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Sample records for eeg source reconstruction

  1. EEG/MEG Source Reconstruction with Spatial-Temporal Two-Way Regularized Regression

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Tian Siva; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Shen, Haipeng; Li, Zhimin

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a spatial-temporal two-way regularized regression method for reconstructing neural source signals from EEG/MEG time course measurements. The proposed method estimates the dipole locations and amplitudes simultaneously

  2. Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Simultaneous EEG Source and Forward Model Reconstruction (SOFOMORE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Mørup, Morten; Winther, Ole

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose an approach to handle forward model uncertainty for EEG source reconstruction. A stochastic forward model is motivated by the many uncertain contributions that form the forward propagation model including the tissue conductivity distribution, the cortical surface, and ele......In this paper we propose an approach to handle forward model uncertainty for EEG source reconstruction. A stochastic forward model is motivated by the many uncertain contributions that form the forward propagation model including the tissue conductivity distribution, the cortical surface...

  3. Simultaneous EEG Source and Forward Model Reconstruction (SOFOMORE) using a Hierarchical Bayesian Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Mørup, Morten; Winther, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to handle forward model uncertainty for EEG source reconstruction. A stochastic forward model representation is motivated by the many random contributions to the path from sources to measurements including the tissue conductivity distribution, the geometry of the cortical s...

  4. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict

  5. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (?200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in ...

  6. Bayesian model selection of template forward models for EEG source reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobbe, Gregor; van Mierlo, Pieter; De Vos, Maarten; Mijović, Bogdan; Hallez, Hans; Van Huffel, Sabine; López, José David; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2014-06-01

    Several EEG source reconstruction techniques have been proposed to identify the generating neuronal sources of electrical activity measured on the scalp. The solution of these techniques depends directly on the accuracy of the forward model that is inverted. Recently, a parametric empirical Bayesian (PEB) framework for distributed source reconstruction in EEG/MEG was introduced and implemented in the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software. The framework allows us to compare different forward modeling approaches, using real data, instead of using more traditional simulated data from an assumed true forward model. In the absence of a subject specific MR image, a 3-layered boundary element method (BEM) template head model is currently used including a scalp, skull and brain compartment. In this study, we introduced volumetric template head models based on the finite difference method (FDM). We constructed a FDM head model equivalent to the BEM model and an extended FDM model including CSF. These models were compared within the context of three different types of source priors related to the type of inversion used in the PEB framework: independent and identically distributed (IID) sources, equivalent to classical minimum norm approaches, coherence (COH) priors similar to methods such as LORETA, and multiple sparse priors (MSP). The resulting models were compared based on ERP data of 20 subjects using Bayesian model selection for group studies. The reconstructed activity was also compared with the findings of previous studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found very strong evidence in favor of the extended FDM head model with CSF and assuming MSP. These results suggest that the use of realistic volumetric forward models can improve PEB EEG source reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Algorithmic procedures for Bayesian MEG/EEG source reconstruction in SPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J D; Litvak, V; Espinosa, J J; Friston, K; Barnes, G R

    2014-01-01

    The MEG/EEG inverse problem is ill-posed, giving different source reconstructions depending on the initial assumption sets. Parametric Empirical Bayes allows one to implement most popular MEG/EEG inversion schemes (Minimum Norm, LORETA, etc.) within the same generic Bayesian framework. It also provides a cost-function in terms of the variational Free energy-an approximation to the marginal likelihood or evidence of the solution. In this manuscript, we revisit the algorithm for MEG/EEG source reconstruction with a view to providing a didactic and practical guide. The aim is to promote and help standardise the development and consolidation of other schemes within the same framework. We describe the implementation in the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software package, carefully explaining each of its stages with the help of a simple simulated data example. We focus on the Multiple Sparse Priors (MSP) model, which we compare with the well-known Minimum Norm and LORETA models, using the negative variational Free energy for model comparison. The manuscript is accompanied by Matlab scripts to allow the reader to test and explore the underlying algorithm. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Algorithmic procedures for Bayesian MEG/EEG source reconstruction in SPM☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J.D.; Litvak, V.; Espinosa, J.J.; Friston, K.; Barnes, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    The MEG/EEG inverse problem is ill-posed, giving different source reconstructions depending on the initial assumption sets. Parametric Empirical Bayes allows one to implement most popular MEG/EEG inversion schemes (Minimum Norm, LORETA, etc.) within the same generic Bayesian framework. It also provides a cost-function in terms of the variational Free energy—an approximation to the marginal likelihood or evidence of the solution. In this manuscript, we revisit the algorithm for MEG/EEG source reconstruction with a view to providing a didactic and practical guide. The aim is to promote and help standardise the development and consolidation of other schemes within the same framework. We describe the implementation in the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software package, carefully explaining each of its stages with the help of a simple simulated data example. We focus on the Multiple Sparse Priors (MSP) model, which we compare with the well-known Minimum Norm and LORETA models, using the negative variational Free energy for model comparison. The manuscript is accompanied by Matlab scripts to allow the reader to test and explore the underlying algorithm. PMID:24041874

  9. EEG/MEG Source Reconstruction with Spatial-Temporal Two-Way Regularized Regression

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Tian Siva

    2013-07-11

    In this work, we propose a spatial-temporal two-way regularized regression method for reconstructing neural source signals from EEG/MEG time course measurements. The proposed method estimates the dipole locations and amplitudes simultaneously through minimizing a single penalized least squares criterion. The novelty of our methodology is the simultaneous consideration of three desirable properties of the reconstructed source signals, that is, spatial focality, spatial smoothness, and temporal smoothness. The desirable properties are achieved by using three separate penalty functions in the penalized regression framework. Specifically, we impose a roughness penalty in the temporal domain for temporal smoothness, and a sparsity-inducing penalty and a graph Laplacian penalty in the spatial domain for spatial focality and smoothness. We develop a computational efficient multilevel block coordinate descent algorithm to implement the method. Using a simulation study with several settings of different spatial complexity and two real MEG examples, we show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods that use only a subset of the three penalty functions. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  10. MEG/EEG source reconstruction, statistical evaluation, and visualization with NUTMEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Sarang S; Zumer, Johanna M; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Trumpis, Michael; Wong, Daniel D E; Sekihara, Kensuke; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2011-01-01

    NUTMEG is a source analysis toolbox geared towards cognitive neuroscience researchers using MEG and EEG, including intracranial recordings. Evoked and unaveraged data can be imported to the toolbox for source analysis in either the time or time-frequency domains. NUTMEG offers several variants of adaptive beamformers, probabilistic reconstruction algorithms, as well as minimum-norm techniques to generate functional maps of spatiotemporal neural source activity. Lead fields can be calculated from single and overlapping sphere head models or imported from other software. Group averages and statistics can be calculated as well. In addition to data analysis tools, NUTMEG provides a unique and intuitive graphical interface for visualization of results. Source analyses can be superimposed onto a structural MRI or headshape to provide a convenient visual correspondence to anatomy. These results can also be navigated interactively, with the spatial maps and source time series or spectrogram linked accordingly. Animations can be generated to view the evolution of neural activity over time. NUTMEG can also display brain renderings and perform spatial normalization of functional maps using SPM's engine. As a MATLAB package, the end user may easily link with other toolboxes or add customized functions.

  11. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael X Cohen

    Full Text Available Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30-50 Hz, followed by a later alpha-band (8-12 Hz conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4-8 Hz, alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions.

  12. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30-50 Hz), followed by a later alpha-band (8-12 Hz) conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4-8 Hz), alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials) had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions.

  13. EEG Source Reconstruction Reveals Frontal-Parietal Dynamics of Spatial Conflict Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30–50 Hz), followed by a later alpha-band (8–12 Hz) conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4–8 Hz), alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials) had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions. PMID:23451201

  14. Performance evaluation of the Champagne source reconstruction algorithm on simulated and real M/EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Julia P; Wipf, David P; Attias, Hagai T; Sekihara, Kensuke; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present an extensive performance evaluation of a novel source localization algorithm, Champagne. It is derived in an empirical Bayesian framework that yields sparse solutions to the inverse problem. It is robust to correlated sources and learns the statistics of non-stimulus-evoked activity to suppress the effect of noise and interfering brain activity. We tested Champagne on both simulated and real M/EEG data. The source locations used for the simulated data were chosen to test the performance on challenging source configurations. In simulations, we found that Champagne outperforms the benchmark algorithms in terms of both the accuracy of the source localizations and the correct estimation of source time courses. We also demonstrate that Champagne is more robust to correlated brain activity present in real MEG data and is able to resolve many distinct and functionally relevant brain areas with real MEG and EEG data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the influence of uncertain forward models on the EEG source reconstruction problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Mørup, Morten; Winther, Ole

    2009-01-01

    in the different areas of the brain when noise is present. Results Due to mismatch between the true and experimental forward model, the reconstruction of the sources is determined by the angles between the i'th forward field associated with the true source and the j'th forward field in the experimental forward...... representation of the signal. Conclusions This analysis demonstrated that caution is needed when evaluating the source estimates in different brain regions. Moreover, we demonstrated the importance of reliable forward models, which may be used as a motivation for including the forward model uncertainty...

  16. The Iterative Reweighted Mixed-Norm Estimate for Spatio-Temporal MEG/EEG Source Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, Daniel; Bekhti, Yousra; Haueisen, Jens; Gramfort, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Source imaging based on magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) allows for the non-invasive analysis of brain activity with high temporal and good spatial resolution. As the bioelectromagnetic inverse problem is ill-posed, constraints are required. For the analysis of evoked brain activity, spatial sparsity of the neuronal activation is a common assumption. It is often taken into account using convex constraints based on the l 1 -norm. The resulting source estimates are however biased in amplitude and often suboptimal in terms of source selection due to high correlations in the forward model. In this work, we demonstrate that an inverse solver based on a block-separable penalty with a Frobenius norm per block and a l 0.5 -quasinorm over blocks addresses both of these issues. For solving the resulting non-convex optimization problem, we propose the iterative reweighted Mixed Norm Estimate (irMxNE), an optimization scheme based on iterative reweighted convex surrogate optimization problems, which are solved efficiently using a block coordinate descent scheme and an active set strategy. We compare the proposed sparse imaging method to the dSPM and the RAP-MUSIC approach based on two MEG data sets. We provide empirical evidence based on simulations and analysis of MEG data that the proposed method improves on the standard Mixed Norm Estimate (MxNE) in terms of amplitude bias, support recovery, and stability.

  17. EEG source reconstruction evidence for the noun-verb neural dissociation along semantic dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Dang, Jianwu; Zhang, Gaoyan

    2017-09-17

    One of the long-standing issues in neurolinguistic research is about the neural basis of word representation, concerning whether grammatical classification or semantic difference causes the neural dissociation of brain activity patterns when processing different word categories, especially nouns and verbs. To disentangle this puzzle, four orthogonalized word categories in Chinese: unambiguous nouns (UN), unambiguous verbs (UV), ambiguous words with noun-biased semantics (AN), and ambiguous words with verb-biased semantics (AV) were adopted in an auditory task for recording electroencephalographic (EEG) signals from 128 electrodes on the scalps of twenty-two subjects. With the advanced current density reconstruction (CDR) algorithm and the constraint of standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography, the spatiotemporal brain dynamics of word processing were explored with the results that in multiple time periods including P1 (60-90ms), N1 (100-140ms), P200 (150-250ms) and N400 (350-450ms), noun-verb dissociation over the parietal-occipital and frontal-central cortices appeared not only between the UN-UV grammatical classes but also between the grammatically identical but semantically different AN-AV pairs. The apparent semantic dissociation within one grammatical class strongly suggests that the semantic difference rather than grammatical classification could be interpreted as the origin of the noun-verb neural dissociation. Our results also revealed that semantic dissociation occurs from an early stage and repeats in multiple phases, thus supporting a functionally hierarchical word processing mechanism. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Independent EEG sources are dipolar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Delorme

    Full Text Available Independent component analysis (ICA and blind source separation (BSS methods are increasingly used to separate individual brain and non-brain source signals mixed by volume conduction in electroencephalographic (EEG and other electrophysiological recordings. We compared results of decomposing thirteen 71-channel human scalp EEG datasets by 22 ICA and BSS algorithms, assessing the pairwise mutual information (PMI in scalp channel pairs, the remaining PMI in component pairs, the overall mutual information reduction (MIR effected by each decomposition, and decomposition 'dipolarity' defined as the number of component scalp maps matching the projection of a single equivalent dipole with less than a given residual variance. The least well-performing algorithm was principal component analysis (PCA; best performing were AMICA and other likelihood/mutual information based ICA methods. Though these and other commonly-used decomposition methods returned many similar components, across 18 ICA/BSS algorithms mean dipolarity varied linearly with both MIR and with PMI remaining between the resulting component time courses, a result compatible with an interpretation of many maximally independent EEG components as being volume-conducted projections of partially-synchronous local cortical field activity within single compact cortical domains. To encourage further method comparisons, the data and software used to prepare the results have been made available (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/BSSComparison.

  19. Source localization of rhythmic ictal EEG activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Lantz, Göran; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Although precise identification of the seizure-onset zone is an essential element of presurgical evaluation, source localization of ictal electroencephalography (EEG) signals has received little attention. The aim of our study was to estimate the accuracy of source localization of rhythmic ictal...... EEG activity using a distributed source model....

  20. Effect of Brain-to-Skull Conductivity Ratio on EEG Source Localization Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Wang; Doutian Ren

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of the brain-to-skull conductivity ratio (BSCR) on EEG source localization accuracy. In this study, we evaluated four BSCRs: 15, 20, 25, and 80, which were mainly discussed according to the literature. The scalp EEG signals were generated by BSCR-related forward computation for each cortical dipole source. Then, for each scalp EEG measurement, the source reconstruction was performed to identify the estimated dipole sources by the actual ...

  1. PyEEG: an open source Python module for EEG/MEG feature extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Forrest Sheng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG) is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting EEG features has the potential to save much time for computational neuroscientists. In this paper, we introduce PyEEG, an open source Python module for EEG feature extraction.

  2. EEG source imaging during two Qigong meditations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Pascal L; Lehmann, Dietrich; Tei, Shisei; Tsujiuchi, Takuya; Kumano, Hiroaki; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Kochi, Kieko

    2012-08-01

    Experienced Qigong meditators who regularly perform the exercises "Thinking of Nothing" and "Qigong" were studied with multichannel EEG source imaging during their meditations. The intracerebral localization of brain electric activity during the two meditation conditions was compared using sLORETA functional EEG tomography. Differences between conditions were assessed using t statistics (corrected for multiple testing) on the normalized and log-transformed current density values of the sLORETA images. In the EEG alpha-2 frequency, 125 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Qigong" than "Thinking of Nothing," forming a single cluster in parietal Brodmann areas 5, 7, 31, and 40, all in the right hemisphere. In the EEG beta-1 frequency, 37 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Thinking of Nothing" than "Qigong," forming a single cluster in prefrontal Brodmann areas 6, 8, and 9, all in the left hemisphere. Compared to combined initial-final no-task resting, "Qigong" showed activation in posterior areas whereas "Thinking of Nothing" showed activation in anterior areas. The stronger activity of posterior (right) parietal areas during "Qigong" and anterior (left) prefrontal areas during "Thinking of Nothing" may reflect a predominance of self-reference, attention and input-centered processing in the "Qigong" meditation, and of control-centered processing in the "Thinking of Nothing" meditation.

  3. Incorporating priors for EEG source imaging and connectivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu eLei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography source imaging (ESI is a useful technique to localize the generators from a given scalp electric measurement and to investigate the temporal dynamics of the large-scale neural circuits. By introducing reasonable priors from other modalities, ESI reveals the most probable sources and communication structures at every moment in time. Here, we review the available priors from such techniques as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, functional MRI (fMRI, and positron emission tomography (PET. The modality's specific contribution is analyzed from the perspective of source reconstruction. For spatial priors, such as EEG-correlated fMRI, temporally coherent networks and resting-state fMRI are systematically introduced in the ESI. Moreover, the fiber tracking (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI and neuro-stimulation techniques (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS are also introduced as the potential priors, which can help to draw inferences about the neuroelectric connectivity in the source space. We conclude that combining EEG source imaging with other complementary modalities is a promising approach towards the study of brain networks in cognitive and clinical neurosciences.

  4. PyEEG: An Open Source Python Module for EEG/MEG Feature Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Forrest Sheng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG) is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting ...

  5. SCoT: a Python toolbox for EEG source connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinger, Martin; Brunner, Clemens; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of brain connectivity has become an important research tool in neuroscience. Connectivity can be estimated between cortical sources reconstructed from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Such analysis often relies on trial averaging to obtain reliable results. However, some applications such as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) require single-trial estimation methods. In this paper, we present SCoT-a source connectivity toolbox for Python. This toolbox implements routines for blind source decomposition and connectivity estimation with the MVARICA approach. Additionally, a novel extension called CSPVARICA is available for labeled data. SCoT estimates connectivity from various spectral measures relying on vector autoregressive (VAR) models. Optionally, these VAR models can be regularized to facilitate ill posed applications such as single-trial fitting. We demonstrate basic usage of SCoT on motor imagery (MI) data. Furthermore, we show simulation results of utilizing SCoT for feature extraction in a BCI application. These results indicate that CSPVARICA and correct regularization can significantly improve MI classification. While SCoT was mainly designed for application in BCIs, it contains useful tools for other areas of neuroscience. SCoT is a software package that (1) brings combined source decomposition and connectivtiy estimation to the open Python platform, and (2) offers tools for single-trial connectivity estimation. The source code is released under the MIT license and is available online at github.com/SCoT-dev/SCoT.

  6. SCoT: A Python Toolbox for EEG Source Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBillinger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of brain connectivity has become an important research tool in neuroscience. Connectivity can be estimated between cortical sources reconstructed from the electroencephalogram (EEG. Such analysis often relies on trial averaging to obtain reliable results. However, some applications such as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs require single-trial estimation methods.In this paper, we present SCoT – a source connectivity toolbox for Python. This toolbox implements routines for blind source decomposition and connectivity estimation with theMVARICA approach. Additionally, a novel extension called CSPVARICA is available for labeled data. SCoT estimates connectivity from various spectral measures relying on vector autoregressive (VAR models. Optionally, these VAR models can be regularized to facilitate ill posed applications such as single-trial fitting.We demonstrate basic usage of SCoT on motor imagery (MI data. Furthermore, we show simulation results of utilizing SCoT for feature extraction in a BCI application. These results indicate that CSPVARICA and correct regularization can significantly improve MI classification. While SCoT was mainly designed for application in BCIs, it contains useful tools for other areas of neuroscience. SCoT is a software package that (1 brings combined source decomposition and connectivtiy estimation to the open Python platform, and (2 offers tools for single-trial connectivity estimation. The source code is released under the MIT license and is available online at github.com/SCoT-dev/SCoT.

  7. Beamformer source analysis and connectivity on concurrent EEG and MEG data during voluntary movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Hellriegel, Helge; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Krause, Holger; Schnitzler, Alfons; Deuschl, Günther; Raethjen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) are the two modalities for measuring neuronal dynamics at a millisecond temporal resolution. Different source analysis methods, to locate the dipoles in the brain from which these dynamics originate, have been readily applied to both modalities alone. However, direct comparisons and possible advantages of combining both modalities have rarely been assessed during voluntary movements using coherent source analysis. In the present study, the cortical and sub-cortical network of coherent sources at the finger tapping task frequency (2-4 Hz) and the modes of interaction within this network were analysed in 15 healthy subjects using a beamformer approach called the dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) with subsequent source signal reconstruction and renormalized partial directed coherence analysis (RPDC). MEG and EEG data were recorded simultaneously allowing the comparison of each of the modalities separately to that of the combined approach. We found the identified network of coherent sources for the finger tapping task as described in earlier studies when using only the MEG or combined MEG+EEG whereas the EEG data alone failed to detect single sub-cortical sources. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) level of the coherent rhythmic activity at the tapping frequency in MEG and combined MEG+EEG data was significantly higher than EEG alone. The functional connectivity analysis revealed that the combined approach had more active connections compared to either of the modalities during the finger tapping (FT) task. These results indicate that MEG is superior in the detection of deep coherent sources and that the SNR seems to be more vital than the sensitivity to theoretical dipole orientation and the volume conduction effect in the case of EEG.

  8. Beamformer source analysis and connectivity on concurrent EEG and MEG data during voluntary movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuraman Muthuraman

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG are the two modalities for measuring neuronal dynamics at a millisecond temporal resolution. Different source analysis methods, to locate the dipoles in the brain from which these dynamics originate, have been readily applied to both modalities alone. However, direct comparisons and possible advantages of combining both modalities have rarely been assessed during voluntary movements using coherent source analysis. In the present study, the cortical and sub-cortical network of coherent sources at the finger tapping task frequency (2-4 Hz and the modes of interaction within this network were analysed in 15 healthy subjects using a beamformer approach called the dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS with subsequent source signal reconstruction and renormalized partial directed coherence analysis (RPDC. MEG and EEG data were recorded simultaneously allowing the comparison of each of the modalities separately to that of the combined approach. We found the identified network of coherent sources for the finger tapping task as described in earlier studies when using only the MEG or combined MEG+EEG whereas the EEG data alone failed to detect single sub-cortical sources. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR level of the coherent rhythmic activity at the tapping frequency in MEG and combined MEG+EEG data was significantly higher than EEG alone. The functional connectivity analysis revealed that the combined approach had more active connections compared to either of the modalities during the finger tapping (FT task. These results indicate that MEG is superior in the detection of deep coherent sources and that the SNR seems to be more vital than the sensitivity to theoretical dipole orientation and the volume conduction effect in the case of EEG.

  9. EEGNET: An Open Source Tool for Analyzing and Visualizing M/EEG Connectome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Shamas, Mohamad; Khalil, Mohamad; El Falou, Wassim; Wendling, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The brain is a large-scale complex network often referred to as the "connectome". Exploring the dynamic behavior of the connectome is a challenging issue as both excellent time and space resolution is required. In this context Magneto/Electroencephalography (M/EEG) are effective neuroimaging techniques allowing for analysis of the dynamics of functional brain networks at scalp level and/or at reconstructed sources. However, a tool that can cover all the processing steps of identifying brain networks from M/EEG data is still missing. In this paper, we report a novel software package, called EEGNET, running under MATLAB (Math works, inc), and allowing for analysis and visualization of functional brain networks from M/EEG recordings. EEGNET is developed to analyze networks either at the level of scalp electrodes or at the level of reconstructed cortical sources. It includes i) Basic steps in preprocessing M/EEG signals, ii) the solution of the inverse problem to localize / reconstruct the cortical sources, iii) the computation of functional connectivity among signals collected at surface electrodes or/and time courses of reconstructed sources and iv) the computation of the network measures based on graph theory analysis. EEGNET is the unique tool that combines the M/EEG functional connectivity analysis and the computation of network measures derived from the graph theory. The first version of EEGNET is easy to use, flexible and user friendly. EEGNET is an open source tool and can be freely downloaded from this webpage: https://sites.google.com/site/eegnetworks/.

  10. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of brain dynamics from EEG with a Markov prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    the functional dynamics of the brain. Solving the inverse problem of EEG is however highly ill-posed as there are many more potential locations of the EEG generators than EEG measurement points. Several well-known properties of brain dynamics can be exploited to alleviate this problem. More short ranging......Electroencephalography (EEG) can capture brain dynamics in high temporal resolution. By projecting the scalp EEG signal back to its origin in the brain also high spatial resolution can be achieved. Source localized EEG therefore has potential to be a very powerful tool for understanding...

  11. Characterization of dynamic changes of current source localization based on spatiotemporal fMRI constrained EEG source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thinh; Potter, Thomas; Grossman, Robert; Zhang, Yingchun

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Neuroimaging has been employed as a promising approach to advance our understanding of brain networks in both basic and clinical neuroscience. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) represent two neuroimaging modalities with complementary features; EEG has high temporal resolution and low spatial resolution while fMRI has high spatial resolution and low temporal resolution. Multimodal EEG inverse methods have attempted to capitalize on these properties but have been subjected to localization error. The dynamic brain transition network (DBTN) approach, a spatiotemporal fMRI constrained EEG source imaging method, has recently been developed to address these issues by solving the EEG inverse problem in a Bayesian framework, utilizing fMRI priors in a spatial and temporal variant manner. This paper presents a computer simulation study to provide a detailed characterization of the spatial and temporal accuracy of the DBTN method. Approach. Synthetic EEG data were generated in a series of computer simulations, designed to represent realistic and complex brain activity at superficial and deep sources with highly dynamical activity time-courses. The source reconstruction performance of the DBTN method was tested against the fMRI-constrained minimum norm estimates algorithm (fMRIMNE). The performances of the two inverse methods were evaluated both in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy. Main results. In comparison with the commonly used fMRIMNE method, results showed that the DBTN method produces results with increased spatial and temporal accuracy. The DBTN method also demonstrated the capability to reduce crosstalk in the reconstructed cortical time-course(s) induced by neighboring regions, mitigate depth bias and improve overall localization accuracy. Significance. The improved spatiotemporal accuracy of the reconstruction allows for an improved characterization of complex neural activity. This improvement can be

  12. Monitoring alert and drowsy states by modeling EEG source nonstationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2017-10-01

    Objective. As a human brain performs various cognitive functions within ever-changing environments, states of the brain characterized by recorded brain activities such as electroencephalogram (EEG) are inevitably nonstationary. The challenges of analyzing the nonstationary EEG signals include finding neurocognitive sources that underlie different brain states and using EEG data to quantitatively assess the state changes. Approach. This study hypothesizes that brain activities under different states, e.g. levels of alertness, can be modeled as distinct compositions of statistically independent sources using independent component analysis (ICA). This study presents a framework to quantitatively assess the EEG source nonstationarity and estimate levels of alertness. The framework was tested against EEG data collected from 10 subjects performing a sustained-attention task in a driving simulator. Main results. Empirical results illustrate that EEG signals under alert versus drowsy states, indexed by reaction speeds to driving challenges, can be characterized by distinct ICA models. By quantifying the goodness-of-fit of each ICA model to the EEG data using the model deviation index (MDI), we found that MDIs were significantly correlated with the reaction speeds (r  =  -0.390 with alertness models and r  =  0.449 with drowsiness models) and the opposite correlations indicated that the two models accounted for sources in the alert and drowsy states, respectively. Based on the observed source nonstationarity, this study also proposes an online framework using a subject-specific ICA model trained with an initial (alert) state to track the level of alertness. For classification of alert against drowsy states, the proposed online framework achieved an averaged area-under-curve of 0.745 and compared favorably with a classic power-based approach. Significance. This ICA-based framework provides a new way to study changes of brain states and can be applied to

  13. Sparse Source EEG Imaging with the Variational Garrote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Stahlhut, Carsten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    EEG imaging, the estimation of the cortical source distribution from scalp electrode measurements, poses an extremely ill-posed inverse problem. Recent work by Delorme et al. (2012) supports the hypothesis that distributed source solutions are sparse. We show that direct search for sparse solutions...

  14. Simultaneous head tissue conductivity and EEG source location estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akalin Acar, Zeynep; Acar, Can E; Makeig, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Accurate electroencephalographic (EEG) source localization requires an electrical head model incorporating accurate geometries and conductivity values for the major head tissues. While consistent conductivity values have been reported for scalp, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid, measured brain-to-skull conductivity ratio (BSCR) estimates have varied between 8 and 80, likely reflecting both inter-subject and measurement method differences. In simulations, mis-estimation of skull conductivity can produce source localization errors as large as 3cm. Here, we describe an iterative gradient-based approach to Simultaneous tissue Conductivity And source Location Estimation (SCALE). The scalp projection maps used by SCALE are obtained from near-dipolar effective EEG sources found by adequate independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of sufficient high-density EEG data. We applied SCALE to simulated scalp projections of 15cm(2)-scale cortical patch sources in an MR image-based electrical head model with simulated BSCR of 30. Initialized either with a BSCR of 80 or 20, SCALE estimated BSCR as 32.6. In Adaptive Mixture ICA (AMICA) decompositions of (45-min, 128-channel) EEG data from two young adults we identified sets of 13 independent components having near-dipolar scalp maps compatible with a single cortical source patch. Again initialized with either BSCR 80 or 25, SCALE gave BSCR estimates of 34 and 54 for the two subjects respectively. The ability to accurately estimate skull conductivity non-invasively from any well-recorded EEG data in combination with a stable and non-invasively acquired MR imaging-derived electrical head model could remove a critical barrier to using EEG as a sub-cm(2)-scale accurate 3-D functional cortical imaging modality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anatomically constrained dipole adjustment (ANACONDA) for accurate MEG/EEG focal source localizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Jung, Hyun-Kyo; Fujimaki, Norio

    2005-10-01

    This paper proposes an alternative approach to enhance localization accuracy of MEG and EEG focal sources. The proposed approach assumes anatomically constrained spatio-temporal dipoles, initial positions of which are estimated from local peak positions of distributed sources obtained from a pre-execution of distributed source reconstruction. The positions of the dipoles are then adjusted on the cortical surface using a novel updating scheme named cortical surface scanning. The proposed approach has many advantages over the conventional ones: (1) as the cortical surface scanning algorithm uses spatio-temporal dipoles, it is robust with respect to noise; (2) it requires no a priori information on the numbers and initial locations of the activations; (3) as the locations of dipoles are restricted only on a tessellated cortical surface, it is physiologically more plausible than the conventional ECD model. To verify the proposed approach, it was applied to several realistic MEG/EEG simulations and practical experiments. From the several case studies, it is concluded that the anatomically constrained dipole adjustment (ANACONDA) approach will be a very promising technique to enhance accuracy of focal source localization which is essential in many clinical and neurological applications of MEG and EEG.

  16. Anatomically constrained dipole adjustment (ANACONDA) for accurate MEG/EEG focal source localizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Jung, Hyun-Kyo; Fujimaki, Norio

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes an alternative approach to enhance localization accuracy of MEG and EEG focal sources. The proposed approach assumes anatomically constrained spatio-temporal dipoles, initial positions of which are estimated from local peak positions of distributed sources obtained from a pre-execution of distributed source reconstruction. The positions of the dipoles are then adjusted on the cortical surface using a novel updating scheme named cortical surface scanning. The proposed approach has many advantages over the conventional ones: (1) as the cortical surface scanning algorithm uses spatio-temporal dipoles, it is robust with respect to noise; (2) it requires no a priori information on the numbers and initial locations of the activations; (3) as the locations of dipoles are restricted only on a tessellated cortical surface, it is physiologically more plausible than the conventional ECD model. To verify the proposed approach, it was applied to several realistic MEG/EEG simulations and practical experiments. From the several case studies, it is concluded that the anatomically constrained dipole adjustment (ANACONDA) approach will be a very promising technique to enhance accuracy of focal source localization which is essential in many clinical and neurological applications of MEG and EEG

  17. Real Time Hand Motion Reconstruction System for Trans-Humeral Amputees Using EEG and EMG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Fernandez-Vargas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Predicting a hand’s position using only biosignals is a complex problem that has not been completely solved. The only reliable solutions currently available require invasive surgery. The attempts using non-invasive technologies are rare, and usually have led to lower correlation values between the real and the reconstructed position than those required for real-world applications. In this study, we propose a solution for reconstructing the hand’s position in three dimensions using EEG and EMG to detect from the shoulder area. This approach would be valid for most trans-humeral amputees. In order to find the best solution, we tested four different architectures for the system based on artificial neural networks. Our results show that it is possible to reconstruct the hand’s motion trajectory with a correlation value up to 0.809 compared to a typical value in the literature of 0.6. We also demonstrated that both EEG and EMG contribute jointly to the motion reconstruction. Furthermore, we discovered that the system architectures do not change the results radically. In addition, our results suggest that different motions may have different brain activity patterns that could be detected through EEG. Finally, we suggest a method to study non-linear relations in the brain through the EEG signals, which may lead to a more accurate system.

  18. An alternative subspace approach to EEG dipole source localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Bobby; He, Bin

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate a new approach to electroencephalography (EEG) three-dimensional (3D) dipole source localization by using a non-recursive subspace algorithm called FINES. In estimating source dipole locations, the present approach employs projections onto a subspace spanned by a small set of particular vectors (FINES vector set) in the estimated noise-only subspace instead of the entire estimated noise-only subspace in the case of classic MUSIC. The subspace spanned by this vector set is, in the sense of principal angle, closest to the subspace spanned by the array manifold associated with a particular brain region. By incorporating knowledge of the array manifold in identifying FINES vector sets in the estimated noise-only subspace for different brain regions, the present approach is able to estimate sources with enhanced accuracy and spatial resolution, thus enhancing the capability of resolving closely spaced sources and reducing estimation errors. The present computer simulations show, in EEG 3D dipole source localization, that compared to classic MUSIC, FINES has (1) better resolvability of two closely spaced dipolar sources and (2) better estimation accuracy of source locations. In comparison with RAP-MUSIC, FINES' performance is also better for the cases studied when the noise level is high and/or correlations among dipole sources exist.

  19. An alternative subspace approach to EEG dipole source localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoliang; Xu, Bobby; He Bin

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate a new approach to electroencephalography (EEG) three-dimensional (3D) dipole source localization by using a non-recursive subspace algorithm called FINES. In estimating source dipole locations, the present approach employs projections onto a subspace spanned by a small set of particular vectors (FINES vector set) in the estimated noise-only subspace instead of the entire estimated noise-only subspace in the case of classic MUSIC. The subspace spanned by this vector set is, in the sense of principal angle, closest to the subspace spanned by the array manifold associated with a particular brain region. By incorporating knowledge of the array manifold in identifying FINES vector sets in the estimated noise-only subspace for different brain regions, the present approach is able to estimate sources with enhanced accuracy and spatial resolution, thus enhancing the capability of resolving closely spaced sources and reducing estimation errors. The present computer simulations show, in EEG 3D dipole source localization, that compared to classic MUSIC, FINES has (1) better resolvability of two closely spaced dipolar sources and (2) better estimation accuracy of source locations. In comparison with RAP-MUSIC, FINES' performance is also better for the cases studied when the noise level is high and/or correlations among dipole sources exist

  20. A technique to consider mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources for fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging: a preliminary simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2006-01-01

    fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging can be a powerful tool in studying human brain functions with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions. Recent studies on the combination of fMRI and EEG/MEG have suggested that fMRI prior information could be readily implemented by simply imposing different weighting factors to cortical sources overlapping with the fMRI activations. It has been also reported, however, that such a hard constraint may cause severe distortions or elimination of meaningful EEG/MEG sources when there are distinct mismatches between the fMRI activations and the EEG/MEG sources. If one wants to obtain the actual EEG/MEG source locations and uses the fMRI prior information as just an auxiliary tool to enhance focality of the distributed EEG/MEG sources, it is reasonable to weaken the strength of fMRI constraint when severe mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources are observed. The present study suggests an efficient technique to automatically adjust the strength of fMRI constraint according to the mismatch level. The use of the proposed technique rarely affects the results of conventional fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging if no major mismatch between the two modalities is detected; while the new results become similar to those of typical EEG/MEG source imaging without fMRI constraint if the mismatch level is significant. A preliminary simulation study using realistic EEG signals demonstrated that the proposed technique can be a promising tool to selectively apply fMRI prior information to EEG/MEG source imaging

  1. Detecting Large-Scale Brain Networks Using EEG: Impact of Electrode Density, Head Modeling and Source Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quanying; Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2018-01-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain were recently detected using high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG). This was done by using an advanced analysis workflow to estimate neural signals in the cortex and to assess functional connectivity (FC) between distant cortical regions. FC analyses were conducted either using temporal (tICA) or spatial independent component analysis (sICA). Notably, EEG-RSNs obtained with sICA were very similar to RSNs retrieved with sICA from functional magnetic resonance imaging data. It still remains to be clarified, however, what technological aspects of hdEEG acquisition and analysis primarily influence this correspondence. Here we examined to what extent the detection of EEG-RSN maps by sICA depends on the electrode density, the accuracy of the head model, and the source localization algorithm employed. Our analyses revealed that the collection of EEG data using a high-density montage is crucial for RSN detection by sICA, but also the use of appropriate methods for head modeling and source localization have a substantial effect on RSN reconstruction. Overall, our results confirm the potential of hdEEG for mapping the functional architecture of the human brain, and highlight at the same time the interplay between acquisition technology and innovative solutions in data analysis. PMID:29551969

  2. Localizing Brain Activity from Multiple Distinct Sources via EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Dassios

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An important question arousing in the framework of electroencephalography (EEG is the possibility to recognize, by means of a recorded surface potential, the number of activated areas in the brain. In the present paper, employing a homogeneous spherical conductor serving as an approximation of the brain, we provide a criterion which determines whether the measured surface potential is evoked by a single or multiple localized neuronal excitations. We show that the uniqueness of the inverse problem for a single dipole is closely connected with attaining certain relations connecting the measured data. Further, we present the necessary and sufficient conditions which decide whether the collected data originates from a single dipole or from numerous dipoles. In the case where the EEG data arouses from multiple parallel dipoles, an isolation of the source is, in general, not possible.

  3. Review on solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergult Anneleen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of electroencephalogram (EEG source localization is to find the brain areas responsible for EEG waves of interest. It consists of solving forward and inverse problems. The forward problem is solved by starting from a given electrical source and calculating the potentials at the electrodes. These evaluations are necessary to solve the inverse problem which is defined as finding brain sources which are responsible for the measured potentials at the EEG electrodes. Methods While other reviews give an extensive summary of the both forward and inverse problem, this review article focuses on different aspects of solving the forward problem and it is intended for newcomers in this research field. Results It starts with focusing on the generators of the EEG: the post-synaptic potentials in the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These cells generate an extracellular current which can be modeled by Poisson's differential equation, and Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions. The compartments in which these currents flow can be anisotropic (e.g. skull and white matter. In a three-shell spherical head model an analytical expression exists to solve the forward problem. During the last two decades researchers have tried to solve Poisson's equation in a realistically shaped head model obtained from 3D medical images, which requires numerical methods. The following methods are compared with each other: the boundary element method (BEM, the finite element method (FEM and the finite difference method (FDM. In the last two methods anisotropic conducting compartments can conveniently be introduced. Then the focus will be set on the use of reciprocity in EEG source localization. It is introduced to speed up the forward calculations which are here performed for each electrode position rather than for each dipole position. Solving Poisson's equation utilizing FEM and FDM corresponds to solving a large sparse linear system. Iterative

  4. EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain dead. EEG cannot be used to measure intelligence. Normal Results Brain electrical activity has a certain ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  5. Raviart–Thomas-type sources adapted to applied EEG and MEG: implementation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursiainen, S

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies numerically electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (EEG and MEG), two non-invasive imaging modalities in which external measurements of the electric potential and the magnetic field are, respectively, utilized to reconstruct the primary current density (neuronal activity) of the human brain. The focus is on adapting a Raviart–Thomas-type source model to meet the needs of EEG and MEG applications. The goal is to construct a model that provides an accurate approximation of dipole source currents and can be flexibly applied to different reconstruction strategies as well as to realistic computation geometries. The finite element method is applied in the simulation of the data. Least-squares fit interpolation is used to establish Cartesian source directions, which guarantee that the recovered current field is minimally dependent on the underlying finite element mesh. Implementation is explained in detail and made accessible, e.g., by using quadrature-free formulae and the Gaussian one-point rule in numerical integration. Numerical results are presented concerning, for example, the iterative alternating sequential inverse algorithm as well as resolution, smoothness and local refinement of the finite element mesh. Both spherical and pseudo-realistic head models, as well as real MEG data, are utilized in the numerical experiments. (paper)

  6. Blind Source Separation of Event-Related EEG/MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsomaa, Johanna; Sarvas, Jukka; Ilmoniemi, Risto Juhani

    2017-09-01

    Blind source separation (BSS) can be used to decompose complex electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography data into simpler components based on statistical assumptions without using a physical model. Applications include brain-computer interfaces, artifact removal, and identifying parallel neural processes. We wish to address the issue of applying BSS to event-related responses, which is challenging because of nonstationary data. We introduce a new BSS approach called momentary-uncorrelated component analysis (MUCA), which is tailored for event-related multitrial data. The method is based on approximate joint diagonalization of multiple covariance matrices estimated from the data at separate latencies. We further show how to extend the methodology for autocovariance matrices and how to apply BSS methods suitable for piecewise stationary data to event-related responses. We compared several BSS approaches by using simulated EEG as well as measured somatosensory and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) evoked EEG. Among the compared methods, MUCA was the most tolerant one to noise, TMS artifacts, and other challenges in the data. With measured somatosensory data, over half of the estimated components were found to be similar by MUCA and independent component analysis. MUCA was also stable when tested with several input datasets. MUCA is based on simple assumptions, and the results suggest that MUCA is robust with nonideal data. Event-related responses and BSS are valuable and popular tools in neuroscience. Correctly designed BSS is an efficient way of identifying artifactual and neural processes from nonstationary event-related data.

  7. FieldTrip: Open source software for advanced analysis of MEG, EEG, and invasive electrophysiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostenveld, Robert; Fries, Pascal; Maris, Eric; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow experimental neuroscientists to analyze experimental data. It includes algorithms for simple and advanced analysis, such as time-frequency analysis using multitapers, source reconstruction using dipoles, distributed sources and beamformers, connectivity analysis, and nonparametric statistical permutation tests at the channel and source level. The implementation as toolbox allows the user to perform elaborate and structured analyses of large data sets using the MATLAB command line and batch scripting. Furthermore, users and developers can easily extend the functionality and implement new algorithms. The modular design facilitates the reuse in other software packages.

  8. Sparse EEG/MEG source estimation via a group lasso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lim

    Full Text Available Non-invasive recordings of human brain activity through electroencephalography (EEG or magnetoencelphalography (MEG are of value for both basic science and clinical applications in sensory, cognitive, and affective neuroscience. Here we introduce a new approach to estimating the intra-cranial sources of EEG/MEG activity measured from extra-cranial sensors. The approach is based on the group lasso, a sparse-prior inverse that has been adapted to take advantage of functionally-defined regions of interest for the definition of physiologically meaningful groups within a functionally-based common space. Detailed simulations using realistic source-geometries and data from a human Visual Evoked Potential experiment demonstrate that the group-lasso method has improved performance over traditional ℓ2 minimum-norm methods. In addition, we show that pooling source estimates across subjects over functionally defined regions of interest results in improvements in the accuracy of source estimates for both the group-lasso and minimum-norm approaches.

  9. EEG and MEG source localization using recursively applied (RAP) MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Signal and Image Processing Inst.

    1996-12-31

    The multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) algorithm locates multiple asynchronous dipolar sources from electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. A signal subspace is estimated from the data, then the algorithm scans a single dipole model through a three-dimensional head volume and computes projections onto this subspace. To locate the sources, the user must search the head volume for local peaks in the projection metric. Here we describe a novel extension of this approach which we refer to as RAP (Recursively APplied) MUSIC. This new procedure automatically extracts the locations of the sources through a recursive use of subspace projections, which uses the metric of principal correlations as a multidimensional form of correlation analysis between the model subspace and the data subspace. The dipolar orientations, a form of `diverse polarization,` are easily extracted using the associated principal vectors.

  10. EEG

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... However, very few studies have examined the use of EEG in developing countries, including Ni- ... of evoked potentials from brain neurons, referred to as .... Percentage. Gender. Male. 89. 62.7. Female. 53. 37.3. Age. 0-10. 59.

  11. Review on solving the inverse problem in EEG source analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabri Simon G

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this primer, we give a review of the inverse problem for EEG source localization. This is intended for the researchers new in the field to get insight in the state-of-the-art techniques used to find approximate solutions of the brain sources giving rise to a scalp potential recording. Furthermore, a review of the performance results of the different techniques is provided to compare these different inverse solutions. The authors also include the results of a Monte-Carlo analysis which they performed to compare four non parametric algorithms and hence contribute to what is presently recorded in the literature. An extensive list of references to the work of other researchers is also provided. This paper starts off with a mathematical description of the inverse problem and proceeds to discuss the two main categories of methods which were developed to solve the EEG inverse problem, mainly the non parametric and parametric methods. The main difference between the two is to whether a fixed number of dipoles is assumed a priori or not. Various techniques falling within these categories are described including minimum norm estimates and their generalizations, LORETA, sLORETA, VARETA, S-MAP, ST-MAP, Backus-Gilbert, LAURA, Shrinking LORETA FOCUSS (SLF, SSLOFO and ALF for non parametric methods and beamforming techniques, BESA, subspace techniques such as MUSIC and methods derived from it, FINES, simulated annealing and computational intelligence algorithms for parametric methods. From a review of the performance of these techniques as documented in the literature, one could conclude that in most cases the LORETA solution gives satisfactory results. In situations involving clusters of dipoles, higher resolution algorithms such as MUSIC or FINES are however preferred. Imposing reliable biophysical and psychological constraints, as done by LAURA has given superior results. The Monte-Carlo analysis performed, comparing WMN, LORETA, sLORETA and SLF

  12. Matrix kernels for MEG and EEG source localization and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S.; Leahy, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The most widely used model for electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) assumes a quasi-static approximation of Maxwell's equations and a piecewise homogeneous conductor model. Both models contain an incremental field element that linearly relates an incremental source element (current dipole) to the field or voltage at a distant point. The explicit form of the field element is dependent on the head modeling assumptions and sensor configuration. Proper characterization of this incremental element is crucial to the inverse problem. The field element can be partitioned into the product of a vector dependent on sensor characteristics and a matrix kernel dependent only on head modeling assumptions. We present here the matrix kernels for the general boundary element model (BEM) and for MEG spherical models. We show how these kernels are easily interchanged in a linear algebraic framework that includes sensor specifics such as orientation and gradiometer configuration. We then describe how this kernel is easily applied to ''gain'' or ''transfer'' matrices used in multiple dipole and source imaging models

  13. Equivalent charge source model based iterative maximum neighbor weight for sparse EEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Tian, Yin; Lei, Xu; Hu, Xiao; Yao, Dezhong

    2008-12-01

    How to localize the neural electric activities within brain effectively and precisely from the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings is a critical issue for current study in clinical neurology and cognitive neuroscience. In this paper, based on the charge source model and the iterative re-weighted strategy, proposed is a new maximum neighbor weight based iterative sparse source imaging method, termed as CMOSS (Charge source model based Maximum neighbOr weight Sparse Solution). Different from the weight used in focal underdetermined system solver (FOCUSS) where the weight for each point in the discrete solution space is independently updated in iterations, the new designed weight for each point in each iteration is determined by the source solution of the last iteration at both the point and its neighbors. Using such a new weight, the next iteration may have a bigger chance to rectify the local source location bias existed in the previous iteration solution. The simulation studies with comparison to FOCUSS and LORETA for various source configurations were conducted on a realistic 3-shell head model, and the results confirmed the validation of CMOSS for sparse EEG source localization. Finally, CMOSS was applied to localize sources elicited in a visual stimuli experiment, and the result was consistent with those source areas involved in visual processing reported in previous studies.

  14. Reconstruction of multiple line source attenuation maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celler, A.; Sitek, A.; Harrop, R.

    1996-01-01

    A simple configuration for a transmission source for the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was proposed, which utilizes a series of collimated line sources parallel to the axis of rotation of a camera. The detector is equipped with a standard parallel hole collimator. We have demonstrated that this type of source configuration can be used to generate sufficient data for the reconstruction of the attenuation map when using 8-10 line sources spaced by 3.5-4.5 cm for a 30 x 40cm detector at 65cm distance from the sources. Transmission data for a nonuniform thorax phantom was simulated, then binned and reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative methods. The optimum maps are obtained with data binned into 2-3 bins and FBP reconstruction. The activity in the source was investigated for uniform and exponential activity distributions, as well as the effect of gaps and overlaps of the neighboring fan beams. A prototype of the line source has been built and the experimental verification of the technique has started

  15. Source localization of rhythmic ictal EEG activity: a study of diagnostic accuracy following STARD criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Lantz, Göran; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Åkeson, Per; Pedersen, Birthe; Pinborg, Lars H; Ziebell, Morten; Jespersen, Bo; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2013-10-01

    Although precise identification of the seizure-onset zone is an essential element of presurgical evaluation, source localization of ictal electroencephalography (EEG) signals has received little attention. The aim of our study was to estimate the accuracy of source localization of rhythmic ictal EEG activity using a distributed source model. Source localization of rhythmic ictal scalp EEG activity was performed in 42 consecutive cases fulfilling inclusion criteria. The study was designed according to recommendations for studies on diagnostic accuracy (STARD). The initial ictal EEG signals were selected using a standardized method, based on frequency analysis and voltage distribution of the ictal activity. A distributed source model-local autoregressive average (LAURA)-was used for the source localization. Sensitivity, specificity, and measurement of agreement (kappa) were determined based on the reference standard-the consensus conclusion of the multidisciplinary epilepsy surgery team. Predictive values were calculated from the surgical outcome of the operated patients. To estimate the clinical value of the ictal source analysis, we compared the likelihood ratios of concordant and discordant results. Source localization was performed blinded to the clinical data, and before the surgical decision. Reference standard was available for 33 patients. The ictal source localization had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 76%. The mean measurement of agreement (kappa) was 0.61, corresponding to substantial agreement (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.84). Twenty patients underwent resective surgery. The positive predictive value (PPV) for seizure freedom was 92% and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 43%. The likelihood ratio was nine times higher for the concordant results, as compared with the discordant ones. Source localization of rhythmic ictal activity using a distributed source model (LAURA) for the ictal EEG signals selected with a standardized method

  16. EEG Source Reconstruction using Sparse Basis Function Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    -validation this approach is more automated than competing approaches such as Multiple Sparse Priors (Friston et al., 2008) or Champagne (Wipf et al., 2010) that require manual selection of noise level and auxiliary signal free data, respectively. Finally, we propose an unbiased estimator of the reproducibility...

  17. Source-Modeling Auditory Processes of EEG Data Using EEGLAB and Brainstorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Stropahl

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG source localization approaches are often used to disentangle the spatial patterns mixed up in scalp EEG recordings. However, approaches differ substantially between experiments, may be strongly parameter-dependent, and results are not necessarily meaningful. In this paper we provide a pipeline for EEG source estimation, from raw EEG data pre-processing using EEGLAB functions up to source-level analysis as implemented in Brainstorm. The pipeline is tested using a data set of 10 individuals performing an auditory attention task. The analysis approach estimates sources of 64-channel EEG data without the prerequisite of individual anatomies or individually digitized sensor positions. First, we show advanced EEG pre-processing using EEGLAB, which includes artifact attenuation using independent component analysis (ICA. ICA is a linear decomposition technique that aims to reveal the underlying statistical sources of mixed signals and is further a powerful tool to attenuate stereotypical artifacts (e.g., eye movements or heartbeat. Data submitted to ICA are pre-processed to facilitate good-quality decompositions. Aiming toward an objective approach on component identification, the semi-automatic CORRMAP algorithm is applied for the identification of components representing prominent and stereotypic artifacts. Second, we present a step-wise approach to estimate active sources of auditory cortex event-related processing, on a single subject level. The presented approach assumes that no individual anatomy is available and therefore the default anatomy ICBM152, as implemented in Brainstorm, is used for all individuals. Individual noise modeling in this dataset is based on the pre-stimulus baseline period. For EEG source modeling we use the OpenMEEG algorithm as the underlying forward model based on the symmetric Boundary Element Method (BEM. We then apply the method of dynamical statistical parametric mapping (dSPM to obtain

  18. Solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis by spherical and fdm head modeling: a comparative analysis - biomed 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vatta, F.; Meneghini, F.; Esposito, F.; Mininel, S.; Di Salle, F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural source localization techniques based on electroencephalography (EEG) use scalp potential data to infer the location of underlying neural activity. This procedure entails modeling the sources of EEG activity and modeling the head volume conduction process to link the modeled sources to the

  19. EEG recordings as a source for the detection of IRBD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Sissel; Duun-Christensen, Bolette; Kempfner, Lykke

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to develop a supportive algorithm for the detection of idiopathic Rapid Eye-Movement (REM) sleep Behaviour Disorder (iRBD) from EEG recordings. iRBD is defined as REM sleep without atonia with no current sign of neurodegenerative disease, and is one...... of the earliest known biomarkers of Parkinson's Disease (PD). It is currently diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG), primarily based on EMG recordings during REM sleep. The algorithm was developed using data collected from 42 control subjects and 34 iRBD subjects. A feature was developed to represent high amplitude...

  20. Smartphones Get Emotional: Mind Reading Images and Reconstructing the Neural Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Kai; Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    components across subjects we are able to remove artifacts and identify common sources of synchronous brain activity, consistent with earlier ndings based on conventional EEG equipment. Applying a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the neural sources not only facilitates dierentiation of emotional responses...... but may also provide an intuitive interface for interacting with a 3D rendered model of brain activity. Integrating a wireless EEG set with a smartphone thus offers completely new opportunities for modeling the mental state of users as well as providing a basis for novel bio-feedback applications.......Combining a 14 channel neuroheadset with a smartphone to capture and process brain imaging data, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish among emotional responses re ected in dierent scalp potentials when viewing pleasant and unpleasant pictures compared to neutral content. Clustering independent...

  1. Integration of EEG source imaging and fMRI during continuous viewing of natural movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingstall, Kevin; Bartels, Andreas; Singh, Vanessa; Kwon, Soyoung; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2010-10-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are noninvasive neuroimaging tools which can be used to measure brain activity with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, respectively. By combining the neural and hemodynamic recordings from these modalities, we can gain better insight into how and where the brain processes complex stimuli, which may be especially useful in patients with different neural diseases. However, due to their vastly different spatial and temporal resolutions, the integration of EEG and fMRI recordings is not always straightforward. One fundamental obstacle has been that paradigms used for EEG experiments usually rely on event-related paradigms, while fMRI is not limited in this regard. Therefore, here we ask whether one can reliably localize stimulus-driven EEG activity using the continuously varying feature intensities occurring in natural movie stimuli presented over relatively long periods of time. Specifically, we asked whether stimulus-driven aspects in the EEG signal would be co-localized with the corresponding stimulus-driven BOLD signal during free viewing of a movie. Secondly, we wanted to integrate the EEG signal directly with the BOLD signal, by estimating the underlying impulse response function (IRF) that relates the BOLD signal to the underlying current density in the primary visual area (V1). We made sequential fMRI and 64-channel EEG recordings in seven subjects who passively watched 2-min-long segments of a James Bond movie. To analyze EEG data in this natural setting, we developed a method based on independent component analysis (ICA) to reject EEG artifacts due to blinks, subject movement, etc., in a way unbiased by human judgment. We then calculated the EEG source strength of this artifact-free data at each time point of the movie within the entire brain volume using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). This provided for every voxel in the brain (i.e., in 3D space) an

  2. Analytic sensing for multi-layer spherical models with application to EEG source imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kandaswamy, Djano; Blu, Thierry; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Source imaging maps back boundary measurements to underlying generators within the domain; e. g., retrieving the parameters of the generating dipoles from electrical potential measurements on the scalp such as in electroencephalography (EEG). Fitting such a parametric source model is non-linear in the positions of the sources and renewed interest in mathematical imaging has led to several promising approaches. One important step in these methods is the application of a sensing principle that ...

  3. Probabilistic M/EEG source imaging from sparse spatio-temporal event structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Attias, Hagai T.; Wipf, David

    While MEG and EEG source imaging methods have to tackle a severely ill-posed problem their success can be stated as their ability to constrain the solutions using appropriate priors. In this paper we propose a hierarchical Bayesian model facilitating spatio-temporal patterns through the use of bo...

  4. EEG source localization in full-term newborns with hypoxic-ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jennekens, W.; Dankers, F.; Blijham, P.; Cluitmans, P.; van Pul, C.; Andriessen, P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate EEG source localization by standardized weighted low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (swLORETA) for monitoring of fullterm newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, using a standard anatomic head model. Three representative examples of neonatal

  5. FieldTrip: Open source software for advanced analysis of MEG, EEG, and invasive electrophysiological data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Maris, E.G.G.; Schoffelen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow

  6. A Smartphone Interface for a Wireless EEG Headset with Real-Time 3D Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stahlhut, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a fully functional handheld brain scanner consisting of a low-cost 14-channel EEG headset with a wireless connec- tion to a smartphone, enabling minimally invasive EEG monitoring in naturalistic settings. The smartphone provides a touch-based interface with real-time brain state...

  7. Matching pursuit and source deflation for sparse EEG/MEG dipole moment estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shun Chi; Swindlehurst, A Lee

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we propose novel matching pursuit (MP)-based algorithms for EEG/MEG dipole source localization and parameter estimation for multiple measurement vectors with constant sparsity. The algorithms combine the ideas of MP for sparse signal recovery and source deflation, as employed in estimation via alternating projections. The source-deflated matching pursuit (SDMP) approach mitigates the problem of residual interference inherent in sequential MP-based methods or recursively applied (RAP)-MUSIC. Furthermore, unlike prior methods based on alternating projection, SDMP allows one to efficiently estimate the dipole orientation in addition to its location. Simulations show that the proposed algorithms outperform existing techniques under various conditions, including those with highly correlated sources. Results using real EEG data from auditory experiments are also presented to illustrate the performance of these algorithms.

  8. Spatiotemporal source analysis in scalp EEG vs. intracerebral EEG and SPECT: a case study in a 2-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarabi, A; Grebe, R; Berquin, P; Bourel Ponchel, E; Jalin, C; Fohlen, M; Bulteau, C; Delalande, O; Gondry, C; Héberlé, C; Moullart, V; Wallois, F

    2012-06-01

    This case study aims to demonstrate that spatiotemporal spike discrimination and source analysis are effective to monitor the development of sources of epileptic activity in time and space. Therefore, they can provide clinically useful information allowing a better understanding of the pathophysiology of individual seizures with time- and space-resolved characteristics of successive epileptic states, including interictal, preictal, postictal, and ictal states. High spatial resolution scalp EEGs (HR-EEG) were acquired from a 2-year-old girl with refractory central epilepsy and single-focus seizures as confirmed by intracerebral EEG recordings and ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Evaluation of HR-EEG consists of the following three global steps: (1) creation of the initial head model, (2) automatic spike and seizure detection, and finally (3) source localization. During the source localization phase, epileptic states are determined to allow state-based spike detection and localization of underlying sources for each spike. In a final cluster analysis, localization results are integrated to determine the possible sources of epileptic activity. The results were compared with the cerebral locations identified by intracerebral EEG recordings and SPECT. The results obtained with this approach were concordant with those of MRI, SPECT and distribution of intracerebral potentials. Dipole cluster centres found for spikes in interictal, preictal, ictal and postictal states were situated an average of 6.3mm from the intracerebral contacts with the highest voltage. Both amplitude and shape of spikes change between states. Dispersion of the dipoles was higher in the preictal state than in the postictal state. Two clusters of spikes were identified. The centres of these clusters changed position periodically during the various epileptic states. High-resolution surface EEG evaluated by an advanced algorithmic approach can be used to investigate the

  9. Optimal Measurement Conditions for Spatiotemporal EEG/MEG Source Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizenga, Hilde M.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Developed a method to determine the required number and position of sensors for human brain electromagnetic source analysis. Studied the method through a simulation study and an empirical study on visual evoked potentials in one adult male. Results indicate the method is fast and reliable and improves source precision. (SLD)

  10. Feature Selection and Blind Source Separation in an EEG-Based Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Thaut

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Most EEG-based BCI systems make use of well-studied patterns of brain activity. However, those systems involve tasks that indirectly map to simple binary commands such as “yes” or “no” or require many weeks of biofeedback training. We hypothesized that signal processing and machine learning methods can be used to discriminate EEG in a direct “yes”/“no” BCI from a single session. Blind source separation (BSS and spectral transformations of the EEG produced a 180-dimensional feature space. We used a modified genetic algorithm (GA wrapped around a support vector machine (SVM classifier to search the space of feature subsets. The GA-based search found feature subsets that outperform full feature sets and random feature subsets. Also, BSS transformations of the EEG outperformed the original time series, particularly in conjunction with a subset search of both spaces. The results suggest that BSS and feature selection can be used to improve the performance of even a “direct,” single-session BCI.

