WorldWideScience

Sample records for educational software games

  1. Computer Game Theories for Designing Motivating Educational Software: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Chee Siang; Rao, G. S. V. Radha Krishna

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate computer game theories for educational software. We propose a framework for designing engaging educational games based on contemporary game studies which includes ludology and narratology. Ludology focuses on the study of computer games as play and game activities, while narratology revolves around the…

  2. Education (gaming simulation: characteristic of software). Kyoiku (gaming simulation: software no tokucho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, N [Osaka Kyoiku University, Osaka (Japan)

    1992-12-10

    This paper explains history and classification of gaming simulations briefly, and then introduces some instances actually applied to education and training. First, an environmental game by personal computer network gaming system is introduced, which was recently developed. Each player is required to decide on his own investment for products and environmental protection in consideration of the present state of the environment and the managerial situation of his company. If his decision making is not correct, he fails to continue his management due to the aggravation of the environment. In addition, a gaming simulation for the acid rain problem is described, which is being developed in the same way of thinking. Second, an instance of an educational gaming called Sweden Game is introduced, where students learning the mathematical programming carried out the simulation of a pipe-line plan covering six regions of Sweden. Finally, the state of training is explained, in which several kinds of management games are utilized to bring up mainstay leaders in business organizations. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Graphic Design Of “Green Mission” Education Game Using Software Based On Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Yanti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Educational game is a digital game in its design using the elements of education and in it support teaching and learning by using technology that is interactive media. Generally an educational game has a fun look, an easy-to-use menu, as well as color combinations that are used that are GUI-based (Graphic User Interface so as to create appeal to users. Because it is undeniable that the human brain tends to more quickly capture learning through visual images rather than writings. Therefore, graphic design of an educational game becomes one of the important points. Software applications become one of the solutions in making game design, one of which is a vector-based software applications. There are various software that can be used in accordance with the function and usefulness of each. But in general the way the software works almost same.

  4. Computer games and software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Kendra M L

    2015-01-01

    Computer games represent a significant software application domain for innovative research in software engineering techniques and technologies. Game developers, whether focusing on entertainment-market opportunities or game-based applications in non-entertainment domains, thus share a common interest with software engineers and developers on how to best engineer game software.Featuring contributions from leading experts in software engineering, the book provides a comprehensive introduction to computer game software development that includes its history as well as emerging research on the inte

  5. Student’s Entrepreneur Model Development in Creative Industry through Utilization of Web Development Software and Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, B.; Hasbullah, H.; Elvyanti, S.; Purnama, W.

    2018-02-01

    The creative industry is the utilization of creativity, skill and talent of individuals to create wealth and jobs by generating and exploiting creativity power of individual. In the field of design, utilization of information technology can spur creative industry, development of creative industry design will accommodate a lot of creative energy that can pour their ideas and creativity without limitations. Open Source software is a trend in the field of information technology has developed since the 1990s. Examples of applications developed by the Open Source approach is the Apache web services, Linux and Android Operating System, the MySQL database. This community service activities based entrepreneurship aims to: 1). give an idea about the profile of the UPI student’s knowledge of entrepreneurship about the business based creative industries in software by using web software development and educational game 2) create a model for fostering entrepreneurship based on the creative industries in software by leveraging web development and educational games, 3) conduct training and guidance on UPI students who want to develop business in the field of creative industries engaged in the software industry . PKM-based entrepreneurship activity was attended by about 35 students DPTE FPTK UPI had entrepreneurial high interest and competence in information technology. Outcome generated from PKM entrepreneurship is the emergence of entrepreneurs from the students who are interested in the creative industry in the field of software which is able to open up business opportunities for themselves and others. Another outcome of this entrepreneurship PKM activity is the publication of articles or scientific publications in journals of national/international indexed.

  6. Games, Actions and Social Software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.N. van Eijck (Jan); R. Verbrugge; not CWI et al

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis is the second book that appears as a product of the multi-disciplinary project ``Games, Action and Social Software'', which was carried out at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIAS) in Wassenaar, from September 2006 through

  7. COMPUTER GAMES AND EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhov, Anton

    2018-01-01

    This paper devoted to the research of educational resources and possibilities of modern computer games. The “internal” educational aspects of computer games include educational mechanism (a separate or integrated “tutorial”) and representation of a real or even fantastic educational process within virtual worlds. The “external” dimension represents educational opportunities of computer games for personal and professional development in different genres of computer games (various transport, so...

  8. Designing an Educational Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas; Hansen, Charina Benedikte Søgaard

    2010-01-01

    When designing games with learning purposes used in a classroom, there often occur problems about the lack of learning content or the lack of game contents. Other disadvantages of existing educational games are the difficulty to provide a continual balance between the challenge and the pupils......’ skill to control and solve the given task. In this paper we suggest three different perspectives that need to be communicated across in order to design a useful educational game: teachers, pupils and game designers. It is our intention with this paper to suggest some design principles for educational...... games, and to integrate teachers, pupils and game designers needs and requirements. To set up these design principles for educational games we have used a holistic perspective. This means that the design principles must be seen in coherence within the social and physical environment. The design...

  9. Games in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    , 2007). Some of these newer formats are developed in partnerships between research and education institutions and game developers and are based on learning theory as well as game design methods. Games well suited for creating narrative framework or simulations where students gain first-hand experience......This paper presents a categorisation of science game formats in relation to the educational possibilities or limitations they offer in science education. This includes discussion of new types of science game formats and gamification of science. Teaching with the use of games and simulations...... in science education dates back to the 1970s and early 80s were the potentials of games and simulations was discussed extensively as the new teaching tool ( Ellington et al. , 1981). In the early 90s the first ITC -based games for exploration of science and technical subjects was developed (Egenfeldt...

  10. Gamers on Games and Gaming : Implications for Educational Game Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Staalduinen, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, there has been a steadily increasing interest in the use of games for educational purposes. This has led to an increased design, use and study of educational games; games where the players learn through playing. However, experiments with the educational use of games have not

  11. Software Components for Serious Game Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim; Van der Vegt, Wim; Bahreini, Kiavash; Dascalu, Mihai; Van Lankveld, Giel

    2016-01-01

    The large upfront investments required for game development pose a severe barrier for the wider uptake of serious games in education and training. Also, there is a lack of well-established methods and tools that support game developers at preserving and enhancing the games’ pedagogical

  12. Educational Games for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noemí, Peña-Miguel; Máximo, Sedano Hoyuelos

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of new technologies in society has created a need for interactive contents that can make the most of the potential that technological advances offer. Serious games as educational games are such content: they can be defined as video games or interactive applications whose main purpose is to provide not only entertainment but also…

  13. Evaluation of a Game to Teach Requirements Collection and Analysis in Software Engineering at Tertiary Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainey, Thomas; Connolly, Thomas M.; Stansfield, Mark; Boyle, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    A highly important part of software engineering education is requirements collection and analysis which is one of the initial stages of the Database Application Lifecycle and arguably the most important stage of the Software Development Lifecycle. No other conceptual work is as difficult to rectify at a later stage or as damaging to the overall…

  14. Incorporating Gaming in Software Engineering Projects: Case of RMU Monopoly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Acharya

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in engineering education is retaining student interest in the engineering discipline. Active student involvement in engineering projects is one way of retaining student interest. Such involvement can only be realized if project inception comes entirely from the student. This paper presents a software game, RMU Monopoly, developed as a project requirement for a software engineering course and describes the challenges and gains of implementing such a project. The RMU Monopoly was proposed by three junior software engineering students. The game is a multi-platform software program that allows up to eight players and implements the rules of the Monopoly board game. To ensure agility the game was developed using the spiral software development model. The Software Requirements Specification (SRS document was finalized through an iterative procedure. Standard Unified Modeling Language (UML diagrams were used for product design. A Risk Mitigation, Monitoring, and Management Plan (RMMM was developed to ensure proactive risk management. Gantt chart, weekly progress meetings and weekly scrum meetings were used to track project progress. C# and Sub- Version were used in a client-server architecture to develop the software. The project was successful in retaining student interest in the software engineering discipline

  15. Simulation gaming in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulione, M S

    1983-10-01

    Simulation games can be used in nursing education to promote problem solving or to impart information. Most games focus upon one of the two areas: cognitive knowledge or affective knowledge. We call these types of games content games and process games, respectively. Simulation games of both types are used in nursing education. Since simulation gaming in nursing education is a relatively new teaching strategy much of its use has been haphazard. In order for a simulation game to be an effective teaching strategy; there must be a "fit" between the game and the instructional objectives. The game operator should analyze the components of each game used prior to playing the game, so he will be able to use the game appropriately. One disadvantage of gaming is that there is a risk of experiencing untoward reactions in the gaming experience. For this reason, the operator should support all the participants throughout the game. Finally, the game operator should assess the effectiveness of the gaming process through the debriefing session and through research. To extend our knowledge of the effects of simulation games, game operators can research the effect of simulation gaming on student motivation, cognitive learning, and affective learning.

  16. Advances in Games Technology: Software, Models, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Edmond; Brindle, Geoff; Jones, Kevin; Zhou, Suiping; Chaudhari, Narendra S.; Wong, Kok-Wai

    2009-01-01

    Games technology has undergone tremendous development. In this article, the authors report the rapid advancement that has been observed in the way games software is being developed, as well as in the development of games content using game engines. One area that has gained special attention is modeling the game environment such as terrain and…

  17. Can Video Games Be Educational?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, Chad

    2009-01-01

    One of the biggest debates among music educators today is about whether or not video games are a valid educational tool. As far back as the early 1990s, teachers were using games such as Sid Meier's Civilization to reinforce history and social studies concepts, but until recently games that dealt with areas of music education have been few and far…

  18. Effective Educational Methods In Educational Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Van Zyl, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines the teaching methods used in three successful educational video games with the goal to provide a concise, practical guide for the proper implementation of educational learning into video games. The main source for analysing the teaching methods of educational games in this thesis is James Paul Gee’s book What Video Games Have To Teach Us About Learning And Literacy (2004). Gee expresses 36 learning principles existing in good games (chapter 4.2). This ideology serves ...

  19. Movement Patterns in Educational Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Christensen, Bianca Clavio; Nielsen, Thorsten B.

    2018-01-01

    Although movement is essential in location-based games to get from one point of interest to the next, it is seldom taken into account for the game design and the selection of locations. Instead, player movement is usually analyzed after the fact, i.e. when the game is ready to play. In this paper......-based educational games....

  20. Gaming Research for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the use of gaming to teach Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) in public education. The intent of the investigation was to identify attitudes about gaming and its use in education, as well as the need to utilize gaming as a platform to serve as an integrator of STEM subject matter. Participants included…

  1. Ludic Educational Game Creation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidakis, Nikolaos; Syntychakis, Efthimios; Kalafatis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents initial findings and ongoing work of the game creation tool, a core component of the IOLAOS(IOLAOS in ancient Greece was a divine hero famed for helping with some of Heracles’s labors.) platform, a general open authorable framework for educational and training games. The game...... creation tool features a web editor, where the game narrative can be manipulated, according to specific needs. Moreover, this tool is applied for creating an educational game according to a reference scenario namely teaching schoolers road safety. A ludic approach is used both in game creation and play....... Helping children staying safe and preventing serious injury on the roads is crucial. In this context, this work presents an augmented version of the IOLAOS architecture including an enhanced game creation tool and a new multimodality module. In addition presents a case study for creating educational games...

  2. Recreational Games for Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Recreational games can be incorporated into physical education programs to encourage play and activity among students during their leisure time. Students can play their own games during recess, before or after school, during intramural programs, or in their neighborhood with family and friends. This article describes five such games namely:…

  3. Games and simulation in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Juan, Angel A.; Loch, Birgit; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Ventura, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of computer technologies, together with the increasing speed of Internet-based communications, has promoted the use of simulation software and serious games in higher education. These technological and methodological tools can significantly enrich the learning experience in almost any knowledge area. In particular, they will have a significant impact on how the learning process is performed in the so called Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. T...

  4. Educational game models: conceptualization and evaluation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educational game models: conceptualization and evaluation. ... The Game Object Model (GOM), that marries educational theory and game design, forms the basis for the development of the Persona Outlining ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  5. Selecting and Buying Educational Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, David H.

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines for selecting/buying educational software are discussed under the following headings: educational soundness; appropriateness; challenge and progress; motivation and reward; correctness; compatibility with systems; instructions and handlings. Includes several sources of software reviews. (JN)

  6. Design education with simulation games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juuti, Tero; Lehtonen, Timo; Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård

    2008-01-01

    " This paper is a report on the use of simulation games in design education. Our objective was to find solution to the question: "How to do design education effectively and efficiently for hundreds of people with minimum resources?" In the paper the learning theories are described in short. Our...... data was gathered from exams and the results were analysed. Especially the learning of low grade exam students was impressive when using simulation game. The data from industry is based on observations while using simulation game. The results were that each of the workshop, game, and simulation...... elements can support the effort if configured and synchronized properly. The simulation games are valuable method for design education with skillful design, scoping and facilitation."...

  7. Leveraging the Social Aspect of Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    With games captivating the minds of many children in the United States, educators may be interested in trying to introduce games into their classrooms. This article offers educators insights into how to understand and incorporate games that are inherently social, promoting effective discourse in their classrooms. Although educational games and…

  8. CLICHE: Education Games for Climate Change Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajar As'ari

    2017-10-01

    In this paper will discuss about education games: CLICHE. Game which explain concisely the cause and some action to minimizing climate change cause through digital game play that will has impact to lessening the climate change effects.

  9. The Education Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubar, David

    1982-01-01

    Four programs are reviewed: Crossword Magic, Master Type, The Vocabulary Baseball Game, and Meet the Presidents. The major innovations highlighted by the products selected are the ways the creators turned learning into a game. It is noted that whether this approach is desirable is for the individual teacher to decide. (MP)

  10. Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Kelle, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Schmitz, B., & Kelle, S. (2010, 1-6 February). Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games. Presentation at JTEL Winter School 2010 on Advanced Learning Technologies, Innsbruck, Austria.

  11. Software Engineering Education Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    and Engineering (CMSC 735) Codes: GPEV2 * Textiooks: IEEE Tutoria on Models and Metrics for Software Management and Engameeing by Basi, Victor R...Software Engineering (Comp 227) Codes: GPRY5 Textbooks: IEEE Tutoria on Software Design Techniques by Freeman, Peter and Wasserman, Anthony 1. Software

  12. An Application of a Game Development Framework in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Inge Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how a game development framework was used as a learning aid in a software engineering. Games can be used within higher education in various ways to promote student participation, enable variation in how lectures are taught, and improve student interest. In this paper, we describe a case study at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU where a game development framework was applied to make students learn software architecture by developing a computer game. We provide a model for how game development frameworks can be integrated with a software engineering or computer science course. We describe important requirements to consider when choosing a game development framework for a course and an evaluation of four frameworks based on these requirements. Further, we describe some extensions we made to the existing game development framework to let the students focus more on software architectural issues than the technical implementation issues. Finally, we describe a case study of how a game development framework was integrated in a software architecture course and the experiences from doing so.

  13. Educational games for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, E A; Sackett, K; Pretorius, R; Erdley, S; Bhoopathi, P S; Mustafa, R; Schünemann, H J

    2008-01-23

    The use of games as an educational strategy has the potential to improve health professionals' performance (e.g. adherence to standards of care) through improving their knowledge, skills and attitudes. The objective was to assess the effect of educational games on health professionals' performance, knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction, and on patient outcomes. We used a comprehensive search strategy including an electronic search of the following databases: DARE, EPOC register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, ERIC, and Dissertation Abstracts Online (search date: January 2007). We also screened the reference list of included studies and relevant reviews, contact authors of relevant papers and reviews, and searched ISI Web of Science for papers citing studies included in the review We included randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled clinical trials (CCT), controlled before and after (CBA) and interrupted time-series analysis (ITS). Study participants were qualified health professionals or in postgraduate training. The intervention was an educational game with "a form of competitive activity or sport played according to rules". Using a standardized data form we extracted data on methodological quality, participants, interventions and outcomes of interest that included patient outcomes, professional behaviour (process of care outcomes), and professional's knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction. The search strategy identified 1156 citations. Out of 55 potentially eligible citations, we included one RCT. The methodological quality was fair. The game, used as a reinforcement technique, was based on the television game show "Family Feud" and focused on infection control. The study did not assess any patient or process of care outcomes. The group that was randomized to the game had statistically higher scores on the knowledge test (P = 0.02). The findings of this systematic review do not confirm nor refute the utility of games as a teaching

  14. Player Transformation of Educational Multiplayer Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Misfeldt, Morten

    2004-01-01

    transformed the game to accommodate social interaction. With these transformed ways of playing the game, they managed to get to the top of the high score list while avoiding the educational parts of the game. Players transforming educational games to escape learning elements can be a problem when these games...... are used for formal education. In this paper we argue that player transformation of educational games can, however, be the basis of exciting and unconventional learning of valuable things, such as how to transform information technology to better accommodate social interaction.......Children's great interest in multiplayer games has led to attempts to design educational multiplayer games. In this study, we have studied a test of an educational multiplayer game designed for mathematics education for children aged nine to twelve. In our observations, it became clear that pupils...

  15. Educational games for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Kairouz, Victor F; Sackett, Kay M; Erdley, William S; Mustafa, Reem A; Fiander, Michelle; Gabriel, Carolynne; Schünemann, Holger

    2013-03-28

    The use of games as an educational strategy has the potential to improve health professionals' performance (e.g. adherence to standards of care) through improving their knowledge, skills and attitudes. The objective was to assess the effect of educational games on health professionals' performance, knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction, and on patient outcomes. We searched the following databases in January 2012: MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Database of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, EPOC Register, ERIC, Proquest Dissertations & Theses Database, and PsycINFO. Related reviews were sought in DARE and the above named databases. Database searches identified 1546 citations. We also screened the reference lists of included studies in relevant reviews, contacted authors of relevant papers and reviews, and searched ISI Web of Science for papers citing studies included in the review. These search methods identified an additional 62 unique citations for a total of 1608 for this update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled clinical trials (CCT), controlled before and after (CBA) and interrupted time-series analysis (ITS). Study participants were qualified health professionals or in postgraduate training. The intervention was an educational game with "a form of competitive activity or sport played according to rules". Using a standardized data form we extracted data on methodological quality, participants, interventions and outcomes of interest that included patient outcomes, professional behavior (process of care outcomes), and professional's knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction. The search strategy identified a total of 2079 unique citations. Out of 84 potentially eligible citations, we included two RCTs. The game evaluated in the first study used as a reinforcement technique, was based on the television game show "Family Feud" and focused on infection control. The study did not assess any patient or process of care outcomes. The

  16. The RAGE Game Software Components Repository for Supporting Applied Game Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krassen Stefanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the architecture of the RAGE repository, which is a unique and dedicated infrastructure that provides access to a wide variety of advanced technology components for applied game development. The RAGE project, which is the principal Horizon2020 research and innovation project on applied gaming, develops up to three dozens of software components (RAGE software assets that are reusable across a wide diversity of game engines, game platforms and programming languages. The RAGE repository provides storage space for assets and their artefacts and is designed as an asset life-cycle management system for defining, publishing, updating, searching and packaging for distribution of these assets. It will be embedded in a social platform for asset developers and other users. A dedicated Asset Repository Manager provides the main functionality of the repository and its integration with other systems. Tools supporting the Asset Manager are presented and discussed. When the RAGE repository is in full operation, applied game developers will be able to easily enhance the quality of their games by including selected advanced game software assets. Making available the RAGE repository system and its variety of software assets aims to enhance the coherence and decisiveness of the applied game industry.

  17. Educational Software: A Developer's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Timothy C.; Loane, Russell F.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the current status and short-term future of computer software development in higher education. Topics discussed include educational advantages of software; current program development techniques, including object oriented programming; and market trends, including IBM versus Macintosh and multimedia programs. (LRW)

  18. Designing intervention in educational game research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Magnussen, Rikke

    2010-01-01

    of game technology in educational settings: the game Global Conflict: Latin America, which is a role-playing game, set in a 3D environment. In the game, students play a freelance journalist who has to investigate particular issues or conflicts in the Latin American region. The game is designed to teach......The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today’s teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often...... problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research...

  19. Designing intervention in educational game research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2010-01-01

    of game technology in educational settings: the game Global Conflict: Latin America, which is a role-playing game, set in a 3D environment. In the game, students play a freelance journalist who has to investigate particular issues or conflicts in the Latin American region. The game is designed to teach......The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today's teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often...... problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research...

  20. Dimensions in Educational Game-Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments within learning games have shown that games hold a great potential for meeting current educational needs. These developments have also pointed out a number of challenges to address if games are to play a role in the educational setting. One key issue is the design of learning...... games, another is to implement them into the educational setting. Each of these issues provide a set of challenges, which is to be negotiated in order to create successful game-based learning. In order to meet these issues, eight key dimensions in educational game-design are presented, as well...

  1. An Educational Tool for Creating Distributed Physical Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    programming for physical games development. This is done by providing an educational tool that allows a change of representation of the problems related to game designing from a virtual to a physical representation. Indeed, MITS seems to be a valuable system for bringing into education a vast number of issues...... (such as parallel programming, distribution, communication protocols, master dependency, connectivity, topology, island modeling software behavioral models, adaptive interactivity, feedback, user and multi-user game interaction, etc.). This can both improve the education-related issues in computer......The development of physical interactive games demands extensive knowledge in engineering, computer science and gaming. In this paper we describe how the Modular Interactive Tiles System (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing...

  2. Towards a Low Cost Adaptation of Educational Games for People with Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Torrente, Javier; Del Blanco, Angel; Serrano-Laguna, Angel; Vallejo-Pinto, Jose Angel; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how to increase the level of accessibility in videogames by adding support for it in game authoring software. This approach can reduce the effort required to make a game accessible for people with disabilities, resulting in significant savings. A case study is presented to support the approach based on the eAdventure educational game authoring platform, which allows semi-automatic adaptation of the games. The game, "My First Day At Work", was made accessible for stude...

  3. RAGE Reusable Game Software Components and Their Integration into Serious Game Engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim; Nyamsuren, Enkhbold; Westera, Wim

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents and validates a methodology for integrating reusable software components in diverse game engines. While conforming to the RAGE com-ponent-based architecture described elsewhere, the paper explains how the interac-tions and data exchange processes between a reusable software

  4. Exploring the Learning Mechanism in Educational Games

    OpenAIRE

    Kiili, Kristian; Ketamo, Harri

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the problem based gaming model that tries to explain the learning process in educational games. The model was studied through Geometry game aimed for pre-school children (N = 24). The game relays on learning by teaching approach and involves AI-engine modeling the human concept learning structures. The qualitative analyses were used to explore participants learning processes and gaming strategies. The results indicated that the model well describes th...

  5. Game Literacy, Gaming Cultures and Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of how the popular "3-Cs" model (creative, critical and cultural) for literacy and media literacy can be applied to the study of computer games in the English and Media classroom. Focusing on the development of an existing computer games course that encompasses many opportunities for critical activity…

  6. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  7. Health Education Video Games for Children and Adolescents: Theory, Design, and Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra A.

    This study examined whether video games could be effective health education and therapeutic interventions for children and adolescents with diabetes. KIDZ Health Software developed a game about diabetes self-management, and tested its effectiveness for children with diabetes. The Packy and Marlon Super Nintendo video game promotes fun,…

  8. Towards a service-oriented architecture framework for educational serious games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandao Carvalho, M.; Bellotti, F.; Hu, J.; Baalsrud Hauge, J.; Berta, R.; De Gloria, A.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Sampson, D.G.; Huang, R.; Hwang, G.-J.

    2015-01-01

    Producing educational serious games can be costly and time-consuming. The Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach of software development can offer a solution to reduce costs and foment serious games development. In this work, we apply a model called Activity Theory-based Model of Serious Games

  9. Taking Educational Games Seriously: Using the RETAIN Model to Design Endogenous Fantasy into Standalone Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Glenda A.; Kenny, Robert F.; Vick, Erik H.

    2008-01-01

    We are witnessing a mad rush to pour educational content into games in an ad hoc manner in hopes that player/learners are motivated simply because the content is housed inside a game. A failure to base educational game design on well-established learning and instructional theories increases the risk of the game failing to meet its intended…

  10. Video Games and Software Engineers : Designing a study based on the benefits from Video Games and how they can improve Software Engineers

    OpenAIRE

    Cosic Prica, Srdjan

    2017-01-01

    Context: This is a study about investigating if playing video games can improve any skills and characteristics in a software engineer. Due to lack of resources and time, this study will focus on designing a study that others may use to measure the results and if video games actually can improve software engineers. Objectives: The main objectives are finding the benefits of playing video games and how those benefits are discovered. Meaning what types of games and for how long someone needs to ...

  11. Video Game Discourses and Implications for Game-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Nicola; Maclure, Maggie

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly prevalent educational discourses promote the use of video games in schools and universities. At the same time, populist discourses persist, particularly in print media, which condemn video games because of putative negative effects on behaviour and socialisation. These contested discourses, we suggest, influence the acceptability of…

  12. Are Games Effective Learning Tools? A Review of Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The literature around the use, efficacy and design of educational games and game-based learning approaches has been building up gradually and in phases, across different disciplines and in an ad hoc way. This has been problematic in a number of ways and resulted in fragmented literature and inconsistent referencing patterns between different…

  13. Towards personalized feedback in educational computer games for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasilyeva, E.; Uskov, V.

    2007-01-01

    Educational games as well as other computer games become an important part of children’s life and modern education. Feedback that is provided during a game to a child plays a significant role in computer games in general. In the context of educational computer games being developed for children game

  14. Let the Game do the Talking: The influence of explicitness and game behavior on comprehension in an educational computer game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergervoet, Erwin; van der Sluis, Frans; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus; Gavrilova, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    An endogenous educational game is a game where the educational content is integrated in the game play mechanics themselves. These games rely on a constructivist approach to learning, where the learner constructs knowledge through concrete experiences. Endogenous educational games which are

  15. Collaborative Virtual Gaming Worlds in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Nicola; Hollins, Paul

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and massively multi-player online role-playing games (MMORPGs) for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider…

  16. Three dimensions of effective educational game design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, Nick; Bril, Ivo; Braad, Eelco

    2015-01-01

    For over thirty years, there has been a discussion about the effectiveness of educational games in comparison to traditional learning materials. To help further this discussion, we aim to understand ‘how educational games work’ by formalising (and visualising) the educational and motivational

  17. Collaborative virtual gaming worlds in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Whitton, Nicola; Hollins, Paul

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider in scope; it considers the range of collaborative gaming worlds that exist and discusses their potential for learning, with particular reference to h...

  18. Educational On-Line Gaming Propensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek; Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Educational on-line games are promising for new generations of students who are grown up digital. Th e new generations of students are technology savvy and spend lots of time on the web and on social networks. Based on an exploratory study, this article investigates the factors that infl uence...... students’ willingness to participate in serious games for teaching/learning. Th is study investigates the relationship between students’ behavior on Facebook, Facebook games, and their attitude toward educational on-line games. Th e results of the study reveal that the early adopters of educational games...... are likely to be students, who are young, have only a few Facebook connections, who currently play Facebook game(s). Furthermore, the study emphasizes that there may be differences between students coming from various countries....

  19. Simulation and serious games for education

    CERN Document Server

    Goei, Sui; Trooster, Wim

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces state-of-the-art research on simulation and serious games for education. The major part of this book is based on selected work presented at the 2014 Asia-Europe Symposium on Simulation and Serious Games held in Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands (Oct 1–2, 2014). It covers three major domains of education applications that use simulation and serious games: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education; Special Needs Education and Humanity and Social Science Education. Researchers and developers in simulation and serious games for education benefit from this book, and it also offers educators and professionals involved in training insights into the possible applications of simulation and serious games in various areas.

  20. Collaborative virtual gaming worlds in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Whitton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs and massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider in scope; it considers the range of collaborative gaming worlds that exist and discusses their potential for learning, with particular reference to higher education. The paper discusses virtual gaming worlds from a theoretical pedagogic perspective, exploring the educational benefits of gaming environments. Then practical considerations associated with the use of virtual gaming worlds in formal settings in higher education are considered. Finally, the paper considers development options that are open to educators, and discusses the potential of Alternate Reality Games (ARGs for learning in higher education. In all, this paper hopes to provide a balanced overview of the range of virtual gaming worlds that exist, to examine some of the practical considerations associated with their use, and to consider their benefits and challenges in learning and teaching in the higher education context.

  1. Engagement states and learning from educational games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Chang, Mido; Evans, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Children's and adolescents' cognitive, affective, and behavioral states of engagement enhance or impede enjoyment of, and performance with, educational games. We propose a comprehensive model of engagement states and apply it to research on educational game development and research on the role of various aspects of engagement on game play and learning. Emphasis is placed on individual differences in attention, memory, motor speed and control, persistence, and positive and negative affect (approach/avoidance), and how these pertain to social cognitions regarding mathematics achievement. Our challenge is to develop educational games that are effective for a wide variety of student engagement states. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  2. New directions in cognitive educational game design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bril, Ivo; Degens, Nick; Braad, Eelco; Allison, Colin; Morgado, Leonel; Pirker, Johanna; Beck, Dennis; Richter, Jonathon; Gütl, Christian

    2016-01-01

    What makes an educational game good? This paper describes three research directions that could provide insight in the underlying principles of effective educational games. These aspects are 1) The importance of distinguishing between types of to-be-learned knowledge, 2) the need to understand the

  3. Game-Like Technology Innovation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the methodological challenges and perspectives of designing game-like scenarios for the implementation of innovation processes in school science education. This paper presents a design-based research study of a game-like innovation scenario designed for technology education for Danish public school students aged 13-15. Students…

  4. Bringing your a-game: Educational gaming for student success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Haley P; Kaylor, Sara K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the theoretical basis for the integration of gaming in nursing education and discuss aspects related to the implementation of "The Race for Nursing Student Success" game. This game was designed for 112 junior-level baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a fundamentals nursing course. Students were divided into groups of 5-8 and rotated through ten specific learning activities that took place in various locations throughout the nursing building. Student and faculty feedback indicated positive responses to this instructional strategy and also promoted a learner-centered teaching environment. This learning activity supports the use of educational gaming as a means to develop learner-centered environments that provide experiential experiences, enhance learning, and stimulate interest, and motivation for students to learn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of Mobile Educational Game of Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Rahayu Kurniasari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Along the rapid development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT, learning media are required to undergo renewal. Innovation of learning media that combines modern technology is needed to improve the effectiveness of learning. The research is a Research and Development (R&D. The product result of this research is mobile educational game of economics. This research aims to determine the feasibility of mobile educational game of economics. Media feasibility was assessed based on the results of media-use response questionnaires that given to experts and students. Expert validation result showed that mobile educational game of economics achieved very good judgment. The assessment questionnaires result from the student also stated that the quality and effectiveness of mobile educational game of economics were very good. So, the research concluded that mobile educational game of economics worthy to be used as a media of economics learning.

  6. 78 FR 32690 - Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-752] Certain Gaming and Entertainment... importation of certain gaming and entertainment consoles, related software, and components thereof by reason... violation of [[Page 32691

  7. Game-like Technology Innovation Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

      The aim of this paper is to discuss the first results and methodological challenges and perspectives of designing game-inspired scenarios for implementation of innovation processes into schools' science education. This paper comprises and report on a case study of a game-inspired innovation...... scenario designed for technology education in grades 7 - 9 in Danish schools. In the paper, methodological challenges of doing design-based research into technology innovation education are discussed. The preliminary results from the first studies of a game-inspired technology innovation camp are also...... presented, along with discussions of the future of development of these educational spaces....

  8. Software Development as Music Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses how software development can be used as a method for music education research. It explains how software development can externalize ideas, stimulate action and reflection, and provide evidence to support the educative value of new software-based experiences. Parallels between the interactive software development process and…

  9. Designing an Electronic Educational Game to Facilitate Immersion and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxin; Williams, Doug; Prejean, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Advocates of electronic educational games often cite the work on motivation to support the use of games in education. However, motivation alone is inadequate to facilitate learning. Many of the educational games that focused their game design solely on the motivational effect failed to be either educational or entertaining. Theory and research is…

  10. Instructional games in allied health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M A

    1980-08-01

    A theoretical framework and practical suggestions for incorporating games and simulation into allied health instruction are presented. Research findings that support the use of educational simulation/games as a tool for higher cognitive learning are discussed. Examples and step-by-step instructions are given to help allied health educatiors and students write their own simulation games, try them out, evaluate them, and incorporate them into classroom use to stimulate interaction. Advantages of using educational simulation/games in allied health education as well as possible disadvantages of this teaching strategy are discussed. Use of instructional games to enhance teaching effectiveness as measured by student achievement in the allied health fields is emphasized.

  11. Deducto and Color Deducto: Enhance Logical Reasoning through Educational Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present the various features of the educational games, Deducto and Color Deducto. With a firm belief that technology can bring about a revolution in education, these activities have been designed to help enhance the logical reasoning and analytical thinking of children. They have been developed in python with a focus on Sugar environment, OLPC XO’s software paradigm. They conform to Sugar's cardinal objective of learning through reasoning, critique and experimentation. Deducto focuses on helping children learn the art of deducing logic through pattern recognition. Color Deducto, a variant of Deducto, combines pattern recognition and concepts of Munsell Color System helping children get familiar with color system concepts in a playful manner. Besides the pre-defined levels of the games, the activities empower children to design their own levels and develop games on their own.

  12. Game play in vocational training and engineering education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne A. Foss

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Educational games may create a new and improved learning culture by drawing advantage of the new knowledge and skills of today’s students obtained from extensive use of interactive game software. This paper presents a design basis and online learning resources taking advantage of game-related features like a high degree of interactivity, attractive graphics, a dynamical virtual universe, and an incentive system to promote prolonged and more advanced use. The educational resources, denoted PIDstop, are targeted towards the engineering domain. Feedback from over 2000 users clearly indicates that PIDstop has a positive learning effect. Training packages for vocational training of Automation Technicians is emphasized in this paper. Such learning resources must have a limited mathematical complexity; hence, the representation should be rather descriptive. Evaluation of learning resources to assess the actual learning effect is important, and a two-step procedure based on formative and summative evaluation is proposed for this purpose.

  13. Authoring of Adaptive Single-Player Educational Games

    OpenAIRE

    Mehm, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Digital Educational Games, as one of the most important application areas of Serious Games, combine positive properties of digital games, such as strong motivation for players and inherent learning processes, with educational methods and technologies. Adaptive algorithms allow such games to be aligned automatically to the needs of different players, thereby increasing the learning efficacy. However, educational games are among the most complex game production endeavors, since they are often f...

  14. A Study on the Game Programming Education Based on Educational Game Engine at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongho; Kim, Kwanwoong; Jung, Soonyoung

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that the game programming education at school should be conducted in consideration of an individual student's ability, an elementary programmer. Language to be used in the programming education also need to be associated with the ones that are actually used in the game industry. Lately, many researches on the educational programming…

  15. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Software Documentation]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  16. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Computer software]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  17. Making Gameplay Matter: Designing Modern Educational Tabletop Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    One of the great failings in educational game design is a focus on the question-and-answer model of gameplay. This type of educational game has players engage in some sort of time-wasting activity like rolling a die and moving, and then the focus of the game, the activity of answering a question, is triggered. Thousands of educational games use…

  18. Improving Video Game Development: Facilitating Heterogeneous Team Collaboration through Flexible Software Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Juergen; Schweda, Angelika; Winkler, Dietmar; Biffl, Stefan

    Based on our observations of Austrian video game software development (VGSD) practices we identified a lack of systematic processes/method support and inefficient collaboration between various involved disciplines, i.e. engineers and artists. VGSD includes heterogeneous disciplines, e.g. creative arts, game/content design, and software. Nevertheless, improving team collaboration and process support is an ongoing challenge to enable a comprehensive view on game development projects. Lessons learned from software engineering practices can help game developers to increase game development processes within a heterogeneous environment. Based on a state of the practice survey in the Austrian games industry, this paper presents (a) first results with focus on process/method support and (b) suggests a candidate flexible process approach based on Scrum to improve VGSD and team collaboration. Results showed (a) a trend to highly flexible software processes involving various disciplines and (b) identified the suggested flexible process approach as feasible and useful for project application.

