WorldWideScience

Sample records for effect chiral boundaries

  1. Chiral boundary conditions for singletons and W-branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeymaekers, Joris; Van den Bleeken, Dieter

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the holographic dictionary for a free massless scalar in AdS3, focusing on the `singleton' solutions for which the boundary profile is an arbitrary chiral function. We look for consistent boundary conditions which include this class of solutions. On one hand, we give a no-go argument that they cannot be interpreted within any boundary condition which preserves full conformal invariance. On the other hand, we show that such solutions fit naturally in a generalization of the Compère-Song-Strominger boundary conditions, which preserve a chiral Virasoro and current algebra. These observations have implications for the black hole deconstruction proposal, which proposes singleton solutions as candidate black hole microstate geometries. Our results suggest that the chiral boundary condition, which also contains the extremal BTZ black hole, is the natural setting for holographically interpreting the black hole deconstruction proposal.

  2. A quenched study of the Schroedinger functional with chirally rotated boundary conditions. Non-preturbative tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J. Gonzalez [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Renner, D.B. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Shindler, A. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2012-08-23

    The use of chirally rotated boundary conditions provides a formulation of the Schroedinger functional that is compatible with automatic O(a) improvement of Wilson fermions up to O(a) boundary contributions. The elimination of bulk O(a) effects requires the non-perturbative tuning of the critical mass and one additional boundary counterterm. We present the results of such a tuning in a quenched setup for several values of the renormalized gauge coupling, from perturbative to nonperturbative regimes, and for a range of lattice spacings. We also check that the correct boundary conditions and symmetries are restored in the continuum limit. (orig.)

  3. Chiral vortical effect for bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avkhadiev, Artur; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2017-08-01

    The thermal contribution to the chiral vortical effect is believed to be related to the axial anomaly in external gravitational fields. We use the universality of the spin-gravity interaction to extend this idea to a wider set of phenomena. We consider the Kubo formula at weak coupling for the spin current of a vector field and derive a novel anomalous effect caused by the medium rotation: the chiral vortical effect for bosons. The effect consists in a spin current of vector bosons along the angular velocity of the medium. We argue that it has the same anomalous nature as in the fermionic case and show that this effect provides a mechanism for helicity transfer, from flow helicity to magnetic helicity.

  4. Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-12-01

    The chiral magnetic effect (CME) is the generation of electrical current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum chiral anomaly [S. L. Adler. Axial-vector vertex in spinor electrodynamics. Physical Review, 177, 2426 (1969), J. S. Bell and R. Jackiw. A PCAC puzzle: π 0 γγin the σ-model. Il Nuovo Cimento A, 60, 47-61 (1969)] in systems possessing charged chiral fermions. In quark-gluon plasma containing nearly massless quarks, the chirality imbalance is sourced by the topological transitions. In condensed matter systems, the chiral quasiparticles emerge in gapless semiconductors with two energy bands having pointlike degeneracies opening the path to the study of chiral anomaly [H. B. Nielsen and M. Ninomiya. The Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly and Weyl fermions in a crystal. Physics Letters B, 130, 389-396 (1983)]. Recently, these novel materials - so-called Dirac and Weyl semimetals have been discovered experimentally, are suitable for the investigation of the CME in condensed matter experiments. Here we report on the first experimental observation of the CME in a 3D Dirac semimetal ZrTe5 [Q. Li, D. E. Kharzeev, C. Zhang, Y. Huang, I. Pletikosić, A. V. Fedorov, R. D. Zhong, J. A. Schneeloch, G. D. Gu, and T. Valla. Chiral magnetic effect in ZrTe5. Nature Physics (2016) doi:10.1038/nphys3648].

  5. Chiral vortical effect generated by chiral anomaly in vortex-skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the type of the general macroscopic parity-violating effects, when there is the current along the vortex, which is concentrated in the vortex core. We consider vortices in chiral superfluids with Weyl points. In the vortex core, the positions of the Weyl points form the skyrmion structure. We show that the mass current concentrated in such a core is provided by the spectral flow through the Weyl points according to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw equation for chiral anomaly.

  6. Chiral effective field theories of the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, M.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Scherer, S. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Effective field theories of the strong interactions based on the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD provide a model-independent approach to low-energy hadron physics. We give a brief introduction to mesonic and baryonic chiral perturbation theory and discuss a number of applications. We also consider the effective field theory including vector and axial-vector mesons. (authors)

  7. Effect of interlayer exchange coupling on magnetic chiral structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. P.; Kwon, H. Y.; Kim, H. S.; Shim, J. H.; Won, C. [Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-28

    We numerically investigated the effect of interlayer exchange coupling on magnetic chiral structures, such as a helical/cycloidal spin structure and magnetic skyrmion crystal (SkX), which are produced in a magnetic system involving the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). We report the existence of a phase transition where the length scale of magnetic structure discontinuously changes, and that there can be a novel magnetic structure around the phase boundary that exhibits double-ordering lengths of magnetic structure. Therefore, the system has multiple ground phases determined by the ratio of interlayer exchange coupling strength and DMI strength. Furthermore, we investigated the critical condition of the external perpendicular field required for the SkX. The critical field is significantly reduced under the effect of interlayer exchange coupling, which can stabilize the SkX without the external field.

  8. Strange two-baryon interactions using chiral effective field theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder, H.

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed the leading order strangeness S = −1,−2 baryon-baryon potential in a chiral effective field theory approach. The chiral potential consists of one-pseudoscalar-meson exchanges and non-derivative four-baryon contact terms. The potential, derived using SU(3)f symmetry constraints,

  9. Chiral vortical effect from the compactified D4-branes with smeared D0-brane charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chao; Chen, Yidian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Mei [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-03-15

    By using the boundary derivative expansion formalism of fluid/gravity correspondence, we study the chiral vortical effect from the compactified D4-branes with smeared D0-brane charge. This background corresponds to a strongly coupled, nonconformal relativistic fluid with a conserved vector current. The presence of the chiral vortical effect is induced by the addition of a Chern-Simons term in the bulk action. Except that the non-dissipative anomalous viscous coefficient and the sound speed rely only on the chemical potential, most of the other thermal and hydrodynamical quantities of the first order depend both on the temperature and the chemical potential. According to our result, the way that the chiral vortical effect coefficient depends on the chemical potential seems irrelevant with whether the relativistic fluid is conformal or not. Stability analysis shows that this anomalous relativistic fluid is stable and the doping of the smeared D0-brane charge will slow down the sound speed.

  10. A quenched study of the Schroedinger functional with chirally rotated boundary conditions. Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J. Gonzalez [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Renner, D.B. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Shindler, A. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2012-08-24

    In a previous paper (J. G. Lopez et al.,2012) we have discussed the non-perturbative tuning of the chirally rotated Schroedinger functional ({chi}SF). This tuning is required to eliminate bulk O(a) cutoff effects in physical correlation functions. Using our tuning results obtained in this paper we perform scaling and universality tests analyzing the residual O(a) cutoff effects of several step-scaling functions and we compute renormalization factors at the matching scale. As an example of possible application of the {chi}SF we compute the renormalized strange quark mass using large volume data obtained from Wilson twisted mass fermions at maximal twist. (orig.)

  11. Out-of-equilibrium chiral magnetic effect from chiral kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Anping; Jiang, Yin; Shi, Shuzhe; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2018-02-01

    Recently there has been significant interest in the macroscopic manifestation of chiral anomaly in many-body systems of chiral fermions. A notable example is the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). Enthusiastic efforts have been made to search for the CME in the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. A crucial challenge is that the extremely strong magnetic field in such collisions may last only for a brief moment and the CME current may have to occur at so early a stage that the quark-gluon matter is still far from thermal equilibrium. This thus requires modeling of the CME in an out-of-equilibrium setting. With the recently developed theoretical tool of chiral kinetic theory, we make a first phenomenological study of the CME-induced charge separation during the pre-thermal stage in heavy ion collisions. The effect is found to be very sensitive to the time dependence of the magnetic field and also influenced by the initial quark momentum spectrum as well as the relaxation time of the system evolution toward thermal equilibrium. Within the present approach, such pre-thermal charge separation is found to be modest.

  12. Effects of size and ligand density on the chirality transfer from chiral-ligand-capped nanoparticles to nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Taizo; Sharma, Anshul; Nemati, Ahlam; Bergquist, Leah; Hegmann, Torsten

    2017-08-01

    Studies of chiroptical effects of chiral ligand-capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are a fascinating and rapidly evolving field in nanomaterial research with promising applications of such chiral metal NPs in catalysis and metamaterials as well as chiral sensing and separation. The aim of our studies was to seek out a system that not only allows the detection and understanding of Au NP chirality but also permits visualization and ranking — considering size, shape and nature as well as density of the ligand shell — of the extent of chirality transfer to a surrounding medium. Nematic liquid crystal (N-LC) phases are an ideal platform to examine these effects, exhibiting characteristic defect textures upon doping with a chiral additive. To test this, we synthesized series of Au NPs capped with two structurally different chiral ligands and studied well-dispersed mixtures in two nematic liquid crystal hosts. Induced circular dichroism (ICD) spectropolarimetry and polarized light optical microscopy (POM) confirmed that all Au NPs induce chiral nematic (N*-LC) phases, and measurements of the helical pitch as well as calculation of the helical twisting power (HTP) in various cell geometries allowed for an insightful ranking of the efficiency of chirality transfer of all Au NPs as well as their free ligands.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tews, Ingo

    2015-10-12

    The neutron-matter equation of state connects several physical systems over a wide density range, from cold atomic gases in the unitary limit at low densities, to neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate densities, up to neutron stars which reach supranuclear densities in their core. An accurate description of the neutron-matter equation of state is therefore crucial to describe these systems. To calculate the neutron-matter equation of state reliably, precise many-body methods in combination with a systematic theory for nuclear forces are needed. Chiral effective field theory (EFT) is such a theory. It provides a systematic framework for the description of low-energy hadronic interactions and enables calculations with controlled theoretical uncertainties. Chiral EFT makes use of a momentum-space expansion of nuclear forces based on the symmetries of Quantum Chromodynamics, which is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. In chiral EFT, the description of nuclear forces can be systematically improved by going to higher orders in the chiral expansion. On the other hand, continuum Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most precise many-body methods available to study strongly interacting systems at finite densities. They treat the Schroedinger equation as a diffusion equation in imaginary time and project out the ground-state wave function of the system starting from a trial wave function by propagating the system in imaginary time. To perform this propagation, continuum QMC methods require as input local interactions. However, chiral EFT, which is naturally formulated in momentum space, contains several sources of nonlocality. In this Thesis, we show how to construct local chiral two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) interactions and discuss results of first QMC calculations for pure neutron systems. We have performed systematic auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for neutron matter using local chiral NN interactions. By

  14. Synergistic effects on enantioselectivity of zwitterionic chiral stationary phases for separations of chiral acids, bases, and amino acids by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christian V; Pell, Reinhard; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2008-11-15

    In an attempt to overcome the limited applicability scope of earlier proposed Cinchona alkaloid-based chiral weak anion exchangers (WAX) and recently reported aminosulfonic acid-based chiral strong cation exchangers (SCX), which are conceptionally restricted to oppositely charged solutes, their individual chiral selector (SO) subunits have been fused in a combinatorial synthesis approach into single, now zwitterionic, chiral SO motifs. The corresponding zwitterionic ion-exchange-type chiral stationary phases (CSPs) in fact combined the applicability spectra of the parent chiral ion exchangers allowing for enantioseparations of chiral acids and amine-type solutes in liquid chromatography using polar organic mode with largely rivaling separation factors as compared to the parent WAX and SCX CSPs. Furthermore, the application spectrum could be remarkably expanded to various zwitterionic analytes such as alpha- and beta-amino acids and peptides. A set of structurally related yet different CSPs consisting of either a quinine or quinidine alkaloid moiety as anion-exchange subunit and various chiral or achiral amino acids as cation-exchange subunits enabled us to derive structure-enantioselectivity relationships, which clearly provided strong unequivocal evidence for synergistic effects of the two oppositely charged ion-exchange subunits being involved in molecular recognition of zwitterionic analytes by zwitterionic SOs driven by double ionic coordination.

  15. The magnetic equation of state in effective chiral models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almasi, Gabor; Friman, Bengt [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tarnowski, Wojciech [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Jagiellonian University, PL-30-059 Cracow (Poland); Redlich, Krzysztof [University of Wroclaw, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, PL-50-204 Wroclaw (Poland); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The chiral properties of QCD are often studied using effective models like the Quark-Meson model. In these models the gauge sector of QCD is integrated out and the models do not show confinement, but they are significantly easier to deal with. Concerning chiral properties they are constructed to be in the same universality class as QCD, so sufficiently close to the chiral phase transition they have the same universal properties (e.g. critical exponents). A finite current quark mass however breaks chiral symmetry explicitly rendering it an approximate symmetry both in QCD and in effective models. This causes violation of the scaling laws at the chiral phase transition. The measure of the violation in QCD and the effective model is in general different. However the better the model is, the closer the deviations from the scaling should be to the deviations in QCD. In this talk the scaling violations in effective models of QCD are discussed, and the results are compared with lattice data on the magnetic equation of state.

  16. (Non)-renormalization of the chiral vortical effect coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golkar, Siavash; Son, Dam T. [Kadanoff Center for Theoretical Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,5640 South Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-02-26

    We show using diagramtic arguments that in some (but not all) cases, the temperature dependent part of the chiral vortical effect coefficient is independent of the coupling constant. An interpretation of this result in terms of quantization in the effective 3 dimensional Chern-Simons theory is also given. In the language of 3D, dimensionally reduced theory, the value of the chiral vortical coefficient is related to the formula ∑{sub n=1}{sup ∞}n=−1/12. We also show that in the presence of dynamical gauge fields, the CVE coefficient is not protected from renormalization, even in the large N limit.

  17. Nonperturbative effects of a topological theta term on principal chiral nonlinear sigma models in 2 + 1 dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cenke; Ludwig, Andreas W W

    2013-05-17

    We study the effects of a topological Theta term on 2+1-dimensional principal chiral models, which are nonlinear sigma models defined on Lie group manifolds. We find that when Θ=π, the nature of the disordered phase of the principal chiral model is strongly affected by the topological term: it is either a gapless conformal field theory, or it is gapped and twofold degenerate. The result of our Letter can be used to analyze the boundary states of three-dimensional symmetry protected topological phases.

  18. Deuteron magnetic quadrupole moment from chiral effective field theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C. -P.; de Vries, J.; Mereghetti, E.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; van Kolck, U.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic quadrupole moment (MQM) of the deuteron at leading order in the systematic expansion provided by chiral effective field theory. We take into account parity (P) and time-reversal (T) violation which, at the quark-gluon level, results from the QCD vacuum angle and

  19. Chiral vortaic effect and neutron asymmetries at NICA

    OpenAIRE

    Rogachevsky, Oleg; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    We study the possibility of testing experimentally signatures of P-odd effects related with the vorticity of the medium. The Chiral Vortaic Effect is generalized to the case of conserved charges different from the electric one. In the case of baryonic charge and chemical potential such effect should manifest itself in neutron asymmetries at the NICA accelerator complex measured by the MPD detector. The required accuracy may be achieved in a few months of accelerator running. We also discuss p...

  20. Chiral random matrix theory and effective theories of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K.; Iida, S

    2000-05-08

    The correlations of the QCD Dirac eigenvalues are studied with use of an extended chiral random matrix model. The inclusion of spatial dependence which the original model lacks enables us to investigate the effects of diffusion modes. We get analytical expressions of level correlation functions with non-universal behavior caused by diffusion modes which is characterized by Thouless energy. Pion mode is shown to be responsible for these diffusion effects when QCD vacuum is considered a disordered medium.

  1. Microwave analog of Stern-Gerlach effects using nonuniform chiral metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Satoshi; Sawada, Kei; Nagai, Shotaro; Sanada, Atsushi; Hisamoto, Nobuyuki; Ueda, Tetsuya

    2017-10-01

    This study observes microwave beam splitting dependent on circular polarizations through nonuniform chiral metamaterials. Nonuniform chiral metamaterials with a gradation in refractive index are constructed using chiral meta-atoms that exhibit optical activities at microwave frequencies. Microwave scattering far-field patterns by the nonuniform chiral metamaterials demonstrate a deflection of microwaves, which transmit in a direction perpendicular to the refractive index gradient. Furthermore, circularly polarized microwaves with opposite "spins of light" go their separate ways in the nonuniform chiral metamaterials. This phenomenon is an optical analog of the Stern-Gerlach effects for electrons.

  2. Thermoelectric effects in electron chiral tunneling in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafilo, A. V.; Ilinskaya, O. A.; Krive, I. V.; Park, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric effects in a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube in the presence of long-range electrostatic and pseudomagnetic potentials (produced by strain) are considered. It is shown that for strong scattering potentials (chiral tunneling) a pronounced energy "gap" appears in the energy dependence of electron transmission coefficient. This results in strong violation of Wiedemann-Franz law and in a peak-like behavior of thermopower as a function of chemical potential. The electronic figure-of-merit (ZT) is calculated and shown to be sensitive at low temperatures to nanotube chirality. By tuning chemical potential, ZT can reach high values (ZT≃5) that makes specially engineered nanotube-based thermocouple to be a promising nano-device with a high thermoelectric performance.

  3. Chiral effective theory with a light scalar and lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, J., E-mail: joan.soto@ub.edu [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Talavera, P., E-mail: pere.talavera@icc.ub.edu [Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Comte Urgell 187, E-08036 Barcelona (Spain); Tarrus, J., E-mail: tarrus@ecm.ub.es [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-01-21

    We extend the usual chiral perturbation theory framework ({chi}PT) to allow the inclusion of a light dynamical isosinglet scalar. Using lattice QCD results, and a few phenomenological inputs, we explore the parameter space of the effective theory. We discuss the S-wave pion-pion scattering lengths, extract the average value of the two light quark masses and evaluate the impact of the dynamical singlet field in the low-energy constants l{sup Macron }{sub 1}, l{sup Macron }{sub 3} and l{sup Macron }{sub 4} of {chi}PT. We also show how to extract the mass and width of the sigma resonance from chiral extrapolations of lattice QCD data.

  4. Chiral separation of the clinically important compounds fucose and pipecolic acid using CE: determination of the most effective chiral selector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistasi, Christoforos A; Stavrou, Ioannis J; Stefan-Van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P

    2013-09-01

    In this study, simple electrophoretic methods were developed for the chiral separation of the clinically important compounds fucose and pipecolic acid. In recent years, these analytes, and particularly their individual enantiomers, have attracted considerable attention due to their role in biological functions and disorders. The detectability and sensitivity of pipecolic acid and fucose were improved by reacting them with fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC-Cl) and 5-amino-2-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANSA), respectively. The enantioseparation conditions were optimized by initially investigating the type of the chiral selector. Different chiral selectors, such as polymeric surfactants and cyclodextrins, were used and the most effective ones were determined with regard to resolution and analysis time. A 10-mM β-cyclodextrin was able to separate the enantiomers of ANSA-DL-fucose and the polymeric surfactant poly(sodium N-undecanoyl-LL-leucine-valinate) was able to separate the enantiomers of FMOC-DL-pipecolic acid, with resolution values of 3.45 and 2.78, respectively. Additional parameters, such as the concentration and the pH of the background electrolyte (BGE), the concentration of the chiral selector, and the addition of modifiers were examined in order to optimize the separations. The addition of the chiral ionic liquid D-alanine tert-butyl ester lactate into the BGE was also investigated, for the first time, in order to improve resolution of the enantiomers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Preparation of Two New Diasteromeric Chiral Stationary Phases Based on (+-(18-Crown-6-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic Acid and (R- or (S-1-(1-Naphthylethylamine and Chiral Tethering Group Effect on the Chiral Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalingam Agneeswari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Two new diastereomeric chiral stationary phases (CSPs based on (+-(18-crown-6-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid as a chiral tethering group and a Π-basic chiral unit such as (R-1-(1-naphthylethylamine (CSP 1 or (S-1-(1-naphthylethylamine (CSP 2 were prepared. The two CSPs were applied to the enantiomeric separation of N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl-1-phenylalkylamines and N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl-α-amino acid derivatives using 20% isopropyl alcohol in hexane as a normal mobile phase. To elucidate the effect of the two chiral units on the chiral recognition, the chiral recognition abilities of the two CSPs were compared with each other and with that of a CSP (CSP 3 based on (R-1-(1-naphthylethylamine. From the chromatographic chiral recognition results, (R-1-(1-naphthylethylamine and (+−(18-crown-6-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid constituting CSP 1 were concluded to show a cooperative (“matched” effect on the chiral recognition while (S-1-(1-naphthylethylamine and (+-(18-crown-6-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid constituting CSP 2 were concluded to show an uncooperative (“mismatched” effect on the chiral recognition. From these results, it was concluded that (+-(18-crown-6-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid can be successfully used as a chiral tethering group for the preparation of new CSPs.

  6. Distinguishability and chiral stability in solution: Effects of decoherence and intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Heekyung [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7 (Canada); Wardlaw, David M., E-mail: dwardlaw@mun.ca [Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1C 5S7 (Canada); Frolov, Alexei M., E-mail: afrolov@uwo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6H 5B7 (Canada)

    2014-05-28

    We examine the effect of decoherence and intermolecular interactions (chiral discrimination energies) on the chiral stability and the distinguishability of initially pure versus mixed states in an open chiral system. Under a two-level approximation for a system, intermolecular interactions are introduced by a mean-field theory, and interaction between a system and an environment is modeled by a continuous measurement of a population difference between the two chiral states. The resultant equations are explored for various parameters, with emphasis on the combined effects of the initial condition of the system, the chiral discrimination energies, and the decoherence in determining: the distinguishability as measured by a population difference between the initially pure and mixed states, and the decoherence process; the chiral stability as measured by the purity decay; and the stationary state of the system at times long relative to the time scales of the system dynamics and of the environmental effects.

  7. Boundary effect in electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, X L; Yang, F; Xuan, S H; Zong, L H; Zhu, W; Jiang, W Q

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the boundary friction coefficient on the rheological properties of the electrorheological (ER) fluids in quasistatic and dynamic states is investigated by computer simulation. The relation between the shear stress and the boundary friction coefficient in quasistatic and dynamic states is discussed qualitatively and quantitatively, and the trend matches the previously reported experimental results well. The flow curves of ER fluids, under different friction coefficients, are calculated, and it is found that the friction coefficient affects the flow curves. In two dimensions, the transitions in structure corresponding to the shear stress variations are presented to understand the mechanism of ER fluids.

  8. Chiral assembly of weakly curled hard rods: Effect of steric chirality and polarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensink, H. H., E-mail: wensink@lps.u-psud.fr; Morales-Anda, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides–UMR 8502, Université Paris-Sud & CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-10-14

    We theoretically investigate the pitch of lyotropic cholesteric phases composed of slender rods with steric chirality transmitted via a weak helical deformation of the backbone. In this limit, the model is amenable to analytical treatment within Onsager theory and a closed expression for the pitch versus concentration and helical shape can be derived. Within the same framework, we also briefly review the possibility of alternative types of chiral order, such as twist-bend or screw-like nematic phases, finding that cholesteric order dominates for weakly helical distortions. While long-ranged or “soft” chiral forces usually lead to a pitch decreasing linearly with concentration, steric chirality leads to a much steeper decrease of quadratic nature. This reveals a subtle link between the range of chiral intermolecular interaction and the pitch sensitivity with concentration. A much richer dependence on the thermodynamic state is revealed for polar helices where parallel and anti-parallel pair alignments along the local director are no longer equivalent. It is found that weak temperature variations may lead to dramatic changes in the pitch, despite the lyotropic nature of the assembly.

  9. Effective Lagrangians and chiral random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, M.A.; Verbaarschot, J.J.M. [Department of Physics, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    1995-08-15

    Recently, sum rules were derived for the inverse eigenvalues of the Dirac operator. They were obtained in two different ways: (i) starting from the low-energy effective Lagrangian and (ii) starting from a random matrix theory with the symmetries of the Dirac operator. This suggests that the effective theory can be obtained directly from the random matrix theory. Previously, this was shown for three or more colors with fundamental fermions. In this paper we construct the effective theory from a random matrix theory for two colors in the fundamental representation and for an arbitrary number of colors in the adjoint representation. We construct a fermionic partition function for Majorana fermions in Euclidean spacetime. Their reality condition is formulated in terms of complex conjugation of the second kind.

  10. Photo- and pion electroproduction in chiral effective field theory; Photo- und Elektropionproduktion in chiraler effektiver Feldtheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilt, Marius

    2011-12-13

    This thesis is concerned with pion photoproduction (PPP) and pion electroproduction (PEP) in the framework of manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. For that purpose two different approaches are used. Firstly, a one-loop-order calculation up to chiral order O(q{sup 4}) including pions and nucleons as degrees of freedom, is performed to describe the energy dependence of the reactions over a large range. To improve the dependence on the virtuality of the photon in PEP, in a second approach vector mesons are included as explicit degrees of freedom. The latter calculation includes one-loop contributions up to chiral order O(q{sup 3}). Only three of the four physical processes of PPP and PEP can be accessed experimentally. These reactions are measured at several different facilities, e.g. Mainz, Bonn, or Saskatoon. The data obtained there are used to explore the limits of chiral perturbation theory. This thesis is the first complete manifestly Lorentz-invariant calculation up to order O(q{sup 4}) for PPP and PEP, and the first calculation ever for these processes including vector mesons explicitly. Beside the calculation of physical observables, a partial wave decomposition is performed and the most important multipoles are analyzed. They may be extracted from the calculated amplitudes and allow one to examine the nucleon and {delta} resonances. The number of diagrams one has to calculate is very large. In order to handle these expressions, several routines were developed for the computer algebra system Mathematica. For the multipole decomposition, two different programs are used. On the one hand, a modified version of the so-called {chi}MAID has been employed. On the other hand, similar routines were developed for Mathematica. In the end, the different calculations are compared with respect to their applicability to PPP and PEP.

  11. Anisotropic hydrodynamics, holography and the chiral magnetic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahramanov, Ilmar; Kalaydzhyan, Tigran; Kirsch, Ingo [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik

    2012-03-15

    We discuss a possible dependence of the chiral magnetic effect (CME) on the elliptic flow coefficient {upsilon}{sub 2}. We first study this in a hydrodynamic model for a static anisotropic plasma with multiple anomalous U(1) currents. In the case of two charges, one axial and one vector, the CME formally appears as a first-order transport coefficient in the vector current. We compute this transport coefficient and show its dependence on {upsilon}{sub 2}. We also determine the CME-coefficient from first-order corrections to the dual AdS background using the fluid-gravity duality. For small anisotropies, we find numerical agreement with the hydrodynamic result. (orig.)

  12. The Effective Chiral Lagrangian for a Light Dynamical "Higgs Particle"

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, R.; Merlo, L.; Rigolin, S.; Yepes, J.

    2013-01-01

    We generalize the basis of CP-even chiral effective operators describing a dynamical Higgs sector, to the case in which the Higgs-like particle is light. Gauge and gauge-Higgs operators are considered up to mass dimension five. This analysis completes the tool needed to explore at leading order the connection between linear realizations of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism - whose extreme case is the Standard Model - and non-linear realizations with a light Higgs-like particle present. It may also provide a model-independent guideline to explore which exotic gauge-Higgs couplings may be expected, and their relative strength to Higgsless observable amplitudes. With respect to fermions, the analysis is reduced by nature to the consideration of those flavour-conserving operators that can be written in terms of pure-gauge or gauge-Higgs ones via the equations of motion, but for the standard Yukawa-type couplings.

  13. Chiral Anomaly as the Origin of the Planar Hall Effect in Weyl Semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, S.; Sharma, Girish; Taraphder, A.; Tewari, Sumanta

    2017-10-01

    In condensed matter physics, the term "chiral anomaly" implies the violation of the separate number conservation laws of Weyl fermions of different chiralities in the presence of parallel electric and magnetic fields. One effect of the chiral anomaly in the recently discovered Dirac and Weyl semimetals is a positive longitudinal magnetoconductance. Here we show that chiral anomaly and nontrivial Berry curvature effects engender another striking effect in Weyl semimetals, the planar Hall effect (PHE). Remarkably, the PHE manifests itself when the applied current, magnetic field, and the induced transverse "Hall" voltage all lie in the same plane, precisely in a configuration in which the conventional Hall effect vanishes. In this work we treat the PHE quasiclassically, and predict specific experimental signatures for type-I and type-II Weyl semimetals that can be directly checked in experiments.

  14. On a chiral analog of the Einstein-de Haas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    The Einstein-de Haas effect reveals a transfer of angular momentum from microscopic constituents (electrons) to a macroscopic body, but in the case of massless fermions, one could expect the transfer of the chirality of constituents to macroscopic helical motion. For such a picture to be consistent, the macroscopic helicity is to be conserved classically, to echo the conservation of the angular momentum of a rotating body. The helicity conservation would in turn impose constraints on hydrodynamics of chiral liquids (whose constituents are massless fermions). Essentially, the chiral liquids are dissipation-free, on the classical level. Reservations and alternatives to this scenario are discussed.

  15. Mechanical separation of chiral dipoles by chiral light

    CERN Document Server

    Canaguier-Durand, Antoine; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Optical forces take on a specific form when involving chiral light fields interacting with chiral objects. We show that optical chirality density and flow can have mechanical effects through reactive and dissipative components of chiral forces exerted on chiral dipoles. Remarkably, these force components are directly related to standard observables: optical rotation and circular dichroism, respectively. As a consequence, resulting forces and torques are dependent on the enantiomeric form of the chiral dipole. This leads to promising strategies for the mechanical separation of chiral objects using chiral light forces.

  16. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-02-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects—quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and chiral current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma—have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects.

  17. ONDAS ELECTROMAGNÉTICAS EN EL PLANO FRONTERA ENTRE DOS MEDIOS QUIRALES ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AT THE PLANE BOUNDARY BETWEEN TWO CHIRAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Torres-Silva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudia la propagación de ondas electromagnéticas en medios quirales isotrópicos y los efectos producidos por un plano frontera entre tales medios. En analogía con el fenómeno de reflexión y refracción de ondas electromagnéticas planas en dieléctricos ordinarios, se estudian los aspectos cinéticos y dinámicos de estos fenómenos, tal como la intensidad de las componentes de onda y el cambio en la polarización de la onda al cruzar la frontera. Como un prerrequisito, mostramos que la solución de onda plana debe ser escrita como una superposición conveniente de las amplitudes quirales circularmente polarizadas en ambos lados de la interfaz. Se presenta el conjunto apropiado de condiciones que la solución debe satisfacer en la frontera y el sistema de ecuaciones que debe ser resuelto para los coeficientes de amplitud de manera de satisfacer las condiciones de frontera. Las ecuaciones pueden ser resueltas explícitamente para algunos casos y configuraciones particulares (por ejemplo, incidencia normal, las características prominentes de estas soluciones pueden ser analizadas en algún detalle. También se presenta un desarrollo de la solución general de las ecuaciones. Este trabajo podría ser aplicado en diseño de microondas en muy altas frecuencias y en líneas de transmisión no simétricas.This work is concerned with the propagation of electromagnetic waves in isotropic chiral media and with the effects produced by a plane boundary between two such media. In analogy with the phenomena of reflection and refraction of plane electromagnetic waves in ordinary dielectrics, the kinematical and dynamical aspects of these phenomena are studied, in situations such as the intensity of the various wave components and the change in the polarization of the wave, as it crosses the boundary. As a prerequisite to this, we show that the plane wave solution must be written as a suitable superposition of the circularly polarized

  18. Enantioselective Effects of Chiral Pesticides on their Primary Targets and Secondary Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Zhang, Jianyun; Yao, Yijun

    2017-01-01

    Enantioselectivity has been well recognized in the environmental fate and effects of chiral pesticides. Enantiospecific action of the optical enantiomers on the biological molecules establishes the mechanistic basis for the enantioselective toxicity of chiral pesticides to both target and non-target organisms. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for research literature concerning the enantioselective effects of chiral pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, on biomolecules in various species by using some key words. The results of the relevant literatures were reviewed in the text and summarized in tables. Pesticides generally exert their activity on the target organisms via disrupting the primary target biomolecules. In non-target species, effects of pesticides on the secondary targets distinguished from the primary ones make great contribution to their toxicity. Recent investigations have provided convincing evidence of enantioselective toxicity of chiral pesticides to both target and non-target species which is recognized to result from their enantiospecific action on the primary or secondary targets in organisms. This review confirms that chiral pesticides have enantiospecific effects on both primary and secondary target biomolecules in organisms. Future studies regarding toxicological effects of chiral pesticides should focus on the relationship between the enantiomeric difference in the compound-biomolecules interaction and the enantioselectivity in their toxicity.

  19. Meson-Baryon Effective Chiral Lagrangian at $O(q^3)$ Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, José Antonio; Verbeni, Michela; Oller, Jose Antonio; Prades, Joaquim; Verbeni, Michela

    2007-01-01

    After our work [1] was published, Frink and Meissner [2] pointed out that the O(q^3) three-flavour meson-baryon chiral Lagrangian presented there was not minimal. Here, we critically review their paper and revise ours. Remarkably, we find that the effective meson-baryon chiral Lagrangian at O(q^3) contains 76 monomials, i.e. eight less than in [1] and two less than in [2].

  20. Chiral symmetry and effective field theories for hadronic, nuclear and stellar matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Jeremy W., E-mail: jwholt.phys@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195 (United States); Rho, Mannque [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Weise, Wolfram [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); ECT*, Villa Tambosi, I-38123 Villazzano (Italy)

    2016-03-21

    Chiral symmetry, first entering in nuclear physics in the 1970s for which Gerry Brown played a seminal role, has led to a stunningly successful framework for describing strongly-correlated nuclear dynamics both in finite and infinite systems. We review how the early, germinal idea conceived with the soft-pion theorems in the pre-QCD era has evolved into a highly predictive theoretical framework for nuclear physics, aptly assessed by Steven Weinberg: “it (chiral effective field theory) allows one to show in a fairly convincing way that what they (nuclear physicists) have been doing all along... is the correct first step in a consistent approximation scheme”. Our review recounts both how the theory presently fares in confronting Nature and how one can understand its extremely intricate workings in terms of the multifaceted aspects of chiral symmetry, namely, chiral perturbation theory, skyrmions, Landau Fermi-liquid theory, the Cheshire cat phenomenon, and hidden local and mended symmetries.

  1. Effect of chiral selective tunneling on quantum transport in magnetic topological-insulator thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabze, Tahere; Cheraghchi, Hosein

    2017-10-01

    The electronic transport properties in magnetically doped ultrathin films of topological insulators are investigated by using Landauer-Buttiker formalism. The chiral selective tunneling is addressed in such systems which leads to transport gap and as a consequence current blocking. This quantum blocking of transport occurs when the magnetic states with opposite chirality are aligned energetically. This can be observed when an electron tunnels through a barrier or well of magnetic potential induced by the exchange field. It is proved and demonstrated that this chiral transition rule fails when structural inversion asymmetric potential or an in-plane magnetization is turning on. This finding is useful to interpret quantum transport through topological-insulator thin films especially to shed light on longitudinal conductance behavior of quantum anomalous Hall effect. Besides, one can design electronic devices by means of magnetic topological-insulator thin films based on the chiral selective tunneling leading to negative differential resistance.

  2. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-08

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented.

  3. Introduction to Chiral Symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-05-09

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. We will also discuss some effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. We will present some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisionsd.

  4. Chiral Inorganic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; de Moura, André F; Wu, Xiaoling; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-06-28

    The field of chiral inorganic nanostructures is rapidly expanding. It started from the observation of strong circular dichroism during the synthesis of individual nanoparticles (NPs) and their assemblies and expanded to sophisticated synthetic protocols involving nanostructures from metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and nanocarbons. Besides the well-established chirality transfer from bioorganic molecules, other methods to impart handedness to nanoscale matter specific to inorganic materials were discovered, including three-dimentional lithography, multiphoton chirality transfer, polarization effects in nanoscale assemblies, and others. Multiple chiral geometries were observed with characteristic scales from ångströms to microns. Uniquely high values of chiral anisotropy factors that spurred the development of the field and differentiate it from chiral structures studied before, are now well understood; they originate from strong resonances of incident electromagnetic waves with plasmonic and excitonic states typical for metals and semiconductors. At the same time, distinct similarities with chiral supramolecular and biological systems also emerged. They can be seen in the synthesis and separation methods, chemical properties of individual NPs, geometries of the nanoparticle assemblies, and interactions with biological membranes. Their analysis can help us understand in greater depth the role of chiral asymmetry in nature inclusive of both earth and space. Consideration of both differences and similarities between chiral inorganic, organic, and biological nanostructures will also accelerate the development of technologies based on chiroplasmonic and chiroexcitonic effects. This review will cover both experiment and theory of chiral nanostructures starting with the origin and multiple components of mirror asymmetry of individual NPs and their assemblies. We shall consider four different types of chirality in nanostructures and related physical, chemical, and

  5. Boundary layer thickness effect on boattail drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Chamberlain, R.; Bober, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to investigate the effects of boundary layer changes on the flow over high angle boattail nozzles. The tests were run on an isolated axisymmetric sting mounted model. Various boattail geometries were investigated at high subsonic speeds over a range of boundary layer thicknesses. In general, boundary layer effects were small at speeds up to Mach 0.8. However, at higher speeds significant regions of separated flow were present on the boattail. When separation was present large reductions in boattail drag resulted with increasing boundary layer thickness. The analysis predicts both of these trends.

  6. Optical chirality breaking in a bilayered chiral metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianxing; Fu, Yuegang; Liu, Zhiying; Zhou, Jianhong

    2017-09-18

    We propose a planar optical bilayered chiral metamaterial, which consists of periodic metallic arrays of two L-shaped structures and a nanorod twisted on both sides of a dielectric slab, to investigate the optical chirality breaking effect by using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Even the metamaterial is with chiral symmetry, an optical chirality breaking window in the asymmetric transmission pass band is obtained in chiral metamaterial structure. We analyze the plasmonic mode properties and attribute the mechanism of the optical chirality breaking effect to the plasmonic analogue of EIT. The optical chirality breaking window can be modulated by changing the geometric parameters of the nanorods in the structure.

  7. Dynamical Local Chirality and Chiral Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandru, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We present some of the reasoning and results substantiating the notion that spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking (SChSB) in QCD is encoded in local chiral properties of Dirac eigenmodes. Such association is possible when viewing chirality as a dynamical effect, measured with respect to the benchmark of statistically independent left-right components. Following this rationale leads to describing local chiral behavior by a taylor-made correlation, namely the recently introduced correlation coefficient of polarization C_A. In this language, correlated modes (C_A>0) show dynamical preference for local chirality while anti-correlated modes (C_A<0) favor anti-chirality. Our conclusion is that SChSB in QCD can be viewed as dominance of low-energy correlation (chirality) over anti-correlation (anti-chirality) of Dirac sea. The spectral range of local chirality, chiral polarization scale Lambda_ch, is a dynamically generated scale in the theory associated with SChSB. One implication of these findings is briefly dis...

  8. Effect of grain boundary misorientation on discontinuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    showed that the discontinuous precipitation (DP) reaction rate was dependent on the geometry of the grain boundary in ... 80% thickness reduction) had no effect on the frequency of special-grain boundaries. Keywords. AZ91 alloy .... increasing solute concentration, the influence of the ener- getics and kinetics is diminished ...

  9. Dynamic Chiral Magnetic Effect and Faraday Rotation in Macroscopically Disordered Helical Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Pesin, D A

    2017-03-10

    We develop an effective medium theory for electromagnetic wave propagation through gapless nonuniform systems with a dynamic chiral magnetic effect. The theory allows us to calculate macroscopic-disorder-induced corrections to the values of optical, as well as chiral magnetic conductivities. In particular, we show that spatial fluctuations of the optical conductivity induce corrections to the effective value of the chiral magnetic conductivity. The absolute value of the effect varies strongly depending on the system parameters, but yields the leading frequency dependence of the polarization rotation and circular dichroism signals. Experimentally, these corrections can be observed as features in the Faraday rotation angle near frequencies that correspond to the bulk plasmon resonances of a material. Such features are not expected to be present in single-crystal samples.

  10. arXiv Chiral Effective Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bishara, Fady

    2017-02-03

    We present the effective field theory for dark matter interactions with the visible sector that is valid at scales of O(1 GeV). Starting with an effective theory describing the interactions of fermionic and scalar dark matter with quarks, gluons and photons via higher dimension operators that would arise from dimension-five and dimension-six operators above electroweak scale, we perform a nonperturbative matching onto a heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory that describes dark matter interactions with light mesons and nucleons. This is then used to obtain the coefficients of the nuclear response functions using a chiral effective theory description of nuclear forces. Our results consistently keep the leading contributions in chiral counting for each of the initial Wilson coefficients.

  11. Modeling finite-volume effects and chiral symmetry breaking in two-flavor QCD thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Bertram

    2017-11-01

    Finite-volume effects in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) have been a subject of much theoretical interest for more than two decades. They are in particular important for the analysis and interpretation of QCD simulations on a finite, discrete space-time lattice. Most of these effects are closely related to the phenomenon of spontaneous breaking of the chiral flavor symmetry and the emergence of pions as light Goldstone bosons. These long-range fluctuations are strongly affected by putting the system into a finite box, and an analysis with different methods can be organized according to the interplay between pion mass and box size. The finite volume also affects critical behavior at the chiral phase transition in QCD. In the present review, I will be mainly concerned with modeling such finite volume effects as they affect the thermodynamics of the chiral phase transition for two quark flavors. I review recent work on the analysis of finite-volume effects which makes use of the quark-meson model for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. To account for the effects of critical long-range fluctuations close to the phase transition, most of the calculations have been performed using non-perturbative Renormalization Group (RG) methods. I give an overview over the application of these methods to a finite volume. The method, the model and the results are put into the context of related work in random matrix theory for very small volumes, chiral perturbation theory for larger volumes, and related methods and approaches. They are applied towards the analysis of finite-volume effects in lattice QCD simulations and their interpretation, mainly in the context of the chiral phase transition for two quark flavors.

  12. Baryonic forces and hyperons in nuclear matter from SU(3) chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petschauer, Stefan Karl

    2016-02-12

    In this work the baryon-baryon interaction is studied at next-to-leading order in SU(3) chiral effective field theory and applied to hyperon-nucleon scattering. The properties of hyperons in isospin-symmetric as well as asymmetric nuclear matter are calculated within the Bruecker-Hartree-Fock formalism. Moreover, the leading three-baryon interaction is derived and its low-energy constants are estimated from decuplet intermediate states. We conclude, that chiral effective field theory is a well-suited tool to describe the baryonic forces.

  13. Charge-Dependent Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzdak, Adam [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Koch, Volker [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liao, Jinfeng [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We provide a phenomenological analysis of present experimental searches for local parity violation manifested through the Chiral Magnetic Effect. We introduce and discuss the relevant correlation functions used for the measurements. Our analysis of the available data from both RHIC and LHC shows that the present experimental evidence for the Chiral Magnetic Effect is rather ambiguous. We further discuss in some detail various background contributions due to conventional physics, which need to be understood quantitatively in order to draw a definitive conclusion about the existence of local parity violation in heavy ion collisions.

  14. Impurity Induced Polar Kerr Effect in A Chiral p-wave Superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Goryo, Jun

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the polar Kerr effect (PKE) in a chiral p-wave (p_x+i p_y-wave) superconductor. It is found that the off-diagonal component of a current-current correlation function is induced by impurity scattering in the chiral p-wave condensate, and a nonzero Hall conductivity is obtained using the Kubo formula. We estimate the Kerr rotation angle by using this impurity-induced Hall conductivity and compare it with experimental results [Jing Xia et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 167002 (2006)].

  15. Field theoretic perspectives of the Wigner function formulation of the chiral magnetic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Hou, De-fu; Ren, Hai-cang

    2017-11-01

    We assess the applicability of the Wigner function formulation in its present form to the chiral magnetic effect and note some issues regarding the conservation and the consistency of the electric current in the presence of an inhomogeneous and time-dependent axial chemical potential. The problems are rooted in the ultraviolet divergence of the underlying field theory associated with the axial anomaly and can be fixed with the Pauli-Villars regularization of the Wigner function. The chiral magnetic current with a nonconstant axial chemical potential is calculated with the regularized Wigner function and the phenomenological implications are discussed.

  16. Long-period helical structures and twist-grain boundary phases induced by chemical substitution in the Mn1 -x(Co,Rh ) xGe chiral magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N.; Deutsch, M.; Chaboussant, G.; Damay, F.; Bonville, P.; Fomicheva, L. N.; Tsvyashchenko, A. V.; Rössler, U. K.; Mirebeau, I.

    2017-07-01

    We study the evolution of helical magnetism in MnGe chiral magnet upon partial substitution of Mn for 3 d -Co and 4 d -Rh ions. At high doping levels, we observe spin helices with very long periods—more than ten times larger than in the pure compound—and sizable ordered moments. This behavior calls for a change in the energy balance of interactions leading to the stabilization of the observed magnetic structures. Strikingly, neutron scattering unambiguously shows a double periodicity in the observed spectra at x =0.5 and >0.2 for Co- and Rh-doping, respectively. In analogy with observations made in smectic liquid crystals, we suggest that it may reveal the presence of magnetic "twist grain boundary" phases, involving a dense short-range correlated network of magnetic screw dislocations. The dislocation cores are here tentatively described as smooth textures, made of nonradial double-core skyrmions.

  17. Low energy structure of the nucleon from chiral effective field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alarcón Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some updated results regarding the scalar and electromagnetic structure of the nucleon obtained by the relativistic formulation of chiral effective field theory with baryons. We compare them with previous determinations available in the literature, and show their relevance for searches of physics beyond the standard model in the low energy frontier.

  18. Synthesis of amino acid block-copolymer imprinted chiral mesoporous silica and its acoustically-induced optical Kerr effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Pradip, E-mail: pradip.paik@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering and Nanoscience and Technology, School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Central University P.O., Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500046, AP (India); Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, 52900 (Israel); Mastai, Yitzhak, E-mail: mastai@mail.biu.ac.il [Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, 52900 (Israel); Kityk, Iwan; Rakus, Piort [Electrical Engineering Department, Czestochowa University Technology, Armii Krajowej 17, Czestochowa (Poland); Gedanken, Aharon, E-mail: gedanken@mail.biu.ac.il [Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, 52900 (Israel)

    2012-08-15

    Chiral mesoporous SiO{sub 2} (CMS) have been synthesized and studied the Acoustically-Induced Optical Kerr Effects (AIOKE) and the results have been compared with non-chiral mesoporous silica. The CMS with controllable pore sizes (of {approx}3 nm) and high surface areas of ca. 650 m{sup 2}g{sup -1} was synthesized by mimicking the intrinsic chirality of the amino acid block copolymers. The chiral mesoporous materials were characterized through HRTEM, BET, small-angle XRD, {sup 29}Si-NMR and circular dichroism. AIOKE measurements have been performed using an Er:glass 20 ns laser with a 10 Hz frequency repetition. The optimal AIOKE results of the CMS were achieved for 9.7% of the chromophore in the matrices. We found that the AIOKE for the CMS mimicked with chiral block copolymers is quite high compared to the non-chiral SiO{sub 2}. A difference in AIOKE for these two compounds is observed, enabling CMS that can be used for the design of the acoustically-operated quantum electronic devices. - Graphical abstract: Novel chiral mesoporous SiO{sub 2} (CMS) is showing Acoustically-Induced Optical Kerr Effects (AIOKE). Different in AIOKE of two mesoporous materials is observed, enabling CMS can be used for the design of the acoustically-operated quantum electronic devices.Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chiral mesoporous SiO{sub 2} (CMS) synthesized with amino acid block copolymers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Acoustically-induced Optical Kerr Effects (AIOKE) of chiral mesoporous SiO{sub 2} studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIOKE very high for CMS compared to non chiral SiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CMS can be used in acoustically-operated quantum electronic devices.

  19. Punctuated Chirality

    OpenAIRE

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Thorarinson, Joel; Walker, Sara Imari

    2008-01-01

    Most biomolecules occur in mirror, or chiral, images of each other. However, life is homochiral: proteins contain almost exclusively levorotatory (L) amino acids, while only dextrorotatory (R) sugars appear in RNA and DNA. The mechanism behind this fundamental asymmetry of life remains an open problem. Coupling the spatiotemporal evolution of a general autocatalytic polymerization reaction network to external environmental effects, we show through a detailed statistical analysis that high int...

  20. Baryon number fluctuations in chiral effective models and their phenomenological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almási, Gábor András; Friman, Bengt; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2017-07-01

    We study the critical properties of net-baryon-number fluctuations at the chiral restoration transition in a medium at finite temperature and net baryon density. The chiral dynamics of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is modeled by the Polyakov-loop extended quark-meson Lagrangian that includes the coupling of quarks to vector meson and temporal gauge fields. The functional renormalization group is employed to properly account for the O (4 ) criticality at the phase boundary. We focus on the properties and systematics of ratios of the net-baryon-number cumulants χBn, for 1 ≤n ≤6 , near the phase boundary. The results are presented in the context of the recent experimental data of the STAR Collaboration on fluctuations of the net proton number in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. We show that the model results for the energy dependence of the cumulant ratios are in good overall agreement with the data, with one exception. At center-of-mass energies below 19.6 GeV, we find that the measured fourth-order cumulant deviates considerably from the model results, which incorporate the expected O (4 ) and Z (2 ) criticality. We assess the influence of model assumptions and in particular of repulsive vector-interactions, which are used to modify the location of the critical end point in the model, on the cumulants ratios. Finally, we discuss a possibility to test to what extent the fluctuations are affected by nonequilibrium dynamics by comparing certain ratios of cumulants.

  1. Enantioselective decomposition of chiral alkyl bromides on Cu(6 4 3) R&S: Effects of moving the chiral center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampulla, D. M.; Gellman, A. J.

    2006-07-01

    The enantioselective surface chemistry of two chiral alkyl halides, S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane and R-2-bromobutane, have been compared on the naturally chiral Cu(6 4 3) R&S surfaces. Temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy was used to quantify the yields of the various decomposition products during heating. A fraction of the adsorbed alkyl bromides desorb intact while the remainder decomposes by debromination to form either S-2-methyl-1-butyl or R-2-butyl groups on the surfaces. The S-2-methyl-1-butyl group then reacts by β-hydride elimination to form 2-methyl-1-butene or by hydrogenation to form 2-methylbutane. The R-2-butyl group reacts by β-hydride elimination to form butene or by hydrogenation to form butane. This surface chemistry on Cu(6 4 3) R&S is not enantioselective at low coverages but is enantioselective at high coverages. In R-2-bromobutane the chiral carbon atom coincides with the debromination reaction center while the β-hydride elimination centers are achiral. In S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane the chiral carbon atom coincides with the β-hydride elimination reaction center while the center for debromination is achiral. Results show that the enantioselectivities are influenced by the surface structure to a greater extent than they are by the adsorbate structure.

  2. Chiral streamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Dandan; Cao, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Lu, Xinpei, E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ostrikov, Kostya [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia); Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P.O. Box 218, Sydney, New South Wales 2070 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of time-varying electromagnetic fields and solid, liquid, and gaseous matter may lead to electrical breakdown phenomena through the excitation of ionization waves or streamers that control the dynamics of localized plasma propagation through the media. The streamers usually propagate along straight lines, either between random points in space or along a certain direction in a guided mode. Here, we report on a new type of plasma discharges with the regular helical propagation pattern driven by a pulsed dc voltage in nitrogen at sub-atmospheric-pressure conditions. The helical guided streamers, named chiral streamers or chi-streamers, are excited without any external magnetic fields, which commonly cause helical plasma motions. We also demonstrate a hybrid propagation mode involving the interchangeable chiral streamers and the straight-line propagating plasmas. High-speed, time-resolved optical imaging reveals that the chiral streamers and the hybrid patterns are made of spatially localized discrete plasma bullets, similar to the straight-line guided streamers. These results may enable effective control of propagation of confined plasmas and electromagnetic energy along pre-determined, potentially deterministic paths, which have important implications for the development of next-generation plasma-based radiation sources, communication devices, and medical treatments.

