prompt gamma-ray emission, a fading synchrotron ``afterglow'' is detectable at lower energies. While long-duration GRBs (duration >2 sec) are linked to the deaths of massive stars, the progenitors of short-duration GRBs (duration black hole. Such merging systems are also important to understand because they are premier candidates for gravitational wave detections with current facilities and are likely sites of heavy element nucleosynthesis. The launch of NASA's Swift satellite in 2004, with its rapid multi-wavelength monitoring and localization capabilities, led to the first discoveries of short GRB afterglows and therefore robust associations to host galaxies. At a detection rate of roughly 10 events per year, the growing number of well-localized short GRBs has enabled comprehensive population studies of their afterglows and environments for the first time. In this talk, I describe my multi-wavelength observational campaign to address testable predictions for the progenitors of short GRBs. My work comprises several lines of independent evidence to demonstrate that short GRBs originate from the mergers of two compact objects, and also provides the first constraints on the explosion properties for a large sample of events. With the direct detection of gravitational waves from compact object mergers on the horizon, these studies provide necessary inputs to inform the next decade of joint electromagnetic-gravitational wave search strategies.

  8. Origin of the Moon Unveiled by its Heavy Iron Isotope Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitrasson, F.; Halliday, A. N.; Lee, D.; Levasseur, S.; Teutsch, N.

    2002-12-01

    The origin of the Moon has long been of interest and although the Giant Impact theory is currently the preferred explanation, unequivocal supporting evidence has been lacking. We have measured the iron isotope compositions of Shergotty-Nakhla-Chassigny meteorites and eucrites thought to come from Mars and Vesta, as well as samples from the Moon and the mafic Earth using high precision plasma source mass spectrometry. The mean iron isotope composition of the lunar samples, expressed in the conventional delta notation (d57Fe/54Fe) with respect to the IRMM-14 isotopic standard, is heavier (0.221 per mil (0.041: one standard deviation, 10 samples)) than those of the Earth (0.119 per mil (0.044, 7 samples)), which themselves are heavier than Martian meteorites (0.009 per mil (0.024, 6 samples)) and the eucrites measured (0.033 per mil (0.038, 7 samples)). Student's t-test calculations show that the Moon and Earth means are different from each other and from those of the other planetary bodies at >99% level of significance. The iron isotope compositions show no simple relationship with planetary heliocentric position, mantle oxygen fugacity, volatile content, or planet size. Similarly, these results do not support an origin of the Moon through co-accretion with the Earth, or as a fragment ejected from the Earth's mantle, or as another planet captured by the early Earth. In contrast, these data can be explained if the Earth, and especially the Moon, went through partial vaporisation and condensation leading to kinetic iron isotopic fractionation. Our data are also consistent with the suggested levels of enrichment of refractory elements for the bulk Earth and Moon. These new iron isotope results thus provide strong support for the origin of the Moon through a giant impact between the proto-Earth and another planet. Raleigh kinetic fractionation calculations indicate that only 1% loss of the current Fe budget of the Moon is required to explain its heavier isotopic composition. This is consistent with the small total losses computed in dynamic simulations of the Giant Impact.

  9. UNVEILING THE PATHS OF THE THEATER OF THE OPPRESSED AS A STRATEGY FOR PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Jamaica Sousa da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Investigar as concepções sobre reabilitação psicossocial dos usuários e profissionais que trabalham com Teatro do Oprimido (TO no CAPS III- Liberdade de Aracaju/SE/Brasil em 2011. Identificando quais foram às melhorias na qualidade de vida de portadores de sofrimento psíquico. Métodos: Estudo exploratório-descritivo e qualitativo, coletado através de entrevista semiestruturada com 06 usuários e 01 profissional, sendo analisado através da análise de conteúdo. Resultados: Revelaram usuários ativos; melhora na expressão dialógica e corporal e o TO como uma estratégia de reabilitação psicossocial, pois além de aproximar os participantes, mostram caminhos para o resgate da autonomia através das encenações, além de incentivar à arte. Apresentam também melhora na qualidade de vida e permitem intervalos entre as crises psiquiátricas maiores, tornando-se uma ponte de fortalecimento para a aproximação familiar. Porém, existem dificuldades na sua operacionalização.  Conclusões: Trata-se de uma ferramenta que possibilita a estabilização e a reabilitação dos portadores de sofrimento psíquico.

  10. UNVEILING THE NEW GENERATION OF STARS IN NGC 604 WITH GEMINI-NIRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fariña, Cecilia; Bosch, Guillermo L.; Barbá, Rodolfo H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a near-infrared study focused on the detection and characterization of the youngest stellar component of the NGC 604 giant star-forming region in the Triangulum galaxy (M 33). By means of color-color diagrams derived from the photometry of JHK s images taken with the Gemini Near Infrared Imaging and Spectrometer (NIRI), we have found 68 candidate massive young stellar objects. The spatial distribution of these sources matches the areas where previous studies suggested that star formation might be taking place, and the high spatial resolution of our deep NIRI imaging allows us to pinpoint the star-forming knots. An analysis of the fraction of objects that show infrared excess suggests that the star formation is still active, supporting the presence of a second generation of stars being born, although the evidence for or against sequential star formation does not seem to be conclusive.

  11. Less is More: unveiling the functional core of hematopoietic stem cells through knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Lara; Lin, Kuanyin K.; Boles, Nathan C.; Yang, Liubin; King, Katherine Y.; Jeong, Mira; Mayle, Allison; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) represent one of the first recognized somatic stem cells. As such, nearly 200 genes have been examined for roles in HSC function in knockout mice. In this review, we compile the majority of these reports to provide a broad overview of the functional modules revealed by these genetic analyses and highlight some key regulatory pathways involved, including cell cycle control, TGF-β signaling, Pten/AKT signaling, Wnt signaling, and cytokine signaling. Finally, we propose recommendations for characterization of HSC function in knockout mice to facilitate cross-study comparisons that would generate a more cohesive picture of HSC biology. In the field of design, the minimalist movement stripped down buildings and objects to their most basic features, a sentiment that architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe summarized in his motto “less is more”. By depleting HSCs of specific genes, knockout studies transpose the minimalist approach into research biology, providing insights into the essential core of genetic features that is indispensable for a well-functioning hematopoietic system. PMID:22958929

  12. A real time chemotaxis assay unveils unique migratory profiles amongst different primary murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif J Iqbal

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis assays are an invaluable tool for studying the biological activity of inflammatory mediators such as CC chemokines, which have been implicated in a wide range of chronic inflammatory diseases. Conventional chemotaxis systems such as the modified Boyden chamber are limited in terms of the data captured given that the assays are analysed at a single time-point. We report the optimisation and validation of a label-free, real-time cell migration assay based on electrical cell impedance to measure chemotaxis of different primary murine macrophage populations in response to a range of CC chemokines and other chemoattractant signalling molecules. We clearly demonstrate key differences in the migratory behavior of different murine macrophage populations and show that this dynamic system measures true macrophage chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis or fugetaxis. We highlight an absolute requirement for Gαi signaling and actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as demonstrated by Pertussis toxin and cytochalasin D inhibition. We also studied the chemotaxis of CD14(+ human monocytes and demonstrate distinct chemotactic profiles amongst different monocyte donors to CCL2. This real-time chemotaxis assay will allow a detailed analysis of factors that regulate macrophage responses to chemoattractant cytokines and inflammatory mediators.

  13. A Real Time Chemotaxis Assay Unveils Unique Migratory Profiles amongst Different Primary Murine Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif J.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Christou, Ivy; White, Gemma E.; McNeill, Eileen; Kenyon, Amy; Taylor, Lewis; Kapellos, Theodore S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Channon, Keith M.; Greaves, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis assays are an invaluable tool for studying the biological activity of inflammatory mediators such as CC chemokines, which have been implicated in a wide range of chronic inflammatory diseases. Conventional chemotaxis systems such as the modified Boyden chamber are limited in terms of the data captured given that the assays are analysed at a single time-point. We report the optimisation and validation of a label-free, real-time cell migration assay based on electrical cell impedance to measure chemotaxis of different primary murine macrophage populations in response to a range of CC chemokines and other chemoattractant signalling molecules. We clearly demonstrate key differences in the migratory behavior of different murine macrophage populations and show that this dynamic system measures true macrophage chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis or fugetaxis. We highlight an absolute requirement for Gαi signaling and actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as demonstrated by Pertussis toxin and cytochalasin D inhibition. We also studied the chemotaxis of CD14+ human monocytes and demonstrate distinct chemotactic profiles amongst different monocyte donors to CCL2. This real-time chemotaxis assay will allow a detailed analysis of factors that regulate macrophage responses to chemoattractant cytokines and inflammatory mediators. PMID:23516549

  14. Unveiling consumer’s privacy paradox behaviour in an economic exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Bai

    2015-01-01

    Privacy paradox is of great interest to IS researchers and firms gathering personal information. It has been studied from social, behavioural, and economic perspectives independently. However, prior research has not examined the degrees of influence these perspectives contribute to the privacy paradox problem. We combine both economic and behavioural perspectives in our study of the privacy paradox with a price valuation of personal information through an economic experiment combined with a behavioural study on privacy paradox. Our goal is to reveal more insights on the privacy paradox through economic valuation on personal information. Results indicate that general privacy concerns or individual disclosure concerns do not have a significant influence on the price valuation of personal information. Instead, prior disclosure behaviour in specific scenario, like with healthcare providers or social networks, is a better indicator of consumer price valuations. PMID:27708687

  15. Lattice strain in irradiated materials unveils a prevalent defect evolution mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debelle, Aurélien; Crocombette, Jean-Paul; Boulle, Alexandre; Chartier, Alain; Jourdan, Thomas; Pellegrino, Stéphanie; Bachiller-Perea, Diana; Carpentier, Denise; Channagiri, Jayanth; Nguyen, Tien-Hien; Garrido, Frédérico; Thomé, Lionel

    2018-01-01

    Modification of materials using ion beams has become a widespread route to improve or design materials for advanced applications, from ion doping for microelectronic devices to emulation of nuclear reactor environments. Yet, despite decades of studies, major issues regarding ion/solid interactions are not solved, one of them being the lattice-strain development process in irradiated crystals. In this work, we address this question using a consistent approach that combines x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements with both molecular dynamics (MD) and rate equation cluster dynamics (RECD) simulations. We investigate four distinct materials that differ notably in terms of crystalline structure and nature of the atomic bonding. We demonstrate that these materials exhibit a common behavior with respect to the strain development process. In fact, a strain build-up followed by a strain relaxation is observed in the four investigated cases. The strain variation is unambiguously ascribed to a change in the defect configuration, as revealed by MD simulations. Strain development is due to the clustering of interstitial defects into dislocation loops, while the strain release is associated with the disappearance of these loops through their integration into a network of dislocation lines. RECD calculations of strain depth profiles, which are in agreement with experimental data, indicate that the driving force for the change in the defect nature is the defect clustering process. This study paves the way for quantitative predictions of the microstructure changes in irradiated materials.