  19. Integrating indigenous games and knowledge into Physical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrating indigenous games and knowledge into Physical Education: Implications for ... The aim of this study was to analyse indigenous Zulu games towards integrating indigenous game skill and knowledge ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  20. Is it all in the game? : learner support in an educational knowledge management simulation game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemkuil, Hendrik Hermanus

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is about the educational use of computer games. The fast growth of the use of digital games (on game consoles, personal computers and the Internet) in the last two decades has led to renewed attention to the role of game play in education (see for example Dawes and Dumbleton, 2001,

  1. Game Theory and Educational Policy: Private Education Legislation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing-Wah; Pan, Su-Yan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a game theory analysis of legislating private education in China, based on set of primary and secondary documents related to this issue. The article argues that shaping educational legislation is a dynamic, repeated game of negotiation, cooperation, and/or competition on multiple occasions among various interested actors,…

  2. Video Games as Moral Educators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Angeline

    2012-01-01

    The growing interest in video gaming is matched by a corresponding increase in concerns about the harmful effects on children and adolescents. There are numerous studies on aggression and addiction which spark debates on the negative effects of video gaming. At the same time, there are also studies demonstrating prosocial effects. This paper…

  3. Learning vocabulary through a serious game in Primary Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heitink, Maaike Christine; Fisser, Petra; Voogt, Joke; McBride, Ron; Searson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the effect of a serious game on the vocabulary of students in primary education. 206 students and 10 teachers used the game during vocabulary lessons in three conditions: (a)online game and vocabulary instruction, (b)online game only, and (c)paper game and vocabulary instruction.

  4. Resolving Conflicts in Educational Game Design through Playtesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Brian; Heeter, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    Educational game designs must balance the often conflicting values of game designers, instructional designers, and content experts. In order to reach this balance, however, colleagues should adopt development strategies that already inform the design of commercial computer games. Commercial game designers recognize that great games are not created…

  5. Gaming in Nursing Education: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pront, Leeanne; Müller, Amanda; Koschade, Adam; Hutton, Alison

    The aim of this research was to investigate videogame-based learning in nursing education and establish how videogames are currently employed and how they link to the development of decision-making, motivation, and other benefits. Although digital game-based learning potentially offers a safe and convenient environment that can support nursing students developing essential skills, nurse educators are typically slow to adopt such resources. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was conducted, followed by a thematic analysis of the literature. Evaluations of identified games found generally positive results regarding usability and effectiveness of videogames in nursing education. Analysis of advantages of videogames in nursing education identified potential benefits for decision-making, motivation, repeated exposure, logistical, and financial value. Despite the paucity of games available and the methodological limitations identified, findings provide evidence to support the potential effectiveness of videogames as a learning resource in nursing education.

  6. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    OpenAIRE

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation wit...

  7. Socio-educational assessment of electronic games

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbinas, Rokas; Rapkauskaitė, Gintarė

    2015-01-01

    This article presents social pedagogic opportunities of electronic games played by middle to high school students. Survey of 5th to 12th class students reveals electronical game properties and their correlations with student emotional state, social activity, ability to create and maintain social relations, delinquent traits and academic diffculties. Results and observations of this study are important for social pedagogues and the rest of educational process organizators, for parents trying t...

  8. Using games to provide interactive perioperative education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carifa, Linda; Janiszewski Goodin, Heather

    2011-10-01

    Perioperative nurses must use critical thinking and sound clinical judgment to meet their patients' needs safely and effectively. This requires the integration and continual updating of large amounts of detailed clinical information. Innovative education strategies are designed to make teaching and learning more interesting and interactive, especially for the presentation of complex subject material. One interactive educational strategy is the use of games. Educational games can foster collaboration and critical thinking among peers and associates. An example of this was the Perioperative QuizBowl: Evidence-Based Practice presented at the annual AORN Congress from 2003 to 2010, which was used to teach and reinforce evidence-based practice in a fun, competitive way. Although AORN no longer presents this offering, the QuizBowl format demonstrates how educational games can support clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Game based learning for computer science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Czauderna, André; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Czauderna, A., Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2011). Game based learning for computer science education. In G. van der Veer, P. B. Sloep, & M. van Eekelen (Eds.), Computer Science Education Research Conference (CSERC '11) (pp. 81-86). Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit.

  10. Game-like Technology Innovation Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    scenario designed for technology education in grades 7 - 9 in Danish schools. In the paper, methodological challenges of doing design-based research into technology innovation education are discussed. The preliminary results from the first studies of a game-inspired technology innovation camp are also...

  11. SEI Software Engineering Education Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    Planning, and Control, Kotler , P. Marketing Decision Making, Concepts and Strategy, Cravens Managerial Fnance: Essentials, Kroncke, C., Nammers, E., and...Textbooks: Applying Software Engineering Principles , Maria Systems: Cyber Turbo Dos Variety of Micros Courses: Introduction to Software Engineering...Assistant Professor of Computer Systems (513) 255-6913 Courses: Software Engineeing Managemrent EENG543 G N R A Textbooks: Principles of Productive

  12. Reflections on Software Engineering Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, H.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the software engineering community has focused on organizing its existing knowledge and finding opportunities to transform that knowledge into a university curriculum. SWEBOK (the Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge) and Software Engineering 2004 are two initiatives

  13. Aligning Game Activity with Educational Goals: Following a Constrained Design Approach to Instructional Computer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Brett E.; Scoresby, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design, creation and implementation of an instructional game for use in a high school poetry class following a commitment to an educational game design principle of "alignment". We studied groups of instructional designers and an interactive fiction computer game they built. The game was implemented in a 9th grade English classroom…

  14. Digital Games as Educational Technology: Promise and Challenges in the Use of Games to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Sigmund; Fletcher, J. Dexter; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Digital games were reviewed as an emerging tool in educational technology. Factors such as instructional effectiveness, time on task, relationship to curricula, student socio-economic status, violence in games, and game mechanics were considered. Despite considerable variability among studies, larger overall effect sizes for the impact of games on…

  15. DEVELOPING EVALUATION INSTRUMENT FOR MATHEMATICS EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Setyaningrum

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase and availability of mathematics software, either for classroom or individual learning activities, presents a challenge for teachers. It has been argued that many products are limited in quality. Some of the more commonly used software products have been criticized for poor content, activities which fail to address some learning issues, poor graphics presentation, inadequate documentation, and other technical problems. The challenge for schools is to ensure that the educational software used in classrooms is appropriate and effective in supporting intended outcomes and goals. This paper aimed to develop instrument for evaluating mathematics educational software in order to help teachers in selecting the appropriate software. The instrument considers the notion of educational including content, teaching and learning skill, interaction, and feedback and error correction; and technical aspects of educational software including design, clarity, assessment and documentation, cost and hardware and software interdependence. The instrument use a checklist approach, the easier and effective methods in assessing the quality of educational software, thus the user needs to put tick in each criteria. The criteria in this instrument are adapted and extended from standard evaluation instrument in several references.   Keywords: mathematics educational software, educational aspect, technical aspect.

  16. Software Engineering Education: Some Important Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok; Cagiltay, Nergiz Ercil; Kilic, Ozkan

    2007-01-01

    Software engineering education has been emerging as an independent and mature discipline. Accordingly, various studies are being done to provide guidelines for curriculum design. The main focus of these guidelines is around core and foundation courses. This paper summarizes the current problems of software engineering education programs. It also…

  17. The Economics of Educational Software Portability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joao Batista Araujo e

    1990-01-01

    Discusses economic issues that affect the portability of educational software. Topics discussed include economic reasons for portability, including cost effectiveness; the nature and behavior of educational computer software markets; the role of producers, buyers, and consumers; potential effects of government policies; computer piracy; and…

  18. An Application of Games-Based Learning within Software Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Thomas M.; Stansfield, Mark; Hainey, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For some time now, computer games have played an important role in both children and adults' leisure activities. While there has been much written on the negative aspects of computer games, it has also been recognised that they have potential advantages and benefits. There is no doubt that computer games are highly engaging and incorporate…

  19. Students @ play: serious games for learning in higher education.

    OpenAIRE

    Rooney, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    The rise of digital games over recent years has been exponential. While many are used for entertainment, digital games have also begun to permeate education — which has lead to the coining of the term ―serious games‖ [1]. Proponents of serious games argue that they hold enormous potential for learning [2], by embodying a range of pedagogical strategies. While some have adopted commercial games for use in the classroom, others have designed games specifically for educational purposes. Howev...

  20. Computer simulation games in population and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, R S

    1988-01-01

    Computer-based simulation games are effective training tools that have several advantages. They enable players to learn in a nonthreatening manner and develop strategies to achieve goals in a dynamic environment. They also provide visual feedback on the effects of players' decisions, encourage players to explore and experiment with options before making final decisions, and develop players' skills in analysis, decision making, and cooperation. 2 games have been developed by the Research Triangle Institute for public-sector planning agencies interested in or dealing with developing countries. The UN Population and Development Game teaches players about the interaction between population variables and the national economy and how population policies complement other national policies, such as education. The BRIDGES Education Planning Game focuses on the effects education has on national policies. In both games, the computer simulates the reactions of a fictional country's socioeconomic system to players' decisions. Players can change decisions after seeing their effects on a computer screen and thus can improve their performance in achieving goals.

  1. Design Principles of Next-Generation Digital Gaming for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Jenkins, Henry; Holland, Walter; Miller, Heather; O'Driscoll, Alice; Tan, Katie Philip; Todd, Katie.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of digital games, describes research at MIT that is exploring the potential of digital games for supporting learning, and offers hypotheses about the design of next-generation educational video and computer games. Highlights include simulations and games; and design principles, including context and using information to…

  2. Toward an Analysis of Video Games for Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenholley, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Video games have tremendous potential in mathematics education, yet there is a push to simply add mathematics to a video game without regard to whether the game structure suits the mathematics, and without regard to the level of mathematical thought being learned in the game. Are students practicing facts, or are they problem-solving? This paper…

  3. 77 FR 40082 - Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-745] Certain Gaming and Entertainment... gaming and entertainment consoles, related software, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... finally concluded that an industry exists within the United States that practices the '896, '094, '571...

  4. 3D Game-Based Learning System for Improving Learning Achievement in Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su,Chung-Ho; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, such that students could better learn curriculum by 3-dimension virtual reality. To enhance software engineering learning, this paper develops a 3D game-based learning system to assist teaching and assess the students' motivation, satisfaction and learning achievement. A…

  5. Children as Educational Computer Game Designers: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytak, Ahmet; Land, Susan M.; Smith, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how children designed computer games as artifacts that reflected their understanding of nutrition. Ten 5th grade students were asked to design computer games with the software "Game Maker" for the purpose of teaching 1st graders about nutrition. The results from the case study show that students were able to…

  6. Virtual Education: Guidelines for Using Games Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Advanced three-dimensional virtual environment technology, similar to that used by the film and computer games industry, can allow educational developers to rapidly create realistic online virtual environments. This technology has been used to generate a range of interactive Virtual Reality (VR) learning environments across a spectrum of…

  7. Educational Game Systems in Artificial Intelligence Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubarkova, Elena V.; Sadchikov, Ilya A.; Suslova, Irina A.; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrey ?.; Milova, Larisa N.

    2016-01-01

    Article actuality based on fact that existing knowledge system aimed at future professional life of students: a skillful use game activity in educational process will teach students to look for alternative ways solving of real problems. The purpose of article lies in theoretical substantiation, development and testing of criteria, which must be…

  8. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-05-25

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation with increased time on task, immediate feedback, ability to learn from mistakes without becoming discouraged, and potential for behavior and attitude change. Development of quality games for pharmacy education requires content expertise as well as expertise in the science and design of gaming. When well done, serious gaming provides a valuable additional tool for pharmacy education.

  9. Efficient Software Assets for Fostering Learning in Applied Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurer, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Alexander; Steiner, Christina; Van der Vegt, Wim; Nadolski, Rob; Nyamsuren, Enkhbold; Albert, Dietrich

    2018-01-01

    Digital game technologies are a promising way to enable training providers to reach other target groups, namely those who are not interested in traditional learning technologies. Theoretically, through using digital game technologies we are able to foster the acquisition of any competence by

  10. An Ontology for Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Thong Chee; Jusoh, Yusmadi Yah; Adbullah, Rusli; Alwi, Nor Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Software agents communicate using ontology. It is important to build an ontology for specific domain such as Software Engineering Education. Building an ontology from scratch is not only hard, but also incur much time and cost. This study aims to propose an ontology through adaptation of the existing ontology which is originally built based on a…

  11. Good practices for educational software engineering projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Duim, Louwarnoud; Andersson, Jesper; Sinnema, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications indicate the importance of software engineering in the computer science curriculum. In this paper, we present the final part of software engineering education at University of Groningen in the Netherlands and Vaxjo University in Sweden, where student teams perform an industrial

  12. Reflecting Indigenous Culture in Educational Software Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Marilyn

    1989-01-01

    Discusses research on Australian Aboriginal cognition which relates to the development of appropriate educational software. Describes "Tinja," a software program using familiar content and experiences, Aboriginal characters and cultural values, extensive graphics and animation, peer and group work, and open-ended design to help young…

  13. Learning vocabulary through a serious game in Primary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Heitink, Maaike Christine; Fisser, Petra; Voogt, Joke; McBride, Ron; Searson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the effect of a serious game on the vocabulary of students in primary education. 206 students and 10 teachers used the game during vocabulary lessons in three conditions: (a)online game and vocabulary instruction, (b)online game only, and (c)paper game and vocabulary instruction. Both immediate learning and retention effects were examined. Additionally a student questionnaire and teacher interview regarding their experiences has been employed. Results show a significant le...

  14. The effects of computer game elements in physics instruction software for middle schools: A study of cognitive and affective gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, David Alan

    Can the educational effectiveness of physics instruction software for middle schoolers be improved by employing "game elements" commonly found in recreational computer games? This study utilized a selected set of game elements to contextualize and embellish physics word problems with the aim of making such problems more engaging. Game elements used included: (1) a fantasy-story context with developed characters; and (2) high-end graphics and visual effects. The primary purpose of the study was to find out if the added production cost of using such game elements was justified by proportionate gains in physics learning. The theoretical framework for the study was a modified version of Lepper and Malone's "intrinsically-motivating game elements" model. A key design issue in this model is the concept of "endogeneity", or the degree to which the game elements used in educational software are integrated with its learning content. Two competing courseware treatments were custom-designed and produced for the study; both dealt with Newton's first law. The first treatment (T1) was a 45 minute interactive tutorial that featured cartoon characters, color animations, hypertext, audio narration, and realistic motion simulations using the Interactive PhysicsspTM software. The second treatment (T2) was similar to the first except for the addition of approximately three minutes of cinema-like sequences where characters, game objectives, and a science-fiction story premise were described and portrayed with high-end graphics and visual effects. The sample of 47 middle school students was evenly divided between eighth and ninth graders and between boys and girls. Using a pretest/posttest experimental design, the independent variables for the study were: (1) two levels of treatment; (2) gender; and (3) two schools. The dependent variables were scores on a written posttest for both: (1) physics learning, and (2) attitude toward physics learning. Findings indicated that, although

  15. Using Games to Creatively Enhance the Counselor Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing games within the classroom may assist counselor educators with enhancing learning. Counselor educators may integrate games within the curriculum to assist students in learning and developing self-awareness and to assess knowledge and skills. This article describes the utilization of games within experiential-learning theory and presents…

  16. Gaming the System: Developing an Educational Game for Securing Principles of Arterial Blood Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Cory Ann; Warren, Jonah; Glendon, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the development process for creating a digital educational mini game prototype designed to provide practice opportunities for learning fundamental principles of arterial blood gases. Mini games generally take less than an hour to play and focus on specific subject matter. An interdisciplinary team of faculty from two universities mentored student game developers to design a digital educational mini game prototype. Sixteen accelerated bachelor of science in nursing students collaborated with game development students and playtested the game prototype during the last semester of their senior year in nursing school. Playtesting is a form of feedback that supports an iterative design process that is critical to game development. A 10-question survey was coupled with group discussions addressing five broad themes of an archetypical digital educational mini game to yield feedback on game design, play, and content. Four rounds of playtesting and incorporating feedback supported the iterative process. Accelerated bachelor of science in nursing student playtester feedback suggests that the digital educational mini game prototype has potential for offering an engaging, playful game experience that will support securing the fundamental principles of arterial blood gases. Next steps are to test the digital educational mini game for teaching and learning effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiobiology software for educational purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, A.K.; Sharma, S.K.; Kumar, R.; Bal, C.S.; Nair, O.; Haresh, K.P.; Julka, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    To understand radio-nuclide therapy and the basis of radiation protection, it is essential to understand radiobiology. With limited time for classroom teaching and limited time and resources for radiobiology experiments students do not acquire firm grasp of theoretical mathematical models and experimental knowledge of target theory and Linear quadratic models that explain nature of cell survival curves. We believe that this issue might be addressed with numerical simulation of cell survival curves using mathematical models. Existing classroom teaching can be reoriented to understand the subject using the concept of modeling, simulation and virtual experiments. After completion of the lecture, students can practice with simulation tool at their convenient time. In this study we have developed software that can help the students to acquire firm grasp of theoretical and experimental radiobiology. The software was developed using FreeMat ver 4.0, open source software. Target theory, linear quadratic model, cell killing based on Poisson model have been included. The implementation of the program structure was to display the menu for the user choice to be made and then program flows depending on the users choice. The program executes by typing 'Radiobiology' on the command line interface. Students can investigate the effect of radiation dose on cell, interactively. They can practice to draw the cell survival curve based on the input and output data and they can also compare their handmade graphs with automatically generated graphs by the program. This software is in the early stage of development and will evolve on user feedback. We feel this simulation software will be quite useful for students entering in the nuclear medicine, radiology and radiotherapy disciplines. (author)

  18. Integrating ICT with education: using computer games to enhance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrating ICT with education: using computer games to enhance learning mathematics at undergraduate level. ... This research seeks to look into ways in which computer games as ICT tools can be used to ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  19. Towards an affordable alternative educational video game input device

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Andrew C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the prototype design results of an alternative physical educational video gaming input device. The device elicits increased physical activity from the players as compared to the compact gaming controller. Complicated...

  20. Extensive Evaluation of Using a Game Project in a Software Architecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alf Inge

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an extensive evaluation of introducing a game project to a software architecture course. In this project, university students have to construct and design a type of software architecture, evaluate the architecture, implement an application based on the architecture, and test this implementation. In previous years, the domain…

  1. Planning start-up: digital educational game solutions provider

    OpenAIRE

    Paschalis, Antreas; Ibironke, Fakinkunmi; Essa, Lubna; Alsatrawi, Ali Jawad

    2015-01-01

    Game-based learning is a growing field that provides education with a new perspective of teaching through games. Game based learning is still considered an emerging field due to problems that have been identified in its real applications in official education in classes. The research conducted shows a very attractive market ahead for game based learning around the world. However the businesses success in this domain lie in providing value proposition that addresses the real barriers faced tod...

  2. Sport Education as a Curriculum Approach to Student Learning of Invasion Games: Effects on Game Performance and Game Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Cláudio; Valério, Carla; Mesquita, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    The teaching and learning of games and sport-based activities has historically been the dominant form of the physical education curricula. With an interest in providing to students meaningful and culturally situated sporting experiences, Sport Education is probably the most implemented and researched pedagogical model worldwide. However, although there is considerable evidence that the model as a curriculum approach can benefit the development of social goals and healthy sport behaviors, not a single study as to date examined students' game-play development beyond participation in single and isolated teaching units. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine students' development of Game Performance and Game Involvement during participation in three consecutive Sport Education seasons of invasion games. The participants were an experienced physical education teacher and one seventh-grade class totaling 26 students (10 girls and 16 boys). Using the Game Performance Assessment Instrument (Oslin et al., 1998), pre-test to post-tests measures of students' Game Performance and Game Involvement were collected during their participation in basketball (20 lessons), handball (16 lessons), and football (18 lessons) units. Inter-group differences and pre-test to post-test improvements within each season were analyzed through 2 (time) x group (sport) repeated measures ANOVA tests. There were found significant pre-test to post-test improvements in Game Performance and Game Involvement in the second (handball) and third (football) seasons, but not in the first season (basketball). Students' Game Performance and Involvement scores of handball and football were significantly higher than their scores while playing basketball. The opportunity for an extended engagement in game-play activities and prolonged membership of students in the same teams throughout three consecutive seasons of Sport Education were key to the outcomes found. The specific configurations of the game

  3. Utility of ck metrics in predicting size of board-based software games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabhat, N.; Azam, F.; Malik, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Software size is one of the most important inputs of many software cost and effort estimation models. Early estimation of software plays an important role at the time of project inception. An accurate estimate of software size is, therefore, crucial for planning, managing, and controlling software development projects dealing with the development of software games. However, software size is unavailable during early phase of software development. This research determines the utility of CK (Chidamber and Kemerer) metrics, a well-known suite of object-oriented metrics, in estimating the size of software applications using the information from its UML (Unified Modeling Language) class diagram. This work focuses on a small subset dealing with board-based software games. Almost sixty games written using an object-oriented programming language are downloaded from open source repositories, analyzed and used to calibrate a regression-based size estimation model. Forward stepwise MLR (Multiple Linear Regression) is used for model fitting. The model thus obtained is assessed using a variety of accuracy measures such as MMRE (Mean Magnitude of Relative Error), Prediction of x(PRED(x)), MdMRE (Median of Relative Error) and validated using K-fold cross validation. The accuracy of this model is also compared with an existing model tailored for size estimation of board games. Based on a small subset of desktop games developed in various object-oriented languages, we obtained a model using CK metrics and forward stepwise multiple linear regression with reasonable estimation accuracy as indicated by the value of the coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.756).Comparison results indicate that the existing size estimation model outperforms the model derived using CK metrics in terms of accuracy of prediction. (author)

  4. Sport Education as a Curriculum Approach to Student Learning of Invasion Games: Effects on Game Performance and Game Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Cláudio; Valério, Carla; Mesquita, Isabel

    2018-01-01

    The teaching and learning of games and sport-based activities has historically been the dominant form of the physical education curricula. With an interest in providing to students meaningful and culturally situated sporting experiences, Sport Education is probably the most implemented and researched pedagogical model worldwide. However, although there is considerable evidence that the model as a curriculum approach can benefit the development of social goals and healthy sport behaviors, not a single study as to date examined students’ game-play development beyond participation in single and isolated teaching units. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine students’ development of Game Performance and Game Involvement during participation in three consecutive Sport Education seasons of invasion games. The participants were an experienced physical education teacher and one seventh-grade class totaling 26 students (10 girls and 16 boys). Using the Game Performance Assessment Instrument (Oslin et al., 1998), pre-test to post-tests measures of students’ Game Performance and Game Involvement were collected during their participation in basketball (20 lessons), handball (16 lessons), and football (18 lessons) units. Inter-group differences and pre-test to post-test improvements within each season were analyzed through 2 (time) x group (sport) repeated measures ANOVA tests. There were found significant pre-test to post-test improvements in Game Performance and Game Involvement in the second (handball) and third (football) seasons, but not in the first season (basketball). Students’ Game Performance and Involvement scores of handball and football were significantly higher than their scores while playing basketball. The opportunity for an extended engagement in game-play activities and prolonged membership of students in the same teams throughout three consecutive seasons of Sport Education were key to the outcomes found. The specific configurations of

  5. A Model-driven Framework for Educational Game Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Roungas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Educational games are a class of serious games whose main purpose is to teach some subject to their players. Despite the many existing design frameworks, these games are too often created in an ad-hoc manner, and typically without the use of a game design document (GDD. We argue that a reason for this phenomenon is that current ways to structure, create and update GDDs do not increase the value of the artifact in the design and development process. As a solution, we propose a model-driven, web-based knowledge management environment that supports game designers in the creation of a GDD that accounts for and relates educational and entertainment game elements. The foundation of our approach is our devised conceptual model for educational games, which also defines the structure of the design environment. We present promising results from an evaluation of our environment with eight experts in serious games.

  6. Experimenting with Educational Games using the Xbox, PC, and iPad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrlick, D.; Kilb, D. L.; Peach, C. L.; Simms, E.; Yang, A.; Layman, C.; Deutscher, R.

    2012-12-01

    gaming techniques work and which do not. We have discovered how simple concepts such as audio queues and voice-overs play a powerful role in obtaining and holding a player's attention. We have also found having the learning goals built into the gameplay is often more effective than directly quizzing the player's knowledge. By adding surprises to the gameplay, a game does a better job keeping the player's attention. Also, presenting non-traditional physical interactions with the game through motion controls or touch-screens help spur the player's interest. The duration of the game is another important factor. Depending on how much interactivity there is available to the player, the game's duration can either lead to overwhelming frustration if too short, or repetitive boredom if the game is too long. Overall, we find one of the most important parts of the learning gaming experience is making sure players are having fun while learning. After creating our games on various formats and software suites, we are working toward understanding the efficacy of our gaming approaches in not only holding players interest, but also in achieving specific learning goals related to the science behind the gameplay. We hope to encourage educators to view educational games as a useful addition to the range of approaches they use to engage students in science. Perhaps this can even motivate some educators to create their own games.

  7. Game-based Research Collaboration adapted to Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Damgaard Hansen, Sidse; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents prospects for adapting scientific discovery games to science education. In the paper a prototype of The Quantum Computing Game is presented as a working example of adapting game-based research collaboration to physics education. The game concept is the initial result of a three......-year, inter-disciplinary project “Pilot Center for Community-driven Research” at Aarhus and Aalborg University in Denmark. The paper discusses how scientific discovery games can contribute to educating students in how to work with unsolved scientific problems and creation of new scientific knowledge. Based...

  8. Serious Games for education and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro De Gloria

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Serious Games (SGs are gaining an ever increasing interest for education and traning. Exploiting the latest simulation and visualization technologies, SGs are able to contextualize the player’s experience in challenging, realistic environments, supporting situated cognition. However, we still miss methods and tools for effectively and deeply infusing pedagogy and instruction inside digital games. After presenting an overview of the state of the art of the SG taxonomies, the paper introduces the pedagogical theories and models most relevant to SGs and their implications on SG design.  We also present a schema for a proper integration of games in education, supporting different goals in different steps of a formal education process. By analyzing a set of well-established SGs and formats, the paper presents the main mechanics and models that are being used in SG designs, with a particular focus on assessment, feedback and learning analytics. An overview of tools and models for SG design is also presented. Finally, based on the performed analysis, indications for future research in the field are provided.

  9. The Evaluation of CEIT Teacher Candidates in Terms of Computer Games, Educational Use of Computer Games and Game Design Qualifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı BAĞCI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer games have an important usage potential in the education of today’s digital student profile. Also computer teachers known as technology leaders in schools are the main stakeholders of this potential. In this study, opinions of the computer teachers about computer games are examined from different perspectives. 119 computer teacher candidates participated in this study, and the data were collected by a questionnaire. As a result of this study, computer teacher candidates have a positive thinking about the usage of computer games in education and they see themselves qualified for the analysis and design of educational games. But they partially have negative attitudes about some risks like addiction and lose of time. Also the candidates who attended the educational game courses and play games from their mobile phones have more positive opinions, and they see themselves more qualified than others. Males have more positive opinions about computer games than females, but in terms of educational games and the analysis and design of the computer games, there is no significant difference between males and females.

  10. Digital game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents research on digital game-based learning in secondary education. The main research question is: How do digital games contribute to learning, engagement and motivation to learn? The thesis contains seven chapters. Chapter one is an introduction to digital game-based learning

  11. Using Data Mining Results to Improve Educational Video Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    This study uses information about in-game strategy use, identified through cluster analysis of actions in an educational video game, to make data-driven modifications to the game in order to reduce construct-irrelevant behavior. The examination of student strategies identified through cluster analysis indicated that (a) it was common for students…

  12. Historical Perspectives on Games and Education from the Learning Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Brett E.; Satwicz, Tom; Caswell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews three classic theorists' writing on games, learning, and development. Piaget, Vygotsky, and Bruner all wrote about games and play as important to thinking and learning. This review attempts to synthesize their perspectives as a means to revisit underused theoretical perspectives on the role of games in education. The views of…

  13. Speedminton: Using the Tactical Games Model in Secondary Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Ju; Bullard, Susan; Hovatter, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and learning of sport and sports-related games dominates the curriculum in most secondary physical education programs in America. For many secondary school students, playing games can be exciting and lead to a lifetime of participation in sport-related activities. Using the Tactical Games Model (TGM) (Mitchell et al., 2006) to teach the…

  14. Breaking with fun, educational and realistic learning games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus Henriksen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    are commonly conceived as means for staging learning processes, and that thinking learning games so has an inhibiting effect in regard to creating learning processes. The paper draws upon a qualitative study of participants' experiences with ‘the EIS Simulation', which is a computer-based learning game......This paper addresses the game conceptions and values that learning games inherit from regular gaming, as well as how they affect the use and development of learning games. Its key points concern the issues of thinking learning games as fun, educative and realistic, which is how learning games...... for teaching change management and change implementation. The EIS is played in groups, who share the game on a computer, and played by making change decisions in order to implement an IT system in an organisation. In this study, alternative participatory incentives, means for creating learning processes...

  15. Fidelity and game-based technology in management education

    OpenAIRE

    Cornacchione Jr.,Edgard B.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores educational technology and management education by analyzing fidelity in game-based management education interventions. A sample of 31 MBA students was selected to help answer the research question: To what extent do MBA students tend to recognize specific game-based academic experiences, in terms of fidelity, as relevant to their managerial performance? Two distinct game-based interventions (BG1 and BG2) with key differences in fidelity levels were explored: BG1 presented...

  16. Computer Games in Pre-School Settings: Didactical Challenges when Commercial Educational Computer Games Are Implemented in Kindergartens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsnes, Vigdis; Gram Okland, Nils Tore; Krumsvik, Rune

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the didactical implications when commercial educational computer games are used in Norwegian kindergartens by analysing the dramaturgy and the didactics of one particular game and the game in use in a pedagogical context. Our justification for analysing the game by using dramaturgic theory is that we consider the game to be…

  17. A three-dimensional model for educational game analysis & design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, Nick; Bril, Ivo; Braad, Eelco

    2015-01-01

    For over thirty years, there has been a discussion about the effectiveness of educational games in comparison to traditional learning materials. To help further this discussion, we aim to understand ‘how educational games work’ by formalising (and visualising) the educational and motivational

  18. EPIC: A Framework for Using Video Games in Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Ethics education can potentially be supplemented through the use of video games. This article proposes a novel framework (Ethics Practice and Implementation Categorization [EPIC] Framework), which helps educators choose games to be used for ethics education purposes. The EPIC Framework is derived from a number of classic moral development,…

  19. Knowledge of the educational implications of computer games by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports an expost facto research carried out to find out from 153 Computer Education Students (from Colleges of Education) their knowledge of Computer games. The researcher specifically set out to investigate, if those Computer Education Students thought pupils could actually learn form Computer games.

  20. RunJumpCode: An Educational Game for Educating Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Matthew; Baghaei, Nilufar; Ragon, Pedrito; Lambert, Jonathon; Rajakaruna, Tharindu; Houghton, Travers; Dacey, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Programming promotes critical thinking, problem solving and analytic skills through creating solutions that can solve everyday problems. However, learning programming can be a daunting experience for a lot of students. "RunJumpCode" is an educational 2D platformer video game, designed and developed in Unity, to teach players the…

  1. Development of a Kinect Software Tool to Classify Movements during Active Video Gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Michael; Thornton, Ashleigh L; Lay, Brendan S; Ward, Brodie; Nathan, David; Hunt, Daniel; Braham, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    While it has been established that using full body motion to play active video games results in increased levels of energy expenditure, there is little information on the classification of human movement during active video game play in relationship to fundamental movement skills. The aim of this study was to validate software utilising Kinect sensor motion capture technology to recognise fundamental movement skills (FMS), during active video game play. Two human assessors rated jumping and side-stepping and these assessments were compared to the Kinect Action Recognition Tool (KART), to establish a level of agreement and determine the number of movements completed during five minutes of active video game play, for 43 children (m = 12 years 7 months ± 1 year 6 months). During five minutes of active video game play, inter-rater reliability, when examining the two human raters, was found to be higher for the jump (r = 0.94, p game play, demonstrating that both humans and KART had higher agreement for jumps than sidesteps in the game play condition. The results of the study provide confidence that the Kinect sensor can be used to count the number of jumps and sidestep during five minutes of active video game play with a similar level of accuracy as human raters. However, in contrast to humans, the KART system required a fraction of the time to analyse and tabulate the results.

  2. Software Package STATISTICA and Educational Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidova Liliya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the main aspects of application of the software package STATISTICA in the educational process. Technologies of data mining which can be useful for students researches have been considered. The main tools of these technologies have been discussed.

  3. Cognitive Analysis of Educational Games: The Number Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Maas, Han; Nyamsuren, Enkhbold

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the cognitive strategies underlying performance in the Number task, a Math game that requires both arithmetic fluency and mathematical creativity. In this game all elements in a set of numbers (for instance, 2, 5, 9) have to be used precisely once to create a target number (for

  4. Cognitive Analysis of Educational Games : The Number Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maas, H.L.J.; Nyamsuren, E.

    We analyze the cognitive strategies underlying performance in the Number task, a Math game that requires both arithmetic fluency and mathematical creativity. In this game all elements in a set of numbers (for instance, 2, 5, 9) have to be used precisely once to create a target number (for instance,

  5. A systematic review of serious games in asthma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David; Monnier, Delphine; Tesnière, Antoine; Hadchouel, Alice

    2017-05-01

    Serious games may be useful tools for asthma education. The objectives of this systematic review were to identify the available articles on serious games designed to educate patients and the general public about asthma and to assess their impact on patient's knowledge, behavior, and clinical outcomes related to asthma. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo, and Web of Science were systematically searched from January 1980 to December 2015 for studies investigating serious games in asthma education. Two investigators independently assessed studies against inclusion criteria and rated those included on indicators of quality. Investigators extracted data on serious games' content and learning objectives, and on outcomes following Kirkpatrick classification. A total of 12 articles were found to be relevant, describing a total of 10 serious games. All serious games were directed toward children, with eight games for children with asthma and two for school-based intervention. The average Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument score was 13.9 of 18, which is high. Most of the serious games were associated with high rates of satisfaction and improvement in children's knowledge. Seven studies evaluated the impact of serious games on clinical outcomes and found no significant difference relative to control groups. Although serious games designed for asthma education have evolved with advances in technology, results of their evaluation remained similar across studies, with clear improvements in knowledge but little or no change in behaviors and clinical outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A CLASSROOM GAME FOR TEACHING MANAGEMENT OF SOFTWARE COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS M. ZAPATA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La gestión en ingeniería de software necesita algunas destrezas especiales. A menudo, esas destrezas no se pueden desarrollar a partir de los métodos tradicionales de enseñanza. Otras disciplinas administrativas usan aprendizaje activo (v. g. aprendizaje mediante juegos para desarrollar esas destrezas, pero los profesores en ingeniería de software no suelen conducir experiencias similares. En este artículo se propone un juego de clase para simular el comportamiento de varios roles pertenecientes a una compañía de software. Nuestra meta es la "práctica", en un ambiente similar al entorno real, de las destrezas que requieren los miembros de los equipos de desarrollo de software. Además, se compendian los resultados de la práctica del juego con dos grupos de estudiantes.