  3. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  4. High-effective approach from amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst and its catalytic reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Jun; Li, Huiying; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Developing the high-efficient and green synthetic method for chiral amino alcohols is an intriguing target. We have developed the Mg2+-doped Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for hydrogenation of L-phenylalanine methyl ester to chiral L-phenylalaninol without racemization. The effect of different L-phenylalanine esters on this title reaction was studied, verifying that Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 is an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols. DFT calculation was used to study the adsorption of substrate on the catalyst, and showed that the substrate adsorbs on the surface active sites mainly by amino group (-NH2) absorbed on Al2O3, and carbonyl (C=O) and alkoxy (RO-) group oxygen absorbed on the boundary of Cu and Al2O3. This catalytic hydrogenation undergoes the formation of a hemiacetal intermediate and the cleavage of the C–O bond (rate-determining step) by reacting with dissociated H to obtain amino aldehyde and methanol ad-species. The former is further hydrogenated to amino alcohols, and the latter desorbs from the catalyst surface. PMID:27619990

  5. High-effective approach from amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst and its catalytic reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Jun; Li, Huiying; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2016-09-01

    Developing the high-efficient and green synthetic method for chiral amino alcohols is an intriguing target. We have developed the Mg2+-doped Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for hydrogenation of L-phenylalanine methyl ester to chiral L-phenylalaninol without racemization. The effect of different L-phenylalanine esters on this title reaction was studied, verifying that Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 is an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols. DFT calculation was used to study the adsorption of substrate on the catalyst, and showed that the substrate adsorbs on the surface active sites mainly by amino group (-NH2) absorbed on Al2O3, and carbonyl (C=O) and alkoxy (RO-) group oxygen absorbed on the boundary of Cu and Al2O3. This catalytic hydrogenation undergoes the formation of a hemiacetal intermediate and the cleavage of the C-O bond (rate-determining step) by reacting with dissociated H to obtain amino aldehyde and methanol ad-species. The former is further hydrogenated to amino alcohols, and the latter desorbs from the catalyst surface.

  6. Bayesian truncation errors in chiral effective field theory: model checking and accounting for correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Jordan; Wesolowski, Sarah; Furnstahl, Dick

    2017-09-01

    Chiral effective field theory (EFT) predictions are necessarily truncated at some order in the EFT expansion, which induces an error that must be quantified for robust statistical comparisons to experiment. A Bayesian model yields posterior probability distribution functions for these errors based on expectations of naturalness encoded in Bayesian priors and the observed order-by-order convergence pattern of the EFT. As a general example of a statistical approach to truncation errors, the model was applied to chiral EFT for neutron-proton scattering using various semi-local potentials of Epelbaum, Krebs, and Meißner (EKM). Here we discuss how our model can learn correlation information from the data and how to perform Bayesian model checking to validate that the EFT is working as advertised. Supported in part by NSF PHY-1614460 and DOE NUCLEI SciDAC DE-SC0008533.

  7. Polarimetric Detection of Enantioselective Adsorption by Chiral Au Nanoparticles – Effects of Temperature, Wavelength and Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Shukla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available R- and S-propylene oxide (PO have been shown to interact enantiospecifically with the chiral surfaces of Au nanopar‐ ticles (NPs modified with D- or L-cysteine (cys. This enantiospecific interaction has been detected using optical polarimetry measurements made on solutions of the D- or L-cys modified Au (cys/Au NPs during addition of racemic PO. The selective adsorption of one enantiomer of the PO onto the cys/Au NP surfaces results in a net rotation of light during addition of the racemic PO to the solution. In order to optimize the conditions used for making these measurements and to quantify enantiospecific adsorption onto chiral NPs, this work has measured the effect of temperature, wavelength and Au NP size on optical rotation by solutions containing D- or L-cys/Au NPs and racemic PO. Increasing temperature, decreasing wave‐ length and decreasing NP size result in larger optical rotations.

  8. Effect of the intersite Coulomb interaction on chiral superconductivity at the noncollinear spin ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val'kov, V. V.; Zlotnikov, A. O.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the effect of the intersite Coulomb interaction in a planar system with the triangular lattice on the structure of chiral order parameter Δ( p) in the phase of coexisting superconductivity and noncollinear 120° magnetic ordering. It has been established that the Coulomb correlations in this phase initiate the state where the quasi-momentum dependence Δ( p) can be presented as a superposition of the chiral invariants corresponding to the {d_{{x^2} - {y^2}}} + i{d_{xy}} and p x + ip y symmetry types. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of the Coulomb interaction shifts the Δ( p) nodal point positions and, thereby, changes the conditions for a quantum topological transition.

  9. Effect of critical process parameters on the synthesis of chiral amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrung, Silvia; Lima Afonso Neto, Watson; Schwarze, Daniel

    equilibrium, the inhibition profiles for substrates and products but also on the possibilities for in-situ product removal (ISPR) and technologies for shifting the equilibrium. In a challenging process such as the synthesis of optically pure chiral amines using ω-transaminase, these decisions will have......Developing a biocatalytic transferase process involves many challenges, and choices have to be made regarding several aspects. Primarily, the selection of the biocatalyst itself and which biocatalyst formulation to use, but also the choice of amine donor has a decisive impact not only on reaction...... process parameters involved in the production of two chiral amines (S-methylbenzylamine and 3-amino-1-phenylbutane) (Figure 1) to demonstrate the effects of such decisions....

  10. Complete next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of NN → NNπ in chiral effective field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filin A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the pion production operator calculated up-to-and-including next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO in chiral effective field theory. We include explicit Delta degrees of freedom and demonstrate that they provide essential contribution required to understand neutral pion production data. Analysis of chiral loops at NNLO reveals new mechanisms which are important, but haven’t been considered in phenomenological studies so far.

  11. The Effect of Recessions on Firms’ Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Eirik Sjåholm; Foss, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The economic theory of the firm offers conflicting predictions of how the two major effects of recessions, changes in demand and access to credit, affect firm boundaries. Using data on Norwegian firms in the recent recession, we find support for both increased and reduced vertical integration...... of core activities in response to a recessionary shock. Further, we find a negative interaction effect between reductions in access to credit and reductions in demand on insourcing of core activities, but no such effect on outsourcing of core activities. We argue that this finding may highlight a possible...... explanation for the conflicting theoretical predictions regarding vertical integration in response to demand and credit shocks....

  12. Electro-optic studies of the flexoelectric effect in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musgrave, B

    2000-01-01

    With the advent of global telecommunications networks and the Internet, the development of portable display technology has gained a new impetus. Liquid crystal devices have played a major role in this area, most conspicuously as displays in laptop computers. To date, these liquid crystalline devices have been generally based on the rather slow ({approx} 30 ms) dielectric response of the achiral nematic liquid crystal phase, although more expensive devices based on the faster (< 100 {mu}s) ferroelectric switching of the smectic C* phase are in production. The research presented in this thesis relates to a new switching effect recently discovered in the chiral nematic phase. The flexoelectrically-driven rotation of the chiral nematic phase's optic axis is fast - of the order 10 {mu}s to lms - proportional to the applied field amplitude and completely in-plane. The optic axis has been deflected by over 30 deg. from the equilibrium position in some materials. These electro-optic properties make the 'flexoelectro-optic' effect a potential contender in the liquid crystal device market. The present thesis contains the first studies of the effect of molecular structure on flexoelectric coupling in the chiral nematic phase. Several homologous series of estradiol-cyanobiphenyl bimesogenic materials synthesized for this work have been characterized and their electro-optic properties investigated. The chiral nematic phases of these materials have unusually strong flexoelectro-optic effects and respond on a sub-millisecond timescale. The ratios of the effective flexoelectric coefficient to the mean splay-bend elastic constant, e-bar/K, in the present materials lie in the range 0.3 to 0.6 C N{sup -1} m{sup -1}, and are the highest measured to date: the highest value previously published is 0.12 C N{sup -1} m{sup -1}, measured for the commercial mixture TM216. In order to interpret the effect of the bimesogens' molecular structure, achiral nematic monomesogens

  13. Chiral magnetic superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharzeev Dmitri E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials with charged chiral quasiparticles in external parallel electric and magnetic fields can support an electric current that grows linearly in time, corresponding to diverging DC conductivity. From experimental viewpoint, this “Chiral Magnetic Superconductivity” (CMS is thus analogous to conventional superconductivity. However the underlying physics is entirely different – the CMS does not require a condensate of Cooper pairs breaking the gauge degeneracy, and is thus not accompanied by Meissner effect. Instead, it owes its existence to the (temperature-independent quantum chiral anomaly and the conservation of chirality. As a result, this phenomenon can be expected to survive to much higher temperatures. Even though the chirality of quasiparticles is not strictly conserved in real materials, the chiral magnetic superconductivity should still exhibit itself in AC measurements at frequencies larger than the chirality-flipping rate, and in microstructures of Dirac and Weyl semimetals with thickness below the mean chirality-flipping length that is about 1 – 100 μm. In nuclear physics, the CMS should contribute to the charge-dependent elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions.

  14. Effects of copper ions on DNA binding and cytotoxic activity of a chiral salicylidene Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Bao-Li; Xu, Wu-Shuang; Tao, Hui-Wen; Li, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Long, Jian-Ying; Liu, Qing-Bo; Xia, Bing; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2014-03-05

    A chiral Schiff base HL N-(5-bromo-salicylaldehyde)dehydroabietylamine (1) and its chiral dinuclear copper complex [Cu2L4]·4DMF (2) have been synthesized and fully characterized. The interactions of 1 and 2 with salmon sperm DNA have been investigated by viscosity measurements, UV, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques. Absorption spectral (Kb=3.30 × 10(5)M(-)(1) (1), 6.63 × 10(5)M(-)(1)(2)), emission spectral (Ksv=7.58 × 10(3)M(-)(1) (1), 1.52 × 10(4)M(-)(1) (2)), and viscosity measurements reveal that 1 and 2 interact with DNA through intercalation and 2 exhibits a higher DNA binding ability. In addition, CD study indicates 2 cause a more evident perturbation on the base stacking and helicity of B-DNA upon binding to it. In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy (ΔH>0) and entropy (ΔS>0) changes of the reactions between the compounds with DNA demonstrate hydrophobic interactions. 1 and 2 were also screened for their cytotoxic ability and 2 demonstrates higher growth inhibition of the selected cancer cells at concentration of 50 μM, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order. All the experimental results show that the involvement of Cu (II) centers has some interesting effect on DNA binding ability and cytotoxicity of the chiral Schiff base. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Chiral Magnetic Effect: Beam-energy and system-size dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Toneev, V. D.; Voronyuk, V.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the energy dependence of the local ${\\cal P}$ and ${\\cal CP}$ violation in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions over a large energy range within a simple phenomenological model. It is expected that at LHC the chiral magnetic effect will be about 20 times weaker than at RHIC. At lower energy range this effect should vanish sharply at energy somewhere above the top SPS one. To elucidate CME background effects a transport model including magnetic field evolution is put forward.

  16. Chirality in molecular collision dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Chirality is a phenomenon that permeates the natural world, with implications for atomic and molecular physics, for fundamental forces and for the mechanisms at the origin of the early evolution of life and biomolecular homochirality. The manifestations of chirality in chemistry and biochemistry are numerous, the striking ones being chiral recognition and asymmetric synthesis with important applications in molecular sciences and in industrial and pharmaceutical chemistry. Chiral discrimination phenomena, due to the existence of two enantiomeric forms, very well known in the case of interaction with light, but still nearly disregarded in molecular collision studies. Here we review some ideas and recent advances about the role of chirality in molecular collisions, designing and illustrating molecular beam experiments for the demonstration of chiral effects and suggesting a scenario for a stereo-directional origin of chiral selection.

  17. Chirality effects at each amino acid position on tripeptide self-assembly into hydrogel biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesan, S.; Easton, C. D.; Styan, K. E.; Waddington, L. J.; Kushkaki, F.; Goodall, L.; McLean, K. M.; Forsythe, J. S.; Hartley, P. G.

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogels formed by ultrashort peptides are emerging as cost-effective materials for cell culture. However, l-peptides are labile to proteases, while their d-isomers are thought to not support cell growth as well. In contrast, the self-assembly behaviour and biological performance of heterochiral peptides (i.e., made of both d and l amino acids) are largely unknown. In this study, we evaluate the effects of amino acid chirality on tripeptide self-assembly and hydrogelation at physiological pH, and cytocompatibility in fibroblast cell culture. A series of uncapped hydrophobic tripeptides with all combinations of d, l amino acids was prepared, tested for self-assembly under physiological conditions, and analysed by circular dichroism, FT-IR, cryo-TEM, AFM, and Thioflavin T fluorescence imaging. Amino acid chirality has a profound effect on the peptides' supramolecular behaviour. Only selected isomers form hydrogels, and of amyloid structure, as confirmed by rheology and XRD. Importantly, they are able to maintain the viability and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro. This study identifies two heterochiral gels that perform well in cell culture and will assist in the design of innovative and cost-effective peptide gel biomaterials.Hydrogels formed by ultrashort peptides are emerging as cost-effective materials for cell culture. However, l-peptides are labile to proteases, while their d-isomers are thought to not support cell growth as well. In contrast, the self-assembly behaviour and biological performance of heterochiral peptides (i.e., made of both d and l amino acids) are largely unknown. In this study, we evaluate the effects of amino acid chirality on tripeptide self-assembly and hydrogelation at physiological pH, and cytocompatibility in fibroblast cell culture. A series of uncapped hydrophobic tripeptides with all combinations of d, l amino acids was prepared, tested for self-assembly under physiological conditions, and analysed by circular dichroism, FT

  18. Chiral Effective Theory Methods and their Application to the Structure of Hadrons from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Shanahan, P E

    2016-01-01

    For many years chiral effective theory (ChEFT) has enabled and supported lattice QCD calculations of hadron observables by allowing systematic effects from unphysical lattice parameters to be controlled. In the modern era of precision lattice simulations approaching the physical point, ChEFT techniques remain valuable tools. In this review we discuss the modern uses of ChEFT applied to lattice studies of hadron structure in the context of recent determinations of important and topical quantities. We consider muon g-2, strangeness in the nucleon, the proton radius, nucleon polarizabilities, and sigma terms relevant to the prediction of dark-matter-hadron interaction cross-sections, among others.

  19. The effect of co-surfactant-modified micelles on chiral separations in EKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojtari, Adeline B; Guetschow, Erik D; Foley, Joe P

    2009-08-01

    The use of chiral pseudostationary phases in EKC provides high efficiencies and excellent resolution for enantiomeric separations. The chiral pseudostationary phases of interest in this study are alcohol-modified ("swollen") micelles, in which a co-surfactant (medium chain-length alcohol) is added with the surfactant. In this study, the chiral surfactant, dodecoxycarbonylvaline (DDCV), along with the co-surfactant, 2-hexanol, has been prepared as swollen micelle in order to investigate the chiral separation of enantiomeric pairs. Three sets of experiments were investigated in which swollen micelle systems contained: chiral surfactant and racemic co-surfactant; chiral surfactant and chiral co-surfactant; and phase ratio increases, in which both chiral surfactant and chiral co-surfactant were employed. In the first two sets of experiments, co-surfactant concentration was held constant and the surfactant concentration was increased. In the third set of experiments, both surfactant and chiral surfactant concentrations were increased proportionally. The chromatographic figures of merit for each enantiomeric pair were investigated and compared with various chiral aggregate systems. In swollen micelle compositions using constant racemic 2-hexanol concentration, when DDCV concentration increased, enantioselectivity and resolution increased; whereas, efficiency remained constant for most of the test compounds. Compositions using constant S-2-hexanol concentration reached a maximum in all chromatographic figures of merit when DDCV concentration was increased from 2 to 3%. An increase in both surfactant and co-surfactant concentrations led to noisy baselines and chiral aggregates that were generally unstable in solution.

  20. Chiral photochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Yoshihisa

    2004-01-01

    Direct Asymmetric Photochemistry with Circularly Polarized Light, H. RauCoherent Laser Control of the Handedness of Chiral Molecules, P. Brumer and M. ShapiroMagnetochiral Anisotropy in Asymmetric Photochemistry, G.L.J.A.RikkenEnantiodifferentiating Photosensitized Reactions, Y. InoueDiastereodifferentiating Photoreactions, N. Hoffmann and J.-P. PeteChirality in Photochromism, Y. Yokoyama and M. SaitoChiral Photochemistry with Transition Metal Complexes, S. Sakaki and T. HamadaTemplate-Induced Enantioselective Photochemical Reactions in S

  1. Chiral algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Beilinson, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Chiral algebras form the primary algebraic structure of modern conformal field theory. Each chiral algebra lives on an algebraic curve, and in the special case where this curve is the affine line, chiral algebras invariant under translations are the same as well-known and widely used vertex algebras. The exposition of this book covers the following topics: the "classical" counterpart of the theory, which is an algebraic theory of non-linear differential equations and their symmetries; the local aspects of the theory of chiral algebras, including the study of some basic examples, such as the ch

  2. Chiral domains in cycloidal multiferroic thin films: switching and memory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, I; Fàbrega, L; Martí, X; Sánchez, F; Fontcuberta, J

    2011-12-16

    Cycloidal magnetic order occurring in some AMnO(3) perovskites is known to induce ferroelectricity. The polarization is perpendicular to the propagation vector direction of the cycloid and its chirality, and therefore it is directly related to the chiral domain structure. We show that the switching process of chiral domains is sensitively dependent on the magnetoelectric history of the sample. Moreover, by appropriate field cycling, magnetic order can display partial chiral memory. We argue that memory results from electric field coupling of cycloidal domain and nucleation and pinning of chiral domain walls, much like the domain structure in other ferroic systems. © 2011 American Physical Society

  3. $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamu, Yusupujiang [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Ji, Chueng -Ryong [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Melnitchouk, W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, P. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, CAS, Beijing (China)

    2015-03-25

    We compute the $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory, including both nucleon and Δ degrees of freedom, within both relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. In addition to the distribution at $x>0$, we estimate the correction to the integrated asymmetry arising from zero momentum contributions from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at $x=0$, which have not been accounted for in previous analyses. In conclusion, we find that the empirical $x$ dependence of $\\bar d - \\bar u$ as well as the integrated asymmetry can be well reproduced in terms of a transverse momentum cutoff parameter.

  4. Deuteron electromagnetic form factors in a renormalizable formulation of chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epelbaum, E. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Gasparyan, A.M. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); SSC RF ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gegelia, J. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Schindler, M.R. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We calculate the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in a modified version of Weinberg's chiral effective field theory approach to the two-nucleon system. We derive renormalizable integral equations for the deuteron without partial wave decomposition. Deuteron form factors are extracted by applying the Lehmann-Symanzik-Zimmermann reduction formalism to the three-point correlation function of deuteron interpolating fields and the electromagnetic current operator. Numerical results of a leading-order calculation with removed cutoff regularization agree well with experimental data. (orig.)

  5. Effects of second neighbor interactions on skyrmion lattices in chiral magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, E A S; Silva, R L; Silva, R C; Pereira, A R

    2017-05-24

    In this paper we investigate the influences of the second neighbor interactions on a skyrmion lattice in two-dimensional chiral magnets. Such a system contains the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya for the spin interactions and therefore, we analyse three situations: firstly, the second neighbor interaction is present only in the exchange coupling; secondly, it is present only in the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya coupling. Finally, the second neighbor interactions are present in both exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya couplings. We show that such effects cause important modifications to the helical and skyrmion phases when an external magnetic field is applied.

  6. Constraints on neutron star radii based on chiral effective field theory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeler, K; Lattimer, J M; Pethick, C J; Schwenk, A

    2010-10-15

    We show that microscopic calculations based on chiral effective field theory interactions constrain the properties of neutron-rich matter below nuclear densities to a much higher degree than is reflected in commonly used equations of state. Combined with observed neutron star masses, our results lead to a radius R=9.7-13.9  km for a 1.4M⊙ star, where the theoretical range is due, in about equal amounts, to uncertainties in many-body forces and to the extrapolation to high densities.

  7. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-09

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications.

  8. Quantifying the chiral magnetic effect from anomalous-viscous fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yin; Shi, Shuzhe; Yin, Yi; Liao, Jinfeng

    2018-01-01

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is a macroscopic manifestation of fundamental chiral anomaly in a many-body system of chiral fermions, and emerges as an anomalous transport current in the fluid dynamics framework. Experimental observation of the CME is of great interest and has been reported in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. Significant efforts have also been made to look for the CME in heavy ion collisions. Critically needed for such a search is the theoretical prediction for the CME signal. In this paper we report a first quantitative modeling framework, Anomalous Viscous Fluid Dynamics (AVFD), which computes the evolution of fermion currents on top of realistic bulk evolution in heavy ion collisions and simultaneously accounts for both anomalous and normal viscous transport effects. AVFD allows a quantitative understanding of the generation and evolution of CME-induced charge separation during the hydrodynamic stage, as well as its dependence on theoretical ingredients. With reasonable estimates of key parameters, the AVFD simulations provide the first phenomenologically successful explanation of the measured signal in 200 AGeV AuAu collisions. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, within the framework of the Beam Energy Scan Theory (BEST) Topical Collaboration. The work is also supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1352368 (SS and JL), by the National Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11735007 (JL) and by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant Contract Number No. DE- SC0012704 (BNL)/DE-SC0011090 (MIT) (YY). JL is grateful to the Institute for Nuclear Theory for hospitality during the INT-16-3 Program. The computation of this research was performed on IU’s Big Red II cluster, supported in part by Lilly Endowment, Inc. (through its support for the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute) and in part by the Indiana METACyt

  9. New Perspectives on the Search for a Parity Violation Effect in Chiral Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, F.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Shelkovnikov, A.; Daussy, C.; Amy-Klein, A.; Chardonnet, C.; Darquie, B.

    2013-06-01

    Parity violation (PV) effects have so far never been observed in chiral molecules. Originating from the weak interaction, PV should lead to frequency differences in the rovibrational spectra of the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule. However the smallness of the effect represents a very difficult experimental challenge. We propose to compare the rovibrational spectra (around 10 μm) of two enantiomers, recorded using the ultra-high resolution spectroscopy technique of Doppler-free two-photon Ramsey interferometry in a supersonic molecular beam. With an alternate beam of left- and right-handed molecules and thanks to our expertise in the control of the absolute frequency of the probe CO_2 lasers, we should reach a fractional sensitivity better around 10^{-15} (a few tens of millihertz), on the frequency difference between enantiomers. We will review our latest results on the high-resolution spectroscopy, either in cell or in a supersonic beam, of methyltrioxorhenium. B. Darquié, C. Stoeffler, A. Shelkovnikov, C. Daussy, A. Amy-Klein, C. Chardonnet, S. Zrig, L. Guy, J. Crassous, P. Soulard, P. Asselin, T. R. Huet, P. Schwerdtfeger, R. Bast and T. Saue, Chirality 22, 870 (2010). C. Stoeffler, B. Darquié, A. Shelkovnikov, C. Daussy, A. Amy-Klein, C. Chardonnet, L. Guy, J. Crassous, T. R. Huet, P. Soulard and P. Asselin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 854 (2011). N. Saleh, S. Zrig, L. Guy, R. Bast, T. Saue, B. Darquié and J. Crassous, submitted to Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. (2013).

  10. Chiral effects in adrenocorticolytic action of o,p'-DDD (mitotane) in human adrenal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, V; Cantillana, T; Bergman, A; Brandt, I

    2010-03-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant disease with poor prognosis. The main pharmacological choice, o,p'-DDD (mitotane), produces severe adverse effects. Since o,p'-DDD is a chiral molecule and stereoisomers frequently possess different pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic properties, we isolated the two o,p'-DDD enantiomers, (R)-(+)-o,p'-DDD and (S)-(-)-o,p'-DDD, and determined their absolute structures. The effects of each enantiomer on cell viability and on cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R were assessed. We also assayed the o,p'-DDD racemate and the m,p'- and p,p'-isomers. The results show small but statistically significant differences in activity of the o,p'-DDD enantiomers for all parameters tested. The three DDD isomers were equally potent in decreasing cell viability, but p,p'-DDD affected hormone secretion slightly less than the o,p'- and m,p'-isomers. The small chiral differences in direct effects on target cells alone do not warrant single enantiomer administration, but might reach importance in conjunction with possible stereochemical effects on pharmacokinetic processes in vivo.

  11. Temperature effects on the enantioselectivity of basic analytes in capillary EKC using sulfated beta-CDs as chiral selectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhen-Lei; Yi, Fei; Guo, Baoyuan; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2007-10-01

    The thermodynamic processes were investigated to reveal the temperature effects during chiral separation by capillary EKC with reversed polarity mode using sulfated beta-CD (S-beta-CD) as chiral selectors. The temperature effects on enantioselectivities of basic analytes (ephedrine, norephedrine, synephrine, and epinephrine) were investigated in detail over a temperature range of 20-60 degrees C. An increase of the capillary temperature produced the decrease of enantioselectivities for ephedrine and norephedrine, but increase of enantioselectivities for synephrine and epinephrine. The thermodynamic variations showed that the interactions between the basic analytes and chiral selectors were always enthalpy- driven. However, the difference in enthalpy and entropy showed that the enantioseparation was an enthalpy-driven process for ephedrine and norephedrine, but an entropydriven process for synephrine and epinephrine. Just because of the different driving forces, there exist two kinds of temperature effects on enantioselectivities mentioned above.

  12. Effect of Quark Spins to the Hadron Distributions for Chiral Magnetic Wave in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Byungsik [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Topological fluctuation of the gluon field in quantum chromodynamics modifies the vacuum structure, and causes various chiral anomalies. In the strong magnetic field generated by semi-central heavy-ion collisions, the axial and vector density fluctuations propagate along the external magnetic field, called the chiral magnetic wave. Up to now the investigation of the various chiral anomalies in heavy ion collisions has been focussed on the charge distribution in the transverse plane. However, this paper points out that the information on the charge distribution is not enough and the spin effect should also be taken into account. Considering the charge and spin distributions together, π{sup ±} with spin 0 are not proper particle species to study the chiral anomalies, as the signal may be significantly suppressed as one of the constituent (anti)quarks should come from background to form the pseudoscalar states. It is, therefore, necessary to analyze explicitly the vector mesons with spin 1 (K⋆{sup ±} (892)) and baryons with spin 3/2 (Δ{sup ++}(1232), Σ{sup −} (1385) and Ω{sup −} ). If the chiral anomaly effects exist, the elliptic flow parameter is expected to be larger for negative particles for each particle species.

  13. Chiral resolution and anticancer effect of xanthones from Garcinia paucinervis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Cui-Cui; Xue, Jing-Jing; Gong, Chi; Li, Xin-Yu; Li, Da-Hong; Li, Zhan-Lin; Hua, Hui-Ming

    2018-02-20

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane-soluble portion of the stems of Garcinia paucinervis led to the isolation of eight new xanthones, including three pairs of enantiomers, (+) and (-) paucinervins L-N (1a-3a, and 1b-3b), one optically pure compound, (-) paucinervin O (4), and one new analogue, paucinervin P (5), as well as thirteen known xanthones (6-18). Their structures were established by detailed analysis of extensive spectroscopic data. The absolute configurations of 1-4 were confirmed by ECD calculations. All the isolates 1-18 displayed antiproliferative effect against HL-60 with IC 50 values ranging from 0.87 to 29.14 μM, of which compound 5 was the most active. Compounds 6, and 14 exhibited potential inhibitory activity against PC-3 cells, while compounds 5-7, 14, and 16-17 displayed cytotoxic potency against Caco-2 cells. A preliminary structure-activity relationship was also discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Three-Nucleon Low-Energy Constants From The Consistency Of Interactions And Currents In Chiral Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazit, D; Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P

    2008-12-18

    The chiral low-energy constants cD and cE are constrained by means of accurate ab initio calculations of the A = 3 binding energies and, for the first time, of the triton {beta} decay. We demonstrate that these low-energy observables allow a robust determination of the two undetermined constants. The consistency of the interactions and currents in chiral effective field theory is key to this remarkable result. The two- plus three-nucleon interactions from chiral effective field theory defined by properties of the A = 2 system and the present determination of c{sub D} and c{sub E} are successful in predicting properties of the A = 3, and 4 systems.

  15. The effect of carbon nanotube chirality on the spiral flow of copper atoms in their cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, M.C.G., E-mail: M070041@e.ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhong, Z.W. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-12-14

    The effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) chirality on the flow of copper atoms along its core has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The investigation is conducted using CNTs of different chirality, and different flow conditions such as temperatures, bias voltages and the initial positions of the copper atoms. The results show that the atoms flow in a spiral fashion along the CNT channels. The effect is most evident in the CNT channel with zigzag CNTs. The movement of the copper atoms is more erratic when the temperature is increased at a low biased voltage, regardless of the types of channel used. The initial positions of the copper atoms affect the way they converge as they move downstream along the channel. A bias voltage of 4 V favours the initiation of a spiral flow, especially when the position of the copper atoms is far from the central axis of the channel. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the transportation of copper atoms in armchair and zigzag CNT channels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spiral flow of copper atoms occurs in a semiconductor-semiconductor CNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compact copper mass is predicted to occur at 673 K with a 4 V bias voltage.

  16. A chiral rhenium complex with predicted high parity violation effects: synthesis, stereochemical characterization by VCD spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Nidal; Roisnel, Thierry; Guy, Laure; Bast, Radovan; Saue, Trond; Darquié, Benoît; Crassous, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    With their rich electronic, vibrational, rotational and hyperfine structure, molecular systems have the potential to play a decisive role in precision tests of fundamental physics. For example, electroweak nuclear interactions should cause small energy differences between the two enantiomers of chiral molecules, a signature of parity symmetry breaking. Enantioenriched oxorhenium(VII) complexes S-(-)- and R-(+)-3 bearing a chiral 2-methyl-1-thio-propanol ligand have been prepared as potential candidates for probing molecular parity violation effects via high resolution laser spectroscopy of the Re=O stretching. Although the rhenium atom is not a stereogenic centre in itself, experimental vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra revealed a surrounding chiral environment, evidenced by the Re=O bond stretching mode signal. The calculated VCD spectrum of the R enantiomer confirmed the position of the sulfur atom cis to the methyl, as observed in the solid-state X-ray crystallographic structure, and showed the ...

  17. Gaugino condensates and chiral-linear duality an effective lagrangian analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Quevedo, Fernando; Quirós, Mariano; Burgess, C P; Derendinger, J P; Quevedo, F; Quiros, M

    1995-01-01

    We show how to formulate the phenomenon of gaugino condensation in a super-Yang-Mills theory with a field-dependent gauge coupling described with a linear multiplet. We prove the duality equivalence of this approach with the more familiar formulation using a chiral superfield. In so doing, we resolve a longstanding puzzle as to how a linear-multiplet formulation can be consistent with the dynamical breaking of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry which is thought to occur once the gauginos condense. In our approach, the composite gauge degrees of freedom are described by a real vector superfield, V, rather than the chiral superfield that is obtained in the traditional dual formulation. Our dualization, when applied to the case of several condensing gauge groups, provides strong evidence that this duality survives strong-coupling effects in string theory. We show how to formulate the phenomenon of gaugino condensation in a super-Yang-Mills theory with a field-dependent gauge coupling described with a linear multiplet. We...

  18. Emergent chiral spin liquid: fractional quantum Hall effect in a kagome Heisenberg model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shou-Shu; Zhu, Wei; Sheng, D N

    2014-09-10

    The fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) realized in two-dimensional electron systems under a magnetic field is one of the most remarkable discoveries in condensed matter physics. Interestingly, it has been proposed that FQHE can also emerge in time-reversal invariant spin systems, known as the chiral spin liquid (CSL) characterized by the topological order and the emerging of the fractionalized quasiparticles. A CSL can naturally lead to the exotic superconductivity originating from the condense of anyonic quasiparticles. Although CSL was highly sought after for more than twenty years, it had never been found in a spin isotropic Heisenberg model or related materials. By developing a density-matrix renormalization group based method for adiabatically inserting flux, we discover a FQHE in a spin-½ isotropic kagome Heisenberg model. We identify this FQHE state as the long-sought CSL with a uniform chiral order spontaneously breaking time reversal symmetry, which is uniquely characterized by the half-integer quantized topological Chern number protected by a robust excitation gap. The CSL is found to be at the neighbor of the previously identified Z2 spin liquid, which may lead to an exotic quantum phase transition between two gapped topological spin liquids.

  19. Theory of circular dichroism of nanomaterials comprising chiral molecules and nanocrystals: plasmon enhancement, dipole interactions, and dielectric effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govorov, Alexander O; Fan, Zhiyuan; Hernandez, Pedro; Slocik, Joseph M; Naik, Rajesh R

    2010-04-14

    Our calculations show that a nonchiral nanocrystal is able to dramatically change the circular dichroism (CD) of a chiral molecule when the nanocrystal and molecule form a complex and couple via dipole and multipole Coulomb interactions. Plasmon resonances of metal nanocrystals in the nanocrystal-molecule complex result in both the resonant enhancement of CD signals of molecules and the appearance of new spectral structures. Two mechanisms, in which a nanocrystal can influence the CD effect, have been identified. The first mechanism is the plasmon-induced change in the electromagnetic field inside the chiral molecule. The second is the optical absorption of the nanocrystal-molecule complex due to the chiral currents inside the metal nanocrystal induced by the dipole of the chiral molecule. The first mechanism creates a change in the angle between the effective electric and magnetic dipoles of the molecule. This mechanism can lead to symmetry breaking and to a plasmon-induced CD signal of the nonchiral molecule. Both mechanisms create interesting Fano-like shapes in the CD spectra. Importantly, the second mechanism gives the main contribution to the CD signal at the plasmon frequency when the absorption band of the chiral molecule is far from the plasmon resonance. This may happen in many cases since many biomolecules are optically active in the UV range, whereas plasmon resonances in commonly used nanometals are found at longer wavelengths. As concrete examples, the paper describes alpha-helix and calixarene ligand molecules coupled with metal nanocrystals. The above results are also applied to complexes incorporating semiconductor nanocrystals. The results obtained here can be used to design a variety of hybrid nanostructures with enhanced and tailored optical chirality in the visible wavelength range.

  20. Direct naked-eye detection of chiral and Faraday effects in white light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, G.; Le Floch, A.; Enoch, J.; Lakshminarayanan, V.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate that the human eye is able to detect the optical activity of chiral molecules and the Faraday effect, even under white-light viewing conditions, without the help of any polarizer. Indeed, we show that our eye acts as a differential analyzer and isolates the response in the blue part of the visible spectrum, thus avoiding the difficulties related to the inherent chromatic dispersion encountered in usual experiments performed under white-light conditions. Moreover the human eye enables to clearly distinguish between the fundamental reciprocal and non-reciprocal characteristics of the optical activity and the Faraday effect, respectively. Furthermore the human eye, without any specific optical dichroic axis in the retina, enables us to read, with the naked eye, hidden information encoded via different states of polarization, and suggests the possibility of direct detection of quantum entanglement effects.

  1. Boundary effects in super-Yang-Mills theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Mushtaq B.; Ganai, Prince A. [National Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Srinagar, Kashmir (India); Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alberta (Canada); Zaz, Zaid [University of Kashmir, Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Srinagar, Kashmir (India); Bhat, Anha [National Institute of Technology, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Srinagar, Kashmir (India); Masood, Syed [International Islamic University, Department of Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, we shall analyze a three dimensional supersymmetry theory with N = 2 supersymmetry. We will analyze the quantization of this theory, in the presence of a boundary. The effective Lagrangian used in the path integral quantization of this theory, will be given by the sum of the gauge fixing term and the ghost term with the original classical Lagrangian. Even though the supersymmetry of this effective Lagrangian will also be broken due to the presence of a boundary, it will be demonstrated that half of the supersymmetry of this theory can be preserved by adding a boundary Lagrangian to the effective bulk Lagrangian. The supersymmetric transformation of this new boundary Lagrangian will exactly cancel the boundary term generated from the supersymmetric transformation of the effective bulk Lagrangian. We will analyze the Slavnov-Taylor identity for this N = 2 Yang-Mills theory with a boundary. (orig.)

  2. Boundary-layer effects in droplet splashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, José Manuel

    2017-07-01

    A drop falling onto a solid substrate will disintegrate into smaller parts when its impact velocity V exceeds the so-called critical velocity for splashing, i.e., when V>V^{*}. Under these circumstances, the very thin liquid sheet, which is ejected tangentially to the solid after the drop touches the substrate, lifts off as a consequence of the aerodynamic forces exerted on it. Subsequently, the growth of capillary instabilities breaks the toroidal rim bordering the ejecta into smaller droplets, violently ejected radially outward, provoking the splash [G. Riboux and J. M. Gordillo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 024507 (2014)]PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.024507. In this contribution, the effect of the growth of the boundary layer is included in the splash model presented in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 024507 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.024507, obtaining very good agreement between the measured and the predicted values of V^{*} for wide ranges of liquid and gas material properties, atmospheric pressures, and substrate wettabilities. Our description also modifies the way at when the liquid sheet is first ejected, which can now be determined in a much more straightforward manner than that proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 024507 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.024507.

  3. Chiral plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Mario; Schäferling, Martin; Duan, Xiaoyang; Giessen, Harald; Liu, Na

    2017-01-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of chirality and its optical manifestation in plasmonic nanosystems and nanostructures. We discuss top-down fabricated structures that range from solid metallic nanostructures to groupings of metallic nanoparticles arranged in three dimensions. We also present the large variety of bottom-up synthesized structures. Using DNA, peptides, or other scaffolds, complex nanoparticle arrangements of up to hundreds of individual nanoparticles have been realized. Beyond this static picture, we also give an overview of recent demonstrations of active chiral plasmonic systems, where the chiral optical response can be controlled by an external stimulus. We discuss the prospect of using the unique properties of complex chiral plasmonic systems for enantiomeric sensing schemes. PMID:28560336

  4. Effective response of classical, auxetic and chiral magnetoelastic materials by use of a new variational principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danas, K.

    2017-08-01

    This work provides a rigorous analysis of the effective response, i.e., average magnetization and magnetostriction, of magnetoelastic composites that are subjected to overall magnetic and mechanical loads. It clarifies the differences between a coupled magnetomechanical analysis in which one applies a Eulerian (current) magnetic field and an electroactive one where the Lagrangian (reference) electric field is usually applied. For this, we propose an augmented vector potential variational formulation to carry out numerical periodic homogenization studies of magnetoelastic solids at finite strains and magnetic fields. We show that the developed variational principle can be used for bottom-up design of microstructures with desired magnetomechanical coupling by properly canceling out the macro-geometry and specimen shape effects. To achieve that, we properly treat the average Maxwell stresses arising from the medium surrounding the magnetoelastic representative volume element (RVE), while at the same time we impose a uniform average Eulerian and not Lagrangian magnetic field. The developed variational principle is then used to study a large number of ideal as well as more realistic two-dimensional microstructures. We study the effect of particle volume fraction, particle distribution and particle shape and orientation upon the effective magnetoelastic response at finite strains. We consider also unstructured isotropic microstructures based on random adsorption algorithms and we carry out a convergence study of the representativity of the proposed unit cells. Finally, three-phase two-dimensional auxetic microstructures are analyzed. The first consists of a periodic distribution of voids and particle chains in a polymer matrix, while the second takes advantage of particle shape and chirality to produce negative and positive swelling by proper change of the chirality and the applied magnetic field.

  5. Rapid Quantitative Chiral Amphetamines Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method in Plasma and Oral Fluid with a Cost-effective Chiral Derivatizing Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused psychostimulant containing a chiral center. Consumption of over-the-counter and prescription medications may yield positive amphetamines results, but chiral separation of l- and d- methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine can help determine whether the source was licit or illicit. We present the first LC-MS/MS method with precolumn derivatization for methamphetamine and amphetamine chiral resolution in plasma and oral fluid collected with the Oral-Eze® and Quantisal™ devices. To 0.5 mL plasma, 0.75 mL Oral-Eze, or 1 mL Quantisal specimen racemic d11-methamphetamine and amphetamine internal standards were added, followed by protein precipitation. Samples were centrifuged and supernatants loaded onto pre-conditioned Phenomenex® Strata™-XC Polymeric Strong Cation solid phase extraction columns. After washing, analytes were eluted with 5% ammonium hydroxide in methanol. The eluate was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in water. Derivatization was performed with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl-5-l-alanineamide (Marfey's reagent) and heating at 45°C for 1 h. Derivatized enantiomer separations were performed under isocratic conditions (methanol:water, 60:40) with a Phenomenex® Kinetex® 2.6 μm C18 column. Analytes were identified and quantified by two MRM transitions and their ratio on a 3200 QTrap (AB Sciex) mass spectrometer in ESI negative mode. In all three matrices, the method was linear for all enantiomers from 1-500 μg/L, with imprecision and accuracy of ≤11.3% and 85.3-108%, respectively. Extraction efficiencies ranged from 67.4-117% and matrix effects from -17.0-468%, with variation always ≤19.1%. Authentic plasma and OF specimens were collected from an IRB-approved study that included controlled Vicks® VapoInhaler™ administration. The present method is sensitive, selective, economic and rapid (separations accomplished in <10 min), and improves methamphetamine result interpretation. PMID:25065924

  6. Rapid quantitative chiral amphetamines liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: method in plasma and oral fluid with a cost-effective chiral derivatizing reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-09-05

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused psychostimulant containing a chiral center. Consumption of over-the-counter and prescription medications may yield positive amphetamines results, but chiral separation of l- and d-methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine can help determine whether the source was licit or illicit. We present the first LC-MS/MS method with precolumn derivatization for methamphetamine and amphetamine chiral resolution in plasma and oral fluid collected with the Oral-Eze(®) and Quantisal™ devices. To 0.5mL plasma, 0.75mL Oral-Eze, or 1mL Quantisal specimen racemic d11-methamphetamine and amphetamine internal standards were added, followed by protein precipitation. Samples were centrifuged and supernatants loaded onto pre-conditioned Phenomenex(®) Strata™-XC Polymeric Strong Cation solid phase extraction columns. After washing, analytes were eluted with 5% ammonium hydroxide in methanol. The eluate was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in water. Derivatization was performed with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl-5-l-alanineamide (Marfey's reagent) and heating at 45°C for 1h. Derivatized enantiomer separations were performed under isocratic conditions (methanol:water, 60:40) with a Phenomenex(®) Kinetex(®) 2.6μm C18 column. Analytes were identified and quantified by two MRM transitions and their ratio on a 3200 QTrap (AB Sciex) mass spectrometer in ESI negative mode. In all three matrices, the method was linear for all enantiomers from 1 to 500μg/L, with imprecision and accuracy of ≤11.3% and 85.3-108%, respectively. Extraction efficiencies ranged from 67.4 to 117% and matrix effects from -17.0 to 468%, with variation always ≤19.1%. Authentic plasma and OF specimens were collected from an IRB-approved study that included controlled Vicks(®) VapoInhaler™ administration. The present method is sensitive, selective, economic and rapid (separations accomplished in <10min), and improves methamphetamine result interpretation. Published

  7. Sea quark densities in the effective chiral quark model with generalized harmonic oscillator potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdanpannah, M.M.; Dehghanzadeh, M. [Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Faculty of Physics, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirjalili, A. [Yazd University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The solution of the Dirac equation with a generalized harmonic oscillator potential is used to extract the constituent bare parton densities. The results are firstly in spatial space which are converted to momentum space, using the Fourier transformation. The final results are presented in terms of the Bjorken x-variable. Employing the effective chiral quark model and the related convolutions, the parton densities inside the proton are obtained. Choosing an appropriate radius of proton, they indicate reasonable behavior. Although the initial framework is completely theoretical, the results for the sea and valence quark densities and also the ratio of d to u valence quarks inside the proton are in good agreement with the available experimental data and some theoretical models. (orig.)

  8. The effect of magnetization and electric polarization on the anomalous transport coefficients of a chiral fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadooghi, N.; Tabatabaee, S. M. A.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of finite magnetization and electric polarization on dissipative and non-dissipative (anomalous) transport coefficients of a chiral fluid are studied. First, using the second law of thermodynamics as well as Onsager’s time-reversal symmetry principle, the complete set of dissipative transport coefficients of this medium is derived. It is shown that the properties of the resulting shear and bulk viscosities are mainly affected by the anisotropy induced by external electric and magnetic fields. Then, using the fact that the anomaly induced currents do not contribute to entropy production, the corresponding algebro-differential equations to non-dissipative anomalous transport coefficients are derived in a certain derivative expansion. The solutions of these equations show that, within this approximation, anomalous transport coefficients are, in particular, given in terms of the electric susceptibility of the medium.

  9. Nuclear dipole polarizability from mean-field modeling constrained by chiral effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lim, Yeunhwan; Holt, Jeremy W.; Ko, Che Ming

    2018-02-01

    We construct a new Skyrme interaction Skχm* by fitting the equation of state and nucleon effective masses in asymmetric nuclear matter from chiral two- and three-body forces as well as the binding energies of finite nuclei. Employing this interaction to study the electric dipole polarizabilities of 48Ca, 68Ni, 120Sn, and 208Pb in the random-phase approximation, we find that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimentally measured values without additional fine tuning of the Skyrme interaction, thus confirming the usefulness of the new Skyrme interaction in studying the properties of nuclei. We further use this interaction to study the neutron skin thicknesses of 48Ca and 208Pb, and they are found to be consistent with the experimental data.

  10. Nucleon form factors in dispersively improved chiral effective field theory: Scalar form factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, J. M.; Weiss, C.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a method for calculating the nucleon form factors (FFs) of G -parity-even operators by combining chiral effective field theory (χ EFT ) and dispersion analysis. The FFs are expressed as dispersive integrals over the two-pion cut at t >4 Mπ2 . The spectral functions are obtained from the elastic unitarity condition and expressed as products of the complex π π →N N ¯ partial-wave amplitudes and the timelike pion FF. χ EFT is used to calculate the ratio of the partial-wave amplitudes and the pion FF, which is real and free of π π rescattering in the t channel (N /D method). The rescattering effects are then incorporated by multiplying with the squared modulus of the empirical pion FF. The procedure results in a marked improvement compared to conventional χ EFT calculations of the spectral functions. We apply the method to the nucleon scalar FF and compute the scalar spectral function, the scalar radius, the t -dependent FF, and the Cheng-Dashen discrepancy. Higher-order chiral corrections are estimated through the π N low-energy constants. Results are in excellent agreement with dispersion-theoretical calculations. We elaborate several other interesting aspects of our method. The results show proper scaling behavior in the large-Nc limit of QCD because the χ EFT calculation includes N and Δ intermediate states. The squared modulus of the timelike pion FF required by our method can be extracted from lattice QCD calculations of vacuum correlation functions of the operator at large Euclidean distances. Our method can be applied to the nucleon FFs of other operators of interest, such as the isovector-vector current, the energy-momentum tensor, and twist-2 QCD operators (moments of generalized parton distributions).

  11. Neutron matter, neutron pairing, and neutron drops based on chiral effective field theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Thomas

    2016-10-19

    The physics of neutron-rich systems is of great interest in nuclear and astrophysics. Precise knowledge of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei is crucial for understanding the synthesis of heavy elements. Infinite neutron matter determines properties of neutron stars, a final stage of heavy stars after a core-collapse supernova. It also provides a unique theoretical laboratory for nuclear forces. Strong interactions are determined by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). However, QCD is non-perturbative at low energies and one presently cannot directly calculate nuclear forces from it. Chiral effective field theory circumvents these problems and connects the symmetries of QCD to nuclear interactions. It naturally and systematically includes many-nucleon forces and gives access to uncertainty estimates. We use chiral interactions throughout all calculation in this thesis. Neutron stars are very extreme objects. The densities in their interior greatly exceed those in nuclei. The exact composition and properties of neutron stars is still unclear but they consist mainly of neutrons. One can explore neutron stars theoretically with calculations of neutron matter. In the inner core of neutron stars exist very high densities and thus maybe exotic phases of matter. To investigate whether there exists a phase transition to such phases even at moderate densities we study the chiral condensate in neutron matter, the order parameter of chiral symmetry breaking, and find no evidence for a phase transition at nuclear densities. We also calculate the more extreme system of spin-polarised neutron matter. With this we address the question whether there exists such a polarised phase in neutron stars and also provide a benchmark system for lattice QCD. We find spin-polarised neutron matter to be an almost non-interacting Fermi gas. To understand the cooling of neutron stars neutron pairing is of great importance. Due to the high densities especially triplet pairing is of interest. We

  12. Chirality in adsorption on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2017-12-07

    In the present review we survey the main advances made in recent years on the understanding of chemical chirality at solid surfaces. Chirality is an important topic, made particularly relevant by the homochiral nature of the biochemistry of life on Earth, and many chiral chemical reactions involve solid surfaces. Here we start our discussion with a description of surface chirality and of the different ways that chirality can be bestowed on solid surfaces. We then expand on the studies carried out to date to understand the adsorption of chiral compounds at a molecular level. We summarize the work published on the adsorption of pure enantiomers, of enantiomeric mixtures, and of prochiral molecules on chiral and achiral model surfaces, especially on well-defined metal single crystals but also on other flat substrates such as highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Several phenomena are identified, including surface reconstruction and chiral imprinting upon adsorption of chiral agents, and the enhancement or suppression of enantioselectivity seen in some cases upon adsorption of enantiomixtures of chiral compounds. The possibility of enhancing the enantiopurity of adsorbed layers upon the addition of chiral seeds and the so-called "sergeants and soldiers" phenomenon are presented. Examples are provided where the chiral behavior has been associated with either thermodynamic or kinetic driving forces. Two main approaches to the creation of enantioselective surface sites are discussed, namely, via the formation of supramolecular chiral ensembles made out of small chiral adsorbates, and by adsorption of more complex chiral molecules capable of providing suitable chiral environments for reactants by themselves, via the formation of individual adsorbate:modifier adducts on the surface. Finally, a discussion is offered on the additional effects generated by the presence of the liquid phase often required in practical applications such as enantioselective crystallization, chiral

  13. Quantum oscillations in the chiral magnetic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sahal; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2017-06-01

    In strong magnetic field, the longitudinal magnetoconductivity in three-dimensional chiral materials is shown to exhibit a new type of quantum oscillations arising from the chiral magnetic effect (CME). These quantum CME oscillations are predicted to dominate over the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) ones in chiral materials with an approximately conserved chirality of quasiparticles at strong magnetic fields. The phase of quantum CME oscillations differs from the phase of the conventional SdH oscillations by π /2 .

  14. Introduction to chiral symmetry in QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdjian H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aspects of chiral symmetry in QCD are presented. The necessity of its spontaneous breakdown is explained. Some low-energy theorems are reviewed. The role of chiral effective Lagrangians in the formulation and realization of chiral perturbation theory is emphasized. The consequences of the presence of anomalies are sketched.

  15. Doped Chiral Polymer Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Some implementations provide a composite material that includes a first material and a second material. In some implementations, the composite material is a metamaterial. The first material includes a chiral polymer (e.g., crystalline chiral helical polymer, poly-.gamma.-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG), poly-L-lactic acid (PLA), polypeptide, and/or polyacetylene). The second material is within the chiral polymer. The first material and the second material are configured to provide an effective index of refraction value for the composite material of 1 or less. In some implementations, the effective index of refraction value for the composite material is negative. In some implementations, the effective index of refraction value for the composite material of 1 or less is at least in a wavelength of one of at least a visible spectrum, an infrared spectrum, a microwave spectrum, and/or an ultraviolet spectrum.

  16. Timoshenko beam model for chiral materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T. Y.; Wang, Y. N.; Yuan, L.; Wang, J. S.; Qin, Q. H.

    2017-12-01

    Natural and artificial chiral materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), chromatin fibers, flagellar filaments, chiral nanotubes, and chiral lattice materials widely exist. Due to the chirality of intricately helical or twisted microstructures, such materials hold great promise for use in diverse applications in smart sensors and actuators, force probes in biomedical engineering, structural elements for absorption of microwaves and elastic waves, etc. In this paper, a Timoshenko beam model for chiral materials is developed based on noncentrosymmetric micropolar elasticity theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions for a chiral beam problem are derived using the variational method and Hamilton's principle. The static bending and free vibration problem of a chiral beam are investigated using the proposed model. It is found that chirality can significantly affect the mechanical behavior of beams, making materials more flexible compared with nonchiral counterparts, inducing coupled twisting deformation, relatively larger deflection, and lower natural frequency. This study is helpful not only for understanding the mechanical behavior of chiral materials such as DNA and chromatin fibers and characterizing their mechanical properties, but also for the design of hierarchically structured chiral materials.