  11. Estimation of effective brain connectivity with dual Kalman filter and EEG source localization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabioun, Mehdi; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Bagher

    2017-09-01

    Effective connectivity is one of the most important considerations in brain functional mapping via EEG. It demonstrates the effects of a particular active brain region on others. In this paper, a new method is proposed which is based on dual Kalman filter. In this method, firstly by using a brain active localization method (standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography) and applying it to EEG signal, active regions are extracted, and appropriate time model (multivariate autoregressive model) is fitted to extracted brain active sources for evaluating the activity and time dependence between sources. Then, dual Kalman filter is used to estimate model parameters or effective connectivity between active regions. The advantage of this method is the estimation of different brain parts activity simultaneously with the calculation of effective connectivity between active regions. By combining dual Kalman filter with brain source localization methods, in addition to the connectivity estimation between parts, source activity is updated during the time. The proposed method performance has been evaluated firstly by applying it to simulated EEG signals with interacting connectivity simulation between active parts. Noisy simulated signals with different signal to noise ratios are used for evaluating method sensitivity to noise and comparing proposed method performance with other methods. Then the method is applied to real signals and the estimation error during a sweeping window is calculated. By comparing proposed method results in different simulation (simulated and real signals), proposed method gives acceptable results with least mean square error in noisy or real conditions.

  12. EEG source imaging assists decoding in a face recognition task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rasmus S.; Eliasen, Anders U.; Pedersen, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    of face recognition. This task concerns the differentiation of brain responses to images of faces and scrambled faces and poses a rather difficult decoding problem at the single trial level. We implement the pipeline using spatially focused features and show that this approach is challenged and source...

  13. Affective attitudes to face images associated with intracerebral EEG source location before face viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzagalli, D; Koenig, T; Regard, M; Lehmann, D

    1999-01-01

    We investigated whether different, personality-related affective attitudes are associated with different brain electric field (EEG) sources before any emotional challenge (stimulus exposure). A 27-channel EEG was recorded in 15 subjects during eyes-closed resting. After recording, subjects rated 32 images of human faces for affective appeal. The subjects in the first (i.e., most negative) and fourth (i.e., most positive) quartile of general affective attitude were further analyzed. The EEG data (mean=25+/-4. 8 s/subject) were subjected to frequency-domain model dipole source analysis (FFT-Dipole-Approximation), resulting in 3-dimensional intracerebral source locations and strengths for the delta-theta, alpha, and beta EEG frequency band, and for the full range (1.5-30 Hz) band. Subjects with negative attitude (compared to those with positive attitude) showed the following source locations: more inferior for all frequency bands, more anterior for the delta-theta band, more posterior and more right for the alpha, beta and 1.5-30 Hz bands. One year later, the subjects were asked to rate the face images again. The rating scores for the same face images were highly correlated for all subjects, and original and retest affective mean attitude was highly correlated across subjects. The present results show that subjects with different affective attitudes to face images had different active, cerebral, neural populations in a task-free condition prior to viewing the images. We conclude that the brain functional state which implements affective attitude towards face images as a personality feature exists without elicitors, as a continuously present, dynamic feature of brain functioning. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Spatio Temporal EEG Source Imaging with the Hierarchical Bayesian Elastic Net and Elitist Lasso Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Linares, Deirel; Vega-Hernández, Mayrim; Rojas-López, Pedro A; Valdés-Hernández, Pedro A; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of EEG generating sources constitutes an Inverse Problem (IP) in Neuroscience. This is an ill-posed problem due to the non-uniqueness of the solution and regularization or prior information is needed to undertake Electrophysiology Source Imaging. Structured Sparsity priors can be attained through combinations of (L1 norm-based) and (L2 norm-based) constraints such as the Elastic Net (ENET) and Elitist Lasso (ELASSO) models. The former model is used to find solutions with a small number of smooth nonzero patches, while the latter imposes different degrees of sparsity simultaneously along different dimensions of the spatio-temporal matrix solutions. Both models have been addressed within the penalized regression approach, where the regularization parameters are selected heuristically, leading usually to non-optimal and computationally expensive solutions. The existing Bayesian formulation of ENET allows hyperparameter learning, but using the computationally intensive Monte Carlo/Expectation Maximization methods, which makes impractical its application to the EEG IP. While the ELASSO have not been considered before into the Bayesian context. In this work, we attempt to solve the EEG IP using a Bayesian framework for ENET and ELASSO models. We propose a Structured Sparse Bayesian Learning algorithm based on combining the Empirical Bayes and the iterative coordinate descent procedures to estimate both the parameters and hyperparameters. Using realistic simulations and avoiding the inverse crime we illustrate that our methods are able to recover complicated source setups more accurately and with a more robust estimation of the hyperparameters and behavior under different sparsity scenarios than classical LORETA, ENET and LASSO Fusion solutions. We also solve the EEG IP using data from a visual attention experiment, finding more interpretable neurophysiological patterns with our methods. The Matlab codes used in this work, including Simulations, Methods

  15. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Dezhong; He Bin

    2003-01-01

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping

  16. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  17. fMRI activation patterns in an analytic reasoning task: consistency with EEG source localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bian; Vasanta, Kalyana C.; O'Boyle, Michael; Baker, Mary C.; Nutter, Brian; Mitra, Sunanda

    2010-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used to model brain activation patterns associated with various perceptual and cognitive processes as reflected by the hemodynamic (BOLD) response. While many sensory and motor tasks are associated with relatively simple activation patterns in localized regions, higher-order cognitive tasks may produce activity in many different brain areas involving complex neural circuitry. We applied a recently proposed probabilistic independent component analysis technique (PICA) to determine the true dimensionality of the fMRI data and used EEG localization to identify the common activated patterns (mapped as Brodmann areas) associated with a complex cognitive task like analytic reasoning. Our preliminary study suggests that a hybrid GLM/PICA analysis may reveal additional regions of activation (beyond simple GLM) that are consistent with electroencephalography (EEG) source localization patterns.

  18. Combined MEG-EEG source localisation in patients with sub-acute sclerosing pan-encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, J; Sinha, Sanjib; Nagappa, Madhu; Mariyappa, N; Bindu, P S; Ravi, G S; Hazra, Nandita; Thennarasu, K; Ravi, V; Taly, A B; Satishchandra, P

    2016-08-01

    To study the genesis and propagation patterns of periodic complexes (PCs) associated with myoclonic jerks in sub-acute sclerosing pan-encephalitis (SSPE) using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG). Simultaneous recording of MEG (306 channels) and EEG (64 channels) in five patients of SSPE (M:F = 3:2; age 10.8 ± 3.2 years; symptom-duration 6.2 ± 10 months) was carried out using Elekta Neuromag(®) TRIUX™ system. Qualitative analysis of 80-160 PCs per patient was performed. Ten isomorphic classical PCs with significant field topography per patient were analysed at the 'onset' and at 'earliest significant peak' of the burst using discrete and distributed source imaging methods. MEG background was asymmetrical in 2 and slow in 3 patients. Complexes were periodic (3) or quasi-periodic (2), occurring every 4-16 s and varied in morphology among patients. Mean source localization at onset of bursts using discrete and distributed source imaging in magnetic source imaging (MSI) was in thalami and or insula (50 and 50 %, respectively) and in electric source imaging (ESI) was also in thalami and or insula (38 and 46 %, respectively). Mean source localization at the earliest rising phase of peak in MSI was in peri-central gyrus (49 and 42 %) and in ESI it was in frontal cortex (52 and 56 %). Further analysis revealed that PCs were generated in thalami and or insula and thereafter propagated to anterolateral surface of the cortices (viz. sensori-motor cortex and frontal cortex) to same side as that of the onset. This novel MEG-EEG based case series of PCs provides newer insights for understanding the plausible generators of myoclonus in SSPE and patterns of their propagation.

  19. Source-based neurofeedback methods using EEG recordings: training altered brain activity in a functional brain source derived from blind source separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David J.; Congedo, Marco; Ciorciari, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A developing literature explores the use of neurofeedback in the treatment of a range of clinical conditions, particularly ADHD and epilepsy, whilst neurofeedback also provides an experimental tool for studying the functional significance of endogenous brain activity. A critical component of any neurofeedback method is the underlying physiological signal which forms the basis for the feedback. While the past decade has seen the emergence of fMRI-based protocols training spatially confined BOLD activity, traditional neurofeedback has utilized a small number of electrode sites on the scalp. As scalp EEG at a given electrode site reflects a linear mixture of activity from multiple brain sources and artifacts, efforts to successfully acquire some level of control over the signal may be confounded by these extraneous sources. Further, in the event of successful training, these traditional neurofeedback methods are likely influencing multiple brain regions and processes. The present work describes the use of source-based signal processing methods in EEG neurofeedback. The feasibility and potential utility of such methods were explored in an experiment training increased theta oscillatory activity in a source derived from Blind Source Separation (BSS) of EEG data obtained during completion of a complex cognitive task (spatial navigation). Learned increases in theta activity were observed in two of the four participants to complete 20 sessions of neurofeedback targeting this individually defined functional brain source. Source-based EEG neurofeedback methods using BSS may offer important advantages over traditional neurofeedback, by targeting the desired physiological signal in a more functionally and spatially specific manner. Having provided preliminary evidence of the feasibility of these methods, future work may study a range of clinically and experimentally relevant brain processes where individual brain sources may be targeted by source-based EEG neurofeedback. PMID

  20. The Role of Skull Modeling in EEG Source Imaging for Patients with Refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Restrepo, Victoria; Carrette, Evelien; Strobbe, Gregor; Gadeyne, Stefanie; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl; Mierlo, Pieter van

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the influence of different skull modeling approaches on EEG source imaging (ESI), using data of six patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy who later underwent successful epilepsy surgery. Four realistic head models with different skull compartments, based on finite difference methods, were constructed for each patient: (i) Three models had skulls with compact and spongy bone compartments as well as air-filled cavities, segmented from either computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a CT-template and (ii) one model included a MRI-based skull with a single compact bone compartment. In all patients we performed ESI of single and averaged spikes marked in the clinical 27-channel EEG by the epileptologist. To analyze at which time point the dipole estimations were closer to the resected zone, ESI was performed at two time instants: the half-rising phase and peak of the spike. The estimated sources for each model were validated against the resected area, as indicated by the postoperative MRI. Our results showed that single spike analysis was highly influenced by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), yielding estimations with smaller distances to the resected volume at the peak of the spike. Although averaging reduced the SNR effects, it did not always result in dipole estimations lying closer to the resection. The proposed skull modeling approaches did not lead to significant differences in the localization of the irritative zone from clinical EEG data with low spatial sampling density. Furthermore, we showed that a simple skull model (MRI-based) resulted in similar accuracy in dipole estimation compared to more complex head models (based on CT- or CT-template). Therefore, all the considered head models can be used in the presurgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy to localize the irritative zone from low-density clinical EEG recordings.

  1. Source Signals Separation and Reconstruction Following Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For separation and reconstruction of source signals from observed signals problem, the physical significance of blind source separation modal and independent component analysis is not very clear, and its solution is not unique. Aiming at these disadvantages, a new linear and instantaneous mixing model and a novel source signals separation reconstruction solving method from observed signals based on principal component analysis (PCA are put forward. Assumption of this new model is statistically unrelated rather than independent of source signals, which is different from the traditional blind source separation model. A one-to-one relationship between linear and instantaneous mixing matrix of new model and linear compound matrix of PCA, and a one-to-one relationship between unrelated source signals and principal components are demonstrated using the concept of linear separation matrix and unrelated of source signals. Based on this theoretical link, source signals separation and reconstruction problem is changed into PCA of observed signals then. The theoretical derivation and numerical simulation results show that, in despite of Gauss measurement noise, wave form and amplitude information of unrelated source signal can be separated and reconstructed by PCA when linear mixing matrix is column orthogonal and normalized; only wave form information of unrelated source signal can be separated and reconstructed by PCA when linear mixing matrix is column orthogonal but not normalized, unrelated source signal cannot be separated and reconstructed by PCA when mixing matrix is not column orthogonal or linear.

  2. The effects of the German renewable energy sources Act (EEG) on market, technical and industrial development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stryi-Hipp, G.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1999, the German photovoltaic market has been growing rapidly. In 2003, more than 130 MWp PV systems were installed in Germany; in 2004, more than 200 MWp are expected to be installed additionally. The main reason for this impressive market success has been the market stimulation policy of the German government. In January 1999, the 100.000 Roofs Programme for photovoltaic systems had started, offering interest-reduced loans for PV systems. In April 2000, it was backed by the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG), which considerably increased the feed-in tariff to 99 Pfennig (0.51 euros) per kWh. Since then, the PV market has boomed. In 2003, the 100,000 Roofs Programme (HTRP) ended successfully, after loans for more than 300 MWp PV systems had been granted. In order to fill the gap created by the termination of the programme, the government decided to increase the feed-in tariff provided by the EEG. Since January 2004, grid-connected PV systems on roofs and facades receive a tariff between 0,540 euros and 0,624 euros per kWh over 20 years. This improvement of the EEG further increased the interest in photovoltaics. The growth rate of the photovoltaic market, exceeding 50% in 2004, has led to the demand being higher than the available supply of PV systems. (author)

  3. Cortical sources of resting state EEG rhythms are related to brain hypometabolism in subjects with Alzheimer's disease: an EEG-PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Caroli, Anna; Salvatore, Elena; Nicolai, Emanuele; Marzano, Nicola; Lizio, Roberta; Cavedo, Enrica; Landau, Susan; Chen, Kewei; Jagust, William; Reiman, Eric; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Montella, Patrizia; De Stefano, Manuela; Gesualdo, Loreto; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Soricelli, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Cortical sources of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) delta (2-4 Hz) and low-frequency alpha (8-10.5 Hz) rhythms show abnormal activity (i.e., current density) in patients with dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we hypothesized that abnormality of this activity is related to relevant disease processes as revealed by cortical hypometabolism typically observed in AD patients by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Resting state eyes-closed EEG data were recorded in 19 AD patients with dementia and 40 healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. EEG frequency bands of interest were delta and low-frequency alpha. EEG sources were estimated in these bands by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images were recorded only in the AD patients, and cortical hypometabolism was indexed by the so-called Alzheimer's discrimination analysis tool (PALZ) in the frontal association, ventromedial frontal, temporoparietal association, posterior cingulate, and precuneus areas. Results showed that compared with the Nold group, the AD group pointed to higher activity of delta sources and lower activity of low-frequency alpha sources in a cortical region of interest formed by all cortical areas of the PALZ score. In the AD patients, there was a positive correlation between the PALZ score and the activity of delta sources in the cortical region of interest (p < 0.05). These results suggest a relationship between resting state cortical hypometabolism and synchronization of cortical neurons at delta rhythms in AD patients with dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. EEG source space analysis of the supervised factor analytic approach for the classification of multi-directional arm movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy Handiru, Vikram; Vinod, A. P.; Guan, Cuntai

    2017-08-01

    Objective. In electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems for motor control tasks the conventional practice is to decode motor intentions by using scalp EEG. However, scalp EEG only reveals certain limited information about the complex tasks of movement with a higher degree of freedom. Therefore, our objective is to investigate the effectiveness of source-space EEG in extracting relevant features that discriminate arm movement in multiple directions. Approach. We have proposed a novel feature extraction algorithm based on supervised factor analysis that models the data from source-space EEG. To this end, we computed the features from the source dipoles confined to Brodmann areas of interest (BA4a, BA4p and BA6). Further, we embedded class-wise labels of multi-direction (multi-class) source-space EEG to an unsupervised factor analysis to make it into a supervised learning method. Main Results. Our approach provided an average decoding accuracy of 71% for the classification of hand movement in four orthogonal directions, that is significantly higher (>10%) than the classification accuracy obtained using state-of-the-art spatial pattern features in sensor space. Also, the group analysis on the spectral characteristics of source-space EEG indicates that the slow cortical potentials from a set of cortical source dipoles reveal discriminative information regarding the movement parameter, direction. Significance. This study presents evidence that low-frequency components in the source space play an important role in movement kinematics, and thus it may lead to new strategies for BCI-based neurorehabilitation.

  5. Localization of extended brain sources from EEG/MEG: the ExSo-MUSIC approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birot, Gwénaël; Albera, Laurent; Wendling, Fabrice; Merlet, Isabelle

    2011-05-01

    We propose a new MUSIC-like method, called 2q-ExSo-MUSIC (q ≥ 1). This method is an extension of the 2q-MUSIC (q ≥ 1) approach for solving the EEG/MEG inverse problem, when spatially-extended neocortical sources ("ExSo") are considered. It introduces a novel ExSo-MUSIC principle. The novelty is two-fold: i) the parameterization of the spatial source distribution that leads to an appropriate metric in the context of distributed brain sources and ii) the introduction of an original, efficient and low-cost way of optimizing this metric. In 2q-ExSo-MUSIC, the possible use of higher order statistics (q ≥ 2) offers a better robustness with respect to Gaussian noise of unknown spatial coherence and modeling errors. As a result we reduced the penalizing effects of both the background cerebral activity that can be seen as a Gaussian and spatially correlated noise, and the modeling errors induced by the non-exact resolution of the forward problem. Computer results on simulated EEG signals obtained with physiologically-relevant models of both the sources and the volume conductor show a highly increased performance of our 2q-ExSo-MUSIC method as compared to the classical 2q-MUSIC algorithms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PWC-ICA: A Method for Stationary Ordered Blind Source Separation with Application to EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Mullen, Tim; Robbins, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a class of algorithms widely applied to separate sources in EEG data. Most ICA approaches use optimization criteria derived from temporal statistical independence and are invariant with respect to the actual ordering of individual observations. We propose a method of mapping real signals into a complex vector space that takes into account the temporal order of signals and enforces certain mixing stationarity constraints. The resulting procedure, which we call Pairwise Complex Independent Component Analysis (PWC-ICA), performs the ICA in a complex setting and then reinterprets the results in the original observation space. We examine the performance of our candidate approach relative to several existing ICA algorithms for the blind source separation (BSS) problem on both real and simulated EEG data. On simulated data, PWC-ICA is often capable of achieving a better solution to the BSS problem than AMICA, Extended Infomax, or FastICA. On real data, the dipole interpretations of the BSS solutions discovered by PWC-ICA are physically plausible, are competitive with existing ICA approaches, and may represent sources undiscovered by other ICA methods. In conjunction with this paper, the authors have released a MATLAB toolbox that performs PWC-ICA on real, vector-valued signals. PMID:27340397

  7. PWC-ICA: A Method for Stationary Ordered Blind Source Separation with Application to EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kenneth; Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Mullen, Tim; Robbins, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a class of algorithms widely applied to separate sources in EEG data. Most ICA approaches use optimization criteria derived from temporal statistical independence and are invariant with respect to the actual ordering of individual observations. We propose a method of mapping real signals into a complex vector space that takes into account the temporal order of signals and enforces certain mixing stationarity constraints. The resulting procedure, which we call Pairwise Complex Independent Component Analysis (PWC-ICA), performs the ICA in a complex setting and then reinterprets the results in the original observation space. We examine the performance of our candidate approach relative to several existing ICA algorithms for the blind source separation (BSS) problem on both real and simulated EEG data. On simulated data, PWC-ICA is often capable of achieving a better solution to the BSS problem than AMICA, Extended Infomax, or FastICA. On real data, the dipole interpretations of the BSS solutions discovered by PWC-ICA are physically plausible, are competitive with existing ICA approaches, and may represent sources undiscovered by other ICA methods. In conjunction with this paper, the authors have released a MATLAB toolbox that performs PWC-ICA on real, vector-valued signals.

  8. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain......-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models....... Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging...

  9. Truncated RAP-MUSIC (TRAP-MUSIC) for MEG and EEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Niko; Stenroos, Matti; Sarvas, Jukka; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2018-02-15

    Electrically active brain regions can be located applying MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) on magneto- or electroencephalographic (MEG; EEG) data. We introduce a new MUSIC method, called truncated recursively-applied-and-projected MUSIC (TRAP-MUSIC). It corrects a hidden deficiency of the conventional RAP-MUSIC algorithm, which prevents estimation of the true number of brain-signal sources accurately. The correction is done by applying a sequential dimension reduction to the signal-subspace projection. We show that TRAP-MUSIC significantly improves the performance of MUSIC-type localization; in particular, it successfully and robustly locates active brain regions and estimates their number. We compare TRAP-MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC in simulations with varying key parameters, e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, correlation between source time-courses, and initial estimate for the dimension of the signal space. In addition, we validate TRAP-MUSIC with measured MEG data. We suggest that with the proposed TRAP-MUSIC method, MUSIC-type localization could become more reliable and suitable for various online and offline MEG and EEG applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Model-based analysis and optimization of the mapping of cortical sources in the spontaneous scalp EEG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sazonov, A.; Bergmans, J.W.M.; Cluitmans, P.J.M.; Griep, P.A.M.; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Boon, P.A.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The mapping of brain sources into the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) depends on volume conduction properties of the head and on an electrode montage involving a reference. Mathematically, this source mapping (SM) is fully determined by an observation function (OF) matrix. This paper analyses the

  11. Open Ephys electroencephalography (Open Ephys  +  EEG): a modular, low-cost, open-source solution to human neural recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher; Voigts, Jakob; Agrawal, Uday; Ladow, Max; Santoyo, Juan; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) offers a unique opportunity to study human neural activity non-invasively with millisecond resolution using minimal equipment in or outside of a lab setting. EEG can be combined with a number of techniques for closed-loop experiments, where external devices are driven by specific neural signals. However, reliable, commercially available EEG systems are expensive, often making them impractical for individual use and research development. Moreover, by design, a majority of these systems cannot be easily altered to the specification needed by the end user. We focused on mitigating these issues by implementing open-source tools to develop a new EEG platform to drive down research costs and promote collaboration and innovation. Here, we present methods to expand the open-source electrophysiology system, Open Ephys (www.openephys.org), to include human EEG recordings. We describe the equipment and protocol necessary to interface various EEG caps with the Open Ephys acquisition board, and detail methods for processing data. We present applications of Open Ephys  +  EEG as a research tool and discuss how this innovative EEG technology lays a framework for improved closed-loop paradigms and novel brain-computer interface experiments. The Open Ephys  +  EEG system can record reliable human EEG data, as well as human EMG data. A side-by-side comparison of eyes closed 8-14 Hz activity between the Open Ephys  +  EEG system and the Brainvision ActiCHamp EEG system showed similar average power and signal to noise. Open Ephys  +  EEG enables users to acquire high-quality human EEG data comparable to that of commercially available systems, while maintaining the price point and extensibility inherent to open-source systems.

  12. Open Ephys electroencephalography (Open Ephys  +  EEG): a modular, low-cost, open-source solution to human neural recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher; Voigts, Jakob; Agrawal, Uday; Ladow, Max; Santoyo, Juan; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Electroencephalography (EEG) offers a unique opportunity to study human neural activity non-invasively with millisecond resolution using minimal equipment in or outside of a lab setting. EEG can be combined with a number of techniques for closed-loop experiments, where external devices are driven by specific neural signals. However, reliable, commercially available EEG systems are expensive, often making them impractical for individual use and research development. Moreover, by design, a majority of these systems cannot be easily altered to the specification needed by the end user. We focused on mitigating these issues by implementing open-source tools to develop a new EEG platform to drive down research costs and promote collaboration and innovation. Approach. Here, we present methods to expand the open-source electrophysiology system, Open Ephys (www.openephys.org), to include human EEG recordings. We describe the equipment and protocol necessary to interface various EEG caps with the Open Ephys acquisition board, and detail methods for processing data. We present applications of Open Ephys  +  EEG as a research tool and discuss how this innovative EEG technology lays a framework for improved closed-loop paradigms and novel brain-computer interface experiments. Main results. The Open Ephys  +  EEG system can record reliable human EEG data, as well as human EMG data. A side-by-side comparison of eyes closed 8-14 Hz activity between the Open Ephys  +  EEG system and the Brainvision ActiCHamp EEG system showed similar average power and signal to noise. Significance. Open Ephys  +  EEG enables users to acquire high-quality human EEG data comparable to that of commercially available systems, while maintaining the price point and extensibility inherent to open-source systems.

  13. A Pilot Study of EEG Source Analysis Based Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Tinnitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a novel therapeutic tool to induce a suppression of tinnitus. However, the optimal target sites are unknown. We aimed to determine whether low-frequency rTMS induced lasting suppression of tinnitus by decreasing neural activity in the cortex, navigated by high-density electroencephalogram (EEG source analysis, and the utility of EEG for targeting treatment.In this controlled three-armed trial, seven normal hearing patients with tonal tinnitus received a 10-day course of 1-Hz rTMS to the cortex, navigated by high-density EEG source analysis, to the left temporoparietal cortex region, and to the left temporoparietal with sham stimulation. The Tinnitus handicap inventory (THI and a visual analog scale (VAS were used to assess tinnitus severity and loudness. Measurements were taken before, and immediately, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after the end of the interventions.Low-frequency rTMS decreased tinnitus significantly after active, but not sham, treatment. Responders in the EEG source analysis-based rTMS group, 71.4% (5/7 patients, experienced a significant reduction in tinnitus loudness, as evidenced by VAS scores. The target site of neuronal generators most consistently associated with a positive response was the frontal lobe in the right hemisphere, sourced using high-density EEG equipment, in the tinnitus patients. After left temporoparietal rTMS stimulation, 42.8% (3/7 patients experienced a decrease in tinnitus loudness.Active EEG source analysis based rTMS resulted in significant suppression in tinnitus loudness, showing the superiority of neuronavigation-guided coil positioning in dealing with tinnitus. Non-auditory areas should be considered in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. This knowledge in turn can contribute to investigate the pathophysiology of tinnitus.

  14. Gadgetron: An Open Source Framework for Medical Image Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new open source framework for medical image reconstruction called the “Gadgetron.” The framework implements a flexible system for creating streaming data processing pipelines where data pass through a series of modules or “Gadgets” from raw data to reconstructed images...... with a set of dedicated toolboxes in shared libraries for medical image reconstruction. This includes generic toolboxes for data-parallel (e.g., GPU-based) execution of compute-intensive components. The basic framework architecture is independent of medical imaging modality, but this article focuses on its...

  15. Women and post-conflict reconstruction: Issues and sources

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    Women and Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Issues and Sources is a review of literature dealing with political, economic and social reconstruction from a gender perspective. One of its objectives is to go beyond conventional images of women as victims of war, and to document the many different ways in which women make a contribution to the rebuilding of countries emerging from armed conflicts. Special attention is given to women's priority concerns, to their resources and capacities, and to stru...

  16. Evaluation of a finite-element reciprocity method for epileptic EEG source localization: Accuracy, computational complexity and noise robustness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirvany, Yazdan; Rubæk, Tonny; Edelvik, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of an EEG source localization method that combines a finite element method (FEM) and the reciprocity theorem.The reciprocity method is applied to solve the forward problem in a four-layer spherical head model for a large number of test dipoles...... noise and electrode misplacement.The results show approximately 3% relative error between numerically calculated potentials done by the reciprocity theorem and the analytical solutions. When adding EEG noise with SNR between 5 and 10, the mean localization error is approximately 4.3 mm. For the case...... with 10 mm electrode misplacement the localization error is 4.8 mm. The reciprocity EEG source localization speeds up the solution of the inverse problem with more than three orders of magnitude compared to the state-of-the-art methods.The reciprocity method has high accuracy for modeling the dipole...

  17. Bedside functional brain imaging in critically-ill children using high-density EEG source modeling and multi-modal sensory stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a common cause of death and critical illness in children and young adults. Fundamental management focuses on early characterization of the extent of injury and optimizing recovery by preventing secondary damage during the days following the primary injury. Currently, bedside technology for measuring neurological function is mainly limited to using electroencephalography (EEG for detection of seizures and encephalopathic features, and evoked potentials. We present a proof of concept study in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care setting, featuring a bedside functional imaging set-up designed to map cortical brain activation patterns by combining high density EEG recordings, multi-modal sensory stimulation (auditory, visual, and somatosensory, and EEG source modeling. Use of source-modeling allows for examination of spatiotemporal activation patterns at the cortical region level as opposed to the traditional scalp potential maps. The application of this system in both healthy and brain-injured participants is demonstrated with modality-specific source-reconstructed cortical activation patterns. By combining stimulation obtained with different modalities, most of the cortical surface can be monitored for changes in functional activation without having to physically transport the subject to an imaging suite. The results in patients in an intensive care setting with anatomically well-defined brain lesions suggest a topographic association between their injuries and activation patterns. Moreover, we report the reproducible application of a protocol examining a higher-level cortical processing with an auditory oddball paradigm involving presentation of the patient's own name. This study reports the first successful application of a bedside functional brain mapping tool in the intensive care setting. This application has the potential to provide clinicians with an additional dimension of information to manage

  18. Discussion of Source Reconstruction Models Using 3D MCG Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Massimo De; Uchikawa, Yoshinori

    In this study we performed the source reconstruction of magnetocardiographic signals generated by the human heart activity to localize the site of origin of the heart activation. The localizations were performed in a four compartment model of the human volume conductor. The analyses were conducted on normal subjects and on a subject affected by the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Different models of the source activation were used to evaluate whether a general model of the current source can be applied in the study of the cardiac inverse problem. The data analyses were repeated using normal and vector component data of the MCG. The results show that a distributed source model has the better accuracy in performing the source reconstructions, and that 3D MCG data allow finding smaller differences between the different source models.

  19. Model-Based Analysis and Optimization of the Mapping of Cortical Sources in the Spontaneous Scalp EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Sazonov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mapping of brain sources into the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG depends on volume conduction properties of the head and on an electrode montage involving a reference. Mathematically, this source mapping (SM is fully determined by an observation function (OF matrix. This paper analyses the OF-matrix for a generation model for the desynchronized spontaneous EEG. The model involves a four-shell spherical volume conductor containing dipolar sources that are mutually uncorrelated so as to reflect the desynchronized EEG. The reference is optimized in order to minimize the impact in the SM of the sources located distant from the electrodes. The resulting reference is called the localized reference (LR. The OF-matrix is analyzed in terms of the relative power contribution of the sources and the cross-channel correlation coefficient for five existing references as well as for the LR. It is found that the Hjorth Laplacian reference is a fair approximation of the LR, and thus is close to optimum for practical intents and purposes. The other references have a significantly poorer performance. Furthermore, the OF-matrix is analyzed for limits to the spatial resolution for the EEG. These are estimated to be around 2 cm.

  20. Point source reconstruction principle of linear inverse problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazono, Yasushi; Matani, Ayumu; Fujimaki, Norio; Murata, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Exact point source reconstruction for underdetermined linear inverse problems with a block-wise structure was studied. In a block-wise problem, elements of a source vector are partitioned into blocks. Accordingly, a leadfield matrix, which represents the forward observation process, is also partitioned into blocks. A point source is a source having only one nonzero block. An example of such a problem is current distribution estimation in electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography, where a source vector represents a vector field and a point source represents a single current dipole. In this study, the block-wise norm, a block-wise extension of the l p -norm, was defined as the family of cost functions of the inverse method. The main result is that a set of three conditions was found to be necessary and sufficient for block-wise norm minimization to ensure exact point source reconstruction for any leadfield matrix that admit such reconstruction. The block-wise norm that satisfies the conditions is the sum of the cost of all the observations of source blocks, or in other words, the block-wisely extended leadfield-weighted l 1 -norm. Additional results are that minimization of such a norm always provides block-wisely sparse solutions and that its solutions form cones in source space

  1. Group Independent Component Analysis (gICA) and Current Source Density (CSD) in the study of EEG in ADHD adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Valery A; Mueller, Andreas; Candrian, Gian; Grin-Yatsenko, Vera A; Kropotov, Juri D

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the performance of the spectral analysis of resting EEG, Current Source Density (CSD) and group independent components (gIC) in diagnosing ADHD adults. Power spectra of resting EEG, CSD and gIC (19 channels, linked ears reference, eyes open/closed) from 96 ADHD and 376 healthy adults were compared between eyes open and eyes closed conditions, and between groups of subjects. Pattern of differences in gIC and CSD spectral power between conditions was approximately similar, whereas it was more widely spatially distributed for EEG. Size effect (Cohen's d) of differences in gIC and CSD spectral power between groups of subjects was considerably greater than in the case of EEG. Significant reduction of gIC and CSD spectral power depending on conditions was found in ADHD patients. Reducing power in a wide frequency range in the fronto-central areas is a common phenomenon regardless of whether the eyes were open or closed. Spectral power of local EEG activity isolated by gICA or CSD in the fronto-central areas may be a suitable marker for discrimination of ADHD and healthy adults. Spectral analysis of gIC and CSD provides better sensitivity to discriminate ADHD and healthy adults. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Early effect of NEURAPAS® balance on current source density (CSD of human EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Klaus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Psychiatric patients often suffer from stress, anxiety and depression. Various plant extracts are known to fight stress (valerian, anxiety (passion flower or depression (St. John's wort. NEURAPAS® balance is a mixture of these three extracts and has been designed to cover this complex of psychiatric conditions. The study was initiated to quantitatively assess the effect of this combination on brain electric activity. Method Quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG current source density (CSD recording from 16 healthy male and female human volunteers (average age 49 years was used in a randomized, placebo-controlled cross over study. Recordings were performed 0. 5, 1. 5, 3 and 4 hours after administration of the preparations under the conditions of 6 min eyes open and 5 min d2 concentration test, mathematical calculation test and memory test, respectively. All variables (electric power within 6 frequency ranges at 17 electrode positions were fed into a linear discriminant analysis (eyes open condition. In the presence of mental load these variables were used to construct brain maps of frequency changes. Results Under the condition of mental load, centro-parietal spectral power remained statistically significantly lower within alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 frequencies in the presence of verum in comparison to placebo. Discriminant analysis revealed a difference to placebo 3 and 4 hours after intake of 6 tablets of NEURAPAS® balance. Data location within the polydimensional space was projected into the area of the effects of sedative and anti-depressive reference drugs tested earlier under identical conditions. Results appeared closer to the effects of fluoxetine than to St. John's wort. Conclusions Analysis of the neurophysiological changes following the intake of NEURAPAS® balance revealed a similarity of frequency changes to those of calming and anti-depressive drugs on the EEG without impairment of cognition. Trial registration Clinical

  3. Classification of single normal and Alzheimer’s disease individuals from cortical sources of resting state EEG rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eBabiloni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG rhythms in groups of Alzheimer’s disease (AD compared to healthy elderly (Nold subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2-4 Hz, theta (4-8 Hz, alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz, alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz, beta 1 (13-20 Hz, beta 2 (20-30 Hz, and gamma (30-40 Hz were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e. 70%. Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%. These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%.

  4. A realistic multimodal modeling approach for the evaluation of distributed source analysis: application to sLORETA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosandier-Rimélé, D; Ramantani, G; Zentner, J; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Dümpelmann, M

    2017-10-01

    Electrical source localization (ESL) deriving from scalp EEG and, in recent years, from intracranial EEG (iEEG), is an established method in epilepsy surgery workup. We aimed to validate the distributed ESL derived from scalp EEG and iEEG, particularly regarding the spatial extent of the source, using a realistic epileptic spike activity simulator. ESL was applied to the averaged scalp EEG and iEEG spikes of two patients with drug-resistant structural epilepsy. The ESL results for both patients were used to outline the location and extent of epileptic cortical patches, which served as the basis for designing a spatiotemporal source model. EEG signals for both modalities were then generated for different anatomic locations and spatial extents. ESL was subsequently performed on simulated signals with sLORETA, a commonly used distributed algorithm. ESL accuracy was quantitatively assessed for iEEG and scalp EEG. The source volume was overestimated by sLORETA at both EEG scales, with the error increasing with source size, particularly for iEEG. For larger sources, ESL accuracy drastically decreased, and reconstruction volumes shifted to the center of the head for iEEG, while remaining stable for scalp EEG. Overall, the mislocalization of the reconstructed source was more pronounced for iEEG. We present a novel multiscale framework for the evaluation of distributed ESL, based on realistic multiscale EEG simulations. Our findings support that reconstruction results for scalp EEG are often more accurate than for iEEG, owing to the superior 3D coverage of the head. Particularly the iEEG-derived reconstruction results for larger, widespread generators should be treated with caution.

  5. A realistic multimodal modeling approach for the evaluation of distributed source analysis: application to sLORETA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosandier-Rimélé, D.; Ramantani, G.; Zentner, J.; Schulze-Bonhage, A.; Dümpelmann, M.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Electrical source localization (ESL) deriving from scalp EEG and, in recent years, from intracranial EEG (iEEG), is an established method in epilepsy surgery workup. We aimed to validate the distributed ESL derived from scalp EEG and iEEG, particularly regarding the spatial extent of the source, using a realistic epileptic spike activity simulator. Approach. ESL was applied to the averaged scalp EEG and iEEG spikes of two patients with drug-resistant structural epilepsy. The ESL results for both patients were used to outline the location and extent of epileptic cortical patches, which served as the basis for designing a spatiotemporal source model. EEG signals for both modalities were then generated for different anatomic locations and spatial extents. ESL was subsequently performed on simulated signals with sLORETA, a commonly used distributed algorithm. ESL accuracy was quantitatively assessed for iEEG and scalp EEG. Main results. The source volume was overestimated by sLORETA at both EEG scales, with the error increasing with source size, particularly for iEEG. For larger sources, ESL accuracy drastically decreased, and reconstruction volumes shifted to the center of the head for iEEG, while remaining stable for scalp EEG. Overall, the mislocalization of the reconstructed source was more pronounced for iEEG. Significance. We present a novel multiscale framework for the evaluation of distributed ESL, based on realistic multiscale EEG simulations. Our findings support that reconstruction results for scalp EEG are often more accurate than for iEEG, owing to the superior 3D coverage of the head. Particularly the iEEG-derived reconstruction results for larger, widespread generators should be treated with caution.

  6. A new method for quantifying the performance of EEG blind source separation algorithms by referencing a simultaneously recorded ECoG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosugi, Naoya; Kitajo, Keiichi; Hasegawa, Naomi; Nagasaka, Yasuo; Okanoya, Kazuo; Fujii, Naotaka

    2017-09-01

    Blind source separation (BSS) algorithms extract neural signals from electroencephalography (EEG) data. However, it is difficult to quantify source separation performance because there is no criterion to dissociate neural signals and noise in EEG signals. This study develops a method for evaluating BSS performance. The idea is neural signals in EEG can be estimated by comparison with simultaneously measured electrocorticography (ECoG). Because the ECoG electrodes cover the majority of the lateral cortical surface and should capture most of the original neural sources in the EEG signals. We measured real EEG and ECoG data and developed an algorithm for evaluating BSS performance. First, EEG signals are separated into EEG components using the BSS algorithm. Second, the EEG components are ranked using the correlation coefficients of the ECoG regression and the components are grouped into subsets based on their ranks. Third, canonical correlation analysis estimates how much information is shared between the subsets of the EEG components and the ECoG signals. We used our algorithm to compare the performance of BSS algorithms (PCA, AMUSE, SOBI, JADE, fastICA) via the EEG and ECoG data of anesthetized nonhuman primates. The results (Best case >JADE = fastICA >AMUSE = SOBI ≥ PCA >random separation) were common to the two subjects. To encourage the further development of better BSS algorithms, our EEG and ECoG data are available on our Web site (http://neurotycho.org/) as a common testing platform. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Dual-Source Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Reconstructed on Integrated Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoude Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual-source swept-source optical coherence tomography (DS-SSOCT has two individual sources with different central wavelengths, linewidth, and bandwidths. Because of the difference between the two sources, the individually reconstructed tomograms from each source have different aspect ratio, which makes the comparison and integration difficult. We report a method to merge two sets of DS-SSOCT raw data in a common spectrum, on which both data have the same spectrum density and a correct separation. The reconstructed tomographic image can seamlessly integrate the two bands of OCT data together. The final image has higher axial resolution and richer spectroscopic information than any of the individually reconstructed tomography image.

  8. A two-way regularization method for MEG source reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Tian Siva; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Shen, Haipeng; Li, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    The MEG inverse problem refers to the reconstruction of the neural activity of the brain from magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements. We propose a two-way regularization (TWR) method to solve the MEG inverse problem under the assumptions that only a small number of locations in space are responsible for the measured signals (focality), and each source time course is smooth in time (smoothness). The focality and smoothness of the reconstructed signals are ensured respectively by imposing a sparsity-inducing penalty and a roughness penalty in the data fitting criterion. A two-stage algorithm is developed for fast computation, where a raw estimate of the source time course is obtained in the first stage and then refined in the second stage by the two-way regularization. The proposed method is shown to be effective on both synthetic and real-world examples. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2012.

  9. A two-way regularization method for MEG source reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Tian Siva

    2012-09-01

    The MEG inverse problem refers to the reconstruction of the neural activity of the brain from magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements. We propose a two-way regularization (TWR) method to solve the MEG inverse problem under the assumptions that only a small number of locations in space are responsible for the measured signals (focality), and each source time course is smooth in time (smoothness). The focality and smoothness of the reconstructed signals are ensured respectively by imposing a sparsity-inducing penalty and a roughness penalty in the data fitting criterion. A two-stage algorithm is developed for fast computation, where a raw estimate of the source time course is obtained in the first stage and then refined in the second stage by the two-way regularization. The proposed method is shown to be effective on both synthetic and real-world examples. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2012.

  10. Source-space EEG neurofeedback links subjective experience with brain activity during effortless awareness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lutterveld, Remko; Houlihan, Sean D; Pal, Prasanta; Sacchet, Matthew D; McFarlane-Blake, Cinque; Patel, Payal R; Sullivan, John S; Ossadtchi, Alex; Druker, Susan; Bauer, Clemens; Brewer, Judson A

    2017-05-01

    Meditation is increasingly showing beneficial effects for psychiatric disorders. However, learning to meditate is not straightforward as there are no easily discernible outward signs of performance and thus no direct feedback is possible. As meditation has been found to correlate with posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) activity, we tested whether source-space EEG neurofeedback from the PCC followed the subjective experience of effortless awareness (a major component of meditation), and whether participants could volitionally control the signal. Sixteen novice meditators and sixteen experienced meditators participated in the study. Novice meditators were briefly trained to perform a basic meditation practice to induce the subjective experience of effortless awareness in a progressively more challenging neurofeedback test-battery. Experienced meditators performed a self-selected meditation practice to induce this state in the same test-battery. Neurofeedback was provided based on gamma-band (40-57Hz) PCC activity extracted using a beamformer algorithm. Associations between PCC activity and the subjective experience of effortless awareness were assessed by verbal probes. Both groups reported that decreased PCC activity corresponded with effortless awareness (Pneurofeedback to link an objective measure of brain activity with the subjective experience of effortless awareness, and suggest potential utility of this paradigm as a tool for meditation training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurophysiological mechanisms of circadian cognitive control in RLS patients - an EEG source localization study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The circadian variation of sensory and motor symptoms with increasing severity in the evening and at night is a key diagnostic feature/symptom of the restless legs syndrome (RLS. Even though many neurological diseases have shown a strong nexus between motor and cognitive symptoms, it has remained unclear whether cognitive performance of RLS patients declines in the evening and which neurophysiological mechanisms are affected by the circadian variation. In the current study, we examined daytime effects (morning vs. evening on cognitive performance in RLS patients (n = 33 compared to healthy controls (n = 29 by analyzing flanker interference effects in combination with EEG and source localization techniques. RLS patients showed larger flanker interference effects in the evening than in the morning (p = .023, while healthy controls did not display a comparable circadian variation. In line with this, the neurophysiological data showed smaller N1 amplitudes in RLS patients compared to controls in the interfering task condition in the evening (p = .042, but not in the morning. The results demonstrate diurnal cognitive changes in RLS patients with intensified impairments in the evening. It seems that not all dopamine-regulated cognitive processes are altered in RLS and thus show daytime-dependent impairments. Instead, the daytime-related cognitive impairment emerges from attentional selection processes within the extra-striate visual cortex, but not from later cognitive processes such as conflict monitoring and response selection.

  12. EEG current source density and the phenomenology of the default network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Rex L; Baldwin, Debora R

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing line of research dedicated to the investigation of the default mode network (DMN) of the brain and resting state networks. However, the mental activity of the DMN has not been rigorously assessed to date. The specific aims of the current study were 2-fold: First, we sought to determine whether the current source density (CSD) levels in the DMN would correspond to other neuroimaging techniques. Second, we sought to understand the subjective mental activity of the DMN during baseline recordings. This study was conducted with 63 nonclinical participants, 34 female and 29 males with a mean age of 19.2 years (standard deviation = 2.0). The participants were recorded in 8 conditions. First, 4-minute eyes-closed baseline (ECB) and eyes-opened baseline (EOB) were obtained. The participants then completed 3 assessment instruments and 3 image conditions while the electroencephalography (EEG) was continuously recorded. Participants completed subjective reports for baselines and image conditions. These were rated by 3 independent raters and compared for reliability using a random effects model with an absolute agreement definition. The mean CSD between all conditions differed significantly, in many but not all regions of interest in the DMN. Interestingly, as suggested by other studies, the DMN appears preferential to self-relevant, self-specific, or self-perceptive processes. The reliability analyses show α for interrater agreement for ECB at .95 and EOB at .96. The subjective reports obtained from the participants regarding the mental activities employed during baseline recordings correspond to attentional and self-regulatory processes, which may also implicate the resting state or DMN as playing a direct role in the maintenance of a complex behavior (eg, being still, attending, and self-regulating). Thus, attention and self-regulation constitute the phenomenology of the resting state (DMN) in this study. The results also

  13. Directed cortical information flow during human object recognition: analyzing induced EEG gamma-band responses in brain's source space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot G Supp

    Full Text Available The increase of induced gamma-band responses (iGBRs; oscillations >30 Hz elicited by familiar (meaningful objects is well established in electroencephalogram (EEG research. This frequency-specific change at distinct locations is thought to indicate the dynamic formation of local neuronal assemblies during the activation of cortical object representations. As analytically power increase is just a property of a single location, phase-synchrony was introduced to investigate the formation of large-scale networks between spatially distant brain sites. However, classical phase-synchrony reveals symmetric, pair-wise correlations and is not suited to uncover the directionality of interactions. Here, we investigated the neural mechanism of visual object processing by means of directional coupling analysis going beyond recording sites, but rather assessing the directionality of oscillatory interactions between brain areas directly. This study is the first to identify the directionality of oscillatory brain interactions in source space during human object recognition and suggests that familiar, but not unfamiliar, objects engage widespread reciprocal information flow. Directionality of cortical information-flow was calculated based upon an established Granger-Causality coupling-measure (partial-directed coherence; PDC using autoregressive modeling. To enable comparison with previous coupling studies lacking directional information, phase-locking analysis was applied, using wavelet-based signal decompositions. Both, autoregressive modeling and wavelet analysis, revealed an augmentation of iGBRs during the presentation of familiar objects relative to unfamiliar controls, which was localized to inferior-temporal, superior-parietal and frontal brain areas by means of distributed source reconstruction. The multivariate analysis of PDC evaluated each possible direction of brain interaction and revealed widespread reciprocal information-transfer during familiar

  14. Brain electric correlates of strong belief in paranormal phenomena: intracerebral EEG source and regional Omega complexity analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzagalli, D; Lehmann, D; Gianotti, L; Koenig, T; Tanaka, H; Wackermann, J; Brugger, P

    2000-12-22

    The neurocognitive processes underlying the formation and maintenance of paranormal beliefs are important for understanding schizotypal ideation. Behavioral studies indicated that both schizotypal and paranormal ideation are based on an overreliance on the right hemisphere, whose coarse rather than focussed semantic processing may favor the emergence of 'loose' and 'uncommon' associations. To elucidate the electrophysiological basis of these behavioral observations, 35-channel resting EEG was recorded in pre-screened female strong believers and disbelievers during resting baseline. EEG data were subjected to FFT-Dipole-Approximation analysis, a reference-free frequency-domain dipole source modeling, and Regional (hemispheric) Omega Complexity analysis, a linear approach estimating the complexity of the trajectories of momentary EEG map series in state space. Compared to disbelievers, believers showed: more right-located sources of the beta2 band (18.5-21 Hz, excitatory activity); reduced interhemispheric differences in Omega complexity values; higher scores on the Magical Ideation scale; more general negative affect; and more hypnagogic-like reveries after a 4-min eyes-closed resting period. Thus, subjects differing in their declared paranormal belief displayed different active, cerebral neural populations during resting, task-free conditions. As hypothesized, believers showed relatively higher right hemispheric activation and reduced hemispheric asymmetry of functional complexity. These markers may constitute the neurophysiological basis for paranormal and schizotypal ideation.

  15. Cascade of neural events leading from error commission to subsequent awareness revealed using EEG source imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Dhar

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to shed light on the respective contributions of three important action monitoring brain regions (i.e. cingulate cortex, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex during the conscious detection of response errors. To this end, fourteen healthy adults performed a speeded Go/Nogo task comprising Nogo trials of varying levels of difficulty, designed to elicit aware and unaware errors. Error awareness was indicated by participants with a second key press after the target key press. Meanwhile, electromyogram (EMG from the response hand was recorded in addition to high-density scalp electroencephalogram (EEG. In the EMG-locked grand averages, aware errors clearly elicited an error-related negativity (ERN reflecting error detection, and a later error positivity (Pe reflecting conscious error awareness. However, no Pe was recorded after unaware errors or hits. These results are in line with previous studies suggesting that error awareness is associated with generation of the Pe. Source localisation results confirmed that the posterior cingulate motor area was the main generator of the ERN. However, inverse solution results also point to the involvement of the left posterior insula during the time interval of the Pe, and hence error awareness. Moreover, consecutive to this insular activity, the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC was activated in response to aware and unaware errors but not in response to hits, consistent with the implication of this area in the evaluation of the value of an error. These results reveal a precise sequence of activations in these three non-overlapping brain regions following error commission, enabling a progressive differentiation between aware and unaware errors as a function of time elapsed, thanks to the involvement first of interoceptive or proprioceptive processes (left insula, later leading to the detection of a breach in the prepotent response mode (right OFC.

  16. EEG biofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořáček, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Vznik EEG aktivity v mozku, rozdělení EEG vln podle frekvence, způsob měření EEG, přístroje pro měření EEG. Dále popis biofeedback metody, její možnosti a návrh biofeedback her. Popis zpracování naměřených EEG signálů. EEG generation, brain rhythms, methods of recording EEG, EEG recorder. Description of biofeedback, potentialities of biofeedback, proposal of biofeedback games. Description of processing measured EEG signals. B

  17. Quantitative EEG and Current Source Density Analysis of Combined Antiepileptic Drugs and Dopaminergic Agents in Genetic Epilepsy: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Hamlin; Wells, Christopher; Mizrahi, Neptune

    2015-07-01

    Two adolescent females with absence epilepsy were classified, one as attention deficit and the other as bipolar disorder. Physical and cognitive exams identified hypotension, bradycardia, and cognitive dysfunction. Their initial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were considered slightly slow, but within normal limits. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) data included relative theta excess and low alpha mean frequencies. A combined treatment of antiepileptic drugs with a catecholamine agonist/reuptake inhibitor was sequentially used. Both patients' physical and cognitive functions improved and they have remained seizure free. The clinical outcomes were correlated with statistically significant changes in QEEG measures toward normal Z-scores in both anterior and posterior regions. In addition, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) Z-scored source correlation analyses of the initial and treated QEEG data showed normalized patterns, supporting a neuroanatomic resolution. This study presents preliminary evidence for a neurophysiologic approach to patients with absence epilepsy and comorbid disorders and may provide a method for further research. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  18. EEGLAB: an open source toolbox for analysis of single-trial EEG dynamics including independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Arnaud; Makeig, Scott

    2004-03-15

    We have developed a toolbox and graphic user interface, EEGLAB, running under the crossplatform MATLAB environment (The Mathworks, Inc.) for processing collections of single-trial and/or averaged EEG data of any number of channels. Available functions include EEG data, channel and event information importing, data visualization (scrolling, scalp map and dipole model plotting, plus multi-trial ERP-image plots), preprocessing (including artifact rejection, filtering, epoch selection, and averaging), independent component analysis (ICA) and time/frequency decompositions including channel and component cross-coherence supported by bootstrap statistical methods based on data resampling. EEGLAB functions are organized into three layers. Top-layer functions allow users to interact with the data through the graphic interface without needing to use MATLAB syntax. Menu options allow users to tune the behavior of EEGLAB to available memory. Middle-layer functions allow users to customize data processing using command history and interactive 'pop' functions. Experienced MATLAB users can use EEGLAB data structures and stand-alone signal processing functions to write custom and/or batch analysis scripts. Extensive function help and tutorial information are included. A 'plug-in' facility allows easy incorporation of new EEG modules into the main menu. EEGLAB is freely available (http://www.sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/) under the GNU public license for noncommercial use and open source development, together with sample data, user tutorial and extensive documentation.

  19. Mobile real-time EEG imaging Bayesian inference with sparse, temporally smooth source priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Hansen, Sofie Therese; Stahlhut, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    EEG based real-time imaging of human brain function has many potential applications including quality control, in-line experimental design, brain state decoding, and neuro-feedback. In mobile applications these possibilities are attractive as elements in systems for personal state monitoring...

  20. German legislation for promotion of renewable energies 2014. Act on feed-in and guaranteed pricing of electricity from renewable energy sources (EEG). Commentary. 7. new rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salje, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The EEG is continuously subjected to changes and the permanent center of political discussions. Therefore now already the 7th edition of the EEG comment of the science and practice well recognized and highly recognized author Prof. Dr. Dr. Peter Salje appear. The revision includes, inter alia, further evaluation of the law of electric power produced from renewable energy sources from the EEG of 2012 and the regulations made there under (including Biomass and AusglMechV). The changes associated with the so-called Photovoltaic amendment dated August 2012 and the recent case law since the publication of the previous edition handed down are considered. In particular, the incorporation of the full basic EEG reform in 2014 guarantees the highest topicality. [de

  1. Kurtosis based blind source extraction of complex noncircular signals with application in EEG artifact removal in real-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush eJavidi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new class of complex domain blind source extraction (BSE algorithms suitable for the extraction of both circular and noncircular complex signals is proposed. This is achieved through sequential extraction based on the degree of kurtosis and in the presence of noncircular measurement noise. The existence and uniqueness analysis of the solution is followed by a study of fast converging variants of the algorithm. The performance is first assessed through simulations on well understood benchmark signals, followed by a case study on real-time artifact removal from EEG signals, verified using both qualitative and quantitative metrics. The results illustrate the power of the proposed approach in real-time blind extraction of general complex-valued sources.

  2. Stable source reconstruction from a finite number of measurements in the multi-frequency inverse source problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Kirkeby, Adrian; Knudsen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    setting: From measurements made at a finite set of frequencies we uniquely determine and reconstruct sources in a subspace spanned by finitely many Fourier-Bessel functions. Further, we obtain a constructive criterion for identifying a minimal set of measurement frequencies sufficient for reconstruction......, and under an additional, mild assumption, the reconstruction method is shown to be stable." Our analysis is based on a singular value decomposition of the source-to-measurement forward operators and the distribution of positive zeros of the Bessel functions of the first kind. The reconstruction method...

  3. An Evaluation of EEG Scanner’s Dependence on the Imaging Technique, Forward Model Computation Method, and Array Dimensionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Attias, Hagai Thomas; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz

    2012-01-01

    EEG source reconstruction involves solving an inverse problem that is highly ill-posed and dependent on a generally fixed forward propagation model. In this contribution we compare a low and high density EEG setup’s dependence on correct forward modeling. Specifically, we examine how different...... forward models affect the source estimates obtained using four inverse solvers Minimum-Norm, LORETA, Minimum-Variance Adaptive Beamformer, and Sparse Bayesian Learning....

  4. The New York Head-A precise standardized volume conductor model for EEG source localization and tES targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Parra, Lucas C; Haufe, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    In source localization of electroencephalograpic (EEG) signals, as well as in targeted transcranial electric current stimulation (tES), a volume conductor model is required to describe the flow of electric currents in the head. Boundary element models (BEM) can be readily computed to represent major tissue compartments, but cannot encode detailed anatomical information within compartments. Finite element models (FEM) can capture more tissue types and intricate anatomical structures, but with the higher precision also comes the need for semi-automated segmentation, and a higher computational cost. In either case, adjusting to the individual human anatomy requires costly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus head modeling is often based on the anatomy of an 'arbitrary' individual (e.g. Colin27). Additionally, existing reference models for the human head often do not include the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and their field of view excludes portions of the head and neck-two factors that demonstrably affect current-flow patterns. Here we present a highly detailed FEM, which we call ICBM-NY, or "New York Head". It is based on the ICBM152 anatomical template (a non-linear average of the MRI of 152 adult human brains) defined in MNI coordinates, for which we extended the field of view to the neck and performed a detailed segmentation of six tissue types (scalp, skull, CSF, gray matter, white matter, air cavities) at 0.5mm(3) resolution. The model was solved for 231 electrode locations. To evaluate its performance, additional FEMs and BEMs were constructed for four individual subjects. Each of the four individual FEMs (regarded as the 'ground truth') is compared to its BEM counterpart, the ICBM-NY, a BEM of the ICBM anatomy, an 'individualized' BEM of the ICBM anatomy warped to the individual head surface, and FEMs of the other individuals. Performance is measured in terms of EEG source localization and tES targeting errors. Results show that the ICBM-NY outperforms

  5. Dipole estimation errors due to not incorporating anisotropic conductivities in realistic head models for EEG source analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, Hans; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2009-10-01

    EEG source analysis is a valuable tool for brain functionality research and for diagnosing neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. It requires a geometrical representation of the human head or a head model, which is often modeled as an isotropic conductor. However, it is known that some brain tissues, such as the skull or white matter, have an anisotropic conductivity. Many studies reported that the anisotropic conductivities have an influence on the calculated electrode potentials. However, few studies have assessed the influence of anisotropic conductivities on the dipole estimations. In this study, we want to determine the dipole estimation errors due to not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull and/or brain tissues. Therefore, head models are constructed with the same geometry, but with an anisotropically conducting skull and/or brain tissue compartment. These head models are used in simulation studies where the dipole location and orientation error is calculated due to neglecting anisotropic conductivities of the skull and brain tissue. Results show that not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull yields a dipole location error between 2 and 25 mm, with an average of 10 mm. When the anisotropic conductivities of the brain tissues are neglected, the dipole location error ranges between 0 and 5 mm. In this case, the average dipole location error was 2.3 mm. In all simulations, the dipole orientation error was smaller than 10°. We can conclude that the anisotropic conductivities of the skull have to be incorporated to improve the accuracy of EEG source analysis. The results of the simulation, as presented here, also suggest that incorporation of the anisotropic conductivities of brain tissues is not necessary. However, more studies are needed to confirm these suggestions.