  7. Computer-Based Simulation Games in Public Administration Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kutergina Evgeniia

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulation, an active learning technique, is now one of the advanced pedagogical technologies. Th e use of simulation games in the educational process allows students to gain a firsthand understanding of the processes of real life. Public- administration, public-policy and political-science courses increasingly adopt simulation games in universities worldwide. Besides person-to-person simulation games, there are computer-based simulations in public-administration education. Currently...

  8. Modding a free and open source software video game: "Play testing is hard work"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Poderi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Video game modding is a form of fan productivity in contemporary participatory culture. We see modding as an important way in which modders experience and conceptualize their work. By focusing on modding in a free and open source software video game, we analyze the practice of modding and the way it changes modders' relationship with their object of interest. The modders' involvement is not always associated with fun and creativity. Indeed, activities such as play testing often undermine these dimensions of modding. We present a case study of modding that is based on ethnographic research done for The Battle for Wesnoth, a free and open source software strategy video game entirely developed by a community of volunteers.

  9. Enhance Learning on Software Project Management through a Role-Play Game in a Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maratou, Vicky; Chatzidaki, Eleni; Xenos, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a role-play game for software project management (SPM) in a three-dimensional online multiuser virtual world. The Opensimulator platform is used for the creation of an immersive virtual environment that facilitates students' collaboration and realistic interaction, in order to manage unexpected events occurring during the…

  10. The Effects of an Educational Video Game on Mathematical Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mido; Evans, Michael A.; Kim, Sunha; Norton, Anderson; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Samur, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to maximizing success in mathematics, our research team implemented an educational video game in fifth grade mathematics classrooms in five schools in the Eastern US. The educational game was developed by our multi-disciplinary research team to achieve a hypothetical learning trajectory of mathematical thinking of 5th grade students.…

  11. Digital games in medical education: Key terms, concepts, and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Kaufman, David

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Game-based education is fast becoming a key instrument in medical education. Method: In this study, papers related to games were filtered and limited to full-text peer-reviewed published in English. Results: To the best of researchers' knowledge, the concepts used in the literature are varied and distinct, and the literature is not conclusive on the definition of educational games for medical education. Conclusion: This paper attempts to classify terms, concepts and definitions common to gamification in medical education.

  12. Using Android-Based Educational Game for Learning Colloid Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, S.; Anjani, R.; Farida, I.; Ramdhani, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    This research is based on the importance of the development of student’s chemical literacy on Colloid material using Android-based educational game media. Educational game products are developed through research and development design. In the analysis phase, material analysis is performed to generate concept maps, determine chemical literacy indicators, game strategies and set game paths. In the design phase, product packaging is carried out, then validation and feasibility test are performed. Research produces educational game based on Android that has the characteristics that is: Colloid material presented in 12 levels of game in the form of questions and challenges, presents visualization of discourse, images and animation contextually to develop the process of thinking and attitude. Based on the analysis of validation and trial results, the product is considered feasible to use.

  13. Audio Visual Media Components in Educational Game for Elementary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilani Hartono

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to review and implement interactive audio visual media used in an educational game to improve elementary students’ interest in learning mathematics. The game was developed for desktop platform. The art of the game was set as 2D cartoon art with animation and audio in order to make students more interest. There were four mini games developed based on the researches on mathematics study. Development method used was Multimedia Development Life Cycle (MDLC that consists of requirement, design, development, testing, and implementation phase. Data collection methods used are questionnaire, literature study, and interview. The conclusion is elementary students interest with educational game that has fun and active (moving objects, with fast tempo of music, and carefree color like blue. This educational game is hoped to be an alternative teaching tool combined with conventional teaching method.

  14. Discovering the Unequal Interest in Popular Online Educational Games and Its Implications: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meilan

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing scholarly interest in educational computer games, research on popular online educational games is rare. Little is known about which online educational games are popular and to what extent, what kind of users are more interested in these games and how interest in the games is related to academic performance. To fill this gap,…

  15. The Educational Efficacy of Distinct Information Delivery Systems in Modified Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirnia, Andrew; Israel, Maya

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of many commercial video games, this popularity is not shared by educational video games. Modified video games, however, can bridge the gap in quality between commercial and education video games by embedding educational content into popular commercial video games. This study examined how different information…

  16. Playing interprofessional games: reflections on using the Interprofessional Education Game (iPEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sundari; Diack, Lesley

    2015-05-01

    This report explores the relevance of gaming in IPE curriculum design with the use of the Interprofessional Education Game (iPEG) as an activity aimed to achieve positive interprofessional learning outcomes for students. It was designed to enable the understanding of professional roles and responsibilities in patient/client care settings. We provide a description of its implementation and evaluation with first year student cohorts (900+ per cohort) over a 3-year period within an established interprofessional education (IPE) programme. The game encapsulates fun and memorable learning styles to explore professional stereotypes and team approaches to care delivery. It can be a valuable teaching tool for those designing IPE curriculum. Evaluation data from students and staff were mainly positive. We discuss the use of the game and its potential to be adapted in flexible and creative ways to assist educators in consider incorporating gaming within their own IPE programmes.

  17. Essential Features of Serious Games Design in Higher Education: Linking Learning Attributes to Game Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameras, Petros; Arnab, Sylvester; Dunwell, Ian; Stewart, Craig; Clarke, Samantha; Petridis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    This paper consolidates evidence and material from a range of specialist and disciplinary fields to provide an evidence-based review and synthesis on the design and use of serious games in higher education. Search terms identified 165 papers reporting conceptual and empirical evidence on how learning attributes and game mechanics may be planned,…

  18. Making Decisions about an Educational Game, Simulation or Workshop: A 'Game Theory' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryer, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Uses game theory to help practitioners make decisions about educational games, simulations, or workshops whose outcomes depend to some extent on chance. Highlights include principles for making decisions involving risk; elementary laws of probability; utility theory; and principles for making decisions involving uncertainty. (eight references)…

  19. Educational Games as a Teaching Tool in Pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburahma, Mona Hassan; Mohamed, Heba Moustafa

    2015-05-25

    The shift in the pharmacist's role from simply dispensing medications to effective delivery of pharmaceutical care interventions and drug therapy management has influenced pharmacy education.(1-3) The educational focus has shifted from basic sciences to clinical and integrated courses that require incorporating active-learning strategies to provide pharmacy graduates with higher levels of competencies and specialized skills. As opposed to passive didactic lectures, active-learning strategies address the educational content in an interactive learning environment to develop interpersonal, communication, and problem-solving skills needed by pharmacists to function effectively in their new roles.(4-6) One such strategy is using educational games. The aim of this paper is to review educational games adopted in different pharmacy schools and to aid educators in replicating the successfully implemented games and overcoming deficiencies in educational games. This review also highlights the main pitfalls within this research area.

  20. Educational gaming in the health sciences: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Gillian; Skirton, Heather; Cooper, Simon; Allum, Peter; Nelmes, Pam

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a report of a review to investigate the use of games to support classroom learning in the health sciences. One aim of education in the health sciences is to enable learners to develop professional competence. Students have a range of learning styles and innovative teaching strategies assist in creating a dynamic learning environment. New attitudes towards experiential learning methods have contributed to the expansion of gaming as a strategy. A search for studies published between January 1980 and June 2008 was undertaken, using appropriate search terms. The databases searched were: British Education Index, British Nursing Index, The Cochrane Library, CINAHLPlus, Medline, PubMed, ERIC, PsychInfo and Australian Education Index. All publications and theses identified through the search were assessed for relevance. Sixteen papers reporting empirical studies or reviews that involved comparison of gaming with didactic methods were included. The limited research available indicates that, while both traditional didactic methods and gaming have been successful in increasing student knowledge, neither method is clearly more helpful to students. The use of games generally enhances student enjoyment and may improve long-term retention of information. While the use of games can be viewed as a viable teaching strategy, care should be exercised in the use of specific games that have not been assessed objectively. Further research on the use of gaming is needed to enable educators to gaming techniques appropriately for the benefit of students and, ultimately, patients.

  1. Diabetic Mario: Designing and Evaluating Mobile Games for Diabetes Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Nandigam, David; Casey, John; Direito, Artur; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, diabetes education has relied on written materials, with limited resources available for children with diabetes. Mobile games can be effective and motivating tools for the promotion of children's health. In our earlier work, we proposed a novel approach for designing computer games aimed at educating children with diabetes. In this article, we apply our game design to a mobile Android game (Mario Brothers). We also introduce four heuristics that are specifically designed for evaluating the mobile game, by adapting traditional usability heuristics. Results of a pilot study (n = 12) to evaluate gameplay over 1-week showed that the children found the game engaging and improved their knowledge of healthy diet and lifestyle.

  2. Serious simulation game development for energy transition education using integrated framework game design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destyanto, A. R.; Putri, O. A.; Hidayatno, A.

    2017-11-01

    Due to the advantages that serious simulation game offered, many areas of studies, including energy, have used serious simulation games as their instruments. However, serious simulation games in the field of energy transition still have few attentions. In this study, serious simulation game is developed and tested as the activity of public education about energy transition which is a conversion from oil to natural gas program. The aim of the game development is to create understanding and awareness about the importance of energy transition for society in accelerating the process of energy transition in Indonesia since 1987 the energy transition program has not achieved the conversion target yet due to the lack of education about energy transition for society. Developed as a digital serious simulation game following the framework of integrated game design, the Transergy game has been tested to 15 users and then analysed. The result of verification and validation of the game shows that Transergy gives significance to the users for understanding and triggering the needs of oil to natural gas conversion.

  3. Bayes Academy - An Educational Game for Learning Bayesian Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sotala, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of 'Bayes Academy', an educational game which aims to teach an understanding of Bayesian networks. A Bayesian network is a directed acyclic graph describing a joint probability distribution function over n random variables, where each node in the graph represents a random variable. To find a way to turn this subject into an interesting game, this work draws on the theoretical background of meaningful play. Among other requirements, actions in the game...

  4. Computer games as a pedagogical tool in education

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Ken

    1997-01-01

    Designing computer based environments is never easy, especially when considering young learners. Traditionally, computer gaming has been seen as lacking in educational value, but rating highly in satisfaction and motivation. The objective of this dissertation is to look at elements of computer based learning and to ascertain how computer games can be included as a means of improving learning. Various theories are drawn together from psychology, instructional technology and computer gaming, to...

  5. Development of a Kinect Software Tool to Classify Movements during Active Video Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Michael; Lay, Brendan S.; Ward, Brodie; Nathan, David; Hunt, Daniel; Braham, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    While it has been established that using full body motion to play active video games results in increased levels of energy expenditure, there is little information on the classification of human movement during active video game play in relationship to fundamental movement skills. The aim of this study was to validate software utilising Kinect sensor motion capture technology to recognise fundamental movement skills (FMS), during active video game play. Two human assessors rated jumping and side-stepping and these assessments were compared to the Kinect Action Recognition Tool (KART), to establish a level of agreement and determine the number of movements completed during five minutes of active video game play, for 43 children (m = 12 years 7 months ± 1 year 6 months). During five minutes of active video game play, inter-rater reliability, when examining the two human raters, was found to be higher for the jump (r = 0.94, p < .01) than the sidestep (r = 0.87, p < .01), although both were excellent. Excellent reliability was also found between human raters and the KART system for the jump (r = 0.84, p, .01) and moderate reliability for sidestep (r = 0.6983, p < .01) during game play, demonstrating that both humans and KART had higher agreement for jumps than sidesteps in the game play condition. The results of the study provide confidence that the Kinect sensor can be used to count the number of jumps and sidestep during five minutes of active video game play with a similar level of accuracy as human raters. However, in contrast to humans, the KART system required a fraction of the time to analyse and tabulate the results. PMID:27442437

  6. Development of a Kinect Software Tool to Classify Movements during Active Video Gaming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosenberg

    Full Text Available While it has been established that using full body motion to play active video games results in increased levels of energy expenditure, there is little information on the classification of human movement during active video game play in relationship to fundamental movement skills. The aim of this study was to validate software utilising Kinect sensor motion capture technology to recognise fundamental movement skills (FMS, during active video game play. Two human assessors rated jumping and side-stepping and these assessments were compared to the Kinect Action Recognition Tool (KART, to establish a level of agreement and determine the number of movements completed during five minutes of active video game play, for 43 children (m = 12 years 7 months ± 1 year 6 months. During five minutes of active video game play, inter-rater reliability, when examining the two human raters, was found to be higher for the jump (r = 0.94, p < .01 than the sidestep (r = 0.87, p < .01, although both were excellent. Excellent reliability was also found between human raters and the KART system for the jump (r = 0.84, p, .01 and moderate reliability for sidestep (r = 0.6983, p < .01 during game play, demonstrating that both humans and KART had higher agreement for jumps than sidesteps in the game play condition. The results of the study provide confidence that the Kinect sensor can be used to count the number of jumps and sidestep during five minutes of active video game play with a similar level of accuracy as human raters. However, in contrast to humans, the KART system required a fraction of the time to analyse and tabulate the results.

  7. The Relevance of Software Development Education for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, Janet; Huisman, Magda; Mentz, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Despite a widely-acknowledged shortage of software developers, and reports of a gap between industry needs and software education, the possible gap between students' needs and software development education has not been explored in detail. In their university education, students want to take courses and carry out projects that clearly relate to…

  8. Generalization of Tactics in Tag Rugby from Practice to Games in Middle School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Ah; Ward, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many of the issues relating to game performance of students found in the physical education literature can be considered a failure of generalization from practices to games, and from games to games. However, no study in secondary physical education has examined generalization effects as a result of effective game pedagogy in the…

  9. Game-centric pedagogy and curriculums in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Murray, John; Morgan, James

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines some recent trends in game-centric education for STEAM (science, technology,engineering, art and mathematics) fields, especially those that explore and promote collaborationamong multiple disciplines. We discuss various multimodal design research activities that draw uponthe...... applications and usage of popular technical hackathons and game design jams in educationalenvironments. The intent of this work is to guide and inform new approaches to the corecomponents of STEAM curriculums.Game-centric methods appear to be well-suited to a variety of education and trainingcircumstances...... a valuable vehicle for enhancing general education andlong-term life skills.We conclude by describing some opportunities to undertake qualitative and quantitative research on teams of participants in popular game development events, such as the multinational Global GameJam (GGJ) series. This process involves...

  10. Role Playing Game (RPG on nursing undergraduate course: educational potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Nathale Soares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a Role Playing Game as an educational strategy in Undergraduate Nursing course, emphasizing its subjective implications in understanding aspects of the profession. This is a qualitative study, conducted through an evaluative research, of deployment analysis type. Nursing students of the 3rd period participated. The instrument to collection was Memories of Game, reports prepared by students after game sessions. The game is a non-traditional educational strategy that enabled approach to students through professional practice, active participation, self-reflection and reflection on professional practice. This strategy favored individualization processes, allowing students to experience situations similar to the nursing practice and exercise skills such as teamwork and creativity. The expansion of studies that address the subjective processes in higher education, through simulation games, can contribute to better design of health development processes.

  11. Educational games in geriatric medicine education: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schünemann Holger J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To systematically review the medical literature to assess the effect of geriatric educational games on the satisfaction, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and behaviors of health care professionals. Methods We conducted a systematic review following the Cochrane Collaboration methodology including an electronic search of 10 electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials (RCT and controlled clinical trials (CCT and excluded single arm studies. Population of interests included members (practitioners or students of the health care professions. Outcomes of interests were participants' satisfaction, knowledge, beliefs, attitude, and behaviors. Results We included 8 studies evaluating 5 geriatric role playing games, all conducted in United States. All studies suffered from one or more methodological limitations but the overall quality of evidence was acceptable. None of the studies assessed the effects of the games on beliefs or behaviors. None of the 8 studies reported a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of change in attitude. One study assessed the impact on knowledge and found non-statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Two studies found levels of satisfaction among participants to be high. We did not conduct a planned meta-analysis because the included studies either reported no statistical data or reported different summary statistics. Conclusion The available evidence does not support the use of role playing interventions in geriatric medical education with the aim of improving the attitudes towards the elderly.

  12. Game-based dynamic simulations supporting technical education and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Bjølseth

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Educational games may improve learning by taking advantage of the new knowledge and skills of today’s students obtained from extensive use of interactive games. This paper describes how interactive dynamic simulators of advanced technical systems and phenomena can be shaped and adapted as games and competitions supporting technical education and training. Some selected examples at different educational levels are shown, from vocational training to university level courses. The potential benefit and perceived learning effect of this approach is also described and underpinned from comprehensive user feedback.

  13. Implementing an composition architecture for an online game software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alberto Guzmán Luna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta una arquitectura para la composición de servicios Web, en la que un plan de composición se construye sobre la base de un agente de planificación, que puede ser ejecutado en forma concurrente durante su composición a fin de estimar la siguiente acción a ejecutar en lugar de preparar un completo plan que con frecuencia será invalidado. Esta característica es muy valiosa cuando se trata de abordar los problemas en tiempo real. Específicamente se propone como un dominio de prueba un software de juegos en línea, llamado ENVIRO.

  14. Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kravcik, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Klemke, R., & Kravčík, M. (2012). Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games. In S. Bocconi, R. Klamma, & Y. Bachvarova (Eds.), Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Pedagogically-driven Serious Games (PDSG 2012). In conjunction with the Seventh European

  15. A Literature Review of Gaming in Education. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClarty, Katie Larsen; Orr, Aline; Frey, Peter M.; Dolan, Robert P.; Vassileva, Victoria; McVay, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The use of simulations and digital games in learning and assessment is expected to increase over the next several years. Although there is much theoretical support for the benefits of digital games in learning and education, there is mixed empirical support. This research report provides an overview of the theoretical and empirical evidence behind…

  16. An Educational Card Game for Learning Families of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin Franco; Martinez, Jose Maria Oliva; Marquez, Serafin Bernal

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an educational card game designed to help high school students (grade 10, 15-16 years old) "understand," as opposed to memorize, the periodic table. The game may also be used to identify different chemical elements found in daily life objects. As an additional value, students learn the names and symbols of the displayed…

  17. Civic Education in the Preservice Classroom: A Study of Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumners, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to better understand social studies teacher education through preservice professional development that incorporates an online gaming and simulation component. Examination of the impact of online gaming and simulations on the self-efficacy and content knowledge of preservice teachers in the methods course was…

  18. Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kravcik, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Klemke, R., & Kravčík, M. (2012, 18 September). Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games. Presentation at S. Bocconi, R. Klamma, & Y. Bachvarova, Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Pedagogically-driven Serious Games (PDSG 2012). In conjunction with the

  19. The Impact of a Simulation Game on Operations Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasin, Federico; Giroux, Helene

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new simulation game and analyzes its impact on operations management education. The proposed simulation was empirically tested by comparing the number of mistakes during the first and second halves of the game. Data were gathered from 100 teams of four or five undergraduate students in business administration, taking their…

  20. The Significance of an Educational Game in Teaching Politology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorkovaya, Marina Vasilievna; Kurenkova, Evgeniya Alekseevna

    2015-01-01

    Game-based learning is being increasingly used in teaching humanities. In teaching politology, it seems to bring the most effective results. Through educational games, learners can fully experience modeling particular situations in the job of a would-be political technologist, which would guarantee training professional politologists with maximum…

  1. A Communities of Practice Perspective on Educational Computer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Curt

    2008-01-01

    Educational computer games provide an environment in which interactions among students, teachers, and texts differ non-trivially from those of the traditional classroom. In order to build and research computer games effectively, it is important to provide a theoretical background that adequately describes and explains learning and interactions in…

  2. Online Video Gaming: What Should Educational Psychologists Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Based on a significant increase in correspondence to the author from parents, teachers and psychologists concerning "addiction" to online video games like "World of Warcraft", this paper provides a brief overview of the main issues surrounding excessive video game playing among adolescents. As an aid to educational psychologists, and based on two…

  3. An Appreciative Inquiry Exploring Game Sense Teaching in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, Shane

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research framed as a strengths-based appreciative inquiry (AI) into the use of a game sense (GS) approach for sport and games teaching in physical education (PE). The aim of this research was to find the elements which sustain teachers in the use of a GS approach. This is particularly pertinent given strong advocacy for GS as…

  4. The Effects of Playing Educational Video Games on Kindergarten Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Feng S.; Calao, Josephine

    2001-01-01

    Investigated whether kindergarten students who played Sony PlayStation educational video games for 40 minutes daily for 11 weeks learned better than peers who did not play such games. Found that the experimental group gained significantly more than the control group in spelling and decoding on the Wide Range Achievement Test-R3. Found no…

  5. The educational game design on relation and functionmaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramuditya, S. A.; Noto, M. S.; Syaefullah, D.

    2018-05-01

    Information technology development is certainly very helpful and important for life, especially for education. Media is always associated with technology. Media is considered important because as a tool in the learning process both inside and outside the classroom and can also be used in the framework of communication and interaction with teachers and students in the learning process. Smartphone technology is currently growing very rapidly, especially for Android platform. Game is one of the entertainment media that becomes an option to eliminate boring or just to spend a time. Educational games specifically designed to teach users a particular learning, developing concepts and understanding and guiding them in training their abilities and motivating them to play it. Game of mathematics education is a game inserted by mathematics learning content. This article discusses development research of designing educational game. The purpose of this research was to produce educational games on relation and function, which should be valid and practical. This research adapts the development model of ADDIE, restricted by analysis, design, and development. Data were collected from validation and practical sheets then were analysed descriptively. Based on the results of data analysis, our educational game was valid and practical.

  6. Computer Games as Virtual Environments for Safety-Critical Software Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Korečko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer games became an inseparable part of everyday life in modern society and the time people spend playing them every day is increasing. This trend caused a noticeable research activity focused on utilizing the time spent playing in a meaningful way, for example to help solving scientific problems or tasks related to computer systems development. In this paper we present one contribution to this activity, a software system consisting of a modified version of the Open Rails train simulator and an application called TS2JavaConn, which allows to use separately developed software controllers with the simulator. The system is intended for validation of controllers developed by formal methods. The paper describes the overall architecture of the system and operation of its components. It also compares the system with other approaches to purposeful utilization of computer games, specifies suitable formal methods and illustrates its intended use on an example.

  7. Educational Contribution of RPG Video Games: Modern Media in Modern Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kratochvíl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    TITLE OF WORK: The Educational Contribution of RPG Video Games: Modern Media in Modern Education AUTHOR: Martin Kratochvíl KEY WORDS: video games, RPG genre, modern education, critical thinking, language learning, student's motivation DEPARTMENT: Department of English Language and Literature Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Education SUPERVISOR: Mark Robert Farrell ABSTRACT: The subject of this topic is to research the potential contribution of RPG video games in the field of modern e...

  8. An evaluation of Global Zakat Game (GZG) as edutainment board game in enhancing Zakat education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Azman Ab.; Sahrir, Muhammad Sabri; Zainuddin, Nurkhamimi; Khafidz, Hasanah Abd.

    2018-01-01

    Board games have become one of the useful tools in teaching and learning. Many instructors and educators have chosen to use board games to enhance the way of delivering course contents. A board game will help students understand the education concept quickly and get involved in experiential learning, where students can manage and solve problems in…

  9. Serious games for global education digital game-based learning in the english as a foreign language (EFL) classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The author of this book conducted different studies to investigate the potential of serious games for global education when used in EFL classrooms. The results show a clear contribution of serious games to global education when used with EFL learners, leading to a reference model of digital game-based learning in the EFL classroom.

  10. Comparison of Learning Software Architecture by Developing Social Applications versus Games on the Android Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an empirical study where the focus was on discovering differences and similarities in students working on development of social applications versus students working on development of games using the same Android development platform. In 2010-2011, students attending the software architecture course at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU could choose between four types of projects. Independently of the chosen type of project, all students had to go through the same phases, produce the same documents based on the same templates, and follow exactly the same process. This study focuses on one of projects—Android project, to see how much the application domain affects the course project independently of the chosen technology. Our results revealed some positive effects for the students doing game development compared to social application development to learn software architecture, like motivated to work with games, a better focus on quality attributes such as modifiability and testability during the development, production of software architectures of higher complexity, and more productive coding working for the project. However, we did not find significant differences in awarded grade between students choosing the two different domains.

  11. Virtual Gaming Simulation in Nursing Education: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyl, Margaret; Hughes, Michelle; Tsui, Joyce; Betts, Lorraine; St-Amant, Oona; Lapum, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    The use of serious gaming in a virtual world is a novel pedagogical approach in nursing education. A virtual gaming simulation was implemented in a health assessment class that focused on mental health and interpersonal violence. The study's purpose was to explore students' experiences of the virtual gaming simulation. Three focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 20 first-year nursing students after they completed the virtual gaming simulation. Analysis yielded five themes: (a) Experiential Learning, (b) The Learning Process, (c) Personal Versus Professional, (d) Self-Efficacy, and (e) Knowledge. Virtual gaming simulation can provide experiential learning opportunities that promote engagement and allow learners to acquire and apply new knowledge while practicing skills in a safe and realistic environment. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):274-280.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Immersive Games and Simulations to Stimulate STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, P. H.; Sumners, C.

    2012-12-01

    New full-dome games in portable planetariums bring the "wow" factor into education. By using a joystick to traverse a rain forest, a temperate forest, a lunar landscape or even the ISS, student can explore virtual worlds.;

  13. Designing an optimal software intensive system acquisition: A game theoretic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Douglas John

    The development of schedule-constrained software-intensive space systems is challenging. Case study data from national security space programs developed at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (USAF SMC) provide evidence of the strong desire by contractors to skip or severely reduce software development design and early defect detection methods in these schedule-constrained environments. The research findings suggest recommendations to fully address these issues at numerous levels. However, the observations lead us to investigate modeling and theoretical methods to fundamentally understand what motivated this behavior in the first place. As a result, Madachy's inspection-based system dynamics model is modified to include unit testing and an integration test feedback loop. This Modified Madachy Model (MMM) is used as a tool to investigate the consequences of this behavior on the observed defect dynamics for two remarkably different case study software projects. Latin Hypercube sampling of the MMM with sample distributions for quality, schedule and cost-driven strategies demonstrate that the higher cost and effort quality-driven strategies provide consistently better schedule performance than the schedule-driven up-front effort-reduction strategies. Game theory reasoning for schedule-driven engineers cutting corners on inspections and unit testing is based on the case study evidence and Austin's agency model to describe the observed phenomena. Game theory concepts are then used to argue that the source of the problem and hence the solution to developers cutting corners on quality for schedule-driven system acquisitions ultimately lies with the government. The game theory arguments also lead to the suggestion that the use of a multi-player dynamic Nash bargaining game provides a solution for our observed lack of quality game between the government (the acquirer) and "large-corporation" software developers. A note is provided that argues this multi

  14. TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY USING EDUCATIONAL GAMES AND GAMIFICATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Rafael de Oliveira Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biotechnology is a new bachelor degree in UFPA, and has been stablished with excellency in the state of Pará. However, there is the need to promote comprehension and learning in Biochemistry, as well as interdisciplinarity, that is an essential part of biotechnology. OBJECTIVES:  To increase learning and interdisciplinarity, educational games were used as tools. The students were instigated to develop educational games in different topics of energy metabolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The games were developed to be used in any teaching environment, since they were made with low-cost and accessible materials. This strategy was applied in three semesters in different Biochemistry classes, between 2012 and 2014. The best games in each class were used in following semesters. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Since the first semester, the failing rates dropped 15% compared to the previous semester, in which educational games were not used. An increase in learning (by observation could be noticed, including comprehension of metabolic pathways and their conections. Twenty games were developed in three semesters, and four of them are still being improved and used in other classes. The participant students answered a questionnaire, in which 47% defined the games as “Relaxing and Instigating”, 33% said the games “Accomplished their didactic and educational role” and 54% said they would recommend the use of these games as a reviewing activity. At the moment, another approach is being used to teach Biochemistry – Gamification, which uses elements found in games, as conflict, cooperation, rules and fun, to improve students’ motivation and engagement. CONCLUSION: As a partial result, there was greater in-class interest and engagement, better comprehension of the course content and the activities gave the students the opportunity to work in groups, to think critically about the themes and to develop opinions based on interdisciplinar and formal

  15. When Playing Meets Learning: Methodological Framework for Designing Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Stephanie B.; Schwarz, Daniel; Bopp, Matthias; Albert, Dietrich

    Game-based learning builds upon the idea of using the motivational potential of video games in the educational context. Thus, the design of educational games has to address optimizing enjoyment as well as optimizing learning. Within the EC-project ELEKTRA a methodological framework for the conceptual design of educational games was developed. Thereby state-of-the-art psycho-pedagogical approaches were combined with insights of media-psychology as well as with best-practice game design. This science-based interdisciplinary approach was enriched by enclosed empirical research to answer open questions on educational game-design. Additionally, several evaluation-cycles were implemented to achieve further improvements. The psycho-pedagogical core of the methodology can be summarized by the ELEKTRA's 4Ms: Macroadaptivity, Microadaptivity, Metacognition, and Motivation. The conceptual framework is structured in eight phases which have several interconnections and feedback-cycles that enable a close interdisciplinary collaboration between game design, pedagogy, cognitive science and media psychology.

  16. Model for Educational Game Using Natural User Interface

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    Azrulhizam Shapi’i

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural User Interface (NUI is a new approach that has become increasingly popular in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI. The use of this technology is widely used in almost all sectors, including the field of education. In recent years, there are a lot of educational games using NUI technology in the market such as Kinect game. Kinect is a sensor that can recognize body movements, postures, and voices in three dimensions. It enables users to control and interact with game without the need of using game controller. However, the contents of most existing Kinect games do not follow the standard curriculum in classroom, thus making it do not fully achieve the learning objectives. Hence, this research proposes a design model as a guideline in designing educational game using NUI. A prototype has been developed as one of the objectives in this study. The prototype is based on proposed model to ensure and assess the effectiveness of the model. The outcomes of this study conclude that the proposed model contributed to the design method for the development of the educational game using NUI. Furthermore, evaluation results of the prototype show a good response from participant and in line with the standard curriculum.

  17. Educational games for mental health professionals: a Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoopathi, P S; Sheoran, R; Adams, C E

    2007-05-01

    Learning in general can be been a passive process. This review is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of educational games as a teaching strategy in mental health professionals. We searched for all relevant randomised control trials (RCT) that compared educational games as teaching strategies with other methods of learning using electronic and reference searching, and by contacting trial authors. Data were extracted from selected trials and, individual person data was analysed using fixed effect Peto Odds Ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI). If appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) or number needed to harm (NNH) was estimated. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences. We identified one trial (n = 34) of an educational game for mental health nursing students which followed up participants only over a few hours. For an outcome we arbitrarily defined ('no academically important improvement [a 10% improvement in scores]'), those allocated to educational games fared considerably better than students in the standard education techniques group (OR 0.06 CI 0.01 to 0.27, NNT 3 CI 2 to 4). On average those in the games group scored six more points than the control students on a test of questions relevant to psychosis set to the standard of the mental health nursing curriculum of the day (WMD 6 CI 2.63 to 9.37). Current limited evidence suggests educational games could help mental health students gain more points in their tests; however this interesting study should be refined and repeated.

  18. Educational software usability: Artifact or Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Sonya E; Eagleson, Roy; Rogers, Kem A

    2017-03-01

    Online educational technologies and e-learning tools are providing new opportunities for students to learn worldwide, and they continue to play an important role in anatomical sciences education. Yet, as we shift to teaching online, particularly within the anatomical sciences, it has become apparent that e-learning tool success is based on more than just user satisfaction and preliminary learning outcomes-rather it is a multidimensional construct that should be addressed from an integrated perspective. The efficiency, effectiveness and satisfaction with which a user can navigate an e-learning tool is known as usability, and represents a construct which we propose can be used to quantitatively evaluate e-learning tool success. To assess the usability of an e-learning tool, usability testing should be employed during the design and development phases (i.e., prior to its release to users) as well as during its delivery (i.e., following its release to users). However, both the commercial educational software industry and individual academic developers in the anatomical sciences have overlooked the added value of additional usability testing. Reducing learner frustration and anxiety during e-learning tool use is essential in ensuring e-learning tool success, and will require a commitment on the part of the developers to engage in usability testing during all stages of an e-learning tool's life cycle. Anat Sci Educ 10: 190-199. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. Usability Testing Analysis on The Bana Game as Education Game Design References on Junior High School

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    F. Adnan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning media is one of the important elements in the learning process. Technological development support makes learning media more varied. The approach of using digital technology as a learning media has a better and more effective impact than other approaches. In order to increase the students’ learning interest, it requires the support of an interesting learning media. The use of gaming applications as learning media can improve learning outcomes. The benefits of using the maximum application cannot be separated from the determination of application design. The Bana game aims to increase the ability of critical thinking of the junior high school students. The usability-testing analysis on the Bana game application is used in order to get the design reference as an educational game development. The game is used as an object of the analysis because it has the same characteristics and goals with the game application to be developed. Usability Testing is a method used to measure the ease of use of an application by users. The Usability Testing consists of learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors, and satisfaction. The results of the analysis obtained will be used as a reference for educational game applications that will be developed.

  20. Game Play Participation of Amotivated Students during Sport Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Garn, Alex C.; Vidoni, Carla; Youngberg, Charli

    2013-01-01

    Sport Education has embedded pedagogical strategies proposed to reduce the prevalence of amotivation in physical education. The purpose of this study was to provide an examination of the game play participation rates of amotivated students within a Sport Education season. A sample of 395 high school students participated in a season of team…

  1. Climate change games as tools for education and engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jason S.; Lee, Joey J.

    2015-05-01

    Scientists, educators and policymakers continue to face challenges when it comes to finding effective strategies to engage the public on climate change. We argue that games on the subject of climate change are well-suited to address these challenges because they can serve as effective tools for education and engagement. Recently, there has been a dramatic increase in the development of such games, many featuring innovative designs that blur traditional boundaries (for example, those that involve social media, alternative reality games, or those that involve direct action upon the real world). Here, we present an overview of the types of climate change game currently available, the benefits and trade-offs of their use, and reasons why they hold such promise for education and engagement regarding climate change.

  2. Educational Gaming: All the Right MUVEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    It is the universal cry of parents the world over, driven mad by the persistent sight of their children investing hours and hours in mastering the many layers of a video game. To the parent, video games are the enemy, the nemesis of homework and learning. But the child sees something of value, something engaging enough to fill a weekend, to the…

  3. Menominee Tribe Links Gaming and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Richard

    1995-01-01

    The Menominee Gaming and Hospitality Institute (College of the Menominee Nation, WI) assists Indian people in mastering skills needed to operate their own gaming enterprises and to manage hotels or resorts. In addition to certificate and degree coursework, the institute is developing a computerized industry database and a product development…

  4. The Challenge of Audience Reception: A Developmental Model for Educational Game Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, John L.