  16. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Seabra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine Synthetase (GS catalyses the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of glutamine synthetase isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  17. Unveiling in situ interactions between marine protists and bacteria through single cell sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; Brazel, David; Poulton, Nicole J; Swan, Brandon K; Gomez, Monica Lluesma; Masland, Dashiell; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrophic protists are a highly diverse and biogeochemically significant component of marine ecosystems, yet little is known about their species-specific prey preferences and symbiotic interactions in situ. Here we demonstrate how these previously unresolved questions can be addressed by sequencing the eukaryote and bacterial SSU rRNA genes from individual, uncultured protist cells collected from their natural marine environment and sorted by flow cytometry. We detected Pelagibacter ubique in association with a MAST-4 protist, an actinobacterium in association with a chrysophyte and three bacteroidetes in association with diverse protist groups. The presence of identical phylotypes among the putative prey and the free bacterioplankton in the same sample provides evidence for predator–prey interactions. Our results also suggest a discovery of novel symbionts, distantly related to Rickettsiales and the candidate divisions ZB3 and TG2, associated with Cercozoa and Chrysophyta cells. This study demonstrates the power of single cell sequencing to untangle ecological interactions between uncultured protists and prokaryotes. PMID:21938022

  18. MicroRNAs sequencing unveils distinct molecular subgroups of plasmablastic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mundo, Lucia; Gazaneo, Sara; Picciolini, Matteo; Vara, Prasad Satya; Sayed, Shaheen; Ginori, Alessandro; Lo Bello, Giuseppe; Del Porro, Leonardo; Navari, Mohsen; Ascani, Stefano; Yonis, Amhed; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Lazzi, Stefano

    2017-12-08

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is an aggressive lymphoma, often arising in the context of immunodeficiency and associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The most frequently detected genetic alteration is the deregulation of MYC gene through the translocation - t(8;14)(q24;q32). The diagnosis of PBL is often challenging because it has an overlap in morphology, immunophenotype, cytogenetics and virus association with other lymphomas and plasma cell neoplasms; further, its molecular basis remains elusive. In the present study we aimed to better define the possible contribution of EBV infection as well as miRNA deregulation in PBL pathogenesis. We studied 23 cases of PBL, 19 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), and 17 extra-medullary plasmacytoma (EMPC). We used qPCR and immunohistochemistry to assess EBV latency patterns, while micro-RNA (miRNA) profiling was performed by next generation sequencing (Illumina) and validated by qPCR. Our analysis revealed a non-canonical EBV latency program with the partial expression of some proteins characterizing latency II and the activation of an abortive lytic cycle. Moreover, we identified miRNA signatures discriminating PBL from BL and EMPC. Interestingly, based on the miRNA profile, PBL appeared constituted by two discrete subgroups more similar to either BL or EMPC, respectively. This pattern was confirmed in an independent set of cases studied by qPCR and corresponded to different clinico-pathological features in the two groups, including HIV infection, MYC rearrangement and disease localization. In conclusion, we uncovered for the first time 1) an atypical EBV latency program in PBL; 2) a miRNA signature distinguishing PBL from the closest malignant counterparts; 3) the molecular basis of PBL heterogeneity.

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Pleistocene jawbone unveils the origin of polar bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Charlotte; Schuster, Stephan C.; Sun, Yazhou; Talbot, Sandra L.; Qi, Ji; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Kasson, Lindsay; Zeyl, Eve; Aars, Jon; Miller, Webb; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Bachmann, Lutz; Wiig, Øystein

    2010-01-01

    The polar bear has become the flagship species in the climate-change discussion. However, little is known about how past climate impacted its evolution and persistence, given an extremely poor fossil record. Although it is undisputed from analyses of mitochondrial (mt) DNA that polar bears constitute a lineage within the genetic diversity of brown bears, timing estimates of their divergence have differed considerably. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we have generated a complete, high-quality mt genome from a stratigraphically validated 130,000- to 110,000-year-old polar bear jawbone. In addition, six mt genomes were generated of extant polar bears from Alaska and brown bears from the Admiralty and Baranof islands of the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska and Kodiak Island. We show that the phylogenetic position of the ancient polar bear lies almost directly at the branching point between polar bears and brown bears, elucidating a unique morphologically and molecularly documented fossil link between living mammal species. Molecular dating and stable isotope analyses also show that by very early in their evolutionary history, polar bears were already inhabitants of the Artic sea ice and had adapted very rapidly to their current and unique ecology at the top of the Arctic marine food chain. As such, polar bears provide an excellent example of evolutionary opportunism within a widespread mammalian lineage.

  20. Femtosecond UV-laser pulses to unveil protein-protein interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Francesco; Monti, Daria M; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Vinciguerra, Roberto; Chino, Marco; Gesuele, Felice; Lombardi, Angelina; Velotta, Raffaele; Altucci, Carlo; Birolo, Leila; Piccoli, Renata; Arciello, Angela

    2016-02-01

    A hallmark to decipher bioprocesses is to characterize protein-protein interactions in living cells. To do this, the development of innovative methodologies, which do not alter proteins and their natural environment, is particularly needed. Here, we report a method (LUCK, Laser UV Cross-linKing) to in vivo cross-link proteins by UV-laser irradiation of living cells. Upon irradiation of HeLa cells under controlled conditions, cross-linked products of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were detected, whose yield was found to be a linear function of the total irradiation energy. We demonstrated that stable dimers of GAPDH were formed through intersubunit cross-linking, as also observed when the pure protein was irradiated by UV-laser in vitro. We proposed a defined patch of aromatic residues located at the enzyme subunit interface as the cross-linking sites involved in dimer formation. Hence, by this technique, UV-laser is able to photofix protein surfaces that come in direct contact. Due to the ultra-short time scale of UV-laser-induced cross-linking, this technique could be extended to weld even transient protein interactions in their native context.

  1. Metaproteomics of Colonic Microbiota Unveils Discrete Protein Functions among Colitic Mice and Control Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Clara; Stupp, Gregory S; Su, Andrew I; Wolan, Dennis W

    2018-02-01

    Metaproteomics can greatly assist established high-throughput sequencing methodologies to provide systems biological insights into the alterations of microbial protein functionalities correlated with disease-associated dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota. Here, the authors utilize the well-characterized murine T cell transfer model of colitis to find specific changes within the intestinal luminal proteome associated with inflammation. MS proteomic analysis of colonic samples permitted the identification of ≈10 000-12 000 unique peptides that corresponded to 5610 protein clusters identified across three groups, including the colitic Rag1 -/- T cell recipients, isogenic Rag1 -/- controls, and wild-type mice. The authors demonstrate that the colitic mice exhibited a significant increase in Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and show that such alterations in the microbial communities contributed to the enrichment of specific proteins with transcription and translation gene ontology terms. In combination with 16S sequencing, the authors' metaproteomics-based microbiome studies provide a foundation for assessing alterations in intestinal luminal protein functionalities in a robust and well-characterized mouse model of colitis, and set the stage for future studies to further explore the functional mechanisms of altered protein functionalities associated with dysbiosis and inflammation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The Relationship between Growth-Inequality-Poverty Triangle and Environmental Degradation: Unveiling the Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Anam Hassan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognize that increase in well-being is no longer dependent on further economic growth, but on economic and social well-being, which means that the decline in carbon dioxide emission without reducing real wellbeing and growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the main driving forces affecting short and long-run carbon emissions pattern due to changes in growth, inequality and poverty triangle in Pakistan over the period 1980 – 2011 by using multivariate cointegration approach. This study uses five different models i.e., each model have an important policy implication in the context of Pakistan. The results indicate that, on the short run, there is a significant negative relationship between economic growth & carbon emissions and economic growth & poverty while there is a positive relationship between i economic growth & income inequality; and ii poverty & income inequality. On the long-run, there is a significant positive relationship between GDP & income inequality, carbon dioxide emissions & income inequality, and poverty & income inequality in Pakistan. On the other side, there is a negative relationship between carbon emissions & economic growth, carbon emissions & income inequality, and economic growth & income inequality. The results of environmental Kuznets curve (EKC hypothesis show an inverted U-shaped trajectory in relation to economic growth in Pakistan. This study contributes to the debate on the existence and policy relevance of the EKC for Pakistan. The conclusion ensures the sustainability of an urgent need to look beyond the EKC by adopting courageous policy measures of environmental preservation in Pakistan irrespective of the country's level of income. For reduction of CO2 emission, environmental progressive management policies, economic transport system regulations, and low emit fuel consumption by industries are the need of the world.

  3. A Broad Phylogenetic Survey Unveils the Diversity and Evolution of Telomeres in Eukaryotes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulnečková, Jana; Ševčíková, Tereza; Fajkus, Jiří; Lukešová, Alena; Lukeš, Martin; Vlček, Čestmír; Lang, B.F.; Kim, E.; Eliáš, M.; Sýkorová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2013), s. 468-483 ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/09/1912 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/10/0705; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Program:GA; ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY * SEQUENCE DATA * GENOME Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M); EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 4.532, year: 2013

  4. Unveiling the inner morphology and gas kinematics of NGC 5135 with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, G.; Gruppioni, C.; Massardi, M.; Giannetti, A.; Burkutean, S.; Cimatti, A.; Pozzi, F.; Talia, M.

    2018-06-01

    The local Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5135, thanks to its almost face-on appearance, a bulge overdensity of stars, the presence of a large-scale bar, an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and a supernova remnant, is an excellent target to investigate the dynamics of inflows, outflows, star formation, and AGN feedback. Here, we present a reconstruction of the gas morphology and kinematics in the inner regions of this galaxy, based on the analysis of Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) archival data. For this purpose, we combine the available ˜100 pc resolution ALMA 1.3 and 0.45 mm observations of dust continuum emission, the spectroscopic maps of two transitions of the CO molecule (tracer of molecular gas mass in star-forming and nuclear regions), and of the CS molecule (tracer of the dense star-forming regions) with the outcome of the spectral energy distribution decomposition. By applying the 3DBAROLO software (3D-Based Analysis of Rotating Objects from Line Observations), we have been able to fit the galaxy rotation curve using a 3D tilted-ring model of the disc. Most of the observed emitting features are described by our kinematic model. We also attempt an interpretation for the emission in a few regions that the axisymmetric model fails to reproduce. The most relevant of these is a region at the northern edge of the inner bar, where multiple velocity components overlap, as a possible consequence of the expansion of a superbubble.

  5. Lipid Droplets: A New Player in Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells Unveiled by Spectroscopic Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Tirinato, Luca; Liberale, Carlo; Di Franco, Simone; Candeloro, Patrizio; Benfante, Antonina; La Rocca, Rosanna; Potze, Lisette; Marotta, Roberto; Ruffilli, Roberta; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar P.; Malerba, Mario; De Angelis, Francesco; Falqui, Andrea; Carbone, Ennio; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model is describing tumors as a hierarchical organized system and CSCs are suggested to be responsible for cancer recurrence after therapy. The identification of specific markers of CSCs is therefore of paramount importance. Here, we show that high levels of lipid droplets (LDs) are a distinctive mark of CSCs in colorectal (CR) cancer. This increased lipid content was clearly revealed by label-free Raman spectroscopy and it directly correlates with well-accepted CR-CSC markers as CD133 and Wnt pathway activity. By xenotransplantation experiments, we have finally demonstrated that CR-CSCs overexpressing LDs retain most tumorigenic potential. A relevant conceptual advance in this work is the demonstration that a cellular organelle, the LD, is a signature of CSCs, in addition to molecular markers. A further functional characterization of LDs could lead soon to design new target therapies against CR-CSCs.