  6. Dipole estimation errors due to not incorporating anisotropic conductivities in realistic head models for EEG source analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallez, Hans; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2009-01-01

    EEG source analysis is a valuable tool for brain functionality research and for diagnosing neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. It requires a geometrical representation of the human head or a head model, which is often modeled as an isotropic conductor. However, it is known that some brain tissues, such as the skull or white matter, have an anisotropic conductivity. Many studies reported that the anisotropic conductivities have an influence on the calculated electrode potentials. However, few studies have assessed the influence of anisotropic conductivities on the dipole estimations. In this study, we want to determine the dipole estimation errors due to not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull and/or brain tissues. Therefore, head models are constructed with the same geometry, but with an anisotropically conducting skull and/or brain tissue compartment. These head models are used in simulation studies where the dipole location and orientation error is calculated due to neglecting anisotropic conductivities of the skull and brain tissue. Results show that not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull yields a dipole location error between 2 and 25 mm, with an average of 10 mm. When the anisotropic conductivities of the brain tissues are neglected, the dipole location error ranges between 0 and 5 mm. In this case, the average dipole location error was 2.3 mm. In all simulations, the dipole orientation error was smaller than 10 deg. We can conclude that the anisotropic conductivities of the skull have to be incorporated to improve the accuracy of EEG source analysis. The results of the simulation, as presented here, also suggest that incorporation of the anisotropic conductivities of brain tissues is not necessary. However, more studies are needed to confirm these suggestions.

  7. Medio-Frontal and Anterior Temporal abnormalities in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD during an acoustic antisaccade task as revealed by electro-cortical source reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockstroh Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is one of the most prevalent disorders in children and adolescence. Impulsivity is one of three core symptoms and likely associated with inhibition difficulties. To date the neural correlate of the antisaccade task, a test of response inhibition, has not been studied in children with (or without ADHD. Methods Antisaccade responses to visual and acoustic cues were examined in nine unmedicated boys with ADHD (mean age 122.44 ± 20.81 months and 14 healthy control children (mean age 115.64 ± 22.87 months, three girls while an electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded. Brain activity before saccade onset was reconstructed using a 23-source-montage. Results When cues were acoustic, children with ADHD had a higher source activity than control children in Medio-Frontal Cortex (MFC between -230 and -120 ms and in the left-hemispheric Temporal Anterior Cortex (TAC between -112 and 0 ms before saccade onset, despite both groups performing similarly behaviourally (antisaccades errors and saccade latency. When visual cues were used EEG-activity preceding antisaccades did not differ between groups. Conclusion Children with ADHD exhibit altered functioning of the TAC and MFC during an antisaccade task elicited by acoustic cues. Children with ADHD need more source activation to reach the same behavioural level as control children.

  8. The Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK), an open-source cone-beam CT reconstruction toolkit based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rit, S; Vila Oliva, M; Sarrut, D; Brousmiche, S; Labarbe, R; Sharp, G C

    2014-01-01

    We propose the Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK, http://www.openrtk.org), an open-source toolkit for fast cone-beam CT reconstruction, based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK) and using GPU code extracted from Plastimatch. RTK is developed by an open consortium (see affiliations) under the non-contaminating Apache 2.0 license. The quality of the platform is daily checked with regression tests in partnership with Kitware, the company supporting ITK. Several features are already available: Elekta, Varian and IBA inputs, multi-threaded Feldkamp-David-Kress reconstruction on CPU and GPU, Parker short scan weighting, multi-threaded CPU and GPU forward projectors, etc. Each feature is either accessible through command line tools or C++ classes that can be included in independent software. A MIDAS community has been opened to share CatPhan datasets of several vendors (Elekta, Varian and IBA). RTK will be used in the upcoming cone-beam CT scanner developed by IBA for proton therapy rooms. Many features are under development: new input format support, iterative reconstruction, hybrid Monte Carlo / deterministic CBCT simulation, etc. RTK has been built to freely share tomographic reconstruction developments between researchers and is open for new contributions.

  9. The Realistic Versus the Spherical Head Model in EEG Dipole Source Analysis in the Presence of Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanrumste, Bart

    2001-01-01

    .... For 27 electrodes, an EEG epoch of one time sample and spatially white Gaussian noise we found that the importance of the realistic head model over the spherical head model reduces by increasing the noise level.

  10. Orientation Estimation and Signal Reconstruction of a Directional Sound Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guarato, Francesco

    , one for each call emission, were compared to those calculated through a pre-existing technique based on interpolation of sound-pressure levels at microphone locations. The application of the method to the bat calls could provide knowledge on bat behaviour that may be useful for a bat-inspired sensor......Previous works in the literature about one tone or broadband sound sources mainly deal with algorithms and methods developed in order to localize the source and, occasionally, estimate the source bearing angle (with respect to a global reference frame). The problem setting assumes, in these cases......, omnidirectional receivers collecting the acoustic signal from the source: analysis of arrival times in the recordings together with microphone positions and source directivity cues allows to get information about source position and bearing. Moreover, sound sources have been included into sensor systems together...

  11. Use Case Analysis: The Ambulatory EEG in Navy Medicine for Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    science of binaural beats . Retrieved from http://binauralbrains.com/the-science-of- binaural - beats / Biosignal. (2016). MicroEEG. Retrieved from http...Cap. Source: Binaural Brains (n.d.). ....................................4  Figure 3.  EEG Machine. Source: Refine Medical Technology (n.d...EEG. Figures 2, 3, and 4 display images of a standard EEG cap, EEG machine, and an EEG recording. Figure 2. Standard EEG Cap. Source: Binaural Brains

  12. Reconstruction of sound source signal by analytical passive TR in the environment with airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Long; Li, Min; Yang, Debin; Niu, Feng; Zeng, Wu

    2017-03-01

    In the acoustic design of air vehicles, the time-domain signals of noise sources on the surface of air vehicles can serve as data support to reveal the noise source generation mechanism, analyze acoustic fatigue, and take measures for noise insulation and reduction. To rapidly reconstruct the time-domain sound source signals in an environment with flow, a method combining the analytical passive time reversal mirror (AP-TR) with a shear flow correction is proposed. In this method, the negative influence of flow on sound wave propagation is suppressed by the shear flow correction, obtaining the corrected acoustic propagation time delay and path. Those corrected time delay and path together with the microphone array signals are then submitted to the AP-TR, reconstructing more accurate sound source signals in the environment with airflow. As an analytical method, AP-TR offers a supplementary way in 3D space to reconstruct the signal of sound source in the environment with airflow instead of the numerical TR. Experiments on the reconstruction of the sound source signals of a pair of loud speakers are conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel with subsonic airflow to validate the effectiveness and priorities of the proposed method. Moreover the comparison by theorem and experiment result between the AP-TR and the time-domain beamforming in reconstructing the sound source signal is also discussed.

  13. A cortical source localization analysis of resting EEG data after remifentanil infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khodayari-Rostamabad, Ahmad; Graversen, Carina; Malver, Lasse P

    2015-01-01

    in several brain areas including inferior frontal gyrus and insula at frontal lobe oscillated more strongly after remifentanil infusion compared to placebo. Furthermore, the source activity at delta band was correlated with continuous reaction time index. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that alterations...... in brain oscillations during remifentanil are mostly localized to frontal, fronto-temporal and fronto-central lobes and related to cognitive function. SIGNIFICANCE: The approach offers the potential to be used for understanding the underlying mechanism of action of remifentanil on brain activity....

  14. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  15. Reconstruction of Sound Source Pressures in an Enclosure Using the Phased Beam Tracing Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2009-01-01

    . First, surfaces of an extended source are divided into reasonably small segments. From each source segment, one beam is projected into the field and all emitted beams are traced. Radiated beams from the source reach array sensors after traveling various paths including the wall reflections. Collecting...... all the pressure histories at the field points, source-observer relations can be constructed in a matrix-vector form for each frequency. By multiplying the measured field data with the pseudo-inverse of the calculated transfer function, one obtains the distribution of source pressure. An omni......-directional sphere and a cubic source in a rectangular enclosure were taken as examples in the simulation tests. A reconstruction error was investigated by Monte Carlo simulation in terms of field point locations. When the source information was reconstructed by the present method, it was shown that the sound power...

  16. German legislation for promotion of renewable energies 2014. Act on feed-in and guaranteed pricing of electricity from renewable energy sources (EEG). Commentary. 7. new rev. ed.; Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz 2014. Gesetz fuer den Ausbau erneuerbarer Energien. Kommentar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salje, Peter [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Zivilrecht und Recht der Wirtschaft

    2015-07-01

    The EEG is continuously subjected to changes and the permanent center of political discussions. Therefore now already the 7th edition of the EEG comment of the science and practice well recognized and highly recognized author Prof. Dr. Dr. Peter Salje appear. The revision includes, inter alia, further evaluation of the law of electric power produced from renewable energy sources from the EEG of 2012 and the regulations made there under (including Biomass and AusglMechV). The changes associated with the so-called Photovoltaic amendment dated August 2012 and the recent case law since the publication of the previous edition handed down are considered. In particular, the incorporation of the full basic EEG reform in 2014 guarantees the highest topicality. [German] Das EEG ist fortlaufend Neuerungen unterworfen und im staendigen Mittelpunkt der politischen Diskussionen. In nunmehr bereits 7. Auflage erscheint daher der EEG-Kommentar von dem in Wissenschaft und Praxis bestens ausgewiesenen und hoechst anerkannten Autor Prof. Dr. Dr. Peter Salje. Die Neubearbeitung umfasst u.a. die weitere Auswertung des Rechts der Stromerzeugung aus Erneuerbaren Energien aus dem EEG 2012 und den dazu ergangenen Verordnungen (u.a. BiomasseV und AusglMechV). Die mit der sog. Photovoltaik-Novelle vom August 2012 einhergehenden Aenderungen sowie die seit Erscheinen der Vorauflage ergangene Rechtsprechung werden beruecksichtigt. Insbesondere die vollumfaengliche Einarbeitung der grundlegenden EEG-Reform 2014 garantiert hoechste Aktualitaet.

  17. Automatic selection of optimal systolic and diastolic reconstruction windows for dual-source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifarth, H.; Puesken, M.; Wienbeck, S.; Maintz, D.; Heindel, W.; Juergens, K.U.; Fischbach, R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a motion-map algorithm that automatically determines optimal reconstruction windows for dual-source coronary CT angiography. In datasets from 50 consecutive patients, optimal systolic and diastolic reconstruction windows were determined using the motion-map algorithm. For manual determination of the optimal reconstruction window, datasets were reconstructed in 5% steps throughout the RR interval. Motion artifacts were rated for each major coronary vessel using a five-point scale. Mean motion scores using the motion-map algorithm were 2.4 ± 0.8 for systolic reconstructions and 1.9 ± 0.8 for diastolic reconstructions. Using the manual approach, overall motion scores were significantly better (1.9 ± 0.5 and 1.7 ± 0.6, p 90% of cases using either approach. Using the automated approach, there was a negative correlation between heart rate and motion scores for systolic reconstructions (ρ = -0.26, p 80 bpm (systolic reconstruction). (orig.)

  18. Source reconstruction using phase space beam summation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graubart, Gideon.

    1990-10-01

    In this work, the phase-space beam summation technique (PSBS), is applied to back propagation and inverse source problems. The PSBS expresses the field as a superposition of shifted and tilted beams. This phase space spectrum of beams is matched to the source distribution via an amplitude function which expresses the local spectrum of the source function in terms of a local Fourier transform. In this work, the emphasis is on the phase space processing of the data, on the information content of this data and on the back propagation scheme. More work is still required to combine this back propagation approach in a full, multi experiment inverse scattering scheme. It is shown that the phase space distribution of the data, computed via the local spectrum transform, is localized along lines that define the local arrival direction of the wave data. We explore how the choice of the beam width affects the compactification of this distribution, and derive criteria for choosing a window that optimizes this distribution. It should be emphasized that compact distribution implies fewer beams in the back propagation scheme and therefore higher numerical efficiency and better physical insight. Furthermore it is shown how the local information property of the phase space representation can be used to improve the performance of this simple back propagation problem, in particular with regard to axial resolution; the distance to the source can be determined by back propagating only the large angle phase space beams that focus on the source. The information concerning transverse distribution of the source, on the other hand, is contained in the axial phase space region and can therefore be determined by the corresponding back propagating beams. Because of the global nature of the plane waves propagators the conventional plane wave back propagation scheme does not have the same 'focusing' property, and therefore suffers from lack of information localization and axial resolution. The

  19. EEG (Electroencephalogram)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in diagnosing brain disorders, especially epilepsy or another seizure disorder. An EEG might also be helpful for diagnosing ... Sometimes seizures are intentionally triggered in people with epilepsy during the test, but appropriate medical care is ...

  20. Reconstructing source-sink dynamics in a population with a pelagic dispersal phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Chen

    Full Text Available For many organisms, the reconstruction of source-sink dynamics is hampered by limited knowledge of the spatial assemblage of either the source or sink components or lack of information on the strength of the linkage for any source-sink pair. In the case of marine species with a pelagic dispersal phase, these problems may be mitigated through the use of particle drift simulations based on an ocean circulation model. However, when simulated particle trajectories do not intersect sampling sites, the corroboration of model drift simulations with field data is hampered. Here, we apply a new statistical approach for reconstructing source-sink dynamics that overcomes the aforementioned problems. Our research is motivated by the need for understanding observed changes in jellyfish distributions in the eastern Bering Sea since 1990. By contrasting the source-sink dynamics reconstructed with data from the pre-1990 period with that from the post-1990 period, it appears that changes in jellyfish distribution resulted from the combined effects of higher jellyfish productivity and longer dispersal of jellyfish resulting from a shift in the ocean circulation starting in 1991. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the source-sink reconstruction is robust to typical systematic and random errors in the ocean circulation model driving the particle drift simulations. The jellyfish analysis illustrates that new insights can be gained by studying structural changes in source-sink dynamics. The proposed approach is applicable for the spatial source-sink reconstruction of other species and even abiotic processes, such as sediment transport.

  1. Reconstruction of extended sources for the Helmholtz equation

    KAUST Repository

    Kress, Rainer

    2013-02-26

    The basis of most imaging methods is to detect hidden obstacles or inclusions within a body when one can only make measurements on an exterior surface. Our underlying model is that of inverse acoustic scattering based on the Helmholtz equation. Our inclusions are interior forces with compact support and our data consist of a single measurement of near-field Cauchy data on the external boundary. We propose an algorithm that under certain assumptions allows for the determination of the support set of these forces by solving a simpler \\'equivalent point source\\' problem, and which uses a Newton scheme to improve the corresponding initial approximation. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Acoustical source reconstruction from non-synchronous sequential measurements by Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Antoni, Jerome; Leclere, Quentin; Jiang, Weikang

    2017-11-01

    Acoustical source reconstruction is a typical inverse problem, whose minimum frequency of reconstruction hinges on the size of the array and maximum frequency depends on the spacing distance between the microphones. For the sake of enlarging the frequency of reconstruction and reducing the cost of an acquisition system, Cyclic Projection (CP), a method of sequential measurements without reference, was recently investigated (JSV,2016,372:31-49). In this paper, the Propagation based Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm (Propagation-FISTA) is introduced, which improves CP in two aspects: (1) the number of acoustic sources is no longer needed and the only making assumption is that of a "weakly sparse" eigenvalue spectrum; (2) the construction of the spatial basis is much easier and adaptive to practical scenarios of acoustical measurements benefiting from the introduction of propagation based spatial basis. The proposed Propagation-FISTA is first investigated with different simulations and experimental setups and is next illustrated with an industrial case.

  3. EEG and MEG Data Analysis in SPM8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Litvak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available SPM is a free and open source software written in MATLAB (The MathWorks, Inc.. In addition to standard M/EEG preprocessing, we presently offer three main analysis tools: (i statistical analysis of scalp-maps, time-frequency images, and volumetric 3D source reconstruction images based on the general linear model, with correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory; (ii Bayesian M/EEG source reconstruction, including support for group studies, simultaneous EEG and MEG, and fMRI priors; (iii dynamic causal modelling (DCM, an approach combining neural modelling with data analysis for which there are several variants dealing with evoked responses, steady state responses (power spectra and cross-spectra, induced responses, and phase coupling. SPM8 is integrated with the FieldTrip toolbox , making it possible for users to combine a variety of standard analysis methods with new schemes implemented in SPM and build custom analysis tools using powerful graphical user interface (GUI and batching tools.

  4. EEG and MEG data analysis in SPM8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, Vladimir; Mattout, Jérémie; Kiebel, Stefan; Phillips, Christophe; Henson, Richard; Kilner, James; Barnes, Gareth; Oostenveld, Robert; Daunizeau, Jean; Flandin, Guillaume; Penny, Will; Friston, Karl

    2011-01-01

    SPM is a free and open source software written in MATLAB (The MathWorks, Inc.). In addition to standard M/EEG preprocessing, we presently offer three main analysis tools: (i) statistical analysis of scalp-maps, time-frequency images, and volumetric 3D source reconstruction images based on the general linear model, with correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory; (ii) Bayesian M/EEG source reconstruction, including support for group studies, simultaneous EEG and MEG, and fMRI priors; (iii) dynamic causal modelling (DCM), an approach combining neural modelling with data analysis for which there are several variants dealing with evoked responses, steady state responses (power spectra and cross-spectra), induced responses, and phase coupling. SPM8 is integrated with the FieldTrip toolbox , making it possible for users to combine a variety of standard analysis methods with new schemes implemented in SPM and build custom analysis tools using powerful graphical user interface (GUI) and batching tools.

  5. BoneSource hydroxyapatite cement: a novel biomaterial for craniofacial skeletal tissue engineering and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C D; Costantino, P D; Takagi, S; Chow, L C

    1998-01-01

    BoneSource-hydroxyapatite cement is a new self-setting calcium phosphate cement biomaterial. Its unique and innovative physical chemistry coupled with enhanced biocompatibility make it useful for craniofacial skeletal reconstruction. The general properties and clinical use guidelines are reviewed. The biomaterial and surgical applications offer insight into improved outcomes and potential new uses for hydroxyapatite cement systems.

  6. Spatiotemporal analysis of single-trial EEG of emotional pictures based on independent component analysis and source location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangang; Tian, Jie

    2007-03-01

    The present study combined the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) algorithms to identify the spatial distribution and time course of single-trial EEG record differences between neural responses to emotional stimuli vs. the neutral. Single-trial multichannel (129-sensor) EEG records were collected from 21 healthy, right-handed subjects viewing the emotion emotional (pleasant/unpleasant) and neutral pictures selected from International Affective Picture System (IAPS). For each subject, the single-trial EEG records of each emotional pictures were concatenated with the neutral, and a three-step analysis was applied to each of them in the same way. First, the ICA was performed to decompose each concatenated single-trial EEG records into temporally independent and spatially fixed components, namely independent components (ICs). The IC associated with artifacts were isolated. Second, the clustering analysis classified, across subjects, the temporally and spatially similar ICs into the same clusters, in which nonparametric permutation test for Global Field Power (GFP) of IC projection scalp maps identified significantly different temporal segments of each emotional condition vs. neutral. Third, the brain regions accounted for those significant segments were localized spatially with LORETA analysis. In each cluster, a voxel-by-voxel randomization test identified significantly different brain regions between each emotional condition vs. the neutral. Compared to the neutral, both emotional pictures elicited activation in the visual, temporal, ventromedial and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulated gyrus. In addition, the pleasant pictures activated the left middle prefrontal cortex and the posterior precuneus, while the unpleasant pictures activated the right orbitofrontal cortex, posterior cingulated gyrus and somatosensory region. Our results were well consistent with other functional imaging

  7. Dual-source CT coronary imaging in heart transplant recipients: image quality and optimal reconstruction interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastarrika, Gorka; Arraiza, Maria; Pueyo, Jesus C.; Cecco, Carlo N. de; Ubilla, Matias; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Rabago, Gregorio

    2008-01-01

    The image quality and optimal reconstruction interval for coronary arteries in heart transplant recipients undergoing non-invasive dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography was evaluated. Twenty consecutive heart transplant recipients who underwent DSCT coronary angiography were included (19 male, one female; mean age 63.1±10.7 years). Data sets were reconstructed in 5% steps from 30% to 80% of the R-R interval. Two blinded independent observers assessed the image quality of each coronary segments using a five-point scale (from 0 = not evaluative to 4=excellent quality). A total of 289 coronary segments in 20 heart transplant recipients were evaluated. Mean heart rate during the scan was 89.1±10.4 bpm. At the best reconstruction interval, diagnostic image quality (score ≥2) was obtained in 93.4% of the coronary segments (270/289) with a mean image quality score of 3.04± 0.63. Systolic reconstruction intervals provided better image quality scores than diastolic reconstruction intervals (overall mean quality scores obtained with the systolic and diastolic reconstructions 3.03±1.06 and 2.73±1.11, respectively; P<0.001). Different systolic reconstruction intervals (35%, 40%, 45% of RR interval) did not yield to significant differences in image quality scores for the coronary segments (P=0.74). Reconstructions obtained at the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle allowed excellent diagnostic image quality coronary angiograms in heart transplant recipients undergoing DSCT coronary angiography. (orig.)

  8. Altered resting state EEG in chronic pancreatitis patients: toward a marker for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jongsma, M.L.A.; Broeke, E.N. van den; Arns, M.W.; Goor, H. van; Rijn, C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electroencephalography (EEG) may be a promising source of physiological biomarkers accompanying chronic pain. Several studies in patients with chronic neuropathic pain have reported alterations in central pain processing, manifested as slowed EEG rhythmicity and increased EEG power in

  9. Altered resting state EEG in chronic pancreatitis patients: toward a marker for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jongsma, M.L.A.; Broeke, E.N. van den; Arns, M.W.; Goor, H. van; Rijn, C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Electroencephalography (EEG) may be a promising source of physiological biomarkers accompanying chronic pain. Several studies in patients with chronic neuropathic pain have reported alterations in central pain processing, manifested as slowed EEG rhythmicity and increased EEG power in

  10. Heat source reconstruction from noisy temperature fields using an optimised derivative Gaussian filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpueyo, D.; Balandraud, X.; Grédiac, M.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a post-processing technique based on a derivative Gaussian filter to reconstruct heat source fields from temperature fields measured by infrared thermography. Heat sources can be deduced from temperature variations thanks to the heat diffusion equation. Filtering and differentiating are key-issues which are closely related here because the temperature fields which are processed are unavoidably noisy. We focus here only on the diffusion term because it is the most difficult term to estimate in the procedure, the reason being that it involves spatial second derivatives (a Laplacian for isotropic materials). This quantity can be reasonably estimated using a convolution of the temperature variation fields with second derivatives of a Gaussian function. The study is first based on synthetic temperature variation fields corrupted by added noise. The filter is optimised in order to reconstruct at best the heat source fields. The influence of both the dimension and the level of a localised heat source is discussed. Obtained results are also compared with another type of processing based on an averaging filter. The second part of this study presents an application to experimental temperature fields measured with an infrared camera on a thin plate in aluminium alloy. Heat sources are generated with an electric heating patch glued on the specimen surface. Heat source fields reconstructed from measured temperature fields are compared with the imposed heat sources. Obtained results illustrate the relevancy of the derivative Gaussian filter to reliably extract heat sources from noisy temperature fields for the experimental thermomechanics of materials.

  11. Sparse Spatio-temporal Inference of Electromagnetic Brain Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Attias, Hagai Thomas; Wipf, David

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic brain activity measured via MEG (or EEG) can be interpreted as arising from a collection of current dipoles or sources located throughout the cortex. Because the number of candidate locations for these sources is much larger than the number of sensors, source reconstruction...

  12. Reconstruction of source location in a network of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalier, Fabien; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Leroy, Nicolas; Varvella, Monica

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the reconstruction of the direction of a gravitational wave source using the detection made by a network of interferometric detectors, mainly the LIGO and Virgo detectors. We suppose that an event has been seen in coincidence using a filter applied on the three detector data streams. Using the arrival time (and its associated error) of the gravitational signal in each detector, the direction of the source in the sky is computed using a χ 2 minimization technique. For reasonably large signals (SNR>4.5 in all detectors), the mean angular error between the real location and the reconstructed one is about 1 deg. . We also investigate the effect of the network geometry assuming the same angular response for all interferometric detectors. It appears that the reconstruction quality is not uniform over the sky and is degraded when the source approaches the plane defined by the three detectors. Adding at least one other detector to the LIGO-Virgo network reduces the blind regions and in the case of 6 detectors, a precision less than 1 deg. on the source direction can be reached for 99% of the sky

  13. Time-stretch microscopy based on time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chi; Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Time-stretch microscopy has emerged as an ultrafast optical imaging concept offering the unprecedented combination of the imaging speed and sensitivity. However, dedicated wideband and coherence optical pulse source with high shot-to-shot stability has been mandated for time-wavelength mapping—the enabling process for ultrahigh speed wavelength-encoded image retrieval. From the practical point of view, exploiting methods to relax the stringent requirements (e.g., temporal stability and coherence) for the source of time-stretch microscopy is thus of great value. In this paper, we demonstrated time-stretch microscopy by reconstructing the time-wavelength mapping sequence from a wideband incoherent source. Utilizing the time-lens focusing mechanism mediated by a narrow-band pulse source, this approach allows generation of a wideband incoherent source, with the spectral efficiency enhanced by a factor of 18. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, time-stretch imaging with the scan rate as high as MHz and diffraction-limited resolution is achieved based on the wideband incoherent source. We note that the concept of time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source can also be generalized to any high-speed optical real-time measurements, where wavelength is acted as the information carrier

  14. Sources of EEG activity most relevant to performance of brain-computer interface based on motor imagery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A.; Húsek, Dušan; Bobrov, P.; Korshakov, A.V.; Chernikova, L.; Konovalov, R.; Mokienko, O.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2012), s. 21-37 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/0262 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0070 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : brain-computer interface * independent component analysis * pattern classification * motor imagery * inverse problem * fMRI * EEG Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.362, year: 2012

  15. Source Plane Reconstruction of the Bright Lensed Galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Rigby, Jane R.; Wuyts, Eva; Koester, Benjamin P.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Barrientos, L. Felipe

    2011-01-01

    We present new HST/WFC3 imaging data of RCS2 032727-132609, a bright lensed galaxy at z=1.7 that is magnified and stretched by the lensing cluster RCS2 032727-132623. Using this new high-resolution imaging, we modify our previous lens model (which was based on ground-based data) to fully understand the lensing geometry, and use it to reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc represents a unique opportunity to peer into 100-pc scale structures in a high redshift galaxy. This new source reconstruction will be crucial for a future analysis of the spatially-resolved rest-UV and rest-optical spectra of the brightest parts of the arc.

  16. Market and system integration of renewable energy sources. A legal analysis of the regulations for direct marketing in the EEG 2012; Markt- und Systemintegration der Erneuerbaren-Energien. Eine rechtliche Analyse der Regeln zur Direktvermarktung im EEG 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Wieland [Kanzlei Becker Buettner Held, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The EEG 2012 presents optional funding instruments for direct marketing of EEG electricity, in particular a market bonus and a flexibility bonus. The author presents the new regulation for direct marketing in the EEG 2012, in consideration of the practice in energy law. Important aspects are a systematic integration of the new specifications in energy law and an analysis of their contents. Effects on the practice of energy management are investigated, as well as the chances and risks connected with implementation by the energy market partners.

  17. Accurate Reconstruction of the Roman Circus in Milan by Georeferencing Heterogeneous Data Sources with GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Guidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the methodological approach and the actual workflow for creating the 3D digital reconstruction in time of the ancient Roman Circus of Milan, which is presently covered completely by the urban fabric of the modern city. The diachronic reconstruction is based on a proper mix of quantitative data originated by current 3D surveys and historical sources, such as ancient maps, drawings, archaeological reports, restrictions decrees, and old photographs. When possible, such heterogeneous sources have been georeferenced and stored in a GIS system. In this way the sources have been analyzed in depth, allowing the deduction of geometrical information not explicitly revealed by the material available. A reliable reconstruction of the area in different historical periods has been therefore hypothesized. This research has been carried on in the framework of the project Cultural Heritage Through Time—CHT2, funded by the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage (JPI-CH, supported by the Italian Ministry for Cultural Heritage (MiBACT, the Italian Ministry for University and Research (MIUR, and the European Commission.

  18. EEG Based Inference of Spatio-Temporal Brain Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese

    Electroencephalography (EEG) provides a measure of brain activity and has improved our understanding of the brain immensely. However, there is still much to be learned and the full potential of EEG is yet to be realized. In this thesis we suggest to improve the information gain of EEG using three...... different approaches; 1) by recovery of the EEG sources, 2) by representing and inferring the propagation path of EEG sources, and 3) by combining EEG with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The common goal of the methods, and thus of this thesis, is to improve the spatial dimension of EEG...... recovery ability. The forward problem describes the propagation of neuronal activity in the brain to the EEG electrodes on the scalp. The geometry and conductivity of the head layers are normally required to model this path. We propose a framework for inferring forward models which is based on the EEG...

  19. Reconstruction of far-field tsunami amplitude distributions from earthquake sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The probability distribution of far-field tsunami amplitudes is explained in relation to the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones. Tsunami amplitude distributions at tide gauge stations follow a similar functional form, well described by a tapered Pareto distribution that is parameterized by a power-law exponent and a corner amplitude. Distribution parameters are first established for eight tide gauge stations in the Pacific, using maximum likelihood estimation. A procedure is then developed to reconstruct the tsunami amplitude distribution that consists of four steps: (1) define the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones; (2) establish a source-station scaling relation from regression analysis; (3) transform the seismic moment distribution to a tsunami amplitude distribution for each subduction zone; and (4) mix the transformed distribution for all subduction zones to an aggregate tsunami amplitude distribution specific to the tide gauge station. The tsunami amplitude distribution is adequately reconstructed for four tide gauge stations using globally constant seismic moment distribution parameters established in previous studies. In comparisons to empirical tsunami amplitude distributions from maximum likelihood estimation, the reconstructed distributions consistently exhibit higher corner amplitude values, implying that in most cases, the empirical catalogs are too short to include the largest amplitudes. Because the reconstructed distribution is based on a catalog of earthquakes that is much larger than the tsunami catalog, it is less susceptible to the effects of record-breaking events and more indicative of the actual distribution of tsunami amplitudes.

  20. Strategy for fitting source strength and reconstruction procedure in radioactive particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosorov, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    The Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) technique is widely applied to study the dynamic properties of flows inside a reactor. Usually, a single radioactive particle that is neutrally buoyant with respect to the phase is used as a tracker. The particle moves inside a 3D volume of interest, and its positions are determined by an array of scintillation detectors, which count the incoming photons. The particle position coordinates are calculated by using a reconstruction procedure that solves a minimization problem between the measured counts and calibration data. Although previous studies have described the influence of specified factors on the RPT resolution and sensitivities, the question of how to choose an appropriate source strength and reconstruction procedure for the given RPT setup remains an unsolved problem. This work describes and applies the original strategy for fitting both the source strength and the sampling time interval to a specified RPT setup to guarantee a required accuracy of measurements. Additionally, the measurement accuracy of an RPT setup can be significantly increased by changing the reconstruction procedure. The results of the simulations, based on the Monte Carlo approach, have demonstrated that the proposed strategy allows for the successful implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle when designing the RPT setup. The limitations and drawbacks of the proposed procedure are also presented. - Highlights: • We develop an original strategy for fitting source strength and measurement time interval in radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique. • The proposed strategy allows successfully to implement the ALAPA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in designing of a RPT setup. • Measurement accuracy of a RPT setup can be significantly increased by improvement of the reconstruction procedure. • The algorithm can be applied to monitor the motion of the radioactive tracer in a reactor

  1. Model-Based Least Squares Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs: Integrating the ORNL HFIR CG1D Source Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bingham, Philip R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    At the present, neutron sources cannot be fabricated small and powerful enough in order to achieve high resolution radiography while maintaining an adequate flux. One solution is to employ computational imaging techniques such as a Magnified Coded Source Imaging (CSI) system. A coded-mask is placed between the neutron source and the object. The system resolution is increased by reducing the size of the mask holes and the flux is increased by increasing the size of the coded-mask and/or the number of holes. One limitation of such system is that the resolution of current state-of-the-art scintillator-based detectors caps around 50um. To overcome this challenge, the coded-mask and object are magnified by making the distance from the coded-mask to the object much smaller than the distance from object to detector. In previous work, we have shown via synthetic experiments that our least squares method outperforms other methods in image quality and reconstruction precision because of the modeling of the CSI system components. However, the validation experiments were limited to simplistic neutron sources. In this work, we aim to model the flux distribution of a real neutron source and incorporate such a model in our least squares computational system. We provide a full description of the methodology used to characterize the neutron source and validate the method with synthetic experiments.

  2. Photogrammetry-Based Head Digitization for Rapid and Accurate Localization of EEG Electrodes and MEG Fiducial Markers Using a Single Digital SLR Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausner, Tommy; Dalal, Sarang S; Crespo-García, Maité

    2017-01-01

    The performance of EEG source reconstruction has benefited from the increasing use of advanced head modeling techniques that take advantage of MRI together with the precise positions of the recording electrodes. The prevailing technique for registering EEG electrode coordinates involves electromagnetic digitization. However, the procedure adds several minutes to experiment preparation and typical digitizers may not be accurate enough for optimal source reconstruction performance (Dalal et al., 2014). Here, we present a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective alternative method to register EEG electrode positions, using a single digital SLR camera, photogrammetry software, and computer vision techniques implemented in our open-source toolbox, janus3D . Our approach uses photogrammetry to construct 3D models from multiple photographs of the participant's head wearing the EEG electrode cap. Electrodes are detected automatically or semi-automatically using a template. The rigid facial features from these photo-based models are then surface-matched to MRI-based head reconstructions to facilitate coregistration to MRI space. This method yields a final electrode coregistration error of 0.8 mm, while a standard technique using an electromagnetic digitizer yielded an error of 6.1 mm. The technique furthermore reduces preparation time, and could be extended to a multi-camera array, which would make the procedure virtually instantaneous. In addition to EEG, the technique could likewise capture the position of the fiducial markers used in magnetoencephalography systems to register head position.

  3. Full field image reconstruction is suitable for high-pitch dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sedlmair, Martin; Tamm, Miriam; Reinartz, Sebastian D; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The field of view (FOV) in high-pitch dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) is limited by the size of the second detector. The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate a full FOV image reconstruction technique for high-pitch DSCT. For reconstruction beyond the FOV of the second detector, raw data of the second system were extended to the full dimensions of the first system, using the partly existing data of the first system in combination with a very smooth transition weight function. During the weighted filtered backprojection, the data of the second system were applied with an additional weighting factor. This method was tested for different pitch values from 1.5 to 3.5 on a simulated phantom and on 25 high-pitch DSCT data sets acquired at pitch values of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.8, and 3.0. Images were reconstructed with FOV sizes of 260 × 260 and 500 × 500 mm. Image quality was assessed by 2 radiologists using a 5-point Likert scale and analyzed with repeated-measure analysis of variance. In phantom and patient data, full FOV image quality depended on pitch. Where complete projection data from both tube-detector systems were available, image quality was unaffected by pitch changes. Full FOV image quality was not compromised at pitch values of 1.6 and remained fully diagnostic up to a pitch of 2.0. At higher pitch values, there was an increasing difference in image quality between limited and full FOV images (P = 0.0097). With this new image reconstruction technique, full FOV image reconstruction can be used up to a pitch of 2.0.

  4. WASS: An open-source pipeline for 3D stereo reconstruction of ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Filippo; Torsello, Andrea; Sclavo, Mauro; Barbariol, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise

    2017-10-01

    Stereo 3D reconstruction of ocean waves is gaining more and more popularity in the oceanographic community and industry. Indeed, recent advances of both computer vision algorithms and computer processing power now allow the study of the spatio-temporal wave field with unprecedented accuracy, especially at small scales. Even if simple in theory, multiple details are difficult to be mastered for a practitioner, so that the implementation of a sea-waves 3D reconstruction pipeline is in general considered a complex task. For instance, camera calibration, reliable stereo feature matching and mean sea-plane estimation are all factors for which a well designed implementation can make the difference to obtain valuable results. For this reason, we believe that the open availability of a well tested software package that automates the reconstruction process from stereo images to a 3D point cloud would be a valuable addition for future researches in this area. We present WASS (http://www.dais.unive.it/wass), an Open-Source stereo processing pipeline for sea waves 3D reconstruction. Our tool completely automates all the steps required to estimate dense point clouds from stereo images. Namely, it computes the extrinsic parameters of the stereo rig so that no delicate calibration has to be performed on the field. It implements a fast 3D dense stereo reconstruction procedure based on the consolidated OpenCV library and, lastly, it includes set of filtering techniques both on the disparity map and the produced point cloud to remove the vast majority of erroneous points that can naturally arise while analyzing the optically complex nature of the water surface. In this paper, we describe the architecture of WASS and the internal algorithms involved. The pipeline workflow is shown step-by-step and demonstrated on real datasets acquired at sea.

  5. Simultaneous reconstruction of material and transient source parameters using the invariant imbedding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corones, J.; Sun, Z.

    1993-01-01

    This paper extends the time domain wave splitting and invariant imbedding method to an inhomogeneous wave equation with a source term: u xx -u tt +A(x)u x =2D(x)i'(t). The direct scattering and inverse source problems of this equation are studied. Operators J ± that map the source function into the scattered waves at the edges of the slab are defined. A system of coupled nonlinear integrodifferential equations for these scattering operator kernels is obtained. The direct scattering problem is to obtain the scattering operator kernels J ± and R + when parameters A and D are given. The inverse problem is to simultaneously reconstruct A(x) and D(x) from the scattering operator kernels R + (0,t), 0≤t≤2 and J - (0,t), 0≤t≤1. Both numerical inversion algorithms and the small time approximate reconstruction method are presented. A Green's function technique is used to derive Green's operator kernel equations for the calculation of the internal field. It provides an alternative effective and fast way to compute the scattering kernels J ± . For constant A and D the Green's operator kernels and source scattering kernels are expressed in closed form. Several numerical examples are given

  6. Simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG imaging for the investigation of resting state networks in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Mauler, Joerg; Arrubla, Jorge; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Scheins, Jurgen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and its relationship to neuronal activity are poorly understood. The human brain uses 80% of its energy for ongoing neural activity that occurs in isolation from any particular stimulus. A promising tool for the investigation of glucose metabolism and its relationship to neuronal activity is simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG data imaging. We here demonstrate the first in vivo human trimodal data at 3T. In one session MR, FDG-PET and EEG data were recorded simultaneously at a 3T hybrid MR-BrainPET scanner (Siemens, Germany) equipped with a 32 channel MR-compatible EEG system (Brain Products, Germany) in 11 healthy volunteers (11 males, mean age: 25.2 years SD: 1.2). MR and EEG data acquisition MP-RAGE (TR = 2250 ms, TE= 3.03 ms, 176 sagittal slices. 1 mm, GRAPPA factor 2. MR-based attenuation correction of PET data via UTE: flip angle=15. Two different echo times TE1=0.07 and TE2=2.46 ms, TR=200 ms. EPI sequence (TR: 2.2 s, TE: 30 ms, FOV: 200 mm, 165 volumes, The subjects were requested to close their eyes and relax EEG data were recorded using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. App. 200 MBq/μmol FDG were injected, data were acquired in list mode and iteratively reconstructed with all necessary corrections into 153 slices with 256 x 256 voxels sized 1.25 mm{sup 3}. The trimodal approach, recording PET data, MR data and EEG data simultaneously was successful. The high neuronal activity of the structures within the default mode network occurs on the basis of a high glucose consumption rate within the default node network. The activity of the default mode is not tied to a special EEG frequency band.

  7. Simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG imaging for the investigation of resting state networks in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuner, Irene; Mauler, Joerg; Arrubla, Jorge; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Scheins, Jurgen; Herzog, Hans; Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and its relationship to neuronal activity are poorly understood. The human brain uses 80% of its energy for ongoing neural activity that occurs in isolation from any particular stimulus. A promising tool for the investigation of glucose metabolism and its relationship to neuronal activity is simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG data imaging. We here demonstrate the first in vivo human trimodal data at 3T. In one session MR, FDG-PET and EEG data were recorded simultaneously at a 3T hybrid MR-BrainPET scanner (Siemens, Germany) equipped with a 32 channel MR-compatible EEG system (Brain Products, Germany) in 11 healthy volunteers (11 males, mean age: 25.2 years SD: 1.2). MR and EEG data acquisition MP-RAGE (TR = 2250 ms, TE= 3.03 ms, 176 sagittal slices. 1 mm, GRAPPA factor 2. MR-based attenuation correction of PET data via UTE: flip angle=15. Two different echo times TE1=0.07 and TE2=2.46 ms, TR=200 ms. EPI sequence (TR: 2.2 s, TE: 30 ms, FOV: 200 mm, 165 volumes, The subjects were requested to close their eyes and relax EEG data were recorded using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. App. 200 MBq/μmol FDG were injected, data were acquired in list mode and iteratively reconstructed with all necessary corrections into 153 slices with 256 x 256 voxels sized 1.25 mm 3 . The trimodal approach, recording PET data, MR data and EEG data simultaneously was successful. The high neuronal activity of the structures within the default mode network occurs on the basis of a high glucose consumption rate within the default node network. The activity of the default mode is not tied to a special EEG frequency band.

  8. The completeness condition and source orbits for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiping; Kang Kejun

    1997-01-01

    The completeness condition for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT are carefully analyzed in theory, and discussions about some source orbits which fulfill the completeness condition are followed

  9. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  10. Two-way regularization for MEG source reconstruction via multilevel coordinate descent

    KAUST Repository

    Siva Tian, Tian

    2013-12-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) source reconstruction refers to the inverse problem of recovering the neural activity from the MEG time course measurements. A spatiotemporal two-way regularization (TWR) method was recently proposed by Tian et al. to solve this inverse problem and was shown to outperform several one-way regularization methods and spatiotemporal methods. This TWR method is a two-stage procedure that first obtains a raw estimate of the source signals and then refines the raw estimate to ensure spatial focality and temporal smoothness using spatiotemporal regularized matrix decomposition. Although proven to be effective, the performance of two-stage TWR depends on the quality of the raw estimate. In this paper we directly solve the MEG source reconstruction problem using a multivariate penalized regression where the number of variables is much larger than the number of cases. A special feature of this regression is that the regression coefficient matrix has a spatiotemporal two-way structure that naturally invites a two-way penalty. Making use of this structure, we develop a computationally efficient multilevel coordinate descent algorithm to implement the method. This new one-stage TWR method has shown its superiority to the two-stage TWR method in three simulation studies with different levels of complexity and a real-world MEG data analysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, E N; Grim, G P; Wilde, C; Wilson, D C; Morgan, G; Wilke, M; Tregillis, I; Merrill, F; Clark, D; Finch, J; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-10-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  12. Point-source reconstruction with a sparse light-sensor array for optical TPC readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutter, G; Richards, M; Bennieston, A J; Ramachers, Y A

    2011-01-01

    A reconstruction technique for sparse array optical signal readout is introduced and applied to the generic challenge of large-area readout of a large number of point light sources. This challenge finds a prominent example in future, large volume neutrino detector studies based on liquid argon. It is concluded that the sparse array option may be ruled out for reasons of required number of channels when compared to a benchmark derived from charge readout on wire-planes. Smaller-scale detectors, however, could benefit from this technology.

  13. Scaled nonuniform Fourier transform for image reconstruction in swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezgebo, Biniyam; Nagib, Karim; Fernando, Namal; Kordi, Behzad; Sherif, Sherif

    2018-02-01

    Swept Source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) is an important imaging modality for both medical and industrial diagnostic applications. A cross-sectional SS-OCT image is obtained by applying an inverse discrete Fourier transform (DFT) to axial interferograms measured in the frequency domain (k-space). This inverse DFT is typically implemented as a fast Fourier transform (FFT) that requires the data samples to be equidistant in k-space. As the frequency of light produced by a typical wavelength-swept laser is nonlinear in time, the recorded interferogram samples will not be uniformly spaced in k-space. Many image reconstruction methods have been proposed to overcome this problem. Most such methods rely on oversampling the measured interferogram then use either hardware, e.g., Mach-Zhender interferometer as a frequency clock module, or software, e.g., interpolation in k-space, to obtain equally spaced samples that are suitable for the FFT. To overcome the problem of nonuniform sampling in k-space without any need for interferogram oversampling, an earlier method demonstrated the use of the nonuniform discrete Fourier transform (NDFT) for image reconstruction in SS-OCT. In this paper, we present a more accurate method for SS-OCT image reconstruction from nonuniform samples in k-space using a scaled nonuniform Fourier transform. The result is demonstrated using SS-OCT images of Axolotl salamander eggs.

  14. Concealed, Unobtrusive Ear-Centered EEG Acquisition: cEEGrids for Transparent EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleichner, Martin G.; Debener, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important clinical tool and frequently used to study the brain-behavior relationship in humans noninvasively. Traditionally, EEG signals are recorded by positioning electrodes on the scalp and keeping them in place with glue, rubber bands, or elastic caps. This setup provides good coverage of the head, but is impractical for EEG acquisition in natural daily-life situations. Here, we propose the transparent EEG concept. Transparent EEG aims for motion tolerant, highly portable, unobtrusive, and near invisible data acquisition with minimum disturbance of a user's daily activities. In recent years several ear-centered EEG solutions that are compatible with the transparent EEG concept have been presented. We discuss work showing that miniature electrodes placed in and around the human ear are a feasible solution, as they are sensitive enough to pick up electrical signals stemming from various brain and non-brain sources. We also describe the cEEGrid flex-printed sensor array, which enables unobtrusive multi-channel EEG acquisition from around the ear. In a number of validation studies we found that the cEEGrid enables the recording of meaningful continuous EEG, event-related potentials and neural oscillations. Here, we explain the rationale underlying the cEEGrid ear-EEG solution, present possible use cases and identify open issues that need to be solved on the way toward transparent EEG. PMID:28439233

  15. Polyquant CT: direct electron and mass density reconstruction from a single polyenergetic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jonathan H.; Perelli, Alessandro; Nailon, William H.; Davies, Mike E.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying material mass and electron density from computed tomography (CT) reconstructions can be highly valuable in certain medical practices, such as radiation therapy planning. However, uniquely parameterising the x-ray attenuation in terms of mass or electron density is an ill-posed problem when a single polyenergetic source is used with a spectrally indiscriminate detector. Existing approaches to single source polyenergetic modelling often impose consistency with a physical model, such as water-bone or photoelectric-Compton decompositions, which will either require detailed prior segmentation or restrictive energy dependencies, and may require further calibration to the quantity of interest. In this work, we introduce a data centric approach to fitting the attenuation with piecewise-linear functions directly to mass or electron density, and present a segmentation-free statistical reconstruction algorithm for exploiting it, with the same order of complexity as other iterative methods. We show how this allows both higher accuracy in attenuation modelling, and demonstrate its superior quantitative imaging, with numerical chest and metal implant data, and validate it with real cone-beam CT measurements.

  16. Direct reconstruction of the source intensity distribution of a clinical linear accelerator using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaconstadopoulos, P; Levesque, I R; Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J

    2016-02-07

    Direct determination of the source intensity distribution of clinical linear accelerators is still a challenging problem for small field beam modeling. Current techniques most often involve special equipment and are difficult to implement in the clinic. In this work we present a maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) approach to the source reconstruction problem utilizing small fields and a simple experimental set-up. The MLEM algorithm iteratively ray-traces photons from the source plane to the exit plane and extracts corrections based on photon fluence profile measurements. The photon fluence profiles were determined by dose profile film measurements in air using a high density thin foil as build-up material and an appropriate point spread function (PSF). The effect of other beam parameters and scatter sources was minimized by using the smallest field size ([Formula: see text] cm(2)). The source occlusion effect was reproduced by estimating the position of the collimating jaws during this process. The method was first benchmarked against simulations for a range of typical accelerator source sizes. The sources were reconstructed with an accuracy better than 0.12 mm in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) to the respective electron sources incident on the target. The estimated jaw positions agreed within 0.2 mm with the expected values. The reconstruction technique was also tested against measurements on a Varian Novalis Tx linear accelerator and compared to a previously commissioned Monte Carlo model. The reconstructed FWHM of the source agreed within 0.03 mm and 0.11 mm to the commissioned electron source in the crossplane and inplane orientations respectively. The impact of the jaw positioning, experimental and PSF uncertainties on the reconstructed source distribution was evaluated with the former presenting the dominant effect.

  17. Sources and methods to reconstruct past masting patterns in European oak species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Péter

    2012-01-01

    The irregular occurrence of good seed years in forest trees is known in many parts of the world. Mast year frequency in the past few decades can be examined through field observational studies; however, masting patterns in the more distant past are equally important in gaining a better understanding of long-term forest ecology. Past masting patterns can be studied through the examination of historical written sources. These pose considerable challenges, because data in them were usually not recorded with the aim of providing information about masting. Several studies examined masting in the deeper past, however, authors hardly ever considered the methodological implications of using and combining various source types. This paper provides a critical overview of the types of archival written that are available for the reconstruction of past masting patterns for European oak species and proposes a method to unify and evaluate different types of data. Available sources cover approximately eight centuries and can be put into two basic categories: direct observations on the amount of acorns and references to sums of money received in exchange for access to acorns. Because archival sources are highly different in origin and quality, the optimal solution for creating databases for past masting data is a three-point scale: zero mast, moderate mast, good mast. When larger amounts of data are available in a unified three-point-scale database, they can be used to test hypotheses about past masting frequencies, the driving forces of masting or regional masting patterns.

  18. Atmospheric dispersion and inverse modelling for the reconstruction of accidental sources of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winiarek, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled releases of pollutant in the atmosphere may be the consequence of various situations: accidents, for instance leaks or explosions in an industrial plant, or terrorist attacks such as biological bombs, especially in urban areas. In the event of such situations, authorities' objectives are various: predict the contaminated zones to apply first countermeasures such as evacuation of concerned population; determine the source location; assess the long-term polluted areas, for instance by deposition of persistent pollutants in the soil. To achieve these objectives, numerical models can be used to model the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants. We will first present the different processes that govern the transport of pollutants in the atmosphere, then the different numerical models that are commonly used in this context. The choice between these models mainly depends of the scale and the details one seeks to take into account. We will then present several inverse modeling methods to estimate the emission as well as statistical methods to estimate prior errors, to which the inversion is very sensitive. Several case studies are presented, using synthetic data as well as real data such as the estimation of source terms from the Fukushima accident in March 2011. From our results, we estimate the Cesium-137 emission to be between 12 and 19 PBq with a standard deviation between 15 and 65% and the Iodine-131 emission to be between 190 and 380 PBq with a standard deviation between 5 and 10%. Concerning the localization of an unknown source of pollutant, two strategies can be considered. On one hand parametric methods use a limited number of parameters to characterize the source term to be reconstructed. To do so, strong assumptions are made on the nature of the source. The inverse problem is hence to estimate these parameters. On the other hand nonparametric methods attempt to reconstruct a full emission field. Several parametric and nonparametric methods are

  19. WASS: an open-source stereo processing pipeline for sea waves 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Filippo; Benetazzo, Alvise; Torsello, Andrea; Barbariol, Francesco; Carniel, Sandro; Sclavo, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    Stereo 3D reconstruction of ocean waves is gaining more and more popularity in the oceanographic community. In fact, recent advances of both computer vision algorithms and CPU processing power can now allow the study of the spatio-temporal wave fields with unprecedented accuracy, especially at small scales. Even if simple in theory, multiple details are difficult to be mastered for a practitioner so that the implementation of a 3D reconstruction pipeline is in general considered a complex task. For instance, camera calibration, reliable stereo feature matching and mean sea-plane estimation are all factors for which a well designed implementation can make the difference to obtain valuable results. For this reason, we believe that the open availability of a well-tested software package that automates the steps from stereo images to a 3D point cloud would be a valuable addition for future researches in this area. We present WASS, a completely Open-Source stereo processing pipeline for sea waves 3D reconstruction, available at http://www.dais.unive.it/wass/. Our tool completely automates the recovery of dense point clouds from stereo images by providing three main functionalities. First, WASS can automatically recover the extrinsic parameters of the stereo rig (up to scale) so that no delicate calibration has to be performed on the field. Second, WASS implements a fast 3D dense stereo reconstruction procedure so that an accurate 3D point cloud can be computed from each stereo pair. We rely on the well-consolidated OpenCV library both for the image stereo rectification and disparity map recovery. Lastly, a set of 2D and 3D filtering techniques both on the disparity map and the produced point cloud are implemented to remove the vast majority of erroneous points that can naturally arise while analyzing the optically complex nature of the water surface (examples are sun-glares, large white-capped areas, fog and water areosol, etc). Developed to be as fast as possible, WASS

  20. Dealing with noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings: empirical mode methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Khramova, Marina V.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-04-01

    In the paper we propose the new method for removing noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings based on empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). As physiological artifacts we consider specific oscillatory patterns that cause problems during EEG analysis and can be detected with additional signals recorded simultaneously with EEG (ECG, EMG, EOG, etc.) We introduce the algorithm of the proposed method with steps including empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing these empirical modes and reconstructing of initial EEG signal. We show the efficiency of the method on the example of filtration of human EEG signal from eye-moving artifacts.

  1. A highly detailed FEM volume conductor model based on the ICBM152 average head template for EEG source imaging and TCS targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufe, Stefan; Huang, Yu; Parra, Lucas C

    2015-08-01

    In electroencephalographic (EEG) source imaging as well as in transcranial current stimulation (TCS), it is common to model the head using either three-shell boundary element (BEM) or more accurate finite element (FEM) volume conductor models. Since building FEMs is computationally demanding and labor intensive, they are often extensively reused as templates even for subjects with mismatching anatomies. BEMs can in principle be used to efficiently build individual volume conductor models; however, the limiting factor for such individualization are the high acquisition costs of structural magnetic resonance images. Here, we build a highly detailed (0.5mm(3) resolution, 6 tissue type segmentation, 231 electrodes) FEM based on the ICBM152 template, a nonlinear average of 152 adult human heads, which we call ICBM-NY. We show that, through more realistic electrical modeling, our model is similarly accurate as individual BEMs. Moreover, through using an unbiased population average, our model is also more accurate than FEMs built from mismatching individual anatomies. Our model is made available in Matlab format.

  2. An artificial neural network approach to reconstruct the source term of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, J.; Palma, C. R.; Weller, P.

    1997-01-01

    This work makes use of one of the main features of artificial neural networks, which is their ability to 'learn' from sets of known input and output data. Indeed, a trained artificial neural network can be used to make predictions on the input data when the output is known, and this feedback process enables one to reconstruct the source term from field observations. With this aim, an artificial neural networks has been trained, using the projections of a segmented plume atmospheric dispersion model at fixed points, simulating a set of gamma detectors located outside the perimeter of a nuclear facility. The resulting set of artificial neural networks was used to determine the release fraction and rate for each of the noble gases, iodines and particulate fission products that could originate from a nuclear accident. Model projections were made using a large data set consisting of effective release height, release fraction of noble gases, iodines and particulate fission products, atmospheric stability, wind speed and wind direction. The model computed nuclide-specific gamma dose rates. The locations of the detectors were chosen taking into account both building shine and wake effects, and varied in distance between 800 and 1200 m from the reactor.The inputs to the artificial neural networks consisted of the measurements from the detector array, atmospheric stability, wind speed and wind direction; the outputs comprised a set of release fractions and heights. Once trained, the artificial neural networks was used to reconstruct the source term from the detector responses for data sets not used in training. The preliminary results are encouraging and show that the noble gases and particulate fission product release fractions are well determined

  3. Radiation source reconstruction with known geometry and materials using the adjoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hykes, Joshua M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to estimate an unknown isotropic source distribution, in space and energy, using detector measurements when the geometry and material composition are known. The estimated source distribution minimizes the difference between the measured and computed responses of detectors located at a selected number of points within the domain. In typical methods, a forward flux calculation is performed for each source guess in an iterative process. In contrast, we use the adjoint flux to compute the responses. Potential applications of the proposed method include determining the distribution of radio-contaminants following a nuclear event, monitoring the flow of radioactive fluids in pipes to determine hold-up locations, and retroactive reconstruction of radiation fields using workers' detectors' readings. After presenting the method, we describe a numerical test problem to demonstrate the preliminary viability of the method. As expected, using the adjoint flux reduces the number of transport solves to be proportional to the number of detector measurements, in contrast to methods using the forward flux that require a typically larger number proportional to the number of spatial mesh cells. (author)

  4. Reconstructing the nature of the first cosmic sources from the anisotropic 21-cm signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Barkana, Rennan; Cohen, Aviad

    2015-03-13

    The redshifted 21-cm background is expected to be a powerful probe of the early Universe, carrying both cosmological and astrophysical information from a wide range of redshifts. In particular, the power spectrum of fluctuations in the 21-cm brightness temperature is anisotropic due to the line-of-sight velocity gradient, which in principle allows for a simple extraction of this information in the limit of linear fluctuations. However, recent numerical studies suggest that the 21-cm signal is actually rather complex, and its analysis likely depends on detailed model fitting. We present the first realistic simulation of the anisotropic 21-cm power spectrum over a wide period of early cosmic history. We show that on observable scales, the anisotropy is large and thus measurable at most redshifts, and its form tracks the evolution of 21-cm fluctuations as they are produced early on by Lyman-α radiation from stars, then switch to x-ray radiation from early heating sources, and finally to ionizing radiation from stars. In particular, we predict a redshift window during cosmic heating (at z∼15), when the anisotropy is small, during which the shape of the 21-cm power spectrum on large scales is determined directly by the average radial distribution of the flux from x-ray sources. This makes possible a model-independent reconstruction of the x-ray spectrum of the earliest sources of cosmic heating.

  5. Three-dimensional reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources using spherical harmonic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, P. L.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Grim, G.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.

    2017-11-01

    Neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray imaging are important diagnostic tools at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measuring the two-dimensional (2D) size and shape of the neutron producing region, for probing the remaining ablator and measuring the extent of the DT plasmas during the stagnation phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. Due to the difficulty and expense of building these imagers, at most only a few two-dimensional projections images will be available to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) sources. In this paper, we present a technique that has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources from a minimal number of 2D projections using spherical harmonics decomposition. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from experimental neutron and x-ray data collected at OMEGA and NIF.

  6. Analyzing Electroencephalogram Signal Using EEG Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh BHARDWAJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The EEG is composed of electrical potentials arising from several sources. Each source (including separate neural clusters, blink artifact or pulse artifact forms a unique topography onto the scalp – ‘scalp map‘. Scalp map may be 2-D or 3-D.These maps are mixed according to the principle of linear superposition. Independent component analysis (ICA attempts to reverse the superposition by separating the EEG into mutually independent scalp maps, or components. MATLAB toolbox and graphic user interface, EEGLAB is used for processing EEG data of any number of channels. Wavelet toolbox has been used for 2-D signal analysis.