    2013-01-01

    According to educational gaming advocates, the engaging nature of games encourages sustained game play and enhanced attention to learning outcomes among players. Because children's and adolescents' play time varies by game genre, engagement with a game likely reflects the match between the genre and the player's preferences and needs. Youth learn…

  5. The Effects of the Size and Weight of a Mobile Device on an Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furio, David; Gonzalez-Gancedo, Santiago; Juan, M.-Carmen; Segui, Ignacio; Costa, Maria

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present an educational game for an iPhone and a Tablet PC. The main objective of the game was to reinforce children's knowledge about the water cycle. The game included different interaction forms like the touch screen and the accelerometer and combined AR mini-games with non-AR mini-games for better gameplay immersion. The main…

  6. Mobile Game Development for Multiple Devices in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltasar Fernández-Manjón

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile learning and educational gaming are two trends that are rapidly having an increasing impact in Technology-Enhanced Learning. However, both approaches present significant technological challenges. Mobile technologies are very diverse and the market pressure pushes the continuous development of new technologies and features. On the other hand, game-based learning needs to deal with enormous development costs and the problem of allowing instructors and experts to actively participate in the game development process. Moreover, there are numerous situations where bringing both approaches together could be very useful, but this combination magnifies the technological barriers previously described. In this work we present , an authoring environment for educational adventure games that supports the production of both desktop and mobile games. This framework provides a graphical environment that allows instructors to create their own educational games with a low cost. Then, the games can be exported to multiple formats, including support for diverse types of mobile platforms. This is achieved through a modular semi-automated exportation process, which is based on mobile device profiles.

  7. Innovative Educational Scenarios in Game Based Teaching and Learning

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    Ion Smeureanu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The didactical game can be considered part of an educational scenario in teaching and learning. This article aims to show how fundamental concepts from the economicmathematical modeling area can be visualized, how to organize knowledge in coherent scenarios, presented in an educational game manner, to gain the attention and influence students' spirit of competition. At the same time, benefitting from the 3D visualizations, the graphical interfaces for navigating in multidimensional spaces or projections are defined and thus imagination used for mental models construction is stimulated and human intuition is capitalized in the process of knowledge discovery, assisted by computer with analytic algorithms type. Exploration becomes a game feature and can be pursued both numerically and visually. 3D environments give realism to visualizations that are found in games, facilitating realimaginary relationship throughout the game and enhancing learning motivation. The innovative character of teaching is given by the method in which the teacher creates his own educational scenario by considering specific learning objectives, age particularities of students, time and space-related resources, the technical requirements of the game and the evaluation method. The paper makes several references to such projects, developed by the authors and implemented in working with students. Game based on demonstration (using simulation, modelling or visualization coordinates users to obtain relevant information; the multiple representations of knowledge are so used and compared through a multitude of examples.

  8. On the Prospects and Concerns of Integrating Open Source Software Environment in Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamthan, Pankaj

    2007-01-01

    Open Source Software (OSS) has introduced a new dimension in software community. As the development and use of OSS becomes prominent, the question of its integration in education arises. In this paper, the following practices fundamental to projects and processes in software engineering are examined from an OSS perspective: project management;…

  9. Integrating Theory and Practice in Education with Business Games

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    Karen Neville

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The meaningful integration of theoretical knowledge and industrial practice in Masters level programmes is now more than ever vital to ensure that graduates have the required competence in IT and that they are ready to contribute to the organisations that hired them within a short timeframe. It is also crucial in ensuring ongoing industrial support for academia because Information technology (IT is regarded as a fundamental component in the success of organisations. This has led to a growing demand for IT specialists, sometimes with hybrid skills, to design, develop, implement, and support IT infrastures in both the public and private sectors. However, in recent years there has been a shortfall of IT graduates, with essential experience entering the job market. In order to keep up with demand, educational institutions must adopt innovative programmes to increase the skill-set and knowledge base of their IT graduates.One such programme, under the auspices of University College Cork, is a Masters course in Management Information and Managerial Accounting Systems (MIMAS. The programme focuses on IT to suit the needs of industry while also combining IT with other theoretical subjects like managerial accounting and the design of management control systems. One key element of the teaching experience is a business simulation where students create software companies and bid for a large scale development project. As part of this, they experience of broad range of tasks and problems inherent in commercial software development. The business game is designed to encourage students to make use of as much of the theoretical elements taught in the degree as possible and is mediated by the teaching staff through the intermediary of a purpose-designed computer system. Our experience indicates the immense value of such practical components in an IT oriented degree programme. It also shows that the application of new technology in training and education will only

  10. Lessons from an Educational Game Usability Evaluation

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    Gabriela Trindade Perry

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the results of a usability evaluation for Xenubi, a cell phone game about the periodic table. We describe and discuss the issues that we faced during the evaluation, which took place in a state high school. These issues are related to conflicts between the data that were gathered through video recordings and through a questionnaire. We also point to the poor performance of the game mechanics during the evaluation. This result was unexpected because the game had an excellent performance in the pilot test. Possible causes for these differences are discussed.

  11. Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kurapati, Shalini; Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Klemke, R., Kurapati, S., & Kolfschoten, G. (2013, 6 June). Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness. In P. Rooney (Ed.), Proceedings of the 3rd Irish Symposium on Game Based Learning (pp. 8-9). Dublin, Ireland. Please see

  12. Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kurapati, Shalini; Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Klemke, R., Kurapati, S., & Kolfschoten, G. (2013, 6 June). Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness. Presentation at the 3rd Irish Symposium on Game Based Learning, Dublin, Ireland. Please see also

  13. Learning to Play Games or Playing Games to Learn? A Health Education Case Study with Soweto Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of an educational computer video game in teaching and learning. Cultural-historical activity theory is used heuristically to explore the social and cultural interactions during game play. It is argued that knowledge construction occurs when video games function as a tool to mediate learning rather…

  14. Grandma's Games Project: Bridging Tradition and Technology Mediated Education

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    Marina Vasileva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a project entitled "Grandma’s games", following a research idea to enrich the educational process of K9 students by introducing the traditional children games of our ancestors in the learning environment, revived and adapted for modern students with the aid of information and communication technology. While creating a strong connection between our heritage and the modern educational trends, the project’s intention goes beyond mere fulfilment of educational goals, striving to increase the interest and motivation of primary education students to develop their creativity and originality while learning, with respect of their own personal preferences and cultural heritage. The "Grandma’s games" research project engaged twelve traditional games in the educational activities at primary schools from both rural and non-rural environments in Republic of Macedonia. Descriptive statistics was applied on the data set sampled from the extensive survey conducted among teachers in these schools, to illustrate the benefits from the application of the Grandma’s games in educational process.

  15. Collecting, Organizing, and Managing Resources for Teaching Educational Games the Wiki Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shelley Henson; Shelton, Brett; Wiley, David

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the pedagogical value of gaming, academics along with game designers and educational content developers have begun producing resources to improve educational game design and make instructional games more accessible to teachers wanting to incorporate them into their classes. However, the rapid growth of such resources has made it…

  16. Creating Effective Educational Computer Games for Undergraduate Classroom Learning: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapeepisarn, Kowit; Wong, Kok Wai; Fung, Chun Che; Khine, Myint Swe

    2008-01-01

    When designing Educational Computer Games, designers usually consider target age, interactivity, interface and other related issues. They rarely explore the genres which should employ into one type of educational game. Recently, some digital game-based researchers made attempt to combine game genre with learning theory. Different researchers use…

  17. Digital Game-Based Learning for K-12 Mathematics Education: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, JaeHwan; Joung, Eunmi

    2018-01-01

    Digital games (e.g., video games or computer games) have been reported as an effective educational method that can improve students' motivation and performance in mathematics education. This meta-analysis study (a) investigates the current trend of digital game-based learning (DGBL) by reviewing the research studies on the use of DGBL for…

  18. Establishing an Educational Game Development Model: From the Experience of Teaching Search Engine Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Richard W. C.; Au, Cheuk Hang

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how different literatures have suggested the positive role of educational games in students' learning, but it can be hard to find an existing game for student learning. Some lecturers may try to develop a game for their courses, but there were not many effective models for educational board game development. The authors have…

  19. Gesture Recognition for Educational Games: Magic Touch Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kye, Neo Wen; Mustapha, Aida; Azah Samsudin, Noor

    2017-08-01

    Children nowadays are having problem learning and understanding basic mathematical operations because they are not interested in studying or learning mathematics. This project proposes an educational game called Magic Touch Math that focuses on basic mathematical operations targeted to children between the age of three to five years old using gesture recognition to interact with the game. Magic Touch Math was developed in accordance to the Game Development Life Cycle (GDLC) methodology. The prototype developed has helped children to learn basic mathematical operations via intuitive gestures. It is hoped that the application is able to get the children motivated and interested in mathematics.

  20. Video Game Literacy - Exploring new paradigms and new educational activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Felini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Literacy is a complex concept of relevance for both traditional and most recent educational theories. Today, concepts of media literacy are being discussed widely. In this article a simple theoretical model and an action-research project are presented. The research project focuses on a training course aiming at the development and strengthening of critical thinking and communicative skills of young people by way of making use of video games. Practical aspects of how to produce a video game with teens and conceptual aspects towards a "video game literacy" are discussed.

  1. AN EDUCATIONAL GAME IN CONSTRUCTION PROCUREMENT NEGOTIATION

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    Ren-Jye Dzeng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Project managers are frequently required to negotiate during the procurement of construction materials and drawing up of contractual agreements. Training in negotiation training requires hands-on experience and interaction with multiple parties. However, in the conventional curriculum on construction management, negotiation is taught merely through lectures and case studies. This study addressed that shortcoming by developing a portfolio negotiation game in which students play different roles and actively make decisions while proceeding through a simulated negotiation process in a competitive context. The proposed game would be the first negotiation game within the domain of the construction industry. During the pilot study, 46 students (with or without industrial working experience played the game; the results showed an increase in learning interest, satisfaction, and effectiveness.

  2. THE EDUCATIONAL POTENTIAL OF VIDEO GAMES

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    Ruxandra Claudia CHIRCA (NEACȘU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In nowadays' world, technological assistance is no longer confined to its primary purpose of communication or informational support and the boundaries between real and virtual world are becoming increasingly harder to be defined. This is the world of digital natives, today's children, who grow up in a technology-brimming environment and who spend most of their time playing video games. Are these video games constructive in any way? Scientific studies state they are. Video games help children in setting their goals, provide constant feedback and offer immediate rewards, along with the opportunity to collaborate with other players. Furthermore, video games can generate strong emotional reactions, such as joy or fear, and they have a captivating story line, which reveals itself within a realm of elaborate graphics.

  3. Sexual content in video games: an analysis of the Entertainment Software Rating Board classification from 1994 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaña-Pérez, Dèsirée; Braverman-Bronstein, Ariela; Basto-Abreu, Ana; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Inti; Hilscher, Rainer; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2018-01-11

    Background: Video games are widely used by children and adolescents and have become a significant source of exposure to sexual content. Despite evidence of the important role of media in the development of sexual attitudes and behaviours, little attention has been paid to monitor sexual content in video games. Methods: Data was obtained about sexual content and rating for 23722 video games from 1994 to 2013 from the Entertainment Software Rating Board database; release dates and information on the top 100 selling video games was also obtained. A yearly prevalence of sexual content according to rating categories was calculated. Trends and comparisons were estimated using Joinpoint regression. Results: Sexual content was present in 13% of the video games. Games rated 'Mature' had the highest prevalence of sexual content (34.5%) followed by 'Teen' (30.7%) and 'E10+' (21.3%). Over time, sexual content decreased in the 'Everyone' category, 'E10+' maintained a low prevalence and 'Teen' and 'Mature' showed a marked increase. Both top and non-top video games showed constant increases, with top selling video games having 10.1% more sexual content across the period of study. Conclusion: Over the last 20 years, the prevalence of sexual content has increased in video games with a 'Teen' or 'Mature' rating. Further studies are needed to quantify the potential association between sexual content in video games and sexual behaviour in children and adolescents.

  4. Video Game Literacy - Exploring new paradigms and new educational activities

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano Felini

    2010-01-01

    Literacy is a complex concept of relevance for both traditional and most recent educational theories. Today, concepts of media literacy are being discussed widely. In this article a simple theoretical model and an action-research project are presented. The research project focuses on a training course aiming at the development and strengthening of critical thinking and communicative skills of young people by way of making use of video games. Practical aspects of how to produce a video game wi...

  5. Serious Gaming and Gamification interventions for health professional education

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry, Sarah; L'Estrade Ehrstrom, Beatrice; Gauthier, Andrea; Alvarez, Julian; Wortley, David; van Rijswijk, Jurriaan; Car, Josip; Lilienthal, Anneliese; Tudor Car, Lorainne; Nikolaou, Charoula K.; Zary, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To evaluate the effectiveness of Serious Gaming and Gamification interventions for delivering pre- and post-registration health professional education compared with traditional learning, other types of eLearning, or other Serious Gaming and Gamification interventions. We will primarily assess the impact of these interventions on students' knowledge, skills, professional attitudes and satisfaction.

  6. Games and gamification: an alternative for distance education models

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    Eliane Schlemmer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents research about how the games and gamification can contribute to the creation of new drawings in distance education. The goal was to understand the contribution of games and gamification, thought from "Games for Change" movement in view of Hybrids, Multimodal and Pervasive Coexistence Spaces configuration for learning, an approach between initial training and basic education. The research is exploratory and qualitative, inspired by the cartographic method of intervention research. It uses participant observation, the logbook and text records, audio, photo and digital video. The data are interpreted from the theoretical framework. In conclusion, the results show that the games and gamification enabled the development of teaching and learning situations that are configured as Hybrid, Multimodal and Pervasive Coexistence Space, a process of co-creation, from the critical reading of the everyday basic education, which sought to identify problems and how games and gamification could contribute to changes in the school. There was a greater engagement of the subjects of learning and reframing of lived experience in the initial training for primary education, from the critical reading of the school routine. The discussion arises about the need for reconfiguration of the teaching and curriculum practices, and how to organize them in time and space, starting from everyday problems, enabling the construction of learning pathways to contribute to an emancipatory education and citizen.

  7. Computer-Based Simulation Games in Public Administration Education

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    Kutergina Evgeniia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulation, an active learning technique, is now one of the advanced pedagogical technologies. Th e use of simulation games in the educational process allows students to gain a firsthand understanding of the processes of real life. Public- administration, public-policy and political-science courses increasingly adopt simulation games in universities worldwide. Besides person-to-person simulation games, there are computer-based simulations in public-administration education. Currently in Russia the use of computer-based simulation games in Master of Public Administration (MPA curricula is quite limited. Th is paper focuses on computer- based simulation games for students of MPA programmes. Our aim was to analyze outcomes of implementing such games in MPA curricula. We have done so by (1 developing three computer-based simulation games about allocating public finances, (2 testing the games in the learning process, and (3 conducting a posttest examination to evaluate the effect of simulation games on students’ knowledge of municipal finances. Th is study was conducted in the National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE and in the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA during the period of September to December 2015, in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Two groups of students were randomly selected in each university and then randomly allocated either to the experimental or the control group. In control groups (n=12 in HSE, n=13 in RANEPA students had traditional lectures. In experimental groups (n=12 in HSE, n=13 in RANEPA students played three simulation games apart from traditional lectures. Th is exploratory research shows that the use of computer-based simulation games in MPA curricula can improve students’ outcomes by 38 %. In general, the experimental groups had better performances on the post-test examination (Figure 2. Students in the HSE experimental group had 27.5 % better

  8. Automated Discovery of Speech Act Categories in Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Vasile; Moldovan, Cristian; Niraula, Nobal; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we address the important task of automated discovery of speech act categories in dialogue-based, multi-party educational games. Speech acts are important in dialogue-based educational systems because they help infer the student speaker's intentions (the task of speech act classification) which in turn is crucial to providing adequate…

  9. Considerations for Realizing the Promise of Educational Gaming Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nancy J.; Fien, Hank; Doabler, Christian T.; Clarke, Ben

    2016-01-01

    One can barely keep up with the pace at which new educational games and apps are being introduced and digested in the market. With so many choices available, how do schools and teachers decide what to use? How do they have confidence their choices will result in desired outcomes? Education technology offers a number of potential benefits that can…

  10. The Hemophilia Games: An Experiment in Health Education Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The Hemophilia Health Education Planning Project was designed to (1) create a set of tools useful in hemophilia planning and education, and (2) create a planning model for other diseases with similar factors. The project used the game-simulations technique which was felt to be particularly applicable to hemophilia health problems, since as a…

  11. Field assessment of serious games for entrepreneurship in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baalsrud Hauge, J.; Bellotti, F.; Berta, R.; Brandao Carvalho, M.; De Gloria, A.; Lavagnino, E.; Nadolski, R.; Ott, M.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of Serious Games (SGs) in education is widely recognized, and their adoption is significant in particular in children instruction. However, the deployment rate of SGs in higher education (HE) and their proper insertion in meaningful curricula is still quite low. This paper intends to

  12. The 1988 Directory of Educational Software Publishing Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic Learning, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Based on questionnaires sent to educational software companies in January 1988, this directory lists 78 companies. Information given includes company address, curriculum subject areas for which the company publishes software, types of machines and operating systems on which the software operates, and grade level for which it is targeted. (LRW)

  13. Educational Affordances and Learning Design in Music Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lee; Leong, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Although music software has become increasingly affordable and widely adopted in today's classrooms, concerns have been raised about a lack of consideration for users' needs during the software development process. This paper examines intra- and inter-sectoral communication pertaining to software development and music education to shed light on…

  14. APPROACHING CARBOHYDRATES AND ITS METABOLISM: AN EXPERIENCE FOR EDUCATIONAL GAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Henrique Dias Ribeiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The study of carbohydrates, its metabolism and many other fields of biochemistry are often understood by students as a junction of chemical structures and reactions of difficult compression. However, Biochemistry should no longer be seen as an abstruse field, but a way to know the human body and its components, including molecular, structural and functional aspects. Therefore, some alternatives are being evaluated in order to assist and improve the dissemination of knowledge among them highlights are the educational games. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this work is the production of two educational games able to include the contents of carbohydrates and its metabolism in higher education. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The educational games produced were made from available materials and low cost. The games were tested in courses of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology of the Federal University of Uberlândia and the response of the students towards the activities was analyzed. The application, had the presence of trained students to instruct on the activity and correcting. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: "What is the Carbohydrate?" and "Mastering the metabolism" are two educational games covering the content of structure and function carbohydrates and basal metabolism, respectively. "What is the Carbohydrate?" consists in unravel amid several options the carbohydrate in the hands of the others players. For this, several questions with two possible answers, “yes” or “not”, are accepted each round, and if the player find difficulty in formulating questions, there are cards tips. “Mastering the metabolism” consists in a combination of cards that simulate pieces of a domino that must be mounted following the metabolic pathway of carbohydrates, and as the game progresses, the main points of regulation of the pathway will be accompanied by surprise questions. The games showed great acceptance by students. CONCLUSION: “What is the Carbohydrate

  15. Tools and approaches for simplifying serious games development in educational settings

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo, Antonio; Rotaru, Dan C.; Freire, Manuel; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2016-01-01

    Serious Games can benefit from the commercial video games industry by taking advantage of current development tools. However, the economics and requirements of serious games and commercial games are very different. In this paper, we describe the factors that impact the total cost of ownership of serious games used in educational settings, review the specific requirements of games used as learning material, and analyze the different development tools available in the industry highlighting thei...

  16. Proprietary software versus Open Source Software for Education

    OpenAIRE

    N. Pankaja

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has brought learning "online" and offers many advantages. It is convenient, available at any time of the day, and can be accessed nearly anywhere in the world. Recently, Cloud computing is all the rage. E-Learning offers tremendous potential to increase the availability and convenience of education. Today, online content is varied and can include: text on a website, digital audio, digital video, animated images, and virtual reality environments. This content can be created in a v...

  17. A rapid review of serious games: From healthcare education to dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipiyaruk, K; Gallagher, J E; Hatzipanagos, S; Reynolds, P A

    2018-03-24

    Games involving technology have the potential to enhance hand-eye coordination and decision-making skills. As a result, game characteristics have been applied to education and training, where they are known as serious games. There is an increase in the volume of literature on serious games in healthcare education; however, evidence on their impact is still ambiguous. The aims of this study were (i) to identify high-quality evidence (systematic reviews or meta-analyses) regarding impacts of serious games on healthcare education; and (ii) to explore evidence regarding impacts of serious games in dental education. A rapid review of the literature was undertaken to synthesise available evidence and examine serious games in healthcare education (Stage 1) and dental education (Stage 2). Nine systematic reviews were included in Stage 1, four of which were of high, three of moderate and two of low quality. For Stage 2, two randomised control trials with moderate quality were included. The findings demonstrated that serious games are potentially effective learning tools in terms of knowledge and skills improvement, although outcomes of serious games over traditional learning approaches were not consistent. In addition, serious games appeared to be more engaging and satisfying for students, which could be considered as the most important positive impact. Serious games provide an option for healthcare and dental education but remain underutilised and researched. At best, they offer a similar experience to other methods in relation to educational outcome; however, they can provide a supplementary strategy to engage students and improve learner satisfaction. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. ESSCOTS for Learning: Transforming Commercial Software into Powerful Educational Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Gives an overview of Educational Support Systems based on commercial off-the-shelf software (ESSCOTS), and discusses the benefits of developing such educational software. Presents results of a study that revealed the learning processes of middle and high school students who used a geographical information system. (JMV)

  19. Mapping the Demand for Serious Games in Postgraduate Medical Education Using the Entrustable Professional Activities Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, Maurits; ten Cate, Olle; van Seventer, Jan-Pieter; Schraagen, Jan Maarten C.; Schijven, Marlies P.

    2015-01-01

    Serious games are potentially powerful tools for residency training and increasingly attract attention from medical educators. At present, serious games have little evidence-based relations with competency-based medical education, which may impede their incorporation into residency training

  20. Mapping the demand for serious games in postgraduate medical education using the entrustable professional activities framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, M.; Cate, O. ten; Seventer, J.P. van; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Schijven, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective : Serious games are potentially powerful tools for residency training and increasingly attract attention from medical educators. At present, serious games have little evidence-based relations with competency-based medical education, which may impede their incorporation into residency

  1. Mapping the Demand for Serious Games in Postgraduate Medical Education Using the Entrustable Professional Activities Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, Maurits; Ten Cate, Olle; Van Seventer, Jan Pieter; Schraagen, Jan Maarten C.; Schijven, Marlies P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Serious games are potentially powerful tools for residency training and increasingly attract attention from medical educators. At present, serious games have little evidence-based relations with competency-based medical education, which may impede their incorporation into residency

  2. Mapping the demand for Serious Games in Postgraduate Medical Education Using the Entrustable Professional Activities Framework.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, M.; ten Cate, TJ; Schraagen, J. M C; van Seventer, A.H.J.; Schijven, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Serious games are potentially powerful tools for residency training and increasingly attract attention from medical educators. At present, serious games have little evidence-based relations with competency-based medical education, which may impede their incorporation into residency

  3. Design Of An Educational Game For Training Learners In The Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design Of An Educational Game For Training Learners In The Use Of 3D Visualization Skills. ... Educational games are one of the earliest forms of instructional technology. However, research focused ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  4. The Use of Simulation Business Games in University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Birknerova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and deep changes in economics and business environment along with the dynamic development of computer art and communication technologies represent the main factors identifying the development in the area of simulation business games. These games may be considered a strange, content-determined group of simulation games. The description of their content specialties, basic elements, and possibilities of their use are the essence of our report. In the conclusion we present a short research carried out at the Faculty of Management of the University of Prešov in Prešov where we made an investigation of the students´ opinions on the use of business games in the university educational process.

  5. Students' Game Performance Improvements during a Hybrid Sport Education-Step-Game-Approach Volleyball Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Hastie, Peter; Pereira, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a hybrid combination of sport education and the step-game-approach (SGA) on students' gameplay performance in volleyball, taking into account their sex and skill-level. Seventeen seventh-grade students (seven girls, 10 boys, average age 11.8) participated in a 25-lesson volleyball season, in which the…

  6. Game-Based Learning in Teacher Education: A Strategy to Integrate Digital Games into Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Biecke

    2012-01-01

    As educational technology is rapidly changing, greater emphasis has been placed on preparing the next generation of teachers for effective technology integration into the classrooms. In this article, the authors describe the design, implementation, and evaluation of a course on digital game-based learning (DGBL) developed for the preservice…

  7. The game as an educative pretext: educate and educate oneself in a health formation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleidilene Ramos Magalhães

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on a game-based educative experience, developed with students of the 1st year of the Medicine program of a federal public educational institution. The game was used as a privileged strategy to approach the students' communication, spontaneity and sensitiveness in the health education process. Through this game, it was possible to approach the theme "the students' mental health", where they could express their feelings as freshman students in the Medicine program. Such experience triggered learning opportunities for students and teachers, what, from Freire's perspective, is seen as a dialogic process of mutual formation with students. Its development favored the rethinking about the teaching practice in health, as well as subsidized the reorientation of the process of preventing and promoting mental health by means of proposals and supporting programs to students enrolled at the institution.

  8. The function of game and role playing in adult education

    OpenAIRE

    Žáková, Zuzana

    2009-01-01

    The subjects of this work are game, role and role playing in upbringing, education and training, and in personnel practice. The work uses knowledge of pedagogy, psychology and sociology, and focuses on social interaction and personality development. It introduces basic educational, training and therapeutic methods and procedures, including methods in the field of adult education, where the core of these methods lies in playing roles. It presents brief characteristics of individual methods, in...

  9. Virtual Games in Social Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose M. Cuenca; Caceres, Myriam J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    The new technologies make the appearance of highly motivating and dynamic games with different levels of interaction possible, in which large amounts of data, information, procedures and values are included which are intimately bound with the social sciences. We set out from the hypothesis that videogames may become interesting resources for their…

  10. Fidelity and Game-based Technology in Management Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard B. Cornacchione Jr.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores educational technology and management education by analyzing fidelity in game-basedmanagement education interventions. A sample of 31 MBA students was selected to help answer the researchquestion: To what extent do MBA students tend to recognize specific game-based academic experiences, interms of fidelity, as relevant to their managerial performance? Two distinct game-based interventions (BG1 andBG2 with key differences in fidelity levels were explored: BG1 presented higher physical and functional fidelitylevels and lower psychological fidelity levels. Hypotheses were tested with data from the participants, collectedshortly after their experiences, related to the overall perceived quality of game-based interventions. The findingsreveal a higher overall perception of quality towards BG1: (a better for testing strategies, (b offering betterbusiness and market models, (c based on a pace that better stimulates learning, and (d presenting a fidelity levelthat better supports real world performance. This study fosters the conclusion that MBA students tend torecognize, to a large extent, that specific game-based academic experiences are relevant and meaningful to theirmanagerial development, mostly with heightened fidelity levels of adopted artifacts. Agents must be ready andmotivated to explore the new, to try and err, and to learn collaboratively in order to perform.

  11. It’s All Fun and Games until Someone Learns Something: Assessing the Learning Outcomes of Two Educational Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Wise

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine whether educational games can be designed that are both fun and effective in improving information seeking skills. Methods – Two skills that are known to be particularly difficult for students taking a required information literacy test were identified. These skills are the ability to identify citations and the ability to search databases with keywords. Educational games were designed to address these two skills. The first game, Citation Tic Tac Toe, placed commonly used bibliographic citations into a tick tac toe style grid. Students were required to play the Tic Tac Toe game and subsequently given citation identification exercises. The second game arranged key concepts related to search phrases in a Magnetic Keyword interface. Students were observed searching databases before and after playing the Magnetic Keyword game and their pre‐ and post‐play searches were analyzed.Results – Students who played the Tic Tac Toe game improved more from pretest to posttest than students who only took an online tutorial. In addition, students who played the Magnetic Keyword game demonstrated quicker database searching for their topics and expressed increased satisfaction with their results. Conclusions – Games can be created which have measurable educational outcomes and are fun. It is important, however, to establish the educational objective prior to beginning game design.

  12. Mobile game-based learning in secondary education: engagement, motivation and learning in a mobile city game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.; Admiraal, W.; Akkerman, S.; ten Dam, G.

    2009-01-01

    Using mobile games in education combines situated and active learning with fun in a potentially excellent manner. The effects of a mobile city game called Frequency 1550, which was developed by The Waag Society to help pupils in their first year of secondary education playfully acquire historical

  13. Problem-Based Educational Game Becomes Student-Centered Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodkroh, Pornpimon; Suwannatthachote, Praweenya; Kaemkate, Wannee

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based educational games are able to provide a fun and motivating environment for teaching and learning of certain subjects. However, most educational game models do not address the learning elements of problem-based educational games. This study aims to synthesize and to propose the important elements to facilitate the learning process and…

  14. LewiSpace: An Exploratory Study with a Machine Learning Model in an Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Ramla; Ouellet, Sébastien; Frasson, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The use of educational games as a tool for providing learners with a playful and educational aspect is widespread. In this paper, we present an educational game that we developed to teach a chemistry lesson, namely drawing a Lewis diagram. Our game is a 3D environment known as LewiSpace and aims at balancing between playful and educational…

  15. The Application of Cognitive Diagnostic Approaches via Neural Network Analysis of Serious Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Serious Educational Games (SEGs) have been a topic of increased popularity within the educational realm since the early millennia. SEGs are generalized form of Serious Games to mean games for purposes other than entertainment but, that also specifically include training, educational purpose and pedagogy within their design. This rise in popularity…

  16. Why Free Software Matters for Literacy Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, Michael D.; Bruce, Bertram C.

    2002-01-01

    Notes that understanding what "free software" means and its implications for access and use of new technologies is an important component of the new literacies. Concludes that if free speech and free press are essential to the development of a general literacy, then free software can promote the development of computer literacy. (SG)

  17. [Applying Game-Based Learning in Nursing Education: Empathy Board Game Learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chueh-Fen; Wu, Shu-Mei; Shu, Ying-Mei; Yeh, Mei-Yu

    2018-02-01

    Attending lectures and reading are two common approaches to acquiring knowledge, while repetitive practice is a common approach to acquiring skills. Nurturing proper attitudes in students is one of the greatest challenges for educators. Health professionals must incorporate empathy into their practice. Creative teaching strategies may offer a feasible approach to enhancing empathy-related competence. The present article focuses on analyzing current, empathy-related curriculums in nursing education in Taiwan, exploring the concepts of empathy and game-based learning, presenting the development of an empathy board game as a teaching aid, and, finally, evaluating the developed education application. Based on the learner-centered principle, this aid was designed with peer learning, allowing learners to influence the learning process, to simulate the various roles of clients, and to develop diverse interpersonal dialogues. The continuous learning loops were formed using the gamification mechanism and transformation, enabling students to connect and practice the three elements of empathy ability: emotion, cognition and expression. Via the game elements of competition, interaction, storytelling, real-time responses, concretizing feedback, integrated peer learning, and equality between teachers and students, students who play patient roles are able to perceive different levels of comfort, which encourages the development of insight into the meaning of empathy. Thereby, the goals of the empathy lesson is achievable within a creative game-based learning environment.

  18. Collaborative learning model inquiring based on digital game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan

    2012-04-01

    With the development of computer education software, digital educational game has become an important part in our life, entertainment and education. Therefore how to make full use of digital game's teaching functions and educate through entertainment has become the focus of current research. The thesis make a connection between educational game and collaborative learning, the current popular teaching model, and concludes digital game-based collaborative learning model combined with teaching practice.

  19. Games and Simulations in Informal Science Education. WCER Working Paper No. 2010-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Patterson, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities and challenges games and simulations pose for informal science education. The authors begin with a brief overview of the recent history of games and games research. They then attempt to clarify the distinctions between games and simulations. Next, they examine types of informal learning…

  20. Teacher perceptions of the value of game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.C.; ten Dam, G.T.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Admiraal, W.F.

    Teachers' perceptions of the usefulness of digital games might be a reason for the limited application of digital games in education. However, participants in most studies of teaching with digital games are teachers who do not use digital games regularly in their teaching. This study examined the

  1. A Study of the Use of Simulations and Games in Education with Special Reference to Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Desmond Vincent

    Chapter 1 of this thesis provides definitions of terms used. Chapter 2 discusses role-playing, strategy games, and models. Chapter 3 explores the significance of games in child development. Chapter 4 relates the historical development of gaming and simulation. Chapter 5 focuses on advantages of simulations and games in education in terms of such…

  2. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playing Escape from Diab (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO), epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10-12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted k...

  3. Using Video Games to Enhance Motivation States in Online Education: Protocol for a Team-Based Digital Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anna; Shaw, Tim; Goodyear, Peter

    2015-09-28

    Video and computer games for education have been of interest to researchers for several decades. Over the last half decade, researchers in the health sector have also begun exploring the value of this medium. However, there are still many gaps in the literature regarding the effective use of video and computer games in medical education, particularly in relation to how learners interact with the platform, and how the games can be used to enhance collaboration. The objective of the study is to evaluate a team-based digital game as an educational tool for engaging learners and supporting knowledge consolidation in postgraduate medical education. A mixed methodology will be used in order to establish efficacy and level of motivation provided by a team-based digital game. Second-year medical students will be recruited as participants to complete 3 matches of the game at spaced intervals, in 2 evenly distributed teams. Prior to playing the game, participants will complete an Internet survey to establish baseline data. After playing the game, participants will voluntarily complete a semistructured interview to establish motivation and player engagement. Additionally, metrics collected from the game platform will be analyzed to determine efficacy. The research is in the preliminary stages, but thus far a total of 54 participants have been recruited into the study. Additionally, a content development group has been convened to develop appropriate content for the platform. Video and computer games have been demonstrated to have value for educational purposes. Significantly less research has addressed how the medium can be effectively utilized in the health sector. Preliminary data from this study would suggest there is an interest in games for learning in the medical student body. As such, it is beneficial to undertake further research into how these games teach and engage learners in order to evaluate their role in tertiary and postgraduate medical education in the future.

  4. Middle school children's game playing preferences: Case studies of children's experiences playing and critiquing science-related educational games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dolly Rebecca Doran

    The playing of computer games is one of the most popular non-school activities of children, particularly boys, and is often the entry point to greater facility with and use of other computer applications. Children are learning skills as they play, but what they learn often does not generalize beyond application to that and other similar games. Nevertheless, games have the potential to develop in students the knowledge and skills described by national and state educational standards. This study focuses upon middle-school aged children, and how they react to and respond to computer games designed for entertainment and educational purposes, within the context of science learning. Through qualitative, case study methodology, the game play, evaluation, and modification experiences of four diverse middle-school-aged students in summer camps are analyzed. The inquiry focused on determining the attributes of computer games that appeal to middle school students, the aspects of science that appeal to middle school children, and ultimately, how science games might be designed to appeal to middle school children. Qualitative data analysis led to the development of a method for describing players' activity modes during game play, rather than the conventional methods that describe game characteristics. These activity modes are used to describe the game design preferences of the participants. Recommendations are also made in the areas of functional, aesthetic, and character design and for the design of educational games. Middle school students may find the topical areas of forensics, medicine, and the environment to be of most interest; designing games in and across these topic areas has the potential for encouraging voluntary science-related play. Finally, when including children in game evaluation and game design activities, results suggest the value of providing multiple types of activities in order to encourage the full participation of all children.

  5. Gender differences and game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Huizenga, J.; Reitenbach, M.; Rosenthal, S.; Volman, M.; ten Dam, G.; Vanthournout, G.; Coertjens, L.; Donche, V.; Gijbels, D.; Evans, C.; Cools, E.; Pedrosa de Jesus, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, differences in school motivation and performance between boys and girls are a major issue in political debates. In the first years of secondary education in the Netherlands, boys tend to underachieve and to be disengaged from school. Game-based learning might improve the school

  6. Perspective of Game Theory in Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, A.; Zascerinska, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sustainable development of society has attracted a lot of research efforts. A strategic aspect to the society's evolution is introduced by the game theory (Fernandez, 2011, p. 1). The research question is as follows: how to organize the process of teaching and learning in education for sustainable development? The aim of the research is to…

  7. A Marketing Perspective on Educational Games, Simulations and Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryer, Patricia

    1989-01-01

    Examines the literature on marketing and uses the four elements of product, price, place, and promotion to elicit guidance for those who wish to market educational games, simulations, and workshops. Devising a marketing strategy centered on the customer is discussed, and the distinction between goods and services is described. (11 references)…

  8. Video Games as Reconstructionist Sites of Learning in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nancy S.

    2008-01-01

    Art education has been in the midst of a transformation shaped by several factors, including changes in contemporary art theories, political and economic factors, and technological developments. Film, music videos, advertisements, video games and other forms of popular culture are shaping how students learn today. Discussions about video gaming…

  9. Game-centric pedagogy and curriculums in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Murray, John; Morgan, James

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines some recent trends in game-centric education for STEAM (science, technology,engineering, art and mathematics) fields, especially those that explore and promote collaborationamong multiple disciplines. We discuss various multimodal design research activities that draw uponthe a...