  17. Boundary effects and gapped dispersion in rotating fermionic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ebihara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the importance of boundary effects on fermionic matter in a rotating frame. By explicit calculations at zero temperature we show that the scalar condensate of fermion and anti-fermion cannot be modified by the rotation once the boundary condition is properly implemented. The situation is qualitatively changed at finite temperature and/or in the presence of a sufficiently strong magnetic field that supersedes the boundary effects. Therefore, to establish an interpretation of the rotation as an effective chemical potential, it is crucial to consider further environmental effects such as the finite temperature and magnetic field.

  18. Applications Of Chiral Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mohta, V

    2005-01-01

    Effective field theory techniques are used to describe the spectrum and interactions of hadrons. The mathematics of classical field theory and perturbative quantum field theory are reviewed. The physics of effective field theory and, in particular, of chiral perturbation theory and heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory are also reviewed. The geometry underlying heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is described in detail. Results by Coleman et. al. in the physics literature are stated precisely and proven. A chiral perturbation theory is developed for a multiplet containing the recently- observed exotic baryons. A small coupling expansion is identified that allows the calculation of self-energy corrections to the exotic baryon masses. Opportunities in lattice calculations are discussed. Chiral perturbation theory is used to study the possibility of two multiplets of exotic baryons mixed by quark masses. A new symmetry constraint on reduced partial widths is identified. Predictions in the literature based ...

  19. Chiral anomaly and anomalous finite-size conductivity in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shun-Qing; Li, Chang-An; Niu, Qian

    2017-09-01

    Graphene is a monolayer of carbon atoms packed into a hexagon lattice to host two spin degenerate pairs of massless two-dimensional Dirac fermions with different chirality. It is known that the existence of non-zero electric polarization in reduced momentum space which is associated with a hidden chiral symmetry will lead to the zero-energy flat band of a zigzag nanoribbon and some anomalous transport properties. Here it is proposed that the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly or non-conservation of chiral charges of Dirac fermions at different valleys can be realized in a confined ribbon of finite width, even in the absence of a magnetic field. In the laterally diffusive regime, the finite-size correction to conductivity is always positive and is inversely proportional to the square of the lateral dimension W, which is different from the finite-size correction inversely proportional to W from the boundary modes. This anomalous finite-size conductivity reveals the signature of the chiral anomaly in graphene, and it is measurable experimentally. This finding provides an alternative platform to explore the purely quantum mechanical effect in graphene.

  20. Chiral effective field theory analysis of hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viviani, M. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Pisa (Italy); Baroni, A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Girlanda, L. [Univ. of Salento and INFN-Lecce, Lecce (Italy). Dept. of Mathematical and Physics; Kievsky, A. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Pisa (Italy); Marcucci, L. E. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy); National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Pisa (Italy); Schiavilla, R. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-06-18

    Weak interactions between quarks induce a parity-violating (PV) component in the nucleon-nucleon potential, whose effects are currently being studied in a number of experiments involving few-nucleon systems. In the present work, we reconsider the derivation of this PV component within a chiral effective field theory (${\\chi }$EFT) framework. Purpose: The objectives of the present work are twofold. The first is to perform a detailed analysis of the PV nucleon-nucleon potential up to next-to-next-to-leading (N2LO) order in the chiral expansion, in particular, by determining the number of independent low-energy constants (LECs) at N2LO. The second objective is to investigate PV effects in a number of few-nucleon observables, including the $\\vec{p}$-p longitudinal asymmetry, the neutron spin rotation in n-p and n-d scattering, and the longitudinal asymmetry in the 3He( $\\vec{n}$,p)3H charge-exchange reaction. Methods: The ${\\chi }$EFT PV potential includes one-pion-exchange, two-pion-exchange, and contact terms as well as 1/M (M being the nucleon mass) nonstatic corrections. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize pion loops. The wave functions for the A=2-4 nuclei are obtained by using strong two- and three-body potentials also derived, for consistency, from ${\\chi }$EFT. In the case of the A=3-4 systems, systems, the wave functions are computed by expanding on a hyperspherical harmonics functions basis. Results: We find that the PV potential at N2LO depends on six LECs: the pion-nucleon PV coupling constant h$1\\atop{π}$ and five parameters multiplying contact interactions. An estimate for the range of values of the various LECs is provided by using available experimental data, and these values are used to obtain predictions for the other PV observables. Conclusions: The ${\\chi }$EFT approach provides a very satisfactory framework to analyze PV effects in few-nucleon systems.

  1. Effect of medium chirality on the rate of resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Justo J; Salam, A

    2011-05-12

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) between two chromophores in an absorptive and dispersive chiral medium is investigated using a quantum electrodynamical formulation. To accurately describe such an environment involves the introduction of electric displacement and auxiliary magnetic field operators that are solutions of the Drude-Born-Fedorov equations and the time-harmonic Maxwell equations. Perturbation theory within the electric and magnetic dipole approximation is used in the derivation of the probability amplitude for energy transfer. Expressions for the contributions to the RET rate arising from the pure electric dipole term, replacing one of the chiral chromophores by its corresponding enantiomer in the mixed electric-magnetic dipole term, and the pure magnetic dipole contribution are obtained. In the near-zone limit in a nonabsorptive medium, the medium chirality amplifies the pure electric dipole contribution to the rate relative to that in a racemic mixture and also increases the discriminatory contribution, but to a lesser extent relative to the pure electric dipole term. On the other hand, under the same conditions, the medium chirality does not affect the pure magnetic dipole contribution to the rate. Measurements of the rate could be used to obtain information on the magnitude of the chirality admittance or concentration of chiral species, by comparing with the rate in an environment comprised of a racemic mixture of the enantiomers. This method could allow for the analysis of macroscopically heterogeneous systems that are comprised of enantiomers and where the chromophores experiencing RET are located in regions of interest.

  2. Large anomalous Nernst effect at room temperature in a chiral antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlas, Muhammad; Tomita, Takahiro; Koretsune, Takashi; Suzuki, Michi-To; Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke; Arita, Ryotaro; Otani, Yoshichika; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2017-11-01

    A temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic conductor can generate a transverse voltage drop perpendicular to both the magnetization and heat current. This anomalous Nernst effect has been considered to be proportional to the magnetization, and thus observed only in ferromagnets. Theoretically, however, the anomalous Nernst effect provides a measure of the Berry curvature at the Fermi energy, and so may be seen in magnets with no net magnetization. Here, we report the observation of a large anomalous Nernst effect in the chiral antiferromagnet Mn 3Sn (ref. ). Despite a very small magnetization ~0.002 μB per Mn, the transverse Seebeck coefficient at zero magnetic field is ~0.35 μV K-1 at room temperature and reaches ~0.6 μV K-1 at 200 K, which is comparable to the maximum value known for a ferromagnetic metal. Our first-principles calculations reveal that this arises from a significantly enhanced Berry curvature associated with Weyl points near the Fermi energy. As this effect is geometrically convenient for thermoelectric power generation--it enables a lateral configuration of modules to cover a heat source--these observations suggest that a new class of thermoelectric materials could be developed that exploit topological magnets to fabricate efficient, densely integrated thermopiles.

  3. Diffraction effects from (111) twist boundaries in gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, I.; Wang, D.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1990-12-05

    The structural characteristics of (111) twist boundaries in gold are investigated using a combination of x-ray diffraction and computer modeling techniques. Comparison of the measured scattering effects with those generated from EAM computer models reveals that the (111) boundary displacement field is weak, rotational in form and centered on O' lattice sites. Furthermore, the measured intensities of the strong O' lattice reflections decrease smoothly with increasing boundary angle up to 30{degree}, as calculated from the model. The effect of double positioning on the diffraction pattern and the structural analysis is discussed. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Diffraction effects from (111) twist boundaries in gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, I.; Wang, D.; Bristowe, P. D.

    1990-12-01

    The structural characteristics of (111) twist boundaries in gold are investigated using a combination of x ray diffraction and computer modeling techniques. Comparison of the measured scattering effects with those generated from EAM computer models reveals that the (111) boundary displacement field is weak, rotational in form and centered on O lattice sites. Furthermore, the measured intensities of the strong O lattice reflections decrease smoothly with increasing boundary angle up to 30 degrees, as calculated from the model. The effect of double positioning on the diffraction pattern and the structural analysis is discussed.

  5. Deformation induced dislocation boundaries: Alignment and effect on mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.; Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The dislocation boundaries formed during cold-rolling of FCC metals have been reported to have a preferred macroscopic direction with respect to the sample axes. However, boundaries have also been reported to form on crystallographic slip planes. The directions of the boundaries formed on crystal......The dislocation boundaries formed during cold-rolling of FCC metals have been reported to have a preferred macroscopic direction with respect to the sample axes. However, boundaries have also been reported to form on crystallographic slip planes. The directions of the boundaries formed...... on crystallographic slip planes are investigated using a newly developed model for formation of such boundaries. It is concluded that these boundaries also lie in the preferred macroscopic direction, i.e. the entire dislocation structure is highly anisotropic. The impact of the anisotropic dislocation structure...... on the flow stress anisotropy is illustrated by comparison of experimental data and model calculations which take the combined effects of the anisotropic dislocation structure and texture into account. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  6. Density-dependent effective baryon–baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petschauer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.petschauer@ph.tum.de [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Haidenbauer, Johann [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Kaiser, Norbert [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Meißner, Ulf-G. [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Weise, Wolfram [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon–baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon–nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  7. Electric fields and chiral magnetic effect in Cu+Au collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Tian Deng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The non-central Cu+Au collisions can create strong out-of-plane magnetic fields and in-plane electric fields. By using the HIJING model, we study the general properties of the electromagnetic fields in Cu+Au collisions at 200 GeV and their impacts on the charge-dependent two-particle correlator γq1q2=〈cos⁡(ϕ1+ϕ2−2ψRP〉 (see main text for definition which was used for the detection of the chiral magnetic effect (CME. Compared with Au+Au collisions, we find that the in-plane electric fields in Cu+Au collisions can strongly suppress the two-particle correlator or even reverse its sign if the lifetime of the electric fields is long. Combining with the expectation that if γq1q2 is induced by elliptic-flow driven effects we would not see such strong suppression or reversion, our results suggest to use Cu+Au collisions to test CME and understand the mechanisms that underlie γq1q2.

  8. Exponential reduction of finite volume effects with twisted boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherman, Aleksey; Sen, Srimoyee; Wagman, Michael L.; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2017-04-01

    Flavor-twisted boundary conditions can be used for exponential reduction of finite volume artifacts in flavor-averaged observables in lattice QCD calculations with S U (Nf) light quark flavor symmetry. Finite volume artifact reduction arises from destructive interference effects in a manner closely related to the phase averaging which leads to large Nc volume independence. With a particular choice of flavor-twisted boundary conditions, finite volume artifacts for flavor-singlet observables in a hypercubic spacetime volume are reduced to the size of finite volume artifacts in a spacetime volume with periodic boundary conditions that is four times larger.

  9. Effect of externally generated turbulence on wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kozakiewicz, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experimental study deals with the effect of externally generated turbulence on the oscillatory boundary layer to simulate the turbulence in the wave boundary layer under broken waves in the swash zone. The subject has been investigated experimentally in a U-shaped, oscillating water tunnel...... results. The mean and turbulence quantities in the outer flow region are increased substantially with the introduction of the grids. It is shown that the externally generated turbulence is able to penetrate the bed boundary layer, resulting in an increase in the bed shear stress, and therefore...

  10. Chiral pinwheel clusters lacking local point chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Shao, Ting-Na; Xie, Jia-Le; Lan, Meng; Yuan, Hong-Kuan; Xiong, Zu-Hong; Wang, Jun-Zhong; Liu, Ying; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2012-07-09

    The supramolecular pinwheel cluster is a unique chiral structure with evident handedness. Previous studies reveal that the chiral pinwheels are composed of chiral or achiral molecules with polar groups, which result in strong intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen-bonding or dipole interactions. Herein, it is shown that the simple linear aromatic molecule, pentacene, can be self-assembled into large chiral pinwheel clusters on the semimetal Bi(111) surface, due to enhanced intermolecular interactions. The pentacene pinwheels reveal two levels of organizational chirality: the chiral hexamers resulting from asymmetric shifting along the long molecular axis, and chiral arrangement of six hexamers with a rotor motif. Furthermore, a new relation between the local point chirality and organizational chirality is identified from the pinwheels: the former is not essential for the latter in 2D pinwheel clusters of the pentacene molecule. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Enantioselective Effects of o,p'-DDT on Cell Invasion and Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells: Chirality in Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangming; Dong, Xiaowu; Zou, Dehong; Yu, Yang; Fang, Qunying; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Meirong

    2015-08-18

    The o,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) with a chiral center possesses enantioselective estrogenic activity, in which R-(-)-o,p'-DDT exerts a more potent estrogenic effect than S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. Although concern regarding DDT exposure and breast cancer has increased in recent decades, the mode of enantioselective action of o,p'-DDT in breast cancer development is still unknown. Herein, we conducted a systematic study of the effect of o,p'-DDT on stereoselective breast tumor cell progression in a widely used in vitro breast tumor cell model, MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated that R-(-)-o,p'-DDT promoted more cancer cell invasion mediated by the human estrogen receptor (ER) by inducing invasion-promoted genes (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and inhibiting invasion-inhibited genes (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -4). Molecular docking verified that the binding affinity between R-(-)-o,p'-DDT and human ER was stronger than that of S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. The enantioselective-induced decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion may involve the downregulation of adhesion-promoted genes (E-cadherin and β-catenin). For the first time, these results reveal that estrogenic-like chiral compounds are of significant concern in the progression of human cancers and that human health risk assessment of chiral chemicals should consider enantioselectivity.

  12. Leading order relativistic hyperon-nucleon interactions in chiral effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai-Wen; Ren, Xiu-Lei; Geng, Li-Sheng; Long, Bing-Wei

    2018-01-01

    We apply a recently proposed covariant power counting in nucleon-nucleon interactions to study strangeness S=‑1 {{\\varLambda }}N-{{\\varSigma }}N interactions in chiral effective field theory. At leading order, Lorentz invariance introduces 12 low energy constants, in contrast to the heavy baryon approach, where only five appear. The Kadyshevsky equation is adopted to resum the potential in order to account for the non-perturbative nature of hyperon-nucleon interactions. A fit to the 36 hyperon-nucleon scattering data points yields {χ }2≃ 16, which is comparable with the sophisticated phenomenological models and the next-to-leading order heavy baryon approach. However, one cannot achieve a simultaneous description of the nucleon-nucleon phase shifts and strangeness S=‑1 hyperon-nucleon scattering data at leading order. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375024, 11522539, 11375120), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M600845, 2017T100008) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities

  13. Peripheral transverse densities of the baryon octet from chiral effective field theory and dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, J. M.; Hiller Blin, A. N.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.; Weiss, C.

    2017-08-01

    The baryon electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of two-dimensional densities describing the distribution of charge and magnetization in transverse space at fixed light-front time. We calculate the transverse densities of the spin-1/2 flavor-octet baryons at peripheral distances b = O (Mπ-1) using methods of relativistic chiral effective field theory (χEFT) and dispersion analysis. The densities are represented as dispersive integrals over the imaginary parts of the form factors in the timelike region (spectral functions). The isovector spectral functions on the two-pion cut t > 4 Mπ2 are calculated using relativistic χEFT including octet and decuplet baryons. The χEFT calculations are extended into the ρ meson mass region using an N / D method that incorporates the pion electromagnetic form factor data. The isoscalar spectral functions are modeled by vector meson poles. We compute the peripheral charge and magnetization densities in the octet baryon states, estimate the uncertainties, and determine the quark flavor decomposition. The approach can be extended to baryon form factors of other operators and the moments of generalized parton distributions.

  14. Mesoscale structure of chiral nematic shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Guo, Ashley; Zhang, Rui; Armas-Perez, Julio C; Martínez-González, José A; Rahimi, Mohammad; Sadati, Monirosadat; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-11-09

    There is considerable interest in understanding and controlling topological defects in nematic liquid crystals (LCs). Confinement, in the form of droplets, has been particularly effective in that regard. Here, we employ a Landau-de Gennes formalism to explore the geometrical frustration of nematic order in shell geometries, and focus on chiral materials. By varying the chirality and thickness in uniform shells, we construct a phase diagram that includes tetravalent structures, bipolar structures (BS), bent structures and radial spherical structures (RSS). It is found that, in uniform shells, the BS-to-RSS structural transition, in response to both chirality and shell geometry, is accompanied by an abrupt change of defect positions, implying a potential use for chiral nematic shells as sensors. Moreover, we investigate thickness heterogeneity in shells and demonstrate that non-chiral and chiral nematic shells exhibit distinct equilibrium positions of their inner core that are governed by shell chirality c.

  15. Chiral flat bands: Existence, engineering, and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Ajith; Andreanov, Alexei; Flach, Sergej

    2017-10-01

    We study flat bands in bipartite tight-binding networks with discrete translational invariance. Chiral flat bands with chiral symmetry eigenenergy E =0 and host compact localized eigenstates for finite range hopping. For a bipartite network with a majority sublattice chiral flat bands emerge. We present a simple generating principle of chiral flat-band networks and as a showcase add to the previously observed cases a number of new potentially realizable chiral flat bands in various lattice dimensions. Chiral symmetry respecting network perturbations—including disorder and synthetic magnetic fields—preserve both the flat band and the modified compact localized states. Chiral flat bands are spectrally protected by gaps and pseudogaps in the presence of disorder due to Griffiths effects.

  16. Traction reveals mechanisms of wall effects for microswimmers near boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinhui; Marcos, Fu, Henry C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of a plane boundary on low-Reynolds-number swimmers has frequently been studied using image systems for flow singularities. However, the boundary effect can also be expressed using a boundary integral representation over the traction on the boundary. We show that examining the traction pattern on the boundary caused by a swimmer can yield physical insights into determining when far-field multipole models are accurate. We investigate the swimming velocities and the traction of a three-sphere swimmer initially placed parallel to an infinite planar wall. In the far field, the instantaneous effect of the wall on the swimmer is well approximated by that of a multipole expansion consisting of a force dipole and a force quadrupole. On the other hand, the swimmer close to the wall must be described by a system of singularities reflecting its internal structure. We show that these limits and the transition between them can be independently identified by examining the traction pattern on the wall, either using a quantitative correlation coefficient or by visual inspection. Last, we find that for nonconstant propulsion, correlations between swimming stroke motions and internal positions are important and not captured by time-averaged traction on the wall, indicating that care must be taken when applying multipole expansions to study boundary effects in cases of nonconstant propulsion.

  17. Chiral Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nitti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic nanotubes, as assembled nanospaces, in which to carry out host–guest chemistry, reversible binding of smaller species for transport, sensing, storage or chemical transformation purposes, are currently attracting substantial interest, both as biological ion channel mimics, or for addressing tailored material properties. Nature’s materials and machinery are universally asymmetric, and, for chemical entities, controlled asymmetry comes from chirality. Together with carbon nanotubes, conformationally stable molecular building blocks and macrocycles have been used for the realization of organic nanotubes, by means of their assembly in the third dimension. In both cases, chiral properties have started to be fully exploited to date. In this paper, we review recent exciting developments in the synthesis and assembly of chiral nanotubes, and of their functional properties. This review will include examples of either molecule-based or macrocycle-based systems, and will try and rationalize the supramolecular interactions at play for the three-dimensional (3D assembly of the nanoscale architectures.

  18. Study of open-charm 0^+ states in unitarized chiral effective theory with one-loop potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Guo, Feng-Kun; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yao, De-Liang

    2017-11-01

    Chiral potentials are derived for the interactions between Goldstone bosons and pseudo-scalar charmed mesons up to next-to-next-to-leading order in a covariant chiral effective field theory with explicit vector charmed-meson degrees of freedom. Using the extended-on-mass-shell scheme, we demonstrate that the ultraviolet divergences and the so-called power counting breaking terms can be properly absorbed by the low-energy constants of the chiral Lagrangians. We calculate the scattering lengths by unitarizing the one-loop potentials and fit them to the data extracted from lattice QCD. The obtained results are compared to the ones without an explicit contribution of vector charmed mesons given previously. It is found that the difference is negligible for S-wave scattering in the threshold region. This validates the use of D^*-less one-loop potentials in the study of the pertinent scattering lengths. We search for dynamically generated open-charm states with J^P=0^+ as poles of the S-matrix on various Riemann sheets. The trajectories of those poles for varying pion masses are presented as well.

  19. The effect of the temperature on the bandgaps based on the chiral liquid crystal polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Shuhui; Wang, Bainian

    2015-10-01

    Chiral side-chain liquid crystal polymer is synthesized from polysiloxanes and liqud crystal monomer 4-(Undecenoic-1- yloxybenzoyloxy)-4'-benzonitrile and 6-[4-(4- Undecenoic -1-yloxybenzoyloxy)- hydroxyphenyl] cholesteryl hexanedioate. The optical and thermal property of the monomer and polymer are shown by POM and DSC. As the unique optical property of the polymer, the bandgaps are shifted for heating temperature. The reflection bandgaps is shifted from 546nm to 429nm with temperature increase. As a photonic material, the chiral polymer which sensitive responses under the outfield is widely studied for reflection display, smart switchable reflective windows and defect model CLC laser etc.

  20. Chiral higher spin gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Raju, Avinash

    2017-06-01

    We construct a candidate for the most general chiral higher spin theory with AdS3 boundary conditions. In the Chern-Simons language, on the left it has the Drinfeld-Sokolov reduced form, but on the right all charges and chemical potentials are turned on. Altogether (for the spin-3 case) these are 19 functions. Despite this, we show that the resulting metric has the form of the "most general" AdS3 boundary conditions discussed by Grumiller and Riegler. The asymptotic symmetry algebra is a product of a W3 algebra on the left and an affine s l (3 )k current algebra on the right, as desired. The metric and higher spin fields depend on all the 19 functions. We compare our work with previous results in the literature.

  1. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  2. Boundary layer effects on particle impaction and capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1984-01-01

    The inertial impaction and deposition of small particles on larger bodies with viscous boundary layers are considered theoretically, in a detailed comment on a paper by Menguturk et al. (1983). Topics addressed include cushion effects, the dimensionless groups corresponding to the diameter range (3-6 microns) examined by Menguturk et al. in a numerical example, analogous effects of particle-gas energy and mass exchange in boundary layers, and the combined effects of particle inertia and diffusion. It is argued that the inertial effects can be characterized in terms of a body, boundary-layer, or sublayer Stokes number. In a reply by Menguturk et al., the focus is on the application of the theoretical model to the erosion of blade surfaces in large gas turbines; the Stokes number is found to be of limited practical value in these cases, because the particle motion is not primarily normal to the blade surfaces.

  3. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  4. Effects of small boundary perturbation on the MHD duct flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahabaleshwar Ulavathi Shettar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the effects of small boundary perturbation on the laminar motion of a conducting fluid in a rectangular duct under applied transverse magnetic field. A small boundary perturbation of magnitude Є is applied on cross-section of the duct. Using the asymptotic analysis with respect to Є, we derive the effective model given by the explicit formulae for the velocity and induced magnetic field. Numerical results are provided confirming that the considered perturbation has nonlocal impact on the asymptotic solution.

  5. Uncertainty quantification for proton–proton fusion in chiral effective field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Acharya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We compute the S-factor of the proton–proton (pp fusion reaction using chiral effective field theory (χEFT up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO and perform a rigorous uncertainty analysis of the results. We quantify the uncertainties due to (i the computational method used to compute the pp cross section in momentum space, (ii the statistical uncertainties in the low-energy coupling constants of χEFT, (iii the systematic uncertainty due to the χEFT cutoff, and (iv systematic variations in the database used to calibrate the nucleon–nucleon interaction. We also examine the robustness of the polynomial extrapolation procedure, which is commonly used to extract the threshold S-factor and its energy-derivatives. By performing a statistical analysis of the polynomial fit of the energy-dependent S-factor at several different energy intervals, we eliminate a systematic uncertainty that can arise from the choice of the fit interval in our calculations. In addition, we explore the statistical correlations between the S-factor and few-nucleon observables such as the binding energies and point-proton radii of 2,3H and 3He as well as the D-state probability and quadrupole moment of 2H, and the β-decay of 3H. We find that, with the state-of-the-art optimization of the nuclear Hamiltonian, the statistical uncertainty in the threshold S-factor cannot be reduced beyond 0.7%.

  6. Homogenization of resonant chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Menzel, C.; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Homogenization of metamaterials is a crucial issue as it allows to describe their optical response in terms of effective wave parameters as, e.g., propagation constants. In this paper we consider the possible homogenization of chiral metamaterials. We show that for meta-atoms of a certain size...... an analytical criterion for performing the homogenization and a tool to predict the homogenization limit. We show that strong coupling between meta-atoms of chiral metamaterials may prevent their homogenization at all....

  7. Chiral symmetry breaking by spatial confinement in tactoidal droplets of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Luana; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2011-03-29

    In many colloidal systems, an orientationally ordered nematic (N) phase emerges from the isotropic (I) melt in the form of spindle-like birefringent tactoids. In cases studied so far, the tactoids always reveal a mirror-symmetric nonchiral structure, sometimes even when the building units are chiral. We report on chiral symmetry breaking in the nematic tactoids formed in molecularly nonchiral polymer-crowded aqueous solutions of low-molecular weight disodium cromoglycate. The parity is broken by twisted packing of self-assembled molecular aggregates within the tactoids as manifested by the observed optical activity. Fluorescent confocal microscopy reveals that the chiral N tactoids are located at the boundaries of cells. We explain the chirality induction as a replacement of energetically costly splay packing of the aggregates within the curved bipolar tactoidal shape with twisted packing. The effect represents a simple pathway of macroscopic chirality induction in an organic system with no molecular chirality, as the only requirements are orientational order and curved shape of confinement.

  8. REVIEW ARTICLE: Chiral metamaterials: simulations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingnan; Zhou, Jiangfeng; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2009-11-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials are composed of periodically arranged artificial structures. They show peculiar properties, such as negative refraction and super-lensing, which are not seen in natural materials. The conventional metamaterials require both negative epsilon and negative μ to achieve negative refraction. Chiral metamaterial is a new class of metamaterials offering a simpler route to negative refraction. In this paper, we briefly review the history of metamaterials and the developments on chiral metamaterials. We study the wave propagation properties in chiral metamaterials and show that negative refraction can be realized in chiral metamaterials with a strong chirality, with neither epsilon nor μ negative required. We have developed a retrieval procedure, adopting a uniaxial bi-isotropic model to calculate the effective parameters such as n ± , κ, epsilon and μ of the chiral metamaterials. Our work on the design, numerical calculations and experimental measurements of chiral metamaterials is introduced. Strong chiral behaviors such as optical activity and circular dichroism are observed and negative refraction is obtained for circularly polarized waves in these chiral metamaterials. We show that 3D isotropic chiral metamaterials can eventually be realized.

  9. The effect of the Polyakov loop on the chiral phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szép Zs.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Polyakov loop is included in the S U(2L × S U(2R chiral quark-meson model by considering the propagation of the constituent quarks, coupled to the (σ, π meson multiplet, on the homogeneous background of a temporal gauge field, diagonal in color space. The model is solved at finite temperature and quark baryon chemical potential both in the chiral limit and for the physical value of the pion mass by using an expansion in the number of flavors Nf. Keeping the fermion propagator at its tree-level, a resummation on the pion propagator is constructed which resums infinitely many orders in 1/Nf, where O(1/Nf represents the order at which the fermions start to contribute in the pion propagator. The influence of the Polyakov loop on the tricritical or the critical point in the µq – T phase diagram is studied for various forms of the Polyakov loop potential.

  10. Chiral bis(amino acid)- and bis(amino alcohol)-oxalamide gelators. Gelation properties, self-assembly motifs and chirality effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frkanec, Leo; Zinić, Mladen

    2010-01-28

    Bis(amino acid)- and bis(amino alcohol)oxalamide gelators represent the class of versatile gelators whose gelation ability is a consequence of strong and directional intermolecular hydrogen bonding provided by oxalamide units and lack of molecular symmetry due to the presence of two chiral centres. Bis(amino acid)oxalamides exhibit ambidextrous gelation properties, being capable to form gels with apolar and also highly polar solvent systems and tend to organise into bilayers or inverse bilayers in hydrogel or organic solvent gel assemblies, respectively. (1)H NMR and FTIR studies of gels revealed the importance of the equilibrium between the assembled network and smaller dissolved gelator assemblies. The organisation in gel assemblies deduced from spectroscopic structural studies are in certain cases closely related to organisations found in the crystal structures of selected gelators, confirming similar organisations in gel assemblies and in the solid state. The pure enantiomer/racemate gelation controversy is addressed and the evidence provided that rac-16 forms a stable toluene gel due to resolution into enantiomeric bilayers, which then interact giving gel fibres and a network of different morphology compared to its (S,S)-enantiomer gel. The TEM investigation of both gels confirmed distinctly different gel morphologies, which allowed the relationship between the stereochemical form of the gelator, the fibre and the network morphology and the network solvent immobilisation capacity to be proposed. Mixing of the constitutionally different bis(amino acid) and bis(amino alcohol)oxalamide gelators resulted in some cases in highly improved gelation efficiency denoted as synergic gelation effect (SGE), being highly dependent also on the stereochemistry of the component gelators. Examples of photo-induced gelation based on closely related bis(amino acid)-maleic acid amide and -fumaramide and stilbene derived oxalamides where gels form by irradiation of the solution of

  11. Synthesis of chiral phosphonoacetamides and their toxic effects on paramecium sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Guezane Lakoud

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Three chiral phosphonoacetamides were prepared by an alternative method . For this purpose, 2-(diethoxyphosphorylacetic acid was prepared from ethyl 2-bromoacetate by treatment of P(OEt 3 followed by saponification of the ester with K 2CO 3. BOP activated amidation of the 2-(diethoxyphosphorylacetic acid with (S-amino acids gave the corresponding phosphonoaceteamides. Growth inhibition of two phosphonoacetamides on Paramecium sp. were studied.

  12. Synthesis of chiral phosphonoacetamides and their toxic effects on paramecium sp

    OpenAIRE

    Samia Guezane Lakoud; Marc Lecouvey; Houria Berrebah; Nour-Eddine Aouf

    2015-01-01

    Three chiral phosphonoacetamides were prepared by an alternative method . For this purpose, 2-(diethoxyphosphoryl)acetic acid was prepared from ethyl 2-bromoacetate by treatment of P(OEt) 3 followed by saponification of the ester with K 2CO 3. BOP activated amidation of the 2-(diethoxyphosphoryl)acetic acid with (S)-amino acids gave the corresponding phosphonoaceteamides. Growth inhibition of two phosphonoacetamides on Paramecium sp. were studied.

  13. Enantioselective Guest Effect on the Spin State of a Chiral Coordination Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gural'skiy, Il'ya A; Kucheriv, Olesia I; Shylin, Sergii I; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Polunin, Ruslan A; Fritsky, Igor O

    2015-12-07

    The diversity of spin crossover (SCO) complexes that, on the one hand, display variable temperature, abruptness and hysteresis of the spin transition, and on the other hand, are spin-sensitive to the various guest molecules, makes these materials unique for the detection of different organic and inorganic compounds. We have developed a homochiral SCO coordination polymer with a spin transition sensitive to the inclusion of the guest 2-butanol, and these solvates with (R)- and (S)-alcohols demonstrate different SCO behaviours depending on the chirality of the organic analyte. A stereoselective response to the guest inclusion is detected as a shift in the temperature of the transition both from dia- to para- and from para- to diamagnetic states in heating and cooling modes respectively. Furthermore, the Mössbauer spectroscopy directly visualizes how the metallic centres in a chiral coordination framework differently sense the interaction with guests of different chiralities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Thin single-walled carbon nanotubes with narrow chirality distribution: constructive interplay of plasma and Gibbs-Thomson effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Mehdipour, Hamid

    2011-10-25

    Multiscale, multiphase numerical modeling is used to explain the mechanisms of effective control of chirality distributions of single-walled carbon nanotubes in direct plasma growth and suggest effective approaches to further improvement. The model includes an unprecedented combination of the plasma sheath, ion/radical transport, species creation/loss, plasma-surface interaction, heat transfer, surface/bulk diffusion, graphene layer nucleation, and bending/lift-off modules. It is shown that the constructive interplay between the plasma and the Gibbs-Thomson effect can lead to the effective nucleation and lift-off of small graphene layers on small metal catalyst nanoparticles. As a result, much thinner nanotubes with narrower chirality distributions can nucleate at much lower process temperatures and pressures compared to thermal CVD. This approach is validated by a host of experimental results, substantially reduces the amounts of energy and atomic matter required for the nanotube growth, and can be extended to other nanoscale structures and materials systems, thereby nearing the ultimate goal of energy- and matter-efficient nanotechnology.

  15. Chirally-modified metal surfaces: energetics of interaction with chiral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dementyev, Petr; Peter, Matthias; Adamovsky, Sergey; Schauermann, Swetlana

    2015-09-21

    Imparting chirality to non-chiral metal surfaces by adsorption of chiral modifiers is a highly promising route to create effective heterogeneously catalyzed processes for the production of enantiopure pharmaceuticals. One of the major current challenges in heterogeneous chiral catalysis is the fundamental-level understanding of how such chirally-modified surfaces interact with chiral and prochiral molecules to induce their enantioselective transformations. Herein we report the first direct calorimetric measurement of the adsorption energy of chiral molecules onto well-defined chirally-modified surfaces. Two model modifiers 1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine and 2-methylbutanoic acid were used to impart chirality to Pt(111) and their interaction with propylene oxide was investigated by means of single-crystal adsorption calorimetry. Differential adsorption energies and absolute surface uptakes were obtained for the R- and S-enantiomers of propylene oxide under clean ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Two types of adsorption behavior were observed for different chiral modifiers, pointing to different mechanisms of imparting chirality to metal surfaces. The results are analyzed and discussed in view of previously reported stereoselectivity of adsorption processes.

  16. Chiral Dynamics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammad W.; Gao, Haiyan; Weller, Henry R.; Holstein, Barry

    2007-10-01

    pt. A. Plenary session. Opening remarks: experimental tests of chiral symmetry breaking / A. M. Bernstein. [Double pie symbols] scattering / H. Leutwyler. Chiral effective field theory in a [Triangle]-resonance region / V. Pascalutsa. Some recent developments in chiral perturbation theory / Ulf-G. Mei ner. Chiral extrapolation and nucleon structure from the lattice / R.D. Young. Recent results from HAPPEX / R. Michaels. Chiral symmetries and low energy searches for new physics / M.J. Ramsey-Musolf. Kaon physics: recent experimental progress / M. Moulson. Status of the Cabibbo angle / V. Cirigliano. Lattice QCD and nucleon spin structure / J.W. Negele. Spin sum rules and polarizabilities: results from Jefferson lab / J-P Chen. Compton scattering and nucleon polarisabilities / Judith A. McGovern. Virtual compton scattering at MIT-bates / R. Miskimen. Physics results from the BLAST detector at the BATES accelerator / R.P. Redwine. The [Pie sympbol]NN system, recent progress / C. Hanhart. Application of chiral nuclear forces to light nuclei / A. Nogga. New results on few-body experiments at low energy / Y. Nagai. Few-body lattice calculations / M.J. Savage. Research opportunities at the upgraded HI?S facility / H.R. Weller -- pt. B. Goldstone boson dynamics. Working group summary: Goldstone Boson dynamics / G. Colangelo and S. Giovannella. Recent results on radiative Kaon decays from NA48 and NA48/2 / S.G. López. Cusps in K-->3 [Pie symbol] decays / B. Kubis. Recent KTeV results on radiative Kaon decays / M.C. Ronquest. The [Double pie symbols] scattering amplitude / J.R. Peláez. Determination of the Regge parameters in the [Double pie symbols] scattering amplitude / I. Caprini. e+e- Hadronic cross section measurement at DA[symbol]NE with the KLOE detector / P. Beltrame. Measurement of the form factors of e+e- -->2([Pie symbol]+[Pie symbol]-), pp and the resonant parameters of the heavy charmonia at BES / H. Hu. Measurement of e+e- multihadronic cross section below 4

  17. Plane boundary effects on characteristics of propeller jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Maoxing; Chiew, Yee-Meng; Hsieh, Shih-Chun

    2017-10-01

    The flow properties of a propeller jet in the presence of a plane bed boundary were investigated using the particle image velocimetry technique. Three clearance heights, Z b = 2 D p, D p, and 0.5 D p, where D p = propeller diameter, were used to examine boundary effects on the development of the jet. In each case, the mean flow properties and turbulence characteristics were measured in a larger field of view than those used in past studies. Both the streamwise and transverse flow fields were measured to obtain the three-dimensional characteristics of the propeller jet. Similar to a confined offset jet, the propeller jet also exhibits a wall attachment behavior when it is placed near a plane boundary. As a result, in contrast to its unconfined counterpart, the confined propeller jet features three regions, namely the free jet, impingement and wall jet regions. The study shows that the extent of each region varies under different clearance heights. The development of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics associated with varying clearance heights are compared to illustrate boundary effects in these regions. In the impingement region, the measured transverse flow fields provide new insights on the lateral motions induced by the impingement of the swirling jet. In the wall jet region, observations reveal that the jet behaves like a typical three-dimensional wall jet and its axial velocity profiles show good agreement with the classical wall jet similarity function.

  18. Effects of coastal forcing on turbulence and boundary- layer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Linda Maria Viktoria

    Coastal mountains of significant elevation impose constraints for the surrounding flow. The aim of this study is to describe the modifications of the marine atmospheric boundary layer that occur offshore of the west coast of the United States. Aircraft measurements, up to 1000 km off the coast from two experiments, are used. This boundary layer is capped by a subsidence inversion, which slopes down toward the coast and produces large thermal winds. Low-level wind maxima (i.e. jets) are typical for these conditions, commonly a 40-50% increase relative to the 30 m wind speed. The effects of coastal forcing on low-level winds cancel in average when no regard is taken for position relative a cape or point. The variability of the low-level wind speed increases nevertheless significantly toward the coast, the standard deviation is +/-40% of the offshore value. The scale of the adjustment downstream of a cape or point is specifically addressed. Some measurements support a formulation of the coastal extent based on an inviscid shallow-water concept; mean variables (i.e. 30 m wind speed and boundary-layer depth) and turbulent parameters (i.e. dissipation and shear production of turbulent kinetic energy) vary in a uniform, predicted manner. The effects of coastal forcing on winds result in cold sea surface temperatures at the coast, due to upwelling. Stability becomes a function of offshore distance. Surface-layer turbulence statistics and spectra (and cospectra) of turbulence variables are presented. Across- and along-wind sampled spectra (and cospectra) show that large wind shear and shallow boundary layer affect the scales of the turbulence eddies. The relation between the standard deviations of wind components are affected. The turbulence appears to be non-local in some aspects, entrainment fluxes are proposed to be important due to a shallow boundary layer with a sharp, sloping inversion and a low-level jet.

  19. Chiral Biomarkers in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The chirality of organic molecules with the asymmetric location of group radicals was discovered in 1848 by Louis Pasteur during his investigations of the rotation of the plane of polarization of light by crystals of sodium ammonium paratartrate. It is well established that the amino acids in proteins are exclusively Levorotary (L-aminos) and the sugars in DNA and RNA are Dextrorotary (D-sugars). This phenomenon of homochirality of biological polymers is a fundamental property of all life known on Earth. Furthermore, abiotic production mechanisms typically yield recemic mixtures (i.e. equal amounts of the two enantiomers). When amino acids were first detected in carbonaceous meteorites, it was concluded that they were racemates. This conclusion was taken as evidence that they were extraterrestrial and produced by abiologically. Subsequent studies by numerous researchers have revealed that many of the amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites exhibit a significant L-excess. The observed chirality is much greater than that produced by any currently known abiotic processes (e.g. Linearly polarized light from neutron stars; Circularly polarized ultraviolet light from faint stars; optically active quartz powders; inclusion polymerization in clay minerals; Vester-Ulbricht hypothesis of parity violations, etc.). This paper compares the measured chirality detected in the amino acids of carbonaceous meteorites with the effect of these diverse abiotic processes. IT is concluded that the levels observed are inconsistent with post-arrival biological contamination or with any of the currently known abiotic production mechanisms. However, they are consistent with ancient biological processes on the meteorite parent body. This paper will consider these chiral biomarkers in view of the detection of possible microfossils found in the Orgueil and Murchison carbonaceous meteorites. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data obtained on these morphological biomarkers will be

  20. Laser Writing of Multiscale Chiral Polymer Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Furlani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to metamaterials is presented that involves laser-based patterning of novel chiral polymer media, wherein chirality is realized at two distinct length scales, intrinsically at the molecular level and geometrically at a length scale on the order of the wavelength of the incident field. In this approach, femtosecond-pulsed laser-induced two-photon lithography (TPL is used to pattern a photoresist-chiral polymer mixture into planar chiral shapes. Enhanced bulk chirality can be realized by tuning the wavelength-dependent chiral response at both the molecular and geometric level to ensure an overlap of their respective spectra. The approach is demonstrated via the fabrication of a metamaterial consisting of a two-dimensional array of chiral polymer-based L-structures. The fabrication process is described and modeling is performed to demonstrate the distinction between molecular and planar geometric-based chirality and the effects of the enhanced multiscale chirality on the optical response of such media. This new approach to metamaterials holds promise for the development of tunable, polymer-based optical metamaterials with low loss.

  1. Effect of basic and acidic additives on the separation of some basic drug enantiomers on polysaccharide-based chiral columns with acetonitrile as mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogaladze, Khatuna; Chankvetadze, Lali; Tsintsadze, Maia; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2015-03-01

    The separation of enantiomers of 16 basic drugs was studied using polysaccharide-based chiral selectors and acetonitrile as mobile phase with emphasis on the role of basic and acidic additives on the separation and elution order of enantiomers. Out of the studied chiral selectors, amylose phenylcarbamate-based ones more often showed a chiral recognition ability compared to cellulose phenylcarbamate derivatives. An interesting effect was observed with formic acid as additive on enantiomer resolution and enantiomer elution order for some basic drugs. Thus, for instance, the enantioseparation of several β-blockers (atenolol, sotalol, toliprolol) improved not only by the addition of a more conventional basic additive to the mobile phase, but also by the addition of an acidic additive. Moreover, an opposite elution order of enantiomers was observed depending on the nature of the additive (basic or acidic) in the mobile phase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mineralogical effects on the detectability of the postperovskite boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grocholski, Brent; Catalli, Krystle; Shim, Sang-Heon; Prakapenka, Vitali (UC); (MIT)

    2017-05-02

    The discovery of a phase transition in Mg-silicate perovskite (Pv) to postperovskite (pPv) at lowermost mantle pressure-temperature (P - T) conditions may provide an explanation for the discontinuous increase in shear wave velocity found in some regions at a depth range of 200 to 400 km above the core-mantle boundary, hereafter the D{double_prime} discontinuity. However, recent studies on binary and ternary systems showed that reasonable contents of Fe{sup 2+} and Al for pyrolite increase the thickness (width of the mixed phase region) of the Pv - pPv boundary (400-600 km) to much larger than the D{double_prime} discontinuity ({le} 70 km). These results challenge the assignment of the D{double_prime} discontinuity to the Pv - pPv boundary in pyrolite (homogenized mantle composition). Furthermore, the mineralogy and composition of rocks that can host a detectable Pv {yields} pPv boundary are still unknown. Here we report in situ measurements of the depths and thicknesses of the Pv {yields} pPv transition in multiphase systems (San Carlos olivine, pyrolitic, and midocean ridge basaltic compositions) at the P - T conditions of the lowermost mantle, searching for candidate rocks with a sharp Pv - pPv discontinuity. Whereas the pyrolitic mantle may not have a seismologically detectable Pv {yields} pPv transition due to the effect of Al, harzburgitic compositions have detectable transitions due to low Al content. In contrast, Al-rich basaltic compositions may have a detectable Pv - pPv boundary due to their distinct mineralogy. Therefore, the observation of the D{prime} discontinuity may be related to the Pv {yields} pPv transition in the differentiated oceanic lithosphere materials transported to the lowermost mantle by subducting slabs.

  3. Mineralogical effects on the detectability of the postperovskite boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocholski, Brent; Catalli, Krystle; Shim, Sang-Heon; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of a phase transition in Mg-silicate perovskite (Pv) to postperovskite (pPv) at lowermost mantle pressure-temperature (P - T) conditions may provide an explanation for the discontinuous increase in shear wave velocity found in some regions at a depth range of 200 to 400 km above the core-mantle boundary, hereafter the D'' discontinuity. However, recent studies on binary and ternary systems showed that reasonable contents of Fe2+ and Al for pyrolite increase the thickness (width of the mixed phase region) of the Pv - pPv boundary (400-600 km) to much larger than the D'' discontinuity (≤ 70 km). These results challenge the assignment of the D'' discontinuity to the Pv - pPv boundary in pyrolite (homogenized mantle composition). Furthermore, the mineralogy and composition of rocks that can host a detectable Pv → pPv boundary are still unknown. Here we report in situ measurements of the depths and thicknesses of the Pv → pPv transition in multiphase systems (San Carlos olivine, pyrolitic, and midocean ridge basaltic compositions) at the P - T conditions of the lowermost mantle, searching for candidate rocks with a sharp Pv - pPv discontinuity. Whereas the pyrolitic mantle may not have a seismologically detectable Pv → pPv transition due to the effect of Al, harzburgitic compositions have detectable transitions due to low Al content. In contrast, Al-rich basaltic compositions may have a detectable Pv - pPv boundary due to their distinct mineralogy. Therefore, the observation of the D'' discontinuity may be related to the Pv → pPv transition in the differentiated oceanic lithosphere materials transported to the lowermost mantle by subducting slabs.

  4. The Three Dimensional Dual of 4D Chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Porrati, M

    2009-01-01

    Chiral gauge theories can be defined in four-dimensional Anti de Sitter space, but AdS boundary conditions explicitly break the chiral symmetry in a specific, well defined manner, which in turns results in an anomalous Ward identity. When the 4D theory admits a dual description in terms of a 3D CFT, the 3D dual of the broken chiral symmetry is a certain double-trace deformation of the CFT, which produces the same anomalous chiral Ward identities that obtains in the 4D bulk theory.

  5. Heavy–light mesons in chiral AdS/QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yizhuang, E-mail: yizhuang.liu@stonybrook.edu; Zahed, Ismail, E-mail: ismail.zahed@stonybrook.edu

    2017-06-10

    We discuss a minimal holographic model for the description of heavy–light and light mesons with chiral symmetry, defined in a slab of AdS space. The model consists of a pair of chiral Yang–Mills and tachyon fields with specific boundary conditions that break spontaneously chiral symmetry in the infrared. The heavy–light spectrum and decay constants are evaluated explicitly. In the heavy mass limit the model exhibits both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry and allows for the explicit derivation of the one-pion axial couplings to the heavy–light mesons.

  6. Antinucleon-nucleon interaction at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Haidenbauer, Johann; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2017-07-01

    Results for the antinucleon-nucleon (\\overline{N}N) interaction obtained at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory (EFT) are reported. A new local regularization scheme is used for the pion-exchange contributions that has been recently suggested and applied in a pertinent study of the N N force within chiral EFT. Furthermore, an alternative strategy for estimating the uncertainty is utilized that no longer depends on a variation of the cutoffs. The low-energy constants associated with the arising contact terms are fixed by a fit to the phase shifts and inelasticities provided by a phase-shift analysis of \\overline{p}p scattering data. An excellent description of the \\overline{N}N amplitudes is achieved at the highest order considered. Moreover, because of the quantitative reproduction of partial waves up to J = 3, there is also a nice agreement on the level of \\overline{p}p observables. Specifically, total and integrated elastic and charge-exchange cross sections agree well with the results from the partial-wave analysis up to laboratory energies of 300 MeV, while differential cross sections and analyzing powers are described quantitatively up to 200-250 MeV. The low-energy structure of the \\overline{N}N amplitudes is also considered and compared to data from antiprotonic hydrogen.

  7. Fluctuation and strain effects in a chiral $p$-wave superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Mark H; Berg, Erez

    2015-01-01

    For a tetragonal material, order parameters of $p_x$ and $p_y$ symmetry are related by rotation and hence have the same $T_{\\rm c}$ at a mean-field level. This degeneracy can be lifted by a symmetry-breaking field, like (uniaxial) in-plane strain, such that at $T_{\\rm c}$, the order parameter is only of $p_x$ or $p_y$ symmetry. Only at a lower temperature also the respective other order parameter condenses to form a chiral $p$-wave state. At the mean-field level, the derivative of $T_{\\rm c}$...

  8. Observation of SERS effect in Raman optical activity, a new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim

    2006-01-01

    , takes this tool to another level, where a single molecule may be studied with respect to chirality, secondary structure and fold determination. ROA has been able to provide information about important dynamics in molecular understanding. However, until recently ROA measurements have required a longer...... exposure and higher concentration of the sample. With SEROA, these obstacles can be overcome, in that both studies on single molecule, i.e., very low concentration, and faster acquisition of the signal can be achieved. In the present work silver colloids were mixed with solution, in which a pentapeptide...

  9. On finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, M F M; Kobdaj, C; Schwarz, K

    2014-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N^3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-N_c sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Precise values for all counter terms relevant at N^3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of (39 +- 1) MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of sigma_{sN} simeq (4 +- 1) MeV. The flavour SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with ( 802 +- 4 ) MeV and (1103 +- 6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  10. Calculation of doublet capture rate for muon capture in deuterium within chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, J.; Tater, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Truhlik, E., E-mail: truhlik@ujf.cas.cz [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Epelbaum, E. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Machleidt, R. [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); Ricci, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy)

    2012-03-13

    The doublet capture rate {Lambda}{sub 1/2} of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant d{sup -hatR} (c{sub D}), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton {beta}-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of {Lambda}{sub 1/2} show a rather large spread for the used values of the d-hatR. Precise measurement of {Lambda}{sub 1/2} in the future will not only help to constrain the value of d-hatR, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the constant d-hatR will allow for consistent calculations of other two-nucleon weak processes, such as proton-proton fusion and solar neutrino scattering on deuterons, which are important for astrophysics.

  11. Enhanced Chiral Discriminatory van der Waals Interactions Mediated by Chiral Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Safari, Hassan; Salam, A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2017-05-01

    We predict a discriminatory interaction between a chiral molecule and an achiral molecule which is mediated by a chiral body. To achieve this, we generalize the van der Waals interaction potential between two ground-state molecules with electric, magnetic, and chiral response to nontrivial environments. The force is evaluated using second-order perturbation theory with an effective Hamiltonian. Chiral media enhance or reduce the free interaction via many-body interactions, making it possible to measure the chiral contributions to the van der Waals force with current technology. The van der Waals interaction is discriminatory with respect to enantiomers of different handedness and could be used to separate enantiomers. We also suggest a specific geometric configuration where the electric contribution to the van der Waals interaction is zero, making the chiral component the dominant effect.

  12. Enhanced Chiral Discriminatory van der Waals Interactions Mediated by Chiral Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Safari, Hassan; Salam, A; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2017-05-12

    We predict a discriminatory interaction between a chiral molecule and an achiral molecule which is mediated by a chiral body. To achieve this, we generalize the van der Waals interaction potential between two ground-state molecules with electric, magnetic, and chiral response to nontrivial environments. The force is evaluated using second-order perturbation theory with an effective Hamiltonian. Chiral media enhance or reduce the free interaction via many-body interactions, making it possible to measure the chiral contributions to the van der Waals force with current technology. The van der Waals interaction is discriminatory with respect to enantiomers of different handedness and could be used to separate enantiomers. We also suggest a specific geometric configuration where the electric contribution to the van der Waals interaction is zero, making the chiral component the dominant effect.

  13. Enantioselective environmental toxicology of chiral pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping

    2015-03-16

    The enantioselective environmental toxic effect of chiral pesticides is becoming more important. As the industry develops, increasing numbers of chiral insecticides and herbicides will be introduced into use, potentially posing toxic effects on nontarget living beings. Chiral pesticides, including herbicides such as acylanilides, phenoxypropanoic acids, and imidazolinones, and insecticides such as synthetic pyrethroids, organophosphates, and DDT often behave enantioselectively during agricultural use. These compounds also pose unpredictable enantioselective ecological threats to nontarget living beings and/or humans, affecting the food chain and entire ecosystems. Thus, to investigate the enantioselective toxic effects of chiral insecticides and herbicides is necessary during environmental protection. The environmental toxicology of chiral pesticides, especially the findings obtained from studies conducted in our laboratory during the past 10 years, is reviewed.