  7. INLINING 3D RECONSTRUCTION, MULTI-SOURCE TEXTURE MAPPING AND SEMANTIC ANALYSIS USING OBLIQUE AERIAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Frommholz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an in-line method for the simplified reconstruction of city buildings from nadir and oblique aerial images that at the same time are being used for multi-source texture mapping with minimal resampling. Further, the resulting unrectified texture atlases are analyzed for fac¸ade elements like windows to be reintegrated into the original 3D models. Tests on real-world data of Heligoland/ Germany comprising more than 800 buildings exposed a median positional deviation of 0.31 m at the fac¸ades compared to the cadastral map, a correctness of 67% for the detected windows and good visual quality when being rendered with GPU-based perspective correction. As part of the process building reconstruction takes the oriented input images and transforms them into dense point clouds by semi-global matching (SGM. The point sets undergo local RANSAC-based regression and topology analysis to detect adjacent planar surfaces and determine their semantics. Based on this information the roof, wall and ground surfaces found get intersected and limited in their extension to form a closed 3D building hull. For texture mapping the hull polygons are projected into each possible input bitmap to find suitable color sources regarding the coverage and resolution. Occlusions are detected by ray-casting a full-scale digital surface model (DSM of the scene and stored in pixel-precise visibility maps. These maps are used to derive overlap statistics and radiometric adjustment coefficients to be applied when the visible image parts for each building polygon are being copied into a compact texture atlas without resampling whenever possible. The atlas bitmap is passed to a commercial object-based image analysis (OBIA tool running a custom rule set to identify windows on the contained fac¸ade patches. Following multi-resolution segmentation and classification based on brightness and contrast differences potential window objects are evaluated against geometric

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Oooo of... - Emission Limits for New or Reconstructed and Existing Affected Sources in the Printing, Coating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reconstructed and Existing Affected Sources in the Printing, Coating and Dyeing of Fabrics and Other Textiles... SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Printing, Coating, and Dyeing...—Emission Limits for New or Reconstructed and Existing Affected Sources in the Printing, Coating and Dyeing...

  9. Involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex in time-based prospective memory task monitoring: An EEG analysis of brain sources using Independent Component and Measure Projection Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Cruz

    Full Text Available Time-based prospective memory (PM, remembering to do something at a particular moment in the future, is considered to depend upon self-initiated strategic monitoring, involving a retrieval mode (sustained maintenance of the intention plus target checking (intermittent time checks. The present experiment was designed to explore what brain regions and brain activity are associated with these components of strategic monitoring in time-based PM tasks.24 participants were asked to reset a clock every four minutes, while performing a foreground ongoing word categorisation task. EEG activity was recorded and data were decomposed into source-resolved activity using Independent Component Analysis. Common brain regions across participants, associated with retrieval mode and target checking, were found using Measure Projection Analysis.Participants decreased their performance on the ongoing task when concurrently performed with the time-based PM task, reflecting an active retrieval mode that relied on withdrawal of limited resources from the ongoing task. Brain activity, with its source in or near the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, showed changes associated with an active retrieval mode including greater negative ERP deflections, decreased theta synchronization, and increased alpha suppression for events locked to the ongoing task while maintaining a time-based intention. Activity in the ACC was also associated with time-checks and found consistently across participants; however, we did not find an association with time perception processing per se.The involvement of the ACC in both aspects of time-based PM monitoring may be related to different functions that have been attributed to it: strategic control of attention during the retrieval mode (distributing attentional resources between the ongoing task and the time-based task and anticipatory/decision making processing associated with clock-checks.

  10. Analysis of EEG Related Saccadic Eye Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funase, Arao; Kuno, Yoshiaki; Okuma, Shigeru; Yagi, Tohru

    Our final goal is to establish the model for saccadic eye movement that connects the saccade and the electroencephalogram(EEG). As the first step toward this goal, we recorded and analyzed the saccade-related EEG. In the study recorded in this paper, we tried detecting a certain EEG that is peculiar to the eye movement. In these experiments, each subject was instructed to point their eyes toward visual targets (LEDs) or the direction of the sound sources (buzzers). In the control cases, the EEG was recorded in the case of no eye movemens. As results, in the visual experiments, we found that the potential of EEG changed sharply on the occipital lobe just before eye movement. Furthermore, in the case of the auditory experiments, similar results were observed. In the case of the visual experiments and auditory experiments without eye movement, we could not observed the EEG changed sharply. Moreover, when the subject moved his/her eyes toward a right-side target, a change in EEG potential was found on the right occipital lobe. On the contrary, when the subject moved his/her eyes toward a left-side target, a sharp change in EEG potential was found on the left occipital lobe.

  11. Ensemble-based data assimilation and optimal sensor placement for scalar source reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mons, Vincent; Wang, Qi; Zaki, Tamer

    2017-11-01

    Reconstructing the characteristics of a scalar source from limited remote measurements in a turbulent flow is a problem of great interest for environmental monitoring, and is challenging due to several aspects. Firstly, the numerical estimation of the scalar dispersion in a turbulent flow requires significant computational resources. Secondly, in actual practice, only a limited number of observations are available, which generally makes the corresponding inverse problem ill-posed. Ensemble-based variational data assimilation techniques are adopted to solve the problem of scalar source localization in a turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180 . This approach combines the components of variational data assimilation and ensemble Kalman filtering, and inherits the robustness from the former and the ease of implementation from the latter. An ensemble-based methodology for optimal sensor placement is also proposed in order to improve the condition of the inverse problem, which enhances the performances of the data assimilation scheme. This work has been partially funded by the Office of Naval Research (Grant N00014-16-1-2542) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant 1461870).

  12. Reconstruction of Chernobyl source parameters using gamma dose rate measurements in town Pripjat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Talerko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available With the help of mathematical modeling of atmospheric transport the calculations of accidental release dispersion from the Chernobyl NPP to town Pripjat during period from 26 till 29 April 1986 have been carried out. Data of gamma rate measurements which was made in 31 points of the town were used. Based on the solution of atmospheric transport inverse problem the reconstruction of Chernobyl source parameters has been made including release intensity and effective source height. The input of main dose-forming radionuclides into the exposure dose during the first 40 hours after the accident (the period of population residence in the town before the evacuation has been estimated. According to the calculations the 131I deposition density averaged over the town territory was about 5.2 × 104 kBq/m2 (on 29.04.86. Minimum and maximum 131I deposition values were 2.8 × 104 kBq/m2 (western part, distance to the unit is 4.5 km and 1.2 × 105 kBq/m2 (north-eastern part of town, 2 km from the unit accordingly. For the moment of the evacuation dated April 27, deposition values were about 90 percent of these values.

  13. Numerical reconstruction of tsunami source using combined seismic, satellite and DART data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivorotko, Olga; Kabanikhin, Sergey; Marinin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    function, the adjoint problem is solved. The conservative finite-difference schemes for solving the direct and adjoint problems in the approximation of shallow water are constructed. Results of numerical experiments of the tsunami source reconstruction are presented and discussed. We show that using a combination of three different types of data allows one to increase the stability and efficiency of tsunami source reconstruction. Non-profit organization WAPMERR (World Agency of Planetary Monitoring and Earthquake Risk Reduction) in collaboration with Informap software development department developed the Integrated Tsunami Research and Information System (ITRIS) to simulate tsunami waves and earthquakes, river course changes, coastal zone floods, and risk estimates for coastal constructions at wave run-ups and earthquakes. The special scientific plug-in components are embedded in a specially developed GIS-type graphic shell for easy data retrieval, visualization and processing. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 12-01-00773 'Theory and Numerical Methods for Solving Combined Inverse Problems of Mathematical Physics') and interdisciplinary project of SB RAS 14 'Inverse Problems and Applications: Theory, Algorithms, Software'.

  14. Meditation and the EEG

    OpenAIRE

    West, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Previous research on meditation and the EEG is described, and findings relating to EEG patterns during meditation are discussed. Comparisons of meditation with other altered states are reviewed and it is concluded that, on the basis of existing EEG evidence, there is some reason for differentiating between meditation and drowsing. Research on alpha-blocking and habituation of the blocking response during meditation is reviewed, and the effects of meditation on EEG patterns outside of meditati...

  15. EEG Oscillations Are Modulated in Different Behavior-Related Networks during Rhythmic Finger Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Martin; Scherer, Reinhold; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2016-11-16

    movement phase-related amplitude modulations. We separate these two EEG source elements motivated by our previous findings in gait. Here, we found two types of large-scale networks, representing the right fingers in distinction from the time sequence of the movements. These findings suggest that EEG source amplitudes reconstructed in a cortical patch are the superposition of these simultaneously present network activities. Separating these frequency-specific networks is relevant for studying function and possible dysfunction of the cortical sensorimotor system in humans as well as to provide more advanced features for brain-computer interfaces. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3611671-11$15.00/0.

  16. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  17. [Cortical functional connectivity during retention of affective pictures in working memory: EEG-source theta coherence analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machinskaya, R I; Rozovskaya, R I; Kurgansky, A V; Pechenkova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A pattern of cortical functional connectivity in the source space was studied in a group of right-handed adult participants (N = 44:17 women, 27 men, aged M = 29.61 ± 6.45 years) who retained in their working memory (WM) traces of realistic pictures of positive, neutral, and negative emotional valence while in their working memory (WM) while performing same different task in which participants had to compare an etalon picture against a target picture that followed after a specified delay. A coherence (COH) between pairs of cortical sources chosen in advance according to fMRI data was estimated in the theta frequency range for the period of time preceding the etalon stimulus, distinct sets of functional links are found. The links of the first type that presumably reflect the involvement of sustained attention were between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the prefrontal areas, and temporal areas of the right hemispheres. When compared to the rest period, links of this type showed strengthening not only during the retention period but also during the period preceding the etalon picture. The links of the second type presumably reflecting a progressive neocortex-to-hippocampus functional integration with increasing memory load and strengthened exclusively during retention period. Those links were between parietal, temporal and prefrontal cortices in the lateral surface of both hemispheres with the additional inclusion of the posterior cingulate cortex and the medial parietal cortex in the left hemisphere. An impact of emotional valence onto the strength and topography of the functional links of the second type was found. In the left hemisphere, an increase in the strength of cortical interaction was more pronounced for pictures of positive valence than for pictures of either neutral or negative valences. When compared to the pictures of neutral valence, the retention of pictorial information of both positive and negative valence showed some extraneous integration

  18. Observation of Point-Light-Walker Locomotion Induces Motor Resonance When Explicitly Represented; An EEG Source Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Inuggi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human motion, to infer the goal of others' actions, is thought to involve the observer's motor repertoire. One prominent class of actions, the human locomotion, has been object of several studies, all focused on manipulating the shape of degraded human figures like point-light walker (PLW stimuli, represented as walking on the spot. Nevertheless, since the main goal of the locomotor function is to displace the whole body from one position to the other, these stimuli might not fully represent a goal-directed action and thus might not be able to induce the same motor resonance mechanism expected when observing a natural locomotion. To explore this hypothesis, we recorded the event-related potentials (ERP of canonical/scrambled and translating/centered PLWs decoding. We individuated a novel ERP component (N2c over central electrodes, around 435 ms after stimulus onset, for translating compared to centered PLW, only when the canonical shape was preserved. Consistently with our hypothesis, sources analysis associated this component to the activation of trunk and lower legs primary sensory-motor and supplementary motor areas. These results confirm the role of own motor repertoire in processing human action and suggest that ERP can detect the associated motor resonance only when the human figure is explicitly involved in performing a meaningful action.

  19. Digital Reconstruction of AN Archaeological Site Based on the Integration of 3d Data and Historical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, G.; Russo, M.; Angheleddu, D.

    2013-02-01

    The methodology proposed in this paper in based on an integrated approach for creating a 3D digital reconstruction of an archaeological site, using extensively the 3D documentation of the site in its current state, followed by an iterative interaction between archaeologists and digital modelers, leading to a progressive refinement of the reconstructive hypotheses. The starting point of the method is the reality-based model, which, together with ancient drawings and documents, is used for generating the first reconstructive step. Such rough approximation of a possible architectural structure can be annotated through archaeological considerations that has to be confronted with geometrical constraints, producing a reduction of the reconstructive hypotheses to a limited set, each one to be archaeologically evaluated. This refinement loop on the reconstructive choices is iterated until the result become convincing by both points of view, integrating in the best way all the available sources. The proposed method has been verified on the ruins of five temples in the My Son site, a wide archaeological area located in central Vietnam. The integration of 3D surveyed data and historical documentation has allowed to support a digital reconstruction of not existing architectures, developing their three-dimensional digital models step by step, from rough shapes to highly sophisticate virtual prototypes.

  20. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melli, Seyed Ali, E-mail: sem649@mail.usask.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wahid, Khan A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Babyn, Paul [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Montgomery, James [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snead, Elisabeth [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); El-Gayed, Ali [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wesolowski, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas–Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  1. Assessment of preconscious sucrose perception using EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotvel, Camilla; Møller, Stine; Nielsen, Rene R

    The objective of the current study is to develop a methodology for food ingredient screening based on Electro-Encephalo-Graphy (EEG). EEG measures electrical activity in the central nervous system, allowing assessment of activity in the ascending gustatory pathway from the taste buds on the tongue...... stimulus. The EEG was recorded using a 64 electrode setup, and gustatory evoked potentials (GEP) were estimated by coherent averaging across all 60 stimulations for each concentration. Cortical source localization based on the GEP was performed using a low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA...

  2. Hemodynamic Response to Interictal Epileptiform Discharges Addressed by Personalized EEG-fNIRS Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Machado, Alexis; von Ellenrieder, Nicolas; Watanabe, Satsuki; Hall, Jeffery A.; Lina, Jean-Marc; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed at studying the hemodynamic response (HR) to Interictal Epileptic Discharges (IEDs) using patient-specific and prolonged simultaneous ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) and functional Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (fNIRS) recordings. Methods: The epileptic generator was localized using Magnetoencephalography source imaging. fNIRS montage was tailored for each patient, using an algorithm to optimize the sensitivity to the epileptic generator. Optodes were glued using collodion to achieve prolonged acquisition with high quality signal. fNIRS data analysis was handled with no a priori constraint on HR time course, averaging fNIRS signals to similar IEDs. Cluster-permutation analysis was performed on 3D reconstructed fNIRS data to identify significant spatio-temporal HR clusters. Standard (GLM with fixed HRF) and cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analyses were performed for comparison purposes. Results: fNIRS detected HR to IEDs for 8/9 patients. It mainly consisted oxy-hemoglobin increases (seven patients), followed by oxy-hemoglobin decreases (six patients). HR was lateralized in six patients and lasted from 8.5 to 30 s. Standard EEG-fMRI analysis detected an HR in 4/9 patients (4/9 without enough IEDs, 1/9 unreliable result). The cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analysis restricted to the region investigated by fNIRS showed additional strong and non-canonical BOLD responses starting earlier than the IEDs and lasting up to 30 s. Conclusions: (i) EEG-fNIRS is suitable to detect the HR to IEDs and can outperform EEG-fMRI because of prolonged recordings and greater chance to detect IEDs; (ii) cluster-permutation analysis unveils additional HR features underestimated when imposing a canonical HR function (iii) the HR is often bilateral and lasts up to 30 s. PMID:27047325

  3. Hemodynamic response to Interictal Epileptiform Discharges addressed by personalized EEG-fNIRS recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni ePellegrino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed at studying the hemodynamic response (HR to Interictal Epileptic Discharges (IEDs using patient-specific and prolonged simultaneous ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG and functional Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (fNIRS recordings. Methods: The epileptic generator was localized using Magnetoencephalography source imaging. fNIRS montage was tailored for each patient, using an algorithm to optimize the sensitivity to the epileptic generator. Optodes were glued using collodion to achieve prolonged acquisition with high quality signal. fNIRS data analysis was handled with no a priori constraint on HR time course, averaging fNIRS signals to similar IEDs. Cluster-permutation analysis was performed on 3D reconstructed fNIRS data to identify significant spatio-temporal HR clusters. Standard (GLM with fixed HRF and cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analyses were performed for comparison purposes. Results: fNIRS detected HR to IEDs for 8/9 patients. It mainly consisted oxy-hemoglobin increases (7 patients, followed by oxy-hemoglobin decreases (6 patients. HR was lateralized in 6 patients and lasted from 8.5 to 30s. Standard EEG-fMRI analysis detected an HR in 4/9 patients (4/9 without enough IEDs, 1/9 unreliable result. The cluster-permutation EEG-fMRI analysis restricted to the region investigated by fNIRS showed additional strong and non-canonical BOLD responses starting earlier than the IEDs and lasting up to 30s. Conclusions: i EEG-fNIRS is suitable to detect the HR to IEDs and can outperform EEG-fMRI because of prolonged recordings and greater chance to detect IEDs; ii cluster-permutation analysis unveils additional HR features underestimated when imposing a canonical HR function iii the HR is often bilateral and lasts up to 30s.

  4. The role of the standard EEG in clinical psychiatry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The EEG is a commonly requested test on patients attending psychiatric services, predominantly to investigate for a possible organic brain syndrome causing behavioural changes. AIMS: To assess referrals for EEG from psychiatric services in comparison with those from other sources. We determine which clinical factors were associated with an abnormal EEG in patients referred from psychiatric sources. METHODS: A retrospective review of EEG requests in a 1-year period was performed. Analysis of referral reasons for psychiatric patients was undertaken, and outcome of patients referred from psychiatric services post-EEG was reviewed. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred and seventy EEGs were reviewed, of which 91 (6.2%) were referred from psychiatry. Neurology service referrals had detection rates of abnormal EEGs of 27%, with psychiatric referrals having the lowest abnormality detection rate of 17.6% (p < 0.1). In psychiatric-referred patients the only significant predictors found of an abnormal EEG were a known history of epilepsy (p < 0.001), being on clozapine (p < 0.05), and a possible convulsive seizure (RR = 6.51). Follow-up data of 53 patients did not reveal a significant clinical impact of EEG results on patient management. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients are referred for EEG from psychiatric sources despite a relatively low index of suspicion of an organic brain disorders, based on reasons for referral documented, with an unsurprising low clinical yield.

  5. Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography based on a detector response function estimated from point source measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohme, Michel S; Qi Jinyi

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of a geometric projection matrix and sinogram blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Direct measurement of a sinogram blurring matrix is difficult in practice because of the requirement of a collimated source. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D blurring kernels from uncollimated point source measurements. Since the resulting sinogram blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and hence provide a more accurate system model. Another advantage of the proposed method over MC simulation is that it can easily be applied to data that have undergone a transformation to reduce the data size (e.g., Fourier rebinning). Point source measurements were acquired with high count statistics in a relatively fine grid inside the microPET II scanner using a high-precision 2D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner and explicitly models the detector block structure. The resulting sinogram blurring matrix is incorporated into a maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method has been validated using a 3 x 3 line phantom, an ultra-micro resolution phantom and a 22 Na point source superimposed on a warm background. The results of the proposed method show improvements in both resolution and contrast ratio when compared with the MAP

  6. Filtration of human EEG recordings from physiological artifacts with empirical mode method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Khramova, Marina V.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper we propose the new method for dealing with noise and physiological artifacts in experimental human EEG recordings. The method is based on analysis of EEG signals with empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). We consider noises and physiological artifacts on EEG as specific oscillatory patterns that cause problems during EEG analysis and can be detected with additional signals recorded simultaneously with EEG (ECG, EMG, EOG, etc.) We introduce the algorithm of the method with following steps: empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing empirical modes with artifacts, reconstruction of the initial EEG signal. We test the method on filtration of experimental human EEG signals from eye-moving artifacts and show high efficiency of the method.

  7. A high-throughput system for high-quality tomographic reconstruction of large datasets at Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Robert C; Bodey, Andrew J; Price, Stephen W T; Basham, Mark; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-06-13

    Tomographic datasets collected at synchrotrons are becoming very large and complex, and, therefore, need to be managed efficiently. Raw images may have high pixel counts, and each pixel can be multidimensional and associated with additional data such as those derived from spectroscopy. In time-resolved studies, hundreds of tomographic datasets can be collected in sequence, yielding terabytes of data. Users of tomographic beamlines are drawn from various scientific disciplines, and many are keen to use tomographic reconstruction software that does not require a deep understanding of reconstruction principles. We have developed Savu, a reconstruction pipeline that enables users to rapidly reconstruct data to consistently create high-quality results. Savu is designed to work in an 'orthogonal' fashion, meaning that data can be converted between projection and sinogram space throughout the processing workflow as required. The Savu pipeline is modular and allows processing strategies to be optimized for users' purposes. In addition to the reconstruction algorithms themselves, it can include modules for identification of experimental problems, artefact correction, general image processing and data quality assessment. Savu is open source, open licensed and 'facility-independent': it can run on standard cluster infrastructure at any institution.

  8. Ear-EEG detects ictal and interictal abnormalities in focal and generalized epilepsy - A comparison with scalp EEG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibrandtsen, I C; Kidmose, P; Christensen, C B; Kjaer, T W

    2017-12-01

    Ear-EEG is recording of electroencephalography from a small device in the ear. This is the first study to compare ictal and interictal abnormalities recorded with ear-EEG and simultaneous scalp-EEG in an epilepsy monitoring unit. We recorded and compared simultaneous ear-EEG and scalp-EEG from 15 patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy. EEGs were compared visually by independent neurophysiologists. Correlation and time-frequency analysis was used to quantify the similarity between ear and scalp electrodes. Spike-averages were used to assess similarity of interictal spikes. There were no differences in sensitivity or specificity for seizure detection. Mean correlation coefficient between ear-EEG and nearest scalp electrode was above 0.6 with a statistically significant decreasing trend with increasing distance away from the ear. Ictal morphology and frequency dynamics can be observed from visual inspection and time-frequency analysis. Spike averages derived from ear-EEG electrodes yield a recognizable spike appearance. Our results suggest that ear-EEG can reliably detect electroencephalographic patterns associated with focal temporal lobe seizures. Interictal spike morphology from sufficiently large temporal spike sources can be sampled using ear-EEG. Ear-EEG is likely to become an important tool in clinical epilepsy monitoring and diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. EEG and Coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshna, Nikesh I

    2016-03-01

    Coma is defined as a state of extreme unresponsiveness, in which a person exhibits no voluntary movement or behavior even to painful stimuli. The utilization of EEG for patients in coma has increased dramatically over the last few years. In fact, many institutions have set protocols for continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring for patients in coma due to potential causes such as subarachnoid hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. Consequently, EEG plays an important role in diagnosis, managenent, and in some cases even prognosis of coma patients.

  10. The FieldTrip-SimBio pipeline for EEG forward solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwerk, Johannes; Oostenveld, Robert; Piastra, Maria Carla; Magyari, Lilla; Wolters, Carsten H

    2018-03-27

    modeling the CSF compartment has been shown in a variety of studies. The presented pipeline facilitates the use of five-compartment head models with the FEM for EEG source analysis. The accuracy with which the EEG forward problem can thereby be solved is increased compared to the commonly used three-compartment head models, and more reliable EEG source reconstruction results can be obtained.

  11. EEG. Renewables Act. Comment. 3. new rev. and enl. ed.; EEG. Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz. Kommentar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenz, Walter [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen (Germany). Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet Berg-, Umwelt- und Europarecht; Mueggenborg, Hans-Juergen (eds.) [Kassel Univ. (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    Like hardly any other law, the Renewable Energy Sources Law (EEG) is a subject to continuing modifications. This makes the application of the already complicated regulations even for experts to a special challenge. With the proven Berliner comment EEG, now a reliable companion through the bureaucratic jungle is available. All regulations of the EEG are commented precisely and easily to understand by profound experts. An extensive selection of terminology enables a rapid orientation within this book. In addition to the excursions to renewable energy technologies, this book also describes the structural aspects in the establishment of a photovoltaic system.

  12. Comparison of 3D reconstruction of mandible for pre-operative planning using commercial and open-source software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Johari Yap; Omar, Marzuki; Pritam, Helmi Mohd Hadi; Husein, Adam; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    3D printing of mandible is important for pre-operative planning, diagnostic purposes, as well as for education and training. Currently, the processing of CT data is routinely performed with commercial software which increases the cost of operation and patient management for a small clinical setting. Usage of open-source software as an alternative to commercial software for 3D reconstruction of the mandible from CT data is scarce. The aim of this study is to compare two methods of 3D reconstruction of the mandible using commercial Materialise Mimics software and open-source Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit (MITK) software. Head CT images with a slice thickness of 1 mm and a matrix of 512x512 pixels each were retrieved from the server located at the Radiology Department of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. The CT data were analysed and the 3D models of mandible were reconstructed using both commercial Materialise Mimics and open-source MITK software. Both virtual 3D models were saved in STL format and exported to 3matic and MeshLab software for morphometric and image analyses. Both models were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Hausdorff Distance. No significant differences were obtained between the 3D models of the mandible produced using Mimics and MITK software. The 3D model of the mandible produced using MITK open-source software is comparable to the commercial MIMICS software. Therefore, open-source software could be used in clinical setting for pre-operative planning to minimise the operational cost.

  13. EEG: Origin and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.; Mulert, C.; Lemieux, L.

    2010-01-01

    The existence of the electrical activity of the brain (i.e. the electroencephalogram or EEG) was discovered more than a century ago by Caton. After the demonstration that the EEG could be recorded from the human scalp by Berger in the 1920s, it made a slow start before it became accepted as a method

  14. The EEG 2017 in the overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altrock, Martin; Vollprecht, Jens

    2016-01-01

    On 08.07.2016, the German Bundestag, the German Renewable Energies Act (EEG) in 2017 passed together with the wind-at-sea law. At the same time, the legislature changed 22 other energy legislation, inter alia, also the EnWG. Here, the law de facto a law amending the EEG 2014 is: The EEG is thus not total re-promulgated. Rather essentially part 3 (''Payment of market premium and feed in rate'') of the EEG 2014 renewed, notably Section 3 supplemented by regulations on the newly introduced procurements. But beyond the framework of support is further developed in various details, like the definition of a plant, the promotion of storage facilities and of course, in the again very ambitious and complicated transitional arrangements. Other notable individual changes concern the introduction of regional evidence of directly marketed electricity from renewable sources, the increase of liability for balancing group deviations in paragraph 60 para. 1 EEG 2017 or readjustments in the special equalization scheme, paragraph 64 para. 2 no. 2 EEG. [de

  15. Technical Note: FreeCT_ICD: An Open Source Implementation of a Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Method using Coordinate Descent Optimization for CT Imaging Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John M; Noo, Frédéric; Young, Stefano; Hsieh, Scott S; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2018-06-01

    To facilitate investigations into the impacts of acquisition and reconstruction parameters on quantitative imaging, radiomics and CAD using CT imaging, we previously released an open source implementation of a conventional weighted filtered backprojection reconstruction called FreeCT_wFBP. Our purpose was to extend that work by providing an open-source implementation of a model-based iterative reconstruction method using coordinate descent optimization, called FreeCT_ICD. Model-based iterative reconstruction offers the potential for substantial radiation dose reduction, but can impose substantial computational processing and storage requirements. FreeCT_ICD is an open source implementation of a model-based iterative reconstruction method that provides a reasonable tradeoff between these requirements. This was accomplished by adapting a previously proposed method that allows the system matrix to be stored with a reasonable memory requirement. The method amounts to describing the attenuation coefficient using rotating slices that follow the helical geometry. In the initially-proposed version, the rotating slices are themselves described using blobs. We have replaced this description by a unique model that relies on tri-linear interpolation together with the principles of Joseph's method. This model offers an improvement in memory requirement while still allowing highly accurate reconstruction for conventional CT geometries. The system matrix is stored column-wise and combined with an iterative coordinate descent (ICD) optimization. The result is FreeCT_ICD, which is a reconstruction program developed on the Linux platform using C++ libraries and the open source GNU GPL v2.0 license. The software is capable of reconstructing raw projection data of helical CT scans. In this work, the software has been described and evaluated by reconstructing datasets exported from a clinical scanner which consisted of an ACR accreditation phantom dataset and a clinical pediatric

  16. 42 CFR 82.13 - What sources of information may be used for dose reconstructions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Dose Reconstruction Process... Atomic Weapons Employers and the former worker medical screening program; (b) NIOSH and other records...) Co-workers of covered employees, or others with information relevant to the covered employee's...

  17. Zoomed MRI Guided by Combined EEG/MEG Source Analysis: A Multimodal Approach for Optimizing Presurgical Epilepsy Work-up and its Application in a Multi-focal Epilepsy Patient Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ü; Rampp, S; Wollbrink, A; Kugel, H; Cho, J -H; Knösche, T R; Grova, C; Wellmer, J; Wolters, C H

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of source analysis based on electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) has gained considerable attention in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. However, in many cases the source analysis alone is not used to tailor surgery unless the findings are confirmed by lesions, such as, e.g., cortical malformations in MRI. For many patients, the histology of tissue resected from MRI negative epilepsy shows small lesions, which indicates the need for more sensitive MR sequences. In this paper, we describe a technique to maximize the synergy between combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis and high resolution MRI. The procedure has three main steps: (1) construction of a detailed and calibrated finite element head model that considers the variation of individual skull conductivities and white matter anisotropy, (2) EMEG source analysis performed on averaged interictal epileptic discharges (IED), (3) high resolution (0.5 mm) zoomed MR imaging, limited to small areas centered at the EMEG source locations. The proposed new diagnosis procedure was then applied in a particularly challenging case of an epilepsy patient: EMEG analysis at the peak of the IED coincided with a right frontal focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), which had been detected at standard 1 mm resolution MRI. Of higher interest, zoomed MR imaging (applying parallel transmission, 'ZOOMit') guided by EMEG at the spike onset revealed a second, fairly subtle, FCD in the left fronto-central region. The evaluation revealed that this second FCD, which had not been detectable with standard 1 mm resolution, was the trigger of the seizures.

  18. Noise-tolerance analysis for detection and reconstruction of absorbing inhomogeneities with diffuse optical tomography using single- and phase-correlated dual-source schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanmani, B; Vasu, R M

    2007-01-01

    An iterative reconstruction procedure is used to invert intensity data from both single- and phase-correlated dual-source illuminations for absorption inhomogeneities. The Jacobian for the dual source is constructed by an algebraic addition of the Jacobians estimated for the two sources separately. By numerical simulations, it is shown that the dual-source scheme performs superior to the single-source system in regard to (i) noise tolerance in data and (ii) ability to reconstruct smaller and lower contrast objects. The quality of reconstructions from single-source data, as indicated by mean-square error at convergence, is markedly poorer compared to their dual-source counterpart, when noise in data was in excess of 2%. With fixed contrast and decreasing inhomogeneity diameter, our simulations showed that, for diameters below 7 mm, the dual-source scheme has a higher percentage contrast recovery compared to the single-source scheme. Similarly, the dual-source scheme reconstructs to a higher percentage contrast recovery from lower contrast inhomogeneity, in comparison to the single-source scheme

  19. The Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Solving the MEG and the Combined MEG/EEG Forward Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carla Piastra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In Electro- (EEG and Magnetoencephalography (MEG, one important requirement of source reconstruction is the forward model. The continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG-FEM has become one of the dominant approaches for solving the forward problem over the last decades. Recently, a discontinuous Galerkin FEM (DG-FEM EEG forward approach has been proposed as an alternative to CG-FEM (Engwer et al., 2017. It was shown that DG-FEM preserves the property of conservation of charge and that it can, in certain situations such as the so-called skull leakages, be superior to the standard CG-FEM approach. In this paper, we developed, implemented, and evaluated two DG-FEM approaches for the MEG forward problem, namely a conservative and a non-conservative one. The subtraction approach was used as source model. The validation and evaluation work was done in statistical investigations in multi-layer homogeneous sphere models, where an analytic solution exists, and in a six-compartment realistically shaped head volume conductor model. In agreement with the theory, the conservative DG-FEM approach was found to be superior to the non-conservative DG-FEM implementation. This approach also showed convergence with increasing resolution of the hexahedral meshes. While in the EEG case, in presence of skull leakages, DG-FEM outperformed CG-FEM, in MEG, DG-FEM achieved similar numerical errors as the CG-FEM approach, i.e., skull leakages do not play a role for the MEG modality. In particular, for the finest mesh resolution of 1 mm sources with a distance of 1.59 mm from the brain-CSF surface, DG-FEM yielded mean topographical errors (relative difference measure, RDM% of 1.5% and mean magnitude errors (MAG% of 0.1% for the magnetic field. However, if the goal is a combined source analysis of EEG and MEG data, then it is highly desirable to employ the same forward model for both EEG and MEG data. Based on these results, we conclude that the newly presented

  20. The Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Solving the MEG and the Combined MEG/EEG Forward Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Maria Carla; Nüßing, Andreas; Vorwerk, Johannes; Bornfleth, Harald; Oostenveld, Robert; Engwer, Christian; Wolters, Carsten H

    2018-01-01

    In Electro- (EEG) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG), one important requirement of source reconstruction is the forward model. The continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG-FEM) has become one of the dominant approaches for solving the forward problem over the last decades. Recently, a discontinuous Galerkin FEM (DG-FEM) EEG forward approach has been proposed as an alternative to CG-FEM (Engwer et al., 2017). It was shown that DG-FEM preserves the property of conservation of charge and that it can, in certain situations such as the so-called skull leakages , be superior to the standard CG-FEM approach. In this paper, we developed, implemented, and evaluated two DG-FEM approaches for the MEG forward problem, namely a conservative and a non-conservative one. The subtraction approach was used as source model. The validation and evaluation work was done in statistical investigations in multi-layer homogeneous sphere models, where an analytic solution exists, and in a six-compartment realistically shaped head volume conductor model. In agreement with the theory, the conservative DG-FEM approach was found to be superior to the non-conservative DG-FEM implementation. This approach also showed convergence with increasing resolution of the hexahedral meshes. While in the EEG case, in presence of skull leakages, DG-FEM outperformed CG-FEM, in MEG, DG-FEM achieved similar numerical errors as the CG-FEM approach, i.e., skull leakages do not play a role for the MEG modality. In particular, for the finest mesh resolution of 1 mm sources with a distance of 1.59 mm from the brain-CSF surface, DG-FEM yielded mean topographical errors (relative difference measure, RDM%) of 1.5% and mean magnitude errors (MAG%) of 0.1% for the magnetic field. However, if the goal is a combined source analysis of EEG and MEG data, then it is highly desirable to employ the same forward model for both EEG and MEG data. Based on these results, we conclude that the newly presented conservative DG

  1. The impact of heart rate on image quality and reconstruction timing of dual-source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yining; Jin Zhengyu; Kong Lingyan; Zhang Zhuhua; Song Lan; Mu Wenbin; Wang Yun; Zhao Wenmin; Zhang Shuyang; Lin Songbai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of patient's heart rate (HR) on coronary CT angiography (CTA) image quality (IQ) and reconstruction timing in dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods Ninety-five patients with suspicion of coronary artery disease were examined with a DSCT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens) using 32 x 0.6 mm collimation. All patients were divided three groups according to the heart rate (HR): group 1, HR ≤ 70 beats per minute (bpm), n=26; group 2, HR >70 bpm to ≤90 bpm, n=37; group 3, HR > 90 bpm, n=32. No beta-blockers were taken before CT scan. 50- 60 ml of nonionic contrast agent were injected with a rate of 5 ml/s. Images were reconstructed from 10% to 100% of the R-R interval using single-segment reconstruction. Two readers independently assessed IQ of all coronary, segments using a 3-point scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (3) for coronary segments and the relationship between IQ and the HR. Results: Overall mean IQ score was 1.31 ± 0.55 for all patients with 1.08 ± 0.27 for group 1, 1.32 ± 0.58 for group 2 and 1.47 ± 0.61 for group 3. The IQ was better in the LAD than the RCA and LCX (P<0.01). Only 1.4% (19/1386) of coronary artery segments were considered non-assessable due to the motion artifacts. Optimal image quality of all coronary segments in 74 patients (77.9%) can be achieved with one reconstruction data set. The best IQ was predominately in diastole (88.5%) in group 1, while the best IQ was in systole (84.4%) in group 3. Conclusions: DSCT can achieve the optimal IQ with a wide range of HR using single-segment reconstruction. With the increasing of HR, the timing of data reconstruction for the best IQ shifts from mid-diastole to systole. (authors)

  2. EEG. Renewables Act. Comment. 4. new rev. and enl. ed.; EEG. Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz. Kommentar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenz, Walter [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet Berg-, Umwelt- und Europarecht; Mueggenborg, Hans-Juergen [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Kassel Univ. (Germany); Cosack, Tilman [Hochschule Trier, Umwelt-Campus Birkenfeld (Germany). IREK - Inst. fuer das Recht der Erneuerbaren Energien, Energieeffizienzrecht und Klimaschutzrecht; Ekardt, Felix (ed.) [Forschungsstelle Nachhaltigkeit und Klimapolitik, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Unlike any other Act, the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) changes continuously. Recently it has been fundamentally transformed with the amendment 2014. Comprehensive, readable and practice-oriented. The proven Berliner comment EEG is your reliable companion through the new regulatory regime. All provisions of the EEG 2014 thorough and easy to understand commented by experts of the matter. 2. The EEG Amending Act of 29.6.2015 has already been considered. A detailed introduction and contributions to the relevant European law and the antitrust aspects of the renewable energy sources to guarantee you a broad understanding of the rules. Valuable background information you provide, the digressions of the most important renewable energy technologies, will explain the pictures thanks to numerous the scientific and technical foundations. Moreover you the construction law aspects in the construction of photovoltaic and wind turbines are explained clearly. [German] Wie kaum ein anderes Gesetz veraendert sich das Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG) laufend. Zuletzt wurde es mit der Novelle 2014 grundlegend umgestaltet. Umfassend, verstaendlich und praxisgerecht Der bewaehrte Berliner Kommentar EEG ist Ihr verlaesslicher Begleiter durch das neue Regelungsregime. Alle Vorschriften des EEG 2014 werden gruendlich und leicht verstaendlich von Kennern der Materie kommentiert. Das 2. EEG-Aenderungsgesetz vom 29.06.2015 ist bereits beruecksichtigt. Eine ausfuehrliche Einleitung sowie Beitraege zum einschlaegigen europaeischen Recht und zu den kartellrechtlichen Aspekten der erneuerbaren Energien verhelfen Ihnen zu einem breiten Verstaendnis der Vorschriften. Wertvolles Hintergrundwissen liefern Ihnen auch die Exkurse zu den wichtigsten Erneuerbare-Energien-Technologien, die Ihnen dank zahlreicher Abbildungen die naturwissenschaftlich-technischen Grundlagen erlaeutern. Zudem werden Ihnen die baurechtlichen Aspekte bei der Errichtung von Photovoltaik- und Windenergieanlagen

  3. Systolic reconstruction in patients with low heart rate using coronary dual-source CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Munemasa; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Shigemoto, Youko; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Miura, Toshiro; Nao, Tomoko; Sano, Yuichi; Narazaki, Akiko; Kido, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between the predictive factors and systolic reconstruction (SR) as an optimal reconstruction window in patients with low heart rate (LHR; less than 65 bpm). Methods: 391 patients (262 male and 129 female, mean age; 67.1 ± 10.1 years of age) underwent coronary CTA without the additional administration of a beta-blocker. Affecting factors for SR were analyzed in age, gender, body weight (BW), diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary arterial disease (CAD), ejection fraction (EF), systolic and diastolic body pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) during coronary CTA. Results: In 29 (7.4%) of the 391 patients, SR was needed, but there was no apparent characteristic difference between the systolic and diastolic reconstruction groups in terms of gender, age, BW, DM, CAD and EF. In a multivariate analysis, the co-existence of DM [P < 0.05; OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.092-0.80], diastolic BP [P < 0.01; OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98] and HRV [P < 0.01; OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99] were found to be the factors for SR. In gender-related analysis, HRV was an important factor regardless of sex, but co-existence of DM affected especially for female and BP for male. Conclusion: Especially in the patients with LHR who had a medication of DM, high HRV or high BP, SR, in addition to DR, was needed to obtain high-quality coronary CTA images.

  4. Systolic reconstruction in patients with low heart rate using coronary dual-source CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Munemasa, E-mail: radokada@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Shigemoto, Youko; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Miura, Toshiro; Nao, Tomoko [Department of Cardiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Sano, Yuichi; Narazaki, Akiko [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Hospital (Japan); Kido, Shoji [Computer-aided Diagnosis and Biomedical Imaging Research Biomedical Engineering, Applied Medical Engineering Science Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Objectives: The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between the predictive factors and systolic reconstruction (SR) as an optimal reconstruction window in patients with low heart rate (LHR; less than 65 bpm). Methods: 391 patients (262 male and 129 female, mean age; 67.1 {+-} 10.1 years of age) underwent coronary CTA without the additional administration of a beta-blocker. Affecting factors for SR were analyzed in age, gender, body weight (BW), diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary arterial disease (CAD), ejection fraction (EF), systolic and diastolic body pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) during coronary CTA. Results: In 29 (7.4%) of the 391 patients, SR was needed, but there was no apparent characteristic difference between the systolic and diastolic reconstruction groups in terms of gender, age, BW, DM, CAD and EF. In a multivariate analysis, the co-existence of DM [P < 0.05; OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.092-0.80], diastolic BP [P < 0.01; OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98] and HRV [P < 0.01; OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99] were found to be the factors for SR. In gender-related analysis, HRV was an important factor regardless of sex, but co-existence of DM affected especially for female and BP for male. Conclusion: Especially in the patients with LHR who had a medication of DM, high HRV or high BP, SR, in addition to DR, was needed to obtain high-quality coronary CTA images.

  5. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Pawel [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgos, Ninon [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Manber, Richard [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Jiao, Jieqing [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Barnes, Anna [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Dementia Research Centre, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  6. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, Pawel; Thielemans, Kris; Burgos, Ninon; Manber, Richard; Jiao, Jieqing; Barnes, Anna; Atkinson, David; Arridge, Simon R; Hutton, Brian F; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  7. EEG Controlled Wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Sim Kok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a brainwave controlled wheelchair. The main objective of this project is to construct a wheelchair which can be directly controlled by the brain without requires any physical feedback as controlling input from the user. The method employed in this project is the Brain-computer Interface (BCI, which enables direct communication between the brain and the electrical wheelchair. The best method for recording the brain’s activity is electroencephalogram (EEG. EEG signal is also known as brainwaves signal. The device that used for capturing the EEG signal is the Emotiv EPOC headset. This headset is able to transmit the EEG signal wirelessly via Bluetooth to the PC (personal computer. By using the PC software, the EEG signals are processed and converted into mental command. According to the mental command (e.g. forward, left... obtained, the output electrical signal is sent out to the electrical wheelchair to perform the desired movement. Thus, in this project, a computer software is developed for translating the EEG signal into mental commands and transmitting out the controlling signal wirelessly to the electrical wheelchair.

  8. Information-Theoretical Analysis of EEG Microstate Sequences in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic von Wegner

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an open-source Python package to compute information-theoretical quantities for electroencephalographic data. Electroencephalography (EEG measures the electrical potential generated by the cerebral cortex and the set of spatial patterns projected by the brain's electrical potential on the scalp surface can be clustered into a set of representative maps called EEG microstates. Microstate time series are obtained by competitively fitting the microstate maps back into the EEG data set, i.e., by substituting the EEG data at a given time with the label of the microstate that has the highest similarity with the actual EEG topography. As microstate sequences consist of non-metric random variables, e.g., the letters A–D, we recently introduced information-theoretical measures to quantify these time series. In wakeful resting state EEG recordings, we found new characteristics of microstate sequences such as periodicities related to EEG frequency bands. The algorithms used are here provided as an open-source package and their use is explained in a tutorial style. The package is self-contained and the programming style is procedural, focusing on code intelligibility and easy portability. Using a sample EEG file, we demonstrate how to perform EEG microstate segmentation using the modified K-means approach, and how to compute and visualize the recently introduced information-theoretical tests and quantities. The time-lagged mutual information function is derived as a discrete symbolic alternative to the autocorrelation function for metric time series and confidence intervals are computed from Markov chain surrogate data. The software package provides an open-source extension to the existing implementations of the microstate transform and is specifically designed to analyze resting state EEG recordings.

  9. Bat calls while preying: A method for reconstructing the signal emitted by a directional sound source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guarato, Francesco; Hallam, John

    2010-01-01

    Understanding and modeling bat biosonar behavior should take into account what the bat actually emitted while exploring the surrounding environment. Recording of the bat calls could be performed by means of a telemetry system small enough to sit on the bat head, though filtering due to bat...... directivity affects recordings and not all bat species are able to carry such a device. Instead, remote microphone recordings of the bat calls could be processed by means of a mathematical method that estimates bat head orientation as a first step before calculating the amplitudes of each call for each...... and discussed. A further improvement of the method is necessary as its performance for call reconstruction strongly depends on correct choice of the sample at which the recorded call is thought to start in each microphone data set....

  10. 3D reconstruction of the source and scale of buried young flood channels on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth A; Campbell, Bruce A; Carter, Lynn M; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Phillips, Roger J

    2013-05-03

    Outflow channels on Mars are interpreted as the product of gigantic floods due to the catastrophic eruption of groundwater that may also have initiated episodes of climate change. Marte Vallis, the largest of the young martian outflow channels (Mars hydrologic activity during a period otherwise considered to be cold and dry. Using data from the Shallow Radar sounder on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we present a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of buried channels on Mars and provide estimates of paleohydrologic parameters. Our work shows that Cerberus Fossae provided the waters that carved Marte Vallis, and it extended an additional 180 kilometers to the east before the emplacement of the younger lava flows. We identified two stages of channel incision and determined that channel depths were more than twice those of previous estimates.

  11. A new open-source pin power reconstruction capability in DRAGON5 and DONJON5 neutronic codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, R., E-mail: richard-pierre.chambon@polymtl.ca; Hébert, A., E-mail: alain.hebert@polymtl.ca

    2015-08-15

    In order to better optimize the fuel energy efficiency in PWRs, the burnup distribution has to be known as accurately as possible, ideally in each pin. However, this level of detail is lost when core calculations are performed with homogenized cross-sections. The pin power reconstruction (PPR) method can be used to get back those levels of details as accurately as possible in a small additional computing time frame compared to classical core calculations. Such a de-homogenization technique for core calculations using arbitrarily homogenized fuel assembly geometries was presented originally by Fliscounakis et al. In our work, the same methodology was implemented in the open-source neutronic codes DRAGON5 and DONJON5. The new type of Selengut homogenization, called macro-calculation water gap, also proposed by Fliscounakis et al. was implemented. Some important details on the methodology were emphasized in order to get precise results. Validation tests were performed on 12 configurations of 3×3 clusters where simulations in transport theory and in diffusion theory followed by pin-power reconstruction were compared. The results shows that the pin power reconstruction and the Selengut macro-calculation water gap methods were correctly implemented. The accuracy of the simulations depends on the SPH method and on the homogenization geometry choices. Results show that the heterogeneous homogenization is highly recommended. SPH techniques were investigated with flux-volume and Selengut normalization, but the former leads to inaccurate results. Even though the new Selengut macro-calculation water gap method gives promising results regarding flux continuity at assembly interfaces, the classical Selengut approach is more reliable in terms of maximum and average errors in the whole range of configurations.

  12. A sparsity-based iterative algorithm for reconstruction of micro-CT images from highly undersampled projection datasets obtained with a synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melli, S. Ali; Wahid, Khan A.; Babyn, Paul; Cooper, David M. L.; Gopi, Varun P.

    2016-12-01

    Synchrotron X-ray Micro Computed Tomography (Micro-CT) is an imaging technique which is increasingly used for non-invasive in vivo preclinical imaging. However, it often requires a large number of projections from many different angles to reconstruct high-quality images leading to significantly high radiation doses and long scan times. To utilize this imaging technique further for in vivo imaging, we need to design reconstruction algorithms that reduce the radiation dose and scan time without reduction of reconstructed image quality. This research is focused on using a combination of gradient-based Douglas-Rachford splitting and discrete wavelet packet shrinkage image denoising methods to design an algorithm for reconstruction of large-scale reduced-view synchrotron Micro-CT images with acceptable quality metrics. These quality metrics are computed by comparing the reconstructed images with a high-dose reference image reconstructed from 1800 equally spaced projections spanning 180°. Visual and quantitative-based performance assessment of a synthetic head phantom and a femoral cortical bone sample imaged in the biomedical imaging and therapy bending magnet beamline at the Canadian Light Source demonstrates that the proposed algorithm is superior to the existing reconstruction algorithms. Using the proposed reconstruction algorithm to reduce the number of projections in synchrotron Micro-CT is an effective way to reduce the overall radiation dose and scan time which improves in vivo imaging protocols.

  13. Localization Accuracy of Distributed Inverse Solutions for Electric and Magnetic Source Imaging of Interictal Epileptic Discharges in Patients with Focal Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heers, Marcel; Chowdhury, Rasheda A; Hedrich, Tanguy; Dubeau, François; Hall, Jeffery A; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Distributed inverse solutions aim to realistically reconstruct the origin of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) from noninvasively recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. Our aim was to compare the performance of different distributed inverse solutions in localizing IEDs: coherent maximum entropy on the mean (cMEM), hierarchical Bayesian implementations of independent identically distributed sources (IID, minimum norm prior) and spatially coherent sources (COH, spatial smoothness prior). Source maxima (i.e., the vertex with the maximum source amplitude) of IEDs in 14 EEG and 19 MEG studies from 15 patients with focal epilepsy were analyzed. We visually compared their concordance with intracranial EEG (iEEG) based on 17 cortical regions of interest and their spatial dispersion around source maxima. Magnetic source imaging (MSI) maxima from cMEM were most often confirmed by iEEG (cMEM: 14/19, COH: 9/19, IID: 8/19 studies). COH electric source imaging (ESI) maxima co-localized best with iEEG (cMEM: 8/14, COH: 11/14, IID: 10/14 studies). In addition, cMEM was less spatially spread than COH and IID for ESI and MSI (p < 0.001 Bonferroni-corrected post hoc t test). Highest positive predictive values for cortical regions with IEDs in iEEG could be obtained with cMEM for MSI and with COH for ESI. Additional realistic EEG/MEG simulations confirmed our findings. Accurate spatially extended sources, as found in cMEM (ESI and MSI) and COH (ESI) are desirable for source imaging of IEDs because this might influence surgical decision. Our simulations suggest that COH and IID overestimate the spatial extent of the generators compared to cMEM.

  14. Analytic reconstruction algorithms for triple-source CT with horizontal data truncation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ming; Yu, Hengyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper explores a triple-source imaging method with horizontal data truncation to enlarge the field of view (FOV) for big objects. Methods: The study is conducted by using theoretical analysis, mathematical deduction, and numerical simulations. The proposed algorithms are implemented in c + + and MATLAB. While the basic platform is constructed in MATLAB, the computationally intensive segments are coded in c + +, which are linked via a MEX interface. Results: A triple-source circular scanning configuration with horizontal data truncation is developed, where three pairs of x-ray sources and detectors are unevenly distributed on the same circle to cover the whole imaging object. For this triple-source configuration, a fan-beam filtered backprojection-type algorithm is derived for truncated full-scan projections without data rebinning. The algorithm is also extended for horizontally truncated half-scan projections and cone-beam projections in a Feldkamp-type framework. Using their method, the FOV is enlarged twofold to threefold to scan bigger objects with high speed and quality. The numerical simulation results confirm the correctness and effectiveness of the developed algorithms. Conclusions: The triple-source scanning configuration with horizontal data truncation cannot only keep most of the advantages of a traditional multisource system but also cover a larger FOV for big imaging objects. In addition, because the filtering is shift-invariant, the proposed algorithms are very fast and easily parallelized on graphic processing units

  15. Hypnagogic imagery and EEG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, M; Katoh, K; Hori, T

    1999-04-01

    The relationships between hypnagogic imagery and EEG activity were studied. 7 subjects (4 women and 3 men) reported the content of hypnagogic imagery every minute and the hypnagogic EEGs were classified into 5 stages according to Hori's modified criteria. The content of the hypnagogic imagery changed as a function of the hypnagogic EEG stages.

  16. Hearing the Sound in the Brain: Influences of Different EEG References

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available If the scalp potential signals, the electroencephalogram (EEG, are due to neural “singers” in the brain, how could we listen to them with less distortion? One crucial point is that the data recording on the scalp should be faithful and accurate, thus the choice of reference electrode is a vital factor determining the faithfulness of the data. In this study, music on the scalp derived from data in the brain using three different reference electrodes were compared, including approximate zero reference—reference electrode standardization technique (REST, average reference (AR, and linked mastoids reference (LM. The classic music pieces in waveform format were used as simulated sources inside a head model, and they were forward calculated to scalp as standard potential recordings, i.e., waveform format music from the brain with true zero reference. Then these scalp music was re-referenced into REST, AR, and LM based data, and compared with the original forward data (true zero reference. For real data, the EEG recorded in an orthodontic pain control experiment were utilized for music generation with the three references, and the scale free index (SFI of these music pieces were compared. The results showed that in the simulation for only one source, different references do not change the music/waveform; for two sources or more, REST provide the most faithful music/waveform to the original ones inside the brain, and the distortions caused by AR and LM were spatial locations of both source and scalp electrode dependent. The brainwave music from the real EEG data showed that REST and AR make the differences of SFI between two states more recognized and found the frontal is the main region that producing the music. In conclusion, REST can reconstruct the true signals approximately, and it can be used to help to listen to the true voice of the neural singers in the brain.

  17. A Numerical Simulation Of The Pulse Sequence Reconstruction in AC Biased TESs With a β Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Lorenza; Vaccarone, Renzo

    2009-01-01

    We study the response of micro-calorimeters based on Ir/Au TESs biased by an AC voltage in the MHz range to the power input generated by beta emission in a Re source thermally connected to the calorimeter itself. The micro-calorimeter is assumed to work at -80 mK, and the energy pulses corresponding to the beta emission have an energy distributed between zero and 2.58 KeV. In this numerical simulation the TES is inserted in a RLC resonating circuit, with a low quality factor. The thermal conductivities between the source and the calorimeter and that from the calorimeter to the heat sink are non-linear. The superconducting to normal transition of the TES is described by a realistic non-linear model. The AC current at the carrier frequency, modulated by the changing resistance of the TES, is demodulated and the output is filtered. The resulting signal is analyzed to deduce the attainable time resolution and the linearity of the response.

  18. Causality within the Epileptic Network: An EEG-fMRI Study Validated by Intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Avanzini, Pietro; Tassi, Laura; Ruggieri, Andrea; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Benuzzi, Francesca; Nichelli, Paolo; Lemieux, Louis; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Accurate localization of the Seizure Onset Zone (SOZ) is crucial in patients with drug-resistance focal epilepsy. EEG with fMRI recording (EEG-fMRI) has been proposed as a complementary non-invasive tool, which can give useful additional information in the pre-surgical work-up. However, fMRI maps related to interictal epileptiform activities (IED) often show multiple regions of signal change, or "networks," rather than highly focal ones. Effective connectivity approaches like Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) applied to fMRI data potentially offers a framework to address which brain regions drives the generation of seizures and IED within an epileptic network. Here, we present a first attempt to validate DCM on EEG-fMRI data in one patient affected by frontal lobe epilepsy. Pre-surgical EEG-fMRI demonstrated two distinct clusters of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal increases linked to IED, one located in the left frontal pole and the other in the ipsilateral dorso-lateral frontal cortex. DCM of the IED-related BOLD signal favored a model corresponding to the left dorso-lateral frontal cortex as driver of changes in the fronto-polar region. The validity of DCM was supported by: (a) the results of two different non-invasive analysis obtained on the same dataset: EEG source imaging (ESI), and "psycho-physiological interaction" analysis; (b) the failure of a first surgical intervention limited to the fronto-polar region; (c) the results of the intracranial EEG monitoring performed after the first surgical intervention confirming a SOZ located over the dorso-lateral frontal cortex. These results add evidence that EEG-fMRI together with advanced methods of BOLD signal analysis is a promising tool that can give relevant information within the epilepsy surgery diagnostic work-up.

  19. Causality within the epileptic network: an EEG-fMRI study validated by intracranial EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elisabetta eVaudano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate localization of the Seizure Onset Zone (SOZ is crucial in patients with drug-resistance focal epilepsy. EEG with fMRI recording (EEG-fMRI has been proposed as a complementary non-invasive tool, which can give useful additional information in the pre-surgical workup. However, fMRI maps related to interictal epileptiform activities (IED often show multiple regions of signal change, or networks, rather than highly focal ones. Effective connectivity approaches like Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM applied to fMRI data potentially offers a framework to address which brain regions drives the generation of seizures and IED within an epileptic network. Here we present a first attempt to validate DCM on EEG-fMRI data in one patient affected by frontal lobe epilepsy. Pre-surgical EEG-fMRI demonstrated two distinct clusters of BOLD signal increases linked to IED, one located in the left frontal pole and the other in the ipsilateral dorso-lateral frontal cortex. DCM of the IED-related BOLD signal favoured a model corresponding to the left dorsolateral frontal cortex as driver of changes in the fronto-polar region. The validity of DCM was supported by: (a the results of two different non-invasive analysis obtained on the same dataset: EEG source imaging (ESI, and psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI; (b the failure of a first surgical intervention limited to the fronto-polar region; (c the results of the intracranial EEG monitoring performed after the first surgical intervention confirming a SOZ located over the dorso-lateral frontal cortex. These results add evidence that EEG-fMRI together with advanced methods of BOLD signal analysis is a promising tool that can give relevant information within the epilepsy surgery diagnostic work-up.

  20. Observation of {gamma}-sources using a new reconstruction technique in the CLUE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoli, B.; Bastieri, D.; Bigongiari, C.; Biral, R.; Ciocci, M.A.; Cresti, M.; Dokoutchaeva, V.; Kartashov, D.; Liello, F.; Malakhov, N.; Mariotti, M.; Marsella, G.; Menzione, A.; Paoletti, R.; Peruzzo, L.; Piccioli, A.; Pegna, R.; Rosso, F.; Saggion, A.; Sartori, G.; Sbarra, C.; Scribano, A.; Smogailov, E.; Stamerra, A.; Turini, N

    2001-04-01

    The CLUE experiment, located in La Palma island at 2200 m a.s.l., is an array of 3x3 telescope, detecting the UV (190 - 230 nm) Cherenkov light produced by atmospheric showers. Since atmospheric absorption in the UV range is higher than in the visible range, CLUE cannot apply existing algorithms normally used in IACT experiments to determine primary cosmic ray direction. In this paper we present a new method developed by CLUE. The algorithm performances were evaluated using simulated showers. Using the new technique, preliminary results of last two years observational campaigns on the Crab Nebula and on Markarian 421 are presented, showing a clear signal on both sources. The CLUE experiment collected also data with the telescopes aiming directly at the Moon: we expect improvements also on the Moon Shadow measurement adopting the new method.

  1. Observation of γ-sources using a new reconstruction technique in the CLUE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartoli, B.; Bastieri, D.; Bigongiari, C.; Biral, R.; Ciocci, M.A.; Cresti, M.; Dokoutchaeva, V.; Kartashov, D.; Liello, F.; Malakhov, N.; Mariotti, M.; Marsella, G.; Menzione, A.; Paoletti, R.; Peruzzo, L.; Piccioli, A.; Pegna, R.; Rosso, F.; Saggion, A.; Sartori, G.; Sbarra, C.; Scribano, A.; Smogailov, E.; Stamerra, A.; Turini, N.