  6. Near-infrared mapping of ARP 299 (IC 694-NGC 3690) - colliding galaxies unveiled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telesco, C.M.; Decher, R.; Gatley, I.; Edinburgh Royal Observatory, England)

    1985-01-01

    Near-infrared maps and multicolor photometry of the interacting galaxies IC 694 and NGC 3690 which form Arp 299 (= Markarian 171) are presented. These data reveal for the first time the distribution of nuclei and old red stars in a cataclysmically interacting system. The nuclei are considerably offset from the visual centroids of the galaxies but not from the mass centroids. The near-infrared colors of the most active regions are strongly affected by extinction, emission form hot dust, and bremsstrahlung. Near-infrared emission is also identified with secondary regions of star formation, probably resulting from the galaxies interaction. 24 references

  7. Unveiling a spinor field classification with non-Abelian gauge symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Luca; da Rocha, Roldão

    2018-05-01

    A spinor fields classification with non-Abelian gauge symmetries is introduced, generalizing the U(1) gauge symmetries-based Lounesto's classification. Here, a more general classification, contrary to the Lounesto's one, encompasses spinor multiplets, corresponding to non-Abelian gauge fields. The particular case of SU(2) gauge symmetry, encompassing electroweak and electromagnetic conserved charges, is then implemented by a non-Abelian spinor classification, now involving 14 mixed classes of spinor doublets. A richer flagpole, dipole, and flag-dipole structure naturally descends from this general classification. The Lounesto's classification of spinors is shown to arise as a Pauli's singlet, into this more general classification.

  8. Unveiling Singlet Fission Mediating States in TIPS-pentacene and its Aza Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Julia; Buckup, Tiago; Paulus, Fabian; Engelhart, Jens U; Bunz, Uwe H F; Motzkus, Marcus

    2015-06-25

    Femtosecond pump-depletion-probe experiments were carried out in order to shed light on the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of triisopropylsilylethynyl (TIPS)-pentacene and two nitrogen-containing derivatives, namely, diaza-TIPS-pentacene and tetraaza-TIPS-pentacene. Measurements performed in the visible and near-infrared spectral range in combination with rate model simulations reveal that singlet fission proceeds via the extremely short-lived intermediate (1)TT state, which absorbs in the near-infrared spectral region only. The T1 → T3 transition probed in the visible region shows a rise time that comprises two components according to a consecutive reaction (S1 → (1)TT → T1). The incorporation of nitrogen atoms into the acene structure leads to shorter dynamics, but the overall triplet formation follows the same kinetic model. This is of particular importance, since experiments on tetraaza-TIPS-pentacene allow for investigation of the triplet state in the visible range without an overlapping singlet contribution. In addition, the pump-depletion-probe experiments show that the triplet absorption in the visible (T1 → T3) and near-infrared (T1 → T2) regions occurs from the same initial state, which was questioned in previous studies. Furthermore, an additional ultrafast transfer between the excited triplet states (T3 → T2) is identified, which is also in agreement with the rate model simulation. By applying depletion pulses, which are resonant with higher vibrational levels, we gain insight into internal vibrational energy redistribution processes within the triplet manifold. This additional information is of great relevance regarding the study of loss channels within these materials.

  9. Unveiling secret interactions among sterile neutrinos with big-bang nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviano, Ninetta; Pisanti, Ofelia; Mangano, Gianpiero; Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Short-baseline neutrino anomalies suggest the existence of low-mass [m ˜O (1 ) eV ] sterile neutrinos νs. These would be efficiently produced in the early universe by oscillations with active neutrino species, leading to a thermal population of the sterile states seemingly incompatible with cosmological observations. In order to relieve this tension it has been recently speculated that new "secret" interactions among sterile neutrinos, mediated by a massive gauge boson X (with MX≪MW), can inhibit or suppress the sterile neutrino thermalization, due to the production of a large matter potential term. We note however, that they also generate strong collisional terms in the sterile neutrino sector that induce an efficient sterile neutrino production after a resonance in matter is encountered, increasing their contribution to the number of relativistic particle species Neff. Moreover, for values of the parameters of the νs-νs interaction for which the resonance takes place at temperature T ≲few MeV , significant distortions are produced in the electron (anti)neutrino spectra, altering the abundance of light element in big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Using the present determination of 4He and deuterium primordial abundances we determine the BBN constraints on the model parameters. We find that 2H/H density ratio exclude much of the parameter space if one assumes a baryon density at the best fit value of Planck experiment, ΩBh2=0.02207 , while bounds become weaker for a higher ΩBh2=0.02261 , the 95% C.L. upper bound of Planck. Due to the large error on its experimental determination, the helium mass fraction Yp gives no significant bounds.

  10. Cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers unveiled by hard X-ray observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    We review the current understanding of the cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers elucidated by X-ray surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Hard X-ray observations at energies above 2 keV are the most efficient and complete tools to find "obscured" AGNs, which are dominant populations among all AGNs. Combinations of surveys with various flux limits and survey area have enabled us to determine the space number density and obscuration properties of AGNs as a function of luminosity and redshift. The results have essentially solved the origin of the X-ray background in the energy band below ∼10 keV. The downsizing (or anti-hierarchical) evolution that more luminous AGNs have the space-density peak at higher redshifts has been discovered, challenging theories of galaxy and black hole formation. Finally, we summarize unresolved issues on AGN evolution and prospects for future X-ray missions.

  11. Satyam’s Manipulative Accounting Methodology Unveiled: An Experience of an Asian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADAN LAL BHASIN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulative accounting practices are perennial and such practices have occurred in all eras, in all countries and affected millions of corporations. Unfortunately, there are few loopholes in accounting and auditing standards, which provide leeway and thus motivate accounting professionals to use aggressively manipulation practices. In fact, manipulative accounting (MA involves the intentional cooking-up of financial records towards a pre-determined target. Every company indeed maneuvers the numbers, to a certain extent, as formally reported in its financial statements (FS to achieve budgetary targets and generously reward senior managers. From Enron, WorldCom to Satyam, it appeared that window-dressing leading to MA is a serious problem that is increasing both in its frequency and severity, which undermines the integrity of financial reports and eroded investors’ confidence. The responsibility of preventing, detecting and investigating financial frauds rests squarely on Board of Directors and they should adopt preventive steps. Despite the raft of CG, and financial disclosure reforms, corporate accounting still remains murky and companies continue to find ways to play ‘hide-and-seek’ game with the system. Satyam computers were once the crown jewel of Indian IT-industry but were brought to the ground by its founders in 2009 as a result of financial manipulations in FS. The present study provides a snapshot of how Mr. Raju (CEO and Chairman mastermind this maze of AM practices? Undoubtedly, Satyam scam is illegal and unethical in which computers were cleverly used to manipulate account books by creating fake invoices, inflating revenues, falsifying the cash and bank balances, showing non-existent interest on fixed deposits, showing ghost employees, and so on. Satyam fraud has shattered the dreams of investors, shocked the government and regulators and led to questioning of the accounting practices of auditors and CG norms in India. Finally, we recommend that “All types of MA practices should be legally recognized as a serious crime, and accounting bodies, law courts and regulatory authorities must adopt exemplary punitive measures to prevent such unethical practices.”

  12. Unveiling the wet chemical etching characteristics of polydimethylsiloxane film for soft micromachining applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakati, A; Maji, D; Das, S

    2017-01-01

    Micromachining of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microstructure by wet chemical etching is explored for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and microfluidic applications. A 100 µ m thick PDMS film was patterned with different microstructure designs by wet chemical etching using a N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (C 16 H 36 FN) and tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride (C 5 H 9 NO) mixture solution with 3:1 volume ratio after lithography for studying etching characteristics. The patterning parameters, such as etch rate, surface roughness, pH of etchant solution with time, were thoroughly investigated. A detailed study of surface morphology with etching time revealed nonlinear behaviour of the PDMS surface roughness and etch rate. A maximum rate of 1.45 µ m min −1 for 10 min etching with surface roughness of 360 nm was achieved. A new approach of wet chemical etching with pH controlled doped etchant was introduced for lower surface roughness of etched microstructures, and a constant etch rate during etching. Variation of the etching rate and surface roughness by pH controlled etching was performed by doping 5–15 gm l −1 of silicic acid (SiO 2xH2 O) into the traditional etchant solution. PDMS etching by silicic acid doped etchant solution showed a reduction in surface roughness from 400 nm to 220 nm for the same 15 µ m etching. This study is beneficial for micromachining of various MEMS and microfluidic structures such as micropillars, microchannels, and other PDMS microstructures. (paper)

  13. Unveiling the status of alien animals in the arid zone of Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubing Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological invasion is one of the most threatening factors for biodiversity conservation. Lacking information on alien species in certain regions of the world hampers a balanced understanding of invasion processes and efficient data exchange among stakeholders. Current knowledge gaps are in need of urgent concern. We therefore conducted a review on alien animals in Xinjiang, an unknown region of invasion ecology. Xinjiang lies in the heartland of the Asian continent, covering an area of 1,664,900 km2. In the past 64 years, 128 alien animal species were recorded in this region, 39% of which became invasive and led to loss of native biodiversity. Most of these species were introduced through diversification of local agriculture and aquaculture. This process was aggravated by improving transportation and flourishing trade. Multiple linear regression models and correlation analysis were run for explaining influence of environmental and anthropogenic factors on status of alien animals: economically developed areas with abundant water resource, oases in particular, were prone to be hotspots of alien animal species in this arid and semi-arid region. This study also revealed that taxonomically biased and lagged research were critical problems that impeded studies on biological invasions in Xinjiang, and proposed feasible solutions.

  14. Gr and hp-1 tomato mutants unveil unprecedented interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and fruit ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    The roots of plants interact with soil mycorrhizal fungi to facilitate soil nutrient acquisition by the plant and carbon transfer to the fungus. Here we use tomato fruit ripening mutations to demonstrate that this root interaction communicates with and supports genetic mechanisms associated with th...

  15. On the way to unveiling the atomic structure of superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy of the transfermium elements (atomic number Z > 100) is nowadays one of the most fascinating and simultaneously challenging tasks in atomic physics. On the one hand, key atomic and even nuclear ground-state properties may be obtained by studying the spectral lines of these heaviest elements. On the other hand, these elements have to be produced “online” by heavy-ion induced fusion-evaporation reactions yielding rates on the order of a few atoms per second at most, which renders their optical spectroscopy extremely difficult. Only recently, a first foray of laser spectroscopy into this heaviest element region was reported. Several atomic transitions in the element nobelium (Z = 102) were observed and characterized, using an ultra-sensitive and highly efficient resonance ionization technique. The findings confirm the predictions and additionally provide a benchmark for theoretical modelling. The work represents an important stepping stone towards experimental studies of the atomic structure of superheavy elements.

  16. Unveiling scientific communities about sustainability and innovation. A bibliometric journey around sustainable terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franceschini, Simone; Faria, Lourenco; Jurowetzki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    innovation), and they concluded that such terms are mostly interchangeable. These findings surprise in light of the different positions shown in the innovation for sustainability debate. Our bibliometric analysis tracks meanings and communities associated with these four terms and indicates some overlaps......, especially between eco-innovation and environmental innovation. However, we found relevant differences of meanings and communities that reflect the different positions in the innovation for sustainability debate....