  14. The two-nucleon electromagnetic charge operator in chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) up to one loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Pastore,L. Girlanda,R. Schiavilla,M. Viviani,S. Pastore,L. Girlanda,R. Schiavilla,M. Viviani

    2011-08-01

    The electromagnetic charge operator in a two-nucleon system is derived in chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) up to order $e\\, Q$ (or N4LO), where $Q$ denotes the low-momentum scale and $e$ is the electric charge. The specific form of the N3LO and N4LO corrections from, respectively, one-pion-exchange and two-pion-exchange depends on the off-the-energy-shell prescriptions adopted for the non-static terms in the corresponding potentials. We show that different prescriptions lead to unitarily equivalent potentials and accompanying charge operators. Thus, provided a consistent set is adopted, predictions for physical observables will remain unaffected by the non-uniqueness associated with these off-the-energy-shell effects.

  15. Streaming effect of wall oscillation to boundary layer separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. H.; Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary theoretical result on the time averaged streaming effect of local forcing excitation to the boundary layer separation from smooth surface. The problem is formulated as a periodic disturbance to a basic steady breakaway separating flow, for which the data are taken from a numerical triple-deck solution. The ratio of Strouhal number St and Reynolds number Re plays an important role, both being assumed sufficiently high. The analytical and numerical results show that this streaming effect is quite strong at proper values of St/Re exp 1/4, which may delay or even suppress the separation.

  16. Probing the effects of ligand isomerism in chiral luminescent lanthanide supramolecular self-assemblies: a europium "Trinity Sliotar" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Oxana; Kitchen, Jonathan A; Lincheneau, Christophe; Peacock, Robert D; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2013-11-25

    "Trinity Sliotar" family: Chiral ligands containing pyridyl and naphthalene moieties were synthesized and characterized. These ligands were successfully used for the synthesis of Eu(III) bundles where chirality of the ligand is successfully transferred onto the lanthanide centre resulting in circularly polarized red luminescence. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of chirality and curvature of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the adsorption of uracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajarajeswari, M.; Iyakutti, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu 625 021 (India); Kawazoe, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Adsorption of uracil on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (5,2) and (5,5) in the presence of water molecules has been investigated using first-principles technique. Uracil is adsorbed on the nanotube noncovalently through {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction. The binding strength of uracil varies with the chirality of the carbon nanotubes. Addition of water molecules inside and outside the nanotube altered the interaction of the uracil with the nanotube and modifies the binding strength. Orientation of the water molecule and the charge transfer through the C-H bonds are the important factors in the interaction of the water molecule with the carbon nanotube. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Resurgence in Quantum Field Theory: Nonperturbative Effects in the Principal Chiral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherman, Aleksey; Dorigoni, Daniele; Dunne, Gerald V.; Ünsal, Mithat

    2014-01-01

    We explain the physical role of nonperturbative saddle points of path integrals in theories without instantons, using the example of the asymptotically free two-dimensional principal chiral model (PCM). Standard topological arguments based on homotopy considerations suggest no role for nonperturbative saddles in such theories. However, the resurgence theory, which unifies perturbative and nonperturbative physics, predicts the existence of several types of nonperturbative saddles associated with features of the large-order structure of the perturbation theory. These points are illustrated in the PCM, where we find new nonperturbative "fracton" saddle point field configurations, and suggest a quantum interpretation of previously discovered "uniton" unstable classical solutions. The fractons lead to a semiclassical realization of IR renormalons in the circle-compactified theory and yield the microscopic mechanism of the mass gap of the PCM.

  19. Chiral dynamics of baryons in the perturbative chiral quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pumsa-ard, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this work we develop and apply variants of a perturbative chiral quark model (PCQM) to the study of baryonic properties dominantly in the low-energy region. In a first step we consider a noncovariant form of the PCQM, where confinement is modelled by a static, effective potential and chiral corrections are treated to second order, in line with similar chiral quark models. We apply the PCQM to the study of the electromagnetic form factors of the baryon octet. We focus in particular on the low-energy observables such as the magnetic moments, the charge and magnetic radii. In addition, the electromagnetic N-delta transition is also studied in the framework of the PCQM. In the chiral loop calculations we consider a quark propagator, which is restricted to the quark ground state, or in hadronic language to nucleon and delta intermediate states, for simplicity. We furthermore include the low-lying excited states to the quark propagator. In particular, the charge radius of the neutron and the transverse helicity amplitudes of the N-delta transition are considerably improved by this additional effect. In a next step we develop a manifestly Lorentz covariant version of the PCQM, where in addition higher order chiral corrections are included. The full chiral quark Lagrangian is motivated by and in analogy to the one of Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). This Lagrangian contains a set of low energy constants (LECs), which are parameters encoding short distance effects and heavy degrees of freedom. We evaluate the chiral Lagrangian to order O(p{sup 4}) and to one loop to generate the dressing of the bare quark operators by pseudoscalar mesons. In addition we include the vector meson degrees of freedom in our study. Projection of the dressed quark operators on the baryonic level serves to calculate the relevant matrix elements. In a first application of this scheme, we resort to a parameterization of the valence quark form factors in the electromagnetic sector. Constraints

  20. Effect of olive-mill waste addition to agricultural soil on the enantioselective behavior of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámiz, Beatriz; Celis, Rafael; Hermosín, M Carmen; Cornejo, Juan

    2013-10-15

    Certain soil management practices can affect the enantioselective behavior of chiral pesticide enantiomers in agricultural soils. In this work, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effects of olive-mill waste (OMW) addition to a Mediterranean agricultural soil on the enantioselectivity of sorption, degradation, and leaching processes of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl. Sorption-desorption isotherms indicated that the sorption of metalaxyl enantiomers by unamended and OMW-amended soil (2% w/w) was non-enantioselective and that OMW addition had little effect on the extent of sorption of metalaxyl enantiomers by the soil. Soil incubation experiments revealed that the degradation of metalaxyl in unamended soil was highly enantioselective, with R-metalaxyl being degraded faster (t1/2 = 12 days) than S-metalaxyl (t1/2 = 39 days). OMW addition to the soil increased the half-life of the biologically-active R-metalaxyl enantiomer from 12 to 28 days, and decreased the half-life of the non-active S-metalaxyl enantiomer from 39 to 33 days. Consequently, the enantioselectivity of metalaxyl degradation in the soil was greatly reduced upon OMW addition. Column leaching data were consistent with batch sorption and incubation results, showing similar retardation of S- and R-metalaxyl in unamended and OMW-amended soil and enantioselective leaching of the fungicide only in unamended soil. The results have important implications regarding the biological efficacy and environmental impact of the fungicide when applied as a mixture of enantiomers or racemate to OMW-treated soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chiral Nuclear Dynamics II

    CERN Document Server

    Rho, Mannque

    2008-01-01

    This is the sequel to the first volume to treat in one effective field theory framework the physics of strongly interacting matter under extreme conditions. This is vital for understanding the high temperature phenomena taking place in relativistic heavy ion collisions and in the early Universe, as well as the high-density matter predicted to be present in compact stars. The underlying thesis is that what governs hadronic properties in a heat bath and/or a dense medium is hidden local symmetry which emerges from chiral dynamics of light quark systems and from the duality between QCD in 4D and

  2. Effects of compressibility on boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, M.

    1976-01-01

    A series of turbulence measurements in a subsonic compressible turbulent boundary-layer flow in the Mach number range of 0.1 to 0.7 is described. Measurements include detailed surveys of the turbulence intensities and Reynolds shear stresses, and other quantities such as the turbulent kinetic energy. These data are examined to bring out the effects of compressibility and show that the stream-wise and transverse fluctuations and the turbulent shear stress follow a universal scaling law. A preliminary attempt is made to examine some of the assumptions made in turbulence models commonly used in numerical codes for the calculation of compressible flows.

  3. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Microwave chirality discrimination in enantiomeric liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, E.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.

    2017-07-01

    Chirality discrimination is of fundamental interest in biology, chemistry, and metamaterial studies. In optics, near-field plasmon-resonance spectroscopy with superchiral probing fields is effectively applicable for analyses of large biomolecules with chiral properties. We show possibility for microwave near-field chirality discrimination analysis based on magnon-resonance spectroscopy. Newly developed capabilities in microwave sensing using magnetoelectric (ME) probing fields originated from multiresonance magnetic-dipolar-mode oscillations in quasi-2D yttrium-iron-garnet disks provide potential for unprecedented measurements of chemical and biological objects. We report on microwave near-field chirality discrimination for aqueous D- and L-glucose solutions. The shown ME-field sensing is addressed to deepen our understanding of microwave-biosystem interactions. It can also be important for an analysis and design of microwave chiral metamaterials.

  5. On chiral and non chiral 1D supermultiplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toppan, Francesco, E-mail: toppan@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (TEO/CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Fisica Teorica

    2011-07-01

    In this talk I discuss and clarify some issues concerning chiral and non chiral properties of the one-dimensional supermultiplets of the N-extended supersymmetry. Quaternionic chirality can be defined for N = 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Octonionic chirality for N = 8 and beyond. Inequivalent chiralities only arise when considering several copies of N = 4 or N = 8 supermultiplets. (author)

  6. Quinine-Based Zwitterionic Chiral Stationary Phase as a Complementary Tool for Peptide Analysis: Mobile Phase Effects on Enantio- and Stereoselectivity of Underivatized Oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Federica; Sardella, Roccaldo; Carotti, Andrea; Natalini, Benedetto; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Peptide stereoisomer analysis is of importance for quality control of therapeutic peptides, the analysis of stereochemical integrity of bioactive peptides in food, and the elucidation of the stereochemistry of peptides from a natural chiral pool which often contains one or more D-amino acid residues. In this work, a series of model peptide stereoisomers (enantiomers and diastereomers) were analyzed on a zwitterionic ion-exchanger chiral stationary phase (Chiralpak ZWIX(+) 5 µm), in order to investigate the retention and separation performance for such compounds on this chiral stationary phase and elucidate its utility for this purpose. The goal of the study focused on 1) investigations of the effects of the sample matrix used to dissolve the peptide samples; 2) optimization of the mobile phase (enabling deriving information on factors of relevance for retention and separation); and 3) derivation of structure-selectivity relationships. It turned out that small di- and tripeptides can be well resolved under optimized conditions, typically with resolutions larger than 1.5. The optimized mobile phase often consisted of methanol-tetrahydrofuran-water (49:49:2; v/v/v) with 25 mM formic acid and 12.5 mM diethylamine. This work proposes some guidance on which mobile phases can be most efficiently used for peptide stereoisomer separations on Chiralpak ZWIX. Chirality 28:5-16, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chiral symmetry and chiral-symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    These lectures concern the dynamics of fermions in strong interaction with gauge fields. Systems of fermions coupled by gauge forces have a very rich structure of global symmetries, which are called chiral symmetries. These lectures will focus on the realization of chiral symmetries and the causes and consequences of thier spontaneous breaking. A brief introduction to the basic formalism and concepts of chiral symmetry breaking is given, then some explicit calculations of chiral symmetry breaking in gauge theories are given, treating first parity-invariant and then chiral models. These calculations are meant to be illustrative rather than accurate; they make use of unjustified mathematical approximations which serve to make the physics more clear. Some formal constraints on chiral symmetry breaking are discussed which illuminate and extend the results of our more explicit analysis. Finally, a brief review of the phenomenological theory of chiral symmetry breaking is presented, and some applications of this theory to problems in weak-interaction physics are discussed. (WHK)

  8. Chiral discrimination in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a fundamental property of molecules whose spatial symmetry is characterized by the absence of improper rotations, making them not superimposable to their mirror image. Chiral molecules constitute the elementary building blocks of living species and one enantiomer is favoured in general (e.g. L-aminoacids and D-sugars pervade terrestrial homochiral biochemistry) because most chemical reactions producing natural substances are enantioselective. Since the effect of chiral chemicals and drugs on living beings can be markedly different between enantiomers, the quest for practical spectroscopical methods to scrutinize chirality is an issue of great importance and interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a topmost analytical technique, but spectrometers currently used are ‘blind’ to chirality, i.e. unable to discriminate the two mirror-image forms of a chiral molecule, because, in the absence of a chiral solvent, the spectral parameters, chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants are identical for enantiomers. Therefore, the development of new procedures for routine chiral recognition would offer basic support to scientists. However, in the presence of magnetic fields, a distinction between true and false chirality is mandatory. The former epitomizes natural optical activity, which is rationalized by a time-even pseudoscalar, i.e. the trace of a second-rank tensor, the mixed electric dipole/magnetic dipole polarizability. The Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism and magnetic optical activity are instead related to a time-odd axial vector. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to discriminate enantiomers via NMR spectroscopy, with the focus on the deep connection between chirality and symmetry properties under the combined set of fundamental discrete operations, namely charge conjugation, parity (space inversion) and time (motion) reversal.

  9. Geostrophic convective turbulence: The effect of boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Kunnen, Rudie P J; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents results of the first direct numerical simulations of rotating Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection in the so-called geostrophic regime, (hence very small Ekman numbers $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-7})$ and high Rayleigh numbers~$Ra=10^{10}$ and~$5\\cdot 10^{10}$), employing the \\emph{full} Navier--Stokes equations. In the geostrophic regime the criteria of very strong rotation and large supercriticality are met simultaneously, which is true for many geophysical and astrophysical flows. Until now, numerical approaches of this regime have been based on \\emph{reduced} versions of the Navier--Stokes equations (cf. Sprague \\emph{et al.} J. Fluid Mech., \\textbf{551}, 141 (2006)), omitting the effect of the viscous (Ekman) boundary layers. By using different velocity boundary conditions at the plates, we study the effect of these Ekman layers. We find that the formation of large-scale structures (Rubio \\emph{et al.} (Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{112} (2014)), which indicates the presence of an inverse energy cascade, ...

  10. Effects of Multiple Boundaries on Perceived Spaciousness and Enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, Arthur E., III

    2013-01-01

    This article reports seven new, original findings, based on 4 experiments, 56 environmental scenes, and 71 participants, on how the factors of area over which one could walk (boundary height, boundary porosity, and boundary proximity) influence perceived spaciousness or enclosure. Perceived spaciousness was most strongly related by the area over…

  11. Speciation and gene flow between snails of opposite chirality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Left-right asymmetry in snails is intriguing because individuals of opposite chirality are either unable to mate or can only mate with difficulty, so could be reproductively isolated from each other. We have therefore investigated chiral evolution in the Japanese land snail genus Euhadra to understand whether changes in chirality have promoted speciation. In particular, we aimed to understand the effect of the maternal inheritance of chirality on reproductive isolation and gene flow. We found that the mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of Euhadra is consistent with a single, relatively ancient evolution of sinistral species and suggests either recent "single-gene speciation" or gene flow between chiral morphs that are unable to mate. To clarify the conditions under which new chiral morphs might evolve and whether single-gene speciation can occur, we developed a mathematical model that is relevant to any maternal-effect gene. The model shows that reproductive character displacement can promote the evolution of new chiral morphs, tending to counteract the positive frequency-dependent selection that would otherwise drive the more common chiral morph to fixation. This therefore suggests a general mechanism as to how chiral variation arises in snails. In populations that contain both chiral morphs, two different situations are then possible. In the first, gene flow is substantial between morphs even without interchiral mating, because of the maternal inheritance of chirality. In the second, reproductive isolation is possible but unstable, and will also lead to gene flow if intrachiral matings occasionally produce offspring with the opposite chirality. Together, the results imply that speciation by chiral reversal is only meaningful in the context of a complex biogeographical process, and so must usually involve other factors. In order to understand the roles of reproductive character displacement and gene flow in the chiral evolution of Euhadra, it will be

  12. Chiral spiral induced by a strong magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuki Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modification of the chiral phase structure of QCD due to an external magnetic field. We first demonstrate how the effect of magnetic field can systematically be incorporated into a generalized Ginzburg-Landau framework. We then analyze the phase structure in the vicinity of the chiral critical point. In the chiral limit, the effect is found to be so drastic that it brings a “continent” of chiral spiral in the phase diagram, by which the chiral tricritical point is totally washed out. This is the case no matter how small the intensity of magnetic field is. On the other hand, the current quark mass protects the chiral critical point from a weak magnetic field. However, the critical point will eventually be covered by the chiral spiral phase as the magnetic field grows.

  13. Particular boundary condition ensures that a fermion in d=1+5, compactified on a finite disk, manifests in d=1+3 as massless spinor with a charge 1/2, mass protected and chirally coupled to the gauge field

    CERN Document Server

    Borstnik, Norma Susana Mankoc

    2008-01-01

    The genuine Kaluza-Klein-like theories--with no fields in addition to gravity--have difficulties with the existence of massless spinors after the compactification of some space dimensions \\cite{witten}. We proposed in previous paper a boundary condition for spinors in d=(1+5) compactified on a flat disk that ensures masslessness of spinors (with all positive half integer charges) in d=(1+3) as well as their chiral coupling to the corresponding background gauge gravitational field. In this paper we study the same toy model, proposing a boundary condition allowing a massless spinor of one handedness and only one charge (1/2) and infinitely many massive spinors of the same charge, allowing disc to be curved. We define the operator of momentum to be Hermitean on the vector space of spinor states--the solutions on a disc with the boundary.

  14. The growth of the tearing mode - Boundary and scaling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical model of resistive magnetic tearing is developed in order to verify and relate the results of the principal approximations used in analytic analyses and to investigate the solutions and their growth-rate scalings over a large range of primary parameters which include parametric values applicable to the solar atmosphere. The computations cover the linear behavior for a variety of boundary conditions, emphasizing effects which differentiate magnetic tearing in astrophysical situations from that in laboratory devices. Eigenfunction profiles for long and short wavelengths are computed and the applicability of the 'constant psi' approximation is investigated. The growth rate is computed for values of the magnetic Reynolds number up to a trillion and of the dimensionless wavelength parameter down to 0.001. The analysis predicts significant effects due to differing values of the magnetic Reynolds number.

  15. Chiral imbalance in QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chiral imbalance (ChI is given by a difference between the numbers of RH and LH quarks which may occur in the fireball after heavy ion collision. To characterize it adiabatically a quark chiral (axial chemical potential must be introduced taking into account emergence of a ChI in such a phase. In this report the phenomenology of formation of Local spatial Parity Breaking (LPB in the hot and dense baryon matter is discussed and its simulation within a number of QCD-inspired models is outlined. The appearance of new states in the spectra of scalar, pseudoscalar and vector particles in such a matter is elucidated. In particular, from the effective vector meson theory in the presence of Chern-Simons interaction it is demonstrated that the spectrum of massive vector mesons splits into three polarization components with different effective masses. The asymmetry in production of longitudinally and transversely polarized states of ρ and ω mesons for various values of the dilepton invariant mass can serve as a characteristic indication of the LPB in PHENIX, STAR and ALICE experiments.

  16. Chiral imbalance in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Alexander; Andrianov, Vladimir; Espriu, Domenec

    2017-03-01

    The chiral imbalance (ChI) is given by a difference between the numbers of RH and LH quarks which may occur in the fireball after heavy ion collision. To characterize it adiabatically a quark chiral (axial) chemical potential must be introduced taking into account emergence of a ChI in such a phase. In this report the phenomenology of formation of Local spatial Parity Breaking (LPB) in the hot and dense baryon matter is discussed and its simulation within a number of QCD-inspired models is outlined. The appearance of new states in the spectra of scalar, pseudoscalar and vector particles in such a matter is elucidated. In particular, from the effective vector meson theory in the presence of Chern-Simons interaction it is demonstrated that the spectrum of massive vector mesons splits into three polarization components with different effective masses. The asymmetry in production of longitudinally and transversely polarized states of ρ and ω mesons for various values of the dilepton invariant mass can serve as a characteristic indication of the LPB in PHENIX, STAR and ALICE experiments.

  17. Enhanced Chiral Recognition by Cyclodextrin Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Jan Ravoo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the effect of multivalency in chiral recognition. To this end, we measured the host-guest interaction of a β-cyclodextrin dimer with divalent chiral guests. We report the synthesis of carbohydrate-based water soluble chiral guests functionalized with two borneol, menthol, or isopinocampheol units in either (+ or (– configuration. We determined the interaction of these divalent guests with a β-cyclodextrin dimer using isothermal titration calorimetry. It was found that—in spite of a highly unfavorable conformation—the cyclodextrin dimer binds to guest dimers with an increased enantioselectivity, which clearly reflects the effect of multivalency.

  18. Boundary effects on radiative processes of two entangled atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, E. [Instituto Politécnico, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro,28625-570 Nova Friburgo (Brazil); Dueñas, J.G. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais,Belo Horizonte, BH 31270-901 (Brazil); Menezes, G. [Grupo de Física Teórica e Matemática Física, Departamento de Física,Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropédica, RJ 23897-000 (Brazil); Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas,Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2016-07-29

    We analyze radiative processes of a quantum system composed by two identical two-level atoms interacting with a massless scalar field prepared in the vacuum state in the presence of perfect reflecting flat mirrors. We consider that the atoms are prepared in a stationary maximally entangled state. We investigate the spontaneous transitions rates from the entangled states to the collective ground state induced by vacuum fluctuations. In the empty-space case, the spontaneous decay rates can be enhanced or inhibited depending on the specific entangled state and changes with the distance between the atoms. Next, we consider the presence of perfect mirrors and impose Dirichlet boundary conditions on such surfaces. In the presence of a single mirror the transition rate for the symmetric state undergoes a slight reduction, whereas for the antisymmetric state our results indicate a slightly enhancement. Finally, we investigate the effect of multiple reflections by two perfect mirrors on the transition rates.

  19. Hydromagnetic free convection currents effects on boundary layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwanza, J.K., E-mail: kwanzakioko@yahoo.co [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya); Marigi, E.M.; Kinyanjui, M. [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2010-06-15

    In this study we discuss an unsteady free convection MHD flow past semi-infinite vertical porous plate. We have considered the flow in the presence of a strong magnetic field and therefore the electromagnetic force is very large. This brings in the phenomenon of Hall and Ion-slip currents. The effects of these two parameters together with that of viscous dissipation and radiation absorption among others on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are presented. The profiles are presented graphically. As the partial differential equations governing this problem are highly non-linear they are solved numerically by a finite difference method. It is found that in presence of heating of the plate by free convection current the velocity boundary layer thickness decreases.

  20. The effect of field cooling on a spin-chiral domain structure in a magnetoelectric helimagnet Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraoka, Y. [Division of Materials Physics, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Tanaka, Y.; Oura, M. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y. [Division of Materials Physics, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kimura, T., E-mail: kimura@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials Physics, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Spin-chiral domain structures near a cleaved crystal face of a magnetoelectric helimagnet, Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22}, were examined after various magnetic and electric field-cooling procedures by means of the scanning resonant X-ray microdiffraction technique using circularly polarized X-rays. We have found that the application of a magnetic field (1–2 k Oe) during the field-cooling procedure stabilizes one of the handedness among the two spin-chiral states (left- or right-handed screw structure) and makes nearly a single spin-chiral domain in the vicinity of the cleaved crystal face. However, it makes the degree of the spin chirality spatially inhomogeneous even within a domain. We discuss the observed field-cooling effect in terms of possible formation of spin-chiral domains with “stripe-type” domain walls accompanied by randomly-distributed ferromagnetic islands. - Highlights: • Spin-chiral domain structures in a magnetoelectric helimagnet, Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22}, were considerably affected by the field-cooling procedure. • The field-cooling with a small magnetic field stabilizes either a left- or right-handed spin-chiral state near a cleaved crystal face perpendicular to the helical axis.

  1. Boundary effects on effective conductivity of random heterogeneous media with spherical inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, A.; Dagan, G.; Miloh, T.

    2012-10-01

    It is common to determine the effective conductivity of heterogeneous media by assuming stationarity of the random local properties. This assumption is not obeyed in a boundary layer of a body of finite size. The effect of different types of boundaries is examined for a two-phase medium with spherical inclusions of given conductivity distributed randomly in a matrix of a different conductivity. Exact solutions are derived for the apparent conductivity and the boundary layer thickness. The interaction between the spheres and the boundaries is fully incorporated in the solutions using a spherical harmonics expansion and the method of images. As applications, the corrections for the effective conductivity are given for two cases of finite bodies: the Maxwell sphere and a cylinder of flow parallel to the axis.

  2. Role of Bending Energy and Knot Chirality in Knot Distribution and Their Effective Interaction along Stretched Semiflexible Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Najafi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Knots appear frequently in semiflexible (biopolymers, including double-stranded DNA, and their presence can affect the polymer’s physical and functional properties. In particular, it is possible and indeed often the case that multiple knots appear on a single chain, with effects which have only come under scrutiny in the last few years. In this manuscript, we study the interaction of two knots on a stretched semiflexible polymer, expanding some recent results on the topic. Specifically, we consider an idealization of a typical optical tweezers experiment and show how the bending rigidity of the chain—And consequently its persistence length—Influences the distribution of the entanglements; possibly more importantly, we observe and report how the relative chirality of the otherwise identical knots substantially modifies their interaction. We analyze the free energy of the chain and extract the effective interactions between embedded knots, rationalizing some of their pertinent features by means of simple effective models. We believe the salient aspect of the knot–knot interactions emerging from our study will be present in a large number of semiflexible polymers under tension, with important consequences for the characterization and manipulation of these systems—Be they artificial or biologica in origin—And for their technological application.

  3. Exploring chiral dynamics with overlap fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    This talk presents a lattice study of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking performed by the JLQCD and TWQCD collaborations with dynamical overlap fermions. Our lattice configurations are generated in a fixed topological sector. Since finite volume effects, partly due to the fixed global topology, are mainly induced by pion fields, the dependence on the lattice volume, topological charge and quark masses can be analytically predicted using chiral perturbation theory (ChPT). We find a good agreement of Dirac operator spectrum calculated on the lattice with the ChPT prediction including its finite size scalings, through which the chiral condensate is determined with good accuracy.

  4. Doped Chiral Polymer Metamaterials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Doped Chiral Polymer Metamaterials (DCPM) with tunable resonance frequencies have been developed by adding plasmonic inclusions into chiral polymers with variable...

  5. Chiral liquid chromatography-circular dichroism-NMR for estimating separation conditions of chiral HPLC without authentic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Takashi; Okamoto, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kozo; Tode, Chisato; Sugiura, Makiko

    2010-05-15

    Chiral separation by high performance liquid chromatography (Chiral HPLC) is one of the most powerful methods for estimating optical and chemical purity of chiral compounds. However, it has a weakness in that much time and effort are required to prepare authentic samples. A novel chiral liquid chromatography-circular dichroism-NMR (LC-CD-NMR) technique, on the other hand, requires only crude chiral compounds that include enantiomers as minor impurities. In this study, chiral LC-CD-NMR was constructed by connecting a conventional LC-NMR system with a CD detector. A pyridylalanine derivative mixture was prepared to mimic technical grade material in an early phase of development. By chiral LC-CD-NMR, the enantiomer peak is identified by an opposite sign of the CD Cotton effect curve and an identical (1)H NMR spectrum to that of the main component. Using NMR as a detector, this method is superior in ability to discriminate enantiomers from other isomers indistinguishable by MS. Furthermore, this method is also applicable for selecting the best separation conditions of chiral HPLC. The degrees of separation (Rs) between the main component and its enantiomer in several chiral columns were compared. Even with modern chromatographic methods, establishing the best chiral HPLC conditions in an early phase of development is difficult: chiral LC-CD-NMR is a suitable solution.

  6. RETRACTED ARTICLE: The Effect of Solute Atoms on Grain Boundary Migration: A Solute Pinning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersent, Emmanuel; Marthinsen, Knut; Nes, Erik

    2012-12-01

    The effect of solute atoms on grain boundary migration has been modeled on the basis of the idea that solute atoms will locally perturb the collective rearrangements of solvent atoms associated with boundary migration. The consequence of such perturbations is the cusping of the boundary and corresponding stress concentrations on the solute atoms which will promote thermal activation of these atoms out of the boundary. This thermal activation is considered to be the rate-controlling mechanism in boundary migration. It is demonstrated that the present statistical approach is capable of explaining, in phenomenological terms, the known effects of solute atoms on boundary migration. The experimental results on the effect of copper on boundary migration in aluminum, due to Gordon and Vandermeer, have been well accounted for.

  7. Competitive chiral induction in a 2D molecular assembly: Intrinsic chirality versus coadsorber-induced chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Li, Shu-Ying; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Noncovalently introducing stereogenic information is a promising approach to embed chirality in achiral molecular systems. However, the interplay of the noncovalently introduced chirality with the intrinsic chirality of molecules or molecular aggregations has rarely been addressed. We report a competitive chiral expression of the noncovalent interaction–mediated chirality induction and the intrinsic stereogenic center–controlled chirality induction in a two-dimensional (2D) molecular assembly at the liquid/solid interface. Two enantiomorphous honeycomb networks are formed by the coassembly of an achiral 5-(benzyloxy)isophthalic acid (BIC) derivative and 1-octanol at the liquid/solid interface. The preferential formation of the globally homochiral assembly can be achieved either by using the chiral analog of 1-octanol, (S)-6-methyl-1-octanol, as a chiral coadsorber to induce chirality to the BIC assembly via noncovalent hydrogen bonding or by covalently linking a chiral center in the side chain of BIC. Both the chiral coadsorber and the intrinsically chiral BIC derivative can act as a chiral seeds to induce a preferred handedness in the assembly of the achiral BIC derivatives. Furthermore, the noncovalent interaction–mediated chirality induction can restrain or even overrule the manifestation of the intrinsic chirality of the BIC molecule and dominate the handedness of the 2D molecular coassembly. This study provides insight into the interplay of intrinsically chiral centers and external chiral coadsorbers in the chiral induction, transfer, and amplification processes of 2D molecular assembly.

  8. Qualitative Analysis of the Helical Electronic Energy of Inherently Chiral Calix[4]arenes: An Approach to Effectively Assign Their Absolute Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For all microhelices on aromatic rings of inherently chiral calix[4]arene, an expression was derived from one approximation and one hypothesis on the basis of the electron-on-a-helix model of Tinoco and Woody as follows: 1/E = μ (H − K Δα2 , where μ = 1 for the right-handed microhelix and μ = −1 for the left-handed microhelix; and H and K are constant and greater than zero. The expression correlates microhelical electronic energy (E with the atom polarizability difference (Δα on both microhelix ends, which intuitively and clearly shows the impact of helical substituent polarizability on helical electronic energy. The case analysis almost entirely proves that the qualitative analysis of the helical electronic energy of inherently chiral calix[4]arenes with the expression is scientific and can be used to effectively assign their absolute configuration

  9. Chiral quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this talk I review studies of hadron properties in bosonized chiral quark models for the quark flavor dynamics. Mesons are constructed from Bethe–Salpeter equations and baryons emerge as chiral solitons. Such models require regularization and I show that the two-fold Pauli–Villars regularization scheme not only fully ...

  10. Chiral separation and quantitation of cetirizine and hydroxyzine by maltodextrin-mediated CE in human plasma: effect of zwitterionic property of cetirizine on enantioseparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojavan, Saeed; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, a very simple CE method for chiral separation and quantitation of zwitterionic cetirizine (CTZ), as the main metabolite of hydroxyzine (HZ), and HZ has been developed. In addition, the effect of zwitterionic property of CTZ on enantioseparation was investigated. Maltodextrin, a linear polysaccharide, as a chiral selector was used and several parameters affecting the separation such as pH of BGE, concentration of chiral selector and applied voltage were studied. The best BGE conditions for CTZ and HZ enantiomers were optimized as 75 mM sodium phosphate solution at pH of 2.0, containing 5% w/v maltodextrin. Results showed that, compared to HZ, pH of BGE was an effective parameter in enantioseparation of CTZ due to the zwitterionic property of CTZ. The linear range of the method was over 30-1200 ng/mL for all enantiomers of CTZ and HZ. The quantification and detection limits (S/N=3) of all enantiomers were 30 and 10 ng/mL, respectively. The method was used to quantitative enantioseparation of CTZ and HZ in spiked human plasma. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Effect of secondary relaxations on diffraction from high-Σ [001] twist boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, P. D.; Balluffi, R. W.

    1984-08-01

    The types of diffraction effects which may be expected from secondary relaxations in high-Σ [001] twist boundaries are calculated and discussed. An idealized two-plane model is used which incorporates secondary relaxations by rotating patches of boundary about coincident site lattice elements normal to the boundary. Local relaxations within the patches are also employed using rotational relaxations about local O-lattice elements in a manner consistent with earlier results. The main effect of secondary relaxations is the splitting of grain boundary reflections into small clusters which fall on a "grain boundary dislocation lattice". This localized splitting is significant only when the deviation of the boundary from a nearby low-Σ misorientation becomes sufficiently large. Under these circumstances a noticeable distortion of the diffraction pattern can also occur. The results are compared with some X-ray diffraction observations from twist boundaries in gold.

  12. Chiral magnetic effect search in p+Au, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; STAR Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The chiral magnetic effect (CME) is a fundamental property of QCD. A major background source for CME measurements is the intrinsic particle correlations (such as resonances/jets decay) coupled with the azimuthal elliptical anisotropy v2. In heavy-ion collisions, the magnetic field direction and event plane azimuthal angle Ψ2 are correlated, thus the CME and the v2-induced background are entangled. In small system p+Au and d+Au collisions, the Ψ2 is mostly due to geometry fluctuations, and thus magnetic field direction and Ψ2 are uncorrelated. The correlation measurements in small system collisions with respect to Ψ2 are only sensitive to v2-induced background while any CME is averaged to zero. In this talk, we will present the STAR measurements of two-particle correlations with respect to Ψ2 in p+Au, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV. These results are analyzed as a function of particle multiplicity to shed light on the background contaminations of the CME measurements in heavy-ion collisions. We will also report results from a new analysis approach as a function of the particle pair invariant mass in order to suppress non-CME related physics backgrounds.

  13. The Search for QCD Sphalerons and the Chiral Magnetic Effect in Heavy-Ion Collisions with ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In non-central heavy-ion collisions unprecedented strong magnetic fields, of the order of 10^14 T, are expected to be produced by the incoming protons contained in the nuclei. These fields can be used to detect possible non-conservation of chirality in the QCD sector, a signature of sphaleron transitions. In particular, the interplay of chiral imbalance and magnetic fields results in the separation of positive and negative charges along the direction of the field, a phenomenon called “Chiral Magnetic Effect” (CME). In this seminar, the challenges and the opportunities in the search for the CME and the detection of magnetic fields in heavy-ion collisions will be discussed, with an emphasis on recent ALICE results.

  14. Chiral extrapolations for nucleon electric charge radii

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, J M M; Young, R D

    2013-01-01

    Lattice simulations for the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon yield insights into the internal structure of hadrons. The logarithmic divergence of the charge radius in the chiral limit poses an interesting challenge in achieving reliable predictions from finite-volume lattice simulations. Recent results near the physical pion mass are examined in order to confront the issue of how the chiral regime is approached. The electric charge radius of the nucleon presents a forum for achieving consistent finite-volume corrections. Newly-developed techniques within the framework of chiral effective field theory are used to achieve a robust extrapolation of the electric charge radius to the physical pion mass, and to infinite volume. The chiral extrapolations exhibit considerable finite-volume dependence; lattice box sizes of L > 7 fm are required in order to achieve a direct lattice simulation result within 2% of the infinite-volume value at the physical point. Predictions of the volume-dependence are provide...

  15. Chiral separation by capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gübitz, G; Schmid, M G

    2000-01-01

    The state of art in chiral capillary electrochromatography is reviewed. Chiral separations by capillary electrochromatography were carried out using capillaries packed with chiral stationary phases or achiral stationary phases in combination with a chiral selector added to the mobile phase. Furthermore, the use of open tubular capillaries containing the chiral selector coated to the capillary wall was also reported. Among other separation principles moleculary imprinted polymers represent a challenging approach for chiral capillary electrochromatography. A recent trend is the use of polymeric continuous beds with a chiral selector incorporated.

  16. Applications of chiral symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    The author discusses several topics in the applications of chiral symmetry at nonzero temperature. First, where does the rho go? The answer: up. The restoration of chiral symmetry at a temperature T{sub {chi}} implies that the {rho} and a{sub 1} vector mesons are degenerate in mass. In a gauged linear sigma model the {rho} mass increases with temperature, m{sub {rho}}(T{sub {chi}}) > m{sub {rho}}(0). The author conjectures that at T{sub {chi}} the thermal {rho} - a{sub 1}, peak is relatively high, at about {approximately}1 GeV, with a width approximately that at zero temperature (up to standard kinematic factors). The {omega} meson also increases in mass, nearly degenerate with the {rho}, but its width grows dramatically with temperature, increasing to at least {approximately}100 MeV by T{sub {chi}}. The author also stresses how utterly remarkable the principle of vector meson dominance is, when viewed from the modern perspective of the renormalization group. Secondly, he discusses the possible appearance of disoriented chiral condensates from {open_quotes}quenched{close_quotes} heavy ion collisions. It appears difficult to obtain large domains of disoriented chiral condensates in the standard two flavor model. This leads to the last topic, which is the phase diagram for QCD with three flavors, and its proximity to the chiral critical point. QCD may be very near this chiral critical point, and one might thereby generated large domains of disoriented chiral condensates.

  17. Chiral perturbation theory for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Manashov, A. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik 1 - Theoretische Physik]|[Sankt-Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Schaefer, A. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik 1 - Theoretische Physik

    2006-08-15

    We analyze the moments of the isosinglet generalized parton distributions H, E, H, E of the nucleon in one-loop order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. We discuss in detail the construction of the operators in the effective theory that are required to obtain all corrections to a given order in the chiral power counting. The results will serve to improve the extrapolation of lattice results to the chiral limit. (orig.)

  18. Effective nonlinear Neumann boundary conditions for 1D nonconvex Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerand, Jessica

    2017-09-01

    We study Hamilton-Jacobi equations in [ 0 , + ∞) of evolution type with nonlinear Neumann boundary conditions in the case where the Hamiltonian is not necessarily convex with respect to the gradient variable. In this paper, we give two main results. First, we prove for a nonconvex and coercive Hamiltonian that general boundary conditions in a relaxed sense are equivalent to effective ones in a strong sense. Here, we exhibit the effective boundary conditions while for a quasi-convex Hamiltonian, we already know them (Imbert and Monneau, 2016). Second, we give a comparison principle for a nonconvex and nonnecessarily coercive Hamiltonian where the boundary condition can have constant parts.

  19. Boundary layer thickness effect on boattail drag. [wind tunnel tests for drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Chamberlin, R.; Bober, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program has been conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, to investigate the effects of boundary layer changes on the flow over high angle boattail nozzles. The tests were run on an isolated axisymmetric sting mounted model. Various boattail geometries were investigated at high subsonic speeds over a range of boundary layer thicknesses. In general, boundary layer effects were small at speeds up to Mach 0.8. However, at higher speeds significant regions of separated flow were present on the boattail. When separation was present large reductions in boattail drag resulted with increasing boundary layer thickness. The analysis predicts both of these trends.

  20. Spectral signatures of chirality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of measuring chirality, via the spectral shift of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional structures. We derive an explicit mapping of the problem of oblique incidence of circularly polarized light on a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal with negligible index contrast...... to the formally equivalent problem of linearly polarized light incident on-axis on a non-chiral structure with index contrast. We derive analytical expressions for the first-order shifts of the band gaps for negligible index contrast. These are modified to give good approximations to the band gap shifts also...

  1. The effect of boundary shape and minima selection on single limb stance postural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Stephen C; Joshi, Mukta N; Bazett-Jones, David M; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E

    2012-11-01

    The effect of time-to-boundary minima selection and stability limit definition was investigated during eyes open and eyes closed condition single-limb stance postural stability. Anteroposterior and mediolateral time-to-boundary were computed using the mean and standard deviation (SD) of all time-to-boundary minima during a trial, and the mean and SD of only the 10 absolute time-to-boundary minima. Time-to-boundary with rectangular, trapezoidal, and multisegmented polygon defined stability limits were also calculated. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test results revealed significant medium-large correlations between anteroposterior and mediolateral time-to-boundary scores calculated using both the mean and SD of the 10 absolute time-to-boundary minima and of all the time-to-boundary minima. Friedman test results revealed significant mediolateral time-to-boundary differences between boundary shape definitions. Follow-up Wilcoxon signed rank test results revealed significant differences between the rectangular boundary shape and both the trapezoidal and multisegmented polygon shapes during the eyes open and eyes closed conditions when both the mean and the SD of the time-to-boundary minima were used to represent postural stability. Significant differences were also revealed between the trapezoidal and multisegmented polygon definitions during the eyes open condition when the SD of the time-to-boundary minima was used to represent postural stability. Based on these findings, the overall results (i.e., stable versus unstable participants or groups) of studies computing postural stability using different minima selection can be compared. With respect to boundary shape, the trapezoid or multisegmented polygon shapes may be more appropriate than the rectangular shape as they more closely represent the anatomical shape of the stance foot.

  2. New chiral diamino-bis(tert-thiophene): an effective ligand for Pd- and Zn-catalyzed asymmetric transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Marco; Melucci, Manuela; Piccinelli, Fabio; Sinisi, Riccardo; Tommasi, Simona; Umani-Ronchi, Achille

    2007-11-21

    Enantiomerically pure diamino-bis(tert-thiophene) proved to be a valuable and flexible chiral ligand for Pd- and Zn-catalyzed transformations, allowing for high levels of stereocontrol in asymmetric allylic alkylation (ee up to 99%) and hydrosilylations of prochiral carbonyls (ee up to 97%).

  3. Diastereoselective Addition of α-Metalated Sulfoxides to Imines Revisited: Mechanism, Computational Studies, and the Effect of External Chiral Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian; Rein, Tobias; Søtofte, Inger

    2003-01-01

    six-membered "flat chair") was probed by quantum mechanical calculations, which underpinned the idea of using external chiral ligands to enhance the diastereoselectivity of otherwise moderately selective reactions. In this way, the diastereomeric ratio of the product 3a could be raised from (84 : 16...

  4. The Effect of Twin Boundaries on the Spectroscopic Performance of CdZnTe Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Roth, D.; Babu, S.; Tueller, Jack; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most single grains in cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) grown by the high-pressure Bridgman (HPB) technique contain multiple twin boundaries. As a consequence, twin boundaries are one of the most common macroscopic material defects found in large area (400 to 700 sq mm) CdZnTe specimens obtained from HPB ingots. Due to the prevalence of twin boundaries, understanding their effect on detector performance is key to the material selection process. Twin boundaries in several 2 mm thick large area specimens were first, documented using infrared transmission imaging. These specimens were then fabricated into either 2 mm pixel or planar detectors in order to examine the effect of the twin boundaries on detector performance. Preliminary results show that twin boundaries, which are decorated with tellurium inclusions, produce a reduction in detector efficiency and a degradation in resolution. The extent of the degradation appears to be a function of the density of tellurium inclusions.

  5. Enhanced Electromagnetic Chirality by Locally Excited Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, M H

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to enhance chiral light-matter interactions through plasmonic nanostructures provides entirely new opportunities for greatly improving the detection limits of chiroptical spectroscopies down to the single molecule level. The most pronounced of these chiral interactions occur in the ultraviolet (UV) range of the electromagnetic spectrum, which is difficult to access with conventional localized plasmon resonance based sensors. Although Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) on noble metal films can sustain resonances in the desired spectral range, their transverse magnetic nature has been an obstacle for enhancing chiroptical effects. Here we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that SPPs excited by near-field sources can exhibit rich and non-trivial chiral characteristics. In particular, we show that the excitation of SPPs by a chiral source not only results in a locally enhanced optical chirality but also achieves manifold enhancement of net optical chirality. Our finding that SPPs facil...

  6. Enantioselective separation on chiral Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Nisha; Bartel, Melissa A; Gellman, Andrew J

    2010-06-30

    The surfaces of chemically synthesized Au nanoparticles have been modified with d- or l-cysteine to render them chiral and enantioselective for adsorption of chiral molecules. Their enantioselective interaction with chiral compounds has been probed by optical rotation measurements during exposure to enantiomerically pure and racemic propylene oxide. The ability of optical rotation to detect enantiospecific adsorption arises from the fact that the specific rotation of polarized light by (R)- and (S)-propylene oxide is enhanced by interaction with Au nanoparticles. This effect is related to previous observations of enhanced circular dichroism by Au nanoparticles modified by chiral adsorbates. More importantly, chiral Au nanoparticles modified with either d- or l-cysteine selectively adsorb one enantiomer of propylene oxide from a solution of racemic propylene oxide, thus leaving an enantiomeric excess in the solution phase. Au nanoparticles modified with l-cysteine (d-cysteine) selectively adsorb the (R)-propylene oxide ((S)-propylene oxide). A simple model has been developed that allows extraction of the enantiospecific equilibrium constants for (R)- and (S)-propylene oxide adsorption on the chiral Au nanoparticles.

  7. New chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis system with chiral amino amide ionic liquids as ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junfang; Mu, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Juan; Su, Yuan; Qi, Li

    2017-12-01

    Using chiral amino amide ionic liquids as the ligands, a new chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis method with Cu(II) as the central ion was constructed for enantioseparation of labeled D,L-amino acids. The effects of key parameters, including pH value of the running buffer, the ratio of Cu(II) to chiral amino amide ionic liquids, the concentration of complexes based on Cu(II)-chiral amino amide ionic liquids were investigated. It has been observed that eight pairs of labeled D,L-amino acids could be baseline-separated with a running buffer of 15.0mM ammonium acetate, 10.0mM Cu(II) and 20.0mML-phenylalaninamide based ionic liquid at pH 5.0. The quantitation of D,L-amino acids was conducted and good linearity (r2 ≥ 0.964) was obtained. Furthermore, an assay for determining the enantiomeric purity of D,L-amino acids was developed and the possible enantiorecognition mechanism was discussed briefly. The results indicated that the chiral amino amide ionic liquids could play the role of ligands in chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis system and exhibit great potential in chiral analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enantiopure heterobimetallic single-chain magnets from the chiral Ru(III) building block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Jing; Gao, Feng; Wu, Tao; Yao, Min-Xia; Li, Yi-Zhi; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2014-01-21

    A pair of one-dimensional enantiomers based on the versatile chiral dicyanoruthenate(III) building block have been synthesized and they are chiral single-chain magnets with the effective spin-reversal barrier of 28.2 K.

  9. Boundary Layer Effect on Behavior of Discrete Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Eliáš

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies systems of rigid bodies with randomly generated geometry interconnected by normal and tangential bonds. The stiffness of these bonds determines the macroscopic elastic modulus while the macroscopic Poisson’s ratio of the system is determined solely by the normal/tangential stiffness ratio. Discrete models with no directional bias have the same probability of element orientation for any direction and therefore the same mechanical properties in a statistical sense at any point and direction. However, the layers of elements in the vicinity of the boundary exhibit biased orientation, preferring elements parallel with the boundary. As a consequence, when strain occurs in this direction, the boundary layer becomes stiffer than the interior for the normal/tangential stiffness ratio larger than one, and vice versa. Nonlinear constitutive laws are typically such that the straining of an element in shear results in higher strength and ductility than straining in tension. Since the boundary layer tends, due to the bias in the elemental orientation, to involve more tension than shear at the contacts, it also becomes weaker and less ductile. The paper documents these observations and compares them to the results of theoretical analysis.

  10. Effects of mussel filtering activity on boundary layer structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.; Sandee, A.J.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of the benthic boundary layer over a bed of mussels (Mytilus edulis) was investigated in a large racetrack flume. Flow was observed to be modified both by the physical roughness of the mussel bed and by the momentum input of the exhalent jets of the mussels. Particularly when the

  11. Boundary Layer Effect on Behavior of Discrete Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliáš, Jan

    2017-02-10

    The paper studies systems of rigid bodies with randomly generated geometry interconnected by normal and tangential bonds. The stiffness of these bonds determines the macroscopic elastic modulus while the macroscopic Poisson's ratio of the system is determined solely by the normal/tangential stiffness ratio. Discrete models with no directional bias have the same probability of element orientation for any direction and therefore the same mechanical properties in a statistical sense at any point and direction. However, the layers of elements in the vicinity of the boundary exhibit biased orientation, preferring elements parallel with the boundary. As a consequence, when strain occurs in this direction, the boundary layer becomes stiffer than the interior for the normal/tangential stiffness ratio larger than one, and vice versa. Nonlinear constitutive laws are typically such that the straining of an element in shear results in higher strength and ductility than straining in tension. Since the boundary layer tends, due to the bias in the elemental orientation, to involve more tension than shear at the contacts, it also becomes weaker and less ductile. The paper documents these observations and compares them to the results of theoretical analysis.

  12. Chiral Brownian heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    van den Broek, Martijn; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  13. Chiral brownian heat pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M; Van den Broeck, C

    2008-04-04

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  14. Chiral Brownian heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Broek, M. van den; Broeck, C. Van Den

    2007-01-01

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  15. Effect of boundary conditions on magnetocapacitance effect in a ring-type magnetoelectric structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juanjuan

    2017-12-01

    By considering the nonlinear magneto-elastic coupling relationships of magnetostrictive materials, an analytical model is proposed. The resonance frequencies can be accurately predicted by this theoretical model, and they are in good agreement with experimental data. Subsequently, the magnetocapacitance effect in a ring-type magnetoelectric (ME) structure with different boundary conditions is investigated, and it is found that various mechanical boundaries, the frequency, the magnetic field, the geometric size, and the interface bonding significantly affect the capacitance of the ME structure. Further, additional resonance frequencies can be predicted by considering appropriate imperfect interface bonding. Finally, the influence of an external force on the capacitance is studied. The result shows that an external force on the boundary changes the capacitance, but has only a weak influence on the resonance frequency.

  16. Understanding the effects of administrative boundary in sampling spatially embedded networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Guanghua; Liu, Yu; Shi, Li; Gao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    When analyzing spatially embedded networks, networks consisting of nodes and connections within an administrative boundary are commonly analyzed directly without considering possible errors or biases due to lost connections to nodes outside the network. However, connections exist not only within administrative boundaries but also to nodes outside of the boundaries. This study empirically analyzed the geographical boundary problem using a mobile communication network constructed based on mobile phone data collected in Heilongjiang province, China. We find that although many connections outside of the administrative boundary are lost, sampled networks based on administrative boundaries perform relatively well in terms of degree and clustering coefficient. We find that the mechanisms behind the reliability of these sampled networks include the effects of distance decay and cohesion strength in administrative regions on spatially embedded networks.

  17. Effects of translational symmetry breaking induced by the boundaries in a driven diffusive system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Vitting; Leung, Kwan-tai

    1991-01-01

    We study the effects of the boundary conditions in a driven diffusive lattice-gas model which is known to display kinetic phase transitions. We find, in the case of attractive interaction, that a boundary-condition-induced symmetry breaking of the translational invariance, along the direction of ...

  18. Graphene chiral liquid crystals and macroscopic assembled fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2011-12-01

    Chirality and liquid crystals are both widely expressed in nature and biology. Helical assembly of mesophasic molecules and colloids may produce intriguing chiral liquid crystals. To date, chiral liquid crystals of 2D colloids have not been explored. As a typical 2D colloid, graphene is now receiving unprecedented attention. However, making macroscopic graphene fibres is hindered by the poor dispersibility of graphene and by the lack of an assembly method. Here we report that soluble, chemically oxidized graphene or graphene oxide sheets can form chiral liquid crystals in a twist-grain-boundary phase-like model with simultaneous lamellar ordering and long-range helical frustrations. Aqueous graphene oxide liquid crystals were continuously spun into metres of macroscopic graphene oxide fibres; subsequent chemical reduction gave the first macroscopic neat graphene fibres with high conductivity and good mechanical performance. The flexible, strong graphene fibres were knitted into designed patterns and into directionally conductive textiles.