    2001-01-01

    The CLUE experiment, located in La Palma island at 2200 m a.s.l., is an array of 3x3 telescope, detecting the UV (190 - 230 nm) Cherenkov light produced by atmospheric showers. Since atmospheric absorption in the UV range is higher than in the visible range, CLUE cannot apply existing algorithms normally used in IACT experiments to determine primary cosmic ray direction. In this paper we present a new method developed by CLUE. The algorithm performances were evaluated using simulated showers. Using the new technique, preliminary results of last two years observational campaigns on the Crab Nebula and on Markarian 421 are presented, showing a clear signal on both sources. The CLUE experiment collected also data with the telescopes aiming directly at the Moon: we expect improvements also on the Moon Shadow measurement adopting the new method

  2. Development of modified voxel phantoms for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources: implementation in SESAME tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courageot, Estelle; Sayah, Rima; Huet, Christelle

    2010-05-07

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. When the dose distribution is evaluated with a numerical anthropomorphic model, the posture and morphology of the victim have to be reproduced as realistically as possible. Several years ago, IRSN developed a specific software application, called the simulation of external source accident with medical images (SESAME), for the dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents by numerical simulation. This tool combines voxel geometry and the MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code for radiation-material interaction. This note presents a new functionality in this software that enables the modelling of a victim's posture and morphology based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces. The procedure for constructing the modified voxel phantoms is described, along with a numerical validation of this new functionality using a voxel phantom of the RANDO tissue-equivalent physical model.

  3. A comparative study of electrocardiogram multi-segment reconstruction and dual source computed tomography using a computer controlled coronary phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kazuya; Higashide, Ryo; Kunitomo, Hirosi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are two main methods for improving temporal resolution of coronary computed tomography (CT): electrocardiogram-gated multi-segment reconstruction (EMR) and dual source scanning using dual source CT (DSCT). We developed a motion phantom system for image quality assessment of cardiac CT to evaluate these two methods. This phantom system was designed to move an object at arbitrary speeds during a desired phase range in cyclic motion. By using this system, we obtained coronary CT mode images for motion objects like coronary arteries. We investigated the difference in motion artifacts between EMR and the DSCT using a 3-mm-diameter acrylic rod resembling the coronary artery. EMR was evaluated using 16-row multi-slice CT (16MSCT). To evaluate the image quality, we examined the degree of motion artifacts by analyzing the profiles around the rod and the displacement of a peak pixel in the rod image. In the 16MSCT, remarkable increases of artifacts and displacement were caused by the EMR. In contrast, the DSCT presented excellent images with fewer artifacts. The results showed the validity of DSCT to improve true temporal resolution. (author)

  4. Vector tomography for reconstructing electric fields with non-zero divergence in bounded domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouri, Alexandra; Brookes, Mike; Rimpiläinen, Ville

    2017-01-01

    In vector tomography (VT), the aim is to reconstruct an unknown multi-dimensional vector field using line integral data. In the case of a 2-dimensional VT, two types of line integral data are usually required. These data correspond to integration of the parallel and perpendicular projection of the vector field along the integration lines and are called the longitudinal and transverse measurements, respectively. In most cases, however, the transverse measurements cannot be physically acquired. Therefore, the VT methods are typically used to reconstruct divergence-free (or source-free) velocity and flow fields that can be reconstructed solely from the longitudinal measurements. In this paper, we show how vector fields with non-zero divergence in a bounded domain can also be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements without the need of explicitly evaluating the transverse measurements. To the best of our knowledge, VT has not previously been used for this purpose. In particular, we study low-frequency, time-harmonic electric fields generated by dipole sources in convex bounded domains which arise, for example, in electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging. We explain in detail the theoretical background, the derivation of the electric field inverse problem and the numerical approximation of the line integrals. We show that fields with non-zero divergence can be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements with the help of two sparsity constraints that are constructed from the transverse measurements and the vector Laplace operator. As a comparison to EEG source imaging, we note that VT does not require mathematical modeling of the sources. By numerical simulations, we show that the pattern of the electric field can be correctly estimated using VT and the location of the source activity can be determined accurately from the reconstructed magnitudes of the field.

  5. Ear-EEG detects ictal and interictal abnormalities in focal and generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, I. C.; Kidmose, P.; Christensen, C. B.

    2017-01-01

    -EEG and scalp-EEG from 15 patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy. EEGs were compared visually by independent neurophysiologists. Correlation and time-frequency analysis was used to quantify the similarity between ear and scalp electrodes. Spike-averages were used to assess similarity of interictal...... and frequency dynamics can be observed from visual inspection and time-frequency analysis. Spike averages derived from ear-EEG electrodes yield a recognizable spike appearance. Conclusions Our results suggest that ear-EEG can reliably detect electroencephalographic patterns associated with focal temporal lobe...... seizures. Interictal spike morphology from sufficiently large temporal spike sources can be sampled using ear-EEG. Significance Ear-EEG is likely to become an important tool in clinical epilepsy monitoring and diagnosis....

  6. EEG. Renewables Act. Comment. 4. new rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenz, Walter; Cosack, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Unlike any other Act, the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) changes continuously. Recently it has been fundamentally transformed with the amendment 2014. Comprehensive, readable and practice-oriented. The proven Berliner comment EEG is your reliable companion through the new regulatory regime. All provisions of the EEG 2014 thorough and easy to understand commented by experts of the matter. 2. The EEG Amending Act of 29.6.2015 has already been considered. A detailed introduction and contributions to the relevant European law and the antitrust aspects of the renewable energy sources to guarantee you a broad understanding of the rules. Valuable background information you provide, the digressions of the most important renewable energy technologies, will explain the pictures thanks to numerous the scientific and technical foundations. Moreover you the construction law aspects in the construction of photovoltaic and wind turbines are explained clearly. [de

  7. Single-trial EEG-informed fMRI reveals spatial dependency of BOLD signal on early and late IC-ERP amplitudes during face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Descoins, Médéric; Soulier, Elisabeth; Le Troter, Arnaud; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine; Guye, Maxime

    2014-10-15

    Simultaneous EEG-fMRI has opened up new avenues for improving the spatio-temporal resolution of functional brain studies. However, this method usually suffers from poor EEG quality, especially for evoked potentials (ERPs), due to specific artifacts. As such, the use of EEG-informed fMRI analysis in the context of cognitive studies has particularly focused on optimizing narrow ERP time windows of interest, which ignores the rich diverse temporal information of the EEG signal. Here, we propose to use simultaneous EEG-fMRI to investigate the neural cascade occurring during face recognition in 14 healthy volunteers by using the successive ERP peaks recorded during the cognitive part of this process. N170, N400 and P600 peaks, commonly associated with face recognition, were successfully and reproducibly identified for each trial and each subject by using a group independent component analysis (ICA). For the first time we use this group ICA to extract several independent components (IC) corresponding to the sequence of activation and used single-trial peaks as modulation parameters in a general linear model (GLM) of fMRI data. We obtained an occipital-temporal-frontal stream of BOLD signal modulation, in accordance with the three successive IC-ERPs providing an unprecedented spatio-temporal characterization of the whole cognitive process as defined by BOLD signal modulation. By using this approach, the pattern of EEG-informed BOLD modulation provided improved characterization of the network involved than the fMRI-only analysis or the source reconstruction of the three ERPs; the latter techniques showing only two regions in common localized in the occipital lobe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SESAME: a software tool for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources and its application to the accident in Chile in December 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, C; Lemosquet, A; Clairand, I; Rioual, J B; Franck, D; de Carlan, L; Aubineau-Lanièce, I; Bottollier-Depois, J F

    2009-01-01

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. This dose distribution can be assessed by physical dosimetric reconstruction methods. Physical dosimetric reconstruction can be achieved using experimental or numerical techniques. This article presents the laboratory-developed SESAME--Simulation of External Source Accident with MEdical images--tool specific to dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents through numerical simulations which combine voxel geometry and the radiation-material interaction MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code. The experimental validation of the tool using a photon field and its application to a radiological accident in Chile in December 2005 are also described.

  9. [Mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flap. Experience of virtual reconstruction using Osirix®, a free and open source software for medical imagery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, S; Cristofari, J-P; Cox, A; Bensimon, J-L; Guedon, C; Barry, B

    2011-12-01

    The techniques of free tissue transfers are mainly used for mandibular reconstruction by specialized surgical teams. This type of reconstruction is mostly realized in matters of head and neck cancers affecting mandibular bone and requiring a wide surgical resection and interruption of the mandible. To decrease the duration of the operation, surgical procedure involves generally two teams, one devoted to cancer resection and the other one to raise the fibular flap and making the reconstruction. For a better preparation of this surgical procedure, we propose here the use of a medical imaging software enabling mandibular reconstructions in three dimensions using the CT-scan done during the initial disease-staging checkup. The software used is Osirix®, developed since 2004 by a team of radiologists from Geneva and UCLA, working on Apple® computers and downloadable free of charge in its basic version. We report here our experience of this software in 17 patients, with a preoperative modelling in three dimensions of the mandible, of the segment of mandible to be removed. It also forecasts the numbers of fragments of fibula needed and the location of osteotomies. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Typology of historical sources and the reconstruction of long-term historical changes of riverine fish: a case study of the Austrian Danube and northern Russian rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidvogl, Gertrud; Lajus, Dmitry; Pont, Didier; Schmid, Martin; Jungwirth, Mathias; Lajus, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Historical data are widely used in river ecology to define reference conditions or to investigate the evolution of aquatic systems. Most studies rely on printed documents from the 19th century, thus missing pre-industrial states and human impacts. This article discusses historical sources that can be used to reconstruct the development of riverine fish communities from the Late Middle Ages until the mid-20th century. Based on the studies of the Austrian Danube and northern Russian rivers, we propose a classification scheme of printed and archival sources and describe their fish ecological contents. Five types of sources were identified using the origin of sources as the first criterion: (i) early scientific surveys, (ii) fishery sources, (iii) fish trading sources, (iv) fish consumption sources and (v) cultural representations of fish. Except for early scientific surveys, all these sources were produced within economic and administrative contexts. They did not aim to report about historical fish communities, but do contain information about commercial fish and their exploitation. All historical data need further analysis for a fish ecological interpretation. Three case studies from the investigated Austrian and Russian rivers demonstrate the use of different source types and underline the necessity for a combination of different sources and a methodology combining different disciplinary approaches. Using a large variety of historical sources to reconstruct the development of past fish ecological conditions can support future river management by going beyond the usual approach of static historical reference conditions. PMID:25284959

  11. Pylogeny: an open-source Python framework for phylogenetic tree reconstruction and search space heuristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Safatli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Pylogeny is a cross-platform library for the Python programming language that provides an object-oriented application programming interface for phylogenetic heuristic searches. Its primary function is to permit both heuristic search and analysis of the phylogenetic tree search space, as well as to enable the design of novel algorithms to search this space. To this end, the framework supports the structural manipulation of phylogenetic trees, in particular using rearrangement operators such as NNI, SPR, and TBR, the scoring of trees using parsimony and likelihood methods, the construction of a tree search space graph, and the programmatic execution of a few existing heuristic programs. The library supports a range of common phylogenetic file formats and can be used for both nucleotide and protein data. Furthermore, it is also capable of supporting GPU likelihood calculation on nucleotide character data through the BEAGLE library.Availability. Existing development and source code is available for contribution and for download by the public from GitHub (http://github.com/AlexSafatli/Pylogeny. A stable release of this framework is available for download through PyPi (Python Package Index at http://pypi.python.org/pypi/pylogeny.

  12. Spanish historical sources to reconstruct climate in the Americas during the XIXth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Herrera, R.; Rubio, F.; Prieto, M.; Hernández, E.; Gimeno, L.

    2001-12-01

    The Spanish colonization of the Americas expanded since the beginning of the XVIth century until the beginning of the XIXth century, when most of the colonies became independent. During this period, a large amount of documentary information was produced, due to the fact that the Spanish Empire was highly centralized and bureaucracy was one of its core elements. Most of these documents are well preserved either in local archives in the Americas or in the Archivo General de Indias in Sevilla, which keeps thousands of bundles relative to any relevant aspect of the ordinary life of the colonies. Different projects are now searching climatic information in this archive with very encouraging results. During the XIXth century Spain kept two colonies in the Americas: Cuba and Puerto Rico, which became independent in 1898. This has allowed that a lot of information survived in Spanish Archives for this period. After a preliminary inspection of different Spanish Archives: Archivo General de Indias, Archivo del Museo Naval and Archivo Histórico Nacional (General Archive of Indies, Archive of the Naval Museum and National Historic Archive), it has been possible to identify two main areas of climatic interest: 1) information from ship logbooks connecting Spain with Cuba and Puerto Rico and 2) reports about hurricanes. The information contained in the ship logbooks is very rich and could help to better characterize elements of the large-scale circulation in the Atlantic; the reports on hurricanes can be very detailed and were elaborated by very skilled personnel. The presentation will provide different examples of the potential of these sources and describe different Spanish projects involved in the abstraction of this type of data.

  13. On the comparsion of the Spherical Wave Expansion-to-Plane Wave Expansion and the Sources Reconstruction Method for Antenna Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Yuri; Cappellin, Cecilia; Las-Heras, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    A comparison between two recently developed methods for antenna diagnostics is presented. On one hand, the Spherical Wave Expansion-to-Plane Wave Expansion (SWE-PWE), based on the relationship between spherical and planar wave modes. On the other hand, the Sources Reconstruction Method (SRM), based...

  14. Multivariate pattern analysis of MEG and EEG: A comparison of representational structure in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2017-09-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) data can reveal the rapid neural dynamics underlying cognition. However, MEG and EEG have systematic differences in sampling neural activity. This poses the question to which degree such measurement differences consistently bias the results of multivariate analysis applied to MEG and EEG activation patterns. To investigate, we conducted a concurrent MEG/EEG study while participants viewed images of everyday objects. We applied multivariate classification analyses to MEG and EEG data, and compared the resulting time courses to each other, and to fMRI data for an independent evaluation in space. We found that both MEG and EEG revealed the millisecond spatio-temporal dynamics of visual processing with largely equivalent results. Beyond yielding convergent results, we found that MEG and EEG also captured partly unique aspects of visual representations. Those unique components emerged earlier in time for MEG than for EEG. Identifying the sources of those unique components with fMRI, we found the locus for both MEG and EEG in high-level visual cortex, and in addition for MEG in low-level visual cortex. Together, our results show that multivariate analyses of MEG and EEG data offer a convergent and complimentary view on neural processing, and motivate the wider adoption of these methods in both MEG and EEG research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of microEEG: A Miniature, Wireless EEG Device

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Arthur C.; Abdel-Baki, Samah G.; Omurtag, Ahmet; Sinert, Richard; Chari, Geetha; Malhotra, Schweta; Weedon, Jeremy; Fenton, Andre A.; Zehtabchi, Shahriar

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of an EEG device is unconventional and complicated by imperfect interrater reliability. We sought to compare the DA of a miniature, wireless, battery-powered EEG device (“microEEG”) to a reference EEG machine in emergency department (ED) patients with altered mental status (AMS). 225 ED patients with AMS underwent 3 EEGs. EEG1 (Nicolet Monitor, “reference”) and EEG2 (microEEG) were recorded simultaneously with EEG cup electrodes using a signal splitter. ...

  16. EEG in Silent Small Vessel Disease : sLORETA Mapping Reveals Cortical Sources of Vascular Cognitive Impairment No Dementia in the Default Mode Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheorajpanday, Rishi V. A.; Marien, Peter; Weeren, Arie J. T. M.; Nagels, Guy; Saerens, Jos; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    Introduction: Vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (vCIND) is a prevalent and potentially preventable disorder. Clinical presof the small vessel subcortical subtype may be insidious and difficult to diagnose in the initial stage. We investigated electroencephalographic sources of subcortical

  17. An EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...some conditions, an automation feature was implemented to help the participants find the HVT. When the HVT was within the sensor footprint, a tone...EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1 Chelsey

  18. An Experiment of Ocular Artifacts Elimination from EEG Signals using ICA and PCA Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjon Turnip

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world of automation, biological signals, especially Electroencephalogram (EEG is gaining wide attention as a source of biometric information. Eye-blinks and movement of the eyeballs produce electrical signals (contaminate the EEG signals that are collectively known as ocular artifacts. These noise signals are required to be separated from the EEG signals to obtain the accurate results. This paper reports an experiment of ocular artifacts elimination from EEG signal using blind source separation algorithm based on independent component analysis and principal component analysis. EEG signals are recorded on three conditions, which are normal conditions, closed eyes, and blinked eyes. After processing, the dominant frequency of EEG signals in the range of 12-14 Hz either on normal, closed, and blinked eyes conditions is obtained. 

  19. Rett syndrome: EEG presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, R; Langill, L; Wong, P K; Ho, H H

    1988-11-01

    Rett syndrome, a degenerative neurological disorder of girls, has a classical presentation and typical EEG findings. The electroencephalograms (EEGs) of 7 girls whose records have been followed from the onset of symptoms to the age of 5 or more are presented. These findings are tabulated with the Clinical Staging System of Hagberg and Witt-Engerström (1986). The records show a progressive deterioration in background rhythms in waking and sleep. The abnormalities of the background activity may only become evident at 4-5 years of age or during stage 2--the Rapid Destructive Stage. The marked contrast between waking and sleep background may not occur until stage 3--the Pseudostationary Stage. In essence EEG changes appear to lag behind clinical symptomatology by 1-3 years. An unexpected, but frequent, abnormality was central spikes seen in 5 of 7 girls. They appeared to be age related and could be evoked by tactile stimulation in 2 patients. We hypothesize that the prominent 'hand washing' mannerism may be self-stimulating and related to the appearance of central spike discharges.

  20. Evaluation of spatial dependence of point spread function-based PET reconstruction using a traceable point-like 22Na source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisuke Murata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The point spread function (PSF of positron emission tomography (PET depends on the position across the field of view (FOV. Reconstruction based on PSF improves spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy. The present study aimed to quantify the effects of PSF correction as a function of the position of a traceable point-like 22Na source over the FOV on two PET scanners with a different detector design. Methods We used Discovery 600 and Discovery 710 (GE Healthcare PET scanners and traceable point-like 22Na sources (<1 MBq with a spherical absorber design that assures uniform angular distribution of the emitted annihilation photons. The source was moved in three directions at intervals of 1 cm from the center towards the peripheral FOV using a three-dimensional (3D-positioning robot, and data were acquired over a period of 2 min per point. The PET data were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP, the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM, OSEM + PSF, and OSEM + PSF + time-of-flight (TOF. Full width at half maximum (FWHM was determined according to the NEMA method, and total counts in regions of interest (ROI for each reconstruction were quantified. Results The radial FWHM of FBP and OSEM increased towards the peripheral FOV, whereas PSF-based reconstruction recovered the FWHM at all points in the FOV of both scanners. The radial FWHM for PSF was 30–50 % lower than that of OSEM at the center of the FOV. The accuracy of PSF correction was independent of detector design. Quantitative values were stable across the FOV in all reconstruction methods. The effect of TOF on spatial resolution and quantitation accuracy was less noticeable. Conclusions The traceable 22Na point-like source allowed the evaluation of spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy across the FOV using different reconstruction methods and scanners. PSF-based reconstruction reduces dependence of the spatial resolution on the

  1. Comparison of Amplitude-Integrated EEG and Conventional EEG in a Cohort of Premature Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledin, Irina; Abu Tailakh, Muhammad; Gilat, Shlomo; Yogev, Hagai; Golan, Agneta; Novack, Victor; Shany, Eilon

    2017-03-01

    To compare amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) and conventional EEG (EEG) activity in premature neonates. Biweekly aEEG and EEG were simultaneously recorded in a cohort of infants born less than 34 weeks gestation. aEEG recordings were visually assessed for lower and upper border amplitude and bandwidth. EEG recordings were compressed for visual evaluation of continuity and assessed using a signal processing software for interburst intervals (IBI) and frequencies' amplitude. Ten-minute segments of aEEG and EEG indices were compared using regression analysis. A total of 189 recordings from 67 infants were made, from which 1697 aEEG/EEG pairs of 10-minute segments were assessed. Good concordance was found for visual assessment of continuity between the 2 methods. EEG IBI, alpha and theta frequencies' amplitudes were negatively correlated to the aEEG lower border while conceptional age (CA) was positively correlated to aEEG lower border ( P continuity and amplitude.

  2. A Parametric Empirical Bayesian framework for the EEG/MEG inverse problem: generative models for multisubject and multimodal integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Henson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent methodological developments within a Parametric Empirical Bayesian (PEB framework for reconstructing intracranial sources of extracranial electroencephalographic (EEG and magnetoencephalographic (MEG data under linear Gaussian assumptions. The PEB framework offers a natural way to integrate multiple constraints (spatial priors on this inverse problem, such as those derived from different modalities (e.g., from functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI or from multiple replications (e.g., subjects. Using variations of the same basic generative model, we illustrate the application of PEB to three cases: 1 symmetric integration (fusion of MEG and EEG; 2 asymmetric integration of MEG or EEG with fMRI, and 3 group-optimisation of spatial priors across subjects. We evaluate these applications on multimodal data acquired from 18 subjects, focusing on energy induced by face perception within a time-frequency window of 100-220ms, 8-18Hz. We show the benefits of multi-modal, multi-subject integration in terms of the model evidence and the reproducibility (over subjects of cortical responses to faces.

  3. DEEP WIDEBAND SINGLE POINTINGS AND MOSAICS IN RADIO INTERFEROMETRY: HOW ACCURATELY DO WE RECONSTRUCT INTENSITIES AND SPECTRAL INDICES OF FAINT SOURCES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Owen, F. N., E-mail: rurvashi@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM-87801 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Many deep wideband wide-field radio interferometric surveys are being designed to accurately measure intensities, spectral indices, and polarization properties of faint source populations. In this paper, we compare various wideband imaging methods to evaluate the accuracy to which intensities and spectral indices of sources close to the confusion limit can be reconstructed. We simulated a wideband single-pointing (C-array, L-Band (1–2 GHz)) and 46-pointing mosaic (D-array, C-Band (4–8 GHz)) JVLA observation using a realistic brightness distribution ranging from 1 μ Jy to 100 mJy and time-, frequency-, polarization-, and direction-dependent instrumental effects. The main results from these comparisons are (a) errors in the reconstructed intensities and spectral indices are larger for weaker sources even in the absence of simulated noise, (b) errors are systematically lower for joint reconstruction methods (such as Multi-Term Multi-Frequency-Synthesis (MT-MFS)) along with A-Projection for accurate primary beam correction, and (c) use of MT-MFS for image reconstruction eliminates Clean-bias (which is present otherwise). Auxiliary tests include solutions for deficiencies of data partitioning methods (e.g., the use of masks to remove clean bias and hybrid methods to remove sidelobes from sources left un-deconvolved), the effect of sources not at pixel centers, and the consequences of various other numerical approximations within software implementations. This paper also demonstrates the level of detail at which such simulations must be done in order to reflect reality, enable one to systematically identify specific reasons for every trend that is observed, and to estimate scientifically defensible imaging performance metrics and the associated computational complexity of the algorithms/analysis procedures.

  4. EEG-Informed fMRI: A Review of Data Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Rodolfo; Leal, Alberto; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2018-01-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a very promising non-invasive technique for the study of human brain function. Despite continuous improvements, it remains a challenging technique, and a standard methodology for data analysis is yet to be established. Here we review the methodologies that are currently available to address the challenges at each step of the data analysis pipeline. We start by surveying methods for pre-processing both EEG and fMRI data. On the EEG side, we focus on the correction for several MR-induced artifacts, particularly the gradient and pulse artifacts, as well as other sources of EEG artifacts. On the fMRI side, we consider image artifacts induced by the presence of EEG hardware inside the MR scanner, and the contamination of the fMRI signal by physiological noise of non-neuronal origin, including a review of several approaches to model and remove it. We then provide an overview of the approaches specifically employed for the integration of EEG and fMRI when using EEG to predict the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal, the so-called EEG-informed fMRI integration strategy, the most commonly used strategy in EEG-fMRI research. Finally, we systematically review methods used for the extraction of EEG features reflecting neuronal phenomena of interest. PMID:29467634

  5. EEG-Informed fMRI: A Review of Data Analysis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Abreu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a very promising non-invasive technique for the study of human brain function. Despite continuous improvements, it remains a challenging technique, and a standard methodology for data analysis is yet to be established. Here we review the methodologies that are currently available to address the challenges at each step of the data analysis pipeline. We start by surveying methods for pre-processing both EEG and fMRI data. On the EEG side, we focus on the correction for several MR-induced artifacts, particularly the gradient and pulse artifacts, as well as other sources of EEG artifacts. On the fMRI side, we consider image artifacts induced by the presence of EEG hardware inside the MR scanner, and the contamination of the fMRI signal by physiological noise of non-neuronal origin, including a review of several approaches to model and remove it. We then provide an overview of the approaches specifically employed for the integration of EEG and fMRI when using EEG to predict the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI signal, the so-called EEG-informed fMRI integration strategy, the most commonly used strategy in EEG-fMRI research. Finally, we systematically review methods used for the extraction of EEG features reflecting neuronal phenomena of interest.

  6. Source-reconstruction of event-related fields reveals hyperfunction and hypofunction of cortical circuits in antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients during Mooney face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Castellanos, Nazareth P; Stawowsky, Cerisa; Helbling, Saskia; Wibral, Michael; Grützner, Christine; Koethe, Dagmar; Birkner, Katharina; Kranaster, Laura; Enning, Frank; Singer, Wolf; Leweke, F Markus; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2014-04-23

    Schizophrenia is characterized by dysfunctions in neural circuits that can be investigated with electrophysiological methods, such as EEG and MEG. In the present human study, we examined event-related fields (ERFs), in a sample of medication-naive, first-episode schizophrenia (FE-ScZ) patients (n = 14) and healthy control participants (n = 17) during perception of Mooney faces to investigate the integrity of neuromagnetic responses and their experience-dependent modification. ERF responses were analyzed for M100, M170, and M250 components at the sensor and source levels. In addition, we analyzed peak latency and adaptation effects due to stimulus repetition. FE-ScZ patients were characterized by significantly impaired sensory processing, as indicated by a reduced discrimination index (A'). At the sensor level, M100 and M170 responses in FE-ScZ were within the normal range, whereas the M250 response was impaired. However, source localization revealed widespread elevated activity for M100 and M170 in FE-ScZ and delayed peak latencies for the M100 and M250 responses. In addition, M170 source activity in FE-ScZ was not modulated by stimulus repetitions. The present findings suggest that neural circuits in FE-ScZ may be characterized by a disturbed balance between excitation and inhibition that could lead to a failure to gate information flow and abnormal spreading of activity, which is compatible with dysfunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  7. Local and Widely Distributed EEG Activity in Schizophrenia With Prevalence of Negative Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin-Yatsenko, Vera A; Ponomarev, Valery A; Pronina, Marina V; Poliakov, Yury I; Plotnikova, Irina V; Kropotov, Juri D

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated EEG frequency abnormalities in resting state (eyes closed and eyes open) EEG in a group of chronic schizophrenia patients as compared with healthy subjects. The study included 3 methods of analysis of deviation of EEG characteristics: genuine EEG, current source density (CSD), and group independent component (gIC). All 3 methods have shown that the EEG in schizophrenia patients is characterized by enhanced low-frequency (delta and theta) and high-frequency (beta) activity in comparison with the control group. However, the spatial pattern of differences was dependent on the type of method used. Comparative analysis has shown that increased EEG power in schizophrenia patients apparently concerns both widely spatially distributed components and local components of signal. Furthermore, the observed differences in the delta and theta range can be described mainly by the local components, and those in the beta range mostly by spatially widely distributed ones. The possible nature of the widely distributed activity is discussed.

  8. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés Correa, A.; Laciar, E.; Patiño, H. D.; Valentinuzzi, M. E.

    2007-11-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records.

  9. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces Correa, A; Laciar, E; Patino, H D; Valentinuzzi, M E

    2007-01-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records

  10. Corrected Four-Sphere Head Model for EEG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næss, Solveig; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Ness, Torbjørn V; Dale, Anders M; Einevoll, Gaute T; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2017-01-01

    The EEG signal is generated by electrical brain cell activity, often described in terms of current dipoles. By applying EEG forward models we can compute the contribution from such dipoles to the electrical potential recorded by EEG electrodes. Forward models are key both for generating understanding and intuition about the neural origin of EEG signals as well as inverse modeling, i.e., the estimation of the underlying dipole sources from recorded EEG signals. Different models of varying complexity and biological detail are used in the field. One such analytical model is the four-sphere model which assumes a four-layered spherical head where the layers represent brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), skull, and scalp, respectively. While conceptually clear, the mathematical expression for the electric potentials in the four-sphere model is cumbersome, and we observed that the formulas presented in the literature contain errors. Here, we derive and present the correct analytical formulas with a detailed derivation. A useful application of the analytical four-sphere model is that it can serve as ground truth to test the accuracy of numerical schemes such as the Finite Element Method (FEM). We performed FEM simulations of the four-sphere head model and showed that they were consistent with the corrected analytical formulas. For future reference we provide scripts for computing EEG potentials with the four-sphere model, both by means of the correct analytical formulas and numerical FEM simulations.

  11. Corrected Four-Sphere Head Model for EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Næss

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The EEG signal is generated by electrical brain cell activity, often described in terms of current dipoles. By applying EEG forward models we can compute the contribution from such dipoles to the electrical potential recorded by EEG electrodes. Forward models are key both for generating understanding and intuition about the neural origin of EEG signals as well as inverse modeling, i.e., the estimation of the underlying dipole sources from recorded EEG signals. Different models of varying complexity and biological detail are used in the field. One such analytical model is the four-sphere model which assumes a four-layered spherical head where the layers represent brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, skull, and scalp, respectively. While conceptually clear, the mathematical expression for the electric potentials in the four-sphere model is cumbersome, and we observed that the formulas presented in the literature contain errors. Here, we derive and present the correct analytical formulas with a detailed derivation. A useful application of the analytical four-sphere model is that it can serve as ground truth to test the accuracy of numerical schemes such as the Finite Element Method (FEM. We performed FEM simulations of the four-sphere head model and showed that they were consistent with the corrected analytical formulas. For future reference we provide scripts for computing EEG potentials with the four-sphere model, both by means of the correct analytical formulas and numerical FEM simulations.

  12. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces Correa, A [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Laciar, E [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Patino, H D [Instituto de Automatica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Valentinuzzi, M E [Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (INSIBIO), UNT-CONICET, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records.

  13. Bluetooth Communication Interface for EEG Signal Recording in Hyperbaric Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastena, Lucio; Formaggio, Emanuela; Faralli, Fabio; Melucci, Massimo; Rossi, Marco; Gagliardi, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Lucio; Storti, Silvia F

    2015-07-01

    Recording biological signals inside a hyperbaric chamber poses technical challenges (the steel walls enclosing it greatly attenuate or completely block the signals as in a Faraday cage), practical (lengthy cables creating eddy currents), and safety (sparks hazard from power supply to the electronic apparatus inside the chamber) which can be overcome with new wireless technologies. In this technical report we present the design and implementation of a Bluetooth system for electroencephalographic (EEG) recording inside a hyperbaric chamber and describe the feasibility of EEG signal transmission outside the chamber. Differently from older systems, this technology allows the online recording of amplified signals, without interference from eddy currents. In an application of this technology, we measured EEG activity in professional divers under three experimental conditions in a hyperbaric chamber to determine how oxygen, assumed at a constant hyperbaric pressure of 2.8 ATA , affects the bioelectrical activity. The EEG spectral power estimated by fast Fourier transform and the cortical sources of the EEG rhythms estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic analysis were analyzed in three different EEG acquisitions: breathing air at sea level; breathing oxygen at a simulated depth of 18 msw, and breathing air at sea level after decompression.

  14. A three domain covariance framework for EEG/MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roś, Beata P; Bijma, Fetsje; de Gunst, Mathisca C M; de Munck, Jan C

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a covariance framework for the analysis of single subject EEG and MEG data that takes into account observed temporal stationarity on small time scales and trial-to-trial variations. We formulate a model for the covariance matrix, which is a Kronecker product of three components that correspond to space, time and epochs/trials, and consider maximum likelihood estimation of the unknown parameter values. An iterative algorithm that finds approximations of the maximum likelihood estimates is proposed. Our covariance model is applicable in a variety of cases where spontaneous EEG or MEG acts as source of noise and realistic noise covariance estimates are needed, such as in evoked activity studies, or where the properties of spontaneous EEG or MEG are themselves the topic of interest, like in combined EEG-fMRI experiments in which the correlation between EEG and fMRI signals is investigated. We use a simulation study to assess the performance of the estimator and investigate the influence of different assumptions about the covariance factors on the estimated covariance matrix and on its components. We apply our method to real EEG and MEG data sets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of the 3D surgical modelling technique with open-source software for mandibular fibula free flap reconstruction and its surgical guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Hersant, B; Quilichini, J; Leyder, P; Meningaud, J P

    2017-06-01

    Tridimensional (3D) surgical modelling is a necessary step to create 3D-printed surgical tools, and expensive professional software is generally needed. Open-source software are functional, reliable, updated, may be downloaded for free and used to produce 3D models. Few surgical teams have used free solutions for mastering 3D surgical modelling for reconstructive surgery with osseous free flaps. We described an Open-source software 3D surgical modelling protocol to perform a fast and nearly free mandibular reconstruction with microvascular fibula free flap and its surgical guides, with no need for engineering support. Four successive specialised Open-source software were used to perform our 3D modelling: OsiriX ® , Meshlab ® , Netfabb ® and Blender ® . Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data on patient skull and fibula, obtained with a computerised tomography (CT) scan, were needed. The 3D modelling of the reconstructed mandible and its surgical guides were created. This new strategy may improve surgical management in Oral and Craniomaxillofacial surgery. Further clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the feasibility, reproducibility, transfer of know how and benefits of this technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. INTELLIGENT EEG ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Murugesan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain is the wonderful organ of human body. It is the agent of information collection and transformation. The neural activity of the human brain starts between the 17th and 23rd week of prenatal development. It is believed that from this early stage and throughout life electrical signals are generated by the brain function but also the status of the whole body. Understanding of neuronal functions and neurophysiologic properties of the brain function together with the mechanisms underlying the generation of signals and their recording is, however, vital for those who deal with these signals for detection, diagnosis, and treatment of brain disorders and the related diseases. This research paper concentrated only on brain tumor detection. Using minimum electrode location the brain tumor possibility is detected. This paper is separated into two parts: the First part deals with electrode location on the scalp and the second part deals with how the fuzzy logic rule based algorithm is applied for estimation of brain tumor from EEG. Basically 8 locations are identified. After acquiring the pure EEG signal Fuzzy Logic Rule is applied to predict the possibility of brain tumor.

  17. EEG resting state functional connectivity analysis in children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeez eAdebimpe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated changes in functional connectivity of the brain networks in patients with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes compared to healthy controls using high-density EEG data collected under eyes-closed resting state condition. EEG source reconstruction was performed with exact Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (eLORETA. We investigated functional connectivity (FC between 84 Brodmann areas using lagged phase synchronization (LPS in four frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β. We further computed the network degree, clustering coefficient and efficiency. Compared to controls, patients displayed higher θ and α and lower β lagged phase synchronization values. In these frequency bands, patients were also characterized by less well ordered brain networks exhibiting higher global degrees and efficiencies and lower clustering coefficients. In the beta band, patients exhibited reduced functional segregation and integration due to loss of both local and long-distance functional connections. These findings suggest that benign epileptic brain networks might be functionally disrupted due to their altered functional organization especially in the α and β frequency bands.

  18. Dual Adaptive Filtering by Optimal Projection Applied to Filter Muscle Artifacts on EEG and Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Boudet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle artifacts constitute one of the major problems in electroencephalogram (EEG examinations, particularly for the diagnosis of epilepsy, where pathological rhythms occur within the same frequency bands as those of artifacts. This paper proposes to use the method dual adaptive filtering by optimal projection (DAFOP to automatically remove artifacts while preserving true cerebral signals. DAFOP is a two-step method. The first step consists in applying the common spatial pattern (CSP method to two frequency windows to identify the slowest components which will be considered as cerebral sources. The two frequency windows are defined by optimizing convolutional filters. The second step consists in using a regression method to reconstruct the signal independently within various frequency windows. This method was evaluated by two neurologists on a selection of 114 pages with muscle artifacts, from 20 clinical recordings of awake and sleeping adults, subject to pathological signals and epileptic seizures. A blind comparison was then conducted with the canonical correlation analysis (CCA method and conventional low-pass filtering at 30 Hz. The filtering rate was 84.3% for muscle artifacts with a 6.4% reduction of cerebral signals even for the fastest waves. DAFOP was found to be significantly more efficient than CCA and 30 Hz filters. The DAFOP method is fast and automatic and can be easily used in clinical EEG recordings.

  19. Educational simulation of the electroencephalogram (EEG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, de N.A.M.; Meurs, van W.L.; Grit, M.B.M.; Good, M.L.; Gravenstein, D.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a model for simulating a spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) and for simulating the effects of anesthesia on the EEG, to allow anesthesiologists and EEG technicians to learn and practice intraoperative EEG monitoring. For this purpose, we developed a linear model to manipulate the

  20. EEG in connection with coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John A; Nordal, Helge J

    2013-01-08

    Coma is a dynamic condition that may have various causes. Important changes may take place rapidly, often with consequences for treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of EEG patterns in comas with various causes, and indicate how EEG contributes in an assessment of the prognosis for coma patients. The article is based on many years of clinical and research-based experience of EEG used for patients in coma. A self-built reference database was supplemented by searches for relevant articles in PubMed. EEG reveals immediate changes in coma, and can provide early information on cause and prognosis. It is the only diagnostic tool for detecting a non-convulsive epileptic status. Locked-in- syndrome may be overseen without EEG. Repeated EEG scans increase diagnostic certainty and make it possible to monitor the development of coma. EEG reflects brain function continuously and therefore holds a key place in the assessment and treatment of coma.

  1. Solving of L0 norm constrained EEG inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Lei, Xu; Hu, Xiao; Yao, Dezhong

    2009-01-01

    l(0) norm is an effective constraint used to solve EEG inverse problem for a sparse solution. However, due to the discontinuous and un-differentiable properties, it is an open issue to solve the l(0) norm constrained problem, which is usually instead solved by using some alternative functions like l(1) norm to approximate l(0) norm. In this paper, a continuous and differentiable function having the same form as the transfer function of Butterworth low-pass filter is introduced to approximate l(0) norm constraint involved in EEG inverse problem. The new approximation based approach was compared with l(1) norm and LORETA solutions on a realistic head model using simulated sources. The preliminary results show that this alternative approximation to l(0) norm is promising for the estimation of EEG sources with sparse distribution.

  2. EEG-Annotate: Automated identification and labeling of events in continuous signals with applications to EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kyung-Min; Hairston, W David; Robbins, Kay

    2018-01-01

    In controlled laboratory EEG experiments, researchers carefully mark events and analyze subject responses time-locked to these events. Unfortunately, such markers may not be available or may come with poor timing resolution for experiments conducted in less-controlled naturalistic environments. We present an integrated event-identification method for identifying particular responses that occur in unlabeled continuously recorded EEG signals based on information from recordings of other subjects potentially performing related tasks. We introduce the idea of timing slack and timing-tolerant performance measures to deal with jitter inherent in such non-time-locked systems. We have developed an implementation available as an open-source MATLAB toolbox (http://github.com/VisLab/EEG-Annotate) and have made test data available in a separate data note. We applied the method to identify visual presentation events (both target and non-target) in data from an unlabeled subject using labeled data from other subjects with good sensitivity and specificity. The method also identified actual visual presentation events in the data that were not previously marked in the experiment. Although the method uses traditional classifiers for initial stages, the problem of identifying events based on the presence of stereotypical EEG responses is the converse of the traditional stimulus-response paradigm and has not been addressed in its current form. In addition to identifying potential events in unlabeled or incompletely labeled EEG, these methods also allow researchers to investigate whether particular stereotypical neural responses are present in other circumstances. Timing-tolerance has the added benefit of accommodating inter- and intra- subject timing variations. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electroencephalogy (EEG) Feedback in Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision- Making The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful...feedback when training rapid decision-making. More specifically, EEG will allow us to provide online feedback about the neural decision processes...Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision-Making Report Title The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful

  4. Three-dimensional surgical modelling with an open-source software protocol: study of precision and reproducibility in mandibular reconstruction with the fibula free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Quilichini, J; Bandini, C M; Leyder, P; Hersant, B; Meningaud, J P

    2017-08-01

    Very few surgical teams currently use totally independent and free solutions to perform three-dimensional (3D) surgical modelling for osseous free flaps in reconstructive surgery. This study assessed the precision and technical reproducibility of a 3D surgical modelling protocol using free open-source software in mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flaps and surgical guides. Precision was assessed through comparisons of the 3D surgical guide to the sterilized 3D-printed guide, determining accuracy to the millimetre level. Reproducibility was assessed in three surgical cases by volumetric comparison to the millimetre level. For the 3D surgical modelling, a difference of less than 0.1mm was observed. Almost no deformations (free flap modelling was between 0.1mm and 0.4mm, and the average precision of the complete reconstructed mandible was less than 1mm. The open-source software protocol demonstrated high accuracy without complications. However, the precision of the surgical case depends on the surgeon's 3D surgical modelling. Therefore, surgeons need training on the use of this protocol before applying it to surgical cases; this constitutes a limitation. Further studies should address the transfer of expertise. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Source coding for transmission of reconstructed dynamic geometry: a rate-distortion-complexity analysis of different approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Mekuria (Rufael); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractLive 3D reconstruction of a human as a 3D mesh with commodity electronics is becoming a reality. Immersive applications (i.e. cloud gaming, tele-presence) benefit from effective transmission of such content over a bandwidth limited link. In this paper we outline different approaches for

  6. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography: intraindividual comparison of image quality of full-dose standard and half-dose iterative reconstructions with dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Wüst, Wolfgang; Brand, Michael; Stahl, Christian; Allmendinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2011-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the image quality of iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in half-dose (HD) datasets compared with full-dose (FD) and HD filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction in abdominal computed tomography (CT). To acquire data with FD and HD simultaneously, contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was performed with a dual-source CT system, both tubes operating at 120 kV, 100 ref.mAs, and pitch 0.8. Three different image datasets were reconstructed from the raw data: Standard FD images applying FBP which served as reference, HD images applying FBP and HD images applying IRIS. For the HD data sets, only data from 1 tube detector-system was used. Quantitative image quality analysis was performed by measuring image noise in tissue and air. Qualitative image quality was evaluated according to the European Guidelines on Quality criteria for CT. Additional assessment of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and edge sharpness was performed. : Image noise in soft tissue was substantially decreased in HD-IRIS (-3.4 HU, -22%) and increased in HD-FBP (+6.2 HU, +39%) images when compared with the reference (mean noise, 15.9 HU). No significant differences between the FD-FBP and HD-IRIS images were found for the visually sharp anatomic reproduction, overall diagnostic acceptability (P = 0.923), lesion conspicuity (P = 0.592), and edge sharpness (P = 0.589), while HD-FBP was rated inferior. Streak artifacts and beam hardening was significantly more prominent in HD-FBP while HD-IRIS images exhibited a slightly different noise pattern. Direct intrapatient comparison of standard FD body protocols and HD-IRIS reconstruction suggest that the latest iterative reconstruction algorithms allow for approximately 50% dose reduction without deterioration of the high image quality necessary for confident diagnosis.

  7. A preliminary study of muscular artifact cancellation in single-channel EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Liu, Aiping; Peng, Hu; Ward, Rabab K

    2014-10-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are often contaminated with muscular artifacts that strongly obscure the EEG signals and complicates their analysis. For the conventional case, where the EEG recordings are obtained simultaneously over many EEG channels, there exists a considerable range of methods for removing muscular artifacts. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to use EEG information in ambulatory healthcare and related physiological signal monitoring systems. For practical reasons, a single EEG channel system must be used in these situations. Unfortunately, there exist few studies for muscular artifact cancellation in single-channel EEG recordings. To address this issue, in this preliminary study, we propose a simple, yet effective, method to achieve the muscular artifact cancellation for the single-channel EEG case. This method is a combination of the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and the joint blind source separation (JBSS) techniques. We also conduct a study that compares and investigates all possible single-channel solutions and demonstrate the performance of these methods using numerical simulations and real-life applications. The proposed method is shown to significantly outperform all other methods. It can successfully remove muscular artifacts without altering the underlying EEG activity. It is thus a promising tool for use in ambulatory healthcare systems.

  8. Source-space ICA for MEG source imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Jones, Richard D

    2016-02-01

    One of the most widely used approaches in electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography (MEG) source imaging is application of an inverse technique (such as dipole modelling or sLORETA) on the component extracted by independent component analysis (ICA) (sensor-space ICA + inverse technique). The advantage of this approach over an inverse technique alone is that it can identify and localize multiple concurrent sources. Among inverse techniques, the minimum-variance beamformers offer a high spatial resolution. However, in order to have both high spatial resolution of beamformer and be able to take on multiple concurrent sources, sensor-space ICA + beamformer is not an ideal combination. We propose source-space ICA for MEG as a powerful alternative approach which can provide the high spatial resolution of the beamformer and handle multiple concurrent sources. The concept of source-space ICA for MEG is to apply the beamformer first and then singular value decomposition + ICA. In this paper we have compared source-space ICA with sensor-space ICA both in simulation and real MEG. The simulations included two challenging scenarios of correlated/concurrent cluster sources. Source-space ICA provided superior performance in spatial reconstruction of source maps, even though both techniques performed equally from a temporal perspective. Real MEG from two healthy subjects with visual stimuli were also used to compare performance of sensor-space ICA and source-space ICA. We have also proposed a new variant of minimum-variance beamformer called weight-normalized linearly-constrained minimum-variance with orthonormal lead-field. As sensor-space ICA-based source reconstruction is popular in EEG and MEG imaging, and given that source-space ICA has superior spatial performance, it is expected that source-space ICA will supersede its predecessor in many applications.

  9. Embedding Dimension Selection for Adaptive Singular Spectrum Analysis of EEG Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanzhi Xu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The recorded electroencephalography (EEG signal is often contaminated with different kinds of artifacts and noise. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA is a powerful tool for extracting the brain rhythm from a noisy EEG signal. By analyzing the frequency characteristics of the reconstructed component (RC and the change rate in the trace of the Toeplitz matrix, it is demonstrated that the embedding dimension is related to the frequency bandwidth of each reconstructed component, in consistence with the component mixing in the singular value decomposition step. A method for selecting the embedding dimension is thereby proposed and verified by simulated EEG signal based on the Markov Process Amplitude (MPA EEG Model. Real EEG signal is also collected from the experimental subjects under both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. The experimental results show that based on the embedding dimension selection method, the alpha rhythm can be extracted from the real EEG signal by the adaptive SSA, which can be effectively utilized to distinguish between the eyes-open and eyes-closed states.

  10. A Removal of Eye Movement and Blink Artifacts from EEG Data Using Morphological Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balbir Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available EEG signals contain a large amount of ocular artifacts with different time-frequency properties mixing together in EEGs of interest. The artifact removal has been substantially dealt with by existing decomposition methods known as PCA and ICA based on the orthogonality of signal vectors or statistical independence of signal components. We focused on the signal morphology and proposed a systematic decomposition method to identify the type of signal components on the basis of sparsity in the time-frequency domain based on Morphological Component Analysis (MCA, which provides a way of reconstruction that guarantees accuracy in reconstruction by using multiple bases in accordance with the concept of “dictionary.” MCA was applied to decompose the real EEG signal and clarified the best combination of dictionaries for this purpose. In our proposed semirealistic biological signal analysis with iEEGs recorded from the brain intracranially, those signals were successfully decomposed into original types by a linear expansion of waveforms, such as redundant transforms: UDWT, DCT, LDCT, DST, and DIRAC. Our result demonstrated that the most suitable combination for EEG data analysis was UDWT, DST, and DIRAC to represent the baseline envelope, multifrequency wave-forms, and spiking activities individually as representative types of EEG morphologies.

  11. Embedding Dimension Selection for Adaptive Singular Spectrum Analysis of EEG Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanzhi; Hu, Hai; Ji, Linhong; Wang, Peng

    2018-02-26

    The recorded electroencephalography (EEG) signal is often contaminated with different kinds of artifacts and noise. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is a powerful tool for extracting the brain rhythm from a noisy EEG signal. By analyzing the frequency characteristics of the reconstructed component (RC) and the change rate in the trace of the Toeplitz matrix, it is demonstrated that the embedding dimension is related to the frequency bandwidth of each reconstructed component, in consistence with the component mixing in the singular value decomposition step. A method for selecting the embedding dimension is thereby proposed and verified by simulated EEG signal based on the Markov Process Amplitude (MPA) EEG Model. Real EEG signal is also collected from the experimental subjects under both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. The experimental results show that based on the embedding dimension selection method, the alpha rhythm can be extracted from the real EEG signal by the adaptive SSA, which can be effectively utilized to distinguish between the eyes-open and eyes-closed states.

  12. EEG-fMRI Bayesian framework for neural activity estimation: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Pierpaolo; Basti, Alessio; Marzetti, Laura; Zappasodi, Filippo; Del Gratta, Cosimo

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Due to the complementary nature of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and given the possibility of simultaneous acquisition, the joint data analysis can afford a better understanding of the underlying neural activity estimation. In this simulation study we want to show the benefit of the joint EEG-fMRI neural activity estimation in a Bayesian framework. Approach. We built a dynamic Bayesian framework in order to perform joint EEG-fMRI neural activity time course estimation. The neural activity is originated by a given brain area and detected by means of both measurement techniques. We have chosen a resting state neural activity situation to address the worst case in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio. To infer information by EEG and fMRI concurrently we used a tool belonging to the sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods: the particle filter (PF). Main results. First, despite a high computational cost, we showed the feasibility of such an approach. Second, we obtained an improvement in neural activity reconstruction when using both EEG and fMRI measurements. Significance. The proposed simulation shows the improvements in neural activity reconstruction with EEG-fMRI simultaneous data. The application of such an approach to real data allows a better comprehension of the neural dynamics.

  13. A Removal of Eye Movement and Blink Artifacts from EEG Data Using Morphological Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagatsuma, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    EEG signals contain a large amount of ocular artifacts with different time-frequency properties mixing together in EEGs of interest. The artifact removal has been substantially dealt with by existing decomposition methods known as PCA and ICA based on the orthogonality of signal vectors or statistical independence of signal components. We focused on the signal morphology and proposed a systematic decomposition method to identify the type of signal components on the basis of sparsity in the time-frequency domain based on Morphological Component Analysis (MCA), which provides a way of reconstruction that guarantees accuracy in reconstruction by using multiple bases in accordance with the concept of “dictionary.” MCA was applied to decompose the real EEG signal and clarified the best combination of dictionaries for this purpose. In our proposed semirealistic biological signal analysis with iEEGs recorded from the brain intracranially, those signals were successfully decomposed into original types by a linear expansion of waveforms, such as redundant transforms: UDWT, DCT, LDCT, DST, and DIRAC. Our result demonstrated that the most suitable combination for EEG data analysis was UDWT, DST, and DIRAC to represent the baseline envelope, multifrequency wave-forms, and spiking activities individually as representative types of EEG morphologies. PMID:28194221

  14. Analysis of tractable distortion metrics for EEG compression applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazán-Prieto, Carlos; Blanco-Velasco, Manuel; Cruz-Roldán, Fernando; Cárdenas-Barrera, Julián

    2012-01-01

    Coding distortion in lossy electroencephalographic (EEG) signal compression methods is evaluated through tractable objective criteria. The percentage root-mean-square difference, which is a global and relative indicator of the quality held by reconstructed waveforms, is the most widely used criterion. However, this parameter does not ensure compliance with clinical standard guidelines that specify limits to allowable noise in EEG recordings. As a result, expert clinicians may have difficulties interpreting the resulting distortion of the EEG for a given value of this parameter. Conversely, the root-mean-square error is an alternative criterion that quantifies distortion in understandable units. In this paper, we demonstrate that the root-mean-square error is better suited to control and to assess the distortion introduced by compression methods. The experiments conducted in this paper show that the use of the root-mean-square error as target parameter in EEG compression allows both clinicians and scientists to infer whether coding error is clinically acceptable or not at no cost for the compression ratio. (paper)

  15. A Review of Issues Related to Data Acquisition and Analysis in EEG/MEG Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puce, Aina; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2017-05-31

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) are non-invasive electrophysiological methods, which record electric potentials and magnetic fields due to electric currents in synchronously-active neurons. With MEG being more sensitive to neural activity from tangential currents and EEG being able to detect both radial and tangential sources, the two methods are complementary. Over the years, neurophysiological studies have changed considerably: high-density recordings are becoming de rigueur; there is interest in both spontaneous and evoked activity; and sophisticated artifact detection and removal methods are available. Improved head models for source estimation have also increased the precision of the current estimates, particularly for EEG and combined EEG/MEG. Because of their complementarity, more investigators are beginning to perform simultaneous EEG/MEG studies to gain more complete information about neural activity. Given the increase in methodological complexity in EEG/MEG, it is important to gather data that are of high quality and that are as artifact free as possible. Here, we discuss some issues in data acquisition and analysis of EEG and MEG data. Practical considerations for different types of EEG and MEG studies are also discussed.

  16. A Review of Issues Related to Data Acquisition and Analysis in EEG/MEG Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina Puce

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG are non-invasive electrophysiological methods, which record electric potentials and magnetic fields due to electric currents in synchronously-active neurons. With MEG being more sensitive to neural activity from tangential currents and EEG being able to detect both radial and tangential sources, the two methods are complementary. Over the years, neurophysiological studies have changed considerably: high-density recordings are becoming de rigueur; there is interest in both spontaneous and evoked activity; and sophisticated artifact detection and removal methods are available. Improved head models for source estimation have also increased the precision of the current estimates, particularly for EEG and combined EEG/MEG. Because of their complementarity, more investigators are beginning to perform simultaneous EEG/MEG studies to gain more complete information about neural activity. Given the increase in methodological complexity in EEG/MEG, it is important to gather data that are of high quality and that are as artifact free as possible. Here, we discuss some issues in data acquisition and analysis of EEG and MEG data. Practical considerations for different types of EEG and MEG studies are also discussed.

  17. Physiological artifacts in scalp EEG and ear-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Simon L; Looney, David; Mandic, Danilo P; Kidmose, Preben

    2017-08-11

    A problem inherent to recording EEG is the interference arising from noise and artifacts. While in a laboratory environment, artifacts and interference can, to a large extent, be avoided or controlled, in real-life scenarios this is a challenge. Ear-EEG is a concept where EEG is acquired from electrodes in the ear. We present a characterization of physiological artifacts generated in a controlled environment for nine subjects. The influence of the artifacts was quantified in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deterioration of the auditory steady-state response. Alpha band modulation was also studied in an open/closed eyes paradigm. Artifacts related to jaw muscle contractions were present all over the scalp and in the ear, with the highest SNR deteriorations in the gamma band. The SNR deterioration for jaw artifacts were in general higher in the ear compared to the scalp. Whereas eye-blinking did not influence the SNR in the ear, it was significant for all groups of scalps electrodes in the delta and theta bands. Eye movements resulted in statistical significant SNR deterioration in both frontal, temporal and ear electrodes. Recordings of alpha band modulation showed increased power and coherence of the EEG for ear and scalp electrodes in the closed-eyes periods. Ear-EEG is a method developed for unobtrusive and discreet recording over long periods of time and in real-life environments. This study investigated the influence of the most important types of physiological artifacts, and demonstrated that spontaneous activity, in terms of alpha band oscillations, could be recorded from the ear-EEG platform. In its present form ear-EEG was more prone to jaw related artifacts and less prone to eye-blinking artifacts compared to state-of-the-art scalp based systems.

  18. The effect of epoch length on estimated EEG functional connectivity and brain network organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Crobe, Alessandra; Marrosu, Francesco; Stam, Cornelis J.; Hillebrand, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Graph theory and network science tools have revealed fundamental mechanisms of functional brain organization in resting-state M/EEG analysis. Nevertheless, it is still not clearly understood how several methodological aspects may bias the topology of the reconstructed functional networks. In this context, the literature shows inconsistency in the chosen length of the selected epochs, impeding a meaningful comparison between results from different studies. Approach. The aim of this study was to provide a network approach insensitive to the effects that epoch length has on functional connectivity and network reconstruction. Two different measures, the phase lag index (PLI) and the amplitude envelope correlation (AEC) were applied to EEG resting-state recordings for a group of 18 healthy volunteers using non-overlapping epochs with variable length (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 s). Weighted clustering coefficient (CCw), weighted characteristic path length (L w) and minimum spanning tree (MST) parameters were computed to evaluate the network topology. The analysis was performed on both scalp and source-space data. Main results. Results from scalp analysis show a decrease in both mean PLI and AEC values with an increase in epoch length, with a tendency to stabilize at a length of 12 s for PLI and 6 s for AEC. Moreover, CCw and L w show very similar behaviour, with metrics based on AEC more reliable in terms of stability. In general, MST parameters stabilize at short epoch lengths, particularly for MSTs based on PLI (1-6 s versus 4-8 s for AEC). At the source-level the results were even more reliable, with stability already at 1 s duration for PLI-based MSTs. Significance. The present work suggests that both PLI and AEC depend on epoch length and that this has an impact on the reconstructed network topology, particularly at the scalp-level. Source-level MST topology is less sensitive to differences in epoch length, therefore enabling the comparison of brain

  19. Source-plane reconstruction of the giant gravitational arc in A2667: A candidate Wolf-Rayet galaxy at z ∼ 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Shuo; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy))" >Covone, Giovanni; Jullo, Eric; Richard, Johan; Izzo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analysis of Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Very Large Telescope imaging and spectroscopic data of a bright lensed galaxy at z = 1.0334 in the lensing cluster A2667. Using this high-resolution imaging, we present an updated lens model that allows us to fully understand the lensing geometry and reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc gives a unique opportunity to view the structure of a high-redshift disk galaxy. We find that the lensed galaxy of A2667 is a typical spiral galaxy with a morphology similar to the structure of its counterparts at higher redshift, z ∼ 2. The surface brightness of the reconstructed source galaxy in the z 850 band reveals the central surface brightness I(0) = 20.28 ± 0.22 mag arcsec –2 and a characteristic radius r s = 2.01 ± 0.16 kpc at redshift z ∼ 1. The morphological reconstruction in different bands shows obvious negative radial color gradients for this galaxy. Moreover, the redder central bulge tends to contain a metal-rich stellar population, rather than being heavily reddened by dust due to high and patchy obscuration. We analyze the VIMOS/integral field unit spectroscopic data and find that, in the given wavelength range (∼1800-3200 Å), the combined arc spectrum of the source galaxy is characterized by a strong continuum emission with strong UV absorption lines (Fe II and Mg II) and shows the features of a typical starburst Wolf-Rayet galaxy, NGC 5253. More specifically, we have measured the equivalent widths of Fe II and Mg II lines in the A2667 spectrum, and obtained similar values for the same wavelength interval of the NGC 5253 spectrum. Marginal evidence for [C III] 1909 emission at the edge of the grism range further confirms our expectation.