  17. mRNA Transcriptomics of Galectins Unveils Heterogeneous Organization in Mouse and Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian John

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Galectins, a family of non-classically secreted, β-galactoside binding proteins is involved in several brain disorders; however no systematic knowledge on the normal neuroanatomical distribution and functions of galectins exits. Hence, the major purpose of this study was to understand spatial distribution and predict functions of galectins in brain and also compare the degree of conservation vs. divergence between mouse and human species. The latter objective was required to determine the relevance and appropriateness of studying galectins in mouse brain which may ultimately enable us to extrapolate the findings to human brain physiology and pathologies.Results: In order to fill this crucial gap in our understanding of brain galectins, we analyzed the in situ hybridization (ISH and microarray data of adult mouse and human brain respectively, from the Allen Brain Atlas, to resolve each galectin-subtype’s spatial distribution across brain distinct cytoarchitecture. Next, transcription factors (TFs that may regulate galectins were identified using TRANSFAC software and the list obtained was further curated to sort TFs on their confirmed transcript expression in the adult brain. Galectin-TF cluster analysis, gene-ontology annotations and co-expression networks were then extrapolated to predict distinct functional relevance of each galectin in the neuronal processes. Data shows that galectins have highly heterogeneous expression within and across brain sub-structures and are predicted to be the crucial targets of brain enriched TFs. Lgals9 had maximal spatial distribution across mouse brain with inferred predominant roles in neurogenesis while LGALS1 was ubiquitously expressed in human. Limbic region associated with learning, memory and emotions and substantia nigra associated with motor movements showed strikingly high expression of LGALS1 and LGALS8 in human vs. mouse brain. The overall expression profile of galectin-8 was most preserved across both these species, however, galectin-9 showed maximal preservation only in the cerebral cortex.Conclusions: It is for the first time that a comprehensive description of galectins’ mRNA expression profile in brain is presented. Results suggests that spatial transcriptome changes in galectins may contribute to differential brain functions and evolution across species that highlights galectins as novel signatures of brain heterogeneity and functions, which if disturbed, can promote several brain disorders.

  18. Integrative analyses unveil speciation linked to host plant shift in Spialia butterflies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernández-Roldán, J. L.; Dapporto, L.; Dincă, V.; Vicente, J. C.; Hornett, E. A.; Šíchová, Jindra; Lukhtanov, V. A.; Talavera, G.; Vila, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 17 (2016), s. 4267-4284 ISSN 0962-1083 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22765S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biogeography * butterflies * Lepidoptera Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 6.086, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mec.13756/abstract

  19. Unveiling distribution patterns of freshwater phytoplankton by a next generation sequencing based approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eiler, A.; Drakare, S.; Bertilsson, S.; Pernthaler, J.; Peura, S.; Rofner, C.; Šimek, Karel; Yang, Y.; Znachor, Petr; Lindström, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013), e53516 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/08/0015 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : phytoplankton * next generation sequencing * diversity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  20. High-field fMRI unveils orientation columns in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Essa; Harel, Noam; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    2008-07-29

    Functional (f)MRI has revolutionized the field of human brain research. fMRI can noninvasively map the spatial architecture of brain function via localized increases in blood flow after sensory or cognitive stimulation. Recent advances in fMRI have led to enhanced sensitivity and spatial accuracy of the measured signals, indicating the possibility of detecting small neuronal ensembles that constitute fundamental computational units in the brain, such as cortical columns. Orientation columns in visual cortex are perhaps the best known example of such a functional organization in the brain. They cannot be discerned via anatomical characteristics, as with ocular dominance columns. Instead, the elucidation of their organization requires functional imaging methods. However, because of insufficient sensitivity, spatial accuracy, and image resolution of the available mapping techniques, thus far, they have not been detected in humans. Here, we demonstrate, by using high-field (7-T) fMRI, the existence and spatial features of orientation- selective columns in humans. Striking similarities were found with the known spatial features of these columns in monkeys. In addition, we found that a larger number of orientation columns are devoted to processing orientations around 90 degrees (vertical stimuli with horizontal motion), whereas relatively similar fMRI signal changes were observed across any given active column. With the current proliferation of high-field MRI systems and constant evolution of fMRI techniques, this study heralds the exciting prospect of exploring unmapped and/or unknown columnar level functional organizations in the human brain.

  1. The unexpectedly bright comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) unveiled at near-infrared wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, Lucas; DiSanti, Michael A.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA GSFC, MS 690, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Gibb, Erika L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Boehnhardt, Hermann, E-mail: lucas.paganini@nasa.gov [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191, Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    We acquired near-infrared spectra of the Oort cloud comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) at three different heliocentric distances (R {sub h}) during the comet's 2013 perihelion passage, providing a comprehensive measure of the outgassing behavior of parent volatiles and cosmogonic indicators. Our observations were performed pre-perihelion at R {sub h} = 1.2 AU with CRIRES (on 2013 February 2 and 4), and post-perihelion at R {sub h} = 0.75 AU with CSHELL (on March 31 and April 1) and R {sub h} = 1.74 AU with NIRSPEC (on June 20). We detected 10 volatile species (H{sub 2}O, OH* prompt emission, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}CO, HCN, CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 2}), and obtained upper limits for two others (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and HDO). One-dimensional spatial profiles displayed different distributions for some volatiles, confirming either the existence of polar and apolar ices, or of chemically distinct active vents in the nucleus. The ortho-para ratio for water was 3.31 ± 0.33 (weighted mean of CRIRES and NIRSPEC results), implying a spin temperature >37 K at the 95% confidence limit. Our (3σ) upper limit for HDO corresponds to D/H < 2.45 × 10{sup –3} (i.e., <16 Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW). At R {sub h} = 1.2 AU (CRIRES), the production rate for water was Q(H{sub 2}O) = 1.9 ± 0.1 × 10{sup 29} s{sup –1} and its rotational temperature was T {sub rot} ∼ 69 K. At R {sub h} = 0.75 AU (CSHELL), we measured Q(H{sub 2}O) = 4.6 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 29} s{sup –1} and T {sub rot} = 80 K on March 31, and 6.6 ± 0.9 × 10{sup 29} s{sup –1} and T {sub rot} = 100 K on April 1. At R {sub h} = 1.74 AU (NIRSPEC), we obtained Q(H{sub 2}O) = 1.1 ± 0.1 × 10{sup 29} s{sup –1} and T {sub rot} ∼ 50 K. The measured volatile abundance ratios classify comet C/2012 F6 as rather depleted in C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and CH{sub 3}OH, while HCN, CH{sub 4}, and CO displayed abundances close to their median values found among comets. H{sub 2}CO was the only volatile showing a relative enhancement. The relative paucity of C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and CH{sub 3}OH (with respect to H{sub 2}O) suggests formation within warm regions of the nebula. However, the normal abundance of HCN and hypervolatiles CH{sub 4} and CO, and the enhancement of H{sub 2}CO, may indicate a possible heterogeneous nucleus of comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon), possibly as a result of radial mixing within the protoplanetary disk.

  2. The mechanism of the growth-inhibitory effect of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on human bladder cancer: a functional analysis of car protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okegawa, T; Pong, R C; Li, Y; Bergelson, J M; Sagalowsky, A I; Hsieh, J T

    2001-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is identified as a high-affinity receptor for adenovirus type 5. We observed that invasive bladder cancer specimens had significantly reduced CAR mRNA levels compared with superficial bladder cancer specimens, which suggests that CAR may play a role in the progression of bladder cancer. Elevated CAR expression in the T24 cell line (CAR-negative cells) increased its sensitivity to adenovirus infection and significantly inhibited its in vitro growth, accompanied by p21 and hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma accumulation. Conversely, decreased CAR levels in both RT4 and 253J cell lines (CAR-positive cells) promoted their in vitro growth. To unveil the mechanism of action of CAR, we showed that the extracellular domain of CAR facilitated intercellular adhesion. Furthermore, interrupting intercellular adhesion of CAR by a specific antibody alleviates the growth-inhibitory effect of CAR. We also demonstrated that both the transmembrane and intracellular domains of CAR were critical for its growth-inhibitory activity. These data indicate that the cell-cell contact initiated by membrane-bound CAR can elicit a negative signal cascade to modulate cell cycle regulators inside the nucleus of bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the presence of CAR cannot only facilitate viral uptake of adenovirus but also inhibit cell growth. These results can be integrated to formulate a new strategy for bladder cancer therapy.

  3. Emulsion-Based RIR-MAPLE Deposition of Conjugated Polymers: Primary Solvent Effect and Its Implications on Organic Solar Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wangyao; Li, Nan K; McCormick, Ryan D; Lichtenberg, Eli; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D

    2016-08-03

    Emulsion-based, resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) has been demonstrated as an alternative technique to deposit conjugated polymer films for photovoltaic applications; yet, a fundamental understanding of how the emulsion target characteristics translate into film properties and solar cell performance is unclear. Such understanding is crucial to enable the rational improvement of organic solar cell (OSC) efficiency and to realize the expected advantages of emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE for OSC fabrication. In this paper, the effect of the primary solvent used in the emulsion target is studied, both experimentally and theoretically, and it is found to determine the conjugated polymer cluster size in the emulsion as well as surface roughness and internal morphology of resulting polymer films. By using a primary solvent with low solubility-in-water and low vapor pressure, the surface roughness of deposited P3HT and PCPDTBT polymer films was reduced to 10 nm, and the efficiency of P3HT:PC61BM OSCs was increased to 3.2% (∼100 times higher compared to the first MAPLE OSC demonstration [ Caricato , A. P. ; Appl. Phys. Lett. 2012 , 100 , 073306 ]). This work unveils the mechanism of polymer film formation using emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE and provides insight and direction to determine the best ways to take advantage of the emulsion target approach to control film properties for different applications.

  4. Origin of selenium–gold interaction in F2CSe⋯AuY (Y = CN, F, Cl, Br, OH, and CH3): Synergistic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xin; Yang, Yu-Ping; Li, Qing-Zhong; Li, Hai-Bei

    2016-01-01

    Selenium–gold interaction plays an important role in crystal materials, molecular self-assembly, and pharmacochemistry involving gold. In this paper, we unveiled the mechanism and nature of selenium–gold interaction by studying complexes F 2 CSe⋯AuY (Y = CN, F, Cl, Br, OH, and CH 3 ). The results showed that the formation of selenium–gold interaction is mainly attributed to the charge transfer from the lone pair of Se atom to the Au—Y anti-bonding orbital. Energy decomposition analysis indicated that the polarization energy is nearly equivalent to or exceeds the electrostatic term in the selenium–gold interaction. Interestingly, the chalcogen–gold interaction becomes stronger with the increase of chalcogen atomic mass in F 2 CX⋯AuCN (X = O, S, Se, and Te). The cyclic ternary complexes are formed with the introduction of NH 3 into F 2 CSe⋯AuY, in which selenium–gold interaction is weakened and selenium–nitrogen interaction is strengthened due to the synergistic effects.