  10. Foundations for Security Aware Software Development Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonald, Jeffrey T

    2005-01-01

    Software vulnerability is part and parcel of modern information systems. Even though eliminating all vulnerability is not possible, reducing exploitable code can be accomplished long term by laying the right programming foundations...

  11. Guidelines for using empirical studies in software engineering education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Fagerholm

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Software engineering education is under constant pressure to provide students with industry-relevant knowledge and skills. Educators must address issues beyond exercises and theories that can be directly rehearsed in small settings. Industry training has similar requirements of relevance as companies seek to keep their workforce up to date with technological advances. Real-life software development often deals with large, software-intensive systems and is influenced by the complex effects of teamwork and distributed software development, which are hard to demonstrate in an educational environment. A way to experience such effects and to increase the relevance of software engineering education is to apply empirical studies in teaching. In this paper, we show how different types of empirical studies can be used for educational purposes in software engineering. We give examples illustrating how to utilize empirical studies, discuss challenges, and derive an initial guideline that supports teachers to include empirical studies in software engineering courses. Furthermore, we give examples that show how empirical studies contribute to high-quality learning outcomes, to student motivation, and to the awareness of the advantages of applying software engineering principles. Having awareness, experience, and understanding of the actions required, students are more likely to apply such principles under real-life constraints in their working life.

  12. Childhood education student teachers responses to a simulation game on food security

    OpenAIRE

    Nadine Felicity Petersen

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an account of student teachers responses to a simulation game about food scarcity and how the game served as a conversation starter about the influence of food scarcity on educational provisioning. The simulation game was utilised as part of a suite of activities during an educational excursion for first years in primary school teacher education. In this investigation data were generated via video recordings of the simulation game itself, summary notes of the key points of...

  13. [Health education for puerperal women in neonatal rooming-in: knowledge acquisition with an educational game].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; de Mello, Débora Falleiros

    2002-01-01

    The study aims at verifying knowledge acquisition through health education activities mediated by the use of an educational game on breast-feeding and basic care provided to the newborn, in rooming-in. Study accomplished at a philanthropic maternity of Ribeirão Preto-SP. Educational activities were accomplished in group, coordinated by the nurse, using board game. Through structured interview guided by a route before and after-game, the authors verified the knowledge acquisition, classifying the answers in insufficient (0-4), regular (5-9), good (10-14) and excellent (15-20). Of the mothers' previous knowledge, 16.7% of answers were excellent increasing for 77.8% after participation in the educational activity. They concluded that the game constituted in appropriate strategy to facilitate change of experiences between puerperas and the development of the health education through ludic-pedagogical activities.

  14. Teaching Software Engineering by Means of Computer-Game Development: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagiltay, Nergiz Ercil

    2007-01-01

    Software-engineering education programs are intended to prepare students for a field that involves rapidly changing conditions and expectations. Thus, there is always a danger that the skills and the knowledge provided may soon become obsolete. This paper describes results and draws on experiences from the implementation of a computer…

  15. Benefits, Barriers and Guideline Recommendations for the Implementation of Serious Games in Education for Stakeholders and Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekleves, Emmanuel; Cosmas, John; Aggoun, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Serious games and game-based learning have received increased attention in recent years as an adjunct to teaching and learning material. This has been well echoed in the literature with numerous articles on the use of games and game theory in education. Despite this, no policy for the incorporation of serious games in education exists to date.…

  16. Socio-Cultural Challenges in Global Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Rashina; Babar, Muhammad Ali; Shastri, Yogeshwar; Yaqoob, Humaa

    2017-01-01

    Global software engineering education (GSEE) is aimed at providing software engineering (SE) students with knowledge, skills, and understanding of working in globally distributed arrangements so they can be prepared for the global SE (GSE) paradigm. It is important to understand the challenges involved in GSEE for improving the quality and…

  17. CIP's Eighth Annual Educational Software Contest: The Winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Denis

    1997-01-01

    Announces the winners of an annual software contest for innovative software in physics education. Winning entries include an application to help students visualize the origin of energy bands in a solid, a package on the radioastronomy of pulsars, and a school-level science simulation program. Also includes student winners, honorable mentions,…

  18. Possibilities and importance of using computer games and simulations in educational process

    OpenAIRE

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses if it is possible and appropriate to use simulations (simulation games) and traditional games in the process of education. It is stressed that the terms "game" and "simulation" can and should be taken in a broader sense, although they are chiefly investigated herein as video-computer games and simulations. Any activity combining the properties of game (competition, rules, players) and the properties of simulation (i.e. operational presentation of reality) should be underst...

  19. A Survey of Educational Games as Interaction Design Tools for Affective Learning: Thematic Analysis Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Zarwina; Kamsin, Amirrudin; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2018-01-01

    A Computer game is the new platform in generating learning experiences for educational purposes. There are many educational games that have been used as an interaction design tool in a learning environment to enhance students learning outcomes. However, research also claims that playing video games can have a negative impact on student behavior,…

  20. The Influence of an Educational Computer Game on Children's Cultural Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang-Ping; Lien, Chi-Jui; Annetta, Len; Lu, Yu-Ling

    2010-01-01

    This study develops an educational computer game, FORmosaHope (FH), to explore the influences that an educational computer game might have on children's cultural identities. FH is a role-playing game, in which children can actively explore a mini-world to learn about science, technology, and society. One hundred and thirty sixth-graders, about…

  1. Recruitment Gaming: A New Tool at the Interface of Education and Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Gavin W.; Tanenbaum, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment gaming embodies an exciting new tool at the interface of the education and private sectors. Employers and recruitment platforms add new complications to the already problematic relationship between game designers and educators. To better understand the emerging recruitment aspects of gaming and identify areas for those in educational…

  2. "Discovering the Cell": An Educational Game about Cell and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Carolina N.; Alves, Gutemberg G.; Cardona, Tania da S.; Melim, Leandra M. C.; Luz, Mauricio R. M. P.; Araujo-Jorge, Tania C.; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The role of games within education becomes clearer as students become more active and are able to take decisions, solve problems and react to the results of those decisions. The educational board game "Discovering the Cell" ("Celula Adentro"), is based on problem-solving learning. This investigative game attempts to stimulate…

  3. Do-It-Yourself Learning Games: Software That Lets You Pick the Questions--and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Wells

    1984-01-01

    Reviews user-adaptable learning games that can be customized for any subject, including Tic Tac Show and the Game Show from Computer Advanced Ideas, which are question-answer learning programs based on game shows, and Master Match from Computer Advanced Ideas and Square Pairs from Scholastic Inc., which are based on the card game Concentration.…

  4. Views of Elementary School Pre-Service Teachers About the Use of Educational Mathematics Games in Mathematics Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Topçu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reveal the opinions of elementary school pre-service teachers about the usage of educational mathematics games in elementary mathematics teaching. In this study, case study that, one of qualitative research methods, was used. Data were collected by utilizing a semi-structured interview form to these elementary school pre-service teachers and analyzed using by content analysis method. A total of 10 junior pre-service teachers enrolled in undergraduate programs of elementary teaching attended to this research. In conclusion, these pre-service teachers indicated that educational computer games would provide benefits such as making students’ learning more permanent, visualizing concepts, making students love mathematics, learning by entertaining, reinforcing what has been learnt and developing thinking skills. Nevertheless, these elementary school pre-service teachers stated the limitations about educational computer games such as causing addiction and physical damages, being time-consuming, requiring special equipment and software and making class management difficult. Besides, it was revealed that the pre-service teachers demonstrated positive attitudes towards the use of games in courses while that they did not feel themselves competent in terms of application.Key Words:    Educational computer games, mathematics teaching, elementary school pre-service teachers

  5. Ergonomic aspects simulation digital online: an educational game proposal to promote environmental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbex, D F; Jappur, R; Selig, P; Varvakis, G

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the ergonomic criteria that guide the construction of an educational game called Environmental Simulator. The focus is on environment navigation considering aspects of content architecture and its esthetics functionality.

  6. Three Designs for Using Game-Based Learning in Business Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lainema, Timo; Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents three didactic frameworks for integrating learning games with other syllabus activities in business education. These three models illustrate how different didactic framings of particular learning games allow for different learning processes, using Kolb’s learning model...

  7. Effects of mathematics computer games on special education students' multiplicative reasoning ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.H.A.M. van den; Robitzsch, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a teacher-delivered intervention with online mathematics mini-games on special education students' multiplicative reasoning ability (multiplication and division). The games involved declarative, procedural, as well as conceptual knowledge of multiplicative

  8. The Social and Emotional Components of Gaming. A Response to "The Challenges of Gaming for Democratic Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middaugh, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This response considers the role of video games in promoting the social and emotional aspects of civic education and engagement. Specifically, it discusses how design choices in iCivics and video games generally may impact students' emotional responses to issues and other people, sense of internal efficacy, and social connectedness. [For "The…

  9. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO) , epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10-12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95-100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes.

  10. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO), epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10–12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95–100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. Aim This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. Method The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Results Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Conclusions Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes. PMID:27547019

  11. Chile: educational game, "Learning about AIDS: the Responsibility of All".

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    For more than 10 years, People's Health Education (EPES) has developed educational materials which call upon target audiences to integrate their practical experiences into a collective learning process based upon games. The methodology and materials aim to meet the needs of the most underprivileged sections of the population. EPES produced "Learning about AIDS: the responsibility of all," a game which can be used as it is or adapted to meet the needs of differing groups. The objectives of the game are to provide basic information on AIDS; to facilitate the expression of ideas, beliefs, and myths about AIDS; to promote forums for discussion in order to exchange opinions and views on sexuality and AIDS; to create awareness on how AIDS affects the community; and to create awareness of the need to prevent the disease. Played in couples to strengthen the level of interpersonal communication on such issues, the game is played because AIDS is a fact of everyday life which is affecting the community, because learning about AIDS will help people to protect themselves and their communities from the disease and groundless associated fears, and because open discussion is needed to help prevent more people from becoming infected with HIV.

  12. Deliberate Practice of Creativity Game Series - A Creativity Training Material for Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrge, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The publication consists of two board games and one card game that enhances creative abilities. They are called "Ide kreativitetsbrætspil", "Skitsespillet" og "Mixspil". They are designed for educational purposes.......The publication consists of two board games and one card game that enhances creative abilities. They are called "Ide kreativitetsbrætspil", "Skitsespillet" og "Mixspil". They are designed for educational purposes....

  13. Mobile Game Based Learning: Can it enhance learning of marginalized peer educators?

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Anupama; Sharples, Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an investigatory project to pilot an SMS based game to enhance the training of peer educators of MSM (Males having Sex with Males) groups in India. The objective of this research was to increase the efficacy of the MSM peer educators by bridging the gap between the training needs and their real life experiences. An SMS based game was designed using participatory approaches as a learning support, upholding their real life experiences in game form. The game was designed on ...

  14. Power Analysis Software for Educational Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chao-Ying Joanne; Long, Haiying; Abaci, Serdar

    2012-01-01

    Given the importance of statistical power analysis in quantitative research and the repeated emphasis on it by American Educational Research Association/American Psychological Association journals, the authors examined the reporting practice of power analysis by the quantitative studies published in 12 education/psychology journals between 2005…

  15. Education Game of Multiplying Based on Horizontal Method of HTML 5 and Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Yoseph Ricky

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, technology is growing rapidly followed by the development of game and its variations. Now, game is easily found on a mobile device. Moreover, game on mobile device can also be used as an excellent medium for learning or often referred as educational game because the nature of educational game is practical, easy to carry anywhere, and tends to be fun. This research was to create a mobile game application for learning with Horizontal method based on HTML 5 and Phonegap and to introduce the method as a method of mathematical multiplication process. This research used the Scrum method for program development. The results obtained showed that the game in this study is considered attractive and received a positive response from the player. Player also found it helpful to know the patterns of mathematics through the multiplication ofnumbers in this game. So through this game the player can perform mathematical multiplication calculations quickly.

  16. 'We don’t need no education': video game preferences, video game motivations, and aggressiveness among adolescent boys of different educational ability levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nije Bijvank, M.; Konijn, E.A.; Bushman, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on low educational ability as a risk factor for aggression and violent game play. We propose that boys of lower educational ability are more attracted to violent video games than other boys are, and that they are also higher in trait aggressiveness and sensation seeking.

  17. "We Don't Need No Education": Video Game Preferences, Video Game Motivations, and Aggressiveness among Adolescent Boys of Different Educational Ability Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijvank, Marije Nije; Konijn, Elly A.; Bushman, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on low educational ability as a risk factor for aggression and violent game play. We propose that boys of lower educational ability are more attracted to violent video games than other boys are, and that they are also higher in trait aggressiveness and sensation seeking. Participants were Dutch boys in public schools (N =…

  18. A conceptual framework of game-informed principles for health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H

    2016-01-01

    Games have been used for training purposes for many years, but their use remains somewhat underdeveloped and under-theorized in health professional education. This paper considers the basis for using serious games (games that have an explicit educational purpose) in health professional education in terms of their underlying concepts and design principles. These principles can be understood as a series of game facets: competition and conflict, chance and luck, experience and performance, simulation and make-believe, tactics and strategies, media, symbols and actions, and complexity and difficulty. Games are distinct and bound in ways that other health professional education activities are not. The differences between games and simulation can be understood in terms of the interconnected concepts of isomorphism (convergence with real-world practice) and anisomorphism (divergence from real-world practice). Gaming facets can extend the instructional design repertoire in health professional education.

  19. Review of the Educational Software Evaluation Forms and Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet ARSLAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to review existing evaluation forms and scales that have been prepared for educational software evaluation. In addition to this purpose, the study aims to provide insight and guidance for future studies in this context. In total, forty-two studies that including evaluation forms and scales have been taken into consideration. “Educational software evaluation”, “Software evaluation”, “Educational software evaluation forms/scales” were searched as keywords in the: “Education Resources Information Centre (ERIC”, “Marmara University e-Library”, “National Thesis Center” and “Science Direct” databases. Twenty-nine of them have met the review selection criteria and been evaluated. There is an increase in the number of evaluation tools between 2006 – 2010. However, it was noticed that there is no sufficient number of evaluation tools targeting “educational games”. It was concluded that reliability and validity studies are very important part of developing educational software evaluation tools and this is a matter that should be considered in future studies.

  20. Games and Simulations for Climate, Weather and Earth Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, R. M.; Clark, S.

    2015-12-01

    We will demonstrate several interactive, computer-based simulations, games, and other interactive multimedia. These resources were developed for weather, climate, atmospheric science, and related Earth system science education. The materials were created by the UCAR Center for Science Education. These materials have been disseminated via our web site (SciEd.ucar.edu), webinars, online courses, teacher workshops, and large touchscreen displays in weather and Sun-Earth connections exhibits in NCAR's Mesa Lab facility in Boulder, Colorado. Our group has also assembled a web-based list of similar resources, especially simulations and games, from other sources that touch upon weather, climate, and atmospheric science topics. We'll briefly demonstrate this directory.

  1. Improving Collaborative Learning in Online Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Colin J.; DeFranco, Joanna F.; Sangwan, Raghvinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Team projects are commonplace in software engineering education. They address a key educational objective, provide students critical experience relevant to their future careers, allow instructors to set problems of greater scale and complexity than could be tackled individually, and are a vehicle for socially constructed learning. While all…

  2. Collaborative gaming and competition for CS-STEM education using SPHERES Zero Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sreeja; Katz, Jacob G.; Saenz-Otero, Alvar

    2013-02-01

    There is widespread investment of resources in the fields of Computer Science, Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (CS-STEM) education to improve STEM interests and skills. This paper addresses the goal of revolutionizing student education using collaborative gaming and competition, both in virtual simulation environments and on real hardware in space. The concept is demonstrated using the SPHERES Zero Robotics (ZR) Program which is a robotics programming competition. The robots are miniature satellites called SPHERES—an experimental test bed developed by the MIT SSL on the International Space Station (ISS) to test navigation, formation flight and control algorithms in microgravity. The participants compete to win a technically challenging game by programming their strategies into the SPHERES satellites, completely from a web browser. The programs are demonstrated in simulation, on ground hardware and then in a final competition when an astronaut runs the student software aboard the ISS. ZR had a pilot event in 2009 with 10 High School (HS) students, a nationwide pilot tournament in 2010 with over 200 HS students from 19 US states, a summer tournament in 2010 with ˜150 middle school students and an open-registration tournament in 2011 with over 1000 HS students from USA and Europe. The influence of collaboration was investigated by (1) building new web infrastructure and an Integrated Development Environment where intensive inter-participant collaboration is possible, (2) designing and programming a game to solve a relevant formation flight problem, collaborative in nature—and (3) structuring a tournament such that inter-team collaboration is mandated. This paper introduces the ZR web tools, assesses the educational value delivered by the program using space and games and evaluates the utility of collaborative gaming within this framework. There were three types of collaborations as variables—within matches (to achieve game objectives), inter

  3. Using Video Games to Develop Communication Skills in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Employers are increasingly concerned that university graduates possess the transferable skills – sometimes termed ‘graduate attributes’ (Barrie, 2006) – necessary to succeed in the workplace. Prominent among these skills are those which relate to communication; however, not all higher education courses are designed explicitly to teach or develop such skills. Many commercial video games, on the other hand, require players to communicate in order to succeed, particularly in an era of increasing...

  4. Memory game as educative strategy for preventing enteroparasitosis: experience report

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuella Silva Joventino; Lydia Vieira Freitas; Raul Feitoza Rogério; Thaís Marques Lima; Levânia Maria Benevides Dias; Lorena Barbosa Ximenes

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of nursing students in education interaction with preschoolers’ caregivers as far as prevention of enteroparasitosis in preschoolers is concerned.This is a descriptive study, like a reporting experience. This activity counted with the participation of 09 caregivers, in the months of June and October 2006. The group had active participation in the experiment and the knowledge shared from a Giant Memory Game with pictures dealing with the...

  5. GAMES FOR LEARNING IN ACCOUNTANCY EDUCATION:A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veruschka Pelser-Carstens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Games for learning (educational gamesareviewedas instructionalstrategiesrequiringstudentstoengageincompetitive activitieswithpredeterminedrulesand conditions.Various studiesproposebeneficial effects ofgamesfor learningandpredicttheirincreased future use.Theelementsof gamesfor learning contribute towardsmakingthem pedagogically soundandteachersand higher educationlecturershaveincreasingly become interested in usingthemto enhancetraditional teaching and learningenvironments.Aim:This paper documents asystematicreview of empirical and theoreticalarticles on the use of gamesfor learningin teaching and learningin order todeterminehow games for learning could contribute towards AccountancyEducation.Method:Articleslistedindigitalacademic databasesweresystematicallyreviewed according to:(i the timespan as2011-2017; (ii the document typeasjournalarticles; (iii the keywordsas“educational games AND student curiosity;”“educational games AND engagement;” “educational gamesAND skills” and“educational games AND active learning.”Although the authors prefer the use ofthe construct ofgames for learninginstead ofeducational games, the literaturestill related to educational games.Conclusions:The study concludeson:(ihowenjoyabledostudents experiencegamesfor learning;(iihowgamesinfluence, shape,andenrichlearning;(iiihow studentsgain,processandassimilateinformationfrom games for learning; (ivthelimitedavailability ofinformationon how games for learningstimulate students’curiosityfor learning; (vhowstudents engage with one another todevelop skillswhile engaging with games for learning;and (vi the need forfurtherresearchtoassess the effectiveness of gamesfor learning.Recommendations:(iThe decision to use gamesfor learningin teaching andlearning should be based onawell-groundedtheoryof learning, as well asontheskills required for the learning area;and (ii gamesfor learningshould beemployedaslearningtools, andnot as stand-alone instruction.

  6. Digital game for education and dissemination of nuclear energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Silva, Marcio H.; Machado, Daniel M.; Santo, Andre Cotelli E.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Mol, Antonio C.A., E-mail: analegey@hotmail.com, E-mail: machado.mol@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Realidade Virtual; Lima, Tiago Rocha; Paula, Vanessa M.; Junior, Israel L.; Augusto, Haline F., E-mail: tlrtiago@gmail.com, E-mail: vnspaula@hotmail.com, E-mail: halineffa@hotmail.com, E-mail: israel_plj@hotmail.com [Centro Universitario Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Students are immersed in a society with many possibilities of interaction, either computer or smart phones. In addition, students demand more innovation, dynamism and interactivity in classrooms. The form of education that can motivate students to engage in the learning process can get them to be interested in the lessons and not prematurely abandon schools. On the other hand, educational materials based on Virtual Reality (VR), as computer games, have been considered an important educational tool for making dynamic, motivating, innovative, in addition to achieving those areas where traditional methods are not reaching its goal. Motivated by the above, and given the competence developed by the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN and the collaboration of the University Center UniCarioca, was developed a digital game based on virtual reality tools for the teaching of a subject of area of science that needs to be addressed to society more contextualized way: the different applications of nuclear energy. It is expected that this digital game is an important tool for the dissemination, teaching and learning the benefits of nuclear energy. (author)

  7. Digital game for education and dissemination of nuclear energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Silva, Marcio H.; Machado, Daniel M.; Santo, Andre Cotelli E.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Mol, Antonio C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Students are immersed in a society with many possibilities of interaction, either computer or smart phones. In addition, students demand more innovation, dynamism and interactivity in classrooms. The form of education that can motivate students to engage in the learning process can get them to be interested in the lessons and not prematurely abandon schools. On the other hand, educational materials based on Virtual Reality (VR), as computer games, have been considered an important educational tool for making dynamic, motivating, innovative, in addition to achieving those areas where traditional methods are not reaching its goal. Motivated by the above, and given the competence developed by the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN and the collaboration of the University Center UniCarioca, was developed a digital game based on virtual reality tools for the teaching of a subject of area of science that needs to be addressed to society more contextualized way: the different applications of nuclear energy. It is expected that this digital game is an important tool for the dissemination, teaching and learning the benefits of nuclear energy. (author)

  8. Simulation Games: The Future of Water Resources Education and Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Rho, J. C.; Mariethoz, G.; Rojas, R. F.; Andersen, M. S.; Kelly, B. F.; Holley, C.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists rely on models of the water cycle to describe and predict problems of water scarcity in a changing climate, and to suggest adaptation strategies for securing future water needs. Yet these models are too often complicated for managers, the general public and for students to understand. Simpler modelling environments will help with finding solutions by engaging a broader segment of the population. Such environments will enable education at the earliest stages and collective action. I propose that simulation games can be an effective communication platform between scientists and 'non-experts' and that such games will shed light on problems of pollution and overuse of water resources. In the same way as pilots use flight simulators to become proficient at flying aircraft, simulation games—if underpinned by good science—can be used to educate the public, students and managers about how to best manage our water resources. I aim to motivate young scientists to think about using games to advance water education and management.

  9. An online spaced-education game for global continuing medical education: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, B Price; Baker, Harley

    2012-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of a "spaced-education" game as a method of continuing medical education (CME) among physicians across the globe. The efficacy of educational games for the CME has yet to be established. We created a novel online educational game by incorporating game mechanics into "spaced education" (SE), an evidence-based method of online CME. This 34-week randomized trial enrolled practicing urologists across the globe. The SE game consisted of 40 validated multiple-choice questions and explanations on urology clinical guidelines. Enrollees were randomized to 2 cohorts: cohort A physicians were sent 2 questions via an automated e-mail system every 2 days, and cohort B physicians were sent 4 questions every 4 days. Adaptive game mechanics re-sent the questions in 12 or 24 days if answered incorrectly and correctly, respectively. Questions expired if not answered on time (appointment dynamic). Physicians retired questions by answering each correctly twice-in-a-row (progression dynamic). Competition was fostered by posting relative performance among physicians. Main outcome measures were baseline scores (percentage of questions answered correctly upon initial presentation) and completion scores (percentage of questions retired). A total of 1470 physicians from 63 countries enrolled. Median baseline score was 48% (interquartile range [IQR] 17) and, in multivariate analyses, was found to vary significantly by region (Cohen dmax = 0.31, P = 0.001) and age (dmax = 0.41, P games. An online SE game can substantially improve guidelines knowledge and is a well-accepted method of global CME delivery.

  10. USING EDUCATIONAL MARBLE GAMES IN GERMAN LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASAN COŞKUN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show how German students can be motivated by learning games. Apart from the development and didacticisation of the learning game “Marbles”, the attitude of Turkish families and language teaching educational establishments and the support of the DaF lessons by German mediating institutions in Turkey will be considered. The attitude of Turkish families to learning foreign languages is mostly positive. Turkish educational authorities and those responsible for education take various measures to expand foreign language teaching availability in the schools. German institutions which provide teachers (Goethe-Institut, ZfA, DAAD promote the improvement of German teaching in Turkey. Nevertheless, the quality of German teaching is not satisfactory mostly because the available teachers are not adequately qualified, teacher training is remote from practice, the quality of text books and teaching materials, the traditions of learning, the excessively large classes, inadequate learning environment (language cabinets and equipment, the nature and method of central examinations (multiple choice and their significance in the Turkish educational system. In the long-term, this leads to frustration in both teachers and students. The Turkish educational authorities initially took measures to expand the availability of language teaching in the course of harmonisation of the Turkish educational system to that of the EU e.g. the introduction of a second foreign language. German mediating institutions ensure reasonable further training for teachers locally and in Germany and support the creation of teaching materials etc.

  11. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eFissler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control, and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  12. Exploring the Educational Effectiveness of Culturally-enhanced Serious Game in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ariffin Mazeyanti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to explore the efficiency of utilizing a culturally - enhanced serious game in education particularly in Information Technology course. To attain this objective, the academic achievement of 61 participants was measured by using quantitative Quasi- Experimental research design approach. Sets of pre- and post-test questions were administered to all participants, where descriptive analysis and hypothesis evaluation were performed to the collected data. The finding revealed that there were significant increase on the mean values of participants who played culturally-enhanced serious game as compared to those who played contemporary serious game (M = 3.00. Therefore, the study suggested that culturally-enhanced serious game has potential to support education particularly in Information Technology course.

  13. Games as an Artistic Medium: Investigating Complexity Thinking in Game-Based Art Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    This action research study examines the making of video games, using an integrated development environment software program called GameMaker, as art education curriculum for students between the ages of 8-13. Through a method I designed, students created video games using the concepts of move, avoid, release, and contact (MARC) to explore their…

  14. Location-based technology and game-based learning in secondary education: learning about medieval Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Akkerman, S.; Huizenga, J.; van Zeijts, H.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile games in education are excellent ways to combine situated, active and constructive learning with fun. In the mobile city game Frequency 1550 teams -of four students each- step into the game's world. With help of the Internet, smart phones and GPS technology, Amsterdam changes into a medieval

  15. The use of digital games and simulators in veterinary education: an overview with examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In view of current technological possibilities and the popularity of games, the interest in games for educational purposes is remarkably on the rise. This article outlines the (future) use of (digital) games and simulators in several disciplines, especially in the veterinary curriculum. The

  16. Active Gaming: Is "Virtual" Reality Right for Your Physical Education Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lisa; Sanders, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Active gaming is growing in popularity and the idea of increasing children's physical activity by using technology is largely accepted by physical educators. Teachers nationwide have been providing active gaming equipment such as virtual bikes, rhythmic dance machines, virtual sporting games, martial arts simulators, balance boards, and other…

  17. The Game of Late Life: A Novel Education Activity for the Psychology of Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, Jay K.; Roberts, Pamela; Radnidge, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of The Game of Late Life--a novel education activity for the psychology of ageing. The game was designed to provide transformational learning where students imagine themselves as older adults and move through late life via a game board, encountering various life events along the way. One of the…

  18. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Educational Card Game for Learning How Human Immunology Is Regulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, TzuFen; Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Lin, Shu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to investigate the effectiveness of an educational card game we developed for learning human immunology. Two semesters of evaluation were included to examine the impact of the game on students' understanding and perceptions of the game-based instruction. Ninety-nine senior high school students (11th graders)…

  19. The Development of Educational and/or Training Computer Games for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jungmin

    2012-01-01

    Computer and video games have much in common with the strategies used in special education. Free resources for game development are becoming more widely available, so lay computer users, such as teachers and other practitioners, now have the capacity to develop games using a low budget and a little self-teaching. This article provides a guideline…

  20. Video and Computer Games: Effect on Children and Implications for Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Steve M.

    1997-01-01

    Video and computer games have assumed a prominent role in the culture of U.S. children and adolescents. The paper examines the health effects of these games, suggests criteria upon which parents and teachers may evaluate the games, and notes some implications for health educators. (SM)

  1. Multiplayer Online Games as Educational Tools: Facing New Challenges in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskeva, Fotini; Mysirlaki, Sofia; Papagianni, Aikaterini

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a proposal for the development of educational multiplayer online games based on the activity theory, as an alternative to the current trend in multiplayer gaming and a means of promoting collaboration among students. In order to examine whether online games are engaging for learners, we consider multiple factors regarding game…

  2. The Impact of Science Education Games on Prescription Drug Abuse Attitudes among Teens: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, Yvonne; Bowling, Kristi G.; Miller, Leslie M.; Ramos, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Two online science education games, in which players learn about the risks of prescription drug abuse in the context of investigating crimes, were evaluated to determine shifts of prescription drug abuse attitudes attributable to game exposure. High school students from grades 11 and 12 (n = 179) were assigned to one of the games and participated…

  3. Effect of an Educational Game on University Students' Learning about Action Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchi, Kelly Cristina Gaviao; Montrezor, Luís Henrique; Marcondes, Fernanda K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational game that is used for teaching the mechanisms of the action potentials in cell membranes. The game was composed of pieces representing the intracellular and extracellular environments, ions, ion channels, and the Na+-K+-ATPase pump. During the game activity, the students arranged…

  4. Global Leadership Education: Upping the Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryunova, Elizabeth; Jenkins, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    While scholars recognize that digital technology is a major tool employed by contemporary learners to access knowledge, its full capacity is yet to be utilized. This paper investigates opportunities to increase individual learning engagement and knowledge retention in higher education and corporate environments through integrating educational…

  5. Imprinting Community College Computer Science Education with Software Engineering Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundley, Jacqueline Holliday

    Although the two-year curriculum guide includes coverage of all eight software engineering core topics, the computer science courses taught in Alabama community colleges limit student exposure to the programming, or coding, phase of the software development lifecycle and offer little experience in requirements analysis, design, testing, and maintenance. We proposed that some software engineering principles can be incorporated into the introductory-level of the computer science curriculum. Our vision is to give community college students a broader exposure to the software development lifecycle. For those students who plan to transfer to a baccalaureate program subsequent to their community college education, our vision is to prepare them sufficiently to move seamlessly into mainstream computer science and software engineering degrees. For those students who plan to move from the community college to a programming career, our vision is to equip them with the foundational knowledge and skills required by the software industry. To accomplish our goals, we developed curriculum modules for teaching seven of the software engineering knowledge areas within current computer science introductory-level courses. Each module was designed to be self-supported with suggested learning objectives, teaching outline, software tool support, teaching activities, and other material to assist the instructor in using it.

  6. The Benefits of Active Video Games for Educational and Physical Activity Approaches: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino Campos, Carlos; del Castillo Fernández, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    This article sets out to conduct a systematic review of the current literature on active video games as potential educational tools for physical education or physical activity. To begin with, research on active video games for educational and physical purposes has been examined with the purpose of verifying improvement of attitudes, intellectual…

  7. For ARGument’s Sake! The Pros and Cons of Alternate Reality Gaming in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Economides , Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Part 1: Futures of Technology for Learning and Education; International audience; This paper explores the potential of Alternate Reality Games, a type of Game-Based Learning experience, within higher education. The discourse opens by explaining the essence of ARGs; it then moves to present the findings from research in this domain, highlighting key benefits and challenges in using ARGs in higher education.

  8. The Challenges of Gaming for Democratic Education: The Case of iCivics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Jeremy; Banks, Angela M.; Nemacheck, Christine; Wenska, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Video games are the most recent technological advancement to be viewed as an educational panacea and a force for democracy. However, this medium has particular affordances and constraints as a tool for democratic education in educational environments. This paper presents results from a study of the design and content of four iCivics games and…

  9. Factors Affecting Teachers' Adoption of Educational Computer Games: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebritchi, Mansureh

    2010-01-01

    Even though computer games hold considerable potential for engaging and facilitating learning among today's children, the adoption of modern educational computer games is still meeting significant resistance in K-12 education. The purpose of this paper is to inform educators and instructional designers on factors affecting teachers' adoption of…

  10. Online Computer Games as Collaborative Learning Environments: Prospects and Challenges for Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Marina

    2009-01-01

    This study is aimed at presenting a critical overview of recent research studies on the use of educational online games as collaborative learning environments in Tertiary Education (TE), namely higher education and vocational training, with a view to identifying: a) the elements that online games should include in order to support fruitful and…

  11. Design Principles for Serious Video Games in Mathematics Education: From Theory to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Chorianopoulos; Michail Giannakos

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in the employment of serious video games in science education, but there are no clear design principles. After surveying previous work in serious video game design, we highlighted the following design principles: 1) engage the students with narrative (hero, story), 2) employ familiar gameplay mechanics from popular video games, 3) engage students into constructive trial and error game-play and 4) situate collaborative learning. As illustrated examples we designed two...

  12. Video games and higher education : What can ‘Call of Duty’ teach our students?

    OpenAIRE

    Nick eTannahill; Patrick eTissington; Carl eSenior

    2012-01-01

    Here it is argued that with game-based learning it is possible, through their inherent teaching mechanisms, to sustain stimulation throughout a class within higher education. That is, the “net generation” (Tapscott, 1999, p. 6) is intrinsically motivated by games and that commercial video games have a potentially important role in the classroom to assist learning of a range of crucial transferable skills. We further argue that commercial off the shelf (COTS) game design is replete with effect...

  13. Video and computer games: effect on children and implications for health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, S M

    1997-04-01

    Video and computer-based games have assumed a prominent role in the culture of American children and adolescents. Given the pervasiveness of their influence, it is likely that these games may affect the health and well-being of children. This paper examines the health effects of these games on children, suggests criteria upon which parents and teachers may evaluate the games, and notes some implications for health educators.

  14. Serious Games and Simulation as Tools for Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Mori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing adoption of computer-based “serious games” as digital tools for education requires to address the question about the role of simulation in teaching and learning process. Whereas many recent studies have stressed the benefits of digital games in a variety of learning contexts, this paper approaches the problem of misuse and limitations of computer-based simulations, and argues that we still need to understand when a digital serious game is actually better than other non-computer-based simulation experiences. Considering that the distinction between the two types of simulation does not mean that they are incompatible, the final question that I address regards the best ways to correlate computer-based and non-computer-based simulation techniques.

  15. Exploring Issues of Implementation, Equity, and Student Achievement With Educational Software in the DC Public Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present analyses from a researcher-practitioner partnership in the District of Columbia Public Schools, where we are exploring the impact of educational software on students’ academic achievement. We analyze a unique data set that combines student-level information from the district with data of student usage of a mathematics game platform: First in Math (FIM. These data offer a window into long-standing issues in the educational technology literature around implementation, equity, and student achievement. We show that time spent in FIM was correlated with improved future performance on standardized math assessments for students in Grades 4–8. However, student time spent using FIM was highly related to factors such as race, gender, and prior achievement. Such observations from data are helpful for school districts and researchers to inform equitable implementation of new technologies and maximize benefits to learners.