  20. Vector tomography for reconstructing electric fields with non-zero divergence in bounded domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koulouri, Alexandra, E-mail: koulouri@uni-muenster.de [Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of Münster, Einsteinstrasse 62, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom); Brookes, Mike [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom); Rimpiläinen, Ville [Institute for Biomagnetism and Biosignalanalysis, University of Münster, Malmedyweg 15, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Department of Mathematics, University of Auckland, Private bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    In vector tomography (VT), the aim is to reconstruct an unknown multi-dimensional vector field using line integral data. In the case of a 2-dimensional VT, two types of line integral data are usually required. These data correspond to integration of the parallel and perpendicular projection of the vector field along the integration lines and are called the longitudinal and transverse measurements, respectively. In most cases, however, the transverse measurements cannot be physically acquired. Therefore, the VT methods are typically used to reconstruct divergence-free (or source-free) velocity and flow fields that can be reconstructed solely from the longitudinal measurements. In this paper, we show how vector fields with non-zero divergence in a bounded domain can also be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements without the need of explicitly evaluating the transverse measurements. To the best of our knowledge, VT has not previously been used for this purpose. In particular, we study low-frequency, time-harmonic electric fields generated by dipole sources in convex bounded domains which arise, for example, in electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging. We explain in detail the theoretical background, the derivation of the electric field inverse problem and the numerical approximation of the line integrals. We show that fields with non-zero divergence can be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements with the help of two sparsity constraints that are constructed from the transverse measurements and the vector Laplace operator. As a comparison to EEG source imaging, we note that VT does not require mathematical modeling of the sources. By numerical simulations, we show that the pattern of the electric field can be correctly estimated using VT and the location of the source activity can be determined accurately from the reconstructed magnitudes of the field. - Highlights: • Vector tomography is used to reconstruct electric fields generated by dipole

  1. Experimental results and first {sup 22}Na source image reconstruction by two prototype modules in coincidence of a liquid xenon positron emission tomograph for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallin-Martel, M.-L., E-mail: mlgallin@lpsc.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 avenue des Martyrs 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Grondin, Y. [Laboratoire TIMC/IMAG, CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, Pavillon Taillefer 38706 La Tronche Cedex (France); Gac, N. [Laboratoire L2S, UMR 8506 CNRS - SUPELEC - Univ Paris-Sud, Gif sur Yvette F-91192 (France); Carcagno, Y.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Grondin, D.; Marton, M.; Muraz, J.-F; Rossetto, O.; Vezzu, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 avenue des Martyrs 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2012-08-01

    A detector with a very specific design using liquid Xenon (LXe) in the scintillation mode is studied for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of small animals. Two prototype modules equipped with Position Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tubes (PSPMTs) operating in the VUV range (178 nm) and at 165 K were built and studied in coincidence. This paper reports on energy, time and spatial resolution capabilities of this experimental test bench. Furthermore, these experimental results were used to perform the first image reconstruction of a {sup 22}Na source placed in the experimental setup.

  2. Experimental results and first 22Na source image reconstruction by two prototype modules in coincidence of a liquid xenon positron emission tomograph for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallin-Martel, M.-L.; Grondin, Y.; Gac, N.; Carcagno, Y.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Grondin, D.; Marton, M.; Muraz, J.-F; Rossetto, O.; Vezzu, F.

    2012-01-01

    A detector with a very specific design using liquid Xenon (LXe) in the scintillation mode is studied for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of small animals. Two prototype modules equipped with Position Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tubes (PSPMTs) operating in the VUV range (178 nm) and at 165 K were built and studied in coincidence. This paper reports on energy, time and spatial resolution capabilities of this experimental test bench. Furthermore, these experimental results were used to perform the first image reconstruction of a 22 Na source placed in the experimental setup.

  3. EEG frequency PCA in EEG-ERP dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robert J; De Blasio, Frances M

    2018-05-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) has long been used to decompose the ERP into components, and these mathematical entities are increasingly accepted as meaningful and useful representatives of the electrophysiological components constituting the ERP. A similar expansion appears to be beginning in regard to decomposition of the EEG amplitude spectrum into frequency components via frequency PCA. However, to date, there has been no exploration of the brain's dynamic EEG-ERP linkages using PCA decomposition to assess components in each measure. Here, we recorded intrinsic EEG in both eyes-closed and eyes-open resting conditions, followed by an equiprobable go/no-go task. Frequency PCA of the EEG, including the nontask resting and within-task prestimulus periods, found seven frequency components within the delta to beta range. These differentially predicted PCA-derived go and no-go N1 and P3 ERP components. This demonstration suggests that it may be beneficial in future brain dynamics studies to implement PCA for the derivation of data-driven components from both the ERP and EEG. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Automated Classification and Removal of EEG Artifacts With SVM and Wavelet-ICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Chong Yeh; Mokhtar, Norrima; Arof, Hamzah; Cumming, Paul; Iwahashi, Masahiro

    2018-05-01

    Brain electrical activity recordings by electroencephalography (EEG) are often contaminated with signal artifacts. Procedures for automated removal of EEG artifacts are frequently sought for clinical diagnostics and brain-computer interface applications. In recent years, a combination of independent component analysis (ICA) and discrete wavelet transform has been introduced as standard technique for EEG artifact removal. However, in performing the wavelet-ICA procedure, visual inspection or arbitrary thresholding may be required for identifying artifactual components in the EEG signal. We now propose a novel approach for identifying artifactual components separated by wavelet-ICA using a pretrained support vector machine (SVM). Our method presents a robust and extendable system that enables fully automated identification and removal of artifacts from EEG signals, without applying any arbitrary thresholding. Using test data contaminated by eye blink artifacts, we show that our method performed better in identifying artifactual components than did existing thresholding methods. Furthermore, wavelet-ICA in conjunction with SVM successfully removed target artifacts, while largely retaining the EEG source signals of interest. We propose a set of features including kurtosis, variance, Shannon's entropy, and range of amplitude as training and test data of SVM to identify eye blink artifacts in EEG signals. This combinatorial method is also extendable to accommodate multiple types of artifacts present in multichannel EEG. We envision future research to explore other descriptive features corresponding to other types of artifactual components.

  5. Engagement Assessment Using EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Li, Jiang; McKenzie, Frederic; Zhang, Guangfan; Wang, Wei; Pepe, Aaron; Xu, Roger; Schnell, Thomas; Anderson, Nick; Heitkamp, Dean

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present methods to analyze and improve an EEG-based engagement assessment approach, consisting of data preprocessing, feature extraction and engagement state classification. During data preprocessing, spikes, baseline drift and saturation caused by recording devices in EEG signals are identified and eliminated, and a wavelet based method is utilized to remove ocular and muscular artifacts in the EEG recordings. In feature extraction, power spectrum densities with 1 Hz bin are calculated as features, and these features are analyzed using the Fisher score and the one way ANOVA method. In the classification step, a committee classifier is trained based on the extracted features to assess engagement status. Finally, experiment results showed that there exist significant differences in the extracted features among different subjects, and we have implemented a feature normalization procedure to mitigate the differences and significantly improved the engagement assessment performance.

  6. Objective Audiometry using Ear-EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Kidmose, Preben

    Recently, a novel electroencephalographic (EEG) method called ear-EEG [1], that enable recording of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) from a personalized earpiece was introduced. Initial investigations show that well established AEPs, such as ASSR and P1-N1-P2 complex can be observed from ear-EEG...

  7. Hypnagogic EEG stages and polysomnogram

    OpenAIRE

    HAYASHI, Mitsuo; HIBINO, Kenji; HORI, Tadao

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to show the polysomnogram of hypnagogic period. Sixteen subjects slept for two nights. Their EEGs (Fz, Cz, Pz, Oz), horizontal and vertical EOGs, submentalis EMG, thoracic and abdominal respiration were recorded. They pressed a button when pip tones (1000Hz, 50dB, max duration : 5s, ISI : 30-90s) were presented, and reported their psychological experiences, According to Hori et al. (1994), the hypnagogic EEGs just 5s before the pip tones were classified into 9 stages,...

  8. The standardized EEG electrode array of the IFCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeck, Margitta; Koessler, Laurent; Bast, Thomas; Leijten, Frans; Michel, Christoph; Baumgartner, Christoph; He, Bin; Beniczky, Sándor

    2017-10-01

    Standardized EEG electrode positions are essential for both clinical applications and research. The aim of this guideline is to update and expand the unifying nomenclature and standardized positioning for EEG scalp electrodes. Electrode positions were based on 20% and 10% of standardized measurements from anatomical landmarks on the skull. However, standard recordings do not cover the anterior and basal temporal lobes, which is the most frequent source of epileptogenic activity. Here, we propose a basic array of 25 electrodes including the inferior temporal chain, which should be used for all standard clinical recordings. The nomenclature in the basic array is consistent with the 10-10-system. High-density scalp EEG arrays (64-256 electrodes) allow source imaging with even sub-lobar precision. This supplementary exam should be requested whenever necessary, e.g. search for epileptogenic activity in negative standard EEG or for presurgical evaluation. In the near future, nomenclature for high density electrodes arrays beyond the 10-10 system needs to be defined, to allow comparison and standardized recordings across centers. Contrary to the established belief that smaller heads needs less electrodes, in young children at least as many electrodes as in adults should be applied due to smaller skull thickness and the risk of spatial aliasing. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. New legal regulations on combined heat and power generation and renewable energy sources. KWKModG 2009, EEWaermeG, EEG 2009, deadlines for communications, publications and audit certificates according to EEG 2009 and KWKModG 2009; Neuer Gesetzesrahmen fuer die Kraft-Waerme-Kopplung und Erneuerbare Energien. Neues Kraft-Waerme-Kopplungsgesetz (KWKModG 2009), Erneuerbare-Energien-Waermegesetz (EEWaermeG), Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG 2009), Fristen fuer Mitteilungen, Veroeffentlichungen und Wirtschaftspruefertestate nach EEG 2009 und KWKModG 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altrock, Martin; Jacobshagen, Ulf; Lehnert, Wieland [BBH Becker Buettner Held, Berlin (Germany); Miller, John A.; Mueller, Ullrich; Topp, Adolf [AGFW - Der Energieeffizienzverband fuer Waerme, Kaelte und KWK e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The new German Act on Combined Heat and Power Generation (KWKModG 2009) is a milestone for the industry. Together with the Heat-from-Renewables Act (EEWaermeG) and the amended Renewables Act (EEG), it will determine the plannings and actions of organizations in this field through 2020 and beyond. This brochure summarizes the three main laws that govern combined heat and power generation and district heating in Germany. The complex legal text is explained in simple terms and supplemented by a multitude of practical hints. There is also an appendix with law texts, exemplary calculations, tables and explanations in digital form. (orig.)

  10. Increased theta band EEG power in sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Case M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Case,1 Sina Shirinpour,1 Huishi Zhang,1 Yvonne H Datta,2 Stephen C Nelson,3 Karim T Sadak,4 Kalpna Gupta,2 Bin He1,5 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, 3Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 4Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, 5Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Objective: Pain is a major issue in the care of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The mechanisms behind pain and the best way to treat it are not well understood. We studied how electroencephalography (EEG is altered in SCD patients. Methods: We recruited 20 SCD patients and compared their resting state EEG to that of 14 healthy controls. EEG power was found across frequency bands using Welch’s method. Electrophysiological source imaging was assessed for each frequency band using the eLORETA algorithm. Results: SCD patients had increased theta power and decreased beta2 power compared to controls. Source localization revealed that areas of greater theta band activity were in areas related to pain processing. Imaging parameters were significantly correlated to emergency department visits, which indicate disease severity and chronic pain intensity. Conclusion: The present results support the pain mechanism referred to as thalamocortical dysrhythmia. This mechanism causes increased theta power in patients. Significance: Our findings show that EEG can be used to quantitatively evaluate differences between controls and SCD patients. Our results show the potential of EEG to differentiate between different levels of pain in an unbiased setting, where specific frequency bands could be used as biomarkers for chronic pain. Keywords: sickle cell disease, electroencephalography, chronic pain, electrophysiological source imaging, thalamocortical dysrhythmia

  11. Radiation Dose Reduction of Chest CT with Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space - Part I: Studies on Image Quality Using Dual Source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hye Jeon; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Jin Seong; Song, Jae Woo; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lim, Chae Hun; Kim, Song Soo

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the image quality (IQ) is improved with iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS), and whether IRIS can be used for radiation reduction in chest CT. Standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in 50 patients and low dose chest CT (LDCT) in another 50 patients were performed, using a dual-source CT, with 120 kVp and same reference mAs (50 mAs for SDCT and 25 mAs for LDCT) employed to both tubes by modifying a dual-energy scan mode. Full-dose data were obtained by combining the data from both tubes and half-dose data were separated from a single tube. These were reconstructed by using a filtered back projection (FBP) and IRIS: full-dose FBP (F-FBP); full-dose IRIS (F-IRIS); half-dose FBP (H-FBP) and half-dose IRIS (H-IRIS). Objective noise was measured. The subjective IQ was evaluated by radiologists for the followings: noise, contrast and sharpness of mediastinum and lung. Objective noise was significantly lower in H-IRIS than in F-FBP (p < 0.01). In both SDCT and LDCT, the IQ scores were highest in F-IRIS, followed by F-FBP, H-IRIS and H-FBP, except those for sharpness of mediastinum, which tended to be higher in FBP. When comparing CT images between the same dose and different reconstruction (F-IRIS/F-FBP and H-IRIS/H-FBP) algorithms, scores tended to be higher in IRIS than in FBP, being more distinct in half-dose images. However, despite the use of IRIS, the scores were lower in H-IRIS than in F-FBP. IRIS generally helps improve the IQ, being more distinct at the reduced radiation. However, reduced radiation by half results in IQ decrease even when using IRIS in chest CT.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of second-generation dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography with iterative reconstructions: a real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, E; Martini, C; Rossi, A; Mollet, N; Lario, C; Castiglione Morelli, M; Clemente, A; Gentile, G; Arcadi, T; Seitun, S; Catalano, O; Aldrovandi, A; Cademartiri, F

    2012-08-01

    The authors evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of second-generation dual-source (DSCT) computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) with iterative reconstructions for detecting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Between June 2010 and February 2011, we enrolled 160 patients (85 men; mean age 61.2±11.6 years) with suspected CAD. All patients underwent CTCA and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). For the CTCA scan (Definition Flash, Siemens), we use prospective tube current modulation and 70-100 ml of iodinated contrast material (Iomeprol 400 mgI/ ml, Bracco). Data sets were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction algorithm (IRIS, Siemens). CTCA and CCA reports were used to evaluate accuracy using the threshold for significant stenosis at ≥50% and ≥70%, respectively. No patient was excluded from the analysis. Heart rate was 64.3±11.9 bpm and radiation dose was 7.2±2.1 mSv. Disease prevalence was 30% (48/160). Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of CTCA in detecting significant stenosis were 90.1%, 93.3%, 53.2% and 99.1% (per segment), 97.5%, 91.2%, 61.4% and 99.6% (per vessel) and 100%, 83%, 71.6% and 100% (per patient), respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios at the per-patient level were 5.89 and 0.0, respectively. CTCA with second-generation DSCT in the real clinical world shows a diagnostic performance comparable with previously reported validation studies. The excellent negative predictive value and likelihood ratio make CTCA a first-line noninvasive method for diagnosing obstructive CAD.

  13. Early Prefrontal Brain Responses to the Hedonic Quality of Emotional Words – A Simultaneous EEG and MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Kati; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Rehbein, Maimu A.; Eden, Annuschka S.; Laeger, Inga; Junghöfer, Markus; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The hedonic meaning of words affects word recognition, as shown by behavioral, functional imaging, and event-related potential (ERP) studies. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics and cognitive functions behind are elusive, partly due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Here, we account for these difficulties by computing combined electro-magnetoencephalographic (EEG/MEG) source localization techniques. Participants covertly read emotionally high-arousing positive and negative nouns, while EEG and MEG were recorded simultaneously. Combined EEG/MEG current-density reconstructions for the P1 (80–120 ms), P2 (150–190 ms) and EPN component (200–300 ms) were computed using realistic individual head models, with a cortical constraint. Relative to negative words, the P1 to positive words predominantly involved language-related structures (left middle temporal and inferior frontal regions), and posterior structures related to directed attention (occipital and parietal regions). Effects shifted to the right hemisphere in the P2 component. By contrast, negative words received more activation in the P1 time-range only, recruiting prefrontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Effects in the EPN were not statistically significant. These findings show that different neuronal networks are active when positive versus negative words are processed. We account for these effects in terms of an “emotional tagging” of word forms during language acquisition. These tags then give rise to different processing strategies, including enhanced lexical processing of positive words and a very fast language-independent alert response to negative words. The valence-specific recruitment of different networks might underlie fast adaptive responses to both approach- and withdrawal-related stimuli, be they acquired or biological. PMID:23940642

  14. Early prefrontal brain responses to the Hedonic quality of emotional words--a simultaneous EEG and MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Kati; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Rehbein, Maimu A; Eden, Annuschka S; Laeger, Inga; Junghöfer, Markus; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The hedonic meaning of words affects word recognition, as shown by behavioral, functional imaging, and event-related potential (ERP) studies. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics and cognitive functions behind are elusive, partly due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Here, we account for these difficulties by computing combined electro-magnetoencephalographic (EEG/MEG) source localization techniques. Participants covertly read emotionally high-arousing positive and negative nouns, while EEG and MEG were recorded simultaneously. Combined EEG/MEG current-density reconstructions for the P1 (80-120 ms), P2 (150-190 ms) and EPN component (200-300 ms) were computed using realistic individual head models, with a cortical constraint. Relative to negative words, the P1 to positive words predominantly involved language-related structures (left middle temporal and inferior frontal regions), and posterior structures related to directed attention (occipital and parietal regions). Effects shifted to the right hemisphere in the P2 component. By contrast, negative words received more activation in the P1 time-range only, recruiting prefrontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Effects in the EPN were not statistically significant. These findings show that different neuronal networks are active when positive versus negative words are processed. We account for these effects in terms of an "emotional tagging" of word forms during language acquisition. These tags then give rise to different processing strategies, including enhanced lexical processing of positive words and a very fast language-independent alert response to negative words. The valence-specific recruitment of different networks might underlie fast adaptive responses to both approach- and withdrawal-related stimuli, be they acquired or biological.

  15. Near-lossless multichannel EEG compression based on matrix and tensor decompositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwels, Justin; Srinivasan, K; Reddy, M Ramasubba; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2013-05-01

    A novel near-lossless compression algorithm for multichannel electroencephalogram (MC-EEG) is proposed based on matrix/tensor decomposition models. MC-EEG is represented in suitable multiway (multidimensional) forms to efficiently exploit temporal and spatial correlations simultaneously. Several matrix/tensor decomposition models are analyzed in view of efficient decorrelation of the multiway forms of MC-EEG. A compression algorithm is built based on the principle of “lossy plus residual coding,” consisting of a matrix/tensor decomposition-based coder in the lossy layer followed by arithmetic coding in the residual layer. This approach guarantees a specifiable maximum absolute error between original and reconstructed signals. The compression algorithm is applied to three different scalp EEG datasets and an intracranial EEG dataset, each with different sampling rate and resolution. The proposed algorithm achieves attractive compression ratios compared to compressing individual channels separately. For similar compression ratios, the proposed algorithm achieves nearly fivefold lower average error compared to a similar wavelet-based volumetric MC-EEG compression algorithm.

  16. Catch-up validation study of an in vitro skin irritation test method based on an open source reconstructed epidermis (phase II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeber, F; Schober, L; Schmid, F F; Traube, A; Kolbus-Hernandez, S; Daton, K; Hoffmann, S; Petersohn, D; Schäfer-Korting, M; Walles, H; Mewes, K R

    2016-10-01

    To replace the Draize skin irritation assay (OECD guideline 404) several test methods based on reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) have been developed and were adopted in the OECD test guideline 439. However, all validated test methods in the guideline are linked to RHE provided by only three companies. Thus, the availability of these test models is dependent on the commercial interest of the producer. To overcome this limitation and thus to increase the accessibility of in vitro skin irritation testing, an open source reconstructed epidermis (OS-REp) was introduced. To demonstrate the capacity of the OS-REp in regulatory risk assessment, a catch-up validation study was performed. The participating laboratories used in-house generated OS-REp to assess the set of 20 reference substances according to the performance standards amending the OECD test guideline 439. Testing was performed under blinded conditions. The within-laboratory reproducibility of 87% and the inter-laboratory reproducibility of 85% prove a high reliability of irritancy testing using the OS-REp protocol. In addition, the prediction capacity was with an accuracy of 80% comparable to previous published RHE based test protocols. Taken together the results indicate that the OS-REp test method can be used as a standalone alternative skin irritation test replacing the OECD test guideline 404. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of historical, topographic maps and remote sensing data for reconstruction of gully network development as source of information for gully erosion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Vladimir; Kuznetsova, Yulia

    2017-04-01

    Central parts of European Russia are characterized by relatively shorter history of intensive agriculture in comparison to the Western Europe. As a result of that, significant part of the time period of large-scale cultivation is covered by different types of historical documents. For the last about 150 years reasonably good-quality maps are available. Gully erosion history for the European Russia is more or less well-established, with known peaks of activity associated with initial cultivation (400-200 years ago for the territory of Central Russian Upland) and change of land ownership in 1861 that caused splitting large landlords-owned fields into numerous small parcels owned by individual peasant families. The latter was the most important trigger for dramatic growth of gully erosion intensity as most of such parcels were oriented downslope. It is believed that by detailed reconstructions of gully network development using all the available information sources it can be possible to obtain information suitable for gully erosion models testing. Such models can later be applied for predicting further development of the existing gully networks for several different land use and climate change scenarios. Reconstructions for the two case study areas located in different geographic and historical settings will be presented.

  18. On the question of 3D seed reconstruction in prostate brachytherapy: the determination of x-ray source and film locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Zaider, Marco; Worman, Michael; Cohen, Gilad

    2004-01-01

    Inaccuracy in seed placement during permanent prostate implants may lead to significant dosimetric deviations from the intended plan. In two recent publications (Todor et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2031-48, Todor et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1153-71), methodology was described for identifying intraoperatively the positions of seeds already implanted, thus allowing re-optimization of the treatment plan and correcting for such seed misplacement. Seed reconstruction is performed using fluoroscopic images and an important (and non-trivial) component of this approach is the ability to accurately determine the position of the gantry relative to the treatment volume. We describe the methodology for acquiring this information, based on the known geometry of six markers attached to the ultrasound probe. This method does not require the C-arm unit to be isocentric and films can be taken with the gantry set at any arbitrary position. This is significant because the patient positioning on the operating table (in the lithotomy position) restricts the range of angles at which films can be taken to a quite narrow (typically ±10 0 ) interval and, as a general rule, the closer the angles the larger the uncertainty in the seed location reconstruction along the direction from the x-ray source to the film. (note)

  19. 3D computed tomography using a microfocus X-ray source: Analysis of artifact formation in the reconstructed images using simulated as well as experimental projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmel, S.; Stephan, J.; Baumann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this contribution is to identify and to quantify the influence of different parameters on the formation of image artifacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT) resulting for example, from beam hardening or from partial lack of information using 3D cone beam CT. In general, the reconstructed image quality depends on a number of acquisition parameters concerning the X-ray source (e.g. X-ray spectrum), the geometrical setup (e.g. cone beam angle), the sample properties (e.g. absorption characteristics) and the detector properties. While it is difficult to distinguish the influence of different effects clearly in experimental projection data, they can be selected individually with the help of simulated projection data by varying the parameter set. The reconstruction of the 3D data set is performed with the filtered back projection algorithm according to Feldkamp, Davis and Kress for experimental as well as for simulated projection data. The experimental data are recorded with an industrial microfocus CT system which features a focal spot size of a few micrometers and uses a digital flat panel detector for data acquisition

  20. EEG Findings in Burnout Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Verbraak, M.J.P.M.; Bunt, P.M. van den; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Arns, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of burnout remains enigmatic since it is only determined by behavioral characteristics. Moreover, the differential diagnosis with depression and chronic fatigue syndrome is difficult. EEG-related variables in 13 patients diagnosed with burnout syndrome were compared with 13 healthy

  1. Parallelization of the AliRoot event reconstruction by performing a semi- automatic source-code transformation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    side bus or processor interconnections. Parallelism can only result in performance gain, if the memory usage is optimized, memory locality improved and the communication between threads is minimized. But the domain of concurrent programming has become a field for highly skilled experts, as the implementation of multithreading is difficult, error prone and labor intensive. A full re-implementation for parallel execution of existing offline frameworks, like AliRoot in ALICE, is thus unaffordable. An alternative method, is to use a semi-automatic source-to-source transformation for getting a simple parallel design, with almost no interference between threads. This reduces the need of rewriting the develop...

  2. Reconstructing the plinian and co-ignimbrite sources of large volcanic eruptions: A novel approach for the Campanian Ignimbrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alejandro; Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Engwell, Samantha

    2016-02-17

    The 39 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) super-eruption was the largest volcanic eruption of the past 200 ka in Europe. Tephra deposits indicate two distinct plume forming phases, Plinian and co-ignimbrite, characteristic of many caldera-forming eruptions. Previous numerical studies have characterized the eruption as a single-phase event, potentially leading to inaccurate assessment of eruption dynamics. To reconstruct the volume, intensity, and duration of the tephra dispersal, we applied a computational inversion method that explicitly accounts for the Plinian and co-ignimbrite phases and for gravitational spreading of the umbrella cloud. To verify the consistency of our results, we performed an additional single-phase inversion using an independent thickness dataset. Our better-fitting two-phase model suggests a higher mass eruption rate than previous studies, and estimates that 3/4 of the total fallout volume is co-ignimbrite in origin. Gravitational spreading of the umbrella cloud dominates tephra transport only within the first hundred kilometres due to strong stratospheric winds in our best-fit wind model. Finally, tephra fallout impacts would have interrupted the westward migration of modern hominid groups in Europe, possibly supporting the hypothesis of prolonged Neanderthal survival in South-Western Europe during the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition.

  3. EEG-MEG Integration Enhances the Characterization of Functional and Effective Connectivity in the Resting State Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Stephani, Ulrich; Deuschl, Günther; Freitag, Christine M.; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    At the sensor level many aspects, such as spectral power, functional and effective connectivity as well as relative-power-ratio ratio (RPR) and spatial resolution have been comprehensively investigated through both electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). Despite this, differences between both modalities have not yet been systematically studied by direct comparison. It remains an open question as to whether the integration of EEG and MEG data would improve the information obtained from the above mentioned parameters. Here, EEG (64-channel system) and MEG (275 sensor system) were recorded simultaneously in conditions with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) in 29 healthy adults. Spectral power, functional and effective connectivity, RPR, and spatial resolution were analyzed at five different frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma). Networks of functional and effective connectivity were described using a spatial filter approach called the dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) followed by the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC). Absolute mean power at the sensor level was significantly higher in EEG than in MEG data in both EO and EC conditions. At the source level, there was a trend towards a better performance of the combined EEG+MEG analysis compared with separate EEG or MEG analyses for the source mean power, functional correlation, effective connectivity for both EO and EC. The network of coherent sources and the spatial resolution were similar for both the EEG and MEG data if they were analyzed separately. Results indicate that the combined approach has several advantages over the separate analyses of both EEG and MEG. Moreover, by a direct comparison of EEG and MEG, EEG was characterized by significantly higher values in all measured parameters in both sensor and source level. All the above conclusions are specific to the resting state task and the specific analysis used in this study to have general

  4. Direct reconstruction and associated uncertainties of 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of HDR brachytherapy cervix patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awunor, O. A.; Dixon, B.; Walker, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper details a practical method for the direct reconstruction of high dose rate 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of brachytherapy cervix patients. It also details the uncertainties associated with such a process. Eight Nucletron interstitial ring applicators—Ø26 mm (×4), Ø30 mm (×3) and Ø34 mm (×1), and one 60 mm intrauterine tube were used in this study. RTQA2 and XRQA2 gafchromic films were irradiated at pre-programmed dwell positions with three successive 192Ir sources and used to derive the coordinates of the source dwell positions. The source was observed to deviate significantly from its expected position by up to 6.1 mm in all ring sizes. Significant inter applicator differences of up to 2.6 mm were observed between a subset of ring applicators. Also, the measured data were observed to differ significantly from commercially available source path models provided by Nucletron with differences of up to 3.7 mm across all ring applicator sizes. The total expanded uncertainty (k = 2) averaged over all measured dwell positions in the rings was observed to be 1.1 ± 0.1 mm (Ø26 mm and Ø30 mm rings) and 1.0 ± 0.3 mm (Ø34 mm ring) respectively, and when transferred to the treatment planning system, equated to maximum %dose changes of 1.9%, 13.2% and 1.5% at regions representative of the parametrium, lateral fornix and organs at risk respectively.

  5. Propofol Anesthesia and Sleep: A High-Density EEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Riedner, Brady A.; Boveroux, Pierre; Noirhomme, Quentin; Landsness, Eric C.; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Phillips, Christophe; Massimini, Marcello; Laureys, Steven; Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The electrophysiological correlates of anesthetic sedation remain poorly understood. We used high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG) and source modeling to investigate the cortical processes underlying propofol anesthesia and compare them to sleep. Design: 256-channel EEG recordings in humans during propofol anesthesia. Setting: Hospital operating room. Patients or Participants: 8 healthy subjects (4 males) Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Initially, propofol induced increases in EEG power from 12–25 Hz. Loss of consciousness (LOC) was accompanied by the appearance of EEG slow waves that resembled the slow waves of NREM sleep. We compared slow waves in propofol to slow waves recorded during natural sleep and found that both populations of waves share similar cortical origins and preferentially propagate along the mesial components of the default network. However, propofol slow waves were spatially blurred compared to sleep slow waves and failed to effectively entrain spindle activity. Propofol also caused an increase in gamma (25–40 Hz) power that persisted throughout LOC. Source modeling analysis showed that this increase in gamma power originated from the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices. During LOC, we found increased gamma functional connectivity between these regions compared to the wakefulness. Conclusions: Propofol anesthesia is a sleep-like state and slow waves are associated with diminished consciousness even in the presence of high gamma activity. Citation: Murphy M; Bruno MA; Riedner BA; Boveroux P; Noirhomme Q; Landsness EC; Brichant JF; Phillips C; Massimini M; Laureys S; Tononi G; Boly M. Propofol anesthesia and sleep: a high-density EEG study. SLEEP 2011;34(3):283-291. PMID:21358845

  6. Gender differences in association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and resting-state EEG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volf, N V; Belousova, L V; Knyazev, G G; Kulikov, A V

    2015-01-22

    Human brain oscillations represent important features of information processing and are highly heritable. Gender has been observed to affect association between the 5-HTTLPR (serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region) polymorphism and various endophenotypes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 5-HTTLPR on the spontaneous electroencephalography (EEG) activity in healthy male and female subjects. DNA samples extracted from buccal swabs and resting EEG recorded at 60 standard leads were collected from 210 (101 men and 109 women) volunteers. Spectral EEG power estimates and cortical sources of EEG activity were investigated. It was shown that effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on electrical activity of the brain vary as a function of gender. Women with the S/L genotype had greater global EEG power compared to men with the same genotype. In men, current source density was markedly different among genotype groups in only alpha 2 and alpha 3 frequency ranges: S/S allele carriers had higher current source density estimates in the left inferior parietal lobule in comparison with the L/L group. In women, genotype difference in global power asymmetry was found in the central-temporal region. Contrasting L/L and S/L genotype carriers also yielded significant effects in the right hemisphere inferior parietal lobule and the right postcentral gyrus with L/L genotype carriers showing lower current source density estimates than S/L genotype carriers in all but gamma bands. So, in women, the effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism were associated with modulation of the EEG activity in a wide range of EEG frequencies. The significance of the results lies in the demonstration of gene by sex interaction with resting EEG that has implications for understanding sex-related differences in affective states, emotion and cognition. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EEG use in a tertiary referral centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively audit all electroencephalograms (EEGs) done over a 2-month period in 2009 by the Neurophysiology Department at Cork University Hospital. There were 316 EEGs performed in total, of which 176\\/316 (56%) were done within 24 hours of request. Out of 316 EEGs, 208 (66%) were considered \\'appropriate\\' by SIGN and NICE guidelines; 79\\/208 (38%) had abnormal EEGs and 28 of these abnormal EEGs had epileptiform features. There were 108\\/316 (34%) \\'inappropriate\\' requests for EEG; of these 15\\/108 (14%) were abnormal. Of the 67\\/316 (21%) patients who had EEGs requested based on a history of syncope\\/funny turns: none of these patients had epileptiform abnormalities on their EEGs. Our audit demonstrates that EEGs are inappropriately over-requested in our institution in particular for cases with reported \\'funny turns\\' and syncope. The yield from EEGs in this cohort of patients was low as would be expected.

  8. The Removal of EOG Artifacts From EEG Signals Using Independent Component Analysis and Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Teng, Chaolin; Li, Kuo; Zhang, Zhonglin; Yan, Xiangguo

    2016-09-01

    The recorded electroencephalography (EEG) signals are usually contaminated by electrooculography (EOG) artifacts. In this paper, by using independent component analysis (ICA) and multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD), the ICA-based MEMD method was proposed to remove EOG artifacts (EOAs) from multichannel EEG signals. First, the EEG signals were decomposed by the MEMD into multiple multivariate intrinsic mode functions (MIMFs). The EOG-related components were then extracted by reconstructing the MIMFs corresponding to EOAs. After performing the ICA of EOG-related signals, the EOG-linked independent components were distinguished and rejected. Finally, the clean EEG signals were reconstructed by implementing the inverse transform of ICA and MEMD. The results of simulated and real data suggested that the proposed method could successfully eliminate EOAs from EEG signals and preserve useful EEG information with little loss. By comparing with other existing techniques, the proposed method achieved much improvement in terms of the increase of signal-to-noise and the decrease of mean square error after removing EOAs.

  9. Upper Palaeolithic lithic raw material sourcing in Central and Northern Portugal as an aid to reconstructing hunter-gatherer societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Aubry

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the study of lithic raw materials used in Upper Palaeolithic occupations preserved in caves, rockshelters and open-air sites from two different geological environments in Portugal. For the sites located in the Lusitanian Basin, flint or silcrete sources are easily available in close vicinity. The Côa Valley sites, located in the Iberian Massif, are within a geological environment where restricted fine-grained vein quartz and siliceous metamorphic rocks are available, but no flint or silcrete, even though both are present in the archaeological assemblages. Data from the two clusters of sites are compared with a third newly located site in the Lower Vouga valley, at the limit of the Iberian Massif with the Lusitanian Basin, where quartz vein raw material types are locally available and flint is about 40 kilometres distant. This study reveals prehistoric adaptations to these different geological contexts, with shorter networks for the Lusitanian basin sites contrasting with the long distance ones for the Côa Valley, and the Vouga site at an intermediary position. Finally, we propose that lithic raw material supply networks, defined by a GIS least-cost algorithm, could be used as a proxy not only for territoriality in the case of local and regional lithic raw material sources, but also to infer long-distance social networks between different Palaeolithic human groups, created and maintained to promote the access to asymmetrically distributed resources.

  10. A Reconstruction Method for the Estimation of Temperatures of Multiple Sources Applied for Nanoparticle-Mediated Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idan Steinberg

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Solid malignant tumors are one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Many times complete removal is not possible and alternative methods such as focused hyperthermia are used. Precise control of the hyperthermia process is imperative for the successful application of such treatment. To that end, this research presents a fast method that enables the estimation of deep tissue heat distribution by capturing and processing the transient temperature at the boundary based on a bio-heat transfer model. The theoretical model is rigorously developed and thoroughly validated by a series of experiments. A 10-fold improvement is demonstrated in resolution and visibility on tissue mimicking phantoms. The inverse problem is demonstrated as well with a successful application of the model for imaging deep-tissue embedded heat sources. Thereby, allowing the physician then ability to dynamically evaluate the hyperthermia treatment efficiency in real time.

  11. A Reconstruction Method for the Estimation of Temperatures of Multiple Sources Applied for Nanoparticle-Mediated Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Idan; Tamir, Gil; Gannot, Israel

    2018-03-16

    Solid malignant tumors are one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Many times complete removal is not possible and alternative methods such as focused hyperthermia are used. Precise control of the hyperthermia process is imperative for the successful application of such treatment. To that end, this research presents a fast method that enables the estimation of deep tissue heat distribution by capturing and processing the transient temperature at the boundary based on a bio-heat transfer model. The theoretical model is rigorously developed and thoroughly validated by a series of experiments. A 10-fold improvement is demonstrated in resolution and visibility on tissue mimicking phantoms. The inverse problem is demonstrated as well with a successful application of the model for imaging deep-tissue embedded heat sources. Thereby, allowing the physician then ability to dynamically evaluate the hyperthermia treatment efficiency in real time.

  12. NOTE: Development of modified voxel phantoms for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources: implementation in SESAME tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courageot, Estelle; Sayah, Rima; Huet, Christelle

    2010-05-01

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. When the dose distribution is evaluated with a numerical anthropomorphic model, the posture and morphology of the victim have to be reproduced as realistically as possible. Several years ago, IRSN developed a specific software application, called the simulation of external source accident with medical images (SESAME), for the dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents by numerical simulation. This tool combines voxel geometry and the MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code for radiation-material interaction. This note presents a new functionality in this software that enables the modelling of a victim's posture and morphology based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces. The procedure for constructing the modified voxel phantoms is described, along with a numerical validation of this new functionality using a voxel phantom of the RANDO tissue-equivalent physical model.

  13. MODIS Land Surface Temperature time series reconstruction with Open Source GIS: A new quality of temperature based ecological indicators in complex terrain (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neteler, M.

    2009-12-01

    In complex terrain like the Central European Alps, meteorological stations and ground surveys are usually sparsely and/or irregularly distributed and often favor agricultural areas. The application of traditional geospatial interpolation methods in complex terrain remains challenging and difficult to optimize. An alternative data source is remote sensing: high temporal resolution satellite data are continuously gaining interest since these data are intrinsically spatialized: continuous field of observations is obtained with this tool instead of point data. The increasing data availability suggests using these time series as surrogate to certain measures from meteorological stations, especially for temperature and related derivatives. The Terra and Aqua satellites with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provide four Earth coverages per day at various resolutions. We analyzed 8 years (2000 to 2008) of daily land surface temperature (LST) data from MODIS in an area located in the Southern European Alps. A method was developed to reconstruct incomplete maps (cloud coverage, invalid pixels) based on image statistics and on a model that includes additional GIS layers. The original LST map resolution of 1000m could be improved to 200m in this process which renders the resulting LST maps applicable at regional scales. We propose the use of these reconstructed daily LST time series as surrogate to meteorological observations especially in the area of epidemiological modeling where data are typically aggregated to decadal indicators. From these daily LST map series, derivable indicators include: 1) temperatures minima, means and maxima for annual/monthly/decadal periods; 2) unusual hot summers;3) the calculation of growing degree days, and 4) spring temperature increase or autumnal temperature decrease. Since more than 8 years of MODIS LST data are available today, even preliminary gradients can be extracted to assess multi-annual temperature trends

  14. 3D Reconstruction of a Fluvial Sediment Slug from Source to Sink: reach-scale modeling of the Dart River, NZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasington, J.; Cook, S.; Cox, S.; James, J.; Lehane, N.; McColl, S. T.; Quincey, D. J.; Williams, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Following heavy rainfall on 4/1/14, a debris flow at Slip Stream (44.59 S 168.34 E) introduced >106 m3 of sediment to the Dart River valley floor in NZ Southern Alps. Runout over an existing fan dammed the Dart River causing a sudden drop in discharge downstream. This broad dam was breached quickly; however the temporary loss of conveyance impounded a 3 km lake with a volume of 6 x 106 m3 and depths that exceed 10 m. Quantifying the impact of this large sediment pulse on the Dart River is urgently needed to assess potential sedimentation downstream and will also provide an ideal vehicle to test theories of bed wave migration in large, extensively braided rivers. Recent advances in geomatics offer the opportunity to study these impacts directly through the production of high-resolution DEMs. These 3D snapshots can then be compared through time to quantify the morphodynamic response of the channel as it adjusts to the change in sediment supply. In this study we describe the methods and results of a novel survey strategy designed to capture of the complex morphology of the Dart River along a remote 40 km reach, from the upstream landslide source to its distal sediment sink in Lake Wakatipu. The scale of this system presents major logistical and methodological challenges, and hitherto would have conventionally be addressed with airborne laser scanning, bringing with it significant deployment constraints and costs. By contrast, we present sub-metre 3D reconstructions of the system (Figure 1), derived from highly redundant aerial photography shot with a non-metric camera from a helicopter survey that extended over an 80 km2 area. Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry was used to solve simultaneously camera position, pose and derive a 3D point cloud based on over 4000 images. Reconstructions were found to exhibit significant systematic error resulting from the implicit estimation of the internal camera orientation parameters, and we show how these effects can be minimized

  15. Three-dimensional image reconstruction with free open-source OsiriX software in video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy and segmentectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fei; Wang, Jian; Yao, Ju; Hang, Fangrong; Lei, Xu; Cao, Yongke

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the practice and the feasibility of Osirix, a free and open-source medical imaging software, in performing accurate video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy and segmentectomy. From July 2014 to April 2016, 63 patients received anatomical video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), either lobectomy or segmentectomy, in our department. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction images of 61 (96.8%) patients were preoperatively obtained with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Preoperative resection simulations were accomplished with patient-individual reconstructed 3D images. For lobectomy, pulmonary lobar veins, arteries and bronchi were identified meticulously by carefully reviewing the 3D images on the display. For segmentectomy, the intrasegmental veins in the affected segment for division and the intersegmental veins to be preserved were identified on the 3D images. Patient preoperative characteristics, surgical outcomes and postoperative data were reviewed from a prospective database. The study cohort of 63 patients included 33 (52.4%) men and 30 (47.6%) women, of whom 46 (73.0%) underwent VATS lobectomy and 17 (27.0%) underwent VATS segmentectomy. There was 1 conversion from VATS lobectomy to open thoracotomy because of fibrocalcified lymph nodes. A VATS lobectomy was performed in 1 case after completing the segmentectomy because invasive adenocarcinoma was detected by intraoperative frozen-section analysis. There were no 30-day or 90-day operative mortalities CONCLUSIONS: The free, simple, and user-friendly software program Osirix can provide a 3D anatomic structure of pulmonary vessels and a clear vision into the space between the lesion and adjacent tissues, which allows surgeons to make preoperative simulations and improve the accuracy and safety of actual surgery. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Broyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The default-mode network (DMN is characterised by coherent very low frequency (VLF brain oscillations. The cognitive significance of this VLF profile remains unclear, partly because of the temporally constrained nature of the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD signal. Previously we have identified a VLF EEG network of scalp locations that shares many features of the DMN. Here we explore the intracranial sources of VLF EEG and examine their overlap with the DMN in adults with high and low ADHD ratings. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DC-EEG was recorded using an equidistant 66 channel electrode montage in 25 adult participants with high- and 25 participants with low-ratings of ADHD symptoms during a rest condition and an attention demanding Eriksen task. VLF EEG power was calculated in the VLF band (0.02 to 0.2 Hz for the rest and task condition and compared for high and low ADHD participants. sLORETA was used to identify brain sources associated with the attention-induced deactivation of VLF EEG power, and to examine these sources in relation to ADHD symptoms. There was significant deactivation of VLF EEG power between the rest and task condition for the whole sample. Using s-LORETA the sources of this deactivation were localised to medial prefrontal regions, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and temporal regions. However, deactivation sources were different for high and low ADHD groups: In the low ADHD group attention-induced VLF EEG deactivation was most significant in medial prefrontal regions while for the high ADHD group this deactivation was predominantly localised to the temporal lobes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Attention-induced VLF EEG deactivations have intracranial sources that appear to overlap with those of the DMN. Furthermore, these seem to be related to ADHD symptom status, with high ADHD adults failing to significantly deactivate medial prefrontal regions while at the same time showing significant attenuation of

  17. EEG correlates of virtual reality hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David; Ciorciari, Joseph; Carbis, Colin; Liley, David

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated hypnosis-related electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence and power spectra changes in high and low hypnotizables (Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale) induced by a virtual reality hypnosis (VRH) induction system. In this study, the EEG from 17 participants (Mean age = 21.35, SD = 1.58) were compared based on their hypnotizability score. The EEG recording associated with a 2-minute, eyes-closed baseline state was compared to the EEG during a hypnosis-related state. This novel induction system was able to produce EEG findings consistent with previous hypnosis literature. Interactions of significance were found with EEG beta coherence. The high susceptibility group (n = 7) showed decreased coherence, while the low susceptibility group (n = 10) demonstrated an increase in coherence between medial frontal and lateral left prefrontal sites. Methodological and efficacy issues are discussed.

  18. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave....

  19. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re-evaluated...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave....

  20. Characterization of Fetal Keratinocytes, Showing Enhanced Stem Cell-Like Properties: A Potential Source of Cells for Skin Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K.B. Tan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal stem cells have been in clinical application as a source of culture-generated grafts. Although applications for such cells are increasing due to aging populations and the greater incidence of diabetes, current keratinocyte grafting technology is limited by immunological barriers and the time needed for culture amplification. We studied the feasibility of using human fetal skin cells for allogeneic transplantation and showed that fetal keratinocytes have faster expansion times, longer telomeres, lower immunogenicity indicators, and greater clonogenicity with more stem cell indicators than adult keratinocytes. The fetal cells did not induce proliferation of T cells in coculture and were able to suppress the proliferation of stimulated T cells. Nevertheless, fetal keratinocytes could stratify normally in vitro. Experimental transplantation of fetal keratinocytes in vivo seeded on an engineered plasma scaffold yielded a well-stratified epidermal architecture and showed stable skin regeneration. These results support the possibility of using fetal skin cells for cell-based therapeutic grafting.

  1. Source Reconstruction of Brain Potentials Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Analyze Face Intra-Domain vs. Face-Occupation Cross-Domain Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Ela I; Lage-Castellanos, Agustín; Bobes, María A; Iglesias, Jaime

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the neural correlates of the access to and retrieval of face structure information in contrast to those concerning the access to and retrieval of person-related verbal information, triggered by faces. We experimentally induced stimulus familiarity via a systematic learning procedure including faces with and without associated verbal information. Then, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in both intra-domain (face-feature) and cross-domain (face-occupation) matching tasks while N400-like responses were elicited by incorrect eyes-eyebrows completions and occupations, respectively. A novel Bayesian source reconstruction approach plus conjunction analysis of group effects revealed that in both cases the generated N170s were of similar amplitude but had different neural origin. Thus, whereas the N170 of faces was associated predominantly to right fusiform and occipital regions (the so-called "Fusiform Face Area", "FFA" and "Occipital Face Area", "OFA", respectively), the N170 of occupations was associated to a bilateral very posterior activity, suggestive of basic perceptual processes. Importantly, the right-sided perceptual P200 and the face-related N250 were evoked exclusively in the intra-domain task, with sources in OFA and extensively in the fusiform region, respectively. Regarding later latencies, the intra-domain N400 seemed to be generated in right posterior brain regions encompassing mainly OFA and, to some extent, the FFA, likely reflecting neural operations triggered by structural incongruities. In turn, the cross-domain N400 was related to more anterior left-sided fusiform and temporal inferior sources, paralleling those described previously for the classic verbal N400. These results support the existence of differentiated neural streams for face structure and person-related verbal processing triggered by faces, which can be activated differentially according to specific task demands.

  2. Source Reconstruction of Brain Potentials Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Analyze Face Intra-Domain vs. Face-Occupation Cross-Domain Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela I. Olivares

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the neural correlates of the access to and retrieval of face structure information in contrast to those concerning the access to and retrieval of person-related verbal information, triggered by faces. We experimentally induced stimulus familiarity via a systematic learning procedure including faces with and without associated verbal information. Then, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs in both intra-domain (face-feature and cross-domain (face-occupation matching tasks while N400-like responses were elicited by incorrect eyes-eyebrows completions and occupations, respectively. A novel Bayesian source reconstruction approach plus conjunction analysis of group effects revealed that in both cases the generated N170s were of similar amplitude but had different neural origin. Thus, whereas the N170 of faces was associated predominantly to right fusiform and occipital regions (the so-called “Fusiform Face Area”, “FFA” and “Occipital Face Area”, “OFA”, respectively, the N170 of occupations was associated to a bilateral very posterior activity, suggestive of basic perceptual processes. Importantly, the right-sided perceptual P200 and the face-related N250 were evoked exclusively in the intra-domain task, with sources in OFA and extensively in the fusiform region, respectively. Regarding later latencies, the intra-domain N400 seemed to be generated in right posterior brain regions encompassing mainly OFA and, to some extent, the FFA, likely reflecting neural operations triggered by structural incongruities. In turn, the cross-domain N400 was related to more anterior left-sided fusiform and temporal inferior sources, paralleling those described previously for the classic verbal N400. These results support the existence of differentiated neural streams for face structure and person-related verbal processing triggered by faces, which can be activated differentially according to specific task demands.

  3. Functional Connectivity Changes in Resting-State EEG as Potential Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Parameswaran Mahadeva; Egan, Catriona; Pinto-Grau, Marta; Burke, Tom; Elamin, Marwa; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Pender, Niall; Lalor, Edmund C; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is heterogeneous and overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Spectral EEG can predict damage in structural and functional networks in frontotemporal dementia but has never been applied to ALS. 18 incident ALS patients with normal cognition and 17 age matched controls underwent 128 channel EEG and neuropsychology assessment. The EEG data was analyzed using FieldTrip software in MATLAB to calculate simple connectivity measures and scalp network measures. sLORETA was used in nodal analysis for source localization and same methods were applied as above to calculate nodal network measures. Graph theory measures were used to assess network integrity. Cross spectral density in alpha band was higher in patients. In ALS patients, increased degree values of the network nodes was noted in the central and frontal regions in the theta band across seven of the different connectivity maps (pEEG has potential utility as a biomarker in ALS.

  4. Optimal use of EEG recordings to target active brain areas with transcranial electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, Jacek P; Koessler, Laurent; Norcia, Anthony M; Bikson, Marom; Parra, Lucas C

    2017-08-15

    To demonstrate causal relationships between brain and behavior, investigators would like to guide brain stimulation using measurements of neural activity. Particularly promising in this context are electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), as they are linked by a reciprocity principle which, despite being known for decades, has not led to a formalism for relating EEG recordings to optimal stimulation parameters. Here we derive a closed-form expression for the TES configuration that optimally stimulates (i.e., targets) the sources of recorded EEG, without making assumptions about source location or distribution. We also derive a duality between TES targeting and EEG source localization, and demonstrate that in cases where source localization fails, so does the proposed targeting. Numerical simulations with multiple head models confirm these theoretical predictions and quantify the achieved stimulation in terms of focality and intensity. We show that constraining the stimulation currents automatically selects optimal montages that involve only a few (4-7) electrodes, with only incremental loss in performance when targeting focal activations. The proposed technique allows brain scientists and clinicians to rationally target the sources of observed EEG and thus overcomes a major obstacle to the realization of individualized or closed-loop brain stimulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. EEG phase reset due to auditory attention: an inverse time-scale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Yin Fen; Strauss, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel tool to evaluate the electroencephalograph (EEG) phase reset due to auditory attention by utilizing an inverse analysis of the instantaneous phase for the first time. EEGs were acquired through auditory attention experiments with a maximum entropy stimulation paradigm. We examined single sweeps of auditory late response (ALR) with the complex continuous wavelet transform. The phase in the frequency band that is associated with auditory attention (6–10 Hz, termed as theta–alpha border) was reset to the mean phase of the averaged EEGs. The inverse transform was applied to reconstruct the phase-modified signal. We found significant enhancement of the N100 wave in the reconstructed signal. Analysis of the phase noise shows the effects of phase jittering on the generation of the N100 wave implying that a preferred phase is necessary to generate the event-related potential (ERP). Power spectrum analysis shows a remarkable increase of evoked power but little change of total power after stabilizing the phase of EEGs. Furthermore, by resetting the phase only at the theta border of no attention data to the mean phase of attention data yields a result that resembles attention data. These results show strong connections between EEGs and ERP, in particular, we suggest that the presentation of an auditory stimulus triggers the phase reset process at the theta–alpha border which leads to the emergence of the N100 wave. It is concluded that our study reinforces other studies on the importance of the EEG in ERP genesis

  6. EEG phase reset due to auditory attention: an inverse time-scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Yin Fen; Strauss, Daniel J

    2009-08-01

    We propose a novel tool to evaluate the electroencephalograph (EEG) phase reset due to auditory attention by utilizing an inverse analysis of the instantaneous phase for the first time. EEGs were acquired through auditory attention experiments with a maximum entropy stimulation paradigm. We examined single sweeps of auditory late response (ALR) with the complex continuous wavelet transform. The phase in the frequency band that is associated with auditory attention (6-10 Hz, termed as theta-alpha border) was reset to the mean phase of the averaged EEGs. The inverse transform was applied to reconstruct the phase-modified signal. We found significant enhancement of the N100 wave in the reconstructed signal. Analysis of the phase noise shows the effects of phase jittering on the generation of the N100 wave implying that a preferred phase is necessary to generate the event-related potential (ERP). Power spectrum analysis shows a remarkable increase of evoked power but little change of total power after stabilizing the phase of EEGs. Furthermore, by resetting the phase only at the theta border of no attention data to the mean phase of attention data yields a result that resembles attention data. These results show strong connections between EEGs and ERP, in particular, we suggest that the presentation of an auditory stimulus triggers the phase reset process at the theta-alpha border which leads to the emergence of the N100 wave. It is concluded that our study reinforces other studies on the importance of the EEG in ERP genesis.

  7. Test-retest reliability of cognitive EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, L. K.; Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Task-related EEG is sensitive to changes in cognitive state produced by increased task difficulty and by transient impairment. If task-related EEG has high test-retest reliability, it could be used as part of a clinical test to assess changes in cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the EEG recorded during the performance of a working memory (WM) task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). METHODS: EEG was recorded while subjects rested quietly and while they performed the tasks. Within session (test-retest interval of approximately 1 h) and between session (test-retest interval of approximately 7 days) reliability was calculated for four EEG components: frontal midline theta at Fz, posterior theta at Pz, and slow and fast alpha at Pz. RESULTS: Task-related EEG was highly reliable within and between sessions (r0.9 for all components in WM task, and r0.8 for all components in the PVT). Resting EEG also showed high reliability, although the magnitude of the correlation was somewhat smaller than that of the task-related EEG (r0.7 for all 4 components). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that under appropriate conditions, task-related EEG has sufficient retest reliability for use in assessing clinical changes in cognitive status.

  8. Tele-transmission of EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle, M; Kubis, N; Sauleau, P; N'Guyen The Tich, S; Touzery-de Villepin, A

    2015-03-01

    EEG recordings can be sent for remote interpretation. This article aims to define the tele-EEG procedures and technical guidelines. Tele-EEG is a complete medical act that needs to be carried out with the same quality requirements as a local one in terms of indications, formulation of the medical request and medical interpretation. It adheres to the same quality requirements for its human resources and materials. It must be part of a medical organization (technical and medical network) and follow all rules and guidelines of good medical practices. The financial model of this organization must include costs related to performing the EEG recording, operating and maintenance of the tele-EEG network and medical fees of the physician interpreting the EEG recording. Implementing this organization must be detailed in a convention between all parties involved: physicians, management of the healthcare structure, and the company providing the tele-EEG service. This convention will set rules for network operation and finance, and also the continuous training of all staff members. The tele-EEG system must respect all rules for safety and confidentiality, and ensure the traceability and storing of all requests and reports. Under these conditions, tele-EEG can optimize the use of human resources and competencies in its zone of utilization and enhance the organization of care management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  10. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6≤pitch≤3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  11. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: image reconstruction and assessment of image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, Thomas G; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Aiimendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2009-12-01

    To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch = 1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch = 3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch = 1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch = 3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6 pitch 3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch = 3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving coronary artery phantom

  12. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography, 91301 Forchheim, Germany and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6{<=}pitch{<=}3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  13. Attentional Selection in a Cocktail Party Environment Can Be Decoded from Single-Trial EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, James A.; Power, Alan J.; Mesgarani, Nima; Rajaram, Siddharth; Foxe, John J.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Slaney, Malcolm; Shamma, Shihab A.; Lalor, Edmund C.

    2015-01-01

    How humans solve the cocktail party problem remains unknown. However, progress has been made recently thanks to the realization that cortical activity tracks the amplitude envelope of speech. This has led to the development of regression methods for studying the neurophysiology of continuous speech. One such method, known as stimulus-reconstruction, has been successfully utilized with cortical surface recordings and magnetoencephalography (MEG). However, the former is invasive and gives a relatively restricted view of processing along the auditory hierarchy, whereas the latter is expensive and rare. Thus it would be extremely useful for research in many populations if stimulus-reconstruction was effective using electroencephalography (EEG), a widely available and inexpensive technology. Here we show that single-trial (≈60 s) unaveraged EEG data can be decoded to determine attentional selection in a naturalistic multispeaker environment. Furthermore, we show a significant correlation between our EEG-based measure of attention and performance on a high-level attention task. In addition, by attempting to decode attention at individual latencies, we identify neural processing at ∼200 ms as being critical for solving the cocktail party problem. These findings open up new avenues for studying the ongoing dynamics of cognition using EEG and for developing effective and natural brain–computer interfaces. PMID:24429136

  14. Video-EEG epilepsian diagnostiikassa - milloin ja miksi?

    OpenAIRE

    Mervaala, Esa; Mäkinen, Riikka; Peltola, Jukka; Eriksson, Kai; Jutila, Leena; Immonen, Arto

    2009-01-01

    Aivosähkötoimintaa mittaava EEG on epilepsian spesifinen tutkimus. Video-EEG:llä (V-EEG) tarkoitetaan EEG:n ja videokuvan samanaikaista tallennusta. Valtaosa epilepsiapotilaista joudutaan diagnosoimaan ilman V-EEG:tä, varsinkin jos kohtauksia on esiintynyt vain muutama. Kohtausten toistuessa tavoite on päästä kohtauksenaikaiseen V-EEG-rekisteröintiin. V-EEG:n käyttöaiheista tärkein on epilepsian diagnostiikka ja erotusdiagnostiikka. V-EEG:llä pystytään erottamaan epileptiset kohtaukset esimer...

  15. Preterm EEG: a multimodal neurophysiological protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjerna, Susanna; Voipio, Juha; Metsäranta, Marjo; Kaila, Kai; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2012-02-18

    Since its introduction in early 1950s, electroencephalography (EEG) has been widely used in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for assessment and monitoring of brain function in preterm and term babies. Most common indications are the diagnosis of epileptic seizures, assessment of brain maturity, and recovery from hypoxic-ischemic events. EEG recording techniques and the understanding of neonatal EEG signals have dramatically improved, but these advances have been slow to penetrate through the clinical traditions. The aim of this presentation is to bring theory and practice of advanced EEG recording available for neonatal units. In the theoretical part, we will present animations to illustrate how a preterm brain gives rise to spontaneous and evoked EEG activities, both of which are unique to this developmental phase, as well as crucial for a proper brain maturation. Recent animal work has shown that the structural brain development is clearly reflected in early EEG activity. Most important structures in this regard are the growing long range connections and the transient cortical structure, subplate. Sensory stimuli in a preterm baby will generate responses that are seen at a single trial level, and they have underpinnings in the subplate-cortex interaction. This brings neonatal EEG readily into a multimodal study, where EEG is not only recording cortical function, but it also tests subplate function via different sensory modalities. Finally, introduction of clinically suitable dense array EEG caps, as well as amplifiers capable of recording low frequencies, have disclosed multitude of brain activities that have as yet been overlooked. In the practical part of this video, we show how a multimodal, dense array EEG study is performed in neonatal intensive care unit from a preterm baby in the incubator. The video demonstrates preparation of the baby and incubator, application of the EEG cap, and performance of the sensory stimulations.