  5. Thrombospondin-1 type 1 repeats in a model of inflammatory bowel disease: transcript profile and therapeutic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is a matricellular protein with regulatory functions in inflammation and cancer. The type 1 repeats (TSR domains of TSP-1 have been shown to interact with a wide range of proteins that result in the anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties of TSP-1. To ascertain possible functions and evaluate potential therapeutic effects of TSRs in inflammatory bowel disease, we conducted clinical, histological and microarray analyses on a mouse model of induced colitis. We used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS to induce colitis in wild-type (WT mice for 7 days. Simultaneously, mice were injected with either saline or one form of TSP-1 derived recombinant proteins, containing either (1 the three type 1 repeats of the TSP-1 (3TSR, (2 the second type 1 repeat (TSR2, or (3 TSR2 with the RFK sequence (TSR2+RFK. Total RNA isolated from the mice colons were processed and hybridized to mouse arrays. Array data were validated by real-time qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Histological and disease indices reveal that the mice treated with the TSRs show different patterns of leukocytic infiltration and that 3TSR treatment was the most effective in decreasing inflammation in DSS-induced colitis. Transcriptional profiling revealed differentially expressed (DE genes, with the 3TSR-treated mice showing the least deviation from the WT-water controls. In conclusion, this study shows that 3TSR treatment is effective in attenuating the inflammatory response to DSS injury. In addition, the transcriptomics work unveils novel genetic data that suggest beneficial application of the TSR domains in inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. The long-term side effects of radiation therapy for benign brain tumors in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    al-Mefty, O.; Kersh, J.E.; Routh, A.; Smith, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral part in managing intracranial tumors. While the risk:benefit ratio is considered acceptable for treating malignant tumors, risks of long-term complications of radiotherapy need thorough assessment in adults treated for benign tumors. Many previously reported delayed complications of radiotherapy can be attributed to inappropriate treatment or to the sensitivity of a developing child's brain to radiation. Medical records, radiological studies, autopsy findings, and follow-up information were reviewed for 58 adult patients (31 men and 27 women) treated between 1958 and 1987 with radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumors. Patient ages at the time of irradiation ranged from 21 to 87 years (mean 47.7 years). The pathology included 46 pituitary adenomas, five meningiomas, four glomus jugulare tumors, two pineal area tumors, and one craniopharyngioma. Average radiation dosage was 4984 cGy (range 3100 to 7012 cGy), given in an average of 27.2 fractions (range 15 to 45 fractions), over a period averaging 46.6 days. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 31 years (mean 8.1 years). Findings related to tumor recurrence or surgery were excluded. Twenty-two patients had complications considered to be delayed side effects of radiotherapy. Two patients had visual deterioration developing 3 and 6 years after treatment; six had pituitary dysfunction; and 17 had varying degrees of parenchymal changes of the brain, occurring mostly in the temporal lobes and relating to the frequent presentation of pituitary tumors. One clival tumor with the radiographic appearance of a meningioma, developed 30 years post-irradiation for acromegaly. This study unveils considerable delayed sequelae of radiotherapy in a series of adult patients receiving what is considered safe treatment for benign brain tumors. 163 refs

  7. Antineoplastic Effects of PPARγ Agonists, with a Special Focus on Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptor that functions as transcription factor and plays an important role in lipid metabolism and insulin sensitization. Recent studies have shown that PPARγ is overexpressed in many tumor types, including cancers of breast, lung, pancreas, colon, glioblastoma, prostate and thyroid differentiated/anaplastic cancers. These data suggest a role of PPARγ in tumor development and/or progression. PPARγ is emerging as a growth-limiting and differentiation-promoting factor, and it exerts a tumor suppressor role. Moreover, naturally-occurring and synthetic PPARγ agonists promote growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic agonists of PPARγ that were developed to treat type II diabetes. These compounds also display anticancer effects which appear mainly to be independent of their PPARγ agonist activity. Various preclinical and clinical studies strongly suggest a role for TZDs both alone and in combination with existing chemotherapeutic agents, for the treatment of cancer. Differentiation therapy involves the use of agents with the ability to induce differentiation in cells that have lost this ability, i.e. cancer cells, targeting pathways capable of re-activating blocked terminal differentiation programs. PPARγ agonists have been shown to induce differentiation in solid tumors such as thyroid differentiated/ anaplastic cancers and sarcomas. However, emerging data suggest that chronic use of TZDs is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The exploration of newer PPARγ agonists can help in unveiling the underlying mechanisms of these drugs, providing new molecules that are able to treat cancer, without increasing the cardiovascular risk of neoplastic patients.

  8. The long-term side effects of radiation therapy for benign brain tumors in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    al-Mefty, O.; Kersh, J.E.; Routh, A.; Smith, R.R. (Univ. of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral part in managing intracranial tumors. While the risk:benefit ratio is considered acceptable for treating malignant tumors, risks of long-term complications of radiotherapy need thorough assessment in adults treated for benign tumors. Many previously reported delayed complications of radiotherapy can be attributed to inappropriate treatment or to the sensitivity of a developing child's brain to radiation. Medical records, radiological studies, autopsy findings, and follow-up information were reviewed for 58 adult patients (31 men and 27 women) treated between 1958 and 1987 with radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumors. Patient ages at the time of irradiation ranged from 21 to 87 years (mean 47.7 years). The pathology included 46 pituitary adenomas, five meningiomas, four glomus jugulare tumors, two pineal area tumors, and one craniopharyngioma. Average radiation dosage was 4984 cGy (range 3100 to 7012 cGy), given in an average of 27.2 fractions (range 15 to 45 fractions), over a period averaging 46.6 days. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 31 years (mean 8.1 years). Findings related to tumor recurrence or surgery were excluded. Twenty-two patients had complications considered to be delayed side effects of radiotherapy. Two patients had visual deterioration developing 3 and 6 years after treatment; six had pituitary dysfunction; and 17 had varying degrees of parenchymal changes of the brain, occurring mostly in the temporal lobes and relating to the frequent presentation of pituitary tumors. One clival tumor with the radiographic appearance of a meningioma, developed 30 years post-irradiation for acromegaly. This study unveils considerable delayed sequelae of radiotherapy in a series of adult patients receiving what is considered safe treatment for benign brain tumors. 163 refs.

  9. Radio-loudness in black hole transients: evidence for an inclination effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, S. E.; Casella, P.; Fender, R.

    2018-06-01

    Accreting stellar-mass black holes appear to populate two branches in a radio:X-ray luminosity plane. We have investigated the X-ray variability properties of a large number of black hole low-mass X-ray binaries, with the aim of unveiling the physical reasons underlying the radio-loud/radio-quiet nature of these sources, in the context of the known accretion-ejection connection. A reconsideration of the available radio and X-ray data from a sample of black hole X-ray binaries confirms that being radio-quiet is the more normal mode of behaviour for black hole binaries. In the light of this we chose to test, once more, the hypothesis that radio loudness could be a consequence of the inclination of the X-ray binary. We compared the slope of the `hard-line' (an approximately linear correlation between X-ray count rate and rms variability, visible in the hard states of active black holes), the orbital inclination, and the radio-nature of the sources of our sample. We found that high-inclination objects show steeper hard-lines than low-inclination objects, and tend to display a radio-quiet nature (with the only exception of V404 Cyg), as opposed to low-inclination objects, which appear to be radio-loud(er). While in need of further confirmation, our results suggest that - contrary to what has been believed for years - the radio-loud/quiet nature of black-hole low mass X-ray binaries might be an inclination effect, rather than an intrinsic source property. This would solve an important issue in the context of the inflow-outflow connection, thus providing significant constraints to the models for the launch of hard-state compact jets.

  10. Shareholder Lock-In Contracts : Share Price and Trading Volume Effects at the Lock-In Expiry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angenandt, P.P.; Goergen, M.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper unveils the diversity in lock-in agreements of firms listed on the Nouveau Marche stock exchange in France.We give the main economic reasons why shareholders adopt lock-in agreements that are more stringent than legally required.We relate the abnormal returns and the abnormal volume at

  11. Effects of Bi(Zn2/3Nb1/3)O3 Modification on the Relaxor Behavior and Piezoelectricity of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zenghui; Wu, Hua; Paterson, Alisa; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2017-10-01

    Relaxor lead magnesium niobate (PMN)-based materials exhibit complex structures and unusual properties that have been puzzling researchers for decades. In this paper, a new ternary solid solution of Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 -PbTiO 3 -Bi(Zn 2/3 Nb 1/3 )O 3 (PMN-PT-BZN) is prepared in the form of ceramics, and the effects of the incorporation of BZN into the PMN-PT binary system are investigated. The crystal structure favors a pseudocubic symmetry and the relaxor properties are enhanced as the concentration of BZN increases. The relaxor behavior and the related phase transformations are studied by dielectric spectroscopy. A phase diagram mapping out the characteristic temperatures and various states is established. Interestingly, the piezoelectricity of the PMN-PT ceramics is significantly enhanced by the BZN substitution, with an optimal value of d 33 reaching 826 pC/N for 0.96[0.7Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 -0.3PbTiO 3 ]-0.04Bi(Zn 2/3 Nb 1/3 )O 3 . This paper provides a better understanding of the relaxor ferroelectric behavior, and unveils a new relaxor-based ternary system as piezoelectric materials potentially useful for electromechanical transducer applications.

  12. risk factors for hypertension among urban males in mombasa kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    risk factors for hypertension among urban males in mombasa kenya. ... A community based cross-sectional study was done in Mombasa Old Town area, whereby males ... The study unveiled that physical exercise had protective effect there by ...

  13. The effectiveness of a serious game to enhance empathy for care workers for people with disabilities: A parallel randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterkenburg, P S; Vacaru, V S

    2018-04-04

    Empathic care is fundamental in healthcare settings and is associated to several positive outcomes for care workers (i.e. burnout, compassion satisfaction) and patients (i.e. therapeutic alliance, trust, wellbeing). Yet, studies showed a decrease in empathy in care workers, which is argued to be a product of personal distress. Thus, interventions should aim at enhancing empathy in care workers working for vulnerable populations to ensure optimal client-carer relationships. The current study investigates the effectiveness of the serious game "The world of EMPA" in enhancing empathy in care workers for people with disabilities, and tests the effect of personal distress on empathy change post intervention. We conducted a superiority parallel randomized controlled trial (RCT) and tested 224 participants in two conditions: the experimental group (n = 111) played a serious game and the control group (n = 113) read a digital information package about disabilities. Participants were assessed on empathy and personal distress prior to and after the intervention. Main results showed that the serious game did not significantly enhance empathy in care workers, whereas reading a digital information package yield a significant decrease in empathy. Exploratory analysis showed that the serious game decreased significantly personal distress in care-workers. This study showed that while the serious game "The world of EMPA" did not enhance empathy, it resulted in a decrease in personal distress in care workers for people with disabilities. Further evidence should corroborate these findings to unveil the mechanisms of this intervention and the long-term effects on personal distress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Virally inactivated human platelet concentrate lysate induces regulatory T cells and immunosuppressive effect in a murine asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh-Lun; Lee, Lin-Wen; Su, Chen-Yao; Hsiao, George; Yang, Yi-Yuan; Leu, Sy-Jye; Shieh, Ying-Hua; Burnouf, Thierry

    2013-09-01

    Platelet concentrate lysates (PCLs) are increasingly used in regenerative medicine. We have developed a solvent/detergent (S/D)-treated PCL. The functional properties of this preparation should be unveiled. We hypothesized that, due to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) content, PCLs may exert immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory functions. PCL was prepared by S/D treatment, oil extraction, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The content of TGF-β in PCL was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cultured CD4+ T cells were used to investigate the effects of PCL on expression of transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), the inhibition of T-cell proliferation, and cytokine production. The regulatory function of PCL-converted CD4+ T cells was analyzed by suppressive assay. The BALB/c mice were given PCL-converted CD4+ T cells before ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge using an asthma model. Inflammatory parameters, such as the level of immunoglobulin E (IgE), airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchial lavage fluid eosinophils, and cytokines were assayed. Recombinant human (rHu) TGF-β1 was used as control. PCL significantly enhanced the development of CD4+Foxp3+-induced regulatory T cells (iTregs). Converted iTregs produced neither Th1 nor Th2 cytokines and inhibited normal T-cell proliferation. PCL- and rHuTGF-β-converted CD4+ T cells prevented OVA-induced asthma. PCL- and rHuTGF-β-modified T cells both significantly reduced expression levels of OVA-specific IgE and significantly inhibited the development of AHR, airway eosinophilia, and Th2 responses in mice. S/D-treated PCL promotes Foxp3+ iTregs and exerts immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. This finding may help to understand the clinical properties of platelet lysates. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. A biophysical approach to menadione membrane interactions: relevance for menadione-induced mitochondria dysfunction and related deleterious/therapeutic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, João P; Martins, André F; Nunes, Cláudia; Morais, Catarina M; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Pinheiro, Teresa J T; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Oliveira, Paulo J; Jurado, Amália S

    2013-08-01

    Menadione (MEN), a polycyclic aromatic ketone, was shown to promote cell injury by imposing massive oxidative stress and has been proposed as a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer diseases. The mechanisms underlying MEN-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death are not yet fully understood. In this work, a systematic study was performed to unveil the effects of MEN on membrane lipid organization, using models mimicking mitochondrial membranes and native mitochondrial membranes. MEN was found to readily incorporate in membrane systems composed of a single phospholipid (phosphatidylcholine) or the lipids dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine and tetraoleoylcardiolipin at 1:1:1 molar ratio, as well as in mitochondrial membranes. Increased permeability in both membrane models, monitored by calcein release, seemed to correlate with the extent of MEN incorporation into membranes. MEN perturbed the physical properties of vesicles composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine or dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine plus tetraoleoylcardiolipin (at 7:3 molar ratio), as reflected by the downshift of the lipid phase transition temperature and the emergence of a new transition peak in the mixed lipid system, detected by DSC. (31)P NMR studies revealed that MEN favored the formation of non-lamellar structures. Also, quenching studies with the fluorescent probes DPH and TMA-DPH showed that MEN distributed across the bilayer thickness in both model and native mitochondrial membranes. MEN's ability to promote alterations of membrane lipid organization was related with its reported mitochondrial toxicity and promotion of apoptosis, predictably involved in its anti-carcinogenic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Behavioral effects of heavy ions and protons and potential countermeasure agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M.; Gatley, J.; Bruneus, M.; Koslosky, S.; Billups, A.