  16. The use of digital games and simulators in veterinary education: an overview with examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bie, M H; Lipman, L J A

    2012-01-01

    In view of current technological possibilities and the popularity of games, the interest in games for educational purposes is remarkably on the rise. This article outlines the (future) use of (digital) games and simulators in several disciplines, especially in the veterinary curriculum. The different types of game-based learning (GBL)-varying from simple interactive computer board games to more complex virtual simulation strategies-will be discussed as well as the benefits, possibilities, and limitations of the educational use of games. The real breakthrough seems to be a few years away. Technological developments in the future might diminish the limitations and stumbling blocks that currently exist. Consequently, educational games will play a new and increasingly important role in the future veterinary curriculum, providing an attractive and useful way of learning.

  17. A systematic review of serious games in medical education: quality of evidence and pedagogical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Agudelo-Londoño, Sandra; González, Rafael A; Cortes, Ariel; Pomares, Alexandra; Delgadillo, Vivian; Yepes, Francisco J; Muñoz, Óscar

    2018-12-01

    The literature shows an optimistic landscape for the effectiveness of games in medical education. Nevertheless, games are not considered mainstream material in medical teaching. Two research questions that arise are the following: What pedagogical strategies do developers use when creating games for medical education? And what is the quality of the evidence on the effectiveness of games? A systematic review was made by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers following the Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines. We included peer-reviewed journal articles which described or assessed the use of serious games or gamified apps in medical education. We used the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) to assess the quality of evidence in the use of games. We also evaluated the pedagogical perspectives of such articles. Even though game developers claim that games are useful pedagogical tools, the evidence on their effectiveness is moderate, as assessed by the MERSQI score. Behaviourism and cognitivism continue to be the predominant pedagogical strategies, and games are complementary devices that do not replace traditional medical teaching tools. Medical educators prefer simulations and quizzes focused on knowledge retention and skill development through repetition and do not demand the use of sophisticated games in their classrooms. Moreover, public access to medical games is limited. Our aim was to put the pedagogical strategy into dialogue with the evidence on the effectiveness of the use of medical games. This makes sense since the practical use of games depends on the quality of the evidence about their effectiveness. Moreover, recognition of said pedagogical strategy would allow game developers to design more robust games which would greatly contribute to the learning process.

  18. A systematic review of serious games in medical education: quality of evidence and pedagogical strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Agudelo-Londoño, Sandra; González, Rafael A.; Cortes, Ariel; Pomares, Alexandra; Delgadillo, Vivian; Yepes, Francisco J.; Muñoz, Óscar

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The literature shows an optimistic landscape for the effectiveness of games in medical education. Nevertheless, games are not considered mainstream material in medical teaching. Two research questions that arise are the following: What pedagogical strategies do developers use when creating games for medical education? And what is the quality of the evidence on the effectiveness of games? Methods: A systematic review was made by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers following the Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines. We included peer-reviewed journal articles which described or assessed the use of serious games or gamified apps in medical education. We used the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) to assess the quality of evidence in the use of games. We also evaluated the pedagogical perspectives of such articles. Results: Even though game developers claim that games are useful pedagogical tools, the evidence on their effectiveness is moderate, as assessed by the MERSQI score. Behaviourism and cognitivism continue to be the predominant pedagogical strategies, and games are complementary devices that do not replace traditional medical teaching tools. Medical educators prefer simulations and quizzes focused on knowledge retention and skill development through repetition and do not demand the use of sophisticated games in their classrooms. Moreover, public access to medical games is limited. Discussion: Our aim was to put the pedagogical strategy into dialogue with the evidence on the effectiveness of the use of medical games. This makes sense since the practical use of games depends on the quality of the evidence about their effectiveness. Moreover, recognition of said pedagogical strategy would allow game developers to design more robust games which would greatly contribute to the learning process. PMID:29457760

  19. Design Principles for Serious Video Games in Mathematics Education: From Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Chorianopoulos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the employment of serious video games in science education, but there are no clear design principles. After surveying previous work in serious video game design, we highlighted the following design principles: 1 engage the students with narrative (hero, story, 2 employ familiar gameplay mechanics from popular video games, 3 engage students into constructive trial and error game-play and 4 situate collaborative learning. As illustrated examples we designed two math video games targeted to primary education students. The gameplay of the math video games embeds addition operations in a seamless way, which has been inspired by that of classic platform games. In this way, the students are adding numbers as part of popular gameplay mechanics and as a means to reach the video game objective, rather than as an end in itself. The employment of well-defined principles in the design of math video games should facilitate the evaluation of learning effectiveness by researchers. Moreover, educators can deploy alternative versions of the games in order to engage students with diverse learning styles. For example, some students might be motived and benefited by narrative, while others by collaboration, because it is unlikely that one type of serious video game might fit all learning styles. The proposed principles are not meant to be an exhaustive list, but a starting point for extending the list and applying them in other cases of serious video games beyond mathematics and learning.

  20. Towards a controlled vocabulary on software engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizard, Sebastián; Vallespir, Diego

    2017-11-01

    Software engineering is the discipline that develops all the aspects of the production of software. Although there are guidelines about what topics to include in a software engineering curricula, it is usually unclear which are the best methods to teach them. In any science discipline the construction of a classification schema is a common approach to understand a thematic area. This study examines previous publications in software engineering education to obtain a first controlled vocabulary (a more formal definition of a classification schema) in the field. Publications from 1988 to 2014 were collected and processed using automatic clustering techniques and the outcomes were analysed manually. The result is an initial controlled vocabulary with a taxonomy form with 43 concepts that were identified as the most used in the research publications. We present the classification of the concepts in three facets: 'what to teach', 'how to teach' and 'where to teach' and the evolution of concepts over time.

  1. Student Preferences on Gaming Aspects for a Serious Game in Pharmacy Practice Education: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huan Ying; Poh, David Yan Hong; Wong, Li Lian; Yap, John Yin Gwee; Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern

    2015-05-11

    Serious games are motivating and provide a safe environment for students to learn from their mistakes without experiencing any negative consequences from their actions. However, little is known about students' gaming preferences and the types of serious games they like to play for education. This study aims to determine the types of gaming aspects that students would like to play in a pharmacy-related serious game. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered survey, which obtained students' responses on their preferences regarding various gaming aspects (reward systems, game settings, storylines, viewing perspectives, and gaming styles) and for a hypothetical gaming scenario (authentic simulation or post-apocalyptic fantasy). Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analyses. Response rate was 72.7% (497/684 undergraduates). The most popular game reward systems were unlocking mechanisms (112/497, 22.5%) and experience points (90/497, 18.1%). Most students preferred fantasy/medieval/mythic (253/497, 50.9%) and modern (117/497, 23.5%) settings, but lower year undergraduates preferred modern settings less than upper year seniors (47/236, 19.9% vs 70/242, 28.9%, P=.022). Almost one-third (147/497, 29.6%) preferred an adventurer storyline or an authentic pharmacy-related plot (119/497, 23.9%), and a collaborative game style was most preferred by the students (182/497, 36.6%). Three-dimensional game perspectives (270/497, 54.3%) were more popular than two-dimensional perspectives (221/497, 44.5%), especially among males than females (126/185, 68.1% vs 142/303, 46.9%, Pgame, a post-apocalyptic fantasy game (scenario B, 287/497, 57.7%) was more popular than an authentic simulation game (scenario A, 209/497, 42.1%). More males preferred the post-apocalyptic fantasy scenario than females (129/187, 69.0% vs 155/306, 50.7%, Pgame, based on an adventurer storyline with an unlocking mechanism reward system. A

  2. Maturity Model of Software Product with Educational Maturity Model

    OpenAIRE

    R.Manjula; J.Vaideeswaran

    2011-01-01

    Software product line engineering is an inter-disciplinary concept. It spans the dimensions of business, architecture, process,and the organization. Similarly, Education System engineering is also an inter-disciplinary concept, which spans the dimensions of academic, infrastructure, facilities, administration etc. Some of the potential benefits of this approach includecontinuous improvements in System quality and adhering to global standards. The increasing competency in IT and Educational Se...

  3. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics...

  4. Quick Prototyping of Educational Software: An Object-Oriented Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Simon C-H

    1994-01-01

    Introduces and demonstrates a quick-prototyping model for educational software development that can be used by teachers developing their own courseware using an object-oriented programming system. Development of a courseware package called "The Match-Maker" is explained as an example that uses HyperCard for quick prototyping. (Contains…

  5. Examination of the Effects of Dimensionality on Cognitive Processing in Science: A Computational Modeling Experiment Comparing Online Laboratory Simulations and Serious Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Richard L.

    2016-02-01

    Within the last 10 years, new tools for assisting in the teaching and learning of academic skills and content within the context of science have arisen. These new tools include multiple types of computer software and hardware to include (video) games. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the effect of computer learning games in the form of three-dimensional serious educational games, two-dimensional online laboratories, and traditional lecture-based instruction in the context of student content learning in science. In particular, this study examines the impact of dimensionality, or the ability to move along the X-, Y-, and Z-axis in the games. Study subjects ( N = 551) were randomly selected using a stratified sampling technique. Independent strata subsamples were developed based upon the conditions of serious educational games, online laboratories, and lecture. The study also computationally models a potential mechanism of action and compares two- and three-dimensional learning environments. F test results suggest a significant difference for the main effect of condition across the factor of content gain score with large effect. Overall, comparisons using computational models suggest that three-dimensional serious educational games increase the level of success in learning as measured with content examinations through greater recruitment and attributional retraining of cognitive systems. The study supports assertions in the literature that the use of games in higher dimensions (i.e., three-dimensional versus two-dimensional) helps to increase student understanding of science concepts.

  6. The Effect of Computer Games on Students’ Critical Thinking Disposition and Educational Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Seifi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research was to investigate the effect of computer games on student’ critical thinking disposition and educational achievement. The research method was descriptive, and its type was casual-comparative. The sample included 270 female high school students in Andimeshk town selected by multistage cluster method. Ricketts questionnaire was used to test critical thinking and the researcher made questionnaires were used to test computer games. T-test and one-way ANOVA were employed to analysis of the data. The findings of the study showed that playing computer games has no significant effect on critical thinking, however, there were a significant effect of playing computer games on students’ educational achievement (P<0/05. Furthermore, the results showed that the type of computer game has no significant effect on students’ disposition to critical thinking and their educational achievement. Keywords: Computer games, disposition to critical thinking, educational achievement, secondary students

  7. Virtual Reality Game Education to Learn Traffic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andru Deva Lukito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – Traffic accident has become number 3 of children death cause in the world according to WHO[1]. Traffic accident that involve children often caused by their own by breaking the law or regulation. Therefor education about traffic regulation and law including traffic sign and its meaning must be given to children early. Because education means process to change a person or a group attitude and behavior in order to make them mature through teaching and training [2]. One of them that can be used is digital media.  One of interactive digital media is digital game, various form of digital game start from 2D, 2.5D, 3D with many point of view and new technology. VR (Virtual Reality as new digital media where alternate reality exist to test various theory without any real consequences, according to Greenbaum “Virtual Reality is an alternate world filled with computer-generated images that respond to human movements. These simulated environments are usually visited with the aid of an expensive data suit which features stereophonic video goggles and fiber-optic data gloves”[3]. Greenbaum statement before were make VR suitable to test traffic law and regulation and educate kid to obey the traffic sign and regulation without real consequences from real world. This Journal contain the result of using virtual reality as traffic regulation education media. Education material that arranged consisting traffic sign that appear on the road and safety riding gear. Keywords – Virtual Reality, Traffic sign, Road traffic, children, education

  8. User-Centred Security Education: A Game Design to Thwart Phishing Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Arachchilage, Nalin Asanka Gamagedara

    2015-01-01

    Phishing is an online identity theft that aims to steal sensitive information such as username, password and online banking details from its victims. Phishing education needs to be considered as a means to combat this threat. This paper reports on a design and development of a mobile game prototype as an educational tool helping computer users to protect themselves against phishing attacks. The elements of a game design framework for avoiding phishing attacks were used to address the game des...

  9. 75 FR 80843 - In the Matter of Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-752] In the Matter of Certain Gaming and... the sale within the United States after importation of certain gaming and entertainment consoles...,094 (``the `094 patent''). The complaint further alleges that an industry in the United States exists...

  10. Mathematics and communication skills using educational software in math classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolis Laffita-Cuza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The current transformations conceive among others, to form in the race of Mathematics-Physics a professor who imparts indistinctly the subjects of Mathematics and Physics in the upper secondary education from the third year of this race which requires putting more emphasis in the orientation of those Subjects to achieve greater professionalism. The present paper approaches from the theoretical aspects the essential aspects in the educational process of the learning of mathematics for the Mathematics-Physics career of the university of pedagogical sciences such as mathematical communicative competences and the use of educational software, all in function of achieving A greater development of student's mathematical logical thinking.

  11. "We don't need no education": Video game preferences, video game motivations, and aggressiveness among adolescent boys of different educational ability levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nije Bijvank, Marije; Konijn, Elly A; Bushman, Brad J

    2012-02-01

    This research focuses on low educational ability as a risk factor for aggression and violent game play. We propose that boys of lower educational ability are more attracted to violent video games than other boys are, and that they are also higher in trait aggressiveness and sensation seeking. Participants were Dutch boys in public schools (N = 830, age-range 11-17). In the Netherlands, standardized tests are used to place students into lower, medium, and higher educational ability groups. Results showed that boys in the lower educational ability group preferred to play violent, stand-alone games, identified more with video game characters, and perceived video games to be more realistic than other boys did. Lower levels of education were also related to higher levels of aggressiveness and sensation seeking. Higher educational ability boys preferred social, multiplayer games. Within a risk and resilience model, boys with lower educational ability are at greater risk for aggression. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. All rights reserved.

  12. Educational interactive multimedia software: The impact of interactivity on learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamon, Derek Trent

    This dissertation discusses the design, development, deployment and testing of two versions of educational interactive multimedia software. Both versions of the software are focused on teaching mechanical engineering undergraduates about the fundamentals of direct-current (DC) motor physics and selection. The two versions of Motor Workshop software cover the same basic materials on motors, but differ in the level of interactivity between the students and the software. Here, the level of interactivity refers to the particular role of the computer in the interaction between the user and the software. In one version, the students navigate through information that is organized by topic, reading text, and viewing embedded video clips; this is referred to as "low-level interactivity" software because the computer simply presents the content. In the other version, the students are given a task to accomplish---they must design a small motor-driven 'virtual' vehicle that competes against computer-generated opponents. The interaction is guided by the software which offers advice from 'experts' and provides contextual information; we refer to this as "high-level interactivity" software because the computer is actively participating in the interaction. The software was used in two sets of experiments, where students using the low-level interactivity software served as the 'control group,' and students using the highly interactive software were the 'treatment group.' Data, including pre- and post-performance tests, questionnaire responses, learning style characterizations, activity tracking logs and videotapes were collected for analysis. Statistical and observational research methods were applied to the various data to test the hypothesis that the level of interactivity effects the learning situation, with higher levels of interactivity being more effective for learning. The results show that both the low-level and high-level interactive versions of the software were effective

  13. Software support for environmental measurement in quality at educational institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Pauliková

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysed theme of this article is based on the training of environmental measurements for workplaces. This is very important for sustainable quality in technical educational institutions. Applied kinds of software, which are taught at technical educational institutions, have to offer the professional and methodical knowledge concerning conditions of working ambient for students of selected technical specialisations. This skill is performed in such a way that the graduates, after entering the practical professional life, will be able to participate in solutions for actual problems that are related to environmental protection by means of software support. Nowadays, during the training processit is also obligatory to introduce technical science. Taking into consideration the above-mentioned facts it is possible to say that information technology support for environmental study subjects is a relevant aspect, which should be integrated into the university educational process. There is an effective progress that further highlights the focus on the quality of university education not only for environmental engineers. Actual trends require an increasing number of software/hardware educated engineers who can participate in qualitative university preparation, i.e.IT environmentalists. The Department of Environmental Engineering at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, TechnicalUniversity in Košice, Slovakia is an institution specified and intended for quality objectivisation. This institution introduced into the study programmes (“Environmental Management” and “Technology of Environmental Protection” study subjects with the software support, which are oriented towards outdoor and indoor ambient and in this way the Department of Process and Environmental Engineering is integrated effectively and intensively into the area of measurement training with regard to the requirement of quality educational processes.

  14. From Playing to Designing: Enhancing Educational Experiences with Location-Based Mobile Learning Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Roger; Smith, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents research into the benefits and implementation strategies of integrating location-based mobile learning games in higher education courses to enhance educational experiences. Two approaches were studied: learning by playing, and learning by designing. In the first, games were developed for undergraduate courses in four discipline…

  15. Application-Driven Educational Game to Assist Young Children in Learning English Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Lee, Shu-Yu

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an educational game, named My-Pet-Shop, to enhance young children's learning of English vocabulary. The educational game is underpinned by an application-driven model, which consists of three components: application scenario, subject learning, and learning regulation. An empirical study is further conducted…

  16. Educational Design for Learning Games with a focus on the teacher’s roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Meyer, Bente Tobiesen

    2010-01-01

    of the educational design of game-based learning. In the paper we shall conceptualize these texts as paratexts, following Genette’s terminology. In the paper we shall present an on-going development of an educational design concept for learning games with a focus on how teachers are and can be included in the design...

  17. Developing a Big Game for Financial Education Using Service Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myunghee; Yoon, Seonghye; Kang, Minjeng; Jang, JeeEun; Lee, Yujung

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and develop an educational game which facilitates building adolescents' knowledge and attitudes in financial principles of a daily life. To achieve this purpose, the authors designed a learner-centered big game for financial education by applying an experience-based triple-diamond instructional design model…

  18. Agent-Based Personalisation and User Modeling for Personalised Educational Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.M.; Bosch, K. van den; Meyer, J.J.C.; Neerincx, M.A

    2016-01-01

    Personalisation can increase the learning efficacy of educational games by tailoring their content to the needs of the individual learner. This paper presents the Personalised Educational Game Architecture (PEGA). It uses a multi-agent organisation and an ontology to offer learners personalised

  19. Arm Chair Activism: Serious Games Usage by INGOs for Educational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Payal; Itu, Sorina

    2012-01-01

    The battle between educators and entertainers continues when it comes to gaming. While this is so, the edutainment battleground has expanded to include actors outside formal schooling agencies, namely International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs). These actors employ digital games with the aim to educate and activate towards specific social…

  20. Game-Based Learning in Professional Development for Practicing Educators: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Tamara R.

    2016-01-01

    Many game-based learning (GBL) researchers working in K-12 educational settings have supported the incorporation of gaming technologies into classroom practice, but little has been communicated about the effect of incorporating GBL into practicing K-12 educators' professional development. This review is a critical appraisal of the quantity and…

  1. A Case Study of Educational Computer Game Design by Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo

    2016-01-01

    Only a limited number of research studies have investigated how students design educational computer games and its impact on student learning. In addition, most studies on educational game design by students were conducted in the areas of mathematics and science. Using the qualitative case study approach, this study explored how seventh graders…

  2. Playability Guidelines for Educational Video Games: A Comprehensive and Integrated Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Amer; Vela, Francisco Luis Gutiérrez; Rodríguez, Patricia Paderewski; Sánchez, José Luís González; Zea, Natalia Padilla

    2012-01-01

    Learning through play is currently an effective and attractive educational strategy. However, are all educational video games (EVG) successful and do they always keep the player motivated? Here, the authors emphasize that the success of an EVG will be more achievable if the game quality is measured, and suggest the use of playability property as a…

  3. Combining collaboration and competition with prevocational game-based math education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Vrugte, Judith; de Jong, Ton; Vandercruysse, Sylke; Wouters, Pieter; van Oostendorp, Herre; Elen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The present study addressed the effectiveness of an educational math game for improving proportional reasoning in prevocational education, and examined the added value of face-to-face collaboration and competition. The study compared four conditions: the game with collaboration, with collaboration

  4. How competition and heterogeneous collaboration interact in prevocational game-based mathematics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Vrugte, Judith; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Vandercruysse, Sylke; Wouters, Pieter; van Oostendorp, Herre; Elen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The present study addresses the effectiveness of an educational mathematics game for improving proportional reasoning in students from prevocational education. Though in theory game-based learning is promising, research shows that results are ambiguous and that we should look into ways to support

  5. Understanding Attention to Adaptive Hints in Educational Games: An Eye-Tracking Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conati, Cristina; Jaques, Natasha; Muir, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a user study that investigates the factors affecting student attention to user-adaptive hints during interaction with an educational computer game. The study focuses on Prime Climb, an educational game designed to provide individualized support for learning number factorization skills in the form of textual hints based on a…

  6. A Synthesis on Digital Games in Education: What the Research Literature Says from 2000 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert; Poling, Nathaniel; Frey, Christopher; Johnson, Margeaux

    2014-01-01

    This research reports the results of a literature synthesis conducted on digital gaming in education research literature. Seventy-three digital gaming research articles in education were identified through a systematic literature search and were coded across several relevant criteria. Our research indicates trends and patterns from empirical…

  7. The effect of traditional games and ordinary games on manipulative skills development in educable mental retarded boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamid reza Gheiji

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Manipulative skills are one of the fundamental skills subtitles which is used in most of daily and sports activities. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of traditional games and ordinary games on manipulative skills development in 8-10 years old Gorgan boys with educable mental retardation. Materials and Methods: Personal information was evaluated by the researcher made questionnaire and children's intelligence by the Wechsler test. Also, manipulative skills were assessed by the Test of Gross Motor Development- edition 2 (TGMD-2 in pre-test. Then, participants were distributed into two groups traditional games (n=15 and ordinary games (n=15 randomly. Post-test of TGMD-2 were done from two groups after 8 weeks training (3 sessions per week and 45 min for each session. Data analyzes was done by independent t-test, paired t-test and variance analysis with repeated measurement in a significant rate (α= 0.05. Results: The two groups showed significant improvements in manipulation skills, but the improvement of traditional games group was significantly more than ordinary games group in all of measured manipulating skills (throwing, catching, kicking, striking, dribbling , rolling a ball (p<0.05. Conclusion: It can be said, selected traditional games could be an appropriate program for the manipulative skills development of children.

  8. Gender-Inclusive Game-Based Learning in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Huizenga, Jantina; Heemskerk, Irma; Kuiper, Els; Volman, Monique; ten Dam, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Boys show a stronger preference for digital entertainment games than girls. For this reason, it may be that game-based learning is more acceptable to boys than to girls. Yet game-based learning might improve the performance of both boys and girls, depending upon the instructional design. In a quasi-experimental study with a secret-trail game,…

  9. The value of simulations and games for tertiary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmans, J.F.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375780718; Bakker, W.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/080095291; van Zeeland, Y.R.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314101160; van der Ree, G.; Jeuring, J.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075189771; van Mil, M.H.W.; Glas, M.A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330981447; van de Grint, E.J.M.; Bastings, M.A.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/133948676; de Smale, S.; Dictus, W.J.A.G.

    Simulations and games play an important role in how young people learn. Through simulations and games you can practice skills that are relevant for professional practice. Through simulations and games you can learn to deal with complexity and diversity. Simulations and games already play a role in

  10. Computer game in the education at primary school

    OpenAIRE

    NEČEDA, Luboš

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is focused on usage of computer game (adventure game) in teaching of chemismy (posted on internet since 2015). Game is situated to the town of České Budějovice and contains set of tests from Inorganic chemisty. This game can be used to motivate students to study chemistry on primarily schools.

  11. Game on! : Evaluation malaria games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rob Willems

    2014-01-01

    The goal of GameOn! is to develop a serious video game. The object: to develop a serious game that aims to change behavior through awareness. The setup A multidisciplinary group which unites expertise from didactic and game production backgrounds produces an educational game for an international

  12. Innovative Research on the Development of Game-based Tourism Information Services Using Component-based Software Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsin Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of studies have been conducted exploring the potential of digital tour guides, that is, multimedia components (e.g., 2D graphic, 3D models, and sound effects that can be integrated into digital storytelling with location-based services. This study uses component-based software engineering to develop the content of game-based tourism information services. The results of this study are combined with 3D VR/AR technology to implement the digital 2D/3D interactive tour guide and show all the attractions’ information on a service platform for the gamification of cultural tourism. Nine kinds of game templates have been built in the component module. Five locations have completed indoor or external 3D VR real scenes and provide online visitors with a virtual tour of the indoor or outdoor attractions. The AR interactive work has three logos. The interactive digital guide includes animated tour guides, interactive guided tours, directions and interactive guides. Based on the usage analysis of the component databases built by this study, VR game types are suited to object-oriented game templates, such as the puzzle game template and the treasure hunt game template. Background music is the database component required for each game. The icons and cue tones are the most commonly used components in 2D graphics and sound effects, but the icons are gathered in different directions to approximate the shape of the component to be consistent. This study built a vivid story of a scene tour for online visitors to enhance the interactive digital guide. However, the developer can rapidly build new digital guides by rearranging the components of the modules to shorten the development time by taking advantage of the usage frequency of various databases that have been built by this study to effectively continue to build and expand the database components. Therefore, more game-based digital tour guides can be created to make better defined high

  13. Childhood education student teachers responses to a simulation game on food security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Felicity Petersen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an account of student teachers responses to a simulation game about food scarcity and how the game served as a conversation starter about the influence of food scarcity on educational provisioning. The simulation game was utilised as part of a suite of activities during an educational excursion for first years in primary school teacher education. In this investigation data were generated via video recordings of the simulation game itself, summary notes of the key points of the discussion session during the game, and students’ learning portfolios. Analysis of the various data sets indicate that student-teachers’ engaged with the game both viscerally and cerebrally, with the game providing a powerful concrete introduction to the issues of food scarcity and unequal distribution of resources. Most student teachers were able to relate the lessons learned from the game to the classroom and educational situation. In addition, I found that the simulation game as method can assist students in their activity of learning to look at education as an equity and justice issue.

  14. A Role-Playing Game for a Software Engineering Lab: Developing a Product Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppiroli, Sara; Ciancarini, Paolo; Gabbrielli, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Software product line development refers to software engineering practices and techniques for creating families of similar software systems from a basic set of reusable components, called shared assets. Teaching how to deal with software product lines in a university lab course is a challenging task, because there are several practical issues that…

  15. Business games : Promising, knowledge oriented tool for education

    OpenAIRE

    Rossman, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Diploma thesis is focused on Business games, as an effective tool for knowledge obtaining. In theoretical part, it defines terms like : knowledge, team, system, simulation and computer modeling and their connection with business games. In practical part, it presents four well chosen games and tries to clarify how these games work and how logic are their outputs. After that, it discuss potential use of this game at Faculty of management, University of economics, Prague.

  16. Effective intervention or child's play? A review of video games for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShazo, Jonathan; Harris, Lynne; Pratt, Wanda

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to identify diabetes education video games and pilot studies in the literature, (2) to review themes in diabetes video game design and evaluation, and (3) to evaluate the potential role of educational video games in diabetes self-management education. Studies were systematically identified for inclusion from Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psychinfo, IEEE Xplore, and ACM Digital Library. Features of each video game intervention were reviewed and coded based on an existing taxonomy of diabetes interventions framework. Nine studies featuring 11 video games for diabetes care were identified. Video games for diabetes have typically targeted children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and used situation problem-solving methods to teach diet, exercise, self-monitored blood glucose, and medication adherence. Evaluations have shown positive outcomes in knowledge, disease management adherence, and clinical outcomes. Video games for diabetes education show potential as effective educational interventions. Yet we found that improvements are needed in expanding the target audience, tailoring the intervention, and using theoretical frameworks. In the future, the reach and effectiveness of educational video games for diabetes education could be improved by expanding the target audience beyond juvenile type 1 diabetes mellitus, the use of tailoring, and increased use of theoretical frameworks.

  17. The appeal of violent video games to lower educated aggressive adolescent boys from two countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Jeroen S; Bushman, Brad J; Konijn, Elly A

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effect of individual differences on appeal and use of video games. Participants were 299 adolescent boys from lower and higher secondary schools in the Netherlands and Belgium. In general, boys were most attracted to violent video games. Boys that scored higher in trait aggressiveness and lower in empathy were especially attracted to violent games and spent more time playing video games than did boys lower in trait aggressiveness. Lower educated boys showed more appreciation for both violent and nonviolent games and spent more time playing them than did higher educated boys. The present study showed that aggressive and less empathic boys were most attracted to violent games. The fact that heavy users of violent games show less empathy and higher aggressiveness suggests the possibility of desensitization. Other studies have shown that playing violent games increases aggressiveness and decreases empathy. These results combined suggest the possibility of a violence cycle. Aggressive individuals are attracted to violent games. Playing violent games increases aggressiveness and decreases empathy, which in turn leads to increased appreciation and use of violent games.

  18. Mobile Gaming and Student Interactions in a Science Center: The Future of Gaming in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood-Blaine, Dana; Huffman, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the impact of an augmented reality iPad-based mobile game, called The Great STEM Caper, on students' interaction at a science center. An open-source, location-based game platform called ARIS (i.e. Augmented Reality and Interactive Storytelling) was used to create an iPad-based mobile game. The game used QR scan codes and a…

  19. Promoting Sex Education Among Teenagers Through an Interactive Game: Reasons for Success and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Samuel Kai Wah; Kwan, Alvin C M; Reynolds, Rebecca; Mellecker, Robin R; Tam, Frankie; Lee, Grace; Hong, Athena; Leung, Ching Yin

    2015-06-01

    A game application, "Making Smart Choices", was developed to fill the gap of limited easy-to-access resources available on sex education in Hong Kong and to disseminate correct knowledge and positive attitudes toward sex to teenagers using popular platforms such as tablets, Facebook, and the Web. Three versions of the game (iPAD, Facebook, and Web-based) were developed using HTML5. A theoretical framework that involved game-based learning and participatory design approach was used to design, develop, modify, and optimize the game for use with secondary school students (n=1176) 12-16 years of age. Pre- and post-test scores of students' safer sex knowledge were compared to test the effectiveness of the game. Students' survey and interviews were analyzed to assess participant feelings and attitudes toward the game. The Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test indicated that students' sex knowledge (n=788) improved with a medium effect size (0.477) after playing the game. Increases in positive attitudes toward sex and relationship and in awareness of making smart sexual choices were reported from student surveys and interviews. Students described the game as "interesting," "interactive," "informative," and "real-to-life." We advocate that the participatory design approach, which supports collaborative efforts of different stakeholders, is an effective framework for developing game-based learning tools for sex education. Our work provides preliminary findings that suggest game-based learning, preferably delivered through popular interactive platforms, can be effective in promoting sex education to teenagers.

  20. Educational Game Development Approach to a particular case: the donor's evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borro Escribano, B; del Blanco, A; Torrente, J; Borro Mate, J M; Fernandez Manjon, B

    2015-01-01

    Serious games are a current trend nowadays. Almost every sector has used serious games in recent years for different educational purposes. The eLearning research team of the Complutense University of Madrid main focus of research is the development of low-cost serious games. During the past 10 years, we have been working with and developing serious games, paying special attention to those related to healthcare. From all these studies, a methodology was defined-the Educational Game Development Approach (EGDA)-to design, develop, and evaluate game-like simulations or serious games in healthcare. We present the application of the EGDA to a particular case, the development of a serious game representing the donor's evaluation in an intensive care unit from the point of view of a hospital coordinator following the EGDA methodology. In this simulation, we changed the strategy of selection of teaching cases by exponentially increasing the number of teaching cases. This kind of educational content provides several benefits to students as they learn while playing; they receive immediate feedback of mistakes and correct moves and an objective assessment. These simulations allow the students to practice in a risk-free environment. Moreover, the addition of game elements increases engagement and promotes the retention of important information. A game-like simulation has been developed through the use of this methodology. This simulation represents a complex medical procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Designing an Orthotic Insole by Using Kinect® XBOX Gaming Sensor Scanner and Computer Aided Engineering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Burhan, Mohd; Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Yarwindran, Mogan; Ibrahim, Mustaffa; Fahrul Hassan, Mohd; Azwir Azlan, Mohd; Turan, Faiz Mohd; Johan, Kartina

    2017-08-01

    Healthcare and medical is one of the most expensive field in the modern world. In order to fulfil medical requirement, this study aimed to design an orthotic insole by using Kinect Xbox Gaming Sensor Scanner and CAE softwares. The accuracy of the Kinect® XBOX 360 gaming sensor is capable of producing 3D reconstructed geometry with the maximum and minimum error of 3.78% (2.78mm) and 1.74% (0.46mm) respectively. The orthotic insole design process had been done by using Autodesk Meshmixer 2.6 and Solidworks 2014 software. Functionality of the orthotic insole designed was capable of reducing foot pressure especially in the metatarsal area. Overall, the proposed method was proved to be highly potential in the design of the insole where it promises low cost, less time consuming, and efficiency in regards that the Kinect® XBOX 360 device promised low price compared to other digital 3D scanner since the software needed to run the device can be downloaded for free.

  2. Serious Games as New Educational Tools: How Effective Are They? A Meta-Analysis of Recent Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, C.; Ecalle, J.; Magnan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-assisted learning is known to be an effective tool for improving learning in both adults and children. Recent years have seen the emergence of the so-called "serious games (SGs)" that are flooding the educational games market. In this paper, the term "serious games" is used to refer to video games (VGs) intended to serve a useful purpose.…

  3. Profiling Academic Research on Massively Multiplayer On-line Role-Play Gaming (MMORPG 2000-2009: Horizons for Educational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Castañeda Peña

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Whilst there exists a large body of publications around Massively Multiplayer On-line Role-Play Gaming (MMORPG, there is little profiling academic research on this type of game. This study aims at unveiling what, when, where and who constitute scholarly work in research about MMORPG. A 777-register dataset was configured with primary documents taken from 16 databases and two web-portals. The dataset was drilled down using specialized text-mining software. Findings revealed four main research interests that comprise the games themselves, gaming experiences, systems architecture and educational MMORPG. It was also found that research on this topic started out in 2002 and some milestones of emerging research were charted out. The most prolific organizations and authors were also identified in which the USA, Canada and Italy occupy outstanding places. It is recommended that research profiling studies be carried out to extend more informed literature reviews and support further research questions.

  4. Developing the Serious Games potential in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit dit Dariel, Odessa J; Raby, Thibaud; Ravaut, Frédéric; Rothan-Tondeur, Monique

    2013-12-01

    Shortened hospital stays, high patient acuity and technological advances demand that nurses increasingly make decisions under conditions of uncertainty and risk (Ebright et al., 2003). With rising trends towards out-patient care, nurses will need to perform complex problem-solving within a dynamic and changing environment for which there is not one clear solution (Schofield et al., 2010; Wolff et al., 2009). The development of sharp clinical reasoning skills, as well as skills in detection, monitoring, investigation and evaluation are therefore essential (Aitken et al., 2002). Yet few nursing students have long-term exposure to home-care and community situations. This is primarily due to scarce human resources and the time-consuming requirements of student supervision (Duque et al., 2008). When students are given the opportunity to experience home-care or community visits these tend to be unstructured leading to wide variations in their competencies. New pedagogical tools are needed to adequately and consistently prepare nurses for the skills they will need to care for patients outside acute care settings. Advances in Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) offer an opportunity to explore innovative pedagogical solutions that could help students develop these skills in a safe environment. A three-phased project is underway that aims to create and test a Serious Game to improve nurses' clinical reasoning and detection skills in home-care and community settings. The first phase of this project involves the development of a scenario, the game engine and the graphic design and will be the focus of this paper. The second and third phases will test the Serious Game as an educational intervention and will be reported in subsequent papers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SIMULATIONS AND GAMES IN MANAGEMENT EDUCATION: TOWARDS A MULTI-DIMENSIONAL EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Paulo Sequeira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Games and simulations have been used in the field of education for many years, particularly in the areas of business, training staff in financial and economic skills, combat training and war gaming. Internet-based games are also commonly used in the areas of education, business and policy to provide a safe but realistic experience of the real world. This paper explores some of the rationale that a team of lecturers at the Lisbon School of Accounting and Administration (ISCAL think should underpin simulation and game usage in an educational context, specifically in management education. Our aim with this work is about promoting learning and knowledge building through one of the latest evolved socio-cultural artifact: online simulations and games.