  16. Independent component analysis of gait-related movement artifact recorded using EEG electrodes during treadmill walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Lynne Snyder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent surge in the use of electroencephalography (EEG as a tool for mobile brain imaging due to its portability and fine time resolution. When EEG is combined with independent component analysis (ICA and source localization techniques, it can model electrocortical activity as arising from temporally independent signals located in spatially distinct cortical areas. However, for mobile tasks, it is not clear how movement artifacts influence ICA and source localization. We devised a novel method to collect pure movement artifact data (devoid of any electrophysiological signals with a 256-channel EEG system. We first blocked true electrocortical activity using a silicone swim cap. Over the silicone layer, we placed a simulated scalp with electrical properties similar to real human scalp. We collected EEG movement artifact signals from ten healthy, young subjects wearing this setup as they walked on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4-1.6 m/s. We performed ICA and dipole fitting on the EEG movement artifact data to quantify how accurately these methods would identify the artifact signals as non-neural. ICA and dipole fitting accurately localized 99% of the independent components in non-neural locations or lacked dipolar characteristics. The remaining 1% of sources had locations within the brain volume and low residual variances, but had topographical maps, power spectra, time courses, and event related spectral perturbations typical of non-neural sources. Caution should be exercised when interpreting ICA for data that includes semi-periodic artifacts including artifact arising from human walking. Alternative methods are needed for the identification and separation of movement artifact in mobile EEG signals, especially methods that can be performed in real time. Separating true brain signals from motion artifact could clear the way for EEG brain computer interfaces for assistance during mobile activities, such as walking.

  17. Prediction of rhythmic and periodic EEG patterns and seizures on continuous EEG with early epileptiform discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, J; Herta, J; Draschtak, S; Pötzl, G; Pirker, S; Fürbass, F; Hartmann, M; Kluge, T; Baumgartner, C

    2015-08-01

    Continuous EEG (cEEG) is necessary to document nonconvulsive seizures (NCS), nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE), as well as rhythmic and periodic EEG patterns of 'ictal-interictal uncertainty' (RPPIIU) including periodic discharges, rhythmic delta activity, and spike-and-wave complexes in neurological intensive care patients. However, cEEG is associated with significant recording and analysis efforts. Therefore, predictors from short-term routine EEG with a reasonably high yield are urgently needed in order to select patients for evaluation with cEEG. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic significance of early epileptiform discharges (i.e., within the first 30 min of EEG recording) on the following: (1) incidence of ictal EEG patterns and RPPIIU on subsequent cEEG, (2) occurrence of acute convulsive seizures during the ICU stay, and (3) functional outcome after 6 months of follow-up. We conducted a separate analysis of the first 30 min and the remaining segments of prospective cEEG recordings according to the ACNS Standardized Critical Care EEG Terminology as well as NCS criteria and review of clinical data of 32 neurological critical care patients. In 17 patients with epileptiform discharges within the first 30 min of EEG (group 1), electrographic seizures were observed in 23.5% (n = 4), rhythmic or periodic EEG patterns of 'ictal-interictal uncertainty' in 64.7% (n = 11), and neither electrographic seizures nor RPPIIU in 11.8% (n = 2). In 15 patients with no epileptiform discharges in the first 30 min of EEG (group 2), no electrographic seizures were recorded on subsequent cEEG, RPPIIU were seen in 26.7% (n = 4), and neither electrographic seizures nor RPPIIU in 73.3% (n = 11). The incidence of EEG patterns on cEEG was significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.008). Patients with early epileptiform discharges developed acute seizures more frequently than patients without early epileptiform discharges (p = 0.009). Finally, functional

  18. FRED (a Framework for Reconstructing Epidemic Dynamics): an open-source software system for modeling infectious diseases and control strategies using census-based populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefenstette, John J; Brown, Shawn T; Rosenfeld, Roni; DePasse, Jay; Stone, Nathan T B; Cooley, Phillip C; Wheaton, William D; Fyshe, Alona; Galloway, David D; Sriram, Anuroop; Guclu, Hasan; Abraham, Thomas; Burke, Donald S

    2013-10-08

    Mathematical and computational models provide valuable tools that help public health planners to evaluate competing health interventions, especially for novel circumstances that cannot be examined through observational or controlled studies, such as pandemic influenza. The spread of diseases like influenza depends on the mixing patterns within the population, and these mixing patterns depend in part on local factors including the spatial distribution and age structure of the population, the distribution of size and composition of households, employment status and commuting patterns of adults, and the size and age structure of schools. Finally, public health planners must take into account the health behavior patterns of the population, patterns that often vary according to socioeconomic factors such as race, household income, and education levels. FRED (a Framework for Reconstructing Epidemic Dynamics) is a freely available open-source agent-based modeling system based closely on models used in previously published studies of pandemic influenza. This version of FRED uses open-access census-based synthetic populations that capture the demographic and geographic heterogeneities of the population, including realistic household, school, and workplace social networks. FRED epidemic models are currently available for every state and county in the United States, and for selected international locations. State and county public health planners can use FRED to explore the effects of possible influenza epidemics in specific geographic regions of interest and to help evaluate the effect of interventions such as vaccination programs and school closure policies. FRED is available under a free open source license in order to contribute to the development of better modeling tools and to encourage open discussion of modeling tools being used to evaluate public health policies. We also welcome participation by other researchers in the further development of FRED.

  19. Star Formation at z = 2.481 in the Lensed Galaxy SDSS J1110 = 6459. I. Lens Modeling and Source Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Traci L.; Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Rigby, Jane R.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Wuyts, Eva; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Florian, Michael; Murray, Katherine T.

    2017-07-01

    Using the combined resolving power of the Hubble Space Telescope and gravitational lensing, we resolve star-forming structures in a z˜ 2.5 galaxy on scales much smaller than the usual kiloparsec diffraction limit of HST. SGAS J111020.0+645950.8 is a clumpy, star-forming galaxy lensed by the galaxy cluster SDSS J1110+6459 at z=0.659, with a total magnification ˜ 30× across the entire arc. We use a hybrid parametric/non-parametric strong lensing mass model to compute the deflection and magnification of this giant arc, reconstruct the light distribution of the lensed galaxy in the source plane, and resolve the star formation into two dozen clumps. We develop a forward-modeling technique to model each clump in the source plane. We ray-trace the model to the image plane, convolve with the instrumental point-spread function (PSF), and compare with the GALFIT model of the clumps in the image plane, which decomposes clump structure from more extended emission. This technique has the advantage, over ray-tracing, of accounting for the asymmetric lensing shear of the galaxy in the image plane and the instrument PSF. At this resolution, we can begin to study star formation on a clump-by-clump basis, toward the goal of understanding feedback mechanisms and the buildup of exponential disks at high redshift. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program # 13003.

  20. Automatic seizure detection: going from sEEG to iEEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas; Remvig, Line Sofie; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2010-01-01

    Several different algorithms have been proposed for automatic detection of epileptic seizures based on both scalp and intracranial electroencephalography (sEEG and iEEG). Which modality that renders the best result is hard to assess though. From 16 patients with focal epilepsy, at least 24 hours...... of ictal and non-ictal iEEG were obtained. Characteristics of the seizures are represented by use of wavelet transformation (WT) features and classified by a support vector machine. When implementing a method used for sEEG on iEEG data, a great improvement in performance was obtained when the high...... frequency containing lower levels in the WT were included in the analysis. We were able to obtain a sensitivity of 96.4% and a false detection rate (FDR) of 0.20/h. In general, when implementing an automatic seizure detection algorithm made for sEEG on iEEG, great improvement can be obtained if a frequency...

  1. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhu eLiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs’ effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of twelve entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP, in anesthesia induced by GA-BAergic agents.Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE and State entropy (SE, three wavelet entropy (WE measures (Shannon WE (SWE, Tsallis WE (TWE and Renyi WE (RWE, Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE, approximate entropy (ApEn, sample entropy (SampEn, Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE measures (Shannon PE (SPE, Tsallis PE (TPE and Renyi PE (RPE. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflu-rane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, phar-macokinetic / pharmacodynamic (PK/PD modeling and prediction probability analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA as a non-entropy measure was compared.Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline vari-ability, higher coefficient of determination and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an ad-vantage in computation efficiency compared with MDFA.Conclusion: Each entropy index has its advantages and disadvantages in estimating DoA. Overall, it is suggested that the RPE index was a superior measure.Significance: Investigating the advantages and disadvantages of these entropy indices could help improve current clinical indices for monitoring DoA.

  2. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  3. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  4. EEG applications for sport and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Trevor; Steffert, Tony; Ros, Tomas; Leach, Joseph; Gruzelier, John

    2008-08-01

    One approach to understanding processes that underlie skilled performing has been to study electrical brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG). A notorious problem with EEG is that genuine cerebral data is often contaminated by artifacts of non-cerebral origin. Unfortunately, such artifacts tend to be exacerbated when the subject is in motion, meaning that obtaining reliable data during exercise is inherently problematic. These problems may explain the limited number of studies using EEG as a methodological tool in the sports sciences. This paper discusses how empirical studies have generally tackled the problem of movement artifact by adopting alternative paradigms which avoid recording during actual physical exertion. Moreover, the specific challenges that motion presents to obtaining reliable EEG data are discussed along with practical and computational techniques to confront these challenges. Finally, as EEG recording in sports is often underpinned by a desire to optimise performance, a brief review of EEG-biofeedback and peak performance studies is also presented. A knowledge of practical aspects of EEG recording along with the advent of new technology and increasingly sophisticated processing models offer a promising approach to minimising, if perhaps not entirely circumventing, the problem of obtaining reliable EEG data during motion.

  5. Effects of oral amines on the EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D F; Moffett, A M; Swash, M

    1977-02-01

    Oral tyramine activated pre-existing episodic EEG abnormalities--namely, sharp waves, spike and wave, and localised theta activity--in epileptic patients. Little change was found in the EEGs of migrainous subjects after chocolate or beta-phenylethylamine. The implications of the findings with tyramine are discussed.

  6. Changes of hypnagogic imagery and EEG stages

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Mitsuo; Katoh, Kohichi; Hori, Tadao

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between hypnagogic imagery and EEG stages. According to Hori, et al. (1994), the hypnagogic EEGs was classified into 9 stages, those were 1) alpha wave train, 2) alpha wave intermittent (>50%), 3) alpha wave intermittent (

  7. Continuous EEG Monitoring in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Friberg, Christian Kærsmose; Wellwood, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous EEG (cEEG) may allow monitoring of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and seizures, including non-convulsive seizures (NCSz), and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). We aimed to evaluate: (a) the diagnostic...

  8. Simultaneous ocular and muscle artifact removal from EEG data by exploiting diverse statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Liu, Aiping; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Yu; Zou, Liang; McKeown, Martin J

    2017-09-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings are frequently contaminated by both ocular and muscle artifacts. These are normally dealt with separately, by employing blind source separation (BSS) techniques relying on either second-order or higher-order statistics (SOS & HOS respectively). When HOS-based methods are used, it is usually in the setting of assuming artifacts are statistically independent to the EEG. When SOS-based methods are used, it is assumed that artifacts have autocorrelation characteristics distinct from the EEG. In reality, ocular and muscle artifacts do not completely follow the assumptions of strict temporal independence to the EEG nor completely unique autocorrelation characteristics, suggesting that exploiting HOS or SOS alone may be insufficient to remove these artifacts. Here we employ a novel BSS technique, independent vector analysis (IVA), to jointly employ HOS and SOS simultaneously to remove ocular and muscle artifacts. Numerical simulations and application to real EEG recordings were used to explore the utility of the IVA approach. IVA was superior in isolating both ocular and muscle artifacts, especially for raw EEG data with low signal-to-noise ratio, and also integrated usually separate SOS and HOS steps into a single unified step. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A generic EEG artifact removal algorithm based on the multi-channel Wiener filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Ben; Francart, Tom; Bertrand, Alexander

    2018-06-01

    Objective. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an essential neuro-monitoring tool for both clinical and research purposes, but is susceptible to a wide variety of undesired artifacts. Removal of these artifacts is often done using blind source separation techniques, relying on a purely data-driven transformation, which may sometimes fail to sufficiently isolate artifacts in only one or a few components. Furthermore, some algorithms perform well for specific artifacts, but not for others. In this paper, we aim to develop a generic EEG artifact removal algorithm, which allows the user to annotate a few artifact segments in the EEG recordings to inform the algorithm. Approach. We propose an algorithm based on the multi-channel Wiener filter (MWF), in which the artifact covariance matrix is replaced by a low-rank approximation based on the generalized eigenvalue decomposition. The algorithm is validated using both hybrid and real EEG data, and is compared to other algorithms frequently used for artifact removal. Main results. The MWF-based algorithm successfully removes a wide variety of artifacts with better performance than current state-of-the-art methods. Significance. Current EEG artifact removal techniques often have limited applicability due to their specificity to one kind of artifact, their complexity, or simply because they are too ‘blind’. This paper demonstrates a fast, robust and generic algorithm for removal of EEG artifacts of various types, i.e. those that were annotated as unwanted by the user.

  10. Detecting Intracranial Hemorrhage Using Automatic Tube Current Modulation With Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction in Unenhanced Head Single- and Dual-Energy Dual-Source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Wichmann, Julian L; Bennett, Dennis W; Leithner, Doris; Bauer, Ralf W; Vogl, Thomas J; Bodelle, Boris

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine diagnostic accuracy, image quality, and radiation dose of low-dose single- and dual-energy unenhanced third-generation dual-source head CT for detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). A total of 123 patients with suspected ICH were examined using a dual-source 192-MDCT scanner. Standard-dose 120-kVp single-energy CT (SECT; n = 36) and 80-kVp and 150-kVp dual-energy CT (DECT; n = 30) images were compared with low-dose SECT (n = 32) and DECT (n = 25) images obtained using automated tube current modulation (ATCM). Advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) was used for all protocols. Detection of ICH was performed by three readers who were blinded to the image acquisition parameters of each image series. Image quality was assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Interobserver agreement was calculated using the Fleiss kappa. Radiation dose was measured as dose-length product (DLP). Detection of ICH was excellent (sensitivity, 94.9-100%; specificity, 94.7-100%) in all protocols (p = 1.00) with perfect interobserver agreement (0.83-0.96). Qualitative ratings showed significantly better ratings for both standard-dose protocols regarding gray matter-to-white matter contrast (p ≤ 0.014), whereas highest gray matter-to-white matter contrast-to-noise ratio was observed with low-dose DECT images (p ≥ 0.057). The lowest posterior fossa artifact index was measured for standard-dose DECT, which showed significantly lower values compared with low-dose protocols (p ≤ 0.034). Delineation of ventricular margins and sharpness of subarachnoidal spaces were rated excellent in all protocols (p ≥ 0.096). Low-dose techniques lowered radiation dose by 26% for SECT images (DLP, 575.0 ± 72.3 mGy · cm vs 771.5 ± 146.8 mGy · cm; p dual-source CT while allowing significant radiation dose reduction.

  11. EEG, job motor or job killer? Symposium for a more rational discussion; EEG - Jobmotor oder Jobkiller? Symposium fuehrt zur Versachlichung der Diskussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeder, M. [Fachhochschule Bochum (Germany); Schulz, E. [Verband der Elektrizitaetswirtschaft - VDEW - e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2005-12-12

    The authors investigated the job effects of the Renewables Act (EEG) discussed at the VDEW symposium of October 2004. There are many divergent factors which necessitated the use of differentiated econometric models. The conclusion was that the EEG should not be judged on the basis of job effects but from environmental and energy aspects. Positive job effects may be expected from more efficient production of electric power from renewable energy sources, which may be achieved by funding on the basis of a EU funding model. (orig.)

  12. Quantitative topographic differentiation of the neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Karel; Krajca, Vladimír; Roth, Zdenek; Melichar, Jan; Petránek, Svojmil

    2006-09-01

    To test the discriminatory topographic potential of a new method of the automatic EEG analysis in neonates. A quantitative description of the neonatal EEG can contribute to the objective assessment of the functional state of the brain, and may improve the precision of diagnosing cerebral dysfunctions manifested by 'disorganization', 'dysrhythmia' or 'dysmaturity'. 21 healthy, full-term newborns were examined polygraphically during sleep (EEG-8 referential derivations, respiration, ECG, EOG, EMG). From each EEG record, two 5-min samples (one from the middle of quiet sleep, the other from the middle of active sleep) were subject to subsequent automatic analysis and were described by 13 variables: spectral features and features describing shape and variability of the signal. The data from individual infants were averaged and the number of variables was reduced by factor analysis. All factors identified by factor analysis were statistically significantly influenced by the location of derivation. A large number of statistically significant differences were also established when comparing the effects of individual derivations on each of the 13 measured variables. Both spectral features and features describing shape and variability of the signal are largely accountable for the topographic differentiation of the neonatal EEG. The presented method of the automatic EEG analysis is capable to assess the topographic characteristics of the neonatal EEG, and it is adequately sensitive and describes the neonatal electroencephalogram with sufficient precision. The discriminatory capability of the used method represents a promise for their application in the clinical practice.

  13. How do reference montage and electrodes setup affect the measured scalp EEG potentials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiang; Lai, Yongxiu; Valdes-Sosa, Pedro A.; Bringas-Vega, Maria L.; Yao, Dezhong

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Human scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely applied in cognitive neuroscience and clinical studies due to its non-invasiveness and ultra-high time resolution. However, the representativeness of the measured EEG potentials for the underneath neural activities is still a problem under debate. This study aims to investigate systematically how both reference montage and electrodes setup affect the accuracy of EEG potentials. Approach. First, the standard EEG potentials are generated by the forward calculation with a single dipole in the neural source space, for eleven channel numbers (10, 16, 21, 32, 64, 85, 96, 128, 129, 257, 335). Here, the reference is the ideal infinity implicitly determined by forward theory. Then, the standard EEG potentials are transformed to recordings with different references including five mono-polar references (Left earlobe, Fz, Pz, Oz, Cz), and three re-references (linked mastoids (LM), average reference (AR) and reference electrode standardization technique (REST)). Finally, the relative errors between the standard EEG potentials and the transformed ones are evaluated in terms of channel number, scalp regions, electrodes layout, dipole source position and orientation, as well as sensor noise and head model. Main results. Mono-polar reference recordings are usually of large distortions; thus, a re-reference after online mono-polar recording should be adopted in general to mitigate this effect. Among the three re-references, REST is generally superior to AR for all factors compared, and LM performs worst. REST is insensitive to head model perturbation. AR is subject to electrodes coverage and dipole orientation but no close relation with channel number. Significance. These results indicate that REST would be the first choice of re-reference and AR may be an alternative option for high level sensor noise case. Our findings may provide the helpful suggestions on how to obtain the EEG potentials as accurately as possible for

  14. Contribution of EEG in transient neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Tcheumeni, Nadine Carole; Turki, Sahar; Amiel, Hélène; Meppiel, Elodie; Masmoudi, Sana; Roos, Caroline; Crassard, Isabelle; Plaisance, Patrick; Benbetka, Houria; Guichard, Jean-Pierre; Houdart, Emmanuel; Baudoin, Hélène; Kubis, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    Identification of stroke mimics and 'chameleons' among transient neurological deficits (TND) is critical. Diagnostic workup consists of a brain imaging study, for a vascular disease or a brain tumour and EEG, for epileptiform discharges. The precise role of EEG in this diagnostic workup has, however, never been clearly delineated. However, this could be crucial in cases of atypical or incomplete presentation with consequences on disease management and treatment. We analysed the EEG patterns on 95 consecutive patients referred for an EEG within 7 days of a TND with diagnostic uncertainty. Patients were classified at the discharge or the 3-month follow-up visit as: 'ischemic origin', 'migraine aura', 'focal seizure', and 'other'. All patients had a brain imaging study. EEG characteristics were correlated to the TND symptoms, imaging study, and final diagnosis. Sixty four (67%) were of acute onset. Median symptom duration was 45 min. Thirty two % were 'ischemic', 14% 'migraine aura', 19% 'focal seizure', and 36% 'other' cause. EEGs were recorded with a median delay of 1.6 day after symptoms onset. Forty EEGs (42%) were abnormal. Focal slow waves were the most common finding (43%), also in the ischemic group (43%), whether patients had a typical presentation or not. Epileptiform discharges were found in three patients, one with focal seizure and two with migraine aura. Non-specific EEG focal slowing is commonly found in TND, and may last several days. We found no difference in EEG presentation between stroke mimics and stroke chameleons, and between other diagnoses.

  15. Signal Quality Evaluation of Emerging EEG Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Radüntz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG registration as a direct measure of brain activity has unique potentials. It is one of the most reliable and predicative indicators when studying human cognition, evaluating a subject's health condition, or monitoring their mental state. Unfortunately, standard signal acquisition procedures limit the usability of EEG devices and narrow their application outside the lab. Emerging sensor technology allows gel-free EEG registration and wireless signal transmission. Thus, it enables quick and easy application of EEG devices by users themselves. Although a main requirement for the interpretation of an EEG is good signal quality, there is a lack of research on this topic in relation to new devices. In our work, we compared the signal quality of six very different EEG devices. On six consecutive days, 24 subjects wore each device for 60 min and completed tasks and games on the computer. The registered signals were evaluated in the time and frequency domains. In the time domain, we examined the percentage of artifact-contaminated EEG segments and the signal-to-noise ratios. In the frequency domain, we focused on the band power variation in relation to task demands. The results indicated that the signal quality of a mobile, gel-based EEG system could not be surpassed by that of a gel-free system. However, some of the mobile dry-electrode devices offered signals that were almost comparable and were very promising. This study provided a differentiated view of the signal quality of emerging mobile and gel-free EEG recording technology and allowed an assessment of the functionality of the new devices. Hence, it provided a crucial prerequisite for their general application, while simultaneously supporting their further development.

  16. Fact Sheet on Sources and Uses of U.S. Funding Provided in Fiscal Year 2006 for Iraq Relief and Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ... about $5.4 billion, in additional non-IRRF funding made available in FY 2006, to four separate funds, for various relief and reconstruction projects in Iraq, including training of Iraqi security...

  17. Combining Cryptography with EEG Biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaševičius, Robertas; Maskeliūnas, Rytis; Kazanavičius, Egidijus; Woźniak, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    Cryptographic frameworks depend on key sharing for ensuring security of data. While the keys in cryptographic frameworks must be correctly reproducible and not unequivocally connected to the identity of a user, in biometric frameworks this is different. Joining cryptography techniques with biometrics can solve these issues. We present a biometric authentication method based on the discrete logarithm problem and Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) codes, perform its security analysis, and demonstrate its security characteristics. We evaluate a biometric cryptosystem using our own dataset of electroencephalography (EEG) data collected from 42 subjects. The experimental results show that the described biometric user authentication system is effective, achieving an Equal Error Rate (ERR) of 0.024.

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Clinical Genetics Department, Human Genetics & Genome Research Division, ... neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the ... level and by developmental changes2. .... for IQ as a confounding factor.30.

  19. Two channel EEG thought pattern classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D A; Nguyen, H T; Burchey, H A

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time electro-encephalogram (EEG) identification system with the goal of achieving hands free control. With two EEG electrodes placed on the scalp of the user, EEG signals are amplified and digitised directly using a ProComp+ encoder and transferred to the host computer through the RS232 interface. Using a real-time multilayer neural network, the actual classification for the control of a powered wheelchair has a very fast response. It can detect changes in the user's thought pattern in 1 second. Using only two EEG electrodes at positions O(1) and C(4) the system can classify three mental commands (forward, left and right) with an accuracy of more than 79 %

  20. Correlation between intra- and extracranial background EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels W.; Madsen, Rasmus E.

    2012-01-01

    Scalp EEG is the most widely used modality to record the electrical signals of the brain. It is well known that the volume conduction of these brain waves through the brain, cerebrospinal fluid, skull and scalp reduces the spatial resolution and the signal amplitude. So far the volume conduction...... has primarily been investigated by realistic head models or interictal spike analysis. We have set up a novel and more realistic experiment that made it possible to compare the information in the intra- and extracranial EEG. We found that intracranial EEG channels contained correlated patterns when...... placed less than 30 mm apart, that intra- and extracranial channels were partly correlated when placed less than 40 mm apart, and that extracranial channels probably were correlated over larger distances. The underlying cortical area that influences the extracranial EEG is found to be up to 45 cm2...

  1. Amplitude-Integrated EEG in the Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Th value of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG in the newborn is explored by researchers at Washington University, St Louis; Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital, Utrecht, Netherlands; and Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.

  2. Predictive Values of Electroencephalography (EEG) in Epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictive Values of Electroencephalography (EEG) in Epilepsy Patients with Abnormal Behavioural Symptoms. OR Obiako, SO Adeyemi, TL Sheikh, LF Owolabi, MA Majebi, MO Gomina, F Adebayo, EU Iwuozo ...

  3. EEG analysis in a telemedical virtual world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jovanov, E.; Starcevic, D.; Samardzic, A.; Marsh, A.; Obrenovic, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Telemedicine creates virtual medical collaborative environments. We propose here a novel concept of virtual medical devices (VMD) for telemedical applications. VMDs provide different views on biomedical recordings and efficient signal analysis. In this paper we present a telemedical EEG analysis

  4. Connectivity Measures in EEG Microstructural Sleep Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Koupparis, Andreas M; Kokkinos, Vasileios; Koutroumanidis, Michalis; Kostopoulos, George K

    2016-01-01

    During Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep (NREM) the brain is relatively disconnected from the environment, while connectedness between brain areas is also decreased. Evidence indicates, that these dynamic connectivity changes are delivered by microstructural elements of sleep: short periods of environmental stimuli evaluation followed by sleep promoting procedures. The connectivity patterns of the latter, among other aspects of sleep microstructure, are still to be fully elucidated. We suggest here a methodology for the assessment and investigation of the connectivity patterns of EEG microstructural elements, such as sleep spindles. The methodology combines techniques in the preprocessing, estimation, error assessing and visualization of results levels in order to allow the detailed examination of the connectivity aspects (levels and directionality of information flow) over frequency and time with notable resolution, while dealing with the volume conduction and EEG reference assessment. The high temporal and frequency resolution of the methodology will allow the association between the microelements and the dynamically forming networks that characterize them, and consequently possibly reveal aspects of the EEG microstructure. The proposed methodology is initially tested on artificially generated signals for proof of concept and subsequently applied to real EEG recordings via a custom built MATLAB-based tool developed for such studies. Preliminary results from 843 fast sleep spindles recorded in whole night sleep of 5 healthy volunteers indicate a prevailing pattern of interactions between centroparietal and frontal regions. We demonstrate hereby, an opening to our knowledge attempt to estimate the scalp EEG connectivity that characterizes fast sleep spindles via an "EEG-element connectivity" methodology we propose. The application of the latter, via a computational tool we developed suggests it is able to investigate the connectivity patterns related to the occurrence

  5. Reconstruction of atmospheric trace metals pollution in Southwest China using sediments from a large and deep alpine lake: Historical trends, sources and sediment focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qi; Liu, Enfeng; Zhang, Enlou; Nath, Bibhash; Shen, Ji; Yuan, Hezhong; Wang, Rong

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric pollution, one of the leading environmental problems in South and East Asia, and its impact on the terrestrial environmental quality remain poorly understood particularly in alpine areas where both historical and present-day mining and smelting operations might leave an imprint. Here, we reconstructed atmospheric trace metals pollution during the past century using core sediments from a large and deep alpine lake in Southwest China. The implication of in lake and/or in watershed sediment focusing in pollution quantification is discussed by analyzing 15 sediment cores. Factor analysis and enrichment factor indicated Cd, Pb and Sb as the typical pollutants. Distinct peaks of Pb and Sb pollution were observed around the 1920s, but little Pb pollution was detected in recent decades, different from other studies in similar regions. Cadmium pollution was observed until the mid-1980s synchronized with Sb. The distinctive variations in atmospheric trace metal pollution process in Southwest China highlight the regional and sub-regional sources of metal pollutants, which should be primarily attributed to non-ferrous metal smelting emissions. Both natural and anthropogenic metals showed wide concentration ranges though exhibited similar temporal trends in the 15 cores. Spatial variations of anthropogenic metals were influenced by the in-watershed pollutants remobilization, whereas, natural metals were regulated by the detrital materials in the sub-basin. In-lake sediment focusing had little influence on the spatial distributions of all metals, different from the traditional sediment focusing pattern observed in small lakes. Anthropogenic Cd accumulation in sediments ranged from 1.5 to 10.1mgm -2 in a specific core with an average of 6.5mgm -2 for the entire lake, highlighting that a reliable whole-lake pollutant budget requires an analysis of multiple cores. Our study suggests that the management of aquatic ecosystem health should take the remobilization of in

  6. Relationship between speed and EEG activity during imagined and executed hand movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Han; Perdoni, Christopher; He, Bin

    2010-04-01

    The relationship between primary motor cortex and movement kinematics has been shown in nonhuman primate studies of hand reaching or drawing tasks. Studies have demonstrated that the neural activities accompanying or immediately preceding the movement encode the direction, speed and other information. Here we investigated the relationship between the kinematics of imagined and actual hand movement, i.e. the clenching speed, and the EEG activity in ten human subjects. Study participants were asked to perform and imagine clenching of the left hand and right hand at various speeds. The EEG activity in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (18-28 Hz) frequency bands were found to be linearly correlated with the speed of imagery clenching. Similar parametric modulation was also found during the execution of hand movements. A single equation relating the EEG activity to the speed and the hand (left versus right) was developed. This equation, which contained a linear independent combination of the two parameters, described the time-varying neural activity during the tasks. Based on the model, a regression approach was developed to decode the two parameters from the multiple-channel EEG signals. We demonstrated the continuous decoding of dynamic hand and speed information of the imagined clenching. In particular, the time-varying clenching speed was reconstructed in a bell-shaped profile. Our findings suggest an application to providing continuous and complex control of noninvasive brain-computer interface for movement-impaired paralytics.

  7. Sleep EEG of Microcephaly in Zika Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Paulo Afonso Medeiros; Aguiar, Aline de Almeida Xavier; Miranda, Jose Lucivan; Falcao, Alexandre Loverde; Andrade, Claudia Suenia; Reis, Luigi Neves Dos Santos; Almeida, Ellen White R Bacelar; Bello, Yanes Brum; Monfredinho, Arthur; Kanda, Rafael Guimaraes

    2018-01-01

    Microcephaly (MC), previously considered rare, is now a health emergency of international concern because of the devastating Zika virus pandemic outbreak of 2015. The authors describe the electroencephalogram (EEG) findings in sleep EEG of epileptic children who were born with microcephaly in areas of Brazil with active Zika virus transmission between 2014 and 2017. The authors reviewed EEGs from 23 children. Nine were females (39.2%), and the age distribution varied from 4 to 48 months. MC was associated with mother positive serology to toxoplasmosis (toxo), rubella (rub), herpes, and dengue (1 case); toxo (1 case); chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (1 case); syphilis (1 case); and Zika virus (ZIKV) (10 cases). In addition, 1 case was associated with perinatal hypoxia and causes of 9 cases remain unknown. The main background EEG abnormality was diffuse slowing (10 cases), followed by classic (3 cases) and modified (5 cases) hypsarrhythmia. A distinct EEG pattern was seen in ZIKV (5 cases), toxo (2 cases), and undetermined cause (1 case). It was characterized by runs of frontocentrotemporal 4.5-13 Hz activity (7 cases) or diffuse and bilateral runs of 18-24 Hz (1 case). In ZIKV, this rhythmic activity was associated with hypsarrhythmia or slow background. Further studies are necessary to determine if this association is suggestive of ZIKV infection. The authors believe that EEG should be included in the investigation of all newly diagnosed congenital MC, especially those occurring in areas of autochthonous transmission of ZIKV.

  8. Resting State EEG in Children With Learning Disabilities: An Independent Component Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz; Alahmadi, Nsreen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the neurophysiological underpinnings of learning disabilities (LD) in children are examined using resting state EEG. We were particularly interested in the neurophysiological differences between children with learning disabilities not otherwise specified (LD-NOS), learning disabilities with verbal disabilities (LD-Verbal), and healthy control (HC) children. We applied 2 different approaches to examine the differences between the different groups. First, we calculated theta/beta and theta/alpha ratios in order to quantify the relationship between slow and fast EEG oscillations. Second, we used a recently developed method for analyzing spectral EEG, namely the group independent component analysis (gICA) model. Using these measures, we identified substantial differences between LD and HC children and between LD-NOS and LD-Verbal children in terms of their spectral EEG profiles. We obtained the following findings: (a) theta/beta and theta/alpha ratios were substantially larger in LD than in HC children, with no difference between LD-NOS and LD-Verbal children; (b) there was substantial slowing of EEG oscillations, especially for gICs located in frontal scalp positions, with LD-NOS children demonstrating the strongest slowing; (c) the estimated intracortical sources of these gICs were mostly located in brain areas involved in the control of executive functions, attention, planning, and language; and (d) the LD-Verbal children demonstrated substantial differences in EEG oscillations compared with LD-NOS children, and these differences were localized in language-related brain areas. The general pattern of atypical neurophysiological activation found in LD children suggests that they suffer from neurophysiological dysfunction in brain areas involved with the control of attention, executive functions, planning, and language functions. LD-Verbal children also demonstrate atypical activation, especially in language-related brain areas. These atypical

  9. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  10. Comparison of different spatial transformations applied to EEG data: A case study of error processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the effects of different spatial transformations applied to the same scalp-recorded EEG data. The spatial transformations applied are two referencing schemes (average and linked earlobes), the surface Laplacian, and beamforming (a distributed source

  11. The five percent electrode system for high-resolution EEG and ERP measurements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenveld, R.; Praamstra, P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A system for electrode placement is described. It is designed for studies on topography and source analysis of spontaneous and evoked EEG activity. METHOD: The proposed system is based on the extended International 10-20 system which contains 74 electrodes, and extends this system up to

  12. How to make an EEG allocation. The EEG allocation is not decided by solar growth rates but by politicians; Wir basteln uns eine EEG-Umlage. Wie hoch die EEG-Umlage wird, haengt weniger am Solarzubau, sondern ist eine politische Entscheidung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welter, Philippe

    2012-09-15

    In political discussions, the EEG allocation is still viewed as a reference point for the cost of financial incentives for renewable energy sources. However, there are many contributing factors of which the cost of renewables is only one. The most important aspects are privileges for industrial consumers, liquidity reserves, and stock exchange electricity prices. The contribution goes into detail.

  13. Determination of head conductivity frequency response in vivo with optimized EIT-EEG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabek, Juhani; Kalogianni, Konstantina; Rotgans, Edwin; van der Helm, Frans C.T.; Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.; Daffertshofer, Andreas; de Munck, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) benefits from accurate head models. Dipole source modelling errors can be reduced from over 1 cm to a few millimetres by replacing generic head geometry and conductivity with tailored ones. When adequate head geometry is available, electrical impedance tomography (EIT)

  14. Temporal Comparison Between NIRS and EEG Signals During a Mental Arithmetic Task Evaluated with Self-Organizing Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Katsunori; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of brain activity with near-infrared spectroscopy and electroencephalography allows spatiotemporal reconstruction of the hemodynamic response regarding the concentration changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin that are associated with recorded brain activity such as cognitive functions. However, the accuracy of state estimation during mental arithmetic tasks is often different depending on the length of the segment for sampling of NIRS and EEG signals. This study compared the results of a self-organizing map and ANOVA, which were both used to assess the accuracy of state estimation. We conducted an experiment with a mental arithmetic task performed by 10 participants. The lengths of the segment in each time frame for observation of NIRS and EEG signals were compared with the 30-s, 1-min, and 2-min segment lengths. The optimal segment lengths were different for NIRS and EEG signals in the case of classification of feature vectors into the states of performing a mental arithmetic task and being at rest.

  15. Deformation of the Early Glaucomatous Monkey Optic Nerve Head Connective Tissue after Acute IOP Elevation in 3-D Histomorphometric Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Thompson, Hilary; Roberts, Michael D.; Sigal, Ian A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To retest the hypothesis that monkey ONH connective tissues become hypercompliant in early experimental glaucoma (EEG), by using 3-D histomorphometric reconstructions, and to expand the characterization of EEG connective tissue deformation to nine EEG eyes. Methods. Trephinated ONH and peripapillary sclera from both eyes of nine monkeys that were perfusion fixed, with one normal eye at IOP 10 mm Hg and the other EEG eye at 10 (n = 3), 30 (n = 3), or 45 (n = 3) mm Hg were serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, 3-D delineated, and quantified with 3-D reconstruction techniques developed in prior studies by the authors. Overall, and for each monkey, intereye differences (EEG eye minus normal eye) for each parameter were calculated and compared by ANOVA. Hypercompliance in the EEG 30 and 45 eyes was assessed by ANOVA, and deformations in all nine EEG eyes were separately compared by region without regard for fixation IOP. Results. Hypercompliant deformation was not significant in the overall ANOVA, but was suggested in a subset of EEG 30/45 eyes. EEG eye deformations included posterior laminar deformation, neural canal expansion, lamina cribrosa thickening, and posterior (outward) bowing of the peripapillary sclera. Maximum posterior laminar deformation and scleral canal expansion co-localized to either the inferior nasal or superior temporal quadrants in the eyes with the least deformation and involved both quadrants in the eyes achieving the greatest deformation. Conclusions. The data suggest that, in monkey EEG, ONH connective tissue hypercompliance may occur only in a subset of eyes and that early ONH connective tissue deformation is maximized in the superior temporal and/or inferior nasal quadrants. PMID:20702834

  16. Quality-on-Demand Compression of EEG Signals for Telemedicine Applications Using Neural Network Predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sriraam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A telemedicine system using communication and information technology to deliver medical signals such as ECG, EEG for long distance medical services has become reality. In either the urgent treatment or ordinary healthcare, it is necessary to compress these signals for the efficient use of bandwidth. This paper discusses a quality on demand compression of EEG signals using neural network predictors for telemedicine applications. The objective is to obtain a greater compression gains at a low bit rate while preserving the clinical information content. A two-stage compression scheme with a predictor and an entropy encoder is used. The residue signals obtained after prediction is first thresholded using various levels of thresholds and are further quantized and then encoded using an arithmetic encoder. Three neural network models, single-layer and multi-layer perceptrons and Elman network are used and the results are compared with linear predictors such as FIR filters and AR modeling. The fidelity of the reconstructed EEG signal is assessed quantitatively using parameters such as PRD, SNR, cross correlation and power spectral density. It is found from the results that the quality of the reconstructed signal is preserved at a low PRD thereby yielding better compression results compared to results obtained using lossless scheme.

  17. An Adaptive Joint Sparsity Recovery for Compressive Sensing Based EEG System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Djelouat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed tremendous efforts to shape the Internet of things (IoT platforms to be well suited for healthcare applications. These platforms are comprised of a network of wireless sensors to monitor several physical and physiological quantities. For instance, long-term monitoring of brain activities using wearable electroencephalogram (EEG sensors is widely exploited in the clinical diagnosis of epileptic seizures and sleeping disorders. However, the deployment of such platforms is challenged by the high power consumption and system complexity. Energy efficiency can be achieved by exploring efficient compression techniques such as compressive sensing (CS. CS is an emerging theory that enables a compressed acquisition using well-designed sensing matrices. Moreover, system complexity can be optimized by using hardware friendly structured sensing matrices. This paper quantifies the performance of a CS-based multichannel EEG monitoring. In addition, the paper exploits the joint sparsity of multichannel EEG using subspace pursuit (SP algorithm as well as a designed sparsifying basis in order to improve the reconstruction quality. Furthermore, the paper proposes a modification to the SP algorithm based on an adaptive selection approach to further improve the performance in terms of reconstruction quality, execution time, and the robustness of the recovery process.

  18. The added value of simultaneous EEG and amplitude-integrated EEG recordings in three newborn infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Nathalie K. S.; ter Horst, Hendrik J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2007-01-01

    Amplitude-integrated electroencephalograms (aEEGs) recorded by cerebral function monitors (CFMs) are used increasingly to monitor the cerebral activity of newborn infants with encephalopathy. Recently, new CFM devices became available which also reveal the original EEG signals from the same leads.

  19. Provision of regulating energy in the context of direct marketing according to the EEG 2012; Zur Bereitstellung von Regelleistung im Rahmen der Direktvermarktung nach dem EEG 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Daniel [Landgericht Koeln (Germany); Osborne Clarke, Koeln (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Electric power from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants cannot be stored and is not available at all times. The results are volatile power supply curves, risks of availability forecasting for grid owners or (direct) marketers, and enhanced requirements on grid operation with stable frequency. All this will directly affect the reliability of power supply in Germany. Grid integration and market integration of renewable energy sources are directly connected. The contribution discusses the challenges of ensuring grid stability as well as the legal regulations governing the supply of regulating power from renewable energy sources. Since 1 January 2012, regulating power from renewable energy sources is provided within the scope of the EEG only by direct marketing, i.e. without receiving fixed reimbursement rates. Direct marketing is only possible outside the scope of the EEG, but this is without relevance for the time being. (orig.)

  20. EEG II. Annexes and regulations. Comment; EEG II. Anlagen und Verordnungen. Kommentar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenz, Walter (ed.) [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Berg-, Umwelt- und Europarecht

    2016-11-01

    Berlin commentary EEG II: safe through the paraphernalia Like hardly any other law, the Renewable Energies Act (EEG) is subject to constant changes. With the 2014 amendment, the EEG was fundamentally redesigned. This makes the application of the complex rules a challenge even for experts. In addition, the sub-rules contain important statements in the form of numerous annexes and regulations - with the EEG amendment 2014, this has become even more detailed. In it, many calculations are only defined in detail and the legal provisions of the EEG are made more definite and supplemented. The Berlin commentary EEG II accompanies you expertly through this complex matter. Experts explain the widely divergent rules in practice. If necessary for a better understanding, the provisions of the EEG 2014 are also explained. Consistently designed for your practice As a buyer of the work, you also benefit from access to an extensive, regularly updated database. This contains important legal energy regulations of the EU, the federal government and the countries. Even earlier legal positions remain searchable and can be conveniently compared with current versions. So you can see at a glance what has changed. [German] Berliner Kommentar EEG II: sicher durch den Paragrafengeflecht Wie kaum ein anderes Gesetz ist das Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG) staendigen Aenderungen unterworfen. Mit der Novelle 2014 wurde das EEG grundlegend umgestaltet. Dies macht die Anwendung der komplexen Regeln selbst fuer Experten zu einer Herausforderung. Zudem enthaelt auch das untergesetzliche Regelwerk wichtige Aussagen in Form zahlreicher Anlagen und Verordnungen - mit der EEG-Novelle 2014 ist dieses noch ausfuehrlicher geworden. In ihm werden viele Berechnungen erst naeher festgelegt und gesetzliche Bestimmungen des EEG entscheidend konkretisiert und ergaenzt. Der Berliner Kommentar EEG II begleitet Sie fachkundig durch diese komplexe Materie. Experten erlaeutern Ihnen praxisorientiert die

  1. Moving Beyond ERP Components: A Selective Review of Approaches to Integrate EEG and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridwell, David A.; Cavanagh, James F.; Collins, Anne G. E.; Nunez, Michael D.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Stober, Sebastian; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2018-01-01

    Relationships between neuroimaging measures and behavior provide important clues about brain function and cognition in healthy and clinical populations. While electroencephalography (EEG) provides a portable, low cost measure of brain dynamics, it has been somewhat underrepresented in the emerging field of model-based inference. We seek to address this gap in this article by highlighting the utility of linking EEG and behavior, with an emphasis on approaches for EEG analysis that move beyond focusing on peaks or “components” derived from averaging EEG responses across trials and subjects (generating the event-related potential, ERP). First, we review methods for deriving features from EEG in order to enhance the signal within single-trials. These methods include filtering based on user-defined features (i.e., frequency decomposition, time-frequency decomposition), filtering based on data-driven properties (i.e., blind source separation, BSS), and generating more abstract representations of data (e.g., using deep learning). We then review cognitive models which extract latent variables from experimental tasks, including the drift diffusion model (DDM) and reinforcement learning (RL) approaches. Next, we discuss ways to access associations among these measures, including statistical models, data-driven joint models and cognitive joint modeling using hierarchical Bayesian models (HBMs). We think that these methodological tools are likely to contribute to theoretical advancements, and will help inform our understandings of brain dynamics that contribute to moment-to-moment cognitive function. PMID:29632480

  2. Independent component analysis separates spikes of different origin in the EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrestarazu, Elena; Iriarte, Jorge; Artieda, Julio; Alegre, Manuel; Valencia, Miguel; Viteri, César

    2006-02-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a novel system that finds independent sources in recorded signals. Its usefulness in separating epileptiform activity of different origin has not been determined. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that ICA is useful for separating different spikes using samples of EEG of patients with focal epilepsy. Digital EEG samples from four patients with focal epilepsy were included. The patients had temporal (n = 2), centrotemporal (n = 1) or frontal spikes (n = 1). Twenty-six samples with two (or more) spikes from two different patients were created. The selection of the two spikes for each mixed EEG was performed randomly, trying to have all the different combinations and rejecting the mixture of two spikes from the same patient. Two different examiners studied the EEGs using ICA with JADE paradigm in Matlab platform, trying to separate and to identify the spikes. They agreed in the correct separation of the spikes in 24 of the 26 samples, classifying the spikes as frontal, temporal or centrotemporal, left or right sided. The demonstration of the possibility of detecting different artificially mixed spikes confirms that ICA may be useful in separating spikes or other elements in real EEGs.

  3. Recording human cortical population spikes non-invasively--An EEG tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterstraat, Gunnar; Fedele, Tommaso; Burghoff, Martin; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Curio, Gabriel

    2015-07-30

    Non-invasively recorded somatosensory high-frequency oscillations (sHFOs) evoked by electric nerve stimulation are markers of human cortical population spikes. Previously, their analysis was based on massive averaging of EEG responses. Advanced neurotechnology and optimized off-line analysis can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of sHFOs, eventually enabling single-trial analysis. The rationale for developing dedicated low-noise EEG technology for sHFOs is unfolded. Detailed recording procedures and tailored analysis principles are explained step-by-step. Source codes in Matlab and Python are provided as supplementary material online. Combining synergistic hardware and analysis improvements, evoked sHFOs at around 600 Hz ('σ-bursts') can be studied in single-trials. Additionally, optimized spatial filters increase the signal-to-noise ratio of components at about 1 kHz ('κ-bursts') enabling their detection in non-invasive surface EEG. sHFOs offer a unique possibility to record evoked human cortical population spikes non-invasively. The experimental approaches and algorithms presented here enable also non-specialized EEG laboratories to combine measurements of conventional low-frequency EEG with the analysis of concomitant cortical population spike responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-Time EEG Signal Enhancement Using Canonical Correlation Analysis and Gaussian Mixture Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Teng Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG signals are usually contaminated with various artifacts, such as signal associated with muscle activity, eye movement, and body motion, which have a noncerebral origin. The amplitude of such artifacts is larger than that of the electrical activity of the brain, so they mask the cortical signals of interest, resulting in biased analysis and interpretation. Several blind source separation methods have been developed to remove artifacts from the EEG recordings. However, the iterative process for measuring separation within multichannel recordings is computationally intractable. Moreover, manually excluding the artifact components requires a time-consuming offline process. This work proposes a real-time artifact removal algorithm that is based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA, feature extraction, and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM to improve the quality of EEG signals. The CCA was used to decompose EEG signals into components followed by feature extraction to extract representative features and GMM to cluster these features into groups to recognize and remove artifacts. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm was demonstrated by effectively removing artifacts caused by blinks, head/body movement, and chewing from EEG recordings while preserving the temporal and spectral characteristics of the signals that are important to cognitive research.

  5. MATLAB Toolboxes for Reference Electrode Standardization Technique (REST) of Scalp EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Li, Fali; Liu, Qiang; Wen, Xin; Lai, Yongxiu; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    Reference electrode standardization technique (REST) has been increasingly acknowledged and applied as a re-reference technique to transform an actual multi-channels recordings to approximately zero reference ones in electroencephalography/event-related potentials (EEG/ERPs) community around the world in recent years. However, a more easy-to-use toolbox for re-referencing scalp EEG data to zero reference is still lacking. Here, we have therefore developed two open-source MATLAB toolboxes for REST of scalp EEG. One version of REST is closely integrated into EEGLAB, which is a popular MATLAB toolbox for processing the EEG data; and another is a batch version to make it more convenient and efficient for experienced users. Both of them are designed to provide an easy-to-use for novice researchers and flexibility for experienced researchers. All versions of the REST toolboxes can be freely downloaded at http://www.neuro.uestc.edu.cn/rest/Down.html, and the detailed information including publications, comments and documents on REST can also be found from this website. An example of usage is given with comparative results of REST and average reference. We hope these user-friendly REST toolboxes could make the relatively novel technique of REST easier to study, especially for applications in various EEG studies.

  6. Methods for artifact detection and removal from scalp EEG: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Kafiul; Rastegarnia, Amir; Yang, Zhi

    2016-11-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the most popular brain activity recording technique used in wide range of applications. One of the commonly faced problems in EEG recordings is the presence of artifacts that come from sources other than brain and contaminate the acquired signals significantly. Therefore, much research over the past 15 years has focused on identifying ways for handling such artifacts in the preprocessing stage. However, this is still an active area of research as no single existing artifact detection/removal method is complete or universal. This article presents an extensive review of the existing state-of-the-art artifact detection and removal methods from scalp EEG for all potential EEG-based applications and analyses the pros and cons of each method. First, a general overview of the different artifact types that are found in scalp EEG and their effect on particular applications are presented. In addition, the methods are compared based on their ability to remove certain types of artifacts and their suitability in relevant applications (only functional comparison is provided not performance evaluation of methods). Finally, the future direction and expected challenges of current research is discussed. Therefore, this review is expected to be helpful for interested researchers who will develop and/or apply artifact handling algorithm/technique in future for their applications as well as for those willing to improve the existing algorithms or propose a new solution in this particular area of research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic Performance of an Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm for Low-Contrast Detectability with a Third-Generation Dual-Source Multidetector CT Scanner: Potential for Radiation Dose Reduction in a Multireader Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effect of radiation dose reduction on low-contrast detectability by using an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) algorithm in a contrast-detail phantom with a third-generation dual-source multidetector computed tomography (CT) scanner. A proprietary phantom with a range of low-contrast cylindrical objects, representing five contrast levels (range, 5-20 HU) and three sizes (range, 2-6 mm) was fabricated with a three-dimensional printer and imaged with a third-generation dual-source CT scanner at various radiation dose index levels (range, 0.74-5.8 mGy). Image data sets were reconstructed by using different section thicknesses (range, 0.6-5.0 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (filtered back projection [FBP] and ADMIRE with a strength range of three to five). Eleven independent readers blinded to technique and reconstruction method assessed all data sets in two reading sessions by measuring detection accuracy with a two-alternative forced choice approach (first session) and by scoring the total number of visible object groups (second session). Dose reduction potentials based on both reading sessions were estimated. Results between FBP and ADMIRE were compared by using both paired t tests and analysis of variance tests at the 95% significance level. During the first session, detection accuracy increased with increasing contrast, size, and dose index (diagnostic accuracy range, 50%-87%; interobserver variability, ±7%). When compared with FBP, ADMIRE improved detection accuracy by 5.2% on average across the investigated variables (P material is available for this article. RSNA, 2015

  8. Linking EEG signals, brain functions and mental operations: Advantages of the Laplacian transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Franck; Burle, Boris; Spieser, Laure; Carbonnell, Laurence; Meckler, Cédric; Casini, Laurence; Hasbroucq, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a very popular technique for investigating brain functions and/or mental processes. To this aim, EEG activities must be interpreted in terms of brain and/or mental processes. EEG signals being a direct manifestation of neuronal activity it is often assumed that such interpretations are quite obvious or, at least, straightforward. However, they often rely on (explicit or even implicit) assumptions regarding the structures supposed to generate the EEG activities of interest. For these assumptions to be used appropriately, reliable links between EEG activities and the underlying brain structures must be established. Because of volume conduction effects and the mixture of activities they induce, these links are difficult to establish with scalp potential recordings. We present different examples showing how the Laplacian transformation, acting as an efficient source separation method, allowed to establish more reliable links between EEG activities and brain generators and, ultimately, with mental operations. The nature of those links depends on the depth of inferences that can vary from weak to strong. Along this continuum, we show that 1) while the effects of experimental manipulation can appear widely distributed with scalp potentials, Laplacian transformation allows to reveal several generators contributing (in different manners) to these modulations, 2) amplitude variations within the same set of generators can generate spurious differences in scalp potential topographies, often interpreted as reflecting different source configurations. In such a case, Laplacian transformation provides much more similar topographies, evidencing the same generator(s) set, and 3) using the LRP as an index of response activation most often produces ambiguous results, Laplacian-transformed response-locked ERPs obtained over motor areas allow resolving these ambiguities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. ADJUST: An automatic EEG artifact detector based on the joint use of spatial and temporal features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognon, Andrea; Jovicich, Jorge; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Buiatti, Marco

    2011-02-01

    A successful method for removing artifacts from electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings is Independent Component Analysis (ICA), but its implementation remains largely user-dependent. Here, we propose a completely automatic algorithm (ADJUST) that identifies artifacted independent components by combining stereotyped artifact-specific spatial and temporal features. Features were optimized to capture blinks, eye movements, and generic discontinuities on a feature selection dataset. Validation on a totally different EEG dataset shows that (1) ADJUST's classification of independent components largely matches a manual one by experts (agreement on 95.2% of the data variance), and (2) Removal of the artifacted components detected by ADJUST leads to neat reconstruction of visual and auditory event-related potentials from heavily artifacted data. These results demonstrate that ADJUST provides a fast, efficient, and automatic way to use ICA for artifact removal. Copyright © 2010 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  10. A Novel Method for Detection of Epilepsy in Short and Noisy EEG Signals Using Ordinal Pattern Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Veisi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this paper, a novel complexity measure is proposed to detect dynamical changes in nonlinear systems using ordinal pattern analysis of time series data taken from the system. Epilepsy is considered as a dynamical change in nonlinear and complex brain system. The ability of the proposed measure for characterizing the normal and epileptic EEG signals when the signal is short or is contaminated with noise is investigated and compared with some traditional chaos-based measures. Materials and Methods: In the proposed method, the phase space of the time series is reconstructed and then partitioned using ordinal patterns. The partitions can be labeled using a set of symbols. Therefore, the state trajectory is converted to a symbol sequence. A finite state machine is then constructed to model the sequence. A new complexity measure is proposed to detect dynamical changes using the state transition matrix of the state machine. The proposed complexity measure was applied to detect epilepsy in short and noisy EEG signals and the results were compared with some chaotic measures. Results: The results indicate that this complexity measure can distinguish normal and epileptic EEG signals with an accuracy of more than 97% for clean EEG and more than 75% for highly noised EEG signals. Discussion and Conclusion: The complexity measure can be computed in a very fast and easy way and, unlike traditional chaotic measures, is robust with respect to noise corrupting the data. This measure is also capable of dynamical change detection in short time series data.

  11. LORETA EEG phase reset of the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Robert W; North, Duane M; Biver, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore phase reset of 3-dimensional current sources in Brodmann areas located in the human default mode network (DMN) using Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) of the human electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG was recorded from 19 scalp locations from 70 healthy normal subjects ranging in age from 13 to 20 years. A time point by time point computation of LORETA current sources were computed for 14 Brodmann areas comprising the DMN in the delta frequency band. The Hilbert transform of the LORETA time series was used to compute the instantaneous phase differences between all pairs of Brodmann areas. Phase shift and lock durations were calculated based on the 1st and 2nd derivatives of the time series of phase differences. Phase shift duration exhibited three discrete modes at approximately: (1) 25 ms, (2) 50 ms, and (3) 65 ms. Phase lock duration present primarily at: (1) 300-350 ms and (2) 350-450 ms. Phase shift and lock durations were inversely related and exhibited an exponential change with distance between Brodmann areas. The results are explained by local neural packing density of network hubs and an exponential decrease in connections with distance from a hub. The results are consistent with a discrete temporal model of brain function where anatomical hubs behave like a "shutter" that opens and closes at specific durations as nodes of a network giving rise to temporarily phase locked clusters of neurons for specific durations.

  12. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for the correlation coefficients between the subjective ratings on the ten positive emotions per film clip and the corresponding EEG spectral powers in different frequency bands. Based on the similarities of the participants' ratings on the ten positive emotions, these emotions were further clustered into three representative clusters, as 'encouragement' for awe, gratitude, hope, inspiration, pride, 'playfulness' for amusement, joy, interest, and 'harmony' for love, serenity. Using the EEG spectral powers as features, both the binary classification on the higher and lower ratings on these positive emotions and the binary classification between the three positive emotion clusters, achieved accuracies of approximately 80% and above. To our knowledge, our study provides the first piece of evidence on the EEG correlates of different positive emotions.

  13. Highly Efficient Compression Algorithms for Multichannel EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Laxmi; Rahman, Daleef; Routray, Aurobinda

    2018-05-01

    The difficulty associated with processing and understanding the high dimensionality of electroencephalogram (EEG) data requires developing efficient and robust compression algorithms. In this paper, different lossless compression techniques of single and multichannel EEG data, including Huffman coding, arithmetic coding, Markov predictor, linear predictor, context-based error modeling, multivariate autoregression (MVAR), and a low complexity bivariate model have been examined and their performances have been compared. Furthermore, a high compression algorithm named general MVAR and a modified context-based error modeling for multichannel EEG have been proposed. The resulting compression algorithm produces a higher relative compression ratio of 70.64% on average compared with the existing methods, and in some cases, it goes up to 83.06%. The proposed methods are designed to compress a large amount of multichannel EEG data efficiently so that the data storage and transmission bandwidth can be effectively used. These methods have been validated using several experimental multichannel EEG recordings of different subjects and publicly available standard databases. The satisfactory parametric measures of these methods, namely percent-root-mean square distortion, peak signal-to-noise ratio, root-mean-square error, and cross correlation, show their superiority over the state-of-the-art compression methods.