    Space travel beyond the Earth's protective magnetic field (for example, to Mars) will involve exposure of astronauts to irradiation by high-energy nuclei such as 56 Fe, which are a component of galactic cosmic rays. These particles have high linear energy transfer (LET) and are expected to irreversibly damage cells they traverse. Exposure to HZE radiation may therefore cause progressive deterioration of brain function, adding to other inescapable damage involved in normal aging. We propose a study of the hypothesis that long-term behavioral alterations are induced after exposure of the brain to 1 GeV/n iron and silicon particles with fluences of 1 to 8 particles/cell targets. Previous studies support this notion but are not definitive, especially with regard to long-term effects. Our principal goal is to examine the neurological effects of high-LET radiation on C57BL/6 mice using a series of behavioral tests to unveil the temporal expression of altered behaviors in the radiation response, as well as the means, which can modulate these responses. The studies planned in this project are designed to: 1) Characterize the behavioral consequences after exposure to low-fluences of heavy ions and protons on C57BL/6 mice. The main behavioral endpoints to be used in these studies are locomotor activity to evaluate the integrity of striatal dopaminergic pathways, and spatial reference memory to probe hippocampal cholinergic pathways. 2) Characterize the neurochemical and structural changes induced by heavy ions and protons. 3) To develop countermeasures to protect neural cell populations exposed to low fluences of heavy ions and protons. The project will test methods to protect injured neural cells based on their molecular and cellular mechanisms that may regulate neural cell survival in the central nervous system. Among the methods that will be studied is the direct administration of neuroprotective molecules as well as the modulation of apoptotic pathways by pharmacological

  17. Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side effects are problems that occur when cancer treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Learn about side effects caused by cancer treatment. Know what signs and symptoms to call your doctor about. Learn about treatments for side effects.

  18. Estimates of volume and magma input in crustal magmatic systems from zircon geochronology: the effect of modelling assumptions and system variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eCaricchi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Magma fluxes in the Earth’s crust play an important role in regulating the relationship between the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions, the chemical evolution of magmatic systems and the distribution of geothermal energy and mineral resources on our planet. Therefore, quantifying magma productivity and the rate of magma transfer within the crust can provide valuable insights to characterise the long-term behaviour of volcanic systems and to unveil the link between the physical and chemical evolution of magmatic systems and their potential to generate resources. We performed thermal modelling to compute the temperature evolution of crustal magmatic intrusions with different final volumes assembled over a variety of timescales (i.e., at different magma fluxes. Using these results, we calculated synthetic populations of zircon ages assuming the number of zircons crystallising in a given time period is directly proportional to the volume of magma at temperature within the zircon crystallisation range. The statistical analysis of the calculated populations of zircon ages shows that the mode, median and standard deviation of the populations varies coherently as function of the rate of magma injection and final volume of the crustal intrusions. Therefore, the statistical properties of the population of zircon ages can add useful constraints to quantify the rate of magma injection and the final volume of magmatic intrusions.Here, we explore the effect of different ranges of zircon saturation temperature, intrusion geometry, and wall rock temperature on the calculated distributions of zircon ages. Additionally, we determine the effect of undersampling on the variability of mode, median and standards deviation of calculated populations of zircon ages to estimate the minimum number of zircon analyses necessary to obtain meaningful estimates of magma flux and final intrusion volume.

  19. Piezoelectric control of magnetoelectric coupling driven non-volatile memory switching and self cooling effects in FE/FSMA multiferroic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kirandeep; Kaur, Davinder

    2017-02-01

    The manipulation of magnetic states and materials' spin degree-of-freedom via a control of an electric (E-) field has been recently pursued to develop magnetoelectric (ME) coupling-driven electronic data storage devices with high read/write endurance, fast dynamic response, and low energy dissipation. One major hurdle for this approach is to develop reliable materials which should be compatible with prevailing silicon (Si)-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, simultaneously allowing small voltage for the tuning of magnetization switching. In this regard, multiferroic heterostructures where ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) layers are alternatively grown on conventional Si substrates are promising as the piezoelectric control of magnetization switching is anticipated to be possible by an E-field. In this work, we study the ferromagnetic shape memory alloys based PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3/Ni50Mn35In15 (PZT/Ni-Mn-In) multiferroic heterostructures, and investigate their potential for CMOS compatible non-volatile magnetic data storage applications. We demonstrate the voltage-impulse controlled nonvolatile, reversible, and bistable magnetization switching at room temperature in Si-integrated PZT/Ni-Mn-In thin film multiferroic heterostructures. We also thoroughly unveil the various intriguing features in these materials, such as E-field tuned ME coupling and magnetocaloric effect, shape memory induced ferroelectric modulation, improved fatigue endurance as well as Refrigeration Capacity (RC). This comprehensive study suggests that these novel materials have a great potential for the development of unconventional nanoscale memory and refrigeration devices with self-cooling effect and enhanced refrigeration efficiency, thus providing a new venue for their applications.

  20. In vitro and in vivo effect of 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol as an antibiofilm agent against quorum sensing mediated biofilm formation of Vibrio spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhakumari, Sivasubramanian; Jayakumar, Rengarajan; Logalakshmi, Ravichandran; Prabhu, Narayanan Marimuthu; Abdul Nazar, Abdul Kuthus; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah; Veera Ravi, Arumugam

    2018-05-25

    This study unveils the in vitro and in vivo antibiofilm potential of 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (DTBMP) from Chroococcus turgidus against Vibrio spp. In the preliminary study, cell free culture supernatant (CFCS) of C. turgidus inhibited the violacein production in biomarker strain Chromobacterium violaceum and its mutant strain CV026 in a dose dependent manner. The effective biofilm inhibitory concentration (BIC) of pure compound DTBMP from C. turgidus was identified as 250 μg/ml concentration in tested Vibrio species. Furthermore, DTBMP proved to effectively inhibit the bioluminescence production in V. harveyi and other biofilm related virulence traits such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) production, hydrophobicity index, swimming and swarming motility at its BIC concentration in three major pathogenic vibrios: V. harveyi, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. The antibiofilm potential of DTBMP was validated through light, confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic analyses. In addition, the non-bactericidal effect of DTBMP was determined through growth curve and 2,3-bis (2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) assay. Real-time PCR studies revealed the down-regulation of master quorum sensing (QS) regulator genes of V. harveyi such as luxR, luxS, luxP, luxQ and luxO on treatment with DTBMP. In vivo results confirmed that DTBMP augmented the survival rate of Litopenaeus vannamei larvae up to 75, 88 and 66% upon infection with V. harveyi, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, respectively. The results of this study ascertain the promising effects of DTBMP as an antibiofilm agent, which could be positively explored to treat biofilm-associated vibrios infections in aquaculture. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The effectiveness of the Brazilian customs activity as a conditioning of the partnership and business results among oil and gas companies; A efetividade da atividade aduaneira brasileira como condicionante dos resultados das aliancas e negocios entre empresas de petroleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Helio Fernando R. [Ministerio da Fazenda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Terceiro Conselho de Contribuintes; Pires, Adilson Rodrigues [Contex - Consultoria em Administracao e Comercio Exterior, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Ronaldo J. [Ronaldo Alves e Associados, Consultores em Exploracao e Producao, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    The thriving of the national oil and gas production depends in major part on the effectiveness of the import operations at non-definitive title made under the customs special regime named Special Customs Regime for Export and Import of Goods for Oil and Natural Gas Exploration and Production Activities - REPETRO. This regime has not totally complied with the targets it has been conceived for, that is, to enable the development of the oil and gas industry at the least import costs in a legal stable environment. This regime is a precarious norm, conceived in a hurry, aiming solely at not unveiling the big threat to the forming of partnerships among companies acting in the commerce of import and/or export of equipment for the exploration and production in the Brazilian territory, that is, the intent of the Federal Fiscal Administration to using the import tax, an extra-fiscal tax by its nature, as a mere collecting instrument. This fact becomes evident from a more detailed analysis of certain aspects of the REPETRO normative structure. (author)

  2. High temperature annealing effects on deep-level defects in a high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.iwamoto@smn.uio.no; Azarov, Alexander; Svensson, Bengt G. [Department of Physics, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, 370-1292 Gunma (Japan); Moe, Anne Marie M. [Washington Mills AS, N-7300 Orkanger (Norway)

    2015-07-28

    Effects of high-temperature annealing on deep-level defects in a high-purity semi-insulating 4H silicon carbide substrate have been studied by employing current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, junction spectroscopy, and chemical impurity analysis measurements. Secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal that the substrate contains boron with concentration in the mid 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3} range, while other impurities including nitrogen, aluminum, titanium, vanadium and chromium are below their detection limits (typically ∼10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}). Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on substrates annealed at 1400–1700 °C exhibit metal/p-type semiconductor behavior with a current rectification of up to 8 orders of magnitude at bias voltages of ±3 V. With increasing annealing temperature, the series resistance of the Schottky barrier diodes decreases, and the net acceptor concentration in the substrates increases approaching the chemical boron content. Admittance spectroscopy results unveil the presence of shallow boron acceptors and deep-level defects with levels in lower half of the bandgap. After the 1400 °C annealing, the boron acceptor still remains strongly compensated at room temperature by deep donor-like levels located close to mid-gap. However, the latter decrease in concentration with increasing annealing temperature and after 1700 °C, the boron acceptor is essentially uncompensated. Hence, the deep donors are decisive for the semi-insulating properties of the substrates, and their thermal evolution limits the thermal budget for device processing. The origin of the deep donors is not well-established, but substantial evidence supporting an assignment to carbon vacancies is presented.

  3. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The placebo effect Joseph H. Friedman, MD Richard Dubinsky, MD WHAT ... placebo: a “dummy” medication that should have no effect on the condition. Placebos are not only drugs. ...