  19. Using Boundary Management for More Effective Product Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thomson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years ago, most companies developed their own products in a single location and brought them to market themselves. Today, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs are enlisting partners on a global scale as subsystem designers and producers in order to create and deliver new products into the market more rapidly and more frequently. This is especially true for large, complex products from the aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and software industries. To assure the delivery of information across organizational boundaries, new coordination mechanisms need to be adopted (boundary management. In this article, best practices are described on how OEMs and partners self-organize and use agile, cooperative techniques to maintain daily communication among numerous internal and partner engineers to better coordinate product design and system integration. This article focuses on examples from the aerospace industry; however; these tactics can be applied in any organization to innovate at faster rates, to make delivery times more predictable, and to realize shorter product development timelines.

  20. Numerical studies on boundary effects on the FPU paradox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambusi, D.; Muraro, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Matematica ' F. Enriques' , Via Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy); Penati, T. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Matematica ' F. Enriques' , Via Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: penati@mat.unimi.it

    2008-03-17

    We study numerically the dynamics of a chain of particles subjected to an on site restoring nonlinear force and a first neighbor harmonic coupling. We excite the first linear mode and investigate the distribution of the average harmonic energies at metastable regime, in the spirit of Fermi Pasta Ulam experiment. The limit distribution turns out to strongly depend on the boundary conditions. A theoretical discussion of the phenomenon is also given.

  1. Effects of organic farming on flies in Danish field boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Sune

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to see if organic farming increases the diversity and abundance of fly families in field boundaries when compared to similar conventional biotopes. Secondly, it was investigated whether an increasing organic farming period would increase diversity and abundance of flies. Furthermore, the results from the sampling programme were interpreted ecologically in terms of general community patterns by subjecting data to multivariate analysis. The study reve...

  2. Effects of surface residual species in SBA-16 on encapsulated chiral (1S,2S)-DPEN-RuCl2(TPP)2 in asymmetric hydrogenation of acetophenone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiufeng; Xing, Bin; Fan, Binbin; Xue, Zhaoteng; Li, Ruifeng

    2016-03-01

    The SBA-16 obtained by different routes of elimination of organic templates were used as the hosts for encapsulation of chiral Ru complex (1S,2S)-DPEN-RuCl2(TPP)2 ( 1) (DPEN = 1,2-diphenylethylene-diamine, TPP = triphenyl phosphine). The methods for removing templates had distinct effects on the amount of residual template in SBA-16, which made the SBA-16 with different surface and structure properties. 1 encapsulated in SBA-16 extracted with the mixture of pyridine and ethanol showed higher activity and enantioselectivity for acetophenone asymmetric hydrogenation.

  3. The time-reversal- and parity-violating nuclear potential in chiral effective theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maekawa, C. M.; Mereghetti, E.; de Vries, J.; van Kolck, U.

    2011-01-01

    We derive the parity- and time-reversal-violating nuclear interactions stemming from the QCD (theta) over bar term and quark/gluon operators of effective dimension 6: quark electric dipole moments, quark and gluon chromo-electric dipole moments, and two four-quark operators. We work in the framework

  4. Chiral Biases in Solids by Effect of Shear Gradients: A Speculation on the Deterministic Origin of Biological Homochirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga, O. [Universitat de Barcelona; Canillas, A. [Universitat de Barcelona; Crusats, Joaquim [Universitat de Barcelona; Hachemi, Zoubir [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Madrid, Spain; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Llorca, Jordi [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain; Ribo, Josep M. [Universitat de Barcelona

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental approach to the study of the chirality of three CM2 meteorite solid samples by direct measurement of the optical activity (circular birefringence; CB). The measurements are based on transmission two modulator generalized ellipsometry in conjuction with microscope optics to map the CB of the samples. In spite of the complexity of such optical analysis, these first results indicate the presence of optically active areas in the meteorite solid matrix. In the case of the Murchison sample the statistics of the CB mapping shows a bimodal distribution with a bias to negative CB values. The composition of the active areas probably corresponds to serpentines and other poorly identified phyllosilicate phases. The results are compatible with the hypothesis that in a mineral-based scenario for the origin of life a CB sign bias in the chiral fractures originated by mechanical and flow shear gradients on clays could be later transferred to the reactions of the absorbed organic compounds.

  5. Finite-temperature effective boundary theory of the quantized thermal Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Ryota; Ryu, Shinsei; Nomura, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    A finite-temperature effective free energy of the boundary of a quantized thermal Hall system is derived microscopically from the bulk two-dimensional Dirac fermion coupled with a gravitational field. In two spatial dimensions, the thermal Hall conductivity of fully gapped insulators and superconductors is quantized and given by the bulk Chern number, in analogy to the quantized electric Hall conductivity in quantum Hall systems. From the perspective of effective action functionals, two disti...

  6. Chiral Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damgaard, Poul H, E-mail: phdamg@nbi.dk [Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center, The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2011-04-01

    Spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD has traditionally been inferred indirectly through low-energy theorems and comparison with experiments. Thanks to the understanding of an unexpected connection between chiral Random Matrix Theory and chiral Perturbation Theory, the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD can now be shown unequivocally from first principles and lattice simulations. In these lectures I give an introduction to the subject, starting with an elementary discussion of spontaneous breaking of global symmetries.

  7. Further proof to the utility of polysaccharide-based chiral selectors in combination with superficially porous silica particles as effective chiral stationary phases for separation of enantiomers in high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaishvili, Qetevan; Jibuti, George; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2016-10-07

    The first ever report on the preparation of chiral stationary phases (CSP) based on superficially porous silica (SPS) particles for the separation of enantiomers in HPLC demonstrated clear advantages of such materials. Higher enantioselectivity at the comparable content of a chiral selector, limited dependence of plate height on the mobile phase flow rate and higher plate numbers and resolution calculated per unit time (i.e. higher speed of separation) were observed with columns made with superficially porous CSP in comparison to columns made with fully-porous silica-based CSP. However, later studies reported diverging conclusions. In this report further evidences are described supporting the findings of our first study about the superior performance of polysaccharide-based chiral selectors in combination with SPS when compared to traditional CSPs based on fully porous silica (FPS) particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. On the effect of basic and acidic additives on the separation of the enantiomers of some basic drugs with polysaccharide-based chiral selectors and polar organic mobile phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiashvili, L; Chankvetadze, L; Farkas, T; Chankvetadze, B

    2013-11-22

    This article reports the systematic study of the effect of basic and acidic additives on HPLC separation of enantiomers of some basic chiral drugs on polysaccharide-based chiral columns under polar organic mobile-phase conditions. In contrary to generally accepted opinion that the basic additives improve the separation of enantiomers of basic compounds, the multiple scenarios were observed including the increase, decrease, disappearance and appearance of separation, as well as the reversal of the enantiomer elution order of studied basic compounds induced by the acidic additives. These effects were observed on most of the studied 6 chiral columns in 2-propanol and acetonitrile as mobile phases and diethylamine as a basic additive. As acidic additives formic acid was used systematically and acetic acid and trifluoroacetic acid were applied for comparative purposes. This study illustrates that the minor acidic additives to the mobile phase can be used as for the adjustment of separation selectivity and the enantiomer elution order of basic compounds, as well as for study of chiral recognition mechanisms with polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and resolution of a multifunctional inherently chiral calix[4]arene with an ABCD substitution pattern at the wide rim: the effect of a multifunctional structure in the organocatalyst on enantioselectivity in asymmetric reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Kimura, Tomohiro; Murata, Shun-ichi; Shimizu, Shoichi

    2009-02-06

    An efficient synthetic route to inherently chiral calix[4]arenes with an ABCD substitution pattern at the wide rim in the cone conformation was developed for the first time. For the synthesis of inherently chiral ABCD-type calix[4]arenes, first 5,11-dibromo-17-(3,5-dimethylphenyl)-25,26,27,28-tetrapropoxycalix[4]arene (9) was prepared as a key intermediate. Then, functionalization of the calix[4]arene 9 was examined, and highly regioselective monofunctionalization was achieved via selective monolithiation of bromo groups. Various multifunctionalized inherently chiral ABCD-type calix[4]arenes can be synthesized by using this method; thus, the synthesis of inherently chiral phosphine and carboxylic acid derivatives of ABCD-type calix[4]arene was demonstrated. In addition, the aminophenol derivative 1b of an ABCD-type calix[4]arene with a 3,5-dimethylphenyl group at the wide rim was synthesized and resolved into optically pure enantiomers. The chiral calix[4]arene 1b was used as an organocatalyst in asymmetric Michael addition reactions of thiophenols. The effect of the 3,5-dimethylphenyl group at the wide rim of calix[4]arene 1b on enantioselectivity was examined, and a positive effect of the 3,5-dimethylphenyl group was observed.

  10. Autoamplification of molecular chirality through the induction of supramolecular chirality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijken, Derk Jan; Beierle, John M.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2014-01-01

    The novel concept for the autoamplification of molecular chirality, wherein the amplification proceeds through the induction of supramolecular chirality, is presented. A solution of prochiral, ring-open diarylethenes is doped with a small amount of their chiral, ring-closed counterpart. The

  11. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos G. [Uppsala University (Sweden); Weiss, Christian [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the partonic (or light-front) description of relativistic systems the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent charge and magnetization densities in transverse space. This formulation allows one to identify the chiral components of nucleon structure as the peripheral densities at transverse distances b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and compute them in a parametrically controlled manner. A dispersion relation connects the large-distance behavior of the transverse charge and magnetization densities to the spectral functions of the Dirac and Pauli form factors near the two--pion threshold at timelike t = 4 M{ sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which can be computed in relativistic chiral effective field theory. Using the leading-order approximation we (a) derive the asymptotic behavior (Yukawa tail) of the isovector transverse densities in the "chiral" region b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and the "molecular" region b = O(M{sub N}{sup 2}/M{sub {pi}}{sup 3}); (b) perform the heavy-baryon expansion of the transverse densities; (c) explain the relative magnitude of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities in a simple mechanical picture; (d) include Delta isobar intermediate states and study the peripheral transverse densities in the large-N{ sub c} limit of QCD; (e) quantify the region of transverse distances where the chiral components of the densities are numerically dominant; (f) calculate the chiral divergences of the b{sup 2}-weighted moments of the isovector transverse densities (charge and anomalous magnetic radii) in the limit M{sub {pi}} -> 0 and determine their spatial support. Our approach provides a concise formulation of the spatial structure of the nucleon's chiral component and offers new insights into basic properties of the chiral expansion. It relates the information extracted from low-t elastic form factors to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  12. The Physics of Boundary-Layer Aero-Optic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Mach-number-dependent function, )(1 ∞ MF for the modified model Eq. (23) and [ ] 2/3 222 2 )/(12 11)( − ∞∞∞∞       − − += UUrMMMF c γ for the...model Eq. (20). To calculate )(1 ∞ MF from (24), experimentally-measured velocity profiles for a M = 0.5 boundary layer were used; Figure 17 shows the...Optical Engineering: The Design of Optical Systems, McGraw- Hill, NY, 1966, Chap. 3, pp. 49-71. [16] S. Gordeyev, E. Jumper, T. Ng and A. Cain , "Aero

  13. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  14. The effect of convective boundary condition on MHD mixed convection boundary layer flow over an exponentially stretching vertical sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Siti Suzilliana Putri Mohamed; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Nazar, Roslinda; Bachok, Norfifah; Ali, Fadzilah Md

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical study that describes the magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection boundary layer flow with heat transfer over an exponentially stretching sheet with an exponential temperature distribution has been presented herein. This study is conducted in the presence of convective heat exchange at the surface and its surroundings. The system is controlled by viscous dissipation and internal heat generation effects. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The converted equations are then solved numerically using the shooting method. The results related to skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for several sets of values of the parameters. The effects of the governing parameters on the features of the flow and heat transfer are examined in detail in this study.

  15. Effects of nano-SiO2on the adsorption of chiral metalaxyl to agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junxing; Liang, Chuanzhou; Zhang, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The application of nanotechnology in agriculture, pesticide delivery and other related fields increases the occurrence of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in soil. Since ENPs have larger surface areas and normally a high adsorption capacity for organic pollutants, they are thought to influence the transport of pesticides in soils and thereafter influence the uptake and transformation of pesticides. The adsorption pattern of racemic-metalaxyl on agricultural soils including kinetics and isotherms changed in the presence of nano-SiO 2 . The adsorption of racemic-metalaxyl on agricultural soil was not enantioselective, in either the presence or the absence of SiO 2 . The adsorption of racemic-metalaxyl on SiO 2 decreased to some extent in soil-SiO 2 mixture, and the absolute decrease was dependent on soil properties. The decreased adsorption of metalaxyl on SiO 2 in soil-SiO 2 mixture arose from the competitive adsorption of soil-dissolved organic matter and the different dispersion and aggregation behaviors of SiO 2 in the presence of soil. Interactions between SiO 2 and soil particles also contributed to the decreased adsorption of metalaxyl on SiO 2 , and the interactions were analyzed by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. The results showed that the presence of nano-particles in soils could decrease the mobility of pesticides in soils and that this effect varied with different soil compositions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Morphogenesis and Optoelectronic Properties of Supramolecular Assemblies of Chiral Perylene Diimides in a Binary Solvent System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaobo; Song, Inho; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Tong, Jiaqi; Zhang, Haoke; Oh, Joon Hak

    2017-07-14

    Chiral supramolecular structures are attracting great attention due to their specific properties and high potential in chiral sensing and separation. Herein, supramolecular assembling behaviors of chiral perylene diimides have been systematically investigated in a mixed solution of tetrahydrofuran and water. They exhibit remarkably different morphologies and chiral aggregation behaviors depending on the mixing ratio of the solvents, i.e., the fraction of water. The morphogenesis and optoelectronic properties of chiral supramolecular structures have been thoroughly studied using a range of experimental and theoretical methods to investigate the morphological effects of chiral supramolecular assemblies on the electrical performances and photogenerated charge-carrier behaviors. In addition, chiral perylene diimides have been discriminated by combining vibrational circular dichroism with theoretical calculations, for the first time. The chiral supramolecular nanostructures developed herein strongly absorb visible spectral region and exhibit high photoresponsivity and detectivity, opening up new opportunities for practical applications in optoelectronics.

  17. The formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Liren; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2018-02-01

    The nuclei and the formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes, namely, single-, double-, and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated by the first principle density functional theory. The formation mechanism from nuclei to corresponding infinitely long carbon nanotubes occurs spirally and via absorbing carbon atoms layer by layer. Carbon atoms at the open end are metastable state compared with ones in the tube wall or the closed end, which indicate the growth point of chiral carbon nanotubes is located at the open end. Growth of outer layer tubular clusters takes precedence over the inner layer in the process of forming multi-walled nuclear structures. Because of the ratio of carbon atoms at the open end to all carbon atoms decreases, the stability of the tubular clusters increases with their length. The infinitely long carbon nanotubes are obtained by executing periodic boundary conditions depend on corresponding nuclear structures.

  18. Chiral/ring closed vs. achiral/open chain triazine-based organogelators: induction and amplification of supramolecular chirality in organic gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascialfari, L; Berti, D; Brandi, A; Cicchi, S; Mannini, M; Pescitelli, G; Procacci, P

    2014-06-07

    The purpose of this study is to compare the gelling behavior of two molecules: a chiral compound and its achiral counterpart. The chiral partner is characterized by a rigid, chiral pyrrolidine nucleus, while the achiral one contains a flexible diethanolamine moiety. The chiral compound is an already known good organogelator, but also the achiral compound shows remarkable gelling properties. Very interestingly, a small fraction of the chiral compound induces chirality and strong CD effects in its aggregates with the achiral one. The observed chirality amplification corresponds to a peculiar sergeant-and-soldier effect. Molecular modelling and CD calculations suggested a model for the supramolecular assembly of hetero-aggregates that fits the experimental data.

  19. Effect of irradiation on mechanical properties of symmetrical grain boundaries investigated by atomic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. Y.; Gao, N.; Setyawan, W.; Xu, B.; Liu, W.; Wang, Z. G.

    2017-08-01

    Tensile response of irradiated symmetric grain boundaries to the externally applied strain has been studied using atomic simulation methods. The absorption of irradiation induced defects by grain boundaries has been confirmed to degrade the mechanical properties of grain boundaries through the change of its undertaken deformation mechanism. Atomic rearrangement, the formations of a stress accumulation region and vacancy-rich zone and the nucleation and movement of dislocations under stress effect have been observed after the displacement cascades in grain boundaries, which are considered as main reasons to induce above degradation. These results suggest the necessity of considering both trapping efficiency to defects and the mechanical property change of irradiated grain boundaries for further development of radiation resistant materials.

  20. Effect of irradiation on mechanical properties of symmetrical grain boundaries investigated by atomic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X. Y.; Gao, N.; Setyawan, W.; Xu, B.; Liu, W.; Wang, Z. G.

    2017-08-01

    Tensile response of irradiated symmetric grain boundaries to externally applied strain has been studied using atomic simulation methods. The absorption of irradiation induced defects by grain boundaries has been confirmed to degrade the mechanical properties of grain boundaries through the change of its under- taken deformation mechanism. Atomic rearrangement, the formations of a stress accumulation region and vacancy-rich zone and the nucleation and movement of dislocations under stress effect have been observed after the displacement cascades in grain boundaries, which are considered as main reasons to induce above degradation. These results suggest the necessity of considering both trap- ping efficiency to defects and the mechanical property change of irradiated grain boundaries for further development of radiation resistant materials.

  1. Effects of Grain Boundary Morphologies on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim H.P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of grain boundary morphologies on stress corrosion cracking (SCC of Alloy 600 have been studied in 40% NaOH at 315°C using C-ring specimens. The configuration of the grain boundary and the intergranular carbide density were controlled by heat treatment. SCC tests were performed at +150 mV above the corrosion potential. The specimen with a serrated grain boundary showed higher SCC resistance than that with a straight grain boundary. This appears to be caused by the fact that the specimen with the serrated grain boundary has longer SCC path. SCC resistance also increased with intergranular carbide density probably due to enhanced relaxation of stress at intergranular carbide.

  2. Effect of grain boundary on the mechanical behaviors of irradiated metals: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, XiaZi; Chu, HaiJian; Duan, HuiLing

    2016-06-01

    The design of high irradiation-resistant materials is very important for the development of next-generation nuclear reactors. Grain boundaries acting as effective defect sinks are thought to be able to moderate the deterioration of mechanical behaviors of irradiated materials, and have drawn increasing attention in recent years. The study of the effect of grain boundaries on the mechanical behaviors of irradiated materials is a multi-scale problem. At the atomic level, grain boundaries can effectively affect the production and formation of irradiation-induced point defects in grain interiors, which leads to the change of density, size distribution and evolution of defect clusters at grain level. The change of microstructure would influence the macroscopic mechanical properties of the irradiated polycrystal. Here we give a brief review about the effect of grain boundaries on the mechanical behaviors of irradiated metals from three scales: microscopic scale, mesoscopic scale and macroscopic scale.

  3. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 2. Comparison with skewness, asymmetry, and other effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    contributions believed to play a prominent role in cross-shore boundary layer and sediment transport processes: (1) converging-diverging effects from bed slope, (2) wave skewness, (3) wave asymmetry, and (4) waves combined with superposed negative currents (intended to loosely represent, for example, return...... from beach slope may make a significant onshore bed load contribution. Generally, however, the results suggest wave skewness (in addition to conventional steady streaming) as the most important onshore contribution outside the surf zone. Streaming induced within the wave boundary layer is also...... investigated for each component, and skewness and asymmetry are demonstrated to promote largely negative streaming velocities, consistent with earlier work. For hydraulically smooth cases, however, a thin region of positive streaming is revealed in the viscous sublayer which is effectively absent...

  4. [Separation and determination of optical isomers of phenylephrine by chiral ligand exchange capillary elcctrophoresis coupling with the promoting effect of ionic liquid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Simei; Zhang, Jiayao; Li, Fei; Hu, Xufang; Cao, Qiue

    2016-01-01

    A method for the separation and determination of optical isomers of phenylephrine was developed based on the promoting effect of non-chiral ionic liquid on chiral ligand-exchange capillary electrophoresis after the electrophoretic parameters were optimized systematically. R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine can be separated and determined effectively in 20 mmol/L Tris-H3PO4 buffer solution (pH 5.4) composed of 4.0 mmol/L Cu(II), 8.0 mmol/L L-proline (L-Pro) and 15 mmol/L 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM] Cl) with the applied voltage of 20 kV, capillary temperature of 25 °C , detection wavelength of 254 nm, and injection of 5 s at 3,447 Pa. The resolution of R- and S-phenylephrines was 1. 42. The linear ranges for the determination of R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine were 12. 5 - 150 mg/L and 15. 0-150 mg/L, respectively. The method has been satisfactorily used for the determination of R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine in the spiked blood and urine samples. The spiked recoveries in the urine sample were in the range of 93. 7% -108. 2% with the RSDs lower than 3. 18% (n= 3) , and the spiked recoveries in the blood sample were in the range of 91. 4% and 113. 1% with the RSDs lower than 4. 82% (n =3).

  5. Can monoatomic xenon become chiral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartik, K; El Haouaj, M; Luhmer, M; Collet, A; Reisse, J

    2000-12-15

    A chiral host, cryptophane-A (1), makes even a monoatomic noble gas chiral. The interaction of xenon and 1 was monitored by (129) Xe NMR and in the presence of a chiral chemical shift reagent. © 2000 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  6. Topological electromagnetic responses of bosonic quantum Hall, topological insulator, and chiral semimetal phases in all dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Matthew F.; Jian, Chao-Ming; Ye, Peng; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the topological part of the electromagnetic response of bosonic integer quantum Hall (BIQH) phases in odd (space-time) dimensions, and bosonic topological insulator (BTI) and bosonic chiral semimetal (BCSM) phases in even dimensions. To do this, we use the nonlinear sigma model (NLSM) description of bosonic symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases, and the method of gauged Wess-Zumino (WZ) actions. We find the surprising result that for BIQH states in dimension 2 m -1 (m =1 ,2 ,⋯ ), the bulk response to an electromagnetic field Aμ is characterized by a Chern-Simons term for Aμ with a level quantized in integer multiples of m ! (factorial). We also show that BTI states (which have an extra Z2 symmetry) can exhibit a Z2-breaking quantum Hall effect on their boundaries, with this boundary quantum Hall effect described by a Chern-Simons term at level m/! 2 . We show that the factor of m ! can be understood by requiring gauge invariance of the exponential of the Chern-Simons term on a general Euclidean manifold, and we also use this argument to characterize the electromagnetic and gravitational responses of fermionic SPT phases with U(1 ) symmetry in all odd dimensions. We then use our gauged boundary actions for the BIQH and BTI states to (i) construct a bosonic analog of a chiral semimetal (BCSM) in even dimensions, (ii) show that the boundary of the BTI state exhibits a bosonic analog of the parity anomaly of Dirac fermions in odd dimensions, and (iii) study anomaly inflow at domain walls on the boundary of BTI states. In a series of Appendixes we derive important formulas and additional results. In particular, in Appendix A we use the connection between equivariant cohomology and gauged WZ actions to give a mathematical interpretation of the actions for the BIQH and BTI boundaries constructed in this paper.

  7. Chiral Perturbation Theory With Lattice Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Ouimet, P P A

    2005-01-01

    In this work, alternative methods to regularize chiral perturbation theory are discussed. First, Long Distance Regularization will be considered in the presence of the decuplet of the lightest spin 32 baryons for several different observables. This serves motivation and introduction to the use of the lattice regulator for chiral perturbation theory. The mesonic, baryonic and anomalous sectors of chiral perturbation theory will be formulated on a lattice of space time points. The consistency of the lattice as a regulator will be discussed in the context of the meson and baryon masses. Order a effects will also be discussed for the baryon masses, sigma terms and magnetic moments. The work will close with an attempt to derive an effective Wess-Zumino-Witten Lagrangian for Wilson fermions at non-zero a. Following this discussion, there will be a proposal for a phenomenologically useful WZW Lagrangian at non-zero a.

  8. Understanding the Effect of Grain Boundary Character on Dynamic Recrystallization in Stainless Steel 316L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Megan; Morse, Michael; Corolewski, Caleb; Fritchman, Koyuki; Stifter, Chris; Poole, Callum; Hurley, Michael; Frary, Megan

    2017-08-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs during high-temperature deformation in metals and alloys with low to medium stacking fault energies. Previous simulations and experimental research have shown the effect of temperature and grain size on DRX behavior, but not the effect of the grain boundary character distribution. To investigate the effects of the distribution of grain boundary types, experimental testing was performed on stainless steel 316L specimens with different initial special boundary fractions (SBF). This work was completed in conjunction with computer simulations that used a modified Monte Carlo method which allowed for the addition of anisotropic grain boundary energies using orientation data from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The correlation of the experimental and simulation work allows for a better understanding of how the input parameters in the simulations correspond to what occurs experimentally. Results from both simulations and experiments showed that a higher fraction of so-called "special" boundaries ( e.g., Σ3 twin boundaries) delayed the onset of recrystallization to larger strains and that it is energetically favorable for nuclei to form on triple junctions without these so-called "special" boundaries.

  9. Effect of Irregularity in Shape and Boundary of a Macro-Texture Region in Titanium (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-15

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0328 EFFECT OF IRREGULARITY IN SHAPE AND BOUNDARY OF A MACRO-TEXTURE REGION IN TITANIUM (POSTPRINT) James L...2 October 2014 – 15 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EFFECT OF IRREGULARITY IN SHAPE AND BOUNDARY OF A MACRO-TEXTURE REGION IN TITANIUM ...aerospace grade titanium alloy material are measured to be about the same level as corner trapped shear wave signals. In addition to the abnormally high

  10. Phenomenology of chiral damping in noncentrosymmetric magnets

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2016-06-21

    A phenomenology of magnetic chiral damping is proposed in the context of magnetic materials lacking inversion symmetry. We show that the magnetic damping tensor acquires a component linear in magnetization gradient in the form of Lifshitz invariants. We propose different microscopic mechanisms that can produce such a damping in ferromagnetic metals, among which local spin pumping in the presence of an anomalous Hall effect and an effective “s-d” Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antisymmetric exchange. The implication of this chiral damping in terms of domain-wall motion is investigated in the flow and creep regimes.

  11. Take a closer look: emotion modifies the boundary extension effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Andrew; Mackintosh, Bundy

    2004-03-01

    Evidence has accumulated showing that central aspects of negative emotional scenes are remembered better than equivalent aspects of nonemotional scenes. Previous work, and an attentional account of these findings, led the authors to predict that anxiety-prone individuals would remember extremely negative emotional pictures as if seen from a closer perspective (i.e., with a less extended background) than other pictures. Findings showed that boundary extension was indeed reduced in high-trait-anxious individuals for very negative scenes, and this was more generally true for arousing scenes, with the exception of those with positive content. These findings are taken to be support for the view that attending to central aspects of emotionally arousing scenes can restrict the usual extended impression of surrounding space.

  12. Chiral symmetry breaking and chiral polarization: Tests for finite temperature and many flavors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It was recently conjectured that, in SU(3 gauge theories with fundamental quarks, valence spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking is equivalent to condensation of local dynamical chirality and appearance of chiral polarization scale Λch. Here we consider more general association involving the low-energy layer of chirally polarized modes which, in addition to its width (Λch, is also characterized by volume density of participating modes (Ω and the volume density of total chirality (Ωch. Few possible forms of the correspondence are discussed, paying particular attention to singular cases where Ω emerges as the most versatile characteristic. The notion of finite-volume “order parameter”, capturing the nature of these connections, is proposed. We study the effects of temperature (in Nf=0 QCD and light quarks (in Nf=12, both in the regime of possible symmetry restoration, and find agreement with these ideas. In Nf=0 QCD, results from several volumes indicate that, at the lattice cutoff studied, the deconfinement temperature Tc is strictly smaller than the overlap–valence chiral transition temperature Tch in real Polyakov line vacuum. Somewhat similar intermediate phase (in quark mass is also seen in Nf=12. It is suggested that deconfinement in Nf=0 is related to indefinite convexity of absolute X-distributions.

  13. Towards racemizable chiral organogelators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bin Lin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A chiral organogelator has been synthesized that can be racemized and self-assembled in apolar solvents whilst at higher concentrations organogels are formed. Field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of bundle fibrils that are able to gelate the solvent. 1H NMR studies showed hydrogen-bond interactions between the peptide head groups of neighbouring organogelator molecules. The enantiomerically pure organogelator can be racemized by the base DBU (1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene as was evident from chiral high-performance liquid chromatography analysis.

  14. Towards racemizable chiral organogelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian Bin; Dasgupta, Debarshi; Cantekin, Seda; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2010-10-06

    A chiral organogelator has been synthesized that can be racemized and self-assembled in apolar solvents whilst at higher concentrations organogels are formed. Field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of bundle fibrils that are able to gelate the solvent. ¹H NMR studies showed hydrogen-bond interactions between the peptide head groups of neighbouring organogelator molecules. The enantiomerically pure organogelator can be racemized by the base DBU (1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene) as was evident from chiral high-performance liquid chromatography analysis.

  15. The molecular mechanism studies of chirality effect of PHA-739358 on Aurora kinase A by molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuanhua; Cui, Wei; Chen, Quan; Tung, Chen-Ho; Ji, Mingjuan; Zhang, Fushi

    2011-02-01

    Aurora kinase family is one of the emerging targets in oncology drug discovery and several small molecules targeting aurora kinases have been discovered and evaluated under early phase I/II trials. Among them, PHA-739358 (compound 1r) is a 3-aminopyrazole derivative with strong activity against Aurora A under early phase II trial. Inhibitory potency of compound 1r (the benzylic substituent at the pro-R position) is 30 times over that of compound 1s (the benzylic substituent at the pro-S position). In present study, the mechanism of how different configurations influence the binding affinity was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations and free energy decomposition analysis. The predicted binding free energies of these two complexes are consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms indicates that although the van der Waals contribution is important for distinguishing the binding affinities of these two inhibitors, the electrostatic contribution plays a more crucial role in that. Moreover, it is observed that different configurations of the benzylic substituent could form different binding patterns with protein, thus leading to variant inhibitory potency of compounds 1r and 1s. The combination of different molecular modeling techniques is an efficient way to interpret the chirality effects of inhibitors and our work gives valuable information for the chiral drug design in the near future.

  16. Wave propagation retrieval method for chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the wave propagation method for the retrieving of effective properties of media with circularly polarized eigenwaves, in particularly for chiral metamaterials. The method is applied for thick slabs and provides bulk effective parameters. Its strong sides are the absence...

  17. Magnetic test of chiral dynamics in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonov, Yu.A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics,117118, Moscow, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25 (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-22

    Strong magnetic fields in the range eB≫m{sub π}{sup 2} effectively probe internal quark structure of chiral mesons and test basic parameters of the chiral theory, such as 〈q-barq〉,f{sub π}. We argue on general grounds that 〈q-barq〉 should grow linearly with eB when charged quark degrees of freedom come into play. To make explicit estimates we extend the previously formulated chiral theory, including quark degrees of freedom, to the case of strong magnetic fields and show that the quark condensate |〈q-barq〉|{sub u,d} grows quadratically with eB for eB<0.2 GeV{sup 2} and linearly for higher field values. These results agree quantitatively with recent lattice data and differ from χPT predictions.

  18. Chirality of sulforhodamine dye molecules incorporated in DNA thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckl, A. J.; Spaeth, H.; Singh, K.; Grote, J.; Naik, R.

    2008-11-01

    Thin films formed from salmon sperm DNA reacted with a cationic surfactant (CTMA-Cl) included up to 25 wt % fluorescent molecule sulforhodamine (SRh). SRh effect on DNA chirality and vice versa was investigated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The CD signals at 250-265 nm indicate that DNA chirality was maintained or enhanced. Induced CD (iCD) signal at 580-610 nm indicates that SRh is chiral in DNA/CTMA. iCD signal from both solutions and thin films generally increases with SRh concentration. The chirality induced in SRh molecules and the absence of significant DNA reduction in chirality are clear indicators of strong binding to DNA/CTMA.

  19. Exotic meson decays in the environment with chiral imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, A. A.; Andrianov, V. A.; Espriu, D.; Iakubovich, A. V.; Putilova, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    An emergence of Local Parity Breaking (LPB) in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC) at high energies is discussed. LPB in the fireball can be produced by a difference between the number densities of right- and left-handed chiral fermions (Chiral Imbalance) which is implemented by a chiral (axial) chemical potential. The effective meson lagrangian induced by QCD is extended to the medium with Chiral Imbalance and the properties of light scalar and pseudoscalar mesons (π, α0) are analyzed. It is shown that exotic decays of scalar mesons arise as a result of mixing of π and α0 vacuum states in the presence of chiral imbalance. The pion electromagnetic formfactor obtains an unusual parity-odd supplement which generates a photon polarization asymmetry in pion polarizability. We hope that the above pointed indications of LPB can be identified in experiments on LHC, RHIC, CBM FAIR and NICA accelerators.

  20. Exotic meson decays in the environment with chiral imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianov A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An emergence of Local Parity Breaking (LPB in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC at high energies is discussed. LPB in the fireball can be produced by a difference between the number densities of right- and left-handed chiral fermions (Chiral Imbalance which is implemented by a chiral (axial chemical potential. The effective meson lagrangian induced by QCD is extended to the medium with Chiral Imbalance and the properties of light scalar and pseudoscalar mesons (π, α0 are analyzed. It is shown that exotic decays of scalar mesons arise as a result of mixing of π and α0 vacuum states in the presence of chiral imbalance. The pion electromagnetic formfactor obtains an unusual parity-odd supplement which generates a photon polarization asymmetry in pion polarizability. We hope that the above pointed indications of LPB can be identified in experiments on LHC, RHIC, CBM FAIR and NICA accelerators.

  1. Effects of microscopic boundary conditions on plastic deformations of small-sized single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, Mitsutoshi; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2009-01-01

    for uniaxial plane strain compression of a single crystal block and for uniform pure bending of a single crystal foil. The compressed block has loading surfaces that are penetrable or impenetrable to dislocations. This allows for a study of the two types of higher-order boundaries available, and a significant......The finite deformation version of the higher-order gradient crystal plasticity model proposed by the authors is applied to solve plane strain boundary value problems, in order to obtain an understanding of the effect of the higher-order boundary conditions. Numerical solutions are carried out...... effect of higher-order boundary conditions on the overall deformation mode of the block is observed. The bent foil has free surfaces through which dislocations can go out of the material, and we observe a strong size-dependent mechanical response resulting from the surface condition assumed....

  2. Effect of riblets on the streaky structures excited by free stream tip vortices in boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiko, Andrey V. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Jung, Kwang Hyo; Chun, Ho Hwan; Lee, Inwon [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    In this study, experimental investigations were made regarding the effect of riblets on the streak instability in boundary layer. The streak instability is now regarded as a major source of the self-regeneration mechanism for the hairpin type coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer flow. Thus, it is important to control the instability to suppress the drag-inducing vortical structure in terms of drag reduction. Toward enhancing the measurement accuracy and spatial resolution, an enlarged version of riblets was applied to a streak which was artificially induced by a microwing in a laminar boundary layer. It is found that the riblets have attenuation effect on the streak instability, i.e., to reduce the spanwise velocity gradient of the quasi-streamwise streak in boundary layer.

  3. Effect of riblets on the streaky structures excited by free stream tip vortices in boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiko, Andrey V. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Jung, Kwang Hyo; Chun, Ho Hwan; Lee, In Won [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    In this study, experimental investigations were made regarding the effect of riblets on the streak instability in boundary layer. The streak instability is now regarded as a major source of the self-regeneration mechanism for the hairpin type coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer flow. Thus, it is important to control the instability to suppress the drag-inducing vortical structure in terms of drag reduction. Toward enhancing the measurement accuracy and spatial resolution, an enlarged version of riblets was applied to a streak which was artificially induced by a microwing in a laminar boundary layer. It is found that the riblets have attenuation effect on the streak instability, i.e., to reduce the spanwise velocity gradient of the quasi-streamwise streak in boundary layer

  4. Transport properties of chiral fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puhr, Matthias

    2017-04-26

    Anomalous transport phenomena have their origin in the chiral anomaly, the anomalous non-conservation of the axial charge, and can arise in systems with chiral fermions. The anomalous transport properties of free fermions are well understood, but little is known about possible corrections to the anomalous transport coefficients that can occur if the fermions are strongly interacting. The main goal of this thesis is to study anomalous transport effects in media with strongly interacting fermions. In particular, we investigate the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) in a Weyl Semimetal (WSM) and the Chiral Separation Effect (CSE) in finite-density Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The recently discovered WSMs are solid state crystals with low-energy excitations that behave like Weyl fermions. The inter-electron interaction in WSMs is typically very strong and non-perturbative calculations are needed to connect theory and experiment. To realistically model an interacting, parity-breaking WSM we use a tight-binding lattice Hamiltonian with Wilson-Dirac fermions. This model features a non-trivial phase diagram and has a phase (Aoki phase/axionic insulator phase) with spontaneously broken CP symmetry, corresponding to the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry for interacting continuum Dirac fermions. We use a mean-field ansatz to study the CME in spatially modulated magnetic fields and find that it vanishes in the Aoki phase. Moreover, our calculations show that outside of the Aoki phase the electron interaction has only a minor influence on the CME. We observe no enhancement of the magnitude of the CME current. For our non-perturbative study of the CSE in QCD we use the framework of lattice QCD with overlap fermions. We work in the quenched approximation to avoid the sign problem that comes with introducing a finite chemical potential on the lattice. The overlap operator calls for the evaluation of the sign function of a matrix with a dimension proportional to the volume

  5. Chiral edge fluctuations of colloidal membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Leroy; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir; Pelcovits, Robert; Powers, Thomas

    Using experiments and theory we study chiral fluctuations of the edge of a nearly flat colloidal membrane, consisting of rod-like viruses held together by the depletion interaction. Our measurements show an anomalous peak in the power spectrum around 1 inverse micron. Using an effective theory to describe the liquid crystal degrees of freedom by geometric properties of the edge, such as length, geodesic torsion, and curvature, we calculate the spectrum of out-of-plane edge fluctuations. The peak arises for sufficiently strong chirality, and corresponds to the instability of a flat membrane to a shape with helical, rippled edges.

  6. Chiral pesticides: Identification, description, and environmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Elin M.; Morrison, Candice N.; Goldsmith, Michael R.; Foreman, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic chemicals, including pesticides, are a major source of contamination and pollution in the environment. Pesticides have many positive uses: increased food production, decreased damage to crops and structures, reduced disease vector populations, and more. Nevertheless, pesticide exposure can pose risks to humans and the environment, so various mitigation strategies are exercised to make them safer, minimize their use, and reduce their unintended environment effects. One strategy that may help achieve these goals relies on the unique properties of chirality or molecular asymmetry. Some common terms related to chirality are defined in Table 1.

  7. Rotating optical microcavities with broken chiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Raktim; Wiersig, Jan; Cao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate in open microcavities with broken chiral symmetry, quasi-degenerate pairs of co-propagating modes in a non-rotating cavity evolve to counter-propagating modes with rotation. The emission patterns change dramatically by rotation, due to distinct output directions of CW and CCW waves. By tuning the degree of spatial chirality, we maximize the sensitivity of microcavity emission to rotation. The rotation-induced change of emission is orders of magnitude larger than the Sagnac effect, pointing to a promising direction for ultrasmall optical gyroscopes.

  8. Effect of free-stream turbulence on boundary layer transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M E

    2014-07-28

    This paper is concerned with the transition to turbulence in flat plate boundary layers due to moderately high levels of free-stream turbulence. The turbulence is assumed to be generated by an (idealized) grid and matched asymptotic expansions are used to analyse the resulting flow over a finite thickness flat plate located in the downstream region. The characteristic Reynolds number Rλ based on the mesh size λ and free-stream velocity is assumed to be large, and the turbulence intensity ε is assumed to be small. The asymptotic flow structure is discussed for the generic case where the turbulence Reynolds number εRλ and the plate thickness and are held fixed (at O(1) and O(λ), respectively) in the limit as [Formula: see text] and ε→0. But various limiting cases are considered in order to explain the relevant transition mechanisms. It is argued that there are two types of streak-like structures that can play a role in the transition process: (i) those that appear in the downstream region and are generated by streamwise vorticity in upstream flow and (ii) those that are concentrated near the leading edge and are generated by plate normal vorticity in upstream flow. The former are relatively unaffected by leading edge geometry and are usually referred to as Klebanoff modes while the latter are strongly affected by leading edge geometry and are more streamwise vortex-like in appearance. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Cumulative effects in strategic environmental assessment: The influence of plan boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidstrup, Morten, E-mail: bidstrup@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University (Denmark); Kørnøv, Lone, E-mail: lonek@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University (Denmark); Partidário, Maria Rosário, E-mail: mariapartidario@tecnico.ulisboa.pt [CEG-IST, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-02-15

    Cumulative effects (CE) assessment is lacking quality in impact assessment (IA) worldwide. It has been argued that the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) provides a suitable IA framework for addressing CE because it is applied to developments with broad boundaries, but few have tested this claim. Through a case study on the Danish mining sector, this article explores how plan boundaries influence the analytical boundaries applied for assessing CE in SEA. The case was studied through document analysis in combination with semi-structured group interviews of the responsible planners, who also serve as SEA practitioners. It was found that CE are to some extent assessed and managed implicitly throughout the planning process. However, this is through a focus on lowering the cumulative stress of mining rather than the cumulative stress on and capacity of the receiving environment. Plan boundaries do influence CE assessment, though all boundaries are not equally influential. The geographical and time boundaries of the Danish mining plans are broad or flexible enough to accommodate a meaningful assessment of CE, but the topical boundary is restrictive. The study indicates that collaboration among planning authorities and legally appointed CE leadership may facilitate better practice on CE assessment in sector-specific SEA contexts. However, most pressing is the need for relating assessment to the receiving environment as opposed to solely the stress of a proposed plan.

  10. Effect of Boundary Conditions on the Back Face Deformations of Flat UHMWPE Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    the experimental results in general, and was computationally more expedient. Delamination is a very common failure mode in composite laminates , and... delaminations in the composites . The calculation showed reasonable agreement with the experimental data for the clamped-corners and free boundary condition...cases for the peak BFD, remaining thickness of the composite and the delamination behavior. The model is useful to assess the size-effects and boundary

  11. Chiral quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ingful. In particular, it is interesting to analyze the hadronic tensor that parametrizes the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and confront the model predictions with empirical data. This picture has led to interesting studies of hadron structure functions in bosonized chiral quark models. Here I will present the results of refs [5–7].

  12. Enantiomeric Separation of 1-(Benzofuran-2-yl)alkylamines on Chiral Stationary Phases Based on Chiral Crown Ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soohyun; Kim, Sang Jun; Hyun, Myung Ho [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Optically active chiral amines are important as building blocks for pharmaceuticals and as scaffolds for chiral ligands and, consequently, many efforts have been devoted to the development of efficient methods for their preparation. For example, reduction of amine precursors with chiral catalysts, enzymatic kinetic resolution or dynamic kinetic resolution of racemic amines and the direct amination of ketones with transaminases have been developed as the efficient methods for the preparation of optically active chiral amines. During the process of developing or utilizing optically active chiral amines, the methods for the determination of their enantiomeric composition are essential. Among various methods, liquid chromatographic resolution of enantiomers on chiral stationary phases (CSPs) have been known to be one of the most accurate and economic means for the determination of the enantiomeric composition of optically active chiral compounds. Especially, CSPs based on chiral crown ethers have been successfully used for the resolution of racemic primary amines. For example, CSPs based on (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid (CSP 1, Figure 1) or (3,3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl)-20-crown-6 (CSP 2 and CSP 3, Figure 1) have been known to be quite effective for the resolution of cyclic and non-cyclic amines, various fluoroquinolone antibacterials containing a primary amino group, tocainide (antiarrhythmic agent) and its analogues, aryl-a-amino ketones and 3-amino-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-ones.

  13. Linear stability of three-dimensional boundary layers - Effects of curvature and non-parallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Balakumar, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of in-plane (wavefront) curvature on the stability of three-dimensional boundary layers. It is found that this effect is stabilizing or destabilizing depending upon the sign of the crossflow velocity profile. We also investigate the effects of surface curvature and nonparallelism on crossflow instability. Computations performed for an infinite-swept cylinder show that while convex curvature stabilizes the three-dimensional boundary layer, nonparallelism is, in general, destabilizing and the net effect of the two depends upon meanflow and disturbance parameters. It is also found that concave surface curvature further destabilizes the crossflow instability.

  14. Effect of a boundary condition on the cylindrical Couette flow of a rarefied gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuge, Shingo

    2014-12-01

    The cylindrical Couette flow of a rarefied gas between a rotating inner cylinder and a stationary outer cylinder is investigated on the basis of kinetic theory. We perform a numerical analysis of the (BGK model) Boltzmann equation for a wide range of the Knudsen number and an asymptotic analysis for small Knudsen numbers employing two kinds of kinetic boundary conditions on the cylinders. One is the modified Maxwell-type boundary condition (proposed by S. K. Dadzie and J. G. Méolans) and the other is the Cercignani-Lampis condition, both of which have separate accommodation coefficients associated with the molecular velocity component normal to the boundary and with the tangential component. Our main interest is in the effect of those boundary conditions on the inverted velocity profile. The results show that the onset of the inversion is practically controlled by the tangential accommodation only.

  15. Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in the Assessment of Enantioselective Toxicity of Chiral Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoqing; Liu, Ying; Li, Feixue

    2017-01-01

    In biological systems, the individual stereoisomers of chiral substances possess significantly different biochemical properties because the specific structure-activity relationships are required for a common site on biomolecules. In the past decade, there has been increasing concern over the enantioselective toxicity of environmental chiral pollutants, especially chiral pesticides. Different responses and activities of a pair of enantiomers of chiral pesticides were often observed. Therefore, assessment of the enantioselective toxicological properties of chiral pesticides is a prerequisite in application of single-isomer products and particularly important for environmental protection. The development of biomarkers that can predict enantioselective effects from chiral pesticides has recently been gained more and more attention. The biomarkers of oxidative stress have become a topic of significant interest for toxic assessments. In this review, we summarized current knowledge and advances in the understanding of enantiomeric oxidative processes in biological systems in response to chiral pesticides. The consistent results in two types of chiral insecticides (synthetic pyrethroids and organochlorine pesticides) showed the significant difference in cytotoxicity of enantiomers, suggesting the antioxidant enzymes are reliable biomarkers for the assessment of toxicity of chiral chemicals. Results indicate that antioxidant enzymes are sensitive and valid biomarkers to assess the oxidative damage caused by chiral herbicides. In addition, it can be inferred that the enantioselectivity of chiral herbicides on antioxidant enzymes exists in other species. Compared with insecticides and herbicides, researches about the enantioselectivity of oxidative stress caused by chiral fungicides are quite limited. Only two kinds of chiral fungicides has been used to study the enantioselectivity of oxidative stress by now. The current knowledge that enantioselective processes of oxidative

  16. Relativistic Chiral Theory of Nuclear Matter and QCD Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Chanfray, G

    2009-01-01

    We present a relativistic chiral theory of nuclear matter which includes the effect of confinement. Nuclear binding is obtained with a chiral invariant scalar background field associated with the radial fluctuations of the chiral condensate Nuclear matter stability is ensured once the scalar response of the nucleon depending on the quark confinement mechanism is properly incorporated. All the parameters are fixed or constrained by hadron phenomenology and lattice data. A good description of nuclear saturation is reached, which includes the effect of in-medium pion loops. Asymmetry properties of nuclear matter are also well described once the full rho meson exchange and Fock terms are included.

  17. Quantum-mechanical picture of peripheral chiral dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos [Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Weiss, Christian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The nucleon's peripheral transverse charge and magnetization densities are computed in chiral effective field theory. The densities are represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states. The orbital motion of the pion causes a large left-right asymmetry in a transversely polarized nucleon. As a result, the effect attests to the relativistic nature of chiral dynamics [pion momenta k = O(Mπ)] and could be observed in form factor measurements at low momentum transfer.

  18. Masses, decay constants and electromagnetic form-factors with twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We discuss some of the effects of twisted boundary conditions in finite volume using continuum SU(3) Chiral Perturbation Theory. We point out how broken cubic symmetry affects the definitions of quantities such as form-factors. Using the $\\pi^+$ as an example, we give one loop results for the mass, decay constants and electromagnetic form-factor and illustrate how the relevant Ward identities are satisfied.

  19. Observation of Charge-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations in p-Pb Collisions and Its Implication for the Search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-03-24

    Charge-dependent azimuthal particle correlations with respect to the second-order event plane in p-Pb and PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV have been studied with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is performed with a three-particle correlation technique, using two particles with the same or opposite charge within the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.4, and a third particle measured in the hadron forward calorimeters (4.4<|η|<5). The observed differences between the same and opposite sign correlations, as functions of multiplicity and η gap between the two charged particles, are of similar magnitude in p-Pb and PbPb collisions at the same multiplicities. These results pose a challenge for the interpretation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions in terms of the chiral magnetic effect.

  20. New experimental constrains on chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlation in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Zhoudunming

    2017-01-01

    Studies of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations for the same- and opposite-sign particle pairs are presented in PbPb collisions at 5 TeV and pPb collisions at 5 and 8.16 TeV, with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The azimuthal correlations are evaluated with respect to the second- and also higher-order event planes, as a function of particle pseudorapidity and transverse momentum, and event multiplicity. By employing an event-shape engineering technique, the dependence of correlations on azimuthal anisotropy flow is investigated. Results presented provide new insights to the origin of observed charge-dependent azimuthal correlations, and have important implications to the search for the chiral magnetic effect in heavy ion collisions.

  1. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb collisions and its implication for the search for the chiral magnetic effect

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Dvornikov, Oleg; Makarenko, Vladimir; Zykunov, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Sharma, Archana; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Markin, Oleg; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Jesus, Orduna; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Spencer, Eric; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Wu, Yujun; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Diamond, Brendan; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Bruner, Christopher; Castle, James; Forthomme, Laurent; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Kumar, Ajay; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mei, Kelvin; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-03-24

    Charge-dependent azimuthal particle correlations with respect to the second-order event plane in pPb and PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV have been studied with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is performed with a three-particle correlation technique, using two particles with the same or opposite charge within the pseudorapidity range $| \\eta | < $ 2.4, and a third particle measured in the hadron forward calorimeters (4.4 $ < | \\eta | < $ 5). The observed differences between the same and opposite sign correlations, as functions of multiplicity and $\\eta$ gap between the two charged particles, are of similar magnitude in pPb and PbPb collisions at the same multiplicities. These results pose a challenge for the interpretation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions in terms of the chiral magnetic effect.

  2. Autoamplification of molecular chirality through the induction of supramolecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijken, Derk Jan; Beierle, John M; Stuart, Marc C A; Szymański, Wiktor; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-05-12

    The novel concept for the autoamplification of molecular chirality, wherein the amplification proceeds through the induction of supramolecular chirality, is presented. A solution of prochiral, ring-open diarylethenes is doped with a small amount of their chiral, ring-closed counterpart. The molecules co-assemble into helical fibers through hydrogen bonding and the handedness of the fibers is biased by the chiral, ring-closed diarylethene. Photochemical ring closure of the open diarylethene yields the ring-closed product, which is enriched in the template enantiomer. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The effects of doping a grain boundary in ZnO with various concentrations of Bi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Johan M.; Hellsing, Bo; Domingos, Helder S.; Bristowe, Paul D.

    2003-06-01

    We have made a systematic study of the Bi-decoration process in a Σ=13 [0 0 0 1] tilt grain boundary in ZnO by first-principles calculations. This grain boundary is taken as a model system for studying the microscopic properties of commercial Bi-doped ZnO-varistors. The calculations show that the decoration process is strongly site dependent and that there is a considerable segregation energy for the Bi-atoms at low concentration. Increasing the concentration lowers the segregation energy which sets an upper limit of approximately 32% for the Bi-concentration in this grain boundary. This implies that the Bi-atoms stay in the grain boundary region rather than diffusing into the ZnO grains during the manufacturing process, but the maximum Bi-concentration is limited which is consistent with the experimental observations. Bi-impurities in ZnO act as donors at low impurity concentration, but a localized Bi-Bi-bond is formed at higher Bi-concentration in the grain boundary. This Bi-state is located in the band gap of ZnO and it may be responsible for the varistor effect observed in Bi-decorated grain boundaries.