  6. Earthquake: Game-based learning for 21st century STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Abigail Christine

    To play is to learn. A lack of empirical research within game-based learning literature, however, has hindered educational stakeholders to make informed decisions about game-based learning for 21st century STEM education. In this study, I modified a research and development (R&D) process to create a collaborative-competitive educational board game illuminating elements of earthquake engineering. I oriented instruction- and game-design principles around 21st century science education to adapt the R&D process to develop the educational game, Earthquake. As part of the R&D, I evaluated Earthquake for empirical evidence to support the claim that game-play results in student gains in critical thinking, scientific argumentation, metacognitive abilities, and earthquake engineering content knowledge. I developed Earthquake with the aid of eight focus groups with varying levels of expertise in science education research, teaching, administration, and game-design. After developing a functional prototype, I pilot-tested Earthquake with teacher-participants (n=14) who engaged in semi-structured interviews after their game-play. I analyzed teacher interviews with constant comparison methodology. I used teachers' comments and feedback from content knowledge experts to integrate game modifications, implementing results to improve Earthquake. I added player roles, simplified phrasing on cards, and produced an introductory video. I then administered the modified Earthquake game to two groups of high school student-participants (n = 6), who played twice. To seek evidence documenting support for my knowledge claim, I analyzed videotapes of students' game-play using a game-based learning checklist. My assessment of learning gains revealed increases in all categories of students' performance: critical thinking, metacognition, scientific argumentation, and earthquake engineering content knowledge acquisition. Players in both student-groups improved mostly in critical thinking, having

  7. An Educational Application of Online Games for Learning Difficulties

    OpenAIRE

    M. Margoudi; Z. Smyrnaiou

    2015-01-01

    The current paper presents the results of a conducted case study. During the past few years the number of children diagnosed with Learning Difficulties has drastically augmented and especially the cases of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). One of the core characteristics of ADHD is a deficit in working memory functions. The review of the literature indicates a plethora of educational software that aim at training and enhancing the working memory. Neverthele...

  8. Clashing and Emerging Genres: The interplay of knowledge forms in educational gaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorkhild Hanghøj

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Based upon a series of design interventions with the educational computer game series Global Conflicts at various secondary schools, this article explores how educational gaming can be understood as a complex interplay between four knowledge forms – i.e. students’ everyday knowledge (non-specialised knowledge, the institutionalised knowledge forms of schooling, teachers’ subject-specific knowledge (specialised knowledge forms, and game-specific knowledge forms such as professional journalism, which is one of the inspirations for the game scenario. Depending on how the GC series was enacted by different teachers and students, these knowledge forms were brought into play rather differently. More specifically, several students experienced genre clashes in relation to their expectations of what it means to play a computer game, whereas other students experienced emerging genres – e.g. when one student was able to transform the game experience into a journalistic article that challenged her classmates’ understanding of journalistic writing.

  9. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  10. Information technologies and software packages for education of specialists in materials science [In Russian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzhizhanovskaya, V.; Ryaboshuk, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents methodological materials, interactive text-books and software packages developed and extensively used for education of specialists in materials science. These virtual laboratories for education and research are equipped with tutorials and software environment for modeling complex

  11. Relationship between Designing Computer-based Educational Games, and Learning Motivation among Elementary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jamebozorg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motivation is an important factor in learning. Educational games increase the learning motivation and understanding of students by creating a sense of joy, satisfaction and involvement. However, it is necessary to incorporate learning elements into the games, differently. In this study, the researcher tried to provide a model for designing educational games and determining its relationship with learning motivation. Materials and Methods:  Components of the model for designing educational games were first determined qualitatively. Then, the relationship between the educational games designed and students' learning motivation was determined. A self-made questionnaire, with elements of educational game designing along with another questionnaire was used to determine the learning motivation. The obtained data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and independent t-test. Results: The model, with 4 main components and 26 sub-components, was designed. That set of various elements, including: the rules, objectives, tools, results and feedbacks, accidents, challenges and interactions displayed in the context of the game, along with instructional design component such as analysis, design, development, utilization and evaluation were used. After implementation of the pattern and designing the "States of Matter" lesson in the science book for the third graders, the results showed that there is a significant correlation between the use of designed educational game and components of the students’ learning motivation (r= 0.85 and P=0.01. Conclusion: According to this study given the relationship between the use of educational games and motivation to learn, it can be concluded that the educational games designed according to scientific principles could lead to the improved students’ motivation and learning.

  12. Use of educational games in the health professions: a mixed-methods study of educators' perspectives in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Gillian; Skirton, Heather; Cooper, Simon; Allum, Peter; Nelmes, Pam

    2010-03-01

    Educational games have been shown to be effective in supporting learning, especially to reinforce knowledge, and students are generally positive about the use of games. The aim of this mixed-methods study that was conducted in the UK was to explore educators' views towards the use of educational games in the health sciences. The data were collected via semistructured interviews with 13 health educators and an online survey that was completed by 97 health educators. Three factors influence the use of classroom games: reflective practice, the impact of games on students, and the impact of logistical factors. Educators assess their own performance and the impact of the games on students when planning their use; however, large classes and the need for preparation time have a negative impact on educators' willingness to use games. Similar constraints might restrict the use of active learning strategies, such as simulation, that are crucial for enabling health professionals to develop competence. These issues require consideration when planning educational methods.

  13. The Study on the Effect of Educational Games for the Development of Students’ Logic-Mathematics of Multiple Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Sujuan; Ma, Linqing

    Firstly, in this article, we expound the theory of the educational games and multiple intelligence and analyze the relationship between them. Then, further, we elaborate educational games' effect on the development of students' multiple intelligence, taking logic-mathematics intelligence for example. Also, we discuss the strategies of using educational games to improve students' intelligence. In a word, we can use the computer games to develop the students' multi-intelligence.

  14. The RAGE Software Asset Model and Metadata Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiev, Atanas; Grigorov, Alexander; Bontchev, Boyan; Boytchev, Pavel; Stefanov, Krassen; Bahreini, Kiavash; Nyamsuren, Enkhbold; Van der Vegt, Wim; Westera, Wim; Prada, Rui; Hollins, Paul; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Software assets are key output of the RAGE project and they can be used by applied game developers to enhance the pedagogical and educational value of their games. These software assets cover a broad spectrum of functionalities – from player analytics including emotion detection to intelligent

  15. Free and controlled game and activities in pre-school education in terms of teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Kázmerová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with free and controlled play activities in preschool education in terms of teachers. It focuses primarily on the game preschool children playing children spend most of their time is their most important activities for the advancement of their entire personality. The theoretical part is focused on defining the concept of game play and substance of the relationship and the importance of play of preschool children. It is focused on free and controlled the game and activities, ...

  16. Using video games to combine learning and assessment in mathematics education

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Juha Mikael Kiili; Keith Devlin; Arttu Perttula; Pauliina Tuomi; Antero Lindstedt

    2015-01-01

    One problem with most education systems is that learning and (summative) assessment are generally treated as quite separate things in schools. We argue that video games can provide an opportunity to combine these processes in an engaging and effective way. The present study focuses on investigating the effectiveness and the assessment power of two different mathematics video games, Semideus and Wuzzit Trouble. In the current study, we validated the Semideus game as a rational number test inst...

  17. Use of Games in Education: GeoGuessr in Geography Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Almost all of the studies which are about the learning effects of the games emphasize as if, they have all agreed on all hands that the games contribute to the child's spiritual and educational development. No matter at which age group it is, to claim that game derived gains couldn't be gained by no other way, wouldn't be exaggeration indeed. The…

  18. Game-based online antenatal breastfeeding education: A pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassley, Jane S; Connor, Kelley C; Bond, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Healthy Moms intervention on antenatal breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention and to determine the feasibility of using an online game-based learning platform to deliver antenatal breastfeeding education. The Internet has potential for improving breastfeeding rates through improving women's access to antenatal breastfeeding education. Twelve computer-based breastfeeding education modules were developed using an online learning platform. Changes in participants' breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention pre- and post-intervention were measured using descriptive statistics and a one-way ANOVA. Of the 25 women submitting the pretest, four completed zero quests; seven, orientation only; eight, one to six breastfeeding quests; and six, 10 to 12 breastfeeding quests. No significant differences in breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention were found among the groups. Online antenatal breastfeeding education is feasible; however, further research is warranted to determine if it can affect breastfeeding outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. THE GAME - A REAL CHANCE OF MODERN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Velickovic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper is to show the need and the potential play activities in the elementary grades so that children quickly and easily overcome fitness problems in the transition from pre-school to the school system of education, and to at least partially alleviate the existing problem discontinuity.The sudden transition from the system playing activities in the system of learning activities, based on the implementation of tasks under strict guidelines, can hardly match the current developmental abilities and needs of children. Therefore, various problems occur in the work of champions: it is difficult to attract his attention, he finds it difficult to work and school homework, forgets what he just heard, does not concentrate long enough, soon he gets bored in class activities, fidget, real careless mistakes, constantly repeating the same mistakes.At the very beginning of their education, which in some ways represents a transitional period, a part of learning activities should be organized through the game, in order to overcome resistance to school.To make it faster and easier to overcome adaptive problems of children in the school environment and learning today in educational theory and practice, trying to find a solution for the organization of educational and play activities in the learning process, at least when it comes to the junior grade.

  20. Educational software reflecting two philosophical approaches to ethics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Collis

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethics education can vary considerably in its instructional strategies based on differences in the theoretical positions underlying the approach to moral development being stressed. Two such approaches are the 'justice' approach as exemplified by Kohlberg's six stages of moral development, and the 'care ethic' approach as exemplified by Gilligan's work on empathy as a base for moral decision-making. Each of these approaches can be demonstrated through different instructional strategies in the ethics education course, but each strategy is often difficult to execute in practice, given time and resource constraints.

  1. Educational software reflecting two philosophical approaches to ethics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, marike; Collis, Betty

    1994-01-01

    Ethics education can vary considerably in its instructional strategies based on differences in the theoretical positions underlying the approach to moral development being stressed. Two such approaches are the 'justice' approach as exemplified by Kohlberg's six stages of moral development, and the

  2. Educational Gaming for Pharmacy Students - Design and Evaluation of a Diabetes-themed Escape Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eukel, Heidi N; Frenzel, Jeanne E; Cernusca, Dan

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To design an educational game that will increase third-year professional pharmacy students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and to evaluate their perceived value of the game. Methods. Faculty members created an innovative educational game, the diabetes escape room. An authentic escape room gaming environment was established through the use of a locked room, an escape time limit, and game rules within which student teams completed complex puzzles focused on diabetes disease management. To evaluate the impact, students completed a pre-test and post-test to measure the knowledge they've gained and a perception survey to identify moderating factors that could help instructors improve the game's effectiveness and utility. Results. Students showed statistically significant increases in knowledge after completion of the game. A one-sample t -test indicated that students' mean perception was statistically significantly higher than the mean value of the evaluation scale. This statically significant result proved that this gaming act offers a potential instructional benefit beyond its novelty. Conclusion. The diabetes escape room proved to be a valuable educational game that increased students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and showed a positive perceived overall value by student participants.

  3. Experiential Learning in Vehicle Dynamics Education via Motion Simulation and Interactive Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Kevin; Kasprzak, Edward; English, Ken; Moore-Russo, Deborah; Lewis, Kemper

    2009-01-01

    Creating active, student-centered learning situations in postsecondary education is an ongoing challenge for engineering educators. Contemporary students familiar with visually engaging and fast-paced games can find traditional classroom methods of lecture and guided laboratory experiments limiting. This paper presents a methodology that incorporates driving simulation, motion simulation, and educational practices into an engaging, gaming-inspired simulation framework for a vehicle dynamics c...

  4. Inclusive Education: Mobile Serious Games for People with Cognitive Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Angel Jaramillo-Alcázar; Sergio Luján-Mora; Luis Salvador-Ullauri

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of mobile devices is increasingly frequent. In many occasions they are used as a means of entertainment for people through video games. Serious games is a category of video games used as teaching methods in different environments. They use fun as a strategy for the learning process. However, the vast majority do not focus on vulnerable groups such as people with cognitive disabilities, because they do not consider accessibility parameters in their design. Some video games de...

  5. Gender-inclusive game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Huizenga, J.; Heemskerk, I.; Kuiper, E.; Volman, M.; ten Dam, G.

    2014-01-01

    Boys show a stronger preference for digital entertainment games than girls. For this reason, it may be that game-based learning is more acceptable to boys than to girls. Yet game-based learning might improve the performance of both boys and girls, depending upon the instructional design. In a

  6. A Climate Change Board Game for Interdisciplinary Communication and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenack, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    This article reports and reflects on the design and use of the board game KEEP COOL on climate change. The game covers and integrates central biophysical, economic, and political aspects of the issue. By using a board game as common language between students and scientists from different scientific cultures, knowledge of different disciplines can…

  7. A Study of Supplementing Conventional Business Education with Digital Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellahi, Abida; Zaka, Bilal; Sultan, Fahd

    2017-01-01

    This paper documents how the adoption of digital games by academia reshapes the current worldview by bringing the potential answers for all learning issues. The central objective of this study is to investigate the extent to which digital games can impact learning effectiveness, and to what extent these games can be used as supplementary elements…

  8. An overview of game-based learning in building services engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanne, Kari

    2016-03-01

    To ensure proper competence development and short graduation times for engineering students, it is essential that the study motivation is encouraged by new learning methods. In game-based learning, the learner's engagement is increased and learning is made meaningful by applying game-like features such as competition and rewarding through virtual promotions or achievement badges. In this paper, the state of the art of game-based learning in building services engineering education at university level is reviewed and discussed. A systematic literature review indicates that educational games have been reported in the field of related disciplines, such as mechanical and civil engineering. The development of system-level educational games that realistically simulate work life in building services engineering is still in its infancy. Novel rewarding practices and more comprehensive approaches entailing the state-of-the-art information tools such as building information modelling, geographic information systems, building management systems and augmented reality are needed in the future.

  9. Examining the Effects of Combining Self-Explanation Principles with an Educational Game on Learning Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Yuan; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Educational researchers have indicated that although computer games have the potential to promote students' motivation and engagement, the work on how to design effective games that fulfil educational purposes is still in its infancy. This study aimed to examine how integration of self-explanation into a computer game affected primary schoolers'…

  10. Using a Fine-Grained Multiple-Choice Response Format in Educational Drill-and-Practice Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beserra, Vagner; Nussbaum, Miguel; Grass, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    When using educational video games, particularly drill-and-practice video games, there are several ways of providing an answer to a quiz. The majority of paper-based options can be classified as being either multiple-choice or constructed-response. Therefore, in the process of creating an educational drill-and-practice video game, one fundamental…

  11. Using Out-of-Character Reasoning to Combine Storytelling and Education in a Serious Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, Johannes Maria; Theune, Mariet; Bocconi, Stefano; Klamma, Ralf; Bachvarova, Y.S.

    To reconcile storytelling and educational meta-goals in the context of a serious game, we propose to make use of out-of-character reasoning in virtual agents. We will implement these agents in a serious game of our design, which will focus on social interaction in conflict scenarios with the

  12. Arm chair activism: Serious games usage by INGOs for educational change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Arora (Payal); S. Itu

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe battle between educators and entertainers continue when it comes to gaming. While this is so, the edutainment battleground has expanded to include actors outside formal schooling agencies, namely International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs). These actors employ digital games

  13. Development of Game-Like Simulations for Procedural Knowledge in Healthcare Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Javier; Borro-Escribano, Blanca; Freire, Manuel; del Blanco, Ángel; Marchiori, Eugenio J.; Martinez-Ortiz, Iván; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Fernández-Manjón, Baltasar

    2014-01-01

    We present EGDA, an educational game development approach focused on the teaching of procedural knowledge using a cost-effective approach. EGDA proposes four tasks: analysis, design, implementation, and quality assurance that are subdivided in a total of 12 subtasks. One of the benefits of EGDA is that anyone can apply it to develop a game since…

  14. Co-Evolution of Mobile Language Learning: Going Global with Games Consoles in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, Akiko; Narumi-Munro, Fumiko; Alexander, Wilma; Parker, Helen; Yamauchi, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Game consoles have been adopted as a learning platform in school education. However, there is a scarcity of studies examining the utility of games consoles with built-in WiFi as affordable learning platforms in universities. This paper contributes to knowledge about the capacity of the Nintendo DSi to create new learning spaces mediated and…

  15. Use of a simulation game for HIV/AIDS education with pre-service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of a simulation game for HIV/AIDS education with pre-service teachers. ... the data were collected over a three-year period by way of video recordings of the simulation game, recordings of large and small ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  16. A Dataset for Education-Related Majors' Performance Measures with Pre/Post-Video Game Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Elena; Tassell, Janet Lynne

    2015-01-01

    This dataset includes a series of 30 education-related majors' performance measures before and after they completed a 10-hour video game practice in a computer lab. The goal of the experimental study was to examine the effects of action video gaming on students' mathematics performance and mathematics anxiety as mediated by the effect of attention…

  17. Visual Perspectives within Educational Computer Games: Effects on Presence and Flow within Virtual Immersive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoresby, Jon; Shelton, Brett E.

    2011-01-01

    The mis-categorizing of cognitive states involved in learning within virtual environments has complicated instructional technology research. Further, most educational computer game research does not account for how learning activity is influenced by factors of game content and differences in viewing perspectives. This study is a qualitative…

  18. Using Educational Computer Games in the Classroom: Science Teachers' Experiences, Attitudes, Perceptions, Concerns, and Support Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo; Haynes, Linda; D'Alba, Adriana; Chumney, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers' experiences, attitudes, perceptions, concerns, and support needs related to the use of educational computer games were investigated in this study. Data were collected from an online survey, which was completed by 111 science teachers. The results showed that 73% of participants had used computer games in teaching. Participants…

  19. An Overview and Study on the Use of Games, Simulations, and Gamification in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Bradley E.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the use of both game-based learning (GBL) and gamification in tertiary education. This study focuses specifically on the use of games and/or simulations as well as familiarity with gamification strategies by communication faculty. Research questions concentrate on the rate, frequency, and usage of digital and non-digital…

  20. Identifying Common Mathematical Misconceptions from Actions in Educational Video Games. CRESST Report 838

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Educational video games provide an opportunity for students to interact with and explore complex representations of academic content and allow for the examination of problem-solving strategies and mistakes that can be difficult to capture in more traditional environments. However, data from such games are notoriously difficult to analyze. This…

  1. An Examination of Digital Game-Based Situated Learning Applied to Chinese Language Poetry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Ren; Lin, You-Shiuan

    2016-01-01

    By gradually placing more importance on game-based education and changing learning motivation by applying game-playing characteristics, students' learning experiences can be enhanced and a better learning effect can be achieved. When teaching the content of Chinese poetry in Taiwanese junior high schools, most teachers only explain the meaning of…

  2. The Importance and Use of Targeted Content Knowledge with Scaffolding Aid in Educational Simulation Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Kinzer, Charles; Hung, Kuo-Hsun; Chen, Cheng-Ling Alice; Hsu, I-Ying

    2013-01-01

    While most current educational simulation games provide learners with gameplay experience to motivate learning, there is often a lack of focus on ensuring that the desired content knowledge is actually learned. Students may focus on completing game activities without learning the targeted content knowledge, thus negating the desired learning…

  3. Learning in a Game-Based Virtual Environment: A Comparative Evaluation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Igor; Warmelink, Harald; Bekebrede, Geertje

    2013-01-01

    The authors define the requirements and a conceptual model for comparative evaluation research of simulation games and serious games (SGs) in a learning context. A first operationalisation of the model was used to comparatively evaluate a suite of 14 SGs on varying topics played between 2004 and 2009 in 13 institutes of higher education in the…

  4. Reviewing the Need for Gaming in Education to Accommodate the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekebrede, G.; Warmelink, H. J. G.; Mayer, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of simulations and games in Dutch higher education. This development is based on the perception that students belong to the "gamer generation" or "net generation": a generation that has grown up with computer games and other technology affecting their preferred learning styles, social…

  5. A Framework for Structuring Learning Assessment in a Online Educational Game: Experiment Centered Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Shawn; Clarke-Midura, Jody; Klopfer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Educational games offer an opportunity to engage and inspire students to take interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) subjects. Unobtrusive learning assessment techniques coupled with machine learning algorithms can be utilized to record students' in-game actions and formulate a model of the students' knowledge…

  6. Using Educational Design Research Methods to Examine the Affordances of Online Games for Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrasidas, Charalambos; Solomou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the affordances and opportunities from using online games in teacher professional development. Following an educational design research approach, we developed an environment to provide opportunities for in-service teachers to engage in-game-based activities. Our work presented in this manuscript was of…

  7. Effects of Mathematics Computer Games on Special Education Students' Multiplicative Reasoning Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Marjoke; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a teacher-delivered intervention with online mathematics mini-games on special education students' multiplicative reasoning ability (multiplication and division). The games involved declarative, procedural, as well as conceptual knowledge of multiplicative relations, and were accompanied with teacher-led lessons…

  8. Effects of mathematics computer games on special education students’ multiplicative reasoning ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355337770; Van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069266255; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a teacher-delivered intervention with online math-ematics mini-games on special education students’ multiplicative reasoning ability(multiplication and division). The games involved declarative, procedural, as well asconceptual knowledge of multiplicative

  9. Inferring a Learner's Cognitive, Motivational and Emotional State in a Digital Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedek, Michael; Seitlinger, Paul; Kopeinik, Simone; Albert, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Digital educational games (DEGs) possess the potential of providing an appealing and intrinsically motivating learning context. Usually this potential is either taken for granted or examined through questionnaires or interviews in the course of evaluation studies. However, an "adaptive" game would increase the probability of a DEG being…

  10. The Research on Chinese Idioms Educational Games in TCFL Based on Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiao-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, overseas set off a craze for learning Chinese. Chinese Idioms teaching is important but difficult for foreigners in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language (TCFL. The VR educational game should be a good choice to solve the problem with education, entertainment, and high immerse. In this study, Yu Gong moves the mountain' is designed as an example. Unity 3D is the main development tool, Leap Motion is interactive way, and also doing an interview with some findings and conclusions. Comparison of textbooks or teachers explaining, VR Chinese Idioms educational game can enhance most of the learners understanding with intense interest. However, the educational game should be integrated into more entertainment and it costs at least 10 minutes or more to adapt the operation of Leap Motion. In the further research, the VR Chinese Idioms educational games for the TCFL can be better gradually based on this research.

  11. Gaming

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Als Richard Duke sein Buch ""Gaming: The Future's Language"" 1974 veröffentlichte, war er ein Pionier für die Entwicklung und Anwendung von Planspielen in Politik, Strategieentwicklung und Management. Das Buch wurde zu einem viel zitierten Standardwerk. 2014 feiert die von Richard D. Duke gegründete International Simulation and Gaming Association (ISAGA) ihr 45-jähriges Bestehen. Gleichzeitig legt Richard D. Duke eine überarbeitete Auflage seines Klassikers vor.   Inhaltsverzeichnis TABLE OF CONTENTSAcknowledgments Preface SECTION I1. The ProblemSECTION II2. Modes of Human Communication3. Mode

  12. Traditional/popular games as contents of body culture in school physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvester Franchi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the popular/traditional games are being practiced little by children, as much at the school as in the moments of leisure. The games reported in research questionnaires were worked during 14 classes, having how objective to reflect on the experience of popular/traditional games in the classes taught in the Scholarship Institutional Program of Initiation to the Teaching. The greatest difficulties found were with kind facing the practice, that even not surpassed in some times, not pulled out the importance of games rescue, showing that these can and should be part of the daily life of the school physical education.

  13. The Gotong Royong Run: An Educational Game to Build the Spirit of Togetherness among Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyadi Guntur Waseso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The spirit of togetherness and cooperation seems to be declining among some of Indonesian communities. The Independence Day celebration can be used as a momentum to strengthen the spirit through various competitions for children. Traditional games which are commonly played for competitions can potentially be developed into educational games. The Gotong Royong Run presented here has been developed and modified from a traditional game called Lari Me-mindahkan Bendera (Flag-moving Race. The game is intended for pre-school and elementary school children to train skills of working cooperatively

  14. The Motivation Scale for the Game (EMJ: Study of the use of the game in educational contexts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz, Carla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though games have been studied and described from multiple perspectives, highlighting their importance in human development, their use in education seems to be largely restricted to preschool education. In this sense, teacher motivation for the integration of new methodologies (including games seems to be relevant when studying change and improvement in education. The aim of this paper is to present a scale that can help to study motivation for the use of the game. We report its psychometric characteristics. The Motivation Scale for the Game (EMJ, by its acronym in Spanish has been built from Eccles and Wigfield’s Expectancy & Value Model (2002. The EMJ scale asses perception of competence to implement playful activities/elements in instructional design (expectation and the value assigned to the 4 components of task value (utility, importance, interest and cost. The structure of the instrument, its theoretical foundations and its factorial structure and reliability are reported from a Chilean teachers simple. The results shows psychometric characteristics that make EMJ a solid, reliable and valid instrument that can provide clues for motivational intervention in the school setting.

  15. Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, R.; Budd, G.; Ross, E.; Wells, P.

    2010-07-15

    The software section of this journal presented new software programs that have been developed to help in the exploration and development of hydrocarbon resources. Software provider IHS Inc. has made additions to its geological and engineering analysis software tool, IHS PETRA, a product used by geoscientists and engineers to visualize, analyze and manage well production, well log, drilling, reservoir, seismic and other related information. IHS PETRA also includes a directional well module and a decline curve analysis module to improve analysis capabilities in unconventional reservoirs. Petris Technology Inc. has developed a software to help manage the large volumes of data. PetrisWinds Enterprise (PWE) helps users find and manage wellbore data, including conventional wireline and MWD core data; analysis core photos and images; waveforms and NMR; and external files documentation. Ottawa-based Ambercore Software Inc. has been collaborating with Nexen on the Petroleum iQ software for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) producers. Petroleum iQ integrates geology and geophysics data with engineering data in 3D and 4D. Calgary-based Envirosoft Corporation has developed a software that reduces the costly and time-consuming effort required to comply with Directive 39 of the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board. The product includes an emissions modelling software. Houston-based Seismic Micro-Technology (SMT) has developed the Kingdom software that features the latest in seismic interpretation. Holland-based Joa Oil and Gas and Calgary-based Computer Modelling Group have both supplied the petroleum industry with advanced reservoir simulation software that enables reservoir interpretation. The 2010 software survey included a guide to new software applications designed to facilitate petroleum exploration, drilling and production activities. Oil and gas producers can use the products for a range of functions, including reservoir characterization and accounting. In

  16. Digital Game-Based Language Learning in Foreign Language Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus ALYAZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available New technologies including digital game-based language learning have increasingly received attention. However, their implementation is far from expected and desired levels due to technical, instructional, financial and sociological barriers. Previous studies suggest that there is a strong need to establish courses in order to support adaptation of game-based learning pedagogy through helping teachers experience digital games themselves before they are expected to use them in teaching. This study was conducted to investigate educational digital games in foreign language teaching, to identify the determining reasons behind the pittfalls in applications and to explore the contribution of a serious game to the development of professional language skills of pre-service teachers. Pre- and post-tests were applied to measure the contribution of the game to the development of their language skills. In addition, a game diary and semi-structured interviews were used to elicit information about the problems pre-service teachers had and their perceptions on the whole process. The analysis of the data illustrated that there was great improvement in pre-service teachers’ professional language skills and attitudes towards using these games while teaching in the future. This is important in foreign language teacher education in terms of enhancing digital game-based language learning pedagogy for teachers.

  17. Possibilities and importance of using computer games and simulations in educational process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses if it is possible and appropriate to use simulations (simulation games and traditional games in the process of education. It is stressed that the terms "game" and "simulation" can and should be taken in a broader sense, although they are chiefly investigated herein as video-computer games and simulations. Any activity combining the properties of game (competition, rules, players and the properties of simulation (i.e. operational presentation of reality should be understood as simulation games, where role-play constitutes their essence and basis. In those games the student assumes a new identity, identifies himself with another personality and responds similarly. Game rules are basic and most important conditions for its existence, accomplishment and goal achievement. Games and simulations make possible for a student to acquire experience and practice i.e. to do exercises in nearly similar or identical life situations, to develop cognitive and psycho-motor abilities and skills, to acquire knowledge, to develop, create and change attitudes and value criteria, and to develop perception of other people’s feelings and attitudes. It is obligatory for the teacher to conduct preparations to use and apply simulation games in the process of teaching.

  18. Educational Software Applied in Teaching Electrocardiogram: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. I. Pontes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The electrocardiogram (ECG is the most used diagnostic tool in medicine; in this sense, it is essential that medical undergraduates learn how to interpret it correctly while they are still on training. Naturally, they go through classic learning (e.g., lectures and speeches. However, they are not often efficiently trained in analyzing ECG results. In this regard, methodologies such as other educational support tools in medical practice, such as educational software, should be considered a valuable approach for medical training purposes. Methods. We performed a literature review in six electronic databases, considering studies published before April 2017. The resulting set comprises 2,467 studies. From this collection, 12 studies have been selected, initially, whereby we carried out a snowballing process to identify other relevant studies through the reference lists of these studies, resulting in five relevant studies, making up a total of 17 articles that passed all stages and criteria. Results. The results show that 52.9% of software types were tutorial and 58.8% were designed to be run locally on a computer. The subjects were discussed together with a greater focus on the teaching of electrophysiology and/or cardiac physiology, identifying patterns of ECG and/or arrhythmias. Conclusions. We found positive results with the introduction of educational software for ECG teaching. However, there is a clear need for using higher quality research methodologies and the inclusion of appropriate controls, in order to obtain more precise conclusions about how beneficial the inclusion of such tools can be for the practices of ECG interpretation.

  19. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about

  20. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly

  1. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-06-24

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new

  2. GAME OF PAPERS OR PROTAGONIZED GAME IN THE ORGANIZATION OF EDUCATION IN CHILDREN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Duarte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches issues about stages of mental development based on the work of Daniil El’konin and the theoretical methodological foundations of historical cultural psychology in L. S. Vygotsky and A. N. Leont’ev. It is analyzed the mental development as part of the development of personality in the context of childhood school education from the perspective of historical critical pedagogy of Dermeval Saviani.

  3. Using Educational Games for Sign Language Learning--A SignWriting Learning Game: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Yosra; Khenissi, Mohamed Ali; Essalmi, Fathi; Jemni, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Apart from being used as a means of entertainment, computer games have been adopted for a long time as a valuable tool for learning. Computer games can offer many learning benefits to students since they can consume their attention and increase their motivation and engagement which can then lead to stimulate learning. However, most of the research…

  4. Using Video Game-Based Instruction in an EFL Program: Understanding the Power of Video Games in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis Guerrero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This small-scale action-research study examines the perceptions of four students in a military academy in Colombia undergoing the processof using a mainstream video game in their EFL classes instead of classic forms of instruction. The video game used served to approach EFL by means of language exploratory activities designed according to the context present in the video game and the course linguistic objectives. This study was conducted on the grounds that computer technology offers the possibility of enhancing EFL instruction by means of simulating and augmenting the target language context. The researcher’s belief is that video games offer a learning environment closely related to students’ experiences and preferences. Results from this study suggest that students were more entertained and attentive and demonstrated more engagement and disposition towards their English classes. Students also learned about matters related to the target language and culture, and were not only circumscribed to linguistic ones. Similarly, results from this study shed some light on the importance of offering access to technology to students before they advance to higher education that support video-gaming practices in the classroom.

  5. Assessment of educational games for health professions: a systematic review of trends and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajed, Hind; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2015-04-01

    Traditional lecturing used in teaching has the lowest retention rate; the use of games as part of an instruction method may enhance retention and reinforce learning by creating a dynamic educational environment. This study aims to systematically review the literature on educational games for the health professions to identify trends and investigate assessment tools used to measure its learning outcomes. Seven databases were used in the search: ERIC, Education Research Complete, Medline, Medline Complete, Academic Search Complete, The Cochrane Library and PubMed. The search identified 2865 papers; among them, 1259 were excluded and 22 were evaluated. The selection incorporated five full papers which focused directly on the health professionals. Two studies involved the use of board games and two studies involved card games, crossword puzzles and one study involved a team quiz competition. Overall, studies lacked a strong link between the use of games for both instructional and assessment purposes. Gaming makes a positive impact on the teaching/learning process. However, existing assessment methodologies have been not fully captured the learning that may occur in these games. Robust research is needed to address the use of games that have been assessed objectively.

  6. Playing and understanding chemistry: Reinterpreting a traditional game for educational use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Rosa da Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of using educational games in the school context cannot be denied. Therefore, this article describes a study about the contributions of a game for teaching colligative properties. The game was used with a second-year class in a high school located in southeast Piauí, Brazil. It is a qualitative study; it used questionnaires for data collection and direct observation about phenomenological aspects that emerged during the application of the game. The results showed that the use of educational games is not common for the subjects observed. Their views on that use lead us to infer that the proposed playful activity has contributed to strengthen distinct aspects needed to improve the teaching and learning process in Chemistry

  7. Agile human centered methodologies to develop educational software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina S. González-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta una propue sta metodológica basada en los enfoques actuales del proceso d e desarrollo de software: las m etodologías ágiles (SCRUM, centradas en el usuario (UCD y el diseño de ex periencia de usuario (UXDy Lean UX. Así, hemos adaptado alguna s de las características de las metodologías ágiles que nos han perm itido producir prototipos centrados en los usuarios con retroal imentación constante de ellos. El objetivo principal de esta propuesta es identificar problemas de usabilidad y factores UX en las primer as etapas de desarrollo de software educativo. Además, hemos aplicado y vali dado esta propuesta en el marco de un proyecto de software educ ativo para los usuarios con necesidades educativas especiales. La met odología propuesta puede ser una buena filosofía de diseño a se guir en los proyectos de desarrollo de softwa re en general, y en proyectos educativos en particular.

  8. Deploying Serious Games for Management in Higher Education: lessons learned and good practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke; Bellotti, Francesco; Nadolski, Rob; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael; Berta, Riccardo; Carvalho, Maria B.

    2013-01-01

    Baalsrud Hauge, J., Bellotti, F., Nadolski, R. J., Kickmeier-Rust, M., Berta, R., & Carvalho, M. B. (2013, 4 October). Deploying Serious Games for Management in Higher Education: lessons learned and good practices. Presentation at ECGBL 2013, Porto, Portugal.

  9. Collaboration Scripts for Mastership Skills: Online game about classroom dilemmas in teacher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Hans; Geerts, Walter; Slootmaker, Aad; Kuipers, Aad; Westera, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Hummel, H. G. K., Geerts, W. M., Slootmaker, A., Kuipers, D., & Westera, W. (in press). Collaboration scripts for mastership skills: Online game about classroom dilemmas in teacher Education. Interactive Learning Environments.