  4. Radiation effects on eye components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Fochler, C.; Abraham, K.; Kulawik, B.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation damage (X-ray, UV light) of the most important components of the vertebrate eye (crystallins and other proteins, hyaluronic acid, vitreous, aqueous humour, ascorbic acid) has been investigated by various methods of physical chemistry. UV absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as circular dichroism unveiled changes of the chromophores/fluorophores of the constituent biopolymers and low-molecular components, together with alterations of helix content and the occurrence of aggregation. Size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, densimetry, viscometry and light scattering experiments monitored changes of the global structure of proteins and polysaccharides involved. Electrophoreses allowed conclusions on fragmentation, unfolding and crosslinking. Analytical methods provided information regarding the integrity of groups of special concern (SH, SS) and revealed the existence of stable noxious species (H 2 O 2 ). By means of various measures and additives, manifold modifications of the impact of both ionizing and nonionizing radiation may be achieved. Caused by differences in the primary reactions, eye polymers are protected efficaciously by typical OH radical scavengers against X-irradiation, whereas compounds which exhibit absorption behavior in the UV range turn out to act as potent protectives ('chemical filters') against UV light. A few substances, such as ascorbate, are able to provide protection against both sorts of radiation and are even able to exhibit a slight chemical repair of already damaged particles. The results obtained are of importance for understanding pathological alterations of the eye (loss of transparency, cataractogenesis) and for developing new strategies for protection and repair of eye components. (author)

  5. Isotope analysis of diamond-surface passivation effect of high-temperature H2O-grown atomic layer deposition-Al2O3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Saito, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The Al 2 O 3 film formed using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method with trimethylaluminum as Al precursor and H 2 O as oxidant at a high temperature (450 °C) effectively passivates the p-type surface conduction (SC) layer specific to a hydrogen-terminated diamond surface, leading to a successful operation of diamond SC field-effect transistors at 400 °C. In order to investigate this excellent passivation effect, we carried out an isotope analysis using D 2 O instead of H 2 O in the ALD and found that the Al 2 O 3 film formed at a conventional temperature (100 °C) incorporates 50 times more CH 3 groups than the high-temperature film. This CH 3 is supposed to dissociate from the film when heated afterwards at a higher temperature (550 °C) and causes peeling patterns on the H-terminated surface. The high-temperature film is free from this problem and has the largest mass density and dielectric constant among those investigated in this study. The isotope analysis also unveiled a relatively active H-exchange reaction between the diamond H-termination and H 2 O oxidant during the high-temperature ALD, the SC still being kept intact. This dynamic and yet steady H termination is realized by the suppressed oxidation due to the endothermic reaction with H 2 O. Additionally, we not only observed the kinetic isotope effect in the form of reduced growth rate of D 2 O-oxidant ALD but found that the mass density and dielectric constant of D 2 O-grown Al 2 O 3 films are smaller than those of H 2 O-grown films. This is a new type of isotope effect, which is not caused by the presence of isotopes in the films unlike the traditional isotope effects that originate from the presence of isotopes itself. Hence, the high-temperature ALD is very effective in forming Al 2 O 3 films as a passivation and/or gate-insulation layer of high-temperature-operation diamond SC devices, and the knowledge of the aforementioned new isotope effect will be a basis for further enhancing ALD

  6. Mixomics analysis of Bacillus subtilis: effect of oxygen availability on riboflavin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junlang; Lei, Pan; Mohsin, Ali; Liu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Mingzhi; Li, Liang; Hu, Jianhua; Hang, Haifeng; Zhuang, Yingping; Guo, Meijin

    2017-09-12

    Riboflavin, an intermediate of primary metabolism, is one kind of important food additive with high economic value. The microbial cell factory Bacillus subtilis has already been proven to possess significant importance for the food industry and have become one of the most widely used riboflavin-producing strains. In the practical fermentation processes, a sharp decrease in riboflavin production is encountered along with a decrease in the dissolved oxygen (DO) tension. Influence of this oxygen availability on riboflavin biosynthesis through carbon central metabolic pathways in B. subtilis is unknown so far. Therefore the unveiled effective metabolic pathways were still an unaccomplished task till present research work. In this paper, the microscopic regulation mechanisms of B. subtilis grown under different dissolved oxygen tensions were studied by integrating 13 C metabolic flux analysis, metabolomics and transcriptomics. It was revealed that the glucose metabolic flux through pentose phosphate (PP) pathway was lower as being confirmed by smaller pool sizes of metabolites in PP pathway and lower expression amount of ykgB at transcriptional level. The latter encodes 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6-PGL) under low DO tension. In response to low DO tension in broth, the glucose metabolic flux through Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway was higher and the gene, alsS, encoding for acetolactate synthase was significantly activated that may result due to lower ATP concentration and higher NADH/NAD + ratio. Moreover, ResE, a membrane-anchored protein that is capable of oxygen regulated phosphorylase activity, and ResD, a regulatory protein that can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated by ResE, were considered as DO tension sensor and transcriptional regulator respectively. This study shows that integration of transcriptomics, 13 C metabolic flux analysis and metabolomics analysis provides a comprehensive understanding of biosynthesized riboflavin's regulatory mechanisms in

  7. Effect of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on white spot lesion development in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizani, Sotiria; Petsi, Georgia; Twetman, Svante; Caroni, Crys; Makou, Margarita; Papagianoulis, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of daily intake of lozenges containing probiotic bacteria on white spot lesion (WSL) formation as well as on salivary lactobacilli (LB) and mutans streptococci (MS) counts, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study design with two parallel arms was employed. Patients (n = 85, mean age 15.9 years) with maxillary braces on at least eight anterior teeth and a remaining treatment period of 7-24 months were finally enrolled and randomly allocated to a test or placebo group. Subjects in the test group were instructed to take one probiotic lozenge containing two strains of Lactobacillus reuteri once daily. An identical lozenge without active bacteria was used in the placebo group. Dental plaque, WSL, and salivary MS and LB levels were recorded at baseline and immediately after debonding. The groups were balanced at baseline. The mean duration of the intervention was 17 months and the total dropout rate was 10 per cent. There were no differences in the incidence of WSL between the groups at debonding. The patients had generally a neglected oral hygiene, both at baseline and at the follow-up. The levels of salivary LB were significantly reduced in both groups (P < 0.05) at the time of debonding compared with baseline, while no alterations of the MS counts were unveiled. WSL were scored from photos that may not fully mirror the clinical situation. Chair-side tests estimate the counts of selected bacteria in saliva and do not reflect the entire microbiota. The invention was implemented approximately 6 months after the onset of the fixed appliances and some lesions may have been present at bonding. Daily intake of probiotic lozenges did not seem to affect the development of WSL during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved

  8. Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Biochemical Mechanisms and Structural Basis of its Functional Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The nitration of protein tyrosine residues to 3-nitrotyrosine represents an oxidative postranslational modification that unveils the disruption of nitric oxide (•NO) signaling and metabolism towards pro-oxidant processes. Indeed, excess levels of reactive oxygen species in the presence of •NO or •NO-derived metabolites lead to the formation of nitrating species such as peroxynitrite. Thus, protein 3-nitrotyrosine has been established as a biomarker of cell, tissue and systemic “nitroxidative stress”. Moreover, tyrosine nitration modifies key properties of the amino acid (i.e. phenol group pKa, redox potential, hydrophobicity and volume). Thus, the incorporation of a nitro group (−NO2) to protein tyrosines can lead to profound structural and functional changes, some of which contribute to altered cell and tissue homeostasis. In this Account, I describe our current efforts to define 1) biologically-relevant mechanisms of protein tyrosine nitration and 2) how this modification can cause changes in protein structure and function at the molecular level. First, the relevance of protein tyrosine nitration via free radical-mediated reactions (in both peroxynitrite-dependent or independent pathways) involving the intermediacy of tyrosyl radical (Tyr•) will be underscored. This feature of the nitration process becomes critical as Tyr• can take variable fates, including the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Fast kinetic techniques, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies, bioanalytical methods and kinetic simulations have altogether assisted to characterize and fingerprint the reactions of tyrosine with peroxynitrite and one-electron oxidants and its further evolution to 3-nitrotyrosine. Recent findings show that nitration of tyrosines in proteins associated to biomembranes is linked to the lipid peroxidation process via a connecting reaction that involves the one-electron oxidation of tyrosine by lipid peroxyl radicals (LOO•). Second

  9. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  10. Deletion of Gpr55 Results in Subtle Effects on Energy Metabolism, Motor Activity and Thermal Pain Sensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Bjursell

    Full Text Available The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55 is activated by cannabinoids and non-cannabinoid molecules and has been speculated to play a modulatory role in a large variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in metabolically perturbed states. We therefore generated male mice deficient in the gene coding for the cannabinoid/lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI receptor Gpr55 and characterized them under normal dietary conditions as well as during high energy dense diet feeding followed by challenge with the CB1 receptor antagonist/GPR55 agonist rimonabant. Gpr55 deficient male mice (Gpr55 KO were phenotypically indistinguishable from their wild type (WT siblings for the most part. However, Gpr55 KO animals displayed an intriguing nocturnal pattern of motor activity and energy expenditure (EE. During the initial 6 hours of the night, motor activity was significantly elevated without any significant effect observed in EE. Interestingly, during the last 6 hours of the night motor activity was similar but EE was significantly decreased in the Gpr55 KO mice. No significant difference in motor activity was detected during daytime, but EE was lower in the Gpr55 KO compared to WT mice. The aforementioned patterns were not associated with alterations in energy intake, daytime core body temperature, body weight (BW or composition, although a non-significant tendency to increased adiposity was seen in Gpr55 KO compared to WT mice. Detailed analyses of daytime activity in the Open Field paradigm unveiled lower horizontal activity and rearing time for the Gpr55 KO mice. Moreover, the Gpr55 KO mice displayed significantly faster reaction time in the tail flick test, indicative of thermal hyperalgesia. The BW-decreasing effect of rimonabant in mice on long-term cafeteria diet did not differ between Gpr55 KO and WT mice. In conclusion, Gpr55 deficiency is associated with subtle effects on diurnal/nocturnal EE and motor activity behaviours but does not

  11. "Further Effects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinigstein, Steven Michael

    In writing Further Effects, I intended to illustrate the benefits that are to be had from the use of effects - processing, when applied at the compositional level, rather than as a post-compositional afterthought. When effects are used creatively in the compositional stage, they will influence the very nature of a piece. They are capable of expressing rhythmic and metric ideas. They can alter the natural timbre of an instrument. This can be done on levels of abstraction ranging from discreet subtlety to disguise beyond recognition. There is one effect (known as "pitch shift.") that allows an instrument to play pitches that are well outside of its range. In Further Effects, I direct the performers to use a volume pedal (which I view as a tool, rather than an effect) for the broadened creative use of dynamics that it so efficiently grants. The use of an effects processor and volume pedal creates a need for ancillary equipment. An amplifier, cables, and an electric hook-up (a microphone or a pickup) will be required for each instrument. While an amplifier serves to project the processed sound, there must also be a device or method to suppress unprocessed sound. A great deal of thought and work goes into the use of effects; yet I feel it is wasteful to use this musical resource merely as post-compositional decoration.