  4. Interacting effects of strengthening and twin boundary migration in nanotwinned materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kartikey; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    Twin boundaries play a governing role in the mechanical characteristics of nanotwinned materials. They act as yield strengthening agents by offering resistance to non-coplanar dislocation slip. Twin boundary migration may cause yield softening while also enhancing the strain hardening response. In this work, we investigate the interaction between strengthening and twin boundary migration mechanisms by developing a length-scale dependent crystal plasticity framework for face-centered-cubic nanotwinned materials. The crystal plasticity model incorporates strengthening mechanisms due to dislocation pile-up via slip and slip-rate gradients and twin boundary migration via source-based twin partial nucleation and lattice dislocation-twin boundary interaction. The coupled effect of the load orientation and initial twin size on the speed of twin boundary is discussed and an expression for the same is proposed in terms of relevant material parameters. The efficacy of finite element simulations and the analytical expression in predicting evolution of nanotwinned microstructures comprising size and spatial distributions of twins is demonstrated.

  5. Constraints on the chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-08-04

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of same- and opposite-sign pairs with respect to the second- and third-order event planes have been measured in pPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 8.16 TeV and PbPb collisions at 5.02TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is motivated by the search for the charge separation phenomenon predicted by the chiral magnetic effect (CME) in heavy ion collisions. Three- and two-particle azimuthal correlators are extracted as functions of the pseudorapidity difference, the transverse momentum (pt) difference, and the pt average of same- and opposite-charge pairs in various event multiplicity ranges. The data suggest that the charge-dependent three-particle correlators with respect to the second- and third-order event planes share a common origin, predominantly arising from charge-dependent two-particle azimuthal correlations coupled with an anisotropic flow. The CME is expected to lead to a v[2]-independent three-particle correlation when the magnetic field is fixed. Using an event shape engineering technique, upper limits on the v[2]-independent fraction of the three-particle correlator are estimated to be 6.6% for pPb and 3.8% for PbPb collisions at 95% confidence level. The results of this analysis, both the dominance of two-particle correlations as a source of the three-particle results and the similarities seen between PbPb and pPb, provide stringent constraints on the origin of charge-dependent three-particle azimuthal correlations and challenge their interpretation as arising from a chiral magnetic effect in heavy ion collisions.

  6. Chiral pyrrolidinium salts derived from menthol as precursor – synthesis and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Ewa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Six new chiral pyrolidinium salts with chiral substituent at quaternary nitrogen atom were synthesized with high overall yields from (--menthol as cheap chiral precursor and were identified by NMR and HRMS spectroscopy. It was shown that anion type had the effect on chemical shift of protons adjacent to quaternary nitrogen atom and physical properties of these salts. Salts with NTf2 or NPf2 were in a liquid state at room temperature and characterized with the highest thermal stability among others. Furthermore, chiral ionic liquid with NTf2 anion was used as solvent in Diels-Alder reaction and gave higher yield and stereoselectivity than in ionic liquids with achiral cations. Synthesized chiral salts have the potential as chiral solvents in synthesis and auxiliaries in analytical methods to improve chiral recognition.

  7. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    KAUST Repository

    Jué, Emilie

    2015-12-21

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics1, current-induced spin–orbit torques2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and some topological magnetic structures8, 9, 10, 11, 12. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. 20).

  8. Chiral logarithms to five loops

    OpenAIRE

    Bissegger, Moritz; Fuhrer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We investigate two specific Green functions in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. We show that, using analyticity and unitarity, their leading logarithmic singularities can be evaluated in the chiral limit to any desired order in the chiral expansion, with a modest calculational cost. The claim is illustrated with an evaluation of the leading logarithm for the scalar two-point function to five-loop order.

  9. Chirality-induced magnon transport in AA-stacked bilayer honeycomb chiral magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this Letter, we study the magnetic transport in AA-stacked bilayer honeycomb chiral magnets coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically. For both couplings, we observe chirality-induced gaps, chiral protected edge states, magnon Hall and magnon spin Nernst effects of magnetic spin excitations. For ferromagnetically coupled layers, thermal Hall and spin Nernst conductivities do not change sign as function of magnetic field or temperature similar to single-layer honeycomb ferromagnetic insulator. In contrast, for antiferromagnetically coupled layers, we observe a sign change in the thermal Hall and spin Nernst conductivities as the magnetic field is reversed. We discuss possible experimental accessible honeycomb bilayer quantum materials in which these effects can be observed.

  10. Chiral algebras of class S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beem, Christopher [Institute for Advanced Study,Einstein Dr., Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Peelaers, Wolfger; Rastelli, Leonardo [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, SUNY,Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); Rees, Balt C. van [Theory Group, Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-05-05

    Four-dimensional N=2 superconformal field theories have families of protected correlation functions that possess the structure of two-dimensional chiral algebras. In this paper, we explore the chiral algebras that arise in this manner in the context of theories of class S. The class S duality web implies nontrivial associativity properties for the corresponding chiral algebras, the structure of which is best summarized in the language of generalized topological quantum field theory. We make a number of conjectures regarding the chiral algebras associated to various strongly coupled fixed points.

  11. Marine Boundary Layer Refractive Effects in the Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-01

    the resulting mirage effects uay also degrade the system’s target identification capabilities. It also mut be determined whether the effects of water...10mV 11 JULY 1978 RISING TIDE I mV 0 I- ’ ww 2 0W 10 MV HIGH TIDE 6 p 1,.V I I I n I j I ,i •’’ I UV 4 lo 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 TIME (PDT) Figure V...i. Example of received signal vs. time during a rising tide. 40 10 mV 20 JULY 1978 FALLING TIDE 1lmV ,0 100z w j 1 OpV 1 -I4 1000 110 120 130 140

  12. Effect of boundary on controlled memristor-based oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Fouda, Mohamed E.

    2012-10-01

    Recently, the applications of memristors have spread into many fields and especially in the circuit theory. Many models have been proposed for the HP-memristor based on the window functions. In this paper, we introduce a complete mathematical analysis of the controlled reactance-less oscillator for two different window functions of Joglekar\\'s model (linear and nonlinear dopant drift) to discuss the effect of changing the window function on the oscillator\\'s behavior. The generalized necessary and sufficient conditions based on the circuit elements and control voltages for both the linear and nonlinear models are introduced. Moreover, closed form expressions for the oscillation frequency and duty cycle are derived for these models and verified using PSPICE simulations showing an excellent matching. Finally a comparison between the linear and nonlinear models which shows their effect on the oscillation frequency and conditions of oscillation is introduced. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Electromagnetic wave propagation through a dielectric-chiral interface and through a chiral slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, S.; Papas, C. H.; Engheta, N.

    1988-01-01

    The reflection from and transmission through a semiinfinite chiral medium are analyzed by obtaining the Fresnel equations in terms of parallel- and perpendicular-polarized modes, and a comparison is made with results reported previously. The chiral medium is described electromagnetically by the constitutive relations D = (epsilon)E+i(gamma)B and H = i(gamma)E+(1/mu)B. The constants epsilon, mu and gamma are real and have values that are fixed by the size, the shape, and the spatial distribution of the elements that collectively compose the medium. The conditions are obtained for the total internal reflection of the incident wave from the interface and for the existence of the Brewster angle. The effects of the chirality on the polarization and the intensity of the reflected wave from the chiral half-space are discussed and illustrated by using the Stokes parameters. The propagation of electromagnetic wave through an infinite slab of chiral medium is formulated for oblique incidence and solved analytically for the case of normal incidence.

  14. Chiral separation of new designer drugs (Cathinones) on chiral ion-exchange type stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolrab, Denise; Frühauf, Peter; Moulisová, Alena; Kuchař, Martin; Gerner, Christopher; Lindner, Wolfgang; Kohout, Michal

    2016-02-20

    We present the enantioseparation of new designer drugs from the cathinone family on structurally different chiral ion-exchange type stationary phases. A novel strong cation-exchange type chiral stationary phase was synthesized and its performance compared with previously reported ion-exchange type chiral stationary phases. The influence of structural elements of the chiral selectors on their chromatographic performance was studied and the possibilities of tuning chromatographic parameters by varying the polarity of the employed mobile phases were determined. Evidence is provided that a change in mobile phase composition strongly influences the solvation shell of the polarized and polarizable units of the selectors and analytes, as well as ionizable mobile phase additives. Furthermore, the structural features of the selectors (e.g. the size of aromatic units and their substitution pattern) are shown to play a key role in the effective formation of diastereomeric complexes with analytes. Thus, we have achieved the enantioseparation of all test analytes with a mass spectrometry-compatible mobile phase with a chiral strong cation-exchange type stationary phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. On the effect of boundary vibration on poiseuille flow of an elastico-viscous liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siginer, A.

    1992-11-01

    The longitudinal and orthogonal superposition of boundary driven, small strain, oscillatory shear flow and steady Poiseuille flow is investigated. Boundary oscillations are of different frequencies and amplitudes and are represented by sinusoidal waveforms. A regular perturbation in terms of the amplitude of the oscillations is used. The flow field is determined up to and including third order for a simple fluid of multiple integral type with fading memory. Flow enhancement effects dependent on material parameters, mean pressure gradient, and amplitude and frequency of the boundary waves are predicted and closed form formulas derived for the mass transport rate. Enhancement is determined both by the elastic and shear thinning or thickening properties of the liquid. Resonance effects are shown to take place and, in particular, mean secondary and longitudinal flows, independent of the mean pressure gradient, are shown to exist for certain frequency relationships.

  16. Boundary-Layer Effects on Acoustic Transmission Through Narrow Slit Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, G P; Lovelock, R K; Murray, A R J; Hibbins, A P; Sambles, J R; Smith, J D

    2015-07-24

    We explore the slit-width dependence of the resonant transmission of sound in air through both a slit array formed of aluminum slats and a single open-ended slit cavity in an aluminum plate. Our experimental results accord well with Lord Rayleigh's theory concerning how thin viscous and thermal boundary layers at a slit's walls affect the acoustic wave across the whole slit cavity. By measuring accurately the frequencies of the Fabry-Perot-like cavity resonances, we find a significant 5% reduction in the effective speed of sound through the slits when an individual viscous boundary layer occupies only 5% of the total slit width. Importantly, this effect is true for any airborne slit cavity, with the reduction being achieved despite the slit width being on a far larger scale than an individual boundary layer's thickness. This work demonstrates that the recent prevalent loss-free treatment of narrow slit cavities within acoustic metamaterials is unrealistic.

  17. Effect of Pressure Gradients on Plate Response and Radiation in a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1997-01-01

    Using the model developed by the author for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers, results are obtained for adverse and favorable pressure gradients. It is shown that when a flexible plate is located in an adverse pressure gradient area, it vibrates more than if it were in a favorable pressure gradient one. Therefore the noise generated by the plate in an adverse pressure gradient is much greater than that due to the plate in a favorable pressure gradient. The effects of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness are also analyzed and found to have the same effect in both adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases. Increasing the Reynolds number is found to increase the loading on the plate and therefore acoustic radiation. An increase in boundary layer thickness is found to decrease the level of the high frequencies and therefore the response and radiation at these frequencies. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  18. Lateral shift in one-dimensional quasiperiodic chiral photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da, Jian, E-mail: dajian521@sina.com [Department of Information Engineering, Huaian Senior Vocational and Technical School, Feiyao road, Huaian 223005, Jiangsu Province (China); Mo, Qi, E-mail: moqiyueyang@163.com [School of Software, Yunnan University, Cuihu Bai Road, Kunming City, Yunnan Province 650091 (China); Cheng, Yaokun [Department of Information Engineering, Huaian Senior Vocational and Technical School, Feiyao road, Huaian 223005, Jiangsu Province (China); Liu, Taixiang [Taishan Vocational College of Nursing, Shandong Province 271000 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the lateral shift of a one-dimensional quasiperiodic photonic crystal consisting of chiral and conventional dielectric materials. The effect of structural irregularity on lateral shift is evaluated by stationary-phase approach. Our results show that the lateral shift can be modulated by varying the structural irregularity in quasiperiodic structure. Besides, the position of peak in lateral shift spectrum stays sensitive to the chiral factor of chiral materials. In comparison with that of periodic structure, quasiperiodic structure provides an extra degree of freedom to manipulate the lateral shift.

  19. Boundary effects on population dynamics in stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiba, Bassel; Chen, Sheng; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate spatially inhomogeneous versions of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model for predator-prey competition and coexistence by means of Monte Carlo simulations on a two-dimensional lattice with periodic boundary conditions. To study boundary effects for this paradigmatic population dynamics system, we employ a simulation domain split into two patches: Upon setting the predation rates at two distinct values, one half of the system resides in an absorbing state where only the prey survives, while the other half attains a stable coexistence state wherein both species remain active. At the domain boundary, we observe a marked enhancement of the predator population density. The predator correlation length displays a minimum at the boundary, before reaching its asymptotic constant value deep in the active region. The frequency of the population oscillations appears only very weakly affected by the existence of two distinct domains, in contrast to their attenuation rate, which assumes its largest value there. We also observe that boundary effects become less prominent as the system is successively divided into subdomains in a checkerboard pattern, with two different reaction rates assigned to neighboring patches. When the domain size becomes reduced to the scale of the correlation length, the mean population densities attain values that are very similar to those in a disordered system with randomly assigned reaction rates drawn from a bimodal distribution.

  20. Assembling optically active and nonactive metamaterials with chiral units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Hu, Yu-Hui; Zhao, Jun-Ming; Feng, Yi-Jun; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2012-12-01

    Metamaterials constructed with chiral units can be either optically active or nonactive depending on the spatial configuration of the building blocks. For a class of chiral units, their effective induced electric and magnetic dipoles, which originate from the induced surface electric current upon illumination of incident light, can be collinear at the resonant frequency. This feature provides significant advantage in designing metamaterials. In this paper we concentrate on several examples. In one scenario, chiral units with opposite chiralities are used to construct the optically nonactive metamaterial structure. It turns out that with linearly polarized incident light, the pure electric or magnetic resonance (and accordingly negative permittivity or negative permeability) can be selectively realized by tuning the polarization of incident light for 90°. Alternatively, units with the same chirality can be assembled as a chiral metamaterial by taking the advantage of the collinear induced electric and magnetic dipoles. It follows that for the circularly polarized incident light, negative refractive index can be realized. These examples demonstrate the unique approach to achieve certain optical properties by assembling chiral building blocks, which could be enlightening in designing metamaterials.

  1. Chiral d-wave superconductivity in doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black-Schaffer, Annica M; Honerkamp, Carsten

    2014-10-22

    A highly unconventional superconducting state with a spin-singlet dx2-y2+/-idxy-wave, or chiral d-wave symmetry has recently been suggested to emerge from electron-electron interactions in doped graphene. It has been argued that graphene doped to the van Hove singularity at 1/4 doping, where the density of states diverge, is particularly likely to be a chiral d-wave superconductor. In this review we summarize the currently mounting theoretical evidence for the existence of a chiral d-wave superconducting state in graphene, obtained with methods ranging from mean-field studies of effective Hamiltonians to angle-resolved renormalization group calculations. We further discuss the multiple distinctive properties of the chiral d-wave superconducting state in graphene, as well as its stability in the presence of disorder. We also review the means of enhancing the chiral d-wave state using proximity-induced superconductivity. The appearance of chiral d-wave superconductivity is intimately linked to the hexagonal crystal lattice and we also offer a brief overview of other materials which have also been proposed to be chiral d-wave superconductors.

  2. Chemical transformation of chiral monolayer-protected gold clusters: observation of ligand size effects on optical and chiroptical responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Kitaoka, Noriyuki; Sasaki, Akito

    2012-01-01

    Versatile functionalization of metal clusters is a key step in understanding the reactivity of protective monolayers. We here demonstrate that reaction of the outermost amino groups on (S)-/(R)-penicillamine-protected gold clusters with ethyl isocyanate readily modifies the chiral surface structure through carbamoylation. Interestingly, the clusters are electrophoretically separated by the size of the surface ligand, not by the size of the gold core, which is revealed by UV-vis, IR, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as SAXS measurements. The ligand size (or length) is extended through additional reactions of the carbamoylated amino groups with isocyanate, while the chemical similarity in ligand structures is realized by their IR spectral similarity. Optical and chiroptical responses of the separated cluster compounds are thus overall similar to each other, but a close inspection reveals that the ligand size has a small but distinct influence on the chiroptical response of the gold clusters.Versatile functionalization of metal clusters is a key step in understanding the reactivity of protective monolayers. We here demonstrate that reaction of the outermost amino groups on (S)-/(R)-penicillamine-protected gold clusters with ethyl isocyanate readily modifies the chiral surface structure through carbamoylation. Interestingly, the clusters are electrophoretically separated by the size of the surface ligand, not by the size of the gold core, which is revealed by UV-vis, IR, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as SAXS measurements. The ligand size (or length) is extended through additional reactions of the carbamoylated amino groups with isocyanate, while the chemical similarity in ligand structures is realized by their IR spectral similarity. Optical and chiroptical responses of the separated cluster compounds are thus overall similar to each other, but a close inspection reveals that the ligand size has a small but distinct

  3. Chiral Orientation of Skeletal Muscle Cells Requires Rigid Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninghao Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of tissue morphology with inherent left–right (LR asymmetry is essential for tissue/organ functions. For skeletal muscle, the largest tissue in mammalian organisms, successful myogenesis requires the regulation of the LR asymmetry to form the appropriate muscle alignment. However, the key factor for reproducing the LR asymmetry of skeletal tissues in a controllable, engineering context remains largely unknown. Recent reports indicate that cell chirality may underlie the LR development in tissue morphogenesis. Here, we report that a rigid substrate is required for the chirality of skeletal muscle cells. By using alternating micropatterned cell-adherent and cell-repellent stripes on a rigid substrate, we found that C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblasts exhibited a unidirectional tilted orientation with respect to the stripe boundary. Importantly, such chiral orientation was reduced when soft substrates were used instead. In addition, we demonstrated the key role of actin stress fibers in the formation of the chiral orientation. This study reveals that a rigid substrate is required for the chiral pattern of myoblasts, paving the way for reconstructing damaged muscle tissue with inherent LR asymmetry in the future.

  4. Effects of K and Ca doping on twin boundary energy of cupperate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoshnevisan, Bahram [Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Mahnaz, E-mail: m.mohammadi_2@grad.kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Qom University of Technology, Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Ab initio simulation for twin boundary energy in YBCO and doped YBCO system for the 1st time. • Local charge transfer and charge redistribution on the twin planes. • Structural and electronic properties of YBKCO and YCBCO systems. • Effect of Ca and K doping on twin boundary. • This explain the effect of twin boundaries in agreement with experimental data. • Structural and electronic properties of twined YBKCO and YCBCO systems. - Abstract: Ab-initio calculations under GGA approximation have been employed to find out the effect Ba substitution by K and Ca on the structural and electronic properties twined and untwined YBCO system. In this regard, the twin boundary energy, γ, and impact of the substitution on the boundary's charge distribution have been of special consideration. Our results show that despite the structural changes the presence of K (Ca) modifies substantially density of levels at the Fermi level, which could be responsible for empirical reports of decreasing the critical temperature (T{sub c}) by increasing the K(Ca) content. Although, the K doping reduces the γ value in YBa{sub 2–x}K{sub x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} system, after calcium doping it remains more or less unchanged. In addition, reduction of the carrier density occurs at twin boundary in CuO{sub 2} layer for the substituted system with respect to the untwined YBCO system. Our results would be noticeable in conjunction with the experimentally reported twinned and alkali substituted superconductive properties of the YBCO samples.

  5. Chiral nanophotonics chiral optical properties of plasmonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schäferling, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the physics behind the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures focusing on chiral aspects. It explains in detail how the geometry determines chiral near-fields and how to tailor their shape and strength. Electromagnetic fields with strong optical chirality interact strongly with chiral molecules and, therefore, can be used for enhancing the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopy techniques. Besides a short review of the latest results in the field of plasmonically enhanced enantiomer discrimination, this book introduces the concept of chiral plasmonic near-field sources for enhanced chiroptical spectroscopy. The discussion of the fundamental properties of these light sources provides the theoretical basis for further optimizations and is of interest for researchers at the intersection of nano-optics, plasmonics and stereochemistry. .

  6. Deleterious localized stress fields: the effects of boundaries and stiffness tailoring in anisotropic laminated plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, R M J; Weaver, P M

    2016-10-01

    The safe design of primary load-bearing structures requires accurate prediction of stresses, especially in the vicinity of geometric discontinuities where deleterious three-dimensional stress fields can be induced. Even for thin-walled structures significant through-thickness stresses arise at edges and boundaries, and this is especially precarious for laminates of advanced fibre-reinforced composites because through-thickness stresses are the predominant drivers in delamination failure. Here, we use a higher-order equivalent single-layer model derived from the Hellinger-Reissner mixed variational principle to examine boundary layer effects in laminated plates comprising constant-stiffness and variable-stiffness laminae and deforming statically in cylindrical bending. The results show that zigzag deformations, which arise due to layerwise differences in the transverse shear moduli, drive boundary layers towards clamped edges and are therefore critically important in quantifying localized stress gradients. The relative significance of the boundary layer scales with the degree of layerwise anisotropy and the thickness to characteristic length ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that the phenomenon of alternating positive and negative transverse shearing deformation through the thickness of composite laminates, previously only observed at clamped boundaries, can also occur at other locations as a result of smoothly varying the material properties over the in-plane dimensions of the laminate.

  7. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao, E-mail: zhangchao@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Liao, Qiang, E-mail: lqzx@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rchen@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhu, Xun, E-mail: zhuxun@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. - Highlights: • Study of bacterial locomotion in flow as an early stage in biofilm formation. • Mathematical model combining bacterial swimming and the motion with flow. • Boundary layer plays a key role in bacterial attachment under flow condition. • The competition between bacterial swimming and the motion with flow is evaluated.

  8. Surface roughness and grain boundary scattering effects on the electrical conductivity of thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, George

    1998-01-01

    In this work, we investigate surface/interface roughness and grain boundary scattering effects on the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline thin films in the Born approximation. We assume for simplicity a random Gaussian roughness convoluted with a domain size distribution ~e^-πr^2/ζ^2 to

  9. Stable Stratification Effects on Flow and Pollutant Dispersion in Boundary Layers Entering a Generic Urban Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomas, J.M.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are used to investigate the effect of stable stratification on rural-to-urban roughness transitions. Smooth-wall turbulent boundary layers are subjected to a generic urban roughness consisting of cubes in an in-line arrangement. Two line sources of pollutant are added to

  10. Multiplicity of solutions for Dirichlet boundary conditions of second-order quasilinear equations with impulsive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Shen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the multiplicity of solutions for Dirichlet boundary conditions of second-order quasilinear equations with impulsive effects. By using critical point theory, a new result is obtained. An example is given to illustrate the main result.

  11. Effects of shear in the convective boundary layer: analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of convective and mechanical turbulence at the entrainment zone are studied through the use of systematic Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) experiments. Five LES experiments with different shear characteristics in the quasi-steady barotropic boundary layer were conducted by increasing the value of

  12. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  13. Detection of graphene chirality using achiral liquid crystalline platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Garvey, Alfred

    2015-09-01

    Monolayer graphene flakes were dispersed at low concentrations into two achiral liquid crystals (LCs) alkoxyphenylbenzoate (9OO4) and 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), separately. The presence of graphene resulted in two types of chiral signatures in the LCs: an electroclinic effect (a polar tilt of the LC director perpendicular to, and linear in, an applied electric field) in the smectic-A phase of 9OO4, and a macroscopic helical twist of the LC director in the nematic phase of 5CB. Graphene flakes generally possess strain chirality and edge chirality. The non-covalent interactions between the LC molecules and chiral graphene flakes induce molecular conformational deracemization in the LC, exhibiting a bulk electroclinic effect and a macroscopic helical twist.

  14. Torsional vibration analysis of bars including secondary torsional shear deformation effect by the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapountzakis, E. J.; Tsipiras, V. J.; Argyridi, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a boundary element method (BEM) is developed for the torsional vibration problem of bars of arbitrary doubly symmetric constant cross section, taking into account the nonuniform warping and secondary torsional shear deformation effects (STSDE). The bar is subjected to arbitrarily distributed or concentrated dynamic torsional loading along its length, while its edges are subjected to the most general torsional and warping boundary conditions. Apart from the angle of twist, the primary angle of twist per unit length is considered as an additional 1-D degree of freedom in order to account for the STSDE in the equations of motion of the bar. The warping shear stress distribution and the pertinent secondary torsional rigidity are computed by satisfying local equilibrium considerations under dynamic conditions without adhering to assumptions of Thin Tube Theory (TTT). By employing a distributed mass model system accounting for rotatory and warping inertia, an initial boundary value and two boundary value problems with respect to the variable along the bar time-dependent 1-D kinematical components, to the primary and secondary warping functions, respectively, are formulated. The latter are solved employing a pure BE method, requiring exclusively boundary discretization of the bar's cross section. The numerical solution of the aforementioned initial boundary value problem is performed through a BE method leading to a system of differential equations with displacement only unknowns, which is solved using an efficient direct time integration technique. Additionally, for the free vibrations case, a generalized eigenvalue problem is formulated through a similar BE technique. The accuracy and reliability of the results is assessed by FEM solutions employing solid or shell modelling. Both open- and closed-shaped cross section bars are examined and the necessity to include nonuniform torsional and STSD effects in the dynamic analysis of bars is demonstrated.

  15. Nuclear chirality, a model and the data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, K.; Koike, T.

    2017-09-01

    In the last decade, the manifestation of chirality in atomic nuclei has become the subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. The common feature of current model calculations is that the chiral geometry of angular momentum coupling is extracted from expectation values of orientation operators, rather than being a starting point in construction of a model. However, using the particle-hole coupling model for triaxial odd-odd nuclei it is possible to construct a basis which contains right-handed, left-handed and planar states of angular momentum coupling. If this basis is used, the chirality is an explicit rather than an extracted feature as in any other models with non-chiral bases. The time-reversal symmetry, which relates the basis states of opposite handedness, can be used to reduce the dimension of matrices for diagonalization of the model Hamiltonian, proving the effectiveness of this approach. Moreover, the final model eigenstate wave functions show a concentration of amplitudes among a relatively small number (˜1%) of components compared to the full model space. In that sense, the ‘chiral’ basis provides a useful tool to examine model predictions providing direct insight into the structure of doublet states. In this work, similarities and differences between the rotational behaviour of an axial and triaxial body provide a starting point for derivation of the basis optimal for valence nucleon coupling to an axial and a triaxial core. The derived ‘chiral’ basis is optimal for coupling of a valence particle and hole to the triaxial core. Model predictions are presented and discussed. A comprehensive review of current experimental data on observed chiral band candidates is also provided.

  16. Chiral Crystallization of Ethylenediamine Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koby, Lawrence; Ningappa, Jyothi B.; Dakesssian, Maria; Cuccia, Louis A.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the crystallization of achiral ethylenediamine sulfate into large chiral crystals that are ideal for polarimetry studies and observation using Polaroid sheets are presented. This experiment is an ideal undergraduate experiment, which clearly demonstrates the chiral crystallization of an achiral molecule.

  17. Local anaesthetic effectivity and toxicity of fomocaine, five N-free fomocaine metabolites and two chiralic fomocaine derivatives in rats compared with procaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, C; Kämena, M; Tschritter, L; Kersten, L; Seeling, A; Glassl, P; Oelschläger, H

    2001-01-01

    Until now, no optimal local anaesthetic drug with long lasting effect and low toxicity has been developed. Fomocaine (CAS 17692-39-6), introduced in the German extrapharmacopoela (DAC) in 1979, is a local anaesthetic, which is largely in accordance with these aspects. Now the basic ether fomocaine, its metabolites O/Se 9 (CAS 3006-96-0), O/Se 10 (CAS 31719-76-3), O/Se 11, O/Se 12 (CAS 64264-21-7) and M5 and its chiralic derivatives O/G 3 and O/G 5 were compared with procaine (CAS 59-46-1) and characterised more in detail in rats. The metabolism of fomocaine was investigated earlier with 14C-fomocaine in rats and beagle dogs. Rac-O/G 3 and Rac-O/G 5 could be separated into the enantiomers via the diastereomeric salts. Basing on standard methods for the testing of the local anaesthetic effects (estimation of infiltration and conduction anaesthesia in rat tail, measurement of corneal anaesthesia) and using a couple of tests characterising the side effects and toxicity of local anaesthetic (paresis of the N. ischiadicus, tissue irritation, determination of the approximative i.p. LD50) it can be concluded that: a) The very good surface anaesthesia caused by fomocaine could be stated, but, as expected, concerning conduction anaesthesia, procaine is better qualified for clinical use. b) Fomocaine is much more effective in conduction and surface anaesthesia than its chiralic derivatives O/G 3 and O/G 5. c) Differences between the two enantiomers of the O/G-substances have been found, but these little discrepancies are without practical relevance. In the case of O/G 5, agonistic effects of both enantiomers could be shown. d) Fomocaine undergoes extensive biotransformation with subsequent formation of 14 metabolites. Five of them (O/Se 9-O/Se 12; M5) are N-free and do not show any pharmacological activity. e) Compared to other local anaesthetics, fomocaine is relatively non-toxic (nearly no tissue irritation, high approximative LD50), however, surprisingly the toxicity of

  18. Increments to chiral recognition facilitating enantiomer separations of chiral acids, bases, and ampholytes using Cinchona-based zwitterion exchanger chiral stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernisch, Stefanie; Pell, Reinhard; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    The intramolecular distances of anion and cation exchanger sites of zwitterionic chiral stationary phases represent potential tuning sites for enantiomer selectivity. In this contribution, we investigate the influence of alkanesulfonic acid chain length and flexibility on enantiomer separations of chiral acids, bases, and amphoteric molecules for six Cinchona alkaloid-based chiral stationary phases in comparison with structurally related anion and cation exchangers. Employing polar-organic elution conditions, we observed an intramolecular counterion effect for acidic analytes which led to reduced retention times but did not impair enantiomer selectivities. Retention of amphoteric analytes is based on simultaneous double ion pairing of their charged functional groups with the acidic and basic sites of the zwitterionic selectors. A chiral center in the vicinity of the strong cation exchanger site is vital for chiral separations of bases. Sterically demanding side chains are beneficial for separations of free amino acids. Enantioseparations of free (un-derivatized) peptides were particularly successful in stationary phases with straight-chain alkanesulfonic acid sites, pointing to a beneficial influence of more flexible moieties. In addition, we observed pseudo-enantiomeric behavior of quinine and quinidine-derived chiral stationary phases facilitating reversal of elution orders for all analytes. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of the radial constant-head boundary in slug tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunfeng; Zhou, Zhifang; Zhao, Yanrong; Cui, Ziteng

    2015-03-01

    A semianalytical model of slug tests, conducted in a completely penetrating well within a radial constant-head boundary, was derived. The model, based on the Cooper et al. (1967) model, estimates the hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient through the matching of type curves. Type curves of the semianalytical solution were plotted, and the effect of the distance of the radial constant-head boundary is discussed. For different storage coefficients, the critical distances of the effect of the constant-head boundary were determined. The effect of the storage coefficient on the response of the water head in slug tests with a radial constant-head boundary of a certain distance is also shown. To verify the model, laboratory slug-test experiments were carried out using a cylindrical test platform, in which an artificial confined coarse-sand aquifer was built. Pumping tests were also executed using the test platform. The Cooper et al. (1967) model and new semianalytical model were used to analyze measurements; the hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient determined using the two methods were compared to demonstrate the importance of the radial constant-head boundary. A model considering the inertial effect was also used to analyze the slug-test measurements, and although the water head response did not oscillate greatly, the inertial effect affected the slug-test calculation result. The laboratory experiments indicate that the proposed semianalytical model is reasonable and reliable. Cooper HH, Bredehoeft JD, Papadopulos IS (1967) Response of a finite-diameter well to an instantaneous charge of water, Water Resour Res 3(1):263-269.

  20. Two-chiral component microemulsion EKC - chiral surfactant and chiral oil. Part 2: diethyl tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Kimberly A; Foley, Joe P

    2007-08-01

    In this second study on dual-chirality microemulsions containing a chiral surfactant and a chiral oil, a less hydrophobic and lower interfacial tension chiral oil, diethyl tartrate, is employed (Part 1, Foley, J. P. et al.., Electrophoresis, DOI: 10.1002/elps.200600551). Six stereochemical combinations of dodecoxycarbonylvaline (DDCV: R, S, or racemic, 2.00% w/v), racemic 2-hexanol (1.65% v/v), and diethyl tartrate (D, L, or racemic, 0.88% v/v) were examined as pseudostationary phases (PSPs) for the enantioseparation of six chiral pharmaceutical compounds: pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, N-methyl ephedrine, metoprolol, synephrine, and atenolol. Average efficiencies increased with the addition of a chiral oil to R-DDCV PSP formulations. Modest improvements in resolution and enantioselectivity (alpha(enant)) were achieved with two-chiral-component systems over the one-chiral-component microemulsion. Slight enantioselective synergies were confirmed using a thermodynamic model. Results obtained in this study are compared to those obtained in Part 1 as well as those obtained with chiral MEEKC using an achiral, low-interfacial-tension oil (ethyl acetate). Dual-chirality microemulsions with the more hydrophobic oil dibutyl tartrate yielded, relative to diethyl tartrate, higher efficiencies (100,000-134,000 vs. 80,800-94,300), but lower resolution (1.64-1.91 vs. 2.08-2.21) due to lower enantioselectivities (1.060-1.067 vs. 1.078-1.081). Atenolol enantiomers could not be separated with the dibutyl tartrate-based microemulsions but were partially resolved using diethyl tartrate microemulsions. A comparable single-chirality microemulsion based on the achiral oil ethyl acetate yielded, relative to diethyl tartrate, lower efficiency (78 300 vs. 91 600), higher resolution (1.99 vs. 1.83), and similar enantioselectivities.

  1. Quark structure of chiral solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-05-01

    There is a prejudice that the chiral soliton model of baryons is something orthogonal to the good old constituent quark models. In fact, it is the opposite: the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in strong interactions explains the appearance of massive constituent quarks of small size thus justifying the constituent quark models, in the first place. Chiral symmetry ensures that constituent quarks interact very strongly with the pseudoscalar fields. The ''chiral soliton'' is another word for the chiral field binding constituent quarks. We show how the old SU(6) quark wave functions follow from the ''soliton'', however, with computable relativistic corrections and additional quark-antiquark pairs. We also find the 5-quark wave function of the exotic baryon Theta+.

  2. An Active Metamaterial Platform for Chiral Responsive Optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lei; Lan, Shoufeng; Cui, Yonghao; Rodrigues, Sean P; Liu, Yongmin; Werner, Douglas H; Cai, Wenshan

    2015-08-05

    Chiral-selective non-linear optics and optoelectronic signal generation are demonstrated in an electrically active photonic metamaterial. The metamaterial reveals significant chiroptical responses in both harmonic generation and the photon drag effect, correlated to the resonance behavior in the linear regime. The multifunctional chiral metamaterial with dual electrical and optical functionality enables transduction of chiroptical responses to electrical signals for integrated photonics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Chiral symmetry and changes of properties in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.E. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    The decrease with density of the nucleon effective mass m{sub n}{sup *} as a movement towards chiral restoration, connecting m{sub n}{sup *} with the density dependent quark condensate (q-barq){sup *} is described. Roughly, m{sub n}{sup *} can be used as the order parameter for the phase of broken chiral symmetry. (author). 22 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Circular dichroism induced by Fano resonances in planar chiral oligomers

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Ben; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    We present a general theory of circular dichroism induced in planar chiral nanostructures with rotational symmetry. It is demonstrated, analytically, that the handedness of the incident field's polarization can control whether a nanostructure induces either absorption or scattering losses, even when the total loss (extinction) is polarization-independent. We then show that this effect is a consequence of modal interference so that strong circular dichroism in absorption and scattering can be engineered by combining Fano resonances with chiral nanoparticle clusters.

  5. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    OpenAIRE

    Tasawar Hayat; Awatif A. Hendi; Jacob A. Gbadeyan; Philip O. Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable m...

  6. On the chirally rotated Schroedinger functional with Wilson fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Lopez, Jenifer

    2011-05-25

    There are many phenomena in nature, which are closely linked to the low energy regime of QCD. From a theoretical point of view, these low energy phenomena can be dealt with only by means of non-perturbative methods. It is the central goal of this thesis to provide a framework for such a nonperturbative renormalization. For that purpose, we employ a 4-dimensional lattice as a regulator of QCD. As a renormalization scheme, we propose a finite volume Schroedinger functional scheme and here in particular, the chirally rotated Schroedinger functional ({chi}SF). We first perform analytical studies of the {chi}SF at tree-level of perturbation theory, in the continuum and on the lattice. We study the eigenvalue spectrum of the continuum Dirac operator, equipped with chirally rotated SF boundary conditions, and derive the corresponding quark propagator. We then determine the tree-level quark propagator on the lattice, employing massless Wilson fermions as a regulator of the theory. Beyond tree-level, all studies are performed in the quenched approximation of QCD, as a first, computationally much simpler step to understand the properties of the newly proposed {chi}SF scheme. One of the main targets of the present work, has been to perform the non-perturbative tuning of the two required coefficients of the {chi}SF scheme, such that a well defined continuum limit can be reached. We demonstrate, as the first main result of this thesis, that the tuning is feasible and that, moreover, physical quantities are insensitive to the particular tuning condition. As in any lattice regularization with SF-like boundary conditions, there are also in the {chi}SF a couple of counterterms at the boundaries, whose coefficients need to be tuned in order to remove the O(a) discretization effects originated at the boundaries. However, besides these boundary O(a) effects, the {chi}SF is expected to be compatible with bulk automatic O(a)-improvement. We show here that, indeed, the scaling behavior

  7. Anisotropy and Strong-Coupling Effects on the Collective Mode Spectrum of Chiral Superconductors: Application to Sr2RuO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Avery Sauls

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent theories of Sr2RuO4 based on the interplay of strong interactions, spin-orbit coupling and multi-band anisotropy predict chiral or helical ground states with strong anisotropy of the pairing states, with deep minima in the excitation gap, as well as strong phase anisotropy for the chiral ground state. We develop time-dependent mean field theory to calculate the Bosonic spectrum for the class of 2D chiral superconductors spanning 3He-A to chiral superconductors with strong anisotropy. Chiral superconductors support a pair of massive Bosonic excitations of the time-reversed pairs labeled by their parity under charge conjugation. These modes are degenerate for 2D 3He-A. Crystal field anisotropy lifts the degeneracy. Strong anisotropy also leads to low-lying Fermions, and thus to channels for the decay of the Bosonic modes. Selection rules and phase space considerations lead to large asymmetries in the lifetimes and hybridization of the Bosonic modes with the continuum of un-bound Fermion pairs. We also highlight results for the excitation of the Bosonic modes by microwave radiation that provide clear signatures of the Bosonic modes of an anisotropic chiral ground state.

  8. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Fang Zou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model in-cluding boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  9. Synthesis of Chiral Chalcone Derivatives Catalyzed by the Chiral Cinchona Alkaloid Squaramide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Xie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An effective method has been developed for the preparation of novel chiral chalcone derivatives under mild conditions from the easily accessible starting materials nitromethane and chalcone derivatives 2. The corresponding products were obtained in moderate yields with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99%.

  10. Experimental demonstration of spontaneous chirality in a nonlinear microresonator

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Qi-Tao; Dong, Chun-Hua; Jing, Hui; Liu, Rui-Shan; Chen, Xi; Ge, Li; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Chirality is an important concept that describes the asymmetry property of a system, which usually emerges spontaneously due to mirror symmetry breaking. Such spontaneous chirality manifests predominantly as parity breaking in modern physics, which has been studied extensively, for instance, in Higgs physics, double-well Bose-Einstein condensates, topological insulators and superconductors. In the optical domain, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking has been elusive experimentally, especially for micro- and nano-photonics which demands multiple identical subsystems, such as photonic nanocavities, meta-molecules and other dual-core settings. Here, for the first time, we observe spontaneous emergence of a chiral field in a single ultrahigh-Q whispering- gallery microresonator. This counter-intuitive effect arises due to the inherent Kerr nonlinearity-modulated coupling between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) propagating waves. At an ultra-weak input threshold of a few hundred microwatts, the initial c...

  11. Leading order relativistic chiral nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiu-Lei; Li, Kai-Wen; Geng, Li-Sheng; Long, Bingwei; Ring, Peter; Meng, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the successes of relativistic theories in studies of atomic/molecular and nuclear systems and the need for a relativistic chiral force in relativistic nuclear structure studies, we explore a new relativistic scheme to construct the nucleon-nucleon interaction in the framework of covariant chiral effective field theory. The chiral interaction is formulated up to leading order with covariant power counting and a Lorentz invariant chiral Lagrangian. We find that the relativistic scheme induces all six spin operators needed to describe the nuclear force. A detailed investigation of the partial wave potentials shows a better description of the {}1S0 and {}3P0 phase shifts than the leading order Weinberg approach, and similar to that of the next-to-leading order Weinberg approach. For the other partial waves with angular momenta J≥slant 1, the relativistic results are almost the same as their leading order non-relativistic counterparts. )

  12. Chiral quantum optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodahl, Peter; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Stobbe, Søren; Rauschenbeutel, Arno; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Volz, Jürgen; Pichler, Hannes; Zoller, Peter

    2017-01-25

    Advanced photonic nanostructures are currently revolutionizing the optics and photonics that underpin applications ranging from light technology to quantum-information processing. The strong light confinement in these structures can lock the local polarization of the light to its propagation direction, leading to propagation-direction-dependent emission, scattering and absorption of photons by quantum emitters. The possibility of such a propagation-direction-dependent, or chiral, light-matter interaction is not accounted for in standard quantum optics and its recent discovery brought about the research field of chiral quantum optics. The latter offers fundamentally new functionalities and applications: it enables the assembly of non-reciprocal single-photon devices that can be operated in a quantum superposition of two or more of their operational states and the realization of deterministic spin-photon interfaces. Moreover, engineered directional photonic reservoirs could lead to the development of complex quantum networks that, for example, could simulate novel classes of quantum many-body systems.

  13. Detection of chiral anomaly and valley transport in Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Enze; Liu, Yanwen; Chen, Zhigang; Liang, Sihang; Cao, Junzhi; Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Li, Qian; Gu, Teng; Wu, Yizheng; Zou, Jin; Xiu, Faxian

    Chiral anomaly is a non-conservation of chiral charge pumped by the topological nontrivial gauge field, which has been predicted to exist in the emergent quasiparticle excitations in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. However, so far, such pumping process hasn't been clearly demonstrated and lacks a convincing experimental identification. Here, we report the detection of the charge pumping effect and the related valley transport in Cd3As2 driven by external electric and magnetic fields (EB). We find that the chiral imbalance leads to a non-zero gyrotropic coefficient, which can be confirmed by the EB-generated Kerr effect. By applying B along the current direction, we observe a negative magnetoresistance despite the giant positive one at other directions, a clear indication of the chiral anomaly. Remarkably, a robust nonlocal response in valley diffusion originated from the chiral anomaly is persistent up to room temperature when B is parallel to E. The ability to manipulate the valley polarization in Dirac semimetal opens up a brand-new route to understand its fundamental properties through external fields and utilize the chiral fermions in valleytronic applications.

  14. Effects of boundary characteristics on resistance to temper embrittlement and segregation behavior of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Gyu; Lee, Ki-Hyoung [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Chul, E-mail: mckim@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong-Sang [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-20

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel has higher strength and fracture toughness than those of commercial SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel, due to its tempered martensitic microstructure as well as the solid solution effect and its higher contents of Ni and Cr. Hence, several studies have been performed on SA508 Gr.4N for nuclear application. In this study, the effects of microstructure on temper embrittlement and segregation behaviors in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were evaluated from the viewpoint of grain boundary characteristics. To evaluate the microstructural effect while excluding chemistry effects, the same heat was used but different microstructure samples were prepared by changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The increased volume fraction of martensite reduces the resistance to temper embrittlement, showing an increased transition-temperature shift (TTS) and increased P segregation at prior austenite boundaries. The segregation occurred intensively at prior austenite grain boundaries in tempered martensite, while the segregation occurred simultaneously at both prior austenite boundaries and packet boundaries in tempered bainite. In the EBSD results, most of the packet boundaries in tempered martensite are special boundaries such as N-Ary-Summation 3 coincident site lattice (CSL) boundaries. The differences in P segregation between tempered martensite and tempered bainite are mainly caused by different portions of low energy special boundaries among the sub-grain boundaries. The reduction of temper embrittlement resistance in tempered martensite could be explained by the increased fraction of low energy CSL boundaries, which leads to a concentrated segregation of P at prior austenite grain boundaries.

  15. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liao, Qiang; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Xun

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of boundary-layer separation controllers on a desktop fume hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Hsu, Ching Min; Hung, Shuo-Fu

    2016-10-02

    A desktop fume hood installed with an innovative design of flow boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, work surface, and corners was developed and characterized for its flow and containment leakage characteristics. The geometric features of the developed desktop fume hood included a rearward offset suction slot, two side plates, two side-plate boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, a slanted surface on the leading edge of the work surface, and two small triangular plates on the upper left and right corners of the hood face. The flow characteristics were examined using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique. The containment leakages were measured by the tracer gas (sulphur hexafluoride) detection method on the hood face plane with a mannequin installed in front of the hood. The results of flow visualization showed that the smoke dispersions induced by the boundary-layer separations on the leading edges of the side plates and work surface, as well as the three-dimensional complex flows on the upper-left and -right corners of the hood face, were effectively alleviated by the boundary-layer separation controllers. The results of the tracer gas detection method with a mannequin standing in front of the hood showed that the leakage levels were negligibly small (≤0.003 ppm) at low face velocities (≥0.19 m/s).

  17. Induced chirality of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous bile salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.; Williamson, C.K.; McGown, L.B. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We will discuss the effects of organized bile salt phases on the chirality of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as investigated by transmission circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD). Amphiphilic bile salt monomers form chiral micellar aggregates and should induce interesting changes in the chirality of the PAH probes. The high sensitivity of FDCD allows us to examine the effects of the organized bile salt media on the probe molecule over a large range of concentrations both above and below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the bile salt. The use of chiral bile salt media for FDCD determination of fluorescent analytes will be discussed.

  18. Constraining the magnitude of the Chiral Magnetic Effect with Event Shape Engineering in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN } = 2.76 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, S.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adolfsson, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Al-Turany, M.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altenkamper, L.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andreou, D.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barioglio, L.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boca, G.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonomi, G.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Bratrud, L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Capon, A. A.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Chandra, S.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Chowdhury, T.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Concas, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Costanza, S.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Degenhardt, H. F.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Doremalen, L. V. R.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dukhishyam, M.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabbietti, L.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, J.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Greiner, L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosa, F.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.

    2018-02-01

    In ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, the event-by-event variation of the elliptic flow v2 reflects fluctuations in the shape of the initial state of the system. This allows to select events with the same centrality but different initial geometry. This selection technique, Event Shape Engineering, has been used in the analysis of charge-dependent two- and three-particle correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN } = 2.76 TeV. The two-particle correlator 〈 cos ⁡ (φα -φβ) 〉, calculated for different combinations of charges α and β, is almost independent of v2 (for a given centrality), while the three-particle correlator 〈 cos ⁡ (φα +φβ - 2Ψ2) 〉 scales almost linearly both with the event v2 and charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The charge dependence of the three-particle correlator is often interpreted as evidence for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME), a parity violating effect of the strong interaction. However, its measured dependence on v2 points to a large non-CME contribution to the correlator. Comparing the results with Monte Carlo calculations including a magnetic field due to the spectators, the upper limit of the CME signal contribution to the three-particle correlator in the 10-50% centrality interval is found to be 26-33% at 95% confidence level.

  19. Constraining the magnitude of the Chiral Magnetic Effect with Event Shape Engineering in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Acharya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, the event-by-event variation of the elliptic flow v2 reflects fluctuations in the shape of the initial state of the system. This allows to select events with the same centrality but different initial geometry. This selection technique, Event Shape Engineering, has been used in the analysis of charge-dependent two- and three-particle correlations in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV. The two-particle correlator 〈cos⁡(φα−φβ〉, calculated for different combinations of charges α and β, is almost independent of v2 (for a given centrality, while the three-particle correlator 〈cos⁡(φα+φβ−2Ψ2〉 scales almost linearly both with the event v2 and charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The charge dependence of the three-particle correlator is often interpreted as evidence for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME, a parity violating effect of the strong interaction. However, its measured dependence on v2 points to a large non-CME contribution to the correlator. Comparing the results with Monte Carlo calculations including a magnetic field due to the spectators, the upper limit of the CME signal contribution to the three-particle correlator in the 10–50% centrality interval is found to be 26–33% at 95% confidence level.

  20. Boundary effect on the elastic field of a semi-infinite solid containing inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y J; Song, G; Yin, H M

    2015-07-08

    The boundary effect of one inhomogeneity embedded in a semi-infinite solid at different depths has firstly been investigated using the fundamental solution for Mindlin's problem. Expanding the eigenstrain in a polynomial form and using the Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method, one can calculate the eigenstrain and thus obtain the elastic field. When the inhomogeneity is far from the boundary, the solution recovers Eshelby's solution. The method has been extended to a many-particle system in a semi-infinite solid, which is first demonstrated by the cases of two spheres. The comparison of the asymptotic form solution with the finite-element results shows the accuracy and capability of this method. The solution has been used to illustrate the boundary effects on its effective material behaviour of a semi-infinite simple cubic lattice particulate composite. The local field of a semi-infinite composite has been calculated at different volume fractions. A representative unit cell has been taken with different depths to the surface. The average stress and strain of the unit cell have been calculated under uniform loading conditions of normal or shear force on the surface, respectively. The effective elastic moduli of the unit cell not only depend on the material proportion, but also on its distance to the surface. The present model can be extended to other types of particle distribution and ellipsoidal particles.

  1. Quarks, baryons and chiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hosaka, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    This book describes baryon models constructed from quarks, mesons and chiral symmetry. The role of chiral symmetry and of quark model structure with SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry are discussed in detail, starting from a pedagogic introduction. Emphasis is placed on symmetry aspects of the theories. As an application, the chiral bag model is studied for nucleon structure, where important methods of theoretical physics, mostly related to the semiclassical approach for a system of strong interactions, are demonstrated. The text is more practical than formal; tools and ideas are explained in detail w

  2. Effect of boundary layer trip on reduction of jet noise in over-expanded nozzle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyoji, Masayuki; Tabaru, Issei

    2017-10-01

    A flow resonance accompanied by the emission of acoustic tones occurs in an over-expanded convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzle when operated at comparatively low pressure ratios. This phenomenon is distinguished from conventional screech tones and is referred to as "transonic tones". In contrast to screech tones, the peak resonant frequency for transonic tones increases with pressure ratio; the peak sound pressure level exceeds 110 dB. In this study, we investigated the basic characteristics of transonic resonance and tones using a circular C-D nozzle in an anechoic room. The effects of the boundary layer trip were also evaluated using a tripping wire for the suppressing transonic resonance and tones. The results of acoustic measurements show that several predominant peaks correspond to transonic tones. However, the boundary layer trip inside the nozzle effectively eliminated these tones and suppressed the unsteadiness of the flow inside the nozzle.

  3. Natural Abundance Isotopic Chirality in the Reagents of the Soai Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Barabás

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic chirality influences sensitively the enantiomeric outcome of the Soai asymmetric autocatalysis. Therefore magnitude and eventual effects of isotopic chirality caused by natural abundance isotopic substitution (H, C, O, Zn in the reagents of the Soai reaction were analyzed by combinatorics and probability calculations. Expectable enantiomeric excesses were calculated by the Pars–Mills equation. It has been found that the chiral isotopic species formed by substitution in the otherwise achiral reagents provide enantiomeric excess (e.e. levels that are higher than the sensitivity threshold of the Soai autocatalysis towards chiral induction. Consequently, possible chiral induction exerted by these e.e. values should be taken into account in considerations regarding the molecular events and the mechanism of the chiral induction in the Soai reaction.