  14. Resting state EEG correlates of memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Kate; Tishler, Ward; Manceor, Stephanie; Hamilton, Kelly; Gaulden, Andrew; Parr, Elaine; Wamsley, Erin J

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies demonstrate that post-training sleep benefits human memory. At the same time, emerging data suggest that other resting states may similarly facilitate consolidation. In order to identify the conditions under which non-sleep resting states benefit memory, we conducted an EEG (electroencephalographic) study of verbal memory retention across 15min of eyes-closed rest. Participants (n=26) listened to a short story and then either rested with their eyes closed, or else completed a distractor task for 15min. A delayed recall test was administered immediately following the rest period. We found, first, that quiet rest enhanced memory for the short story. Improved memory was associated with a particular EEG signature of increased slow oscillatory activity (rest can facilitate memory, and that this may occur via an active process of consolidation supported by slow oscillatory EEG activity and characterized by decreased attention to the external environment. Slow oscillatory EEG rhythms are proposed to facilitate memory consolidation during sleep by promoting hippocampal-cortical communication. Our findings suggest that EEG slow oscillations could play a significant role in memory consolidation during other resting states as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmens, Catherine; Nuyts, Johan; Dupont, Patrick; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Ratib, Osman; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of 18 F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring

  16. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmens, Catherine; Nuyts, Johan; Dupont, Patrick [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Center, University Hospital Gasthuisberg and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Montandon, Marie-Louise; Ratib, Osman; Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: catherine.lemmens@uz.kuleuven.be

    2008-08-21

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of {sup 18}F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  17. How about a Bayesian M/EEG imaging method correcting for incomplete spatio-temporal priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Attias, Hagai T.; Sekihara, Kensuke

    2013-01-01

    previous spatio-temporal inverse M/EEG models, the proposed model benefits of consisting of two source terms, namely, a spatio-temporal pattern term limiting the source configuration to a spatio-temporal subspace and a source correcting term to pick up source activity not covered by the spatio......-temporal prior belief. We have tested the model on both artificial data and real EEG data in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model was tested at different SNRs (-10.0,-5.2, -3.0, -1.0, 0, 0.8, 3.0 dB) using white noise. At all SNRs the sAquavit performs best in AUC measure, e.g. at SNR=0d...

  18. Correlation of BOLD Signal with Linear and Nonlinear Patterns of EEG in Resting State EEG-Informed fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina V. Portnova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent EEG and fMRI acquisitions in resting state showed a correlation between EEG power in various bands and spontaneous BOLD fluctuations. However, there is a lack of data on how changes in the complexity of brain dynamics derived from EEG reflect variations in the BOLD signal. The purpose of our study was to correlate both spectral patterns, as linear features of EEG rhythms, and nonlinear EEG dynamic complexity with neuronal activity obtained by fMRI. We examined the relationships between EEG patterns and brain activation obtained by simultaneous EEG-fMRI during the resting state condition in 25 healthy right-handed adult volunteers. Using EEG-derived regressors, we demonstrated a substantial correlation of BOLD signal changes with linear and nonlinear features of EEG. We found the most significant positive correlation of fMRI signal with delta spectral power. Beta and alpha spectral features had no reliable effect on BOLD fluctuation. However, dynamic changes of alpha peak frequency exhibited a significant association with BOLD signal increase in right-hemisphere areas. Additionally, EEG dynamic complexity as measured by the HFD of the 2–20 Hz EEG frequency range significantly correlated with the activation of cortical and subcortical limbic system areas. Our results indicate that both spectral features of EEG frequency bands and nonlinear dynamic properties of spontaneous EEG are strongly associated with fluctuations of the BOLD signal during the resting state condition.

  19. Investigating reading comprehension through EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Baretta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2012n63p69   Experimental studies point that different factors can influence reading comprehension, such as the topic, text type, reading task, and others. The advances in technologies for the past decades have provided researchers with several possibilities to investigate what goes on in one’s brain since their eyes meet the page until comprehension is achieved. Since the mid-80’s, numerous studies have been conducted with the use of the electroencephalogram (EEG to investigate the process of reading, through the analysis of different components – n400, n100 or n1, P2, among others. These components reveal, for example, how the brain integrates the meaning of a specific word in the semantic context of a given sentence.  based on previous studies, which demonstrate that different types of words affect cognitive load, this paper aims at investigating how the brain processes function and content words inserted in expository and narrative texts with suitable / unsuitable conclusions. results showed that the type of text and word influence the cognitive load in different scalp areas (midline, right and left hemispheres. The  n1s were more pronounced to the content words inserted in narrative texts and to the function words inserted in the expository type of texts, corroborating former studies.

  20. Identifying the effects of microsaccades in tripolar EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisle, Rachel; Steele, Preston; Bartels, Rachel; Lei Ding; Sunderam, Sridhar; Besio, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Microsaccades are tiny, involuntary eye movements that occur during fixation, and they are necessary to human sight to maintain a sharp image and correct the effects of other fixational movements. Researchers have theorized and studied the effects of microsaccades on electroencephalography (EEG) signals to understand and eliminate the unwanted artifacts from EEG. The tripolar concentric ring electrode (TCRE) sensors are used to acquire TCRE EEG (tEEG). The tEEG detects extremely focal signals from directly below the TCRE sensor. We have noticed a slow wave frequency found in some tEEG recordings. Therefore, we conducted the current work to determine if there was a correlation between the slow wave in the tEEG and the microsaccades. This was done by analyzing the coherence of the frequency spectrums of both tEEG and eye movement in recordings where microsaccades are present. Our preliminary findings show that there is a correlation between the two.

  1. Removal of ocular artifacts from the REM sleep EEG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterman, D.; Woestenburg, J.C.; Elton, M.; Hofman, W.; Kok, A.

    1992-01-01

    The present report concerns the first study in which electrooculographic (EOG) contamination of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is systematically investigated. Contamination of REM sleep EEG recordings in six subjects was evaluated in the frequency domain.

  2. Extended seizure detection algorithm for intracranial EEG recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, T. W.; Remvig, L. S.; Henriksen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We implemented and tested an existing seizure detection algorithm for scalp EEG (sEEG) with the purpose of improving it to intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings. Method: iEEG was obtained from 16 patients with focal epilepsy undergoing work up for resective epilepsy surgery. Each patient...... had 4 or 5 recorded seizures and 24 hours of non-ictal data were used for evaluation. Data from three electrodes placed at the ictal focus were used for the analysis. A wavelet based feature extraction algorithm delivered input to a support vector machine (SVM) classifier for distinction between ictal...... and non-ictal iEEG. We compare our results to a method published by Shoeb in 2004. While the original method on sEEG was optimal with the use of only four subbands in the wavelet analysis, we found that better seizure detection could be made if all subbands were used for iEEG. Results: When using...

  3. GRASP. Development of an event reconstruction method using a gamma ray air shower parameterisation and applications to γ-ray sources with H.E.S.S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillert, Andreas

    2014-07-24

    The H.E.S.S. experiment, with its high sensitivity and large field-of-view, is an ideal instrument to survey the Milky Way in VHE γ-rays. An accurate reconstruction of the γ-ray direction as well as a strong reduction of the hadronic background is essential for the analysis of the data. In this work a reconstruction algorithm is developed that applies a fit of pixel amplitudes to an expected image obtained from a Gamma Ray Air Shower Parameterisation (GRASP). This parameterisation was obtained using Monte Carlo air shower simulations by parameterising the angular Cherenkov photon distribution with suitable analytical functions. Furthermore, it provides new classifying variables to differentiate γ-ray induced air showers from hadronic ones. The reconstruction of air shower parameters is achieved by a maximum likelihood fit and improves the angular resolution by 20-30% with respect to traditional image moment analysis methods. In combination with a MVA-based background rejection method using these new classifying variables the sensitivity can be improved by about 70%. An analysis of the Pulsar Wind Nebula MSH 15-5-2 and investigation of its morphology and spectral properties show an indication of energy dependent morphology in VHE γ-rays.

  4. The market premium of the German Renewable Energy Sources Act 2012. Does it really contribute to both market and system integration of renewables?; Die Marktpraemie im EEG 2012. Ein sinnvoller Beitrag zur Markt- und Systemintegration erneuerbarer Energien?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawel, Erik [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. Oekonomie; Univ. Leipzig (Germany). Inst. fuer Infrastruktur und Ressourcenmanagement; Purkus, Alexandra [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung (Germany). Dept. Bioenergie

    2013-03-15

    With the share of renewable energies within the electricity sector rising, improving their market integration (i.e. inclusion in the steering and remuneration processes of the electricity market) and system integration (i.e. enhanced responsibility for grid stability) is of increasing importance. To transform the energy system efficiently while ensuring security of supply, it is necessary to increase the alignment of renewable electricity production with short- and long-term market signals. The German Renewable Energy Sources Act 2012 introduced the market premium to provide market experience to renewable plant operators and incentives for demand-oriented electricity production. Shortly after its introduction, the instrument is already being criticised as ineffective and expensive. Building on early experiences, this article examines whether the market premium in its current design improves market and/or system integration, and if it seems suitable in principle to contribute to these aims (effectiveness). Also, potential efficiency gains and additional costs of ''administering integration'' are discussed (efficiency). While market integration in a strict sense (i.e. exposing renewables to price risks) is not the purpose of the market premium, it has successfully increased participation in direct marketing. However, windfall profits are high, and the benefits of gradually leading plant operators towards the market are questionable. Incentives for demand-oriented electricity production are established, but they prove insufficient particularly in the case of intermittent renewable energy sources. A continuation of the instrument in its current form therefore does not seem recommendable. To conclude, potential alternative solutions are presented.

  5. [EEG changes in symptomatic headache caused by bruxism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieselmann, G; Grabmair, W; Logar, C; Permann, R; Moser, F

    1987-02-20

    EEG recordings were carried out on 36 patients with the verified diagnosis of bruxism and unilateral headache. Occlusal splints were applied in the long-term management of these patients. Initial EEG recordings showed pathological changes in 56% of the patients. The EEG recordings were repeated two and six weeks later in these patients and following improvement in the clinical symptomatology pathological EEG patterns were detected in only 22% of all cases. This decrease is of statistical significance.

  6. Temporal lobe deficits in murderers: EEG findings undetected by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzke-Kopp, L M; Raine, A; Buchsbaum, M; LaCasse, L

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates electroencephalography (EEG) and positron emission tomography (PET) in the same subjects. Fourteen murderers were assessed by using both PET (while they were performing the continuous performance task) and EEG during a resting state. EEG revealed significant increases in slow-wave activity in the temporal, but not frontal, lobe in murderers, in contrast to prior PET findings that showed reduced prefrontal, but not temporal, glucose metabolism. Results suggest that resting EEG shows empirical utility distinct from PET activation findings.

  7. The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrusio, Walter; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Vanacore, Nicola; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. EEG-guided meditation: A personalized approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A; Fingelkurts, Alexander A; Kallio-Tamminen, Tarja

    2015-12-01

    The therapeutic potential of meditation for physical and mental well-being is well documented, however the possibility of adverse effects warrants further discussion of the suitability of any particular meditation practice for every given participant. This concern highlights the need for a personalized approach in the meditation practice adjusted for a concrete individual. This can be done by using an objective screening procedure that detects the weak and strong cognitive skills in brain function, thus helping design a tailored meditation training protocol. Quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) is a suitable tool that allows identification of individual neurophysiological types. Using qEEG screening can aid developing a meditation training program that maximizes results and minimizes risk of potential negative effects. This brief theoretical-conceptual review provides a discussion of the problem and presents some illustrative results on the usage of qEEG screening for the guidance of mediation personalization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Widespread EEG changes precede focal seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Perucca

    Full Text Available The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal, and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline. Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples. At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development, but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures.

  10. Vaginal reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients

  11. ACL Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in moderate exercise and recreational activities, or play sports that put less stress on the knees. ACL reconstruction is generally recommended if: You're an athlete and want to continue in your sport, especially if the sport involves jumping, cutting or ...

  12. The colorful brain: Visualization of EEG background patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a method to transform routine clinical EEG recordings to an alternative visual domain. The method is intended to support the classic visual interpretation of the EEG background pattern and to facilitate communication about relevant EEG characteristics. In addition, it provides

  13. A comparison of EEG spectral entropy with conventional quantitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of EEG spectral entropy with conventional quantitative EEG at varying depths of sevoflurane anaesthesia. PR Bartel, FJ Smith, PJ Becker. Abstract. Background and Aim: Recently an electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral entropy module (M-ENTROPY) for an anaesthetic monitor has become commercially ...

  14. Improving the Specificity of EEG for Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-B. Vialatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. EEG has great potential as a cost-effective screening tool for Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the specificity of EEG is not yet sufficient to be used in clinical practice. In an earlier study, we presented preliminary results suggesting improved specificity of EEG to early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The key to this improvement is a new method for extracting sparse oscillatory events from EEG signals in the time-frequency domain. Here we provide a more detailed analysis, demonstrating improved EEG specificity for clinical screening of MCI (mild cognitive impairment patients. Methods. EEG data was recorded of MCI patients and age-matched control subjects, in rest condition with eyes closed. EEG frequency bands of interest were θ (3.5–7.5 Hz, α1 (7.5–9.5 Hz, α2 (9.5–12.5 Hz, and β (12.5–25 Hz. The EEG signals were transformed in the time-frequency domain using complex Morlet wavelets; the resulting time-frequency maps are represented by sparse bump models. Results. Enhanced EEG power in the θ range is more easily detected through sparse bump modeling; this phenomenon explains the improved EEG specificity obtained in our previous studies. Conclusions. Sparse bump modeling yields informative features in EEG signal. These features increase the specificity of EEG for diagnosing AD.

  15. Analysis of routine EEG usage in a general adult ICU.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, J C

    2009-09-01

    Non-convulsive seizures and status epilepticus are common in brain-injured patients in intensive care units. Continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) monitoring is the most sensitive means of their detection. In centres where cEEG is unavailable, routine EEG is often utilized for diagnosis although its sensitivity is lower.

  16. EEG Neurofeedback treatments in children with ADHD: An updated meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Arthur eMicoulaud Franchi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective We undertook a meta-analysis of published Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT with semi-active control and sham-NF groups to determine whether EEG-NF significantly improves the overall symptoms, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity dimensions for probably unblinded assessment (parent assessment and probably blinded assessment (teacher assessment in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD.Data Sources A systematic review identified independent studies that were eligible for inclusion in a random effects meta-analysis.Data Extraction Effect sizes for ADHD symptoms were expressed as standardized mean differences (SMD with 95% confidence intervals.ResultsFive identified studies met eligibility criteria, 263 patients with ADHD were included, 146 patients were trained with EEG-NF. On parent assessment (probably unblinded assessment, the overall ADHD score (SMD=-0.49 [-0.74, -0.24], the inattention score (SMD=-0.46 [-0.76, -0.15] and the hyperactivity/impulsivity score (SMD=-0.34 [-0.59, -0.09] were significantly improved in patients receiving EEG-NF compared to controls. On teacher assessment (probably blinded assessment, only the inattention score was significantly improved in patients receiving EEG-NF compared to controls (SMD=-0.30 [-0.58, -0.03]. ConclusionsThis meta-analysis of EEG-NF in children with ADHD highlights improvement in the inattention dimension of ADHD symptoms. Future investigations should pay greater attention to adequately blinded studies and EEG-NF protocols that carefully control the implementation and embedding of training.

  17. Multi-Class Motor Imagery EEG Decoding for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deng; Miao, Duoqian; Blohm, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies show that scalp electroencephalography (EEG) as a non-invasive interface has great potential for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). However, one factor that has limited practical applications for EEG-based BCI so far is the difficulty to decode brain signals in a reliable and efficient way. This paper proposes a new robust processing framework for decoding of multi-class motor imagery (MI) that is based on five main processing steps. (i) Raw EEG segmentation without the need of visual artifact inspection. (ii) Considering that EEG recordings are often contaminated not just by electrooculography (EOG) but also other types of artifacts, we propose to first implement an automatic artifact correction method that combines regression analysis with independent component analysis for recovering the original source signals. (iii) The significant difference between frequency components based on event-related (de-) synchronization and sample entropy is then used to find non-contiguous discriminating rhythms. After spectral filtering using the discriminating rhythms, a channel selection algorithm is used to select only relevant channels. (iv) Feature vectors are extracted based on the inter-class diversity and time-varying dynamic characteristics of the signals. (v) Finally, a support vector machine is employed for four-class classification. We tested our proposed algorithm on experimental data that was obtained from dataset 2a of BCI competition IV (2008). The overall four-class kappa values (between 0.41 and 0.80) were comparable to other models but without requiring any artifact-contaminated trial removal. The performance showed that multi-class MI tasks can be reliably discriminated using artifact-contaminated EEG recordings from a few channels. This may be a promising avenue for online robust EEG-based BCI applications. PMID:23087607

  18. Wake and Sleep EEG in Patients With Huntington Disease: An eLORETA Study and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Carla; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Losurdo, Anna; Calandra Buonaura, Giovanna; Imperatori, Claudio; Cortelli, Pietro; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the EEG modifications in patients with Huntington disease (HD) compared with controls, by means of the exact LOw REsolution Tomography (eLORETA) software. We evaluated EEG changes during wake, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Moreover, we reviewed the literature concerning EEG modifications in HD. Twenty-three consecutive adult patients affected by HD were enrolled, 14 women and 9 men, mean age was 57.0 ± 12.4 years. Control subjects were healthy volunteers (mean age 58.2 ± 14.6 years). EEG and polygraphic recordings were performed during wake (before sleep) and during sleep. Sources of EEG activities were determined using the eLORETA software. In wake EEG, significant differences between patients and controls were detected in the delta frequency band (threshold T = ±4.606; P < .01) in the Brodmann areas (BAs) 3, 4, and 6 bilaterally. In NREM sleep, HD patients showed increased alpha power (T = ±4.516; P < .01) in BAs 4 and 6 bilaterally; decreased theta power (T = ±4.516; P < .01) in the BAs 23, 29, and 30; and decreased beta power (T = ±4.516; P < .01) in the left BA 30. During REM, HD patients presented decreased theta and alpha power (threshold T = ±4.640; P < .01) in the BAs 23, 29, 30, and 31 bilaterally. In conclusion, EEG data suggest a motor cortex dysfunction during wake and sleep in HD patients, which correlates with the clinical and polysomnographic evidence of increased motor activity during wake and NREM, and nearly absent motor abnormalities in REM. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2016.

  19. Single camera photogrammetry system for EEG electrode identification and localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Uğur; Sengül, Gökhan

    2010-04-01

    In this study, photogrammetric coordinate measurement and color-based identification of EEG electrode positions on the human head are simultaneously implemented. A rotating, 2MP digital camera about 20 cm above the subject's head is used and the images are acquired at predefined stop points separated azimuthally at equal angular displacements. In order to realize full automation, the electrodes have been labeled by colored circular markers and an electrode recognition algorithm has been developed. The proposed method has been tested by using a plastic head phantom carrying 25 electrode markers. Electrode locations have been determined while incorporating three different methods: (i) the proposed photogrammetric method, (ii) conventional 3D radiofrequency (RF) digitizer, and (iii) coordinate measurement machine having about 6.5 mum accuracy. It is found that the proposed system automatically identifies electrodes and localizes them with a maximum error of 0.77 mm. It is suggested that this method may be used in EEG source localization applications in the human brain.

  20. MEG and EEG data analysis with MNE-Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eGramfort

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography (M/EEG measure the weakelectromagnetic signals generated by neuronal activity in the brain. Using thesesignals to characterize and locate neural activation in the brain is achallenge that requires expertise in physics, signalprocessing, statistics, and numerical methods. As part of the MNE softwaresuite, MNE-Python is an open-sourcesoftware package that addresses this challenge by providingstate-of-the-art algorithms implemented in Python that cover multiple methods of data preprocessing, source localization, statistical analysis, and estimation offunctional connectivity between distributed brain regions.All algorithms and utility functions are implemented in a consistent manner with well-documented interfaces, enabling users to create M/EEG data analysispipelines by writing Python scripts.Moreover, MNE-Python is tightly integrated with the core Python libraries for scientificcomptutation (Numpy, Scipy and visualization (matplotlib and Mayavi, as wellas the greater neuroimaging ecosystem in Python via the Nibabel package. The code is provided under the new BSD licenseallowing code reuse, even in commercial products. Although MNE-Python has onlybeen under heavy development for a couple of years, it has rapidly evolved withexpanded analysis capabilities and pedagogical tutorials because multiple labs have collaborated during code development to help share best practices.MNE-Python also gives easy access to preprocessed datasets,helping users to get started quickly and facilitating reproducibility ofmethods by other researchers. Full documentation, including dozens ofexamples, is available at http://martinos.org/mne.

  1. Optimizing detection and analysis of slow waves in sleep EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensen, Armand; Riedner, Brady; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of individual slow waves in EEG recording during sleep provides both greater sensitivity and specificity compared to spectral power measures. However, parameters for detection and analysis have not been widely explored and validated. We present a new, open-source, Matlab based, toolbox for the automatic detection and analysis of slow waves; with adjustable parameter settings, as well as manual correction and exploration of the results using a multi-faceted visualization tool. We explore a large search space of parameter settings for slow wave detection and measure their effects on a selection of outcome parameters. Every choice of parameter setting had some effect on at least one outcome parameter. In general, the largest effect sizes were found when choosing the EEG reference, type of canonical waveform, and amplitude thresholding. Previously published methods accurately detect large, global waves but are conservative and miss the detection of smaller amplitude, local slow waves. The toolbox has additional benefits in terms of speed, user-interface, and visualization options to compare and contrast slow waves. The exploration of parameter settings in the toolbox highlights the importance of careful selection of detection METHODS: The sensitivity and specificity of the automated detection can be improved by manually adding or deleting entire waves and or specific channels using the toolbox visualization functions. The toolbox standardizes the detection procedure, sets the stage for reliable results and comparisons and is easy to use without previous programming experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modification of EEG power spectra and EEG connectivity in autobiographical memory: a sLORETA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Claudio; Brunetti, Riccardo; Farina, Benedetto; Speranza, Anna Maria; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Contardi, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the modifications of scalp EEG power spectra and EEG connectivity during the autobiographical memory test (AM-T) and during the retrieval of an autobiographical event (the high school final examination, Task 2). Seventeen healthy volunteers were enrolled (9 women and 8 men, mean age 23.4 ± 2.8 years, range 19-30). EEG was recorded at baseline and while performing the autobiographical memory (AM) tasks, by means of 19 surface electrodes and a nasopharyngeal electrode. EEG analysis was conducted by means of the standardized LOw Resolution Electric Tomography (sLORETA) software. Power spectra and lagged EEG coherence were compared between EEG acquired during the memory tasks and baseline recording. The frequency bands considered were as follows: delta (0.5-4 Hz); theta (4.5-7.5 Hz); alpha (8-12.5 Hz); beta1 (13-17.5 Hz); beta2 (18-30 Hz); gamma (30.5-60 Hz). During AM-T, we observed a significant delta power increase in left frontal and midline cortices (T = 3.554; p < 0.05) and increased EEG connectivity in delta band in prefrontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital areas, and for gamma bands in the left temporo-parietal regions (T = 4.154; p < 0.05). In Task 2, we measured an increased power in the gamma band located in the left posterior midline areas (T = 3.960; p < 0.05) and a significant increase in delta band connectivity in the prefrontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital areas, and in the gamma band involving right temporo-parietal areas (T = 4.579; p < 0.05). These results indicate that AM retrieval engages in a complex network which is mediated by both low- (delta) and high-frequency (gamma) EEG bands.

  3. Implementation of a cone-beam reconstruction algorithm for the single-circle source orbit with embedded misalignment correction using homogeneous coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karolczak, Marek; Schaller, Stefan; Engelke, Klaus; Lutz, Andreas; Taubenreuther, Ulrike; Wiesent, Karl; Kalender, Willi

    2001-01-01

    We present an efficient implementation of an approximate cone-beam image reconstruction algorithm for application in tomography, which accounts for scanner mechanical misalignment. The implementation is based on the algorithm proposed by Feldkamp et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 6, 612-619 (1984)] and is directed at circular scan paths. The algorithm has been developed for the purpose of reconstructing volume data from projections acquired in an experimental x-ray microtomography (μCT) scanner [Engelke et al., Der Radiologe 39, 203-212 (1999)]. To mathematically model misalignment we use matrix notation with homogeneous coordinates to describe the scanner geometry, its misalignment, and the acquisition process. For convenience analysis is carried out for x-ray CT scanners, but it is applicable to any tomographic modality, where two-dimensional projection acquisition in cone beam geometry takes place, e.g., single photon emission computerized tomography. We derive an algorithm assuming misalignment errors to be small enough to weight and filter original projections and to embed compensation for misalignment in the backprojection. We verify the algorithm on simulations of virtual phantoms and scans of a physical multidisk (Defrise) phantom

  4. Novel artefact removal algorithms for co-registered EEG/fMRI based on selective averaging and subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munck, Jan C; van Houdt, Petra J; Gonçalves, Sónia I; van Wegen, Erwin; Ossenblok, Pauly P W

    2013-01-01

    Co-registered EEG and functional MRI (EEG/fMRI) is a potential clinical tool for planning invasive EEG in patients with epilepsy. In addition, the analysis of EEG/fMRI data provides a fundamental insight into the precise physiological meaning of both fMRI and EEG data. Routine application of EEG/fMRI for localization of epileptic sources is hampered by large artefacts in the EEG, caused by switching of scanner gradients and heartbeat effects. Residuals of the ballistocardiogram (BCG) artefacts are similarly shaped as epileptic spikes, and may therefore cause false identification of spikes. In this study, new ideas and methods are presented to remove gradient artefacts and to reduce BCG artefacts of different shapes that mutually overlap in time. Gradient artefacts can be removed efficiently by subtracting an average artefact template when the EEG sampling frequency and EEG low-pass filtering are sufficient in relation to MR gradient switching (Gonçalves et al., 2007). When this is not the case, the gradient artefacts repeat themselves at time intervals that depend on the remainder between the fMRI repetition time and the closest multiple of the EEG acquisition time. These repetitions are deterministic, but difficult to predict due to the limited precision by which these timings are known. Therefore, we propose to estimate gradient artefact repetitions using a clustering algorithm, combined with selective averaging. Clustering of the gradient artefacts yields cleaner EEG for data recorded during scanning of a 3T scanner when using a sampling frequency of 2048 Hz. It even gives clean EEG when the EEG is sampled with only 256 Hz. Current BCG artefacts-reduction algorithms based on average template subtraction have the intrinsic limitation that they fail to deal properly with artefacts that overlap in time. To eliminate this constraint, the precise timings of artefact overlaps were modelled and represented in a sparse matrix. Next, the artefacts were disentangled with

  5. Random matrix analysis of human EEG data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šeba, Petr

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 91, - (2003), s. 198104-1 - 198104-4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : random matrix theory * EEG signal Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 7.035, year: 2003

  6. Illumination influences working memory: an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Young; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Pak, Hyensou; Jeong, Yeon-Hong; Kim, Eosu

    2013-09-05

    Illumination conditions appear to influence working efficacy in everyday life. In the present study, we obtained electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of working-memory load, and investigated how these waveforms are modulated by illumination conditions. We hypothesized that illumination conditions may affect cognitive performance. We designed an EEG study to monitor and record participants' EEG during the Sternberg working memory task under four different illumination conditions. Illumination conditions were generated with a factorial design of two color-temperatures (3000 and 7100 K) by two illuminance levels (150 and 700 lx). During a working memory task, we observed that high illuminance led to significantly lower frontal EEG theta activity than did low illuminance. These differences persisted despite no significant difference in task performance between illumination conditions. We found that the latency of an early event-related potential component, such as N1, was significantly modulated by the illumination condition. The fact that the illumination condition affects brain activity but not behavioral performance suggests that the lighting conditions used in the present study did not influence the performance stage of behavioral processing. Nevertheless, our findings provide objective evidence that illumination conditions modulate brain activity. Further studies are necessary to refine the optimal lighting parameters for facilitating working memory. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Discriminant Multitaper Component Analysis of EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Sajda, Paul

    the method for predicting the handedness of a subject’s button press given multivariate EEG data. We show that our method learns multitapers sensitive to oscillatory activity in the 8–12 Hz range with spatial filters selective for lateralized motor cortex. This finding is consistent with the well-known mu...

  8. EEG-based characterization of flicker perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazo, M.; Tsoneva, T.; Garcia Molina, G.

    2013-01-01

    Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP) is an oscillatory electrical response appearing in the electroencephalogram (EEG) in response to flicker stimulation. The SSVEP manifests more prominently in electrodes located near the visual cortex and has oscillatory components at the stimulation

  9. 3D Printed Dry EEG Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachunov, Sammy; Casson, Alexander J

    2016-10-02

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a procedure that records brain activity in a non-invasive manner. The cost and size of EEG devices has decreased in recent years, facilitating a growing interest in wearable EEG that can be used out-of-the-lab for a wide range of applications, from epilepsy diagnosis, to stroke rehabilitation, to Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI). A major obstacle for these emerging applications is the wet electrodes, which are used as part of the EEG setup. These electrodes are attached to the human scalp using a conductive gel, which can be uncomfortable to the subject, causes skin irritation, and some gels have poor long-term stability. A solution to this problem is to use dry electrodes, which do not require conductive gel, but tend to have a higher noise floor. This paper presents a novel methodology for the design and manufacture of such dry electrodes. We manufacture the electrodes using low cost desktop 3D printers and off-the-shelf components for the first time. This allows quick and inexpensive electrode manufacturing and opens the possibility of creating electrodes that are customized for each individual user. Our 3D printed electrodes are compared against standard wet electrodes, and the performance of the proposed electrodes is suitable for BCI applications, despite the presence of additional noise.

  10. 3D Printed Dry EEG Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Krachunov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG is a procedure that records brain activity in a non-invasive manner. The cost and size of EEG devices has decreased in recent years, facilitating a growing interest in wearable EEG that can be used out-of-the-lab for a wide range of applications, from epilepsy diagnosis, to stroke rehabilitation, to Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI. A major obstacle for these emerging applications is the wet electrodes, which are used as part of the EEG setup. These electrodes are attached to the human scalp using a conductive gel, which can be uncomfortable to the subject, causes skin irritation, and some gels have poor long-term stability. A solution to this problem is to use dry electrodes, which do not require conductive gel, but tend to have a higher noise floor. This paper presents a novel methodology for the design and manufacture of such dry electrodes. We manufacture the electrodes using low cost desktop 3D printers and off-the-shelf components for the first time. This allows quick and inexpensive electrode manufacturing and opens the possibility of creating electrodes that are customized for each individual user. Our 3D printed electrodes are compared against standard wet electrodes, and the performance of the proposed electrodes is suitable for BCI applications, despite the presence of additional noise.

  11. An overview of an amplitude integrated EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyo Handryastuti

    2007-05-01

    for neurodevelopmental problem in conditions such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, prematurity, neonatal seizures, central nervous system infection, metabolic disorders, intraventricular or intracranial bleeding and brain malformation. This article gives an overview about aEEG and its role in newborn.

  12. Microneedle array electrode for human EEG recording.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüttge, Regina; van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Vander Sloten, Jos; Verdonck, Pascal; Nyssen, Marc; Haueisen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Microneedle array electrodes for EEG significantly reduce the mounting time, particularly by circumvention of the need for skin preparation by scrubbing. We designed a new replication process for numerous types of microneedle arrays. Here, polymer microneedle array electrodes with 64 microneedles,

  13. EEG signatures of arm isometric exertions in preparation, planning and execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Lakany, Heba; Conway, Bernard A

    2014-04-15

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) activity patterns in humans during motor behaviour provide insight into normal motor control processes and for diagnostic and rehabilitation applications. While the patterns preceding brisk voluntary movements, and especially movement execution, are well described, there are few EEG studies that address the cortical activation patterns seen in isometric exertions and their planning. In this paper, we report on time and time-frequency EEG signatures in experiments in normal subjects (n=8), using multichannel EEG during motor preparation, planning and execution of directional centre-out arm isometric exertions performed at the wrist in the horizontal plane, in response to instruction-delay visual cues. Our observations suggest that isometric force exertions are accompanied by transient and sustained event-related potentials (ERP) and event-related (de-)synchronisations (ERD/ERS), comparable to those of a movement task. Furthermore, the ERPs and ERD/ERS are also observed during preparation and planning of the isometric task. Comparison of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian ERPs indicates the contribution of superficial sources in supplementary and pre-motor (FC(z)), parietal (CP(z)) and primary motor cortical areas (C₁ and FC₁) to ERPs (primarily negative peaks in frontal and positive peaks in parietal areas), but contribution of deep sources to sustained time-domain potentials (negativity in planning and positivity in execution). Transient and sustained ERD patterns in μ and β frequency bands of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian EEG indicate the contribution of both superficial and deep sources to ERD/ERS. As no physical displacement happens during the task, we can infer that the underlying mechanisms of motor-related ERPs and ERD/ERS patterns do not only depend on change in limb coordinate or muscle-length-dependent ascending sensory information and are primary generated by motor preparation, direction

  14. Simultaneous recording of EEG and electromyographic polygraphy increases the diagnostic yield of video-EEG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Aron T; Briggs, Belinda A; Seneviratne, Udaya

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the usefulness of adjunctive electromyographic (EMG) polygraphy in the diagnosis of clinical events captured during long-term video-EEG monitoring. A total of 40 patients (21 women, 19 men) aged between 19 and 72 years (mean 43) investigated using video-EEG monitoring were studied. Electromyographic activity was simultaneously recorded with EEG in four patients selected on clinical grounds. In these patients, surface EMG electrodes were placed over muscles suspected to be activated during a typical clinical event. Of the 40 patients investigated, 24 (60%) were given a diagnosis, whereas 16 (40%) remained undiagnosed. All four patients receiving adjunctive EMG polygraphy obtained a diagnosis, with three of these diagnoses being exclusively reliant on the EMG recordings. Specifically, one patient was diagnosed with propriospinal myoclonus, another patient was diagnosed with facio-mandibular myoclonus, and a third patient was found to have bruxism and periodic leg movements of sleep. The information obtained from surface EMG recordings aided the diagnosis of clinical events captured during video-EEG monitoring in 7.5% of the total cohort. This study suggests that EEG-EMG polygraphy may be used as a technique of improving the diagnostic yield of video-EEG monitoring in selected cases.

  15. Serial EEG findings in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: correlation between clinical course and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun; Kawamoto, Michi; Hikiami, Ryota; Ishii, Junko; Yoshimura, Hajime; Matsumoto, Riki; Kohara, Nobuo

    2017-12-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a paraneoplastic encephalitis characterised by psychiatric features, involuntary movement, and autonomic instability. Various EEG findings in patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis have been reported, however, the correlation between the EEG findings and clinical course of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis remains unclear. We describe a patient with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with a focus on EEG findings, which included: status epilepticus, generalised rhythmic delta activity, excess beta activity, extreme delta brush, and paroxysmal alpha activity upon arousal from sleep, which we term"arousal alpha pattern". Initially, status epilepticus was observed on the EEG when the patient was comatose with conjugate deviation. The EEG then indicated excess beta activity, followed by the emergence of continuous slow activity, including generalised rhythmic delta activity and extreme delta brush, in the most severe phase. Slow activity gradually faded in parallel with clinical amelioration. Excess beta activity persisted, even after the patient became almost independent in daily activities, and finally disappeared with full recovery. In summary, our patient with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis demonstrated slow activity on the EEG, including extreme delta brush during the most severe phase, which gradually faded in parallel with clinical amelioration, with excess beta activity persisting into the recovery phase.

  16. Maxillary reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown James

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the various defects that occur with maxillectomy with a full review of the literature and discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques described. Reconstruction of the maxilla can be relatively simple for the standard low maxillectomy that does not involve the orbital floor (Class 2. In this situation the structure of the face is less damaged and the there are multiple reconstructive options for the restoration of the maxilla and dental alveolus. If the maxillectomy includes the orbit (Class 4 then problems involving the eye (enopthalmos, orbital dystopia, ectropion and diplopia are avoided which simplifies the reconstruction. Most controversy is associated with the maxillectomy that involves the orbital floor and dental alveolus (Class 3. A case is made for the use of the iliac crest with internal oblique as an ideal option but there are other methods, which may provide a similar result. A multidisciplinary approach to these patients is emphasised which should include a prosthodontist with a special expertise for these defects.

  17. Mixed-norm estimates for the M/EEG inverse problem using accelerated gradient methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramfort, Alexandre; Kowalski, Matthieu; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2012-04-07

    Magneto- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the electromagnetic fields produced by the neural electrical currents. Given a conductor model for the head, and the distribution of source currents in the brain, Maxwell's equations allow one to compute the ensuing M/EEG signals. Given the actual M/EEG measurements and the solution of this forward problem, one can localize, in space and in time, the brain regions that have produced the recorded data. However, due to the physics of the problem, the limited number of sensors compared to the number of possible source locations, and measurement noise, this inverse problem is ill-posed. Consequently, additional constraints are needed. Classical inverse solvers, often called minimum norm estimates (MNE), promote source estimates with a small ℓ₂ norm. Here, we consider a more general class of priors based on mixed norms. Such norms have the ability to structure the prior in order to incorporate some additional assumptions about the sources. We refer to such solvers as mixed-norm estimates (MxNE). In the context of M/EEG, MxNE can promote spatially focal sources with smooth temporal estimates with a two-level ℓ₁/ℓ₂ mixed-norm, while a three-level mixed-norm can be used to promote spatially non-overlapping sources between different experimental conditions. In order to efficiently solve the optimization problems of MxNE, we introduce fast first-order iterative schemes that for the ℓ₁/ℓ₂ norm give solutions in a few seconds making such a prior as convenient as the simple MNE. Furthermore, thanks to the convexity of the optimization problem, we can provide optimality conditions that guarantee global convergence. The utility of the methods is demonstrated both with simulations and experimental MEG data.

  18. Interrater variability of EEG interpretation in comatose cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: EEG is widely used to predict outcome in comatose cardiac arrest patients, but its value has been limited by lack of a uniform classification. We used the EEG terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) to assess interrater variability in a cohort...... who were blinded for patient outcome. Percent agreement and kappa (κ) for the categories in the ACNS EEG terminology and for prespecified malignant EEG-patterns were calculated. RESULTS: There was substantial interrater agreement (κ 0.71) for highly malignant patterns and moderate agreement (κ 0.......42) for malignant patterns. Substantial agreement was found for malignant periodic or rhythmic patterns (κ 0.72) while agreement for identifying an unreactive EEG was fair (κ 0.26). CONCLUSIONS: The ACNS EEG terminology can be used to identify highly malignant EEG-patterns in post cardiac arrest patients...

  19. Investigating social cognition in infants and adults using dense array electroencephalography ((d)EEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akano, Adekemi J; Haley, David W; Dudek, Joanna

    2011-06-27

    Dense array electroencephalography ((d)EEG), which provides a non-invasive window for measuring brain activity and a temporal resolution unsurpassed by any other current brain imaging technology¹, ² is being used increasingly in the study of social cognitive functioning in infants and adults. While (d)EEG is enabling researchers to examine brain activity patterns with unprecedented levels of sensitivity, conventional EEG recording systems continue to face certain limitations, including 1) poor spatial resolution and source localization³,⁴2) the physical discomfort for test subjects of enduring the individual application of numerous electrodes to the surface of the scalp, and 3) the complexity for researchers of learning to use multiple software packages to collect and process data. Here we present an overview of an established methodology that represents a significant improvement on conventional methodologies for studying EEG in infants and adults. Although several analytical software techniques can be used to establish indirect indices of source localization to improve the spatial resolution of (d)EEG, the HydroCel Geodesic Sensor Net (HCGSN) by Electrical Geodesics, Inc. (EGI), a dense sensory array that maintains equal distances among adjacent recording electrodes on all surfaces of the scalp, further enhances spatial resolution⁴,⁵(,)⁶ compared to standard (d)EEG systems. The sponge-based HCGSN can be applied rapidly and without scalp abrasion, making it ideal for use with adults⁷,⁸ children⁹,¹⁰, ¹¹,¹² and infants¹², in both research and clinical ⁴,⁵,⁶,¹³,¹⁴,¹⁵settings. This feature allows for considerable cost and time savings by decreasing the average net application time compared to other (d)EEG systems. Moreover, the HCGSN includes unified, seamless software applications for all phases of data, greatly simplifying the collection, processing, and analysis of (d)EEG data. The HCGSN features a low-profile electrode

  20. Low concentration contrast medium for dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography by a combination of iterative reconstruction and low-tube-voltage technique: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Minwen, E-mail: zhengmw2007@163.com; Liu, Ying, E-mail: yingyinglyly@126.com; Wei, Mengqi, E-mail: weimengqi2008@163.com; Wu, Yongjie, E-mail: wu18291988526@163.com; Zhao, Hongliang, E-mail: zhaohl1980@163.com; Li, Jian, E-mail: xjyylj@yeah.net

    2014-02-15

    Objectives: To assess the impact of low-concentration contrast medium on vascular enhancement, image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography (cCTA) by using a combination of iterative reconstruction (IR) and low-tube-voltage technique. Materials and methods: One hundred patients were prospectively randomized to two types of contrast medium and underwent prospective electrocardiogram-triggering cCTA (Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare; collimation: 128 mm × 0.6 mm; tube current: 300 mA s). Fifty patients received Iopromide 370 were scanned using the conventional tube setting (100 kVp or 120 kVp if BMI ≥ 25 kg/m{sup 2}) and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP). Fifty patients received Iodixanol 270 were scanned using the low-tube-voltage (80 kVp or 100 kVp if BMI ≥ 25 kg/m{sup 2}) technique and reconstructed with IR. CT attenuation was measured in coronary artery and other anatomical regions. Noise, image quality and radiation dose were compared. Results: Compared with two Iopromide 370 subgroups, Iomeprol 270 subgroups showed no significant difference in CT attenuation (576.63 ± 95.50 vs. 569.51 ± 118.93 for BMI < 25 kg/m{sup 2}, p = 0.647 and 394.19 ± 68.09 vs. 383.72 ± 63.11 for BMI ≥ 25 kg/m{sup 2}, p = 0.212), noise (in various anatomical regions of interest) and image quality (3.5 vs. 4.0, p = 0.13), but significantly (0.41 ± 0.17 vs. 0.94 ± 0.45 for BMI < 25 kg/m{sup 2}, p < 0.001 and 1.14 ± 0.24 vs. 2.37 ± 0.69 for BMI ≥ 25 kg/m{sup 2}, p < 0.001) lower radiation dose, which reflects dose saving of 56.4% and 51.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Combined IR with low-tube-voltage technique, a low-concentration contrast medium of 270 mg I/ml can still maintain the contrast enhancement without impairing image quality, as well as significantly lower the radiation dose.

  1. Very low-dose (0.15 mGy) chest CT protocols using the COPDGene 2 test object and a third-generation dual-source CT scanner with corresponding third-generation iterative reconstruction software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, John D; Fuld, Matthew K; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sieren, Jered P; Chan, Kung-Sik; Guo, Junfeng; Hoffman, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomographic (CT) acquisitions with Sn prefiltration and third-generation iterative reconstruction on density-based quantitative measures of growing interest in phenotyping pulmonary disease. The effects of both decreasing dose and different body habitus on the accuracy of the mean CT attenuation measurements and the level of image noise (SD) were evaluated using the COPDGene 2 test object, containing 8 different materials of interest ranging from air to acrylic and including various density foams. A third-generation dual-source multidetector CT scanner (Siemens SOMATOM FORCE; Siemens Healthcare AG, Erlangen, Germany) running advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) software (Siemens Healthcare AG) was used.We used normal and very large body habitus rings at dose levels varying from 1.5 to 0.15 mGy using a spectral-shaped (0.6-mm Sn) tube output of 100 kV(p). Three CT scans were obtained at each dose level using both rings. Regions of interest for each material in the test object scans were automatically extracted. The Hounsfield unit values of each material using weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) at 1.5 mGy was used as the reference value to evaluate shifts in CT attenuation at lower dose levels using either WFBP or ADMIRE. Statistical analysis included basic statistics, Welch t tests, multivariable covariant model using the F test to assess the significance of the explanatory (independent) variables on the response (dependent) variable, and CT mean attenuation, in the multivariable covariant model including reconstruction method. Multivariable regression analysis of the mean CT attenuation values showed a significant difference with decreasing dose between ADMIRE and WFBP. The ADMIRE has reduced noise and more stable CT attenuation compared with WFBP. There was a strong effect on the mean CT attenuation values of the scanned materials for ring

  2. Test of the $\\tau$-Model of Bose-Einstein Correlations and Reconstruction of the Source Function in Hadronic Z-boson Decay at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, J; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefiev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; Csörgö, T; de Asmundis, R; Déglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El Hage, A; El Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagan, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; Garcia-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Gruenewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberría, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, J; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V; Kräber, M; Kraemer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladron de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levtchenko, P; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, F L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novak, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pojidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A; Razis, P; Rembeczki, S; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sanchez, E; Schäfer, C; Schegelsky, V; Schopper, H; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Straessner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillasi, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vasquez, R; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitsky, I; Viertel, G; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopianov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobiev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, An; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of pairs of identical charged pions produced in ha- dronic Z decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. A good descrip- tion is achieved using a L ́evy stable distribution in conjunction with a model where a particle’s momentum is correlated with its space-time point of production, the tau-model. Using this description and the measured rapidity and transverse momen- tum distributions, the space-time evolution of particle emission in two-jet events is reconstructed. However, the elongation of the particle emission region previously observed is not accommodated in the τ-model, and this is investigated using an ad hoc modification.

  3. A single camera photogrammetry system for multi-angle fast localization of EEG electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuo; Sheng, Yang

    2011-11-01

    Photogrammetry has become an effective method for the determination of electroencephalography (EEG) electrode positions in three dimensions (3D). Capturing multi-angle images of the electrodes on the head is a fundamental objective in the design of photogrammetry system for EEG localization. Methods in previous studies are all based on the use of either a rotating camera or multiple cameras, which are time-consuming or not cost-effective. This study aims to present a novel photogrammetry system that can realize simultaneous acquisition of multi-angle head images in a single camera position. Aligning two planar mirrors with the angle of 51.4°, seven views of the head with 25 electrodes are captured simultaneously by the digital camera placed in front of them. A complete set of algorithms for electrode recognition, matching, and 3D reconstruction is developed. It is found that the elapsed time of the whole localization procedure is about 3 min, and camera calibration computation takes about 1 min, after the measurement of calibration points. The positioning accuracy with the maximum error of 1.19 mm is acceptable. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system provides a fast and cost-effective method for the EEG positioning.

  4. The effects of lossy compression on diagnostically relevant seizure information in EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, G; McGinley, B; Faul, S; McEvoy, R P; Glavin, M; Marnane, W P; Jones, E

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of compression on EEG signals, in the context of automated detection of epileptic seizures. Specifically, it examines the use of lossy compression on EEG signals in order to reduce the amount of data which has to be transmitted or stored, while having as little impact as possible on the information in the signal relevant to diagnosing epileptic seizures. Two popular compression methods, JPEG2000 and SPIHT, were used. A range of compression levels was selected for both algorithms in order to compress the signals with varying degrees of loss. This compression was applied to the database of epileptiform data provided by the University of Freiburg, Germany. The real-time EEG analysis for event detection automated seizure detection system was used in place of a trained clinician for scoring the reconstructed data. Results demonstrate that compression by a factor of up to 120:1 can be achieved, with minimal loss in seizure detection performance as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the seizure detection system.

  5. Human brain networks in physiological aging: a graph theoretical analysis of cortical connectivity from EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Bramanti, Placido; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2014-01-01

    Modern analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms provides information on dynamic brain connectivity. To test the hypothesis that aging processes modulate the brain connectivity network, EEG recording was conducted on 113 healthy volunteers. They were divided into three groups in accordance with their ages: 36 Young (15-45 years), 46 Adult (50-70 years), and 31 Elderly (>70 years). To evaluate the stability of the investigated parameters, a subgroup of 10 subjects underwent a second EEG recording two weeks later. Graph theory functions were applied to the undirected and weighted networks obtained by the lagged linear coherence evaluated by eLORETA on cortical sources. EEG frequency bands of interest were: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta1 (13-20 Hz), beta2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz). The spectral connectivity analysis of cortical sources showed that the normalized Characteristic Path Length (λ) presented the pattern Young > Adult>Elderly in the higher alpha band. Elderly also showed a greater increase in delta and theta bands than Young. The correlation between age and λ showed that higher ages corresponded to higher λ in delta and theta and lower in the alpha2 band; this pattern reflects the age-related modulation of higher (alpha) and decreased (delta) connectivity. The Normalized Clustering coefficient (γ) and small-world network modeling (σ) showed non-significant age-modulation. Evidence from the present study suggests that graph theory can aid in the analysis of connectivity patterns estimated from EEG and can facilitate the study of the physiological and pathological brain aging features of functional connectivity networks.

  6. Induction and separation of motion artifacts in EEG data using a mobile phantom head device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson S; Schlink, Bryan R; Hairston, W David; König, Peter; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) can assess brain activity during whole-body motion in humans but head motion can induce artifacts that obfuscate electrocortical signals. Definitive solutions for removing motion artifact from EEG have yet to be found, so creating methods to assess signal processing routines for removing motion artifact are needed. We present a novel method for investigating the influence of head motion on EEG recordings as well as for assessing the efficacy of signal processing approaches intended to remove motion artifact. We used a phantom head device to mimic electrical properties of the human head with three controlled dipolar sources of electrical activity embedded in the phantom. We induced sinusoidal vertical motions on the phantom head using a custom-built platform and recorded EEG signals with three different acquisition systems while the head was both stationary and in varied motion conditions. Recordings showed up to 80% reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and up to 3600% increases in the power spectrum as a function of motion amplitude and frequency. Independent component analysis (ICA) successfully isolated the three dipolar sources across all conditions and systems. There was a high correlation (r > 0.85) and marginal increase in the independent components' (ICs) power spectrum (∼15%) when comparing stationary and motion parameters. The SNR of the IC activation was 400%-700% higher in comparison to the channel data SNR, attenuating the effects of motion on SNR. Our results suggest that the phantom head and motion platform can be used to assess motion artifact removal algorithms and compare different EEG systems for motion artifact sensitivity. In addition, ICA is effective in isolating target electrocortical events and marginally improving SNR in relation to stationary recordings.

  7. Removal of the ballistocardiographic artifact from EEG-fMRI data: a canonical correlation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assecondi, Sara; Hallez, Hans; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace; Bianchi, Anna M; Huiskamp, Geertjan M

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can give new insights into how the brain functions. However, the strong electromagnetic field of the MR scanner generates artifacts that obscure the EEG and diminish its readability. Among them, the ballistocardiographic artifact (BCGa) that appears on the EEG is believed to be related to blood flow in scalp arteries leading to electrode movements. Average artifact subtraction (AAS) techniques, used to remove the BCGa, assume a deterministic nature of the artifact. This assumption may be too strong, considering the blood flow related nature of the phenomenon. In this work we propose a new method, based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and blind source separation (BSS) techniques, to reduce the BCGa from simultaneously recorded EEG-fMRI. We optimized the method to reduce the user's interaction to a minimum. When tested on six subjects, recorded in 1.5 T or 3 T, the average artifact extracted with BSS-CCA and AAS did not show significant differences, proving the absence of systematic errors. On the other hand, when compared on the basis of intra-subject variability, we found significant differences and better performance of the proposed method with respect to AAS. We demonstrated that our method deals with the intrinsic subject variability specific to the artifact that may cause averaging techniques to fail.

  8. A New Approach to Eliminate High Amplitude Artifacts in EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Teixeira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High amplitude artifacts represent a problem during EEG recordings in neuroscience research. Taking this into account, this paper proposes a method to identify high amplitude artifacts with no requirement for visual inspection, electrooscillogram (EOG reference channel or user assigned parameters. A potential solution to the high amplitude artifacts (HAA elimination is presented based on blind source separation methods. The assumption underlying the selection of components is that HAA are independent of the EEG signal and different HAA can be generated during the EEG recordings. Therefore, the number of components related to HAA is variable and depends on the processed signal, which means that the method is adaptable to the input signal. The results show, when removing the HAA artifacts, the delta band is distorted but all the other frequency bands are preserved. A case study with EEG signals recorded while participants performed on the Halstead Category Test (HCT is presented. After HAA removal, data analysis revealed, as expected, an error-related frontal ERP wave: the feedback-related negativity (FRN in response to feedback stimuli.

  9. Screening EEG in Aircrew Selection: Clinical Aerospace Neurology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jonathan B.; Riley, Terrence

    2001-01-01

    As clinical aerospace neurologists we do not favor using screening EEG in pilot selection on unselected and otherwise asymptomatic individuals. The role of EEG in aviation screening should be as an adjunct to diagnosis, and the decision to disqualify a pilot should never be based solely on the EEG. Although a policy of using a screening EEG in an unselected population might detect an individual with a potentially increased relative risk, it would needlessly exclude many applicants who would probably never have a seizure. A diagnostic test performed on an asymptomatic individual without clinical indications, in a population with a low prevalence of disease (seizure) may be of limited or possibly detrimental value. We feel that rather than do EEGs on all candidates, a better approach would be to perform an EEG for a specific indication, such as family history of seizure, single convulsion (seizure) , history of unexplained loss of consciousness or head injury. Routine screening EEGs in unselected aviation applications are not done without clinical indication in the U.S. Air Force, Navy, or NASA. The USAF discontinued routine screening EEGs for selection in 1978, the U.S. Navy discontinued it in 1981 , and NASA discontinued it in 1995. EEG as an aeromedical screening tool in the US Navy dates back to 1939. The US Navy routinely used EEGs to screen all aeromedical personnel from 1961 to 1981. The incidence of epileptiform activity on EEG in asymptomatic flight candidates ranges from 0.11 to 2.5%. In 3 studies of asymptomatic flight candidates with epileptiform activity on EEG followed for 2 to 15 years, 1 of 31 (3.2%), 1 of 30 (3.3%), and 0 of 14 (0%) developed a seizure, for a cumulative risk of an individual with an epileptiform EEG developing a seizure of 2.67% (2 in 75). Of 28,658 student naval aviation personnel screened 31 had spikes and/or slow waves on EEG, and only 1 later developed a seizure. Of the 28,627 who had a normal EEG, 4 later developed seizures, or

  10. Value of 100 kVp scan with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm on a single-source CT system during whole-body CT for radiation and contrast medium dose reduction: an intra-individual feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Y; Nakaura, T; Oda, S; Tsuji, A; Urata, J; Furusawa, M; Tanoue, S; Utsunomiya, D; Yamashita, Y

    2018-02-01

    To perform an intra-individual investigation of the usefulness of a contrast medium (CM) and radiation dose-reduction protocol using single-source computed tomography (CT) combined with 100 kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) for whole-body CT (WBCT; chest-abdomen-pelvis CT) in oncology patients. Forty-three oncology patients who had undergone WBCT under both 120 and 100 kVp protocols at different time points (mean interscan intervals: 98 days) were included retrospectively. The CM doses for the 120 and 100 kVp protocols were 600 and 480 mg iodine/kg, respectively; 120 kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), whereas 100 kVp images were reconstructed with FBP (100 kVp-F) and the SAFIRE (100 kVp-S). The size-specific dose estimate (SSDE), iodine load and image quality of each protocol were compared. The SSDE and iodine load of 100 kVp protocol were 34% and 21%, respectively, lower than of 120 kVp protocol (SSDE: 10.6±1.1 versus 16.1±1.8 mGy; iodine load: 24.8±4versus 31.5±5.5 g iodine, p<0.01). Contrast enhancement, objective image noise, contrast-to-noise-ratio, and visual score of 100 kVp-S were similar to or better than of 120 kVp protocol. Compared with the 120 kVp protocol, the combined use of 100 kVp and SAFIRE in WBCT for oncology assessment with an SSCT facilitated substantial reduction in the CM and radiation dose while maintaining image quality. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of automated tube voltage selection, integrated circuit detector and advanced iterative reconstruction on radiation dose and image quality of 3rd generation dual-source aortic CT angiography: An intra-individual comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Stefanie; De Cecco, Carlo N; Wichmann, Julian L; Canstein, Christian; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Caruso, Damiano; Fuller, Stephen R; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-05-01

    To compare, on an intra-individual basis, the effect of automated tube voltage selection (ATVS), integrated circuit detector and advanced iterative reconstruction on radiation dose and image quality of aortic CTA studies using 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT). We retrospectively evaluated 32 patients who had undergone CTA of the entire aorta with both 2nd generation DSCT at 120kV using filtered back projection (FBP) (protocol 1) and 3rd generation DSCT using ATVS, an integrated circuit detector and advanced iterative reconstruction (protocol 2). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. Image quality was subjectively evaluated using a five-point scale. Radiation dose parameters were recorded. All studies were considered of diagnostic image quality. CNR was significantly higher with protocol 2 (15.0±5.2 vs 11.0±4.2; p<.0001). Subjective image quality analysis revealed no significant differences for evaluation of attenuation (p=0.08501) but image noise was rated significantly lower with protocol 2 (p=0.0005). Mean tube voltage and effective dose were 94.7±14.1kV and 6.7±3.9mSv with protocol 2; 120±0kV and 11.5±5.2mSv with protocol 1 (p<0.0001, respectively). Aortic CTA performed with 3rd generation DSCT, ATVS, integrated circuit detector, and advanced iterative reconstruction allow a substantial reduction of radiation exposure while improving image quality in comparison to 120kV imaging with FBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of different Kalman filter approaches in deriving time varying connectivity from EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghumare, Eshwar; Schrooten, Maarten; Vandenberghe, Rik; Dupont, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Kalman filter approaches are widely applied to derive time varying effective connectivity from electroencephalographic (EEG) data. For multi-trial data, a classical Kalman filter (CKF) designed for the estimation of single trial data, can be implemented by trial-averaging the data or by averaging single trial estimates. A general linear Kalman filter (GLKF) provides an extension for multi-trial data. In this work, we studied the performance of the different Kalman filtering approaches for different values of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), number of trials and number of EEG channels. We used a simulated model from which we calculated scalp recordings. From these recordings, we estimated cortical sources. Multivariate autoregressive model parameters and partial directed coherence was calculated for these estimated sources and compared with the ground-truth. The results showed an overall superior performance of GLKF except for low levels of SNR and number of trials.

  13. MEG and EEG data analysis with MNE-Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramfort, Alexandre; Luessi, Martin; Larson, Eric; Engemann, Denis A; Strohmeier, Daniel; Brodbeck, Christian; Goj, Roman; Jas, Mainak; Brooks, Teon; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2013-12-26

    Magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the weak electromagnetic signals generated by neuronal activity in the brain. Using these signals to characterize and locate neural activation in the brain is a challenge that requires expertise in physics, signal processing, statistics, and numerical methods. As part of the MNE software suite, MNE-Python is an open-source software package that addresses this challenge by providing state-of-the-art algorithms implemented in Python that cover multiple methods of data preprocessing, source localization, statistical analysis, and estimation of functional connectivity between distributed brain regions. All algorithms and utility functions are implemented in a consistent manner with well-documented interfaces, enabling users to create M/EEG data analysis pipelines by writing Python scripts. Moreover, MNE-Python is tightly integrated with the core Python libraries for scientific comptutation (NumPy, SciPy) and visualization (matplotlib and Mayavi), as well as the greater neuroimaging ecosystem in Python via the Nibabel package. The code is provided under the new BSD license allowing code reuse, even in commercial products. Although MNE-Python has only been under heavy development for a couple of years, it has rapidly evolved with expanded analysis capabilities and pedagogical tutorials because multiple labs have collaborated during code development to help share best practices. MNE-Python also gives easy access to preprocessed datasets, helping users to get started quickly and facilitating reproducibility of methods by other researchers. Full documentation, including dozens of examples, is available at http://martinos.org/mne.

  14. EEG PHASE RESET OF THE DEFAULT MODE NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Thatcher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore phase reset of 3-dimensional current sources located in Brodmann areas located in the human default mode network (DMN using Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA of the human electroencephalogram (EEG. Methods: The EEG was recorded from 19 scalp locations from 70 healthy normal subjects ranging in age from 13 to 20 years. A time point by time point computation of LORETA current sources were computed for 14 Brodman areas comprising the DMN in the delta frequency band. The Hilbert transform of the LORETA time series was used to compute the instantaneous phase differences between all pai