  12. Unveiling the significance of eigenvectors in diffusing non-Hermitian matrices by identifying the underlying Burgers dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burda, Zdzislaw, E-mail: zdzislaw.burda@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, al. Mickiewicza 30, PL-30059 Kraków (Poland); Grela, Jacek, E-mail: jacekgrela@gmail.com [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics and Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Jagiellonian University, PL-30348 Kraków (Poland); Nowak, Maciej A., E-mail: nowak@th.if.uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics and Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Jagiellonian University, PL-30348 Kraków (Poland); Tarnowski, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.tarnowski@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics and Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Jagiellonian University, PL-30348 Kraków (Poland); Warchoł, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.warchol@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics and Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Jagiellonian University, PL-30348 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Following our recent letter, we study in detail an entry-wise diffusion of non-hermitian complex matrices. We obtain an exact partial differential equation (valid for any matrix size N and arbitrary initial conditions) for evolution of the averaged extended characteristic polynomial. The logarithm of this polynomial has an interpretation of a potential which generates a Burgers dynamics in quaternionic space. The dynamics of the ensemble in the large N limit is completely determined by the coevolution of the spectral density and a certain eigenvector correlation function. This coevolution is best visible in an electrostatic potential of a quaternionic argument built of two complex variables, the first of which governs standard spectral properties while the second unravels the hidden dynamics of eigenvector correlation function. We obtain general formulas for the spectral density and the eigenvector correlation function for large N and for any initial conditions. We exemplify our studies by solving three examples, and we verify the analytic form of our solutions with numerical simulations.

  13. Two magma bodies beneath the summit of Kilauea Volcano unveiled by isotopically distinct melt deliveries from the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruszka, Aaron J.; Heaton, Daniel E.; Marske, Jared P.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2015-01-01

    The summit magma storage reservoir of Kīlauea Volcano is one of the most important components of the magmatic plumbing system of this frequently active basaltic shield-building volcano. Here we use new high-precision Pb isotopic analyses of Kīlauea summit lavas—from 1959 to the active Halema‘uma‘u lava lake—to infer the number, size, and interconnectedness of magma bodies within the volcano's summit reservoir. From 1971 to 1982, the 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the lavas define two separate magma mixing trends that correlate with differences in vent location and/or pre-eruptive magma temperature. These relationships, which contrast with a single magma mixing trend for lavas from 1959 to 1968, indicate that Kīlauea summit eruptions since at least 1971 were supplied from two distinct magma bodies. The locations of these magma bodies are inferred to coincide with two major deformation centers identified by geodetic monitoring of the volcano's summit region: (1) the main locus of the summit reservoir ∼2–4 km below the southern rim of Kīlauea Caldera and (2) a shallower magma body 4 km3 of lava erupted), must therefore be sustained by a nearly continuous supply of new melt from the mantle. The model results show that a minimum of four compositionally distinct, mantle-derived magma batches were delivered to the volcano (at least three directly to the summit reservoir) since 1959. These melt inputs correlate with the initiation of energetic (1959 Kīlauea Iki) and/or sustained (1969–1974 Mauna Ulu, 1983-present Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and 2008-present Halema‘uma‘u) eruptions. Thus, Kīlauea's eruptive behavior is partly tied to the delivery of new magma batches from the volcano's source region within the Hawaiian mantle plume.

  14. The Gondwana Breakup and the History of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans Unveils Two New Clades for Early Neobatrachian Diversification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelise Frazão

    Full Text Available The largest anuran diversity belongs to the Neobatrachia, which harbor more than five thousand extant species. Here, we propose a new hypothesis for the historical aspects of the neobatrachian evolution with a formal biogeographical analysis. We selected 12 genes for 144 neobatrachian genera and four archaeobatrachian outgroups and performed a phylogenetic analysis using a maximum likelihood algorithm with the rapid bootstrap test. We also estimated divergence times for major lineages using a relaxed uncorrelated clock method. According to our time scale, the diversification of crown Neobatrachia began around the end of the Early Cretaceous. Our phylogenetic tree suggests that the first split of Neobatrachia is related to the geological events in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Hence, we propose names for these clades that indicate this connection, i.e., Atlanticanura and Indianura. The Atlanticanura is composed of three major neobatrachian lineages: Heleophrynidae, Australobatrachia and Nobleobatrachia. On the other hand, the Indianura consists of two major lineages: Sooglossoidea and Ranoides. The biogeographical analysis indicates that many neobatrachian splits occurred as a result of geological events such as the separation between South America and Africa, between India and the Seychelles, and between Australia and South America.

  15. Factor VII deficiency: Unveiling the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying three model alterations of the enzyme catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, Maria Eugenia; Andersen, Elisabeth; Skarpen, Ellen; Myklebust, Christiane F; Koehler, Christian; Morth, Jens Preben; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Pinotti, Mirko; Bernardi, Francesco; Thiede, Bernd; Sandset, Per Morten; Skretting, Grethe

    2018-03-01

    Activated factor (F) VII is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein that initiates blood coagulation upon interaction with tissue factor. FVII deficiency is the most common of the rare congenital bleeding disorders. While the mutational pattern has been extensively characterized, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms of mutations, particularly at the intracellular level, have been poorly defined. Here, we aimed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying altered FVII biosynthesis in the presence of three mutation types in the catalytic domain: a missense change, a microdeletion and a frameshift/elongation, associated with severe or moderate to severe phenotypes. Using CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with expression vectors containing the wild-type FVII cDNA (FVIIwt) or harboring the p.I289del, p.G420V or p.A354V-p.P464Hfs mutations, we found that the secretion of the FVII mutants was severely decreased compared to FVIIwt. The synthesis rate of the mutants was slower than the FVIIwt and delayed, and no degradation of the FVII mutants by proteasomes, lysosomes or cysteine proteases was observed. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy studies showed that FVII variants were localized into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but were not detectable within the Golgi apparatus. These findings suggested that a common pathogenic mechanism, possibly a defective folding of the mutant proteins, was triggered by the FVII mutations. The misfolded state led to impaired trafficking of these proteins causing ER retention, which would explain the low to very low FVII plasma levels observed in patients carrying these mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Unveiling factors that contribute to functional aging among health care shiftworkers in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Frida Marina; Bellusci, Silvia M; Teixeira, Liliane R; Borges, Flávio N S; Ferreira, Regiane M; Gonçalves, Mariana B L; Martins, Samantha E; Christoffolete, Marcelo A

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate aging factors associated with work stressors, work ability, and the quality of living conditions, among health care personnel. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 176 health care shiftworkers. Two health survey questionnaires (Tuomi et al., 1997, Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 17(Suppl 1), 67-74; and Tepas, 1996, unpublished instrument) were completed and ergonomic work analyses (Rohmert & Landau, 1983, A new technique for job analysis, London and New York: Taylor & Francis) were carried out at the emergency wards. Main concerns about exposure at the workplace were changes in equipment and technology, transportation, and changes in employer policies. Main concerns about off-the-job conditions were personal safety, increases in the cost of living, food safety, and water and air quality. 81.7% scored adequate (> 36.5 points) in the Work Ability Index, and considered themselves having adequate current work ability to cope with physical, mental, and social demands. The most frequently reported diseases were musculoskeletal disorders and minor emotional problems.

  17. Innervation by a GABAergic neuron depresses spontaneous release in glutamatergic neurons and unveils the clamping phenotype of synaptotagmin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierda, Keimpe D B; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev

    2014-01-01

    The role of spontaneously occurring release events in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and their regulation is intensely debated. To study the interdependence of glutamatergic and GABAergic spontaneous release, we compared reciprocally connected "mixed" glutamatergic/GABAergic neuronal pairs...... from mice cultured on astrocyte islands with "homotypic" glutamatergic or GABAergic pairs and autaptic neurons. We measured mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies simultaneously from both neurons. Neuronal pairs formed both interneuronal synaptic and autaptic connections indiscriminately. We find that whereas m......EPSC and mIPSC frequencies did not deviate between autaptic and synaptic connections, the frequency of mEPSCs in mixed pairs was strongly depressed compared with either autaptic neurons or glutamatergic pairs. Simultaneous imaging of synapses, or comparison to evoked release amplitudes, showed...

  18. Impacts of biological globalization in the Mediterranean: Unveiling the deep history of human-mediated gamebird dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcina, Giovanni; Guerrini, Monica; van Grouw, Hein; Gupta, Brij K.; Panayides, Panicos; Hadjigerou, Pantelis; Al-Sheikhly, Omar F.; Awan, Muhammad N.; Khan, Aleem A.; Zeder, Melinda A.; Barbanera, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Humans have a long history of moving wildlife that over time has resulted in unprecedented biotic homogenization. It is, as a result, often unclear whether certain taxa are native to a region or naturalized, and how the history of human involvement in species dispersal has shaped present-day biodiversity. Although currently an eastern Palaearctic galliform, the black francolin (Francolinus francolinus) was known to occur in the western Mediterranean from at least the time of Pliny the Elder, if not earlier. During Medieval times and the Renaissance, the black francolin was a courtly gamebird prized not only for its flavor, but also its curative, and even aphrodisiac qualities. There is uncertainty, however, whether this important gamebird was native or introduced to the region and, if the latter, what the source of introduction into the western Mediterranean was. Here we combine historical documentation with a DNA investigation of modern birds and archival (13th–20th century) specimens from across the species’ current and historically documented range. Our study proves the black francolin was nonnative to the western Mediterranean, and we document its introduction from the east via several trade routes, some reaching as far as South Asia. This finding provides insight into the reach and scope of long-distance trade routes that serviced the demand of European aristocracy for exotic species as symbols of wealth and prestige, and helps to demonstrate the lasting impact of human-mediated long-distance species dispersal on current day biodiversity. PMID:25733899

  19. Existential Damage: The Specificity of the Institute Unveiled from the Violation To The Right Of Labor Disconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Barbosa Franco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The right of labor disconnection underlies on a constitutional and fundamental prerogative of the entire working class. Rest periods from the laboring environment are protected by law and have the objective to provide workers with recovery of their physical and mental energies. They also assure moments of delight, of family, communitarian and political insertion, for the fulfillment of personal plans. The violation of these disconnection periods can jeopardize projects or life habits, as well as social relations, resulting in existential damage. From these premises, this article aims to analyze the characterizing elements of existential damage in order to evince its peculiarities in relation to moral damage and to defend the accumulation of damages to provide just atonement to the victims and to their dignity as human beings. Thus, this research supports itself on legal dogmatic principles, since it considers that the internal elements of legal order are sufficient to establish a distinction between moral and existential injuries. The main problem relies on the typifying elements of existential damage. Due to their extra-patrimonial nature and relationship to personal rights, they are mistakenly considered by labor courts as moral damages, and, therefore, given limited possibilities of indemnification to the victim. Under this perspective, the contextual complexity above presented is overcome through deductive reasoning, as it indicates in the open norms of the national legal system the possibility of an interdisciplinary and comparative investigation which attests the specificities of moral and existential damages.

  20. Aging stem cells. A Werner syndrome stem cell model unveils heterochromatin alterations as a driver of human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Jingyi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Qu, Jing; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Junzhi; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Xu, Xiuling; Ocampo, Alejandro; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jiping; Li, Ying; Shi, Liang; Guan, Dee; Pan, Huize; Duan, Shunlei; Ding, Zhichao; Li, Mo; Yi, Fei; Bai, Ruijun; Wang, Yayu; Chen, Chang; Yang, Fuquan; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zimei; Aizawa, Emi; Goebl, April; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Reddy, Pradeep; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2015-06-05

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by WRN protein deficiency. Here, we report on the generation of a human WS model in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Differentiation of WRN-null ESCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recapitulates features of premature cellular aging, a global loss of H3K9me3, and changes in heterochromatin architecture. We show that WRN associates with heterochromatin proteins SUV39H1 and HP1α and nuclear lamina-heterochromatin anchoring protein LAP2β. Targeted knock-in of catalytically inactive SUV39H1 in wild-type MSCs recapitulates accelerated cellular senescence, resembling WRN-deficient MSCs. Moreover, decrease in WRN and heterochromatin marks are detected in MSCs from older individuals. Our observations uncover a role for WRN in maintaining heterochromatin stability and highlight heterochromatin disorganization as a potential determinant of human aging. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.