  4. Stoichiometry-Controlled Inversion of Supramolecular Chirality in Nanostructures Co-assembled with Bipyridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Feng, Chuan-Liang

    2018-02-01

    To control supramolecular chirality of the co-assembled nanostructures, one of the remaining issues is how stoichiometry of the different molecules involved in co-assembly influence chiral transformation. Through co-assembly of achiral 1,4-bis(pyrid-4-yl)benzene and chiral phenylalanine-glycine derivative hydrogelators, stoichiometry is found to be an effective tool for controlling supramolecular chirality inversion processes. This inversion is mainly mediated by a delicate balance between intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions and π-π stacking of the two components, which may subtly change the stacking of the molecules, in turn, the self-assembled nanostructures. This study exemplifies a simplistic way to invert the handedness of chiral nanostructures and provide fundamental understanding of the inherent principles of supramolecular chirality. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Insights into chiral recognition mechanisms in supercritical fluid chromatography V. Effect of the nature and proportion of alcohol mobile phase modifier with amylose and cellulose tris-(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Syame; West, Caroline

    2014-12-19

    In enantioselective supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with chiral stationary phases (CSP), the elution strength of carbon dioxide is usually modulated by the use of polar organic solvents, also called modifiers. Alcohols like methanol, ethanol and isopropanol are the most commonly used co-solvents. While most applications of chiral SFC are optimized through a process of varying the co-solvent nature and proportion, only a limited number of thorough investigations have been carried out to unravel the effects of the co-solvent on the enantioseparation process. In an attempt to clarify the effect of the mobile phase co-solvent on enantioselective SFC separations, a wide range of compounds (achiral and chiral) were analyzed on an amylosic (Chiralpak AD-H) and a cellulosic (Lux cellulose-1) CSP. The influence of the modifier polarity and steric hindrance must be considered thus several different alcoholic solvents were evaluated: methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol and 1-butanol, with a proportion of 10% in carbon dioxide. A selected group of racemates was further analyzed with varying proportions of each alcohol ranging from 5 to 25%. Besides, because mixtures of solvents were sometimes reported to produce unexpected results, a 50:50 mixture of methanol and ethanol was also evaluated. Chemometric methods provide some insight into the enantio-separation process and help identifying the differences between the mobile phase conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural and temperature effects on enantiomer separations of bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-based 3-amino-2-carboxylic acids on cinchona alkaloid-based zwitterionic chiral stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilisz, István; Grecsó, Nóra; Palkó, Márta; Fülöp, Ferenc; Lindner, Wolfgang; Péter, Antal

    2014-09-01

    Procedures for the direct high-performance liquid chromatographic enantiomer separation of four bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-based 3-amino-2-carboxylic acids were developed in polar-ionic mode on zwitterionic chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on cinchonane alkaloide quinine, quinidine and chiral sulfonic acid motifs. The effects of the mobile phase composition including the type of acid and base additives, the structures of the analytes and temperature were investigated. Experiments were performed at constant mobile phase compositions in the temperature range 10-50°C in order to study the effects of temperature, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated from plots of ln k or ln α vs. 1/T. Some mechanistic aspects of the chiral recognition process are discussed with respect to the structures of the analytes. It was found that the enantiomeric separations were in most cases enthalpically driven, but entropically driven separation was also observed. The sequence of elution of the enantiomers on the pseudo-enantiomerically behaving CSPs was determined in all cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of pore-size optimization on the performance of polysaccharide-based superficially porous chiral stationary phases for the separation of enantiomers in high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhitashvili, Lia; Bardavelidze, Anna; Ordjonikidze, Teona; Chankvetadze, Lali; Chity, Mike; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2017-01-27

    Our earlier studies on the preparation of chiral stationary phases (CSP) based on superficially porous (or core-shell) silica (SPS) particles for the separation of enantiomers in HPLC have provided proof to the advantages of such sorbents. In particular, higher enantioselectivity was observed with the columns packed with superficially porous CSP compared to the columns packed with fully-porous (FP) silica-based CSPs at comparable content of chiral selector (polysaccharide derivative) in CSP. Also, less dependence of plate height on mobile phase flow rate and higher plate numbers and resolution calculated per unit time (i.e. speed of separation) were observed with SPS-based CSPs. Thirty years of CSP development have demonstrated that wide-pore silica has to be used as a support for large molecular weight chiral selectors such as the ones based on polysaccharides. In this study the effect of pore size of the core-shell silica support and of other experimental factors on column performance is demonstrated. Reduced plate heights in the range 1.4-1.5 were obtained, as well as highly effective baseline separations of enantiomers were observed with analysis times of less than 15s. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Constraints on the chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Sijing; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Mahrous, Ayman; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Haitz, Dominik; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Biasotto, Massimo; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lujan, Paul; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Verweij, Marta; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; 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Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Elwood, Adam; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Zahid, Sema; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Hiltbrand, Joshua; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of same- and opposite-sign pairs with respect to the second- and third-order event planes have been measured in pPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = $ 8.16 TeV and PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is motivated by the search for the charge separation phenomenon predicted by the chiral magnetic effect (CME) in heavy ion collisions. Three- and two-particle azimuthal correlators are extracted as functions of the pseudorapidity difference, the transverse momentum ($ p_{\\mathrm{T}} $) difference, and the $ p_{\\mathrm{T}} $ average of same- and opposite-charge pairs in various event multiplicity ranges. The data suggest that the charge-dependent three-particle correlators with respect to the second- and third-order event planes share a common origin, predominantly arising from charge-dependent two-particle azimuthal correlations coupled with an anisotropic flow. The CME is expected to lead to a $v_{2}$-independent three-pa...

  9. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb collisions with CMS and its implication for the search of the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Zhoudunming

    2017-01-01

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations relative to the event plane in AA collisions have been suggested as providing evidence for the chiral magnetic effect (CME) caused by local strong parity violation. However, the observation of the CME remains inconclusive because of several possible sources of background correlations that may account for part or all of the observed signals. This talk will present the first application of three-particle, charge-dependent azimuthal correlation analysis in proton-nucleus collisions, using pPb data collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. The differences found in comparing same and opposite sign correlations are studied as a function of event multiplicity and the pseudorapidity gap between two of the particles detected in the CMS tracker detector. After selecting events with comparable charge-particle multiplicities, the results for pPb collisions are found to be similar to those for PbPb collisions collected at the same collision energy. ...

  10. Chiral symmetry effect on the pion-nucleon coupling constant; O efeito da simetria quiral na constante de acoplamento pion-nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Vanilse da Silva

    1997-12-31

    In this work we study the effects of chiral symmetry in the pion-nucleon coupling constant in the context of the linear {sigma}- model. First, we introduce the linear {sigma}-model and we discuss the phenomenological hypothesis of CVC and PCAC. Next, we calculate the coupling constant g+{pi}{sub NN}(q{sup 2}) and the nucleon pionic mean square radius considering the contribution of all the diagrams up to one-loop in the framework of the linear {sigma}-model for different values of the mass of the sigma meson and we compare them with the phenomenological form factors. Finally we make an extension of the linear {sigma}-model that consists of taking into account the mass differences of ions and nucleons into the Lagrangian of the model, to study the change dependence of g{sub {pi}nn} (q{sup 2}) and of the mean square radius. (author) 21 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic transitions in $^8$Be with meson-exchange currents derived from chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, S. [University of South Carolina; Wiringa, Robert B. [ANL; Pieper, Steven C. [ANL; Schiavilla, Rocco [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2014-08-01

    We report quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic transitions in $^8$Be. The realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Illinois-7 three-nucleon potentials are used to generate the ground state and nine excited states, with energies that are in excellent agreement with experiment. A dozen $M1$ and eight $E2$ transition matrix elements between these states are then evaluated. The $E2$ matrix elements are computed only in impulse approximation, with those transitions from broad resonant states requiring special treatment. The $M1$ matrix elements include two-body meson-exchange currents derived from chiral effective field theory, which typically contribute 20--30\\% of the total expectation value. Many of the transitions are between isospin-mixed states; the calculations are performed for isospin-pure states and then combined with the empirical mixing coefficients to compare to experiment. In general, we find that transitions between states that have the same dominant spatial symmetry are in decent agreement with experiment, but those transitions between different spatial symmetries are often significantly underpredicted.

  12. Importance of C*-H based modes and large amplitude motion effects in vibrational circular dichroism spectra: the case of the chiral adduct of dimethyl fumarate and anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarello, Marco; Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Lepri, Susan; Ruzziconi, Renzo; Nicu, Valentin Paul

    2014-06-19

    The role played by the C*-H based modes (C* being the chiral carbon atom) and the large amplitude motions in the vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra is investigated. The example of an adduct of dimethyl fumarate and anthracene, i.e., dimethyl-(+)-(11R,12R)-9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracene-11,12-dicarboxylate, and two deuterated isotopomers thereof specially synthesized for this goal, are considered. By comparing the experimental and DFT calculated spectra of the undeuterated and deuterated species, we demonstrate that the C*-H bending, rocking, and stretching modes in the VA and VCD spectra are clearly identified in well defined spectroscopic features. Further, significant information about the conformer distribution is gathered by analyzing the VA and VCD data of both the fingerprint and the C-H stretching regions, with particular attention paid to the band shape data. Effects related to the large amplitude motions of the two methoxy moieties have been simulated by performing linear transit (LT) calculations, which consists of varying systematically the relative positions of the two methoxy moieties and calculating VCD spectra for the partially optimized structures obtained in this way. The LT method allows one to improve the quality of calculated spectra, as compared to experimental results, especially in regard to relative intensities and bandwidths.

  13. Chiral perturbation theory with tensor sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Mateu, Vicent

    2007-05-21

    We construct the most general chirally-invariant Lagrangian for mesons in the presence of external sources coupled to the tensor current \\bar psi sigma_mu nu psi. In order to have only even terms in the chiral expansion, we consider the new source of O(p2). With this choice, we build the even-parity effective Lagrangian up to the p6-order (NLO). While there are only 4 new terms at the p4-order, at p6-order we find 78 terms for n_f=2 and 113 terms for n_f=3. We provide a detailed discussion on the different mechanisms that ensure that our final set of operators is complete and non-redundant. We also examine the odd-parity sector, to conclude that the first operators appear at the p8-order (NNLO).

  14. Chiral Selectivity as a Bridge to Homochirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Berger, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    In abiotic reactions, equal mixtures of L- and D- amino acid enantiomers are produced unless conditions that favor one enantiomer over the other are present. Understanding how the transition from racemic, abiotic chemistry to homochiral polymers used in proteins occurred is fundamental to our understanding of the origins of life on Earth and the search for signs of life elsewhere, but this transition is still poorly understood. We have begun investigations into whether enantiopure amino acid pools are a necessary condition, or if the polymerization process itself can impart some added degree of stereoselectivity. More specifically, we are exploring the polymerization behavior of chiral amino acids to determine if they show a preference for homochiral or heterochiral polymerization. We are also determining the effects of different amino acid chiral ratios (L greater than D) to determine at what level of enantiomeric enrichment homochiral peptides become predominant. These data will allow us to evaluate the plausibility of homochiral polymers arising by known abiotic mechanisms.

  15. A primer for Chiral Perturbative Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Stefan [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Schindler, Matthias R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Physics; George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2012-07-01

    Chiral Perturbation Theory, as effective field theory, is a commonly accepted and well established working tool, approximating quantum chromodynamics at energies well below typical hadron masses. This volume, based on a number of lectures and supplemented with additional material, provides a pedagogical introduction for graduate students and newcomers entering the field from related areas of nuclear and particle physics. Starting with the the Lagrangian of the strong interactions and general symmetry principles, the basic concepts of Chiral Perturbation Theory in the mesonic and baryonic sectors are developed. The application of these concepts is then illustrated with a number of examples. A large number of exercises (81, with complete solutions) are included to familiarize the reader with helpful calculational techniques. (orig.)

  16. Chiral Response of Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, T.; Low, T.; Gómez-Santos, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present an effective (minimal) theory for chiral two-dimensional materials. These materials possess an electromagnetic coupling without exhibiting a topological gap. As an example, we study the response of doped twisted bilayers, unveiling unusual phenomena in the zero frequency limit. An in-plane magnetic field induces a huge paramagnetic response at the neutrality point and, upon doping, also gives rise to a substantial longitudinal Hall response. The system also accommodates nontrivial longitudinal plasmonic modes that are associated with a longitudinal magnetic moment, thus endowing them with a chiral character. Finally, we note that the optical activity can be considerably enhanced upon doping and our general approach would enable systematic exploration of 2D material heterostructures with optical activity.

  17. A primer for chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Chiral Perturbation Theory, as effective field theory, is a commonly accepted and well established working tool, approximating quantum chromodynamics at energies well below typical hadron masses. This volume, based on a number of lectures and supplemented with additional material, provides a pedagogical introduction for graduate students and newcomers entering the field from related areas of nuclear and particle physics. Starting with the the Lagrangian of the strong interactions and general symmetry principles, the basic concepts of Chiral Perturbation Theory in the mesonic and baryonic sectors are developed. The application of these concepts is then illustrated with a number of examples. A large number of exercises (81, with complete solutions) are included to familiarize the reader with helpful calculational techniques.

  18. Why (almost) all bundles are chiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost-Smith, Zachary V.; Blackwell, Robert A.; Glaser, Matthew A.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the self assembly of bundles of achiral hard rods with distributed, short-range attractive interactions. We show that in the majority of cases the equilibrium state of the bundle is chiral, with a double twist structure. We use biased Monte Carlo techniques and cell theory to compute the free energy as a function of an appropriately defined twist order parameter, and show that the formation of spontaneously chiral bundles is driven by maximization of orientational entropy. The finite curvature of the bundle boundary permits orientational escape, in which the circumferential angular range of motion of the rods is maximized for some finite average tilt. We map out the phase diagram of bundles in terms of the density, the ratio of rod length to bundle radius, L / R , and rod aspect ratio, L / D , and find transitions between untwisted, weakly twisted, and strongly twisted states. This work helps explain the common observation of twisted macroscopic bundles, and may provide insight into observations of twist in self-assembled membranes of colloidal rods.[2] This work funded by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-0820579.

  19. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  20. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of the Fixed Boundaries in Channelized Dry Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, L.; Carleo, L.; Papa, M. N.; Villani, P.

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of granular mixtures, involved in several geophysical phenomena like rock avalanches and debris flows, is far from being completely understood. Several features of their motion, such as non-local and boundary effects, still represent open problems. An extensive experimental study on free-surface channelized granular flows is here presented, where the effects of the fixed boundaries are systematically investigated. The entire experimental data set is obtained by using a homogenous acetal-polymeric granular material and three different basal surfaces, allowing different kinematic boundary conditions. Velocity profiles at both the sidewall and the free surface are obtained by using high-speed cameras and the open-source particle image velocimetry code, PIVlab. Significantly, different sidewall velocity profiles are observed by varying the basal roughness and the flow depth. Owing to sidewall friction and non-local effects, such profiles exhibit a clear rheological stratification for high enough flow depths and they can be well described by recurring to composite functions, variously formed of linear, Bagnold and exponential scalings. Moreover, it has been discovered that transitions from one velocity profile to another are also possible on the same basal surface by merely varying the flow depth. This shape transition is due partly to the sidewall resistances, the basal boundary condition and, in particular, the occurrence/inhibition of basal grain rolling. In most of the experiments, the normal-to-bed velocity profiles and the velocity measurements at the free surface strongly suggest the occurrence of a secondary circulating flow, made possible by a chiefly collisional regime beneath the free surface.

  1. Correlation between quadratic magnetic field induced circular birefringence and the natural optical activity of chiral media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surma, M.

    There is a correlation between the natural and the quadratic magnetic field induced circular birefringence of chiral molecules. The circular birefringence created by a chiral molecule is a superposition of the natural and B, B2, B3, magnetic field induced rotations of the optical polarization plane of the light beam passing through the chiral medium. The B and B3 dependent rotations are the linear and nonlinear Faraday effects while, as experimentally observed, the B2 dependent rotation is clockwise for dextrorotatory enantiomers (+) and counterclockwise for laevorotatory enantiomers (-). The natural and B, B2, B3 induced rotations given by a single chiral molecule analysed neat and in water solution are discussed.

  2. Scalar response of the nucleon chiral symmetry and nuclear matter properties

    CERN Document Server

    Chanfray, G

    2010-01-01

    In this talk we present a description of nuclear binding in a chiral approach based on the existence of a chiral invariant scalar field associated with the generation of the masses through spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking. We discuss the emergence of such a field on the example of the NJL model. We also incorporate the effect of confinement at the level of the nucleon substructure to stabilize nuclear matter. In a particular quark-diquark model we illustrate the simutaneous influences of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and confinement on the nucleon mass and on the nuclear matter description.

  3. Review of chiral perturbation theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A review of chiral perturbation theory and recent developments on the comparison of its predictions with experiment is presented. Some interesting topics with scope for further elaboration are touched upon.

  4. Chiral thermodynamics of nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorilla, Salvatore

    2012-10-23

    The equation of state of nuclear matter is calculated at finite temperature in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory up to three-loop order. The dependence of its thermodynamic properties on the isospin-asymmetry is investigated. The chiral quark condensate is evaluated for symmetric nuclear matter. Its behaviour as a function of density and temperature sets important nuclear physics constraints for the QCD phase diagram.

  5. Effects of flow and colony morphology on the thermal boundary layer of corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Isabel M.; Kühl, Michael; Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Ralph, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal microenvironment of corals and the thermal effects of changing flow and radiation are critical to understanding heat-induced coral bleaching, a stress response resulting from the destruction of the symbiosis between corals and their photosynthetic microalgae. Temperature microsensor measurements at the surface of illuminated stony corals with uneven surface topography (Leptastrea purpurea and Platygyra sinensis) revealed millimetre-scale variations in surface temperature and thermal boundary layer (TBL) that may help understand the patchy nature of coral bleaching within single colonies. The effect of water flow on the thermal microenvironment was investigated in hemispherical and branching corals (Porites lobata and Stylophora pistillata, respectively) in a flow chamber experiment. For both coral types, the thickness of the TBL decreased exponentially from 2.5 mm at quasi-stagnant flow (0.3 cm s−1), to 1 mm at 5 cm s−1, with an exponent approximately 0.5 consistent with predictions from the heat transfer theory for simple geometrical objects and typical of laminar boundary layer processes. Measurements of mass transfer across the diffusive boundary layer using O2 microelectrodes revealed a greater exponent for mass transfer when compared with heat transfer, indicating that heat and mass transfer at the surface of corals are not exactly analogous processes. PMID:21602322

  6. Meta-Chirality: Fundamentals, Construction and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Ma

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chiral metamaterials represent a special type of artificial structures that cannot be superposed to their mirror images. Due to the lack of mirror symmetry, cross-coupling between electric and magnetic fields exist in chiral mediums and present unique electromagnetic characters of circular dichroism and optical activity, which provide a new opportunity to tune polarization and realize negative refractive index. Chiral metamaterials have attracted great attentions in recent years and have given rise to a series of applications in polarization manipulation, imaging, chemical and biological detection, and nonlinear optics. Here we review the fundamental theory of chiral media and analyze the construction principles of some typical chiral metamaterials. Then, the progress in extrinsic chiral metamaterials, absorbing chiral metamaterials, and reconfigurable chiral metamaterials are summarized. In the last section, future trends in chiral metamaterials and application in nonlinear optics are introduced.

  7. Controlling nested wrinkle morphology through the boundary effect on narrow-band thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hanyang; Shi, Tielin; Liao, Guanglan; Xia, Qi

    2017-07-01

    We describe the formation of nested wrinkles created by the thermal mismatch between a narrow-band thin film and a compliant substrate. When a film is described as "narrow-band", it literally means that the film band width is much shorter than its length; more precisely, it means that the width is comparable with the wavelength of the wrinkles. A silicon mask was used during film sputtering to create narrow-band films on poly (dimethylsiloxane) substrate, thus creating regular boundaries to steer local stresses and control wrinkle morphology. Disordered nano-scale wrinkles were found nested within highly ordered micro-scale sinusoidal wrinkles. The formation of nested wrinkles was explained through the amplitude and wavelength saturation of nano-scale wrinkles. The disordered morphology of nano-scale wrinkles and the highly ordered morphology of micro-scale wrinkles were explained by using the boundary effect.

  8. Effects of Refractive Index and Diffuse or Specular Boundaries on a Radiating Isothermal Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Equilibrium temperatures of an absorbing-emitting layer were obtained for exposure to incident radiation and with the layer boundaries either specular or diffuse. For high refractive indices the surface condition can influence the radiative heat balance if the layer optical thickness is small. Hence for a spectrally varying absorption coefficient the layer temperature is affected if there is significant radiative energy in the spectral range with a small absorption coefficient. Similar behavior was obtained for transient radiative cooling of a layer where the results are affected by the initial temperature and hence the fraction of energy radiated in the short wavelength region where the absorption coefficient is small. The results are a layer without internal scattering. If internal scattering is significant, the radiation reaching the internal surface of a boundary is diffused and the effect of the two different surface conditions would become small.

  9. The effect of system boundaries on the mean free path for confined gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooraj K. Prabha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mean free path of rarefied gases is accurately determined using Molecular Dynamics simulations. The simulations are carried out on isothermal argon gas (Lennard-Jones fluid over a range of rarefaction levels under various confinements (unbounded gas, parallel reflective wall and explicit solid platinum wall bounded gas in a nanoscale domain. The system is also analyzed independently in constitutive sub-systems to calculate the corresponding local mean free paths. Our studies which predominate in the transition regime substantiate the boundary limiting effect on mean free paths owing to the sharp diminution in molecular free paths near the planar boundaries. These studies provide insight to the transport phenomena of rarefied gases through nanochannels which have established their potential in microscale and nanoscale heat transfer applications.

  10. Global boundary conditions for the Dirac operator

    CERN Document Server

    Falomir, H A

    1997-01-01

    Ellipticity of boundary value problems is characterized in terms of the Calderon projector. The presence of topological obstructions for the chiral Dirac operator under local boundary conditions in even dimension is discussed. Functional determinants for Dirac operators on manifolds with boundary are considered. The functional determinant for a Dirac operator on a bidimensional disk, in the presence of an Abelian gauge field and subject to global boundary conditions of the type introduced by Atiyah-Patodi-Singer, is evaluated. The relationship with the index theorem is also commented.

  11. Double dispersion effects on non-Darcy free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over vertical frustum of a cone with convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamReddy, Ch.; Venkata Rao, Ch.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a numerical analysis is performed to investigate the effects of double dispersion and convective boundary condition on natural convection flow over vertical frustum of a cone in a nanofluid saturated non-Darcy porous medium. In addition, Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects have taken into consideration, and the uniform wall nanoparticle condition is replaced with the zero nanoparticle mass flux boundary condition to execute physically applicable results. For this complex problem, the similarity solution does not exist and hence suitable non-similarity transformations are used to transform the governing equations along with the boundary conditions into non-dimensional form. The Bivariate Pseudo-Spectral Local Linearisation Method (BPSLLM) is used to solve the reduced non-similar, coupled partial differential equations. To test the accuracy of proposed method, the error analysis and convergence tests are conducted. The effect of flow influenced parameters on non-dimensional velocity, temperature, nanoparticle volume fraction, regular concentration field as well as on the surface drag, heat transfer, nanoparticle and regular mass transfer rates are analyzed.

  12. Boundary Electron and Beta Dosimetry-Quantification of the Effects of Dissimilar Media on Absorbed Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Josane C.

    1991-02-01

    This work quantifies the changes effected in electron absorbed dose to a soft-tissue equivalent medium when part of this medium is replaced by a material that is not soft -tissue equivalent. That is, heterogeneous dosimetry is addressed. Radionuclides which emit beta particles are the electron sources of primary interest. They are used in brachytherapy and in nuclear medicine: for example, beta -ray applicators made with strontium-90 are employed in certain ophthalmic treatments and iodine-131 is used to test thyroid function. More recent medical procedures under development and which involve beta radionuclides include radioimmunotherapy and radiation synovectomy; the first is a cancer modality and the second deals with the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the possibility of skin surface contamination exists whenever there is handling of radioactive material. Determination of absorbed doses in the examples of the preceding paragraph requires considering boundaries of interfaces. Whilst the Monte Carlo method can be applied to boundary calculations, for routine work such as in clinical situations, or in other circumstances where doses need to be determined quickly, analytical dosimetry would be invaluable. Unfortunately, few analytical methods for boundary beta dosimetry exist. Furthermore, the accuracy of results from both Monte Carlo and analytical methods has to be assessed. Although restricted to one radionuclide, phosphorus -32, the experimental data obtained in this work serve several purposes, one of which is to provide standards against which calculated results can be tested. The experimental data also contribute to the relatively sparse set of published boundary dosimetry data. At the same time, they may be useful in developing analytical boundary dosimetry methodology. The first application of the experimental data is demonstrated. Results from two Monte Carlo codes and two analytical methods, which were developed elsewhere, are compared

  13. Chiral Receiving Antenna With Low Backscattering Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Karilainen, Antti O

    2011-01-01

    Receiving antennas absorb power from incident waves, but they also re-radiate some power into surrounding space. If a receiving antenna is to be used as a sensor which should not disturb the object under study, it should scatter as little power as possible in the receiving direction. We propose to use a chiral element composed of two orthogonal chiral particles as a low-scattering sensor.The element can transmit and receive circular polarization in all directions with the Huygens' pattern. We derive the vector effective length for the antenna using the small dipole approximation for the chiral particles. We observe that the element does not backscatter, regardless of the polarization, when the incidence direction is normal to the plane of the particles. Scattered fields, scattered axial ratio, and the scattering cross section are presented. We show that the zero-backscattering property holds also for the antenna element when it is capable to receive all the available power with conjugate loading. The approxim...

  14. Study of a Newtonian Fluid through Circular Channels with Slip Boundary Taking into Account Electrokinetic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the slip flow of fluids driven by the combined effect of electrical force and pressure gradient. The underlying boundary value problem is solved through the use of Fourier series expansion in time and Bessel function in space. The exact solutions and numerical investigations show that the slip length and electrical field parameters have significant effects on the velocity profile. By varying these system parameters, one can achieve smooth velocity profiles or wave form profiles with different wave amplitude and frequency. This opens the way for optimizing the flow by choosing the slip length, the electrical field, and electrolyte solutions.

  15. Double stratification effects on boundary layer over a stretching cylinder with chemical reaction and heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohut, Noor Farizza Haniem Mohd; Aziz, Ahmad Sukri Abd; Ali, Zaileha Md

    2017-09-01

    An analysis of double stratification effects on boundary layer flow along a stretching cylinder with chemical reaction and heat generation is presented in this study. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and solved by Runge-Kutta forth-fifth order (RKF45) with shooting technique. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are analyzed graphically. The present analysis is validated by comparing with previously published work and found to be in good agreement.

  16. Effects of air pollution on thermal structure and dispersion in an urban planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The short-term effects of urbanization and air pollution on the transport processes in the urban planetary boundary layer (PBL) are studied. The investigation makes use of an unsteady two-dimensional transport model which has been developed by Viskanta et al., (1976). The model predicts pollutant concentrations and temperature in the PBL. The potential effects of urbanization and air pollution on the thermal structure in the urban PBL are considered, taking into account the results of numerical simulations modeling the St. Louis, Missouri metropolitan area.

  17. An analysis of boundary-effects in obtaining the frequency dependent specific heat by effusivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Behrens, Claus

    The frequency dependent specific heat is a significant response function characterizing the glass transition. Contrary to the dielectric response it is not easily measured over many decades. The introduction of the 3-omega method, where the temperature oscillations at a planar oscillatoric heat...... generator is measured, made this possible. The method relied on a 1-d solution to the heat diffusion equation. There have been attempts to invoke the boundary effects to first order. However we present the fully 3-d solution to the problem including these effects. The frequency range can hereby...

  18. Effects of boundary conditions on bistable behaviour in axisymmetrical shallow shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, P M; Seffen, K A

    2017-07-01

    Multistable shells are thin-walled structures that have more than one stable state of self-stress. We consider isotropic axisymmetrical shallow shells of arbitrary polynomial shapes using a Föppl-von Kármán analytical model. By employing a Rayleigh-Ritz approach, we identify stable shapes from local minima in the strain energy formulation, and we formally characterize the level of influence of the boundary conditions on the critical geometry for achieving bistable inversion-an effect not directly answered in the literature. Systematic insight is afforded by connecting the boundary to ground through sets of extensional and rotational linear springs. For typical cap-like shells, it is shown that bistability is generally enhanced when the extensional spring stiffness increases and when the rotational spring stiffness decreases, i.e. when boundary movements in-plane are resisted but when their rotations are not; however, for certain other shapes and large in-plane stiffness values, bistability can be enhanced by resisting but not entirely preventing edge rotations. Our predictions are furnished as detailed regime maps of the critical geometry, which are accurately correlated against finite-element analysis. Furthermore, the suitabilities of single degree-of-freedom models, for which solutions are achieved in closed form, are evaluated and compared to our more accurate predictions.

  19. Spectral Action for Torsion with and without Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iochum, B.; Levy, Cyril Olivier; Vassilevich, D.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a commutative spectral triple and study the spectral action for a rather general geometric setting which includes the (skew-symmetric) torsion and the chiral bag conditions on the boundary. The spectral action splits into bulk and boundary parts. In the bulk, we clarify certain issues...

  20. On the effect of laterally varying boundary heat flux on rapidly rotating spherical shell convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swarandeep; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2017-08-01

    The onset of convection in a rotating spherical shell subject to laterally varying heat flux at the outer boundary is considered in this paper. The focus is on the geophysically relevant regime of rapid rotation (low Ekman number) where the natural length scale of convection is significantly smaller than the length scale imposed by the boundary heat flux pattern. Contrary to earlier studies at a higher Ekman number, we find a substantial reduction in the onset Rayleigh number Rac with increasing lateral variation. The decrease in Rac is shown to be closely correlated to the equatorial heat flux surplus in the steady, basic state solution. The consistency of such a correlation makes the estimation of Rac possible without solving the full stability problem. The steady baroclinic flow has a strong cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry in the kinetic helicity only for equatorially symmetric lateral variations, with possible implications for dynamo action. Equatorially antisymmetric variations, on the other hand, break the symmetry of the mean flow, in turn negating its helicity. Analysis of the perturbation solution reveals strongly localized clusters through which convection rolls drift in and out at a frequency higher than that for the reference case with homogeneous boundary heat flux. Large lateral variations produce a marked decrease in the azimuthal length scale of columns, which indicates that small-scale motions are essential to the transport of heat in rapidly rotating, localized convection. With an equatorially antisymmetric heat flux pattern, convection in individual clusters goes through an asynchronous wax-wane cycle whose frequency is much lower than the drift rate of the columns. These continual variations in convection intensity may in turn result in fluctuations in the magnetic field intensity, an effect that needs to be considered in dynamo models. Finally, there is a notable analogy between the role of a laterally varying boundary heat flux and the role of a

  1. Determination of the carbon budget of a pasture: effect of system boundaries and flux uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Raphael; Bretscher, Daniel; Münger, Andreas; Neftel, Albrecht; Ammann, Christof

    2016-05-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration in the soil is considered as a potential important mechanism to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the agricultural sector. It can be quantified by the net ecosystem carbon budget (NECB) describing the change of soil C as the sum of all relevant import and export fluxes. NECB was investigated here in detail for an intensively grazed dairy pasture in Switzerland. Two budget approaches with different system boundaries were applied: NECBtot for system boundaries including the grazing cows and NECBpast for system boundaries excluding the cows. CO2 and CH4 exchange induced by soil/vegetation processes as well as direct emissions by the animals were derived from eddy covariance measurements. Other C fluxes were either measured (milk yield, concentrate feeding) or derived based on animal performance data (intake, excreta). For the investigated year, both approaches resulted in a small near-neutral C budget: NECBtot -27 ± 62 and NECBpast 23 ± 76 g C m-2 yr-1. The considerable uncertainties, depending on the approach, were mainly due to errors in the CO2 exchange or in the animal-related fluxes. The comparison of the NECB results with the annual exchange of other GHG revealed CH4 emissions from the cows to be the major contributor in terms of CO2 equivalents, but with much lower uncertainty compared to NECB. Although only 1 year of data limit the representativeness of the carbon budget results, they demonstrate the important contribution of the non-CO2 fluxes depending on the chosen system boundaries and the effect of their propagated uncertainty in an exemplary way. The simultaneous application and comparison of both NECB approaches provides a useful consistency check for the carbon budget determination and can help to identify and eliminate systematic errors.

  2. Chiral behavior of K →π l ν decay form factors in lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S.; Cossu, G.; Feng, X.; Fukaya, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Noaki, J.; Onogi, T.; Jlqcd Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the form factors of the K →π l ν semileptonic decays in three-flavor lattice QCD and study their chiral behavior as a function of the momentum transfer and the Nambu-Goldstone boson masses. Chiral symmetry is exactly preserved by using the overlap quark action, which enables us to directly compare the lattice data with chiral perturbation theory (ChPT). We generate gauge ensembles at a lattice spacing of 0.11 fm with four pion masses covering 290-540 MeV and a strange quark mass ms close to its physical value. By using the all-to-all quark propagator, we calculate the vector and scalar form factors with high precision. Their dependence on ms and the momentum transfer is studied by using the reweighting technique and the twisted boundary conditions for the quark fields. We compare the results for the semileptonic form factors with ChPT at next-to-next-to-leading order in detail. While many low-energy constants appear at this order, we make use of our data of the light meson electromagnetic form factors in order to control the chiral extrapolation. We determine the normalization of the form factors as f+(0 )=0.9636 (36 )(-35+57) and observe reasonable agreement of their shape with experiment.

  3. Effect of disulfide bonding and multimerization on proteoglycan 4's cartilage boundary lubricating ability and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubacker, Saleem; Ponjevic, Dragana; Ham, Hyun O; Messersmith, Phillip B; Matyas, John R; Schmidt, Tannin A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the cartilage boundary lubricating ability of (1) nonreduced (NR) disulfide-bonded proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) multimers versus PRG4 monomers and (2) NR versus reduced and alkylated (R/A) PRG4 monomers and to assess (3) the ability of NR PRG4 multimers versus monomers to adsorb to an articular cartilage surface. PRG4 was separated into two preparations, PRG4 multimer enriched (PRG4Multi+) and PRG4 multimer deficient (PRG4Multi-), using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The cartilage boundary lubricating ability of PRG4Multi+ and PRG4Multi- was compared at a physiological concentration (450 μg/mL) and assessed over a range of concentrations (45, 150, and 450 μg/mL). R/A and NR PRG4Multi- were evaluated at 450 μg/mL. Immunohistochemistry with anti-PRG4 antibody 4D6 was performed to visualize the adsorption of PRG4 preparations to the surface of articular cartilage explants. Separation into enriched populations of PRG4Multi+ and PRG4Multi- was achieved using SEC and was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. PRG4Multi+ and PRG4Multi- both functioned as effective friction-reducing cartilage boundary lubricants at 450 μg/mL, with PRG4Multi+ being more effective than PRG4Multi-. PRG4Multi+ lubricated in a dose-dependent manner, however, PRG4Multi- did not. R/A PRG4Multi- lubricated similar to NR PRG4Multi-. PRG4-containing solutions showed 4D6 immunoreactivity at the articular surface; the immunoreactive intensity of PRG4Multi+ appeared to be similar to SF, whereas PRG4Multi- appeared to have less intensity. These results demonstrate that the intermolecular disulfide-bonded multimeric structure of PRG4 is important for its ability to adsorb to a cartilage surface and function as a boundary lubricant. These findings contribute to a greater understanding of the molecular basis of cartilage boundary lubrication of PRG4. Elucidating the PRG4 structure

  4. Compressibility effects on the non-linear receptivity of boundary layers to dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, Marie F. C.

    The reduction of drag and aerodynamic heating caused by boundary layer transition is of central interest for the development of hypersonic vehicles. Receptivity to flow perturbation in the form of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave growth often determines the first stage of the transition process, which can be delayed by depositing specific excitations into the boundary layer. Weakly ionized Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) actuators are being investigated as possible sources of such excitations, but little is known today about their interaction with high-speed flows. In this framework, the first part of the thesis is dedicated to a receptivity study of laminar compressible boundary layers over a flat plate by linear stability analysis following an adjoint operator formulation, under DBD representative excitations assumed independent of flow conditions. The second part of the work concentrates on the development of a coupled plasma-Navier and Stokes solver targeted at the study of supersonic flow and compressibility effects on DBD forcing and non-parallel receptivity. The linear receptivity study of quasi-parallel compressible flows reveals several interesting features such as a significant shift of the region of maximum receptivity deeper into the flow at high Mach number and strong wave amplitude reduction compared to incompressible flows. The response to DBD relevant excitation distributions and to variations of the base flow conditions and system length scales follows these trends. Observed absolute amplitude changes and relative sensitivity modifications between source types are related to the evolution of the offset between forcing peak profile and relevant adjoint mode maximum. The analysis highlights the crucial importance of designing and placing the actuator in a way that matches its force field to the position of maximum boundary layer receptivity for the specific flow conditions of interest. In order to address the broad time and length scale spectrum

  5. Conceptual framework of acute care nurse practitioner role enactment, boundary work, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Lamothe, Lise; Ritchie, Judith A; Doran, Diane

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new conceptual framework for acute care nurse practitioner role enactment, boundary work and perceptions of team effectiveness. Acute care nurse practitioners contribute positively to patient care by enacting an expanded scope of practise. Researchers have found both positive and negative reactions to the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners in healthcare teams. The process of role enactment, shifting role boundaries, and perceptions of team effectiveness has been studied disparately. A framework linking team structures and processes to desirable outcomes is needed. Literature was obtained by searching CINAHL, PsycInfo, MedLine, PubMed, British Nursing Index, Cochrane Library, JSTOR Archive, Web of Science, and Google Scholar from 1985-2010. A descriptive multiple-case study was completed from March 2009-May 2009. A new conceptual framework describing how role enactment and boundary work affect perceptions of team effectiveness was developed by combining theoretical and empirical sources. The framework proposes proximal indicators used by team members to assess their team's performance. The framework identifies the inter-related dimensions and concepts that different stakeholders need to consider when introducing nurse practitioners in healthcare teams. Further study is needed to identify team-level outcomes that reflect the contributions of all providers to quality patient care, and explore the patients' and families' perceptions of team effectiveness following the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners. The new framework can guide decision-making and research related to the structures, processes, and outcomes of nurse practitioner roles in healthcare teams. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Chiral topological insulator on Nambu 3-algebraic geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Hasebe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chiral topological insulator (AIII-class with Landau levels is constructed based on the Nambu 3-algebraic geometry. We clarify the geometric origin of the chiral symmetry of the AIII-class topological insulator in the context of non-commutative geometry of 4D quantum Hall effect. The many-body groundstate wavefunction is explicitly derived as a (l,l,l−1 Laughlin–Halperin type wavefunction with unique K-matrix structure. Fundamental excitation is identified with anyonic string-like object with fractional charge 1/(2(l−12+1. The Hall effect of the chiral topological insulators turns out be a color version of Hall effect, which exhibits a dual property of the Hall and spin-Hall effects.

  7. Chiral Ramachandran Plots I: Glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch-Shpigler, Yael; Wang, Huan; Tuvi-Arad, Inbal; Avnir, David

    2017-10-24

    Ramachandran plots (RPs) map the wealth of conformations of the polypeptide backbone and are widely used to characterize protein structures. A limitation of the RPs is that they are based solely on two dihedral angles for each amino acid residue and provide therefore only a partial picture of the conformational richness of the protein. Here we extend the structural RP analysis of proteins from a two-dimensional (2D) map to a three-dimensional map by adding the quantitative degree of chirality-the continuous chirality measure (CCM)-of the amino acid residue at each point in the RP. This measure encompasses all bond angles and bond lengths of an amino acid residue. We focus in this report on glycine (Gly) because, due to its flexibility, it occupies a large portion of the 2D map, thus allowing a detailed study of the chirality measure, and in order to evaluate the justification of classically labeling Gly as the only achiral amino acid. We have analyzed in detail 4366 Gly residues extracted from high resolution crystallographic data of 160 proteins. This analysis reveals not only that Gly is practically always conformationally chiral, but that upon comparing with the backbone of all amino acids, the quantitative chirality values of Gly are of similar magnitudes to those of the (chiral) amino acids. Structural trends and energetic considerations are discussed in detail. Generally we show that adding chirality to Ramachandran plots creates far more informative plots that highlight the sensitivity of the protein structure to minor conformational changes.

  8. Chiral superfluidity of the quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15

    In this paper we argue that the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma can be considered as a chiral superfluid. The ''normal'' component of the fluid is the thermalized matter in common sense, while the ''superfluid'' part consists of long wavelength (chiral) fermionic states moving independently. We use several nonperturbative techniques to demonstrate that. First, we analyze the fermionic spectrum in the deconfinement phase (T{sub c}chiral fermionic modes. Third, we use relativistic hydrodynamics for macroscopic description of the effective theory obtained after the bosonization. Finally, solving the hydrodynamic equations in gradient expansion, we find that in the presence of external electromagnetic fields the motion of the ''superfluid'' component gives rise to the chiral magnetic, chiral electric and dipole wave effects. Latter two effects are specific for a two-component fluid, which provides us with crucial experimental tests of the model.

  9. Log-law and compressibility effects in transcritical turbulent boundary layers at supercritical pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Soshi

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we discuss the log-law and effects of compressibility in transcritical heated turbulent boundary layers on a zero-pressure-gradient flat plate at supercritical pressure conditions by solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using direct numerical simulation. In the supercritical fluids (especially at transcritical conditions), due to the strong real fluid effects thermodynamic properties vary abruptly within a narrow temperature range through the pseudo-critical temperature and significantly deviate from the ideal fluid. Peculiar interactions between the strongly non-linear real fluid effects and wall turbulence, and its resultant log-law and turbulence statistics are discussed, which have never been seen in the ideal-fluid turbulent boundary layers. We also show non-negligible compressibility effects in the flow even in the low-Mach number regime considered in this study. This work was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science KAKENHI Grant Number 26709066. Computer time was provided by the K computer at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science through the HPCI System Research project hp150035.

  10. A novel aggregation-induced emission enhancement triggered by the assembly of a chiral gelator: from non-emissive nanofibers to emissive micro-loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenrui; Qing, Guangyan; Sun, Taolei

    2016-12-22

    In this study, a novel aggregation-induced emission (AIE) enhancement triggered by the self-assembly of chiral gelator is described. Tuning of molecular chirality in situ triggers different assemblies of superstructures exhibiting fluorescence. This novel AIE material can constitute an emerging library of chiral supramolecules for turn-on fluorescent sensors. It will also help in better understanding the effects of chiral factors on the photophysical process.

  11. Impulsive Light Scattering by Coherent Phonons in LaAlO3: Disorder and Boundary Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Frenkel, A.; Garrett, G. A.; Whitaker, J. F.; Fahy, S.; Uher, C.; Merlin, R.

    1995-07-01

    Pump-probe measurements of coherent-phonon-induced changes of refractive index in LaAlO3 are dominated by normally weak boundary effects. Atomic displacements in the range 50-500 μÅ were generated and probed by femtosecond laser pulses through impulsive Raman scattering. The absence of a bulk contribution is ascribed to phase mismatch due to domain disorder. Selection rules are consistent with a Raman model considering reflection and transmission at interfaces. Intensities and phonon parameters as a function of temperature agree well with incoherent Raman data.

  12. Analytic theory of curvature effects for wave problems with general boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Gravesen, Jens; Voon, L. C. Lew Yan

    2010-01-01

    A formalism based on a combination of differential geometry and perturbation theory is used to obtain analytic expressions for confined eigenmode changes due to general curvature effects. In cases of circular-shaped and helix-shaped structures, where alternative analytic solutions can be found......, the perturbative solution is shown to yield the same result. The present technique allows the generalization of earlier results to arbitrary boundary conditions. The power of the method is illustrated using examples based on Maxwell’s and Schrödinger’s equations for applications in photonics and nanoelectronics....

  13. Amplification of chirality in liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelkema, Rienk; Feringa, Ben L.

    2006-01-01

    The amplification of molecular chirality by liquid crystalline systems is widely applied in investigations towards enantioselective solvent - solute interactions, chiral supramolecular assemblies, smart materials, and the development of liquid crystal displays. Here we present an overview of recent

  14. Resurgence in η-deformed Principal Chiral Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demulder, Saskia [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, 1050, Brussels (Belgium); Dorigoni, Daniele [Centre for Particle Theory & Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Thompson, Daniel C. [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, 1050, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-07-18

    We study the SU(2) Principal Chiral Model (PCM) in the presence of an integrable η-deformation. We put the theory on ℝ×S{sup 1} with twisted boundary conditions and then reduce the circle to obtain an effective quantum mechanics associated with the Whittaker-Hill equation. Using resurgent analysis we study the large order behaviour of perturbation theory and recover the fracton events responsible for IR renormalons. The fractons are modified from the standard PCM due to the presence of this η-deformation but they are still the constituents of uniton-like solutions in the deformed quantum field theory. We also find novel SL(2,ℂ) saddles, thus strengthening the conjecture that the semi-classical expansion of the path integral gives rise to a resurgent transseries once written as a sum over Lefschetz thimbles living in a complexification of the field space. We conclude by connecting our quantum mechanics to a massive deformation of the N=2 4-d gauge theory with gauge group SU(2) and N{sub f}=2.

  15. Reagent controlled addition of chiral sulfur ylides to chiral aldehydes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Jie

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The degree of reagent and substrate control in the reaction of chiral sulfur ylides with chiral aldehydes has been investigated. Specifically, the reactions of the two enantiomers of the chiral benzyl sulfonium salt 1 with glyceraldehyde acetonide were studied in detail. Of the two new stereogenic centers created, it was found that the C1 stereochemistry was largely controlled by the reagent, whereas control at the C2 center was dependent on the aldehyde used. In one case, the trans isomer was produced via reversible formation of the intermediate betaine, whereas in the alternative case, the C2 center was under Felkin Anh/Cornforth control through non-reversible formation of the betaine. Thus, the aldehyde stereocenter influenced the degree of reversibility in betaine formation, which impacted on the stereocontrol at the C2 position.

  16. Boundary layer model to account for thick mask effects in photolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Burchard, Paul; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2003-06-01

    The lack of transparent optical components at short wavelengths limits the available wavelengths in Deep Ultraviolet lithography, while the required minimum feature on wafer continues to shrink towards deeper sub-wavelength scales. This places a serious limitation on Kirchhoff boundary conditions that replace the field on the mask openings by the incident field, since this approximation fails to account for the increasingly important topographical effects (thick mask effects) in the computation of the lithographic image. In this paper we present a sophisticated various on Kirchhoff approximation capable of modeling rigorous near field effects while retaining the simplicity of the scalar model. Our model is based on a comparison of the fields produced by both the thick and ideal thin masks on the wafer. Polarization and edge diffraction effects as well as phase and transmission errors, are included in our model.

  17. Three chiral ionic liquids as additives for enantioseparation in capillary electrophoresis and their comparison with conventional modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Qi, Xueyong; Feng, Chunlai; Tong, Shanshan; Rui, Mengjie

    2016-09-02

    The combined use of chiral ionic liquids (ILs) and conventional chiral selectors in CE to establish synergistic system has proven to be a convenient and effective approach for enantioseparation. In this work, three amino acid chiral ILs, tetramethylammonium-l-arginine (TMA-l-Arg), tetramethylammonium-l-hydroxyproline (TMA-l-Hyp) and tetramethylammonium-l-isoleucine (TMA-l-Ile), were first applied in CE enantioseparation to investigate their potential synergistic effect with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD). Markedly improved separations were obtained in the chiral ILs/HP-β-CD synergistic systems compared with single HP-β-CD system. Parameters, such as the chiral ILs concentration, HP-β-CD concentration, buffer pH, applied voltage and capillary temperature, were optimized. A systematic comparison of chiral ILs with conventional (commonly used) modifiers was also performed, including the use of achiral ILs, conventional salts and molecular organic solvents. In addition, the chiral configuration of ILs was investigated to demonstrate the existence of synergistic effect between chiral ILs and HP-β-CD. All these results indicate that chiral ILs, as additives for CE chiral separation, has significant superiority over conventional modifiers in certain cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical study of radiative heat transfer and effects of thermal boundary conditions on CLC fuel reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Mansour, R.; Li, H.; Habib, M. A.; Hossain, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    Global warming has become a worldwide concern due to its severe impacts and consequences on the climate system and ecosystem. As a promising technology proving good carbon capture ability with low-efficiency penalty, Chemical Looping Combustion technology has risen much interest. However, the radiative heat transfer was hardly studied, nor its effects were clearly declared. The present work provides a mathematical model for radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion systems and conducts a numerical research on the effects of boundary conditions, solid particles reflectivity, particles size, and the operating temperature. The results indicate that radiative heat transfer has very limited impacts on the flow pattern. Meanwhile, the temperature variations in the static bed region (where solid particles are dense) brought by radiation are also insignificant. However, the effects of radiation on temperature profiles within free bed region (where solid particles are very sparse) are obvious, especially when convective-radiative (mixed) boundary condition is applied on fuel reactor walls. Smaller oxygen carrier particle size results in larger absorption & scattering coefficients. The consideration of radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor increases the temperature gradient within free bed region. On the other hand, the conversion performance of fuel is nearly not affected by radiation heat transfer within fuel reactor. However, the consideration of radiative heat transfer enhances the heat transfer between the gas phase and solid phase, especially when the operating temperature is low.

  19. Numerical study of radiative heat transfer and effects of thermal boundary conditions on CLC fuel reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Mansour, R.; Li, H.; Habib, M. A.; Hossain, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    Global warming has become a worldwide concern due to its severe impacts and consequences on the climate system and ecosystem. As a promising technology proving good carbon capture ability with low-efficiency penalty, Chemical Looping Combustion technology has risen much interest. However, the radiative heat transfer was hardly studied, nor its effects were clearly declared. The present work provides a mathematical model for radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion systems and conducts a numerical research on the effects of boundary conditions, solid particles reflectivity, particles size, and the operating temperature. The results indicate that radiative heat transfer has very limited impacts on the flow pattern. Meanwhile, the temperature variations in the static bed region (where solid particles are dense) brought by radiation are also insignificant. However, the effects of radiation on temperature profiles within free bed region (where solid particles are very sparse) are obvious, especially when convective-radiative (mixed) boundary condition is applied on fuel reactor walls. Smaller oxygen carrier particle size results in larger absorption & scattering coefficients. The consideration of radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor increases the temperature gradient within free bed region. On the other hand, the conversion performance of fuel is nearly not affected by radiation heat transfer within fuel reactor. However, the consideration of radiative heat transfer enhances the heat transfer between the gas phase and solid phase, especially when the operating temperature is low.

  20. Magnetic chirality as probed by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, V.; Loire, M.; Ballou, R.

    2012-11-01

    We review the concept of chirality, at first briefly in a general context then in the specific framework of the spin networks. We next discuss to what extent neutron scattering appears as an unconvertible tool to probe magnetic chirality in the static and dynamical regimes of the spins. The remarkable chiral ground state and excitations of the Fe-langasite compound finally serves to illustrate the use of neutron polarimetry in the experimental studies of the magnetic chirality.

  1. The effect of electron scattering from disordered grain boundaries on the resistivity of metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, Claudio [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile); Synopsys Inc., Avenida Vitacura 5250, Oficina 708, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Henriquez, Ricardo [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Moraga, Luis [Universidad Central de Chile, Toesca 1783, Santiago (Chile); Muñoz, Enrique [Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 7820436 (Chile); Munoz, Raul C., E-mail: ramunoz@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Quantum theory of the resistivity arising from electron-grain boundary scattering in nanometric metallic structures. • The resistivity is controlled by the collective properties of the grain assembly, by the allowed Kronig-Penney (KP) bands and by the electron transmission probability across successive grains. • When the grain diameter d is larger than the electron mean free path l, the increase in resistivity arises mainly from a decrease of the number of states at the Fermi surface that are allowed KP bands. • When the grain diameter d is smaller than the electron mean free path l, the increase in resistivity arises primarily from Anderson localization caused by electron transmission across successive grains. - Abstract: We calculate the electrical resistivity of a metallic specimen, under the combined effects of electron scattering by impurities, grain boundaries, and rough surfaces limiting the film, using a quantum theory based upon the Kubo formalism. Grain boundaries are represented by a one-dimensional periodic array of Dirac delta functions separated by a distance “d” giving rise to a Kronig–Penney (KP) potential. We use the Green's function built from the wave functions that are solutions of this KP potential; disorder is included by incorporating into the theory the probability that an electron is transmitted through several successive grain boundaries. We apply this new theory to analyze the resistivity of samples S1, S2, S7 and S8 measured between 4 and 300 K reported in Appl. Surf. Science273, 315 (2013). Although both the classical and the quantum theories predict a resistivity that agrees with experimental data to within a few percent or better, the phenomena giving rise to the increase of resistivity over the bulk are remarkably different. Classically, each grain boundary contributes to the electrical resistance by reflecting a certain fraction of the incoming electrons. In the quantum description, there are states

  2. Viscoelastic modes in chiral liquid crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amit@fs.rri.local.net (Amit Kumar Agarwal)

    our studies on the viscoelastic modes of some chiral liquid crystals using dynamic light scattering. We discuss viscoelastic modes corresponding to the C director fluctuations in the chiral smectic C phase and the behaviour of the Goldstone-mode near the chiral smectic C–smectic A phase transition. In cholesteric liquid ...

  3. Covariant perturbation theory and chiral superpropagators

    CERN Document Server

    Ecker, G

    1972-01-01

    The authors use a covariant formulation of perturbation theory for the non-linear chiral invariant pion model to define chiral superpropagators leading to S-matrix elements which are independent of the choice of the pion field coordinates. The relation to the standard definition of chiral superpropagators is discussed. (11 refs).

  4. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Kenichi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    {pi} meson, (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone particle caused by a spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, was studied by use of Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation in the limits of effective model as a bound state of quark and antiquark. The effective model has nonlocal interaction and proved to satisfy the Gell-Mann-Oaks-Renner (GMOR) mass formula by treating correct Noether current in spite of loss of local chiral invariance of interaction term. GMOR mass formula: M{sub {pi}}{sup 2}f{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{approx_equal}-2m{sub 0} was realized as the result of the dynamical breaking and the clear breaking of chiral symmetry. M{sub {pi}}, f{sub {pi}}, m{sub 0}, and indicate mass of pseudo scalar meson, decay constant, mass of quark and vacuum condensation of quark and antiquark. (S.Y.)

  5. Crossflow effects on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yibin; Hall, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer with pressure gradient are studied. Attention is focused on the inviscid mode trapped in the temperature adjustment layer; this mode has greater growth rate than any other mode. The eigenvalue problem which governs the relationship between the growth rate, the crossflow amplitude, and the wavenumber is solved numerically, and the results are then used to clarify the effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices. It is shown that crossflow effects on Goertler vortices are fundamentally different for incompressible and hypersonic flows. The neutral mode eigenvalue problem is found to have an exact solution, and as a by-product, we have also found the exact solution to a neutral mode eigenvalue problem which was formulated, but unsolved before, by Bassom and Hall (1991).

  6. Casimir Effect Under Quasi-Periodic Boundary Condition Inspired by Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou; Zhai, Xiang-Hua

    2014-01-01

    When one studies the Casimir effect, the periodic (anti-periodic) boundary condition is usually taken to mimic a periodic (anti-periodic) structure for a scalar field living in a flat space with a non-Euclidean topology. However, there could be an arbitrary phase difference between the value of the scalar field on one endpoint of the unit structure and that on the other endpoint, such as the structure of nanotubes. Then, in this paper, a periodic condition on the ends of the system with an additional phase factor, which is called the "quasi-periodic" condition, is imposed to investigate the corresponding Casimir effect. And an attractive or repulsive Casimir force is found, whose properties depend on the phase angle value. Especially, the Casimir effect disappears when the phase angle takes a particular value. High dimensional spacetime case is also investigated.

  7. Exploring the boundary conditions of unconscious numerical priming effects with continuous flash suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmann, G; Darcy, N; Sterzer, P; Knops, A

    2015-01-01

    The scope and limits of unconscious processing are a controversial topic of research in experimental psychology. Particularly within the visual domain, a wide range of paradigms have been used to experimentally manipulate perceptual awareness. A recent study reported unconscious numerical processing during continuous flash suppression (CFS), which is a powerful variant of interocular suppression and disrupts the conscious perception of visual stimuli for up to seconds. Since this finding of a distance-dependent priming effect contradicts earlier results showing that interocular suppression abolishes semantic processing, we sought to investigate the boundary conditions of this effect in two experiments. Using statistical analyses and experimental designs that precluded an effect of target numerosity, we found evidence for identity priming, but no conclusive evidence for distance-dependent numerical priming under CFS. Our results suggest that previous conclusions on high-level numerical priming under interocular suppression may have been premature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An Examination of the Effect of Boundary Layer Ingestion on Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, James L.; Kim, Huyn Dae; Brown, Gerald V.; Chu, Julio

    2011-01-01

    A Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) system differs from other propulsion systems by the use of electrical power to transmit power from the turbine to the fan. Electrical power can be efficiently transmitted over longer distances and with complex topologies. Also the use of power inverters allows the generator and motors speeds to be independent of one another. This decoupling allows the aircraft designer to place the core engines and the fans in locations most advantageous for each. The result can be very different installation environments for the different devices. Thus the installation effects on this system can be quite different than conventional turbofans where the fan and core both see the same installed environments. This paper examines a propulsion system consisting of two superconducting generators, each driven by a turboshaft engine located so that their inlets ingest freestream air, superconducting electrical transmission lines, and an array of superconducting motor driven fan positioned across the upper/rear fuselage area of a hybrid wing body aircraft in a continuous nacelle that ingests all of the upper fuselage boundary layer. The effect of ingesting the boundary layer on the design of the system with a range of design pressure ratios is examined. Also the impact of ingesting the boundary layer on off-design performance is examined. The results show that when examining different design fan pressure ratios it is important to recalculate of the boundary layer mass-average Pt and MN up the height for each inlet height during convergence of the design point for each fan design pressure ratio examined. Correct estimation of off-design performance is dependent on the height of the column of air measured from the aircraft surface immediately prior to any external diffusion that will flow through the fan propulsors. The mass-averaged Pt and MN calculated for this column of air determine the Pt and MN seen by the propulsor inlet. Since the height

  9. On the Mechanical Properties of Chiral Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Zakeri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are specific structures with valuable characteristics. In general, the structure of each nanotube is defined by a unique chiral vector. In this paper, different structures of short single-walled CNTs are simulated and their mechanical properties are determined using finite element method. For this aim, a simple algorithm is presented which is able to model the geometry of single-walled CNTs with any desired structure based on nano-scale continuum mechanics approach. By changing the chiral angle from 0 to 30 degree for constant length to radius ratio, the effect of nanotube chirality on its mechanical properties is evaluated. It is observed that the tensile modulus of CNTs changes between 0.93-1.02 TPa for different structures, and it can be higher for chiral structures than zigzag and armchair ones. Also, for different chiral angles, the bending modulus changes between 0.76-0.82 TPa, while the torsional modulus varies in the range of 0.283-0.301TPa.

  10. Utilization of Alternate Chirality Enantiomers in Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous study of chirality led to interesting findings for some anaerobic extremophiles: the ability to metabolize substrates with alternate chirality enantiomers of amino acids and sugars. We have subsequently found that not just separate microbial species or strains but entire microbial communities have this ability. The functional division within a microbial community on proteo- and sugarlytic links was also reflected in a microbial diet with L-sugars and D-amino acids. Several questions are addressed in this paper. Why and when was this feature developed in a microbial world? Was it a secondary de novo adaptation in a bacterial world? Or is this a piece of genetic information that has been left in modern genomes as an atavism? Is it limited exclusively to prokaryotes, or does this ability also occur in eukaryotes? In this article, we have used a broader approach to study this phenomenon using anaerobic extremophilic strains from our laboratory collection. A series of experiments were performed on physiologically different groups of extremophilic anaerobes (pure and enrichment cultures). The following characteristics were studied: 1) the ability to grow on alternate chirality enantiomers -- L-sugars and D- amino acids; 2) Growth-inhibitory effect of alternate chirality enantiomers; 3) Stickland reaction with alternate chirality amino acids. The results of this research are presented in this paper.

  11. Capillary electrophoresis of covalently functionalized single-chirality carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pingli; Meany, Brendan; Wang, Chunyan; Piao, Yanmei; Kwon, Hyejin; Deng, Shunliu; Wang, YuHuang

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the separation of chirality-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by degree of surface functionalization using high-performance CE. Controlled amounts of negatively charged and positively charged functional groups were attached to the sidewall of chirality-enriched SWCNTs through covalent functionalization using 4-carboxybenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate or 4-diazo-N,N-diethylaniline tetrafluoroborate, respectively. Surfactant- and pH-dependent studies confirmed that under conditions that minimized ionic screening effects, separation of these functionalized SWCNTs was strongly dependent on the surface charge density introduced through covalent surface chemistry. For both heterogeneous mixtures and single-chirality-enriched samples, covalently functionalized SWCNTs showed substantially increased peak width in electropherogram spectra compared to nonfunctionalized SWCNTs, which can be attributed to a distribution of surface charges along the functionalized nanotubes. Successful separation of functionalized single-chirality SWCNTs by functional density was confirmed with UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies of fraction collected samples. These results suggest a high degree of structural heterogeneity in covalently functionalized SWCNTs, even for chirality-enriched samples, and show the feasibility of applying CE for high-performance separation of nanomaterials based on differences in surface functional density. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chirality-sensitive microwave spectroscopy - application to terpene molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Melanie

    Most molecules of biochemical relevance are chiral. Even though the physical properties of two enantiomers are nearly identical, they might exhibit completely different biochemical effects, such as different odor in the case of carvone. In nature and as products of chemical syntheses, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) is still one of the challenging and very important tasks of analytical chemistry. We recently experimentally demonstrated a new method of differentiating enantiomeric pairs of chiral molecules in the gas phase. It is based on broadband rotational spectroscopy and is a three-wave mixing process that involves a closed cycle of three rotational transitions. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the product of the transition dipole moments. Furthermore, because the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee, this technique allows not only for determining which enantiomer is in excess, but also by how much. A unique advantage of our technique is that it can also be applied to mixtures of chiral molecules, even when the molecules are very similar. In my lecture, I will introduce the technique and give an update on the recent developments.

  13. A numerical investigation on the effects of slot geometry on shock boundary layer interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazazzadeh, M.; Menshadi, M. D.; Karbasizadeh, M. [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Esfahan (Turkmenistan)

    2017-01-15

    Slot is one of the features that control Shock wave-boundary layer interaction (SBLI), which is generally used to prevent strong interference from shockwaves to the boundary layer in supersonic flows. With this feature, the height of the triple point of λ shock significantly increases, and this increase causes a decline in shock power and pressure drop rate. In the current paper, the main focus is on the monitoring of the geometrical effect of slot as an influential parameter on the structure of the shock and flow characteristics by using numerical methods. Therefore, the averaged implicit Navier-Stokes equations and two equation standard k-ω turbulence models for the numerical simulation of the flow field have been used. Results indicate that the numerical results are fairly consistent with the experimental data. Because of the increase in the number of slots (n), and the leading leg of the λ shock is located within the slot, the height of the triple point increases. However, because of the increasing drops due to viscosity, the total pressure changes are negligible. In addition, with an increase in this parameter, changes in the static pressure caused by the leading leg of the shock have increased. By increasing the width of the slots, the height of the triple point has had an upward trend up to s = 8 mm and then had nearly constant values. In this mode, the static pressure changes resulting from the leading leg of the shock are negligible. For increasing the number or the width of slots, the re-expansion waves formed within the slot are removed because of the reduction in the severity of the changes in the boundary layer. To simulate and compare the results with the data obtained from the experimental tests, results from the Cambridge University's wind tunnel tests have been used.

  14. Thermal Boundary Layer Effects on Line-of-Sight Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) Gas Concentration Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2018-01-01

    The effects of thermal boundary layers on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement results must be quantified when using the line-of-sight (LOS) TDLAS under conditions with spatial temperature gradient. In this paper, a new methodology based on spectral simulation is presented quantifying the LOS TDLAS measurement deviation under conditions with thermal boundary layers. The effects of different temperature gradients and thermal boundary layer thickness on spectral collisional widths and gas concentration measurements are quantified. A CO 2 TDLAS spectrometer, which has two gas cells to generate the spatial temperature gradients, was employed to validate the simulation results. The measured deviations and LOS averaged collisional widths are in very good agreement with the simulated results for conditions with different temperature gradients. We demonstrate quantification of thermal boundary layers' thickness with proposed method by exploitation of the LOS averaged the collisional width of the path-integrated spectrum.

  15. Rediscovering Chirality - Role of S-Metoprolol in Cardiovascular Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Jagdish C; Shah, Siddharth N; Chinchansurkar, Sunny; Dey, Arindam; Jain, Rishi

    2017-06-01

    The process of drug discovery and development today encompass a myriad of paths for bringing a new therapeutic molecule that has minimal adverse effects and of optimal use to the patient. Chirality was proposed in the direction of providing a purer and safer form of drug [Ex- cetrizine and levocetrizine]. Decades have passed since the introduction of this concept and numerous chiral molecules are in existence in therapeutics, yet somehow this concept has been ignored. This review aims to rediscover the ignored facts about chirality, its benefits and clear some common myths considering the example of S-Metoprolol in the management of Hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. Relevant articles from Pubmed, Embase, Medline and Google Scholar were searched using the terms "Chiral", "Chirality", "Enantiomers", "Isomers", "Isomerism", "Stereo-chemistry", and "S-Metoprolol". Out of 103 articles found 17 articles mentioning in general about the concept of chirality and articles on study of S-metoprolol in various cardiovascular diseases were then reviewed. Many articles mention about the importance of chirality yet the concept has not been highlighted much. Clear benefits with chiral molecules have been documented for various drug molecules few amongst them being anaesthetics, antihypertensives, antidepressants. Benefits of S-metoprolol over racemate are also clear in terms of responder rates, dose of administration and adverse effects profile in various cardiovascular diseases. Chirality is a good way forward in providing a new drug molecule which is safe with lesser pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics variability, lesser side effects and more potent action. S-metoprolol is chirally pure form of racemate metoprolol and has lesser side effects, is safer in patients of COPD and Diabetes who also have hypertension and comparable responder rates at half the doses when compared to racemate.

  16. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    needed temporal and spatial coupling and means for validation of mesoscale model simulations (Zhong et al., 2009, 2011). When these time series are integrated into energy balance analyses methods (Su, 2002, 2005) with reanalysis data, plateau scale diurnal radiative and turbulence fluxes can be generated (Oku et al., 2005; Su et al., 2010) for the study of the boundary layer atmospheric structures at plateau scale. As such regional land-atmosphere feedbacks and atmospheric boundary layer structures can be studied. The quantification of the multi-scale atmospheric boundary layer and land surface processes over the heterogeneous underlying surface of the Tibetan Plateau is a challenging problem that remains unsettled despite many years of efforts. Using field observation, truth investigation, land surface process parameterization and meso-scale simulation, the dynamical and thermal uniform function of the atmospheric boundary layer and its effect to the atmospheric boundary layer will be analyzed in this research. Results The different characteristics of the Boundary layer with Asia monsoon season exchange over TP The height of atmospheric boundary layer was higher before monsoon season than it in summer. It was around 3-4 km above the ground in spring, while it was 1-2 km during monsoon season. It due to sensible heat flux was stronger in spring than it in summer. Using wavelet analysis method, we decomposed the wind include horizontal and vertical velocity from radiosounding observational data. The reason of high boundary layer height was disclosed. Compared to the observation, the output of model was underestimation during spring, while it was reasonable in summer monsoon. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the precipitation on the TP Numerical simulation of climate on the TP was implemented for the whole year of 2008 using WRF-Noah model. The output of the WRF model is compared to TRMM data set for precipitation and ERA-interim land product for soil moisture. Modeled

  17. The effective time of centrifugation for the analysis of boundary spreading in sedimentation velocity experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besong, Tabot M D; Harding, Stephen E; Winzor, Donald J

    2012-02-15

    This investigation establishes a likely order of magnitude for the zero-time correction factor governing the effective time of centrifugation that is pertinent in the analysis of boundary spreading in sedimentation velocity experiments. This correction is shown to be too small to unduly affect the magnitudes of sedimentation and diffusion coefficients deduced from the application of computer software incorporating the printout value of ω²t and an effective position of the air-solution meniscus that is obtained as an additional parameter in the analysis involving nonlinear least-squares curve-fitting of sedimentation velocity distributions to the Lamm equation. Although this procedure slightly underestimates the actual meniscus position (r(a)), uncertainty about its exact location precludes adoption of the alternative approach with r(a) fixed and the correction to ω²t regarded as the additional curve-fitting parameter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of twin boundaries in vanadium nitride films subjected to tensile/compressive deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Peng, Xianghe; Huang, Cheng; Zhao, Yinbo; Weng, Shayuan; Chen, Xiang; Hu, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Two kinds of atoms can serve as the twin boundary (TB) atoms in a transition metal nitride (TMN). In this work, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the responses of vanadium nitride (VN) films with different kinds of TB atoms (V or N) subjected to uniaxial tensile/compressive deformations, to investigate their effects and the tensile-compressive asymmetry. In compressive deformation, the migration of TBs with V atoms to that with N atoms contributes to softening, while the pile-up of dislocations at TBs contributes to strengthening. During tension, fractures occur at the TBs without distinct nucleation of dislocations, the nature of the brittle fracture, which does not result in any improvement of fracture toughness and critical stress. Different frictional effects, cutoff radii, asymmetrical tensile and compressive nature of the interatomic potential and different deformation mechanisms are responsible for the tension-compression asymmetry in VN.

  19. The effect of coworker knowledge sharing on performance and its boundary conditions: an interactional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seckyoung Loretta; Yun, Seokhwa

    2015-03-01

    Considering the importance of coworkers and knowledge sharing in current business environment, this study intends to advance understanding by investigating the effect of coworker knowledge sharing on focal employees' task performance. Furthermore, by taking an interactional perspective, this study examines the boundary conditions of coworker knowledge sharing on task performance. Data from 149 samples indicate that there is a positive relationship between coworker knowledge sharing and task performance, and this relationship is strengthened when general self-efficacy or abusive supervision is low rather than high. Our findings suggest that the recipients' characteristics and leaders' behaviors could be important contingent factors that limit the effect of coworker knowledge sharing on task performance. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Chiral metamaterials characterisation using the wave propagation retrieval method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation we extend the wave propagation method for the retrieval of the effective properties to the case of chiral metamaterials with circularly polarised eigenwaves. The method is unambiguous, simple and provides bulk effective parameters. Advantages and constraints are discussed...

  1. Chiral symmetry in light-front QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menh-Hsiu; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2004-04-01

    The definition of chiral transformations in light-front field theory is very different from the conventional form in equal-time formalism. We study the consistency of chiral transformations and chiral symmetry in light-front QCD and derive a complete new light-front axial-vector current for QCD. The breaking of chiral symmetry in light-front QCD is only associated with helicity flip interaction between quarks and gluons. Remarkably, the new axial-vector current does not contain the pion pole part so that the associate chiral charge smoothly describes pion transitions for various hadronic processes.

  2. Interfacial organization of achiral porphyrins via unidirectional compression: a general method for chiroptical porphyrin assemblies of selected chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Penglei; Rong, Yunlong; Liu, Minghua

    2016-05-18

    Porphyrins are considered to be important scaffolds bridging supramolecular chemistry and chiral chemistry, where chirality selection via physical effects such as directional stirring and spin-coating has aroused particular interest. Nevertheless, these protocols could only work on a limited number of achiral porphyrins. It still remains a formidable challenge to pave a general avenue for the construction of chiral assemblies using achiral porphyrins. By means of a unique Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) technique of a unidirectional compression configuration, we herein have demonstrated that a series of achiral porphyrins could be facilely organized to form chiral interfacial assemblies of controlled supramolecular chirality. It has been disclosed that such a fascinating chirality selection scenario is intimately related to the direction of the compression-generated vortex-like flow, while the compression speed, one of the most significant parameters of the Langmuir technique, contributes less to this issue. With regard to a surface-pressure-dependent chirality selection phenomenon, it is suggested that the directional vortex-like flow generated by lateral compression might play a role in promoting the preferential growth of chiral assemblies showing an enhanced yet controlled CD signal. Our protocol might be, to some extent, a general method for achieving chiral porphyrin assemblies of controlled chirality.

  3. Effect of the temperature dependence of the viscosity of pseudoplastic lubricants on the boundary friction regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyashenko, I. A.

    2013-07-01

    The boundary friction regime appearing between two atomically smooth solid surfaces with an ultrathin lubricating layer between them is considered. The interrupted (stick-slip) regime of motion typical of the boundary lubrication is represented as a first-order phase transition between the structural states of the lubricant. The thermodynamic and shear melting is described. The universal dependence of the viscosity of high-molecular alkanes (lubricants) on the temperature and velocity gradient is taken into account. The dependence of the friction force on the lubricant temperature and the relative shear velocity of the interacting surfaces are analyzed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the viscosity makes it possible to describe some experimentally observed effects. The possibility of prolonged damped oscillations after lubricant melting prior to the stabilization of the steady-state sliding mode is predicted. In the stick-slip regime in a wide range of parameters, a reversive motion is observed when the upper block moves in both directions after melting.

  4. Cylinder array height effects on evolution of tracked vortex packets within a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yan Ming; Longmire, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    A zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer with Reτ = 2480 was perturbed by a spanwise array of cylinders. When a narrowly spaced array extended to the top of the log region, perturbed packets appeared to reorganize via a top-down mechanism, suggesting that packet organization can originate from above. We test this hypothesis by extending the array height to the edge of the boundary layer to completely disrupt the packet organization. On the other hand, previous measurements showed that the downstream packet organization was reinforced by an array spacing matching the dominant spanwise spacing of unperturbed packets. A shorter array with reduced blockage was tested to see whether the same effect is achievable. To compare the flow organization in the different cases, fixed and flying PIV measurements were obtained in streamwise-spanwise planes at multiple wall normal locations. The flying PIV system allows tracking and quantification of packet evolution through the array and over a distance of 7 δ downstream.

  5. Effect of wall-mounted cylinders on a turbulent boundary layer: hot wire measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Dueñas, Cecilia; Ryan, Mitchell; Longmire, Ellen

    2010-11-01

    Wall-mounted cylinders with height-to-diameter ratio H/D = 2 and large enough to protrude into the logarithmic region, H^+= 200, are used to alter a turbulent boundary layer with Reτ=1150 in an attempt to affect the organization of the coherent vortical structures. Hot-wire measurements, including velocity profiles and frequency spectra, were acquired downstream of a single cylinder and spanwise arrays of cylinders. The single cylinder yielded a momentum deficit that extended from z^+=20 to 200, and a redistribution of the streamwise rms velocity towards the half cylinder height with a corresponding increase in the power spectral density over a broad frequency range. Cylinder arrays with 3D spanwise spacing yielded significant wake interactions. The largest mean streamwise velocity deficits and rms values occurred in the log region at mid-span between cylinders. More detail on the effect of cylinder spacing will be provided in the talk. The results suggest that turbulence within the boundary layer leads to broader spanwise interactions than those occurring in wakes of cylinder arrays in uniform cross flow.

  6. Thermal boundary layer effects on the acoustical impedance of enclosures and consequences for acoustical sensing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen C; LoPresti, Janice L

    2008-03-01

    Expressions are derived for the acoustical impedance of a rectangular enclosure and of a finite annular cylindrical enclosure. The derivation is valid throughout the frequency range in which all dimensions of the enclosure are much less than the wavelength. The results are valid throughout the range from adiabatic to isothermal conditions in the enclosure. The effect is equivalent to placing an additional, frequency-dependent complex impedance in parallel with the adiabatic compliance. As the thermal boundary layer grows to fill the cavity, the reactive part of the impedance varies smoothly from the adiabatic value to the isothermal value. In some microphones, this change in cavity stiffness is sufficient to modify the sensitivity. The resistive part of the additional cavity impedance varies as the inverse square root of frequency at high frequencies where the boundary layer has not grown to fill the enclosure. The thermal modification gives rise to a thermal noise whose spectral density varies asymptotically as l/f(3/2) above the isothermal transition frequency.

  7. Confinement effects in shock/turbulent-boundary-layer interaction through wall-modeled LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Campo, Laura; Larsson, Johan; Bodart, Julien; Helmer, David; Eaton, John

    2016-11-01

    Wall-modeled large-eddy simulations (WMLES) are used to investigate three-dimensional effects imposed by lateral confinement on the interaction of oblique shock waves impinging on turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) developed along the walls of a nearly-square duct. A constant Mach number, M = 2 . 05 , of the incoming air stream is considered, with a Reynolds number based on the incoming turbulent boundary layer momentum thickness Reθ 14 , 000 . The strength of the impinging shock is varied by increasing the height of a compression wedge located at a constant streamwise location that spans the top wall of the duct at a 20° angle. Simulation results are first validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data obtained at several vertical planes. Emphasis is placed on the study of the instantaneous and time-averaged structure of the flow for the stronger-interaction case, which shows mean flow reversal. By performing additional spanwise-periodic simulations, it is found that the structure and location of the shock system and separation bubble are significantly modified by the lateral confinement. Low-frequency unsteadiness and downstream evolution of corner flows are also investigated. Financial support from the United States Department of Energy under the PSAAP program is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Effect of Boundary Layer Thickness on Secondary Structures in a Short Inlet Curved Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Jeremy; Amitay, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The flow pattern in short ducts with aggressive curvature can lead in some cases to an asymmetric flow field. In the current work, a two dimensional honeycomb mesh was added upstream of the curved duct to create a pressure drop across it, and therefore an increased velocity deficit in the boundary layer profile. This velocity deficit led to a stronger streamwise separation, overcoming the flow mechanisms that result in the asymmetric flowfield. Experiments were conducted at M = 0.2, 0.44 and 0.58 in an expanding aggressive duct with square cross section with an area ratio of 1.27. Pressure data, together with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), verify the symmetry of the incoming flow field. Steady pressure distributions along the lower surface of the curved duct were obtained, as well as steady and time dependent total pressure distributions at the aerodynamic interface plane, enabling the analysis of the flow characteristics throughout the duct length. The effect of inserting a honeycomb was tested by increasing its height from 0 to 2.2 times the baseline flow boundary layer thickness upstream of the curve. Crosstream flow symmetry was achieved for specific geometrical configurations with a negligible decrease in the pressure recovery.

  9. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable method was applied to the steady state governing non-linear partial differential equations, which were transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and were solved numerically by applying a shooting iteration technique together with a sixth-order Runge–Kutta integration scheme for better accuracy. The effects of the Prandtl number, the local Biot number, the internal heat generation parameter, thermal radiation and the local Grashof number on the velocity and temperature profiles are illustrated and interpreted in physical terms. A comparison with previously published results on similar special cases showed excellent agreement.

  10. Tests of Chiral perturbation theory with COMPASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Jan M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment at CERN accesses pion-photon reactions via the Primakoff effect., where high-energetic pions react with the quasi-real photon field surrounding the target nuclei. When a single real photon is produced, pion Compton scattering is accessed and from the measured cross-section shape, the pion polarisability is determined. The COMPASS measurement is in contradiction to the earlier dedicated measurements, and rather in agreement with the theoretical expectation from ChPT. In the same experimental data taking, reactions with neutral and charged pions in the final state are measured and analyzed in the context of chiral perturbation theory.

  11. Chirality dependence of exciton effects for E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} in single wall carbon nanotubes under axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Guili, E-mail: yuguili_lxy@cumt.edu.cn [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China); Tang, Gang [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China); Jia, Yonglei [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China); Wu, Ling [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China)

    2012-05-14

    Within the framework of tight-binding model, we have studied the excitons and binding energies of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transitions in the semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) under axial magnetic field (B). The obtained results show that the E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} excitons are split by the axial magnetic field, and the splitting depends on both diameter and chirality. In addition, it is more interesting to find that the binding energies of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transitions are also split by the axial magnetic field, whose splitting presents a clear family behavior, diameter and chirality dependence. However, due to the contrary family behavior of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transitions, a crossover of the splitting appears for some of the carbon nanotubes, which is similar to the overlap of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transition energies detected by the experiment. -- Highlights: ► Exciton splitting depends on diameter and chirality for E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} in single wall nanotube under axial magnetic field. ► Binding energy was split by the magnetic field, showing a family behavior. ► A crossover is found for the binding energy splitting.

  12. Magnetic flux distributions in chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masaru, E-mail: kato@ms.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Fukui, Saoto [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Sato, Osamu [Osaka Prefecture University College of Technology, 26-12, Saiwaicho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8572 (Japan); Togawa, Yoshihiko [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Vortex states in a chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer are investigated. • Vortex and anti-vortex appears depending on strength of helimagnet. • Vortex is elongated under a gradient field. • Vortices form a undulated triangular lattice. - Abstarct: Vortex states in a chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer are investigated numerically, using the Ginzburg–Landau equations with the finite element method. In this bilayer, effect of the chiral helimagnet on the superconductor is taken as an external field. Magnetic field distribution can be controlled by an applied field to the bilayer. It is shown that a single vortex in a gradient field is elongated along the field gradient. In zero applied field, there are up- and down vortices which are parallel or antiparallel to the z-axis, respectively. But increasing the applied field, down-vortices disappear and up-vortices form undulated triangular lattices.

  13. Chiral Recognition of Amino Acids by Magnetoelectrodeposited Cu Film Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Mogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiral behavior of magnetoelectrodeposited (MED Cu film electrodes was investigated for the electrochemical reactions of amino acids. The Cu films were electrodeposited under a magnetic field of 5 T perpendicular to the electrode surface. Such MED Cu films were employed as an electrode, and cyclic voltammograms were measured for the electrochemical reactions of several kinds of amino acids. Chiral behavior was clearly observed as oxidation current difference between the enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The MED film electrodes with the thickness of 50~500 nm exhibited such chiral behavior, and their surface morphologies had network structures, which could be induced by the micro-MHD effect.

  14. Chiral amplification in a cyanobiphenyl nematic liquid crystal doped with helicene-like derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberta Ferrarini

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a chiral non-racemic dopant to a nematic liquid crystal (LC has the effect of transferring the molecular chirality to the phase organization and a chiral nematic phase is formed. This molecular chirality amplification in the LC provides a unique possibility for investigating the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular interactions, and mesoscale organization. It is known that axially chiral or helical-shaped molecules with reduced conformational disorder are good candidates for high helical twisting power derivatives. In particular, biaryl derivatives are known to be efficient chiral inducers in biaryl nematic mesophases. In this paper, we focus on a new series of helicene-like molecules of known absolute configuration. We have integrated cholesteric pitch measurements with geometry optimization by DFT calculations and analysis of the twisting ability by the Surface Chirality model to shed light on the structural features responsible for the analogies and differences exhibited by these derivatives. The investigation of these dopants with well-defined geometry, by virtue of the low conformational freedom, and the substituents variously distributed around the core, allows us to extend our knowledge of the molecular origin of the chirality amplification in liquid crystals and to confirm the simple relationship “molecular P-helicity” → “cholesteric P-handedness” for helical-shaped helicene-like derivatives.

  15. Spontaneous chiral resolution in two-dimensional systems of patchy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-González, J. A.; Chapela, G. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 México D.F. (Mexico); Quintana-H, J., E-mail: jaq@unam.mx [Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México - Apdo. Postal 70213, 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-21

    Short ranged potentials and their anisotropy produce spontaneous chiral resolution in a two dimensional model of patchy particles introduced in this paper. This model could represent an equimolar binary mixture (racemic mixture) of two kinds of chiral molecules (enantiomers) adsorbed to a bi-dimensional domain where only lateral short ranged interactions are present. Most racemic mixtures undergo chiral resolution due to their spatial anisotropy, the combined effect of long range forces and the thermodynamic conditions. The patchy particles are modeled as a hard disk and four different bonding sites located to produce chirality. Phase behavior and structural properties are analysed using Discontinuous Molecular Dynamics in the canonical ensemble. When the four patchy particles are separated by the angles (60°, 120°, 60°, 120°), spontaneous chiral resolution is produced, given by the formation of homochiral clusters, if started from the corresponding racemic mixture. Gel behavior is also obtained in all the systems for low temperatures and low densities.

  16. Chiral acidic amino acids induce chiral hierarchical structure in calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenge; Pacella, Michael S.; Athanasiadou, Dimitra; Nelea, Valentin; Vali, Hojatollah; Hazen, Robert M.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; McKee, Marc D.

    2017-04-01

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology, including in biomineralization, where it is found in many hardened structures of invertebrate marine and terrestrial organisms (for example, spiralling gastropod shells). Here we show that chiral, hierarchically organized architectures for calcium carbonate (vaterite) can be controlled simply by adding chiral acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu). Chiral, vaterite toroidal suprastructure having a `right-handed' (counterclockwise) spiralling morphology is induced by L-enantiomers of Asp and Glu, whereas `left-handed' (clockwise) morphology is induced by D-enantiomers, and sequentially switching between amino-acid enantiomers causes a switch in chirality. Nanoparticle tilting after binding of chiral amino acids is proposed as a chiral growth mechanism, where a `mother' subunit nanoparticle spawns a slightly tilted, consequential `daughter' nanoparticle, which by amplification over various length scales creates oriented mineral platelets and chiral vaterite suprastructures. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for how biomineralization-related enantiomers might exert hierarchical control to form extended chiral suprastructures.

  17. Boost invariant formulation of the chiral kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Shu; Fukushima, Kenji; Pu, Shi

    2017-07-01

    We formulate the chiral kinetic equation with the longitudinal boost invariance. We particularly focus on the physical interpretation of the particle number conservation. There appear two terms associated with the expansion, which did not exist in the nonchiral kinetic equation. One is a contribution to the transverse current arising from the side-jump effect, and the other is a change in the density whose flow makes the longitudinal current. We point out a characteristic pattern in the transverse current driven by the expansion, which we call the chiral circular displacement.

  18. Understanding and representing the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transfer in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, R.J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Pino, D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal of this study is to quantify the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transport in the dry Convective Boundary Layer (CBL). Questions addressed include the effect of wind shear on the depth of the mixed layer, the effect of wind shear on the depth and structure of the capping inversion, and

  19. Chiral Imbalance in QCD and its consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under extreme conditions of high temperature and/or large quark (baryon density, the vacuum of QCD changes its properties, and deconfinement, chiral symmetry restoration as well as chiral symmetry breaking take place. These transitions (phases are accompanied by the rapid change in the rate and nature of topological transitions connecting different topological sectors. The heavy ion collisions (HIC program opens a possibility to study these phenomena in so-called non-Abelian Quark-gluon plasma (QGP. In these phases the currents of light quarks (vector and axial-vector can be independently examined for right-handed (RH and left-handed (LH quarks. To describe such a quark matter chiral chemical potential can be introduced to quantify the presence of chirality imbalance (ChI i.e. the difference between the average numbers of RH and LH quarks in the fireball after HIC. In this review talk we will focus our attention on the discussion of the ChI related developments in heavy ion physics at central collisions and the plans for the future experiments aimed at establishing (or falsifying the presence of Local spacial Parity Breaking (LPB in heavy ion data. We describe some of experimental observables in detecting the signal of LPB. A number of measurements is proposed that allow to reach a definite conclusion on the occurrence of LPB effects in non-Abelian QGP produced in central heavy ion collisions and its simulation within a number of QCD-inspired models is outlined. Based on the effective meson theory in the presence of Chern-Simons interaction it is found that the spectrum of massive vector mesons splits into three polarization components with different effective masses. Moreover a resonance broadening occurs that leads to an increase of spectral contribution to the dilepton production as compared to the vacuum state. The asymmetry in production of longitudinally and transversely polarized states of ρ and ω mesons for various values of the

  20. Lanthanide tris(β-diketonates) as useful probes for chirality determination of biological amino alcohols in vibrational circular dichroism: ligand to ligand chirality transfer in lanthanide coordination sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Terada, Keiko; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    A series of lanthanide tris(β-diketonates) functioned as useful chirality probes in the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) characterization of biological amino alcohols. Various chiral amino alcohols induced intense VCD signals upon ternary complexation with racemic lanthanide tris(β-diketonates). The VCD signals observed around 1500 cm(-1) (β-diketonate IR absorption region) correlated well with the stereochemistry and enantiomeric purity of the targeted amino alcohol, while the corresponding monoalcohol, monoamine, and diol substrates induced very weak VCD signals. The high-coordination number and dynamic property of the lanthanide complex offer an effective chirality VCD probing of biological substrates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 63-gil, Geumjeong-Gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  2. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  3. Experimental Study of Fillets to Reduce Corner Effects in an Oblique Shock-Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted in the 15 cm x 15 cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center that focused on corner effects of an oblique shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. In an attempt to control the interaction in the corner region, eight corner fillet configurations were tested. Three parameters were considered for the fillet configurations: the radius, the fillet length, and the taper length from the square corner to the fillet radius. Fillets effectively reduced the boundary-layer thickness in the corner; however, there was an associated penalty in the form of increased boundary-layer thickness at the tunnel centerline. Larger fillet radii caused greater reductions in boundary-layer thickness along the corner bisector. To a lesser, but measureable, extent, shorter fillet lengths resulted in thinner corner boundary layers. Overall, of the configurations tested, the largest radius resulted in the best combination of control in the corner, evidenced by a reduction in boundary-layer thickness, coupled with minimal impacts at the tunnel centerline.

  4. Asymmetric Synthesis via Chiral Aziridines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Harden, Adrian; Wyatt, Paul

    1996-01-01

    A series of chiral bis(aziridines) has been synthesised and evaluated as chelating ligands for a variety of asymmetric transformations mediated by metals [Os (dihydroxylation), Pd (allylic alkylation) Cu (cyclopropanation and aziridination, Li (1,2-addition of organolithiums to imines)]. In the b...

  5. Single chirality through crystal grinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorduin, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    The properties of chiral molecules in living organisms can be different for left- and right-handed molecules. Therefore, ways to produce molecules of single handedness are of paramount importance, especially for economical, high yielding processes to synthesize pharmaceutical compounds that must be

  6. Review of chiral perturbation theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the CLEO Collaboration. Other sources could be the decay τ →ππν. In the modern context, a fresh Roy equation analysis with the view of combining dis- persion relations with chiral perturbation theory has been carried out [20]. The evaluation of the inhomogeneous terms, the so-called 'driving terms' for the Roy equations ...

  7. Chiral phosphines in nucleophilic organocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the tertiary phosphines possessing various chiral skeletons that have been used in asymmetric nucleophilic organocatalytic reactions, including annulations of allenes, alkynes, and Morita–Baylis–Hillman (MBH acetates, carbonates, and ketenes with activated alkenes and imines, allylic substitutions of MBH acetates and carbonates, Michael additions, γ-umpolung additions, and acylations of alcohols.

  8. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsky, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow, Russia and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Krikun, A. [NORDITA, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University Stockholm, Sweden and Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  9. Algebraic study of chiral anomalies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-14

    Jun 14, 2012 ... †Reproduced with kind permission from Springer Science+Business Media: Algebraic study of chiral anoma- lies, Juan Mañes, Raymond Stora and Bruno Zumino, Communications in Mathematical Physics 102, 157–174. (1985) Springer-Verlag. Even though at variance with normal Pramana policy, we ...

  10. Tris(β-diketonato) Ru(III) complexes as chiral dopants for nematic liquid crystals: the effect of the molecular structure on the helical twisting power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Jun; Watanabe, Go; Kakizawa, Kaori; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Yuge, Hidetaka

    2013-10-07

    Doping nematic liquid crystals with optically active compounds transforms them into chiral nematic phases with helical structures. In this phenomenon, the chirality of the dopant molecules is transferred or amplified to the bulk of the liquid crystals. Δ-[Ru(acac)3] (acac = acetylacetonato) is known to work as one of the dopants with a strong helical twisting power (HTP). In this study, we have systematically modified [Ru(acac)3] to clarify the correlation between the molecular structure and HTP; we have designed and synthesized five new Ru(III) complexes, [Ru(acac)2(acacC8)] (RuC8-1, acac = acetylacetonate, acacC8 = 3-(4'-octyloxy-phenylalkynyl)-pentane-2,4-dionato), [Ru(acac)(acacC8)2] (RuC8-2), [Ru(acacC8)3] (RuC8-3), [Ru(acacC0)3] (RuC0-3, acacC0 = 3-(phenylalkynyl)-pentane-2,4-dionato), and [Ru(acacC24)3] (RuC24-3, acacC24 = 3-(3',4',5'-tri(octyloxy)-phenylalkynyl)-pentane-2,4-dionato). All the complexes, except for RuC0-3, could be separated into Δ, Λ isomers by HPLC on a chiral column and were examined as chiral dopants for a nematic liquid crystal, N-(4-methoxybenzilidene)-4-butylaniline (MBBA). The Δ isomers of RuC8-1, RuC8-2, RuC8-3, and RuC24-3 induced a right-handed (P) helix and the magnitudes of the HTPs (/μm(-1)) were determined as follows: RuC8-1 (+60) RuC8-3 (+78) > RuC24-3 (+41). The HTPs of the ruthenium dopants were not simply proportional to their size. The highest HTP observed in biaxial RuC8-2 was attributed to the balance of the molecular helicity and high ordering in MBBA based on the surface chirality model.

  11. Perturbing effects of chiral stationary phase on enantiomerization second-order rate constants determined by enantioselective dynamic high-performance liquid chromatography: a practical tool to quantify the accessible acid and basic catalytic sites bonded on chromatographic supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilli, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto; La Torre, Francesco; Pierini, Marco; Siani, Gabriella

    2009-05-01

    Second-order rate constants of the diethylamine-promoted enantiomerization of 2-[2-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-2-oxo-1-phenylethyl]-isoindole-1,3-dione, a chiral alpha-substituted ketone endowed with high anti-MAO activity type-A, were measured by dynamic high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), stopped-flow high-performance liquid chromatography (sf-HPLC), and a classical method based on enantioselective HPLC as the monitoring tool. The chiral column used in all determinations was the commercial Chiralpak AD. By comparison of the obtained data, perturbing effects of the stationary phase on the DHPLC and sf-HPLC determinations were highlighted and distinguished in indirect (SP(IPC)) and direct (SP(DPC)) type. It was evidenced that SP(DPC) noise effects may be completely erased by simple mathematical treatment of data obtained at different concentrations of the basic catalyst. Perturbations of type SP(IPC) may instead only be partially kept down by modulating the concentration of the basic catalyst. An estimation of the density distribution of catalytic sites covalently bonded to the stationary phase (SP) of the Chiralpak AD was performed exploiting the quantified SP(DPC) effects. Such an approach might be of general application, supplying a useful way to characterize the attitude of SPs to speed acid- or base-catalyzed equilibria possibly active during chromatographic separations.

  12. Chiral boundary conditions for singletons and W-branes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raeymaekers, Joris; Van den Bleeken, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 7 (2017), s. 1-33, č. článku 049. ISSN 1029-8479 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000437; GA ČR GA17-22899S Grant - others:OP VVV - CoGraDS(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15 003/0000437 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AdS-CFT correspondence * black hole s in string theory Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 6.063, year: 2016

  13. Self-assembly of chiral coordination polymers and macrocycles: a metal template effect on the polymer-macrocycle equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Tara J; Puddephatt, Richard J

    2005-05-16

    The self-assembly of racemic and enantiopure binaphthyl-bis(amidopyridyl) ligands 1,1'-C(20)H(12){NHC(=O)-4-C(5)H(4)N}(2), 1, and 1,1'-C(20)H(12){NHC(=O)-3-C(5)H(4)N}(2), 2, with mercury(II) halides (HgX(2); X = Cl, Br, I) to form extended metal-containing arrays is described. It is shown that the self-assembly can lead to homochiral or heterochiral polymers or macrocycles, through self-recognition or self-discrimination of the ligand units, and the primary materials can further self-assemble through hydrogen bonding between amide substituents. In addition, the formation of macrocycles or polymers can be influenced by the presence or absence of excess mercury(II) halide, through a template effect, and mercury(II) halide inclusion complexes may be formed. In one case, an unusual polymeric compound was obtained, with 1 guest HgX(2) molecule for every 12 mercury halide units in the polymer.

  14. Relativistic chiral mean field model and chiral property of finite nuclei and nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yoko; Hu, Jinniu

    2009-10-01

    We study the role of pion in finite nuclei and nuclear matter with the relativistic chiral mean field (RCMF) model. In the RCMF model, we use the linear sigma model Lagrangian, which contains the nucleon field and sigma and pion fields in chiral symmetric way. We introduce further the omega meson coupling in order to include necessary repulsion to form nucleus. We take first the mean field approximation and obtain meson fluctuation terms to be treated in the 2p-2h space so that the pion exchange interaction is fully taken into account. The pion exchange interaction provides major contribution to the nuclear binding. We calculate ^4He, ^12C and ^16O and nuclear matter. For finite nuclei, we obtain more than a half of the attraction from the pion exchange interaction. We get an extra binding for ^12C than ^16O due to the pion exchange interaction coming from the Pauli-blocking effect. We find the nucleon mass is reduced about 20% from the free space value in the interior of finite nuclei. We calculate also chiral condensate in nuclear matter, which has a similar behavior to the model independent expression as a function of density. This behavior agrees with the behavior of isovector s-wave parameter extracted from deeply bound pionic atoms.

  15. Effects of Iron and Aluminum on Phase Boundaries at 600-800 km Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Sang-Heon; Ye, Yu; Prakapenka, Vitali; Meng, Yue

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution seismic studies have reported complex discontinuity structures at 600-800 km depths. However, the origin of the structures have not been well understood. In order to understand compositional effects, we have measured the post-spinel, post-garnet, and post-ilmenite phase boundaries in MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (iron free) and CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO (iron bearing) systems with pyrolitic oxide ratios. In-situ X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at 20-30 GPa and 1500-2300 K in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at the GSECARS and HPCAT sectors of the Advanced Photon Source. We use the Pt and Au pressure scales for the iron-free and iron-bearing compositions, respectively. The Pt and Au scales were calibrated with respect to each other in separate experiments. In most experiments, Ar was cryogenically loaded in the sample chamber as a thermal insulation and pressure transmitting medium, except for a few experiments where a KCl medium was used. At temperatures above 1900 K, the post-garnet transition occurs at higher pressures than the post-spinel transition in both the iron-free and iron-bearing systems. At lower temperatures, while the post-ilmenite transition occurs at nearly same pressures as the post-spinel transition in the iron-bearing system, the post-ilmenite transition occurs at slightly higher pressure (1 GPa) than the post-spinel transitions in the iron-free system. In the iron-free system, akimotoite is stable to much higher temperature (2300 K) than previously thought. In the iron-bearing system, the stability of akimotoite is limited to 2050 K. Our data indicate that Al partitions more into akimotoite than garnet in the iron-free system, which is the opposite to what has been found in iron-bearing systems. The high Al content in akimotoite seems to be responsible for the high-temperature stability of akimotoite in the iron-free system. The Clapeyron slope of the post-garnet boundary is greater by a factor of 2.5 in the iron-bearing system

  16. Effect of initial conditions, boundary conditions and thickness on the moisture buffering capacity of spruce plywood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osanyintola, O. F.; Talukdar, P.; Simonson, C. J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (China)

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, the moisture buffering capacity of spruce plywood is measured by recording the change in mass of a test specimen when the air relative humidity (RH) is changed between 33% RH and 75% RH. The aim is to represent diurnal cycles in indoor humidity with 33% RH maintained for 16 h and 75% RH maintained for 8 h. Measurements are taken using two different apparatuses, which provide different convective transfer coefficients between the air and the plywood, and the results are compared to a numerical model for validation. The validated numerical model is then used to investigate the effect of initial conditions, boundary conditions and thickness on the moisture buffering capacity of plywood. The results show that the buffering capacity of plywood depends on the initial conditions and thickness of the plywood as well as the surface film coefficient and humidity cycle. (author)

  17. Modeling the Effects of Buoyancy on the Evolution of Geophysical Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Eric; Caponi, Enrique A.

    1992-10-01

    A simple modeling based on the Imperial College k-ɛ turbulence description is shown to be capable of describing the highly anisotropic phenomena associated with the strong buoyancy effects encountered in upper ocean (and atmospheric boundary layer) environments. Both diurnal stratification and transition to buoyant mixing (from that driven by wind shear) are described in considerable detail, provided that the modeling of the turbulent Prandtl number and of the buoyant generation term in the ɛ model equation are evaluated in a suitably realistic and consistent way. The resulting model equations are suitable for simulating the evolution of the ensemble-averaged properties of the oceanic mixed layer in response to a specified history of interfacial shear stress and heat flux. The model is tested by comparing the predicted mixed layer evolution with the dissipation rate measurements of Shay and Gregg.

  18. The application of biofluid mechanics boundary effects on phoretic motions of colloidal spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Po-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    "The Application of Biofluid Mechanics: Boundary Effects on Phoretic Motions of Colloidal Spheres" focuses on the phoretic motion behavior of various micron- to nanometer-size particles. The content of this book is divided into two parts: one on the concentration gradient-driven diffusiophoresis and osmophoresis, and one on thermocapillary motion and thermophoretic motion driven by temperature gradient. Diffusiophoresis and osmophoresis are mainly used in biomedical engineering applications, such as drug delivery, purification, and the description of the behavior of the immune system; thermocapillary motion and thermophoretic motion are applied in the field of semiconductors, as well as in suspended impurities removal. The book also provides a variety of computer programming source codes compiled using Fortran for researchers' future applications. This book is intended for chemical engineers, biomedical engineers and scientists, biophysicists, and fundamental chemotaxis researchers. Dr. Po-Yuan Chen is an Ass...

  19. Moduli stabilisation for chiral global models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, Michele [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mayrhofer, Christoph [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Valandro, Roberto [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2011-10-15

    We combine moduli stabilisation and (chiral) model building in a fully consistent global set-up in Type IIB/F-theory. We consider compactifications on Calabi-Yau orientifolds which admit an explicit description in terms of toric geometry. We build globally consistent compactifications with tadpole and Freed-Witten anomaly cancellation by choosing appropriate brane set-ups and world-volume fluxes which also give rise to SU(5)- or MSSM-like chiral models. We fix all the Kaehler moduli within the Kaehler cone and the regime of validity of the 4D effective field theory. This is achieved in a way compatible with the local presence of chirality. The hidden sector generating the non-perturbative effects is placed on a del Pezzo divisor that does not have any chiral intersections with any other brane. In general, the vanishing D-term condition implies the shrinking of the rigid divisor supporting the visible sector. However, we avoid this problem by generating r

  20. Chiral Induction with Chiral Conformational Switches in the Limit of Low "Sergeants to Soldiers" Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuermaimaiti, Ajiguli; Bombis, Christian; Knudsen, Martin Markvard

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-level insights into chiral adsorption phenomena are highly relevant within the fields of asymmetric heterogeneous catalysis or chiral separation and may contribute to understand the origins of homochirality in nature. Here, we investigate chiral induction by the "sergeants and soldiers......" mechanism for an oligo(phenylene ethynylene) based chiral conformational switch by coadsorbing it with an intrinsically chiral seed on Au(111). Through statistical analysis of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) data we demonstrate successful chiral induction with a very low concentration of seeding...

  1. Effectiveness of "shifting boundaries" teen dating violence prevention program for subgroups of middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bruce G; Mumford, Elizabeth A; Stein, Nan D

    2015-02-01

    We examine whether the Shifting Boundaries (SB) intervention, a primary intervention to prevent youth dating violence and sexual harassment (DV/H), is differentially effective for girls compared with boys or for youth with a history of DV/H experiences. We randomly assigned SB to 30 public middle schools in New York City, enrolling 117 sixth and seventh grade classes to receive a classroom, building, combined, or neither intervention. The SB classroom intervention included six sessions emphasizing the laws/consequences of DV/H, establishing boundaries and safe relationships. The SB schoolwide/building intervention included the use of school-based restraining orders, greater faculty/security presence in unsafe "hot spots" mapped by students, and posters to increase DV/H awareness and reporting. Student surveys were implemented at baseline, immediately after intervention, and 6 months after intervention. At 6 months after intervention, the SB building-level intervention was associated with significant reductions in the frequency of sexual harassment (SH) perpetration and victimization; the prevalence and frequency of sexual dating violence victimization; and the frequency of total dating violence victimization and perpetration. We also had one anomalous finding that the interventions were associated with an increase in the prevalence of SH victimization. These results were consistent for girls and boys, and those with or without a history of DV/H, with the one exception for those exposed to the SB building condition who had earlier reported perpetrating SH had a significantly lower frequency of perpetrating SH at the follow-up than those without such a history. SB can provide effective universal prevention of middle school DV/H experiences, regardless of students' prior exposure histories, and for boys and girls. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.