  10. The Use of Active Video Games in Physical Education and Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Chukhlantseva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ICT cause and accelerate the processes of getting and developing knowledge, facilitate the process of modernization of education. Active video games, which involve physical movement of the player’s body, are used to increase the efficiency of perception of the educational material connected with motor activity and to raise the level of motor activity of young people Active video games which require the display of strength, coordination and flexibility are included into the curriculum of physical education, combining physical education with a game. These games use the player’s body movements as a controller, thus providing an alternative to static games and helping to preserve health. The study is the analysis of publications on the use of ICT, namely active video games (exergames in the field of physical culture and sports. The study has found that the use of active video games in educational and training process promotes physical qualities, improves cognitive functions, improves socialization and motivation to exercise. It has been proved that the use of exergames motivation increases motor activity of students and adults. Specially selected exergames help to familiarize students with various types of sports activities, such as those that are difficult to practice in the gym. Rational use of active video games in the classroom optimizes the educational process. Modern mobile exergames on one platform include several sports and can be used outside sports facilities, encouraging more people to exercise. Exergames personalize elements of the game, the level of difficulty, type of physical activity, have a system of evaluation of changes in the user’s preparedness, increase motivation to exercise.

  11. Hemoaction game: an educational step to improve hemophilia children and nurses self-efficacy

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    NOOASHIN BEHESHTIPOOR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As hemophilia is a chronic bleeding disease and can interfere with daily performance of children, these children require continuous training to prevent bleeding and take timely action (1. Since children nurses play an important role in the education of involved children and their Selfefficacy and also due to today’s approach which is using educational computer games, the use of educational games in respect to teach hemophilia children how to have self-efficacy can be effective (2. Hemoaction game is a computerized educational game designed by the World Federation of Hemophilia to educate hemophilia disease and related procedures to the care of children with hemophilia. By the use of this game children with hemophilia (aged 8-12 and also nursing experts were educated how to increase self efficacy. Nursing School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has used this game for the first time after its publishing, in the world (3. The results of the mentioned study demonstrates that after the Hemophilia disease and its related procedures were instructed to children with hemophilia and nursing experts in order to know how to increase patients’ self efficacy by modern approaches, self efficacy of hemophilia children and nurses were both improved. This educational method is a novel way to enhance both Hemophilia children and nursing staff, as major participants in routine and lifelong education process, self-efficacy. Due to nurses’ important role in improving children with hemophilia self-efficacy by different instructions and world leading educational approaches towards use of modern technology in education, using Hemoaction educational game, published by World Federation of Hemophilia and used by Nursing and Midwifery College of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for the first time, can fulfill hemophilia children needs of care.

  12. Improving collaborative learning in online software engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Colin J.; DeFranco, Joanna F.; Sangwan, Raghvinder S.

    2017-11-01

    Team projects are commonplace in software engineering education. They address a key educational objective, provide students critical experience relevant to their future careers, allow instructors to set problems of greater scale and complexity than could be tackled individually, and are a vehicle for socially constructed learning. While all student teams experience challenges, those in fully online programmes must also deal with remote working, asynchronous coordination, and computer-mediated communications all of which contribute to greater social distance between team members. We have developed a facilitation framework to aid team collaboration and have demonstrated its efficacy, in prior research, with respect to team performance and outcomes. Those studies indicated, however, that despite experiencing improved project outcomes, students working in effective software engineering teams did not experience significantly improved individual achievement. To address this deficiency we implemented theoretically grounded refinements to the collaboration model based upon peer-tutoring research. Our results indicate a modest, but statistically significant (p = .08), improvement in individual achievement using this refined model.

  13. The Use of Simulation Business Games in University Education

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Birknerova

    2010-01-01

    Rapid and deep changes in economics and business environment along with the dynamic development of computer art and communication technologies represent the main factors identifying the development in the area of simulation business games. These games may be considered a strange, content-determined group of simulation games. The description of their content specialties, basic elements, and possibilities of their use are the essence of our report. In the conclusion we present a short research ...

  14. The science of memory - and how it should affect design of games for outside education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieberoth, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    in education, great memories can now be shaped on the go. And of course we need memory to learn. Modern psychology is ripe with information about how we remember and forget the world around us, but for historical reasons, all this useful knowledge rarely reaches teachers or designers of educational games.......Games are great for learning. They inspire, engage and most importantly of all, they are different from other activities at school. We remember good experiences in unusual settings, and may mentally time-travel back to them again and again. With mobile phones as platforms for games and drama...

  15. Enjoyable learning: the role of humour, games, and fun activities in nursing and midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baid, Heather; Lambert, Nicky

    2010-08-01

    Education that captures the attention of students is an essential aspect of promoting meaningful, active learning. Rather than standing at the front of a group of learners simply speaking about a topic, teachers have the opportunity of livening up their teaching with humour, games, and other fun activities. This article critically evaluates the benefits and limitations of humour within nursing education as well as the use of games and fun activities as teaching strategies. Examples of various games and interactive activities are also provided. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Virtual Environment based Serious Game to Support Health Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Gomes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available APEX was developed as a framework for ubiquitous computing (ubicomp prototyping through virtual environments. In this paper the framework is used as a platform for developing a serious game designed to instruct and to inform. The paper describes the Asthma game, a game aimed at raising awareness among children of asthma triggers in the home. It is designed to stimulate a healthier life-style for those with asthma and respiratory problems. The game was developed as the gamification of a checklist for the home environment of asthma patients.

  17. Simulation-based Serious Games for Science Education and teacher assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungho Baek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents serious games developed for the science subject in elementary and middle schools, specifically on the three topics of “Force and Motion,” “State Change of Water,” and “Earth and Moon.” The PC game “Force and Motion” implemented frictional/gravitational/magnetic force simulations, in the mobile game “State Change of Water,” particle-based fluid simulations were implemented, and in the PC- and mobile-based multi-platform game “Earth and Moon,” a solar system simulation was implemented. In order to find out the essential components for the science educational games, the components of each topic were thoroughly analyzed, and then a game-based curriculum was developed for the components classified as having high- or mid-level difficulties in both teaching and learning. Based on the curriculum, the three games were created. The games were evaluated by elementary and middle school teachers, and the evaluation results showed that simulation-based serious games are promising tools for improving learning effects in science-related subjects.

  18. Writerly Gaming: Political Gaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    software for private entertainment (looking/feeling real) or they can be pragmatic software used for training of professionals (affecting soldiers’, pilots’, etc. perception of the real). A third, and less debated game-reality relationship, based on public awareness and typically a socio-political agenda...

  19. Unhappy families: using tabletop games as a technology to understand play in education

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    John Lean

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we argue that tabletop games provide a helpful means of rethinking the affordances of digital games in pedagogy. We argue that tabletop games offer a distinctive technology from digital games in exploring the idea of play as experience, providing a sociable, accessible and tactile platform that can easily be adapted by players to suit their needs. At a workshop session at an international conference on play in education, we used tabletop games to enable discussion and observation of play. This workshop suggested that, rather than a singular definition, tabletop play means different things to different people, and what is ‘counted as’ play depends upon both individual and group interactions. Building upon this discussion, in this article, we return to both tabletop and digital games to discuss the idea of play as experience, especially with regard to the use of technology in educational settings, and how games might be seen as less ‘predictable’ than other technologies. We hope that this discussion provides future inspiration to other scholars who are considering the use of tabletop games in both pedagogical and technological research.

  20. Effect of an educational game on university students' learning about action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchi, Kelly Cristina Gaviao; Montrezor, Luís Henrique; Marcondes, Fernanda K

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational game that is used for teaching the mechanisms of the action potentials in cell membranes. The game was composed of pieces representing the intracellular and extracellular environments, ions, ion channels, and the Na + -K + -ATPase pump. During the game activity, the students arranged the pieces to demonstrate how the ions move through the membrane in a resting state and during an action potential, linking the ion movement with a graph of the action potential. To test the effect of the game activity on student understanding, first-year dental students were given the game to play at different times in a series of classes teaching resting membrane potential and action potentials. In all experiments, students who played the game performed better in assessments. According to 98% of the students, the game supported the learning process. The data confirm the students' perception, indicating that the educational game improved their understanding about action potentials. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Diffusing Innovations: Adoption of Serious Educational Games by K-12 Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallett, David; Annetta, Leonard; Lamb, Richard; Bowling, Brandy

    2014-01-01

    Innovation is a term that has become widely used in education; especially as it pertains to technology infusion. Applying the corporate theory of diffusing innovation to educational practice is an innovation in itself. This mixed-methods study examined 38 teachers in a science educational gaming professional development program that provided…

  2. Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

  3. Experimental software for modeling and interpreting educational data analysis processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya V. Zorina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Problems, tasks and processes of educational data mining are considered in this article. The objective is to create a fundamentally new information system of the University using the results educational data analysis. One of the functions of such a system is knowledge extraction from accumulated in the operation process data. The creation of the national system of this type is an iterative and time-consuming process requiring the preliminary studies and incremental prototyping modules. The novelty of such systems is that there is a lack of those using this methodology of the development, for this purpose a number of experiments was carried out in order to collect data, choose appropriate methods for the study and to interpret them. As a result of the experiment, the authors were available sources available for analysis in the information environment of the home university. The data were taken from the semester performance, obtained from the information system of the training department of the Institute of IT MTU MIREA, the data obtained as a result of the independent work of students and data, using specially designed Google-forms. To automate the collection of information and analysis of educational data, an experimental software package was created. As a methodology for developing the experimental software complex, a decision was made using the methodologies of rational-empirical complexes (REX and single-experimentation program technologies (TPEI. The details of the program implementation of the complex are described in detail, conclusions are given about the availability of the data sources used, and conclusions are drawn about the prospects for further development.

  4. Using serious gaming to transfer knowledge and develop soft skills in postgraduate education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Joanne; Corzo Perez, Gerald Augusto; Karimi, Poolad; Dastgheib, Ali

    2017-04-01

    "Serious gaming" is gaming designed for a purpose other than entertainment and involves using board games, computer games and role-plays or a combination of all, for serious purposes, such as education, outreach, training, or decision support. It is argued that this approach provides a safe environment which facilitates group learning, allows for "learning by experience" in fields where long timescales or high risks make real experience impossible, motivates learners and stimulates players from different disciplines to share knowledge with each other. UNESCO-IHE offers education to water sector professionals from around the globe. All the courses at UNESCO-IHE involve serious games in one way or another. A varied range of games is developed and/or used: the group sizes for the games range from 5 students to over 100. Sometimes they are used as simulations to illustrate feedbacks, tradeoffs, variability, uncertainty and other phenomena, create an awareness of multidimensional water related issues, and sometimes they are used to train and develop soft skills, such as interdisciplinary collaboration, creative problem identification and problem solving, teamwork and robust decision-making under uncertainty. Often, they are able to do both, which is a key strength of serious games as an education tool. These games are also been used in research and advisory projects as well to communicate research outputs to stakeholders and the public and together with them reach an optimum technical decision which is socially viable. This session will discuss the experience with these games and what lessons can be learned for the future.

  5. Gamification in science education: The relationship of educational games to motivation and achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Kelly Elizabeth

    Community colleges have become increasingly more important in America's higher education system. Part of this emphasis has been directly due to President Obama's 2010 directive to produce a competitive workforce in the United States by increasing the community college graduation rate by five million over the next decade (Madhani, 2010). Community colleges allow open admission for students which permits marginally prepared students to enter. These students may lack motivation, which contributes to student attrition (Williams, 2010). The focus of this study is to examine methods that may improve student learning and motivation, which could ultimately lead to higher graduation rates. This study investigates the relationship of gamification to motivation and achievement in a community college microbiology class. Gamification is defined as "the process of adding game mechanics to processes, programs, and platforms that would not traditionally use such concepts" (Swan, 2012). The goal of game-based learning is to increase student motivation and learning. The results of this investigation indicate that educational games increase motivation and achievement of students in a community college microbiology class.

  6. Practicality in Virtuality: Finding Student Meaning in Video Game Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, Timothy; Sadler, Troy D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual differences between video game learning and traditional classroom and laboratory learning. It explores the notion of virtual experience by comparing a commonly used high school laboratory protocol on DNA extraction with a similar experience provided by a biotechnology themed video game. When considered…

  7. Video games: a route to large-scale STEM education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Merrilea J

    2009-01-02

    Video games have enormous mass appeal, reaching audiences in the hundreds of thousands to millions. They also embed many pedagogical practices known to be effective in other environments. This article reviews the sparse but encouraging data on learning outcomes for video games in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines, then reviews the infrastructural obstacles to wider adoption of this new medium.

  8. Role-Playing and Religion: Using Games to Educate Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Adam L.

    2008-01-01

    I have been experimenting with using role-playing and games in my religion classes for several years and have found that students respond well to these pedagogical tools and methods. After reviewing my experiences, I explore the reasons for students' positive response. I argue that role-playing games capitalize on our students' educational…

  9. Inclusive Education: Mobile Serious Games for People with Cognitive Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Jaramillo-Alcázar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of mobile devices is increasingly frequent. In many occasions they are used as a means of entertainment for people through video games. Serious games is a category of video games used as teaching methods in different environments. They use fun as a strategy for the learning process. However, the vast majority do not focus on vulnerable groups such as people with cognitive disabilities, because they do not consider accessibility parameters in their design. Some video games development companies have proposed general guidelines for the implementation of accessible video games, but they have not been formalized as good practices or standards. This article presents a compilation and analysis of different accessibility guidelines for the development of mobile serious games for people with cognitive disabilities. It also proposes a model to evaluate the access of serious games for people with cognitive disabilities and applies it in a case study. Finally, an evaluation tool is proposed for mobile serious games developers focused on people with cognitive disabilities.

  10. Understanding How to Support Intergenerational Play through Educational Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyahhan, Sinem

    2011-01-01

    The limited number of studies on intergenerational play suggests that not many parents play video games with their children (Lenhart, Jones, & Macgill, 2008). However, when intentionally designed to support intergenerational play, video game could provide an opportunity for parents and children to connect in new and powerful ways, especially…

  11. Background Music in Educational Games: Motivational Appeal and Cognitive Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Stephanie B.; Marte, Birgit; Albert, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Most game-designers likely stick to the assumption that background music is a design feature for fostering fun and game play. From a psychological point of view, these (intuitive) aspects act upon the intrinsic motivation and the flow experience of players. However, from a pure cognitive perspective on instructional design, background music could…

  12. Educators Use Career "Games" to Teach Lifelong Career Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Phillip S.

    2004-01-01

    In half the schools in Canada and in over 25,000 classrooms across the United States students from grade 3 to grade 12 are being introduced to careers through an innovative new game-based process called The Real Game Series. Originated in Canada, these programs have been developed and tested through a not-for-profit international partnership…

  13. Use of a simulation game for HIV/AIDS education with pre-service teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Nadine; de Beer, Josef; Dunbar-Krige, Helen

    2011-04-01

    The article describes the use of a simulation game in HIV/AIDS education with pre-service teachers in Johannesburg, South Africa. The use of a simulation game, as novel experiential pedagogy, was an attempt to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS and to demonstrate that anyone can be at risk of HIV infection. Using a generic qualitative research design, the data were collected over a three-year period by way of video recordings of the simulation game, recordings of large and small group discussions afterwards, and via questionnaires and written reflections by the education students four weeks afterwards. Content analysis and discourse analysis led to the construction of three main themes. First, we found that the novelty factor of the simulation game for raising HIV/AIDS awareness was confirmed both during the game itself and after a period of time had elapsed. Second, in light of many education students' naivety about the intersection of biological, socio-cultural and economic issues at play in the spread of HIV, the game prompted more reflexivity about the disease and helped to broaden the participants' discussions. Lastly, the data revealed the disjuncture between theory and practice in HIV/AIDS education. We propose that in raising awareness of HIV and AIDS, educators should move towards more engaging and challenging pedagogies that address the learning needs of the 'new' generation of university students.

  14. BREAKING SPORE: BUILDING INSTRUCTIONAL VALUE IN SCIENCE EDUCATION USING A COMMERCIAL, OFF-THE SHELF GAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schrader

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation explored an alternative method of technology integration and ways to enable educators to judiciously use a wider range of games in their classrooms. Although many games have been created with educational objectives in mind (e.g., Quest Atlantis, Immune Attack, Democracy, proportionally fewer games and simulations are linked to scientific content and standards. More importantly, wildly popular and widely available entertainment-based games with educational components (i.e., edutainment do not necessarily promote scientific understanding. Generally, the purpose of games is entertainment. However, issues may arise if they are marketed as promoting or having a strong basis in content. In this study, we examine the simulation game Spore, which exhibits flawed scientific assumptions and may promote numerous misconceptions if used “as is” with students. We examine how a simple pedagogical adjustment to in a middle school science class may overcome the existing and designed limitations while yielding learning benefits. Specifically, we observe Spore’s influence on students’ conceptual understanding of natural selection when compared to a control group. The findings contribute to a growing body of literature that provides teachers with alternative methods for judicious technology integration, particularly with respect to the affordances of games and simulations like Spore.

  15. Playing for Climate Change: An Educational Alternative Realty Game (ARG) in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sandra Kim

    Learner engagement in the learning process is a challenge faced by educators, instructional designers, administrators and policy makers (Barab, Sadler, Heiselt, & Zuiker, 2007b; Van Eck, 2006). One area in which learner engagement is particularly problematic is science education; participation rates in sciences at the post-secondary level are significantly lower than in other disciplines (Fox & Stephan, 2001; Industry Canada, 2007; Kennepohl, 2009). Learners who are enrolled in science programs at postsecondary institutions also have deficits in their scientific illiteracy, specifically in their ability to understand the language of science and evaluate scientific claims in journal articles and reports. This design-based research study represents the first phase of an ongoing project exploring the role that digital educational games designed to support knowledge building within small groups can play in addressing issues of engagement and literacy in science education. A set of game design principles derived from the existing literature was used to inform the development of a prototype of the game. The prototype was evaluated by a group (N=18) of educational technology graduate students at a local university. As this was a first phase of a study in a field (i.e. game-based learning) that is still contested, it is felt that qualitative research methods can provide a representative view of the effectiveness of the game design principles and types of interactions observed between players as well as between players and artefacts in environment. The data collection methods used in this study included participant observation, data player characteristics survey, interviews, and content analysis. The final products of this study are game design principles and a game prototype. Data gathered from this study will be used to inform the design of the next version of the game, and future research in the area of digital game design and implementation (e.g., learning analytics

  16. Systematizing game learning analytics for serious games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Fernandez, Cristina; Calvo Morata, Antonio; Freire, Manuel; Martinez-Ortiz, Ivan; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2017-01-01

    Applying games in education provides multiple benefits clearly visible in entertainment games: their engaging, goal-oriented nature encourages students to improve while they play. Educational games, also known as Serious Games (SGs) are video games designed with a main purpose other than

  17. Practicality in Virtuality: Finding Student Meaning in Video Game Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, Timothy; Sadler, Troy D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual differences between video game learning and traditional classroom and laboratory learning. It explores the notion of virtual experience by comparing a commonly used high school laboratory protocol on DNA extraction with a similar experience provided by a biotechnology themed video game. When considered conceptually, the notion of virtual experience is not limited to those experiences generated by computer aided technology, as with a video game or computer simulation. The notion of virtuality can apply to many real world experiences as well. It is proposed that the medium of the learning experience, be it video game or classroom, is not an important distinction to consider; instead, we should seek to determine what kinds of meaningful experiences apply for both classrooms and video games.

  18. Gaming geography: Educational games and literacy development in the Grade 4 classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Lotherington

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a case study conducted in two public schools in the greater Toronto area as a complementary component of a multisite experimental study exploring educational game development as a learning activity for motivating and engaging students in curriculum-related literacy activities (Owston et al., 2007. Researchers studied children creating and playing four online board games based on grade 4 geography content, viz., Tic-tac-toe, Trivial Pursuit, Snakes and Ladders, and Mother Goose. The schools shared similar positive orientations to technologically focused learning and good technological resources, but they had different institutional histories of implementing computers in curricular learning. Technological equipment was approached, accessed and utilized quite differently in each class, affecting pedagogical practices and learning experiences. Though improvements to traditional literacy learning were found to be limited to improved logical sentence structure (Owston et al., 2007, game development did allow students to build digital literacy skills, including computer literacy and typing skills. Moreover, the project enabled participating teachers to think about profitably incorporating online board game production in broad-based curricular learning. Résumé :Cet article présente une étude de cas menée dans deux écoles publiques de la grande région de Toronto en complément d’une étude expérimentale multisite visant à explorer la conception de jeux éducatifs en tant qu’activité d’apprentissage pour stimuler la motivation et l’engagement des élèves dans des activités de lecture et d’écriture liées au curriculum (Owston et al., 2007. Les chercheurs ont étudié les enfants lors de la création puis de l’utilisation de quatre jeux de plateau en ligne axés sur la matière de 4e année en géographie. Les élèves ont réalisé une version des jeux de Tic-Tac-Toe, de Quelques arpents de pièges, de Serpents

  19. The emerging Web 2.0 social software: an enabling suite of sociable technologies in health and health care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Wheeler, Steve

    2007-03-01

    Web 2.0 sociable technologies and social software are presented as enablers in health and health care, for organizations, clinicians, patients and laypersons. They include social networking services, collaborative filtering, social bookmarking, folksonomies, social search engines, file sharing and tagging, mashups, instant messaging, and online multi-player games. The more popular Web 2.0 applications in education, namely wikis, blogs and podcasts, are but the tip of the social software iceberg. Web 2.0 technologies represent a quite revolutionary way of managing and repurposing/remixing online information and knowledge repositories, including clinical and research information, in comparison with the traditional Web 1.0 model. The paper also offers a glimpse of future software, touching on Web 3.0 (the Semantic Web) and how it could be combined with Web 2.0 to produce the ultimate architecture of participation. Although the tools presented in this review look very promising and potentially fit for purpose in many health care applications and scenarios, careful thinking, testing and evaluation research are still needed in order to establish 'best practice models' for leveraging these emerging technologies to boost our teaching and learning productivity, foster stronger 'communities of practice', and support continuing medical education/professional development (CME/CPD) and patient education.

  20. Playing in School or at Home? An Exploration of the Effects of Context on Educational Game Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grove, Frederik; Van Looy, Jan; Neys, Joyce; Jansz, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to gain insight into the effects of context on educational game experience. Using a quasi-experimental setup, it compares the playing and learning experiences of adolescent players of the awareness-raising game PING in a domestic (N=135) and a school (N=121) context. Results indicate that both gaming (identification,…

  1. "Supply Chain-Marketing Shark Tank" Experiential Lab Game in Interdisciplinary Business Education: Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, A.; Arora, A. Saxena

    2015-01-01

    This article provides educators in business schools with a new interdisciplinary experiential lab game called Supply Chain-Marketing (SC-Mark) Shark Tank game, which can be implemented in both Supply Chain Management (SCM) and Marketing courses. The SC-Mark experiential lab game is a real-life business environment simulation that explores…

  2. A Mixed-Method Approach on Digital Educational Games for K12: Gender, Attitudes and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Effie Lai-Chong; Gamble, Tim; Schwarz, Daniel; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael D.; Holzinger, Andreas

    Research on the influence of gender on attitudes towards and performance in digital educational games (DEGs) has quite a long history. Generally, males tend to play such games more engagingly than females, consequently attitude and performance of males using DEGs should be presumably higher than that of females. This paper reports an investigation of a DEG, which was developed to enhance the acquisition of geographical knowledge, carried out on British, German and Austrian K12 students aged between 11 and 14. Methods include a survey on initial design concepts, user tests on the system and two single-gender focus groups. Gender and cultural differences in gameplay habit, game type preferences and game character perceptions were observed. The results showed that both genders similarly improved their geographical knowledge, although boys tended to have a higher level of positive user experience than the girls. The qualitative data from the focus groups illustrated some interesting gender differences in perceiving various aspects of the game.

  3. An Educational Board Game to Assist PharmD Students in Learning Autonomic Nervous System Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J Shawn; Tincher, Lindsay; Odeng-Otu, Emmanuel; Herdman, Michelle

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To examine whether playing a board game can assist PharmD students in learning autonomic nervous system (ANS) pharmacology. Design. Of 72 students enrolled in a required second-year pharmacology course, 22 students volunteered to play the board game, which was followed by an in-class examination consisting of 42 ANS questions (ANSQs) and 8 control questions (CTLQs). Participants were given a pretest and a posttest to assess immediate educational improvement. Participants' scores for pretest, posttest, in-class examination, and ANSQs were compared. Also, scores for examination, ANSQs, and CTLQs were compared between board game participants (PART) and nonparticipating classmates (NPART). Assessment. Board game participants scored progressively higher between the pretest, posttest, examination, and ANSQs. Additionally, PART scores were higher than NPART scores for examination and ANSQs. Difference between PART and NPART CTLQ scores was not significant. Conclusion. A board game can assist PharmD students in learning ANS pharmacology.

  4. The Differences in Motivations of Online Game Players and Offline Game Players: A Combined Analysis of Three Studies at Higher Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainey, Tom; Connolly, Thomas; Stansfield, Mark; Boyle, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Computer games have become a highly popular form of entertainment and have had a large impact on how University students spend their leisure time. Due to their highly motivating properties computer games have come to the attention of educationalists who wish to exploit these highly desirable properties for educational purposes. Several studies…

  5. The Impact of a Hybrid Sport Education-Invasion Games Competence Model Soccer Unit on Students' Decision Making, Skill Execution and Overall Game Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Isabel; Farias, Claudio; Hastie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a hybrid Sport Education-Invasion Games Competence Model (SE-IGCM) unit application on students' improvements in decision making, skill execution and overall game performance, during a soccer season. Twenty-six fifth-grade students from a Portuguese public elementary school participated in a…

  6. Educational software for simulating risk of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Madeleine A.; Sandberg, Sonja; Awerbuch, Tamara E.

    1994-03-01

    The AIDS epidemic is still growing rapidly and the disease is thought to be uniformly fatal. With no vaccine or cure in sight, education during high school years is a critical component in the prevention of AIDS. We propose the use of computer software with which high school students can explore via simulation their own risk of acquiring an HIV infection given certain sexual behaviors. This particular software is intended to help students understand the three factors that determine their risk of HIV infection (number of sexual acts, probability that their partners are infected, and riskiness of the specific sexual activities they choose). Users can explicitly calculate their own chances of becoming infected based on decisions they make. Use of the program is expected to personalize the risk of HIV infection and thus increase users' concern and awareness. Behavioral change may not result from increased knowledge alone. Therefore the effectiveness of this program in changing attitudes toward risky sexual behaviors would be enhanced when the simulation is embedded in an appropriate curriculum. A description of the program and an example of its use are presented.

  7. 25 CFR 547.8 - What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... total purchase or wager amount and all prizes and total credits won for the last game played; (ii) The... game recall. The last game recall function shall: (1) Be retrievable at all times, other than when the recall component is involved in the play of a game, upon the operation of an external key-switch, entry...

  8. Building Software Development Capacity to Advance the State of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Educational technologists may advance the state of the field by increasing capacity to develop software tools and instructional applications. Presently, few academic programs in educational technology require even a single computer programming course. Further, the educational technologists who develop software generally work independently or in…

  9. The Perception of Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy among Undergraduate CEIT Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Adem; Ozkilic, Ruchan; Senturk, Aysan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze self-efficacy perceptions for education software development of teacher candidates studying at Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies, with respect to a range of variables. The Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy Perception Scale was used as data collection tool. Sixty…

  10. An augmented reality game to support therapeutic education for children with diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés-Marcelo Calle-Bustos

    Full Text Available Therapeutic education in diabetes helps patients take responsibility for self-control of their disease, and providing technological support systems facilitates this education. In this paper, we present an augmented reality game to support therapeutic education for patients with diabetes. Our game helps children (aged 5-14 years to learn carbohydrate (carb content of different foods. The game shows virtual foods on a real dish. The number of carb choices corresponding to the visualized food is also shown (1 carb choice = 10 grams of carbs. A study to determine the effectiveness of the game in terms of learning and perceived satisfaction and usability was carried out. A total of seventy children with diabetes participated in the study. From the results, we observed that the initial knowledge about carb choices of the children who participated in the study was low (a mean of 2 on a scale from 0 to 9. This indicates that therapeutic education for patients with diabetes is needed. When the results for the pre-knowledge questionnaire and the post-knowledge questionnaire were compared, it was shown that the children learned about carb choices by playing our game. We used two post-knowledge questionnaires (one post-knowledge questionnaire that contained the same foods as the pre-knowledge questionnaire and a second post-knowledge questionnaire that contained foods that were different from the ones on the pre-knowledge questionnaire. There were no statistically significant differences between these two different post-knowledge questionnaires. Moreover, the knowledge acquired was independent of gender and age. We also evaluated usability and perceived satisfaction. The children were satisfied with the game and considered that the game offers a high degree of usability. This game could be a valuable therapeutic education tool for patients with diabetes.

  11. Investigating the effectiveness of an educational card game for learning how human immunology is regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, TzuFen; Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Lin, Shu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to investigate the effectiveness of an educational card game we developed for learning human immunology. Two semesters of evaluation were included to examine the impact of the game on students' understanding and perceptions of the game-based instruction. Ninety-nine senior high school students (11th graders) were recruited for the first evaluation, and the second-semester group consisted of 72 students (also 11th graders). The results obtained indicate that students did learn from the educational card game. Moreover, students who learned from playing the game significantly outperformed their counterparts in terms of their understanding of the processes and connections among different lines of immunological defense (first semester: t = 2.92, p traditional didactic lectures (first semester: t = 2.79, p < 0.01; second semester: t = 2.41, p < 0.05). This finding is evidence that the educational card game has potential to facilitate students' learning of how the immune system works. The implications and suggestions for future work are further discussed. © 2014 T. Su et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Motivation and/or warm up games for third grade children Physical Education lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margelia Bárbara Ramírez Blanco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Physical Education is an important element for the child’s multilateral and harmonic formation, its appropriate implementation is paramount for the development of the individual's physical performance capacity, the health preservation and for the moral and social values formation. The game is an important task for the children to  appropriate and correct physical, psychological and social development, they have as rights to enjoy fully the games and the recreation, which will be guided toward educational aims, their importance in the individual's integral development is universally recognized, they are also an effective aid in the Physical Education. Supported on theoretical and empiric research methods we could carry out our work offering motivational and warm up games like effective tool to be used by the professor in the Physical Education initial part lesson to work with the third grader boys and girls of “Camilo Cienfuegos” elementary school in Pinar del Rio municipality. The designed proposal is composed of ten games, which have the appropriate characteristics of the motivation and/or warm up games, that´s to say, games to increase the students´ motivation; easy to comprehend, of short duration, and to prepare the body to be worked with in the main part of the lesson, what implies the correct relationship whit the objective of it.

  13. Games, Simulations and Virtual Labs for Science Education: a Compendium and Some Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    We have assembled a list of computer-based simulations, games, and virtual labs for science education. This list, with links to the sources of these resources, is available online. The entries span a broad range of science, math, and engineering topics. They also span a range of target student ages, from elementary school to university students. We will provide a brief overview of this web site and the resources found on it. We will also briefly demonstrate some of our own educational simulations and games. Computer-based simulations and virtual labs are valuable resources for science educators in various settings, allowing learners to experiment and explore "what if" scenarios. Educational computer games can motivate learners in both formal and informal settings, encouraging them to spend much more time exploring a topic than they might otherwise be inclined to do. Part of this presentation is effectively a "literature review" of numerous sources of simulations, games, and virtual labs. Although we have encountered several nice collections of such resources, those collections seem to be restricted in scope. They either represent materials developed by a specific group or agency (e.g. NOAA's games web site) or are restricted to a specific discipline (e.g. geology simulations and virtual labs). This presentation directs viewers to games, simulations, and virtual labs from many different sources and spanning a broad range of STEM disciplines.

  14. Gaming science innovations to integrate health systems science into medical education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Earla J; Lewis, Joy H; McCoy, Lise

    2018-01-01

    Health systems science (HSS) is an emerging discipline addressing multiple, complex, interdependent variables that affect providers' abilities to deliver patient care and influence population health. New perspectives and innovations are required as physician leaders and medical educators strive to accelerate changes in medical education and practice to meet the needs of evolving populations and systems. The purpose of this paper is to introduce gaming science as a lens to magnify HSS integration opportunities in the scope of medical education and practice. Evidence supports gaming science innovations as effective teaching and learning tools to promote learner engagement in scientific and systems thinking for decision making in complex scenarios. Valuable insights and lessons gained through the history of war games have resulted in strategic thinking to minimize risk and save lives. In health care, where decisions can affect patient and population outcomes, gaming science innovations have the potential to provide safe learning environments to practice crucial decision-making skills. Research of gaming science limitations, gaps, and strategies to maximize innovations to further advance HSS in medical education and practice is required. Gaming science holds promise to equip health care teams with HSS knowledge and skills required for transformative practice. The ultimate goals are to empower providers to work in complex systems to improve patient and population health outcomes and experiences, and to reduce costs and improve care team well-being.

  15. Assessing Knowledge Retention of an Immersive Serious Game vs. a Traditional Education Method in Aviation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittaro, Luca; Buttussi, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Thanks to the increasing availability of consumer head-mounted displays, educational applications of immersive VR could now reach to the general public, especially if they include gaming elements (immersive serious games). Safety education of citizens could be a particularly promising domain for immersive serious games, because people tend not to pay attention to and benefit from current safety materials. In this paper, we propose an HMD-based immersive game for educating passengers about aviation safety that allows players to experience a serious aircraft emergency with the goal of surviving it. We compare the proposed approach to a traditional aviation safety education method (the safety card) used by airlines. Unlike most studies of VR for safety knowledge acquisition, we do not focus only on assessing learning immediately after the experience but we extend our attention to knowledge retention over a longer time span. This is a fundamental requirement, because people need to retain safety procedures in order to apply them when faced with danger. A knowledge test administered before, immediately after and one week after the experimental condition showed that the immersive serious game was superior to the safety card. Moreover, subjective as well as physiological measurements employed in the study showed that the immersive serious game was more engaging and fear-arousing than the safety card, a factor that can contribute to explain the obtained superior retention, as we discuss in the paper.

  16. The Effect of Age on Teachers' Intention to Use Educational Video Games: A TAM Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mena, Antonio; Martí-Parreño, José; Aldás-Manzano, Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Educational video games (EVGs) are gaining momentum as a means of increasing students' motivation in their learning process. Nevertheless, teachers might face several barriers that dissuade them from using educational video games in their courses. This study analyses factors affecting teachers' behavioural intention to use educational video games…

  17. A Learning Game for Youth Financial Literacy Education in the Teen Grid of Second Life Three-Dimensional Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Franklin, Teresa; Shelor, Roger; Ozercan, Sertac; Reuter, Jarrod; Ye, En; Moriarty, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Game-like three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds have become popular venues for youth to explore and interact with friends. To bring vital financial literacy education to them in places they frequent, a multi-disciplinary team of computer scientists, educators, and financial experts developed a youth-oriented financial literacy education game in…

  18. The design game in Participatory Design and design education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törpel, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    carefully. Cases from student projects are used as illustrating examples; work environments were redesigned and design games played. It turns out that degrees of freedom are present for the choice of (gaming) method as well as the ways of using the selected method. These degrees of freedom should be used...... in a way that will be labeled as »interested«, rather than in a way labeled as »taking for granted«. It is not possible to guarantee an interested and beneficial approach; yet the paper argues on the grounds that reflective gaming practice can be supportive in this direction....

  19. Game-based versus traditional case-based learning: comparing effectiveness in stroke continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telner, Deanna; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Chan, David; Chester, Bob; Marlow, Bernard; Meuser, James; Rothman, Arthur; Harvey, Bart

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate family physicians' enjoyment of and knowledge gained from game-based learning, compared with traditional case-based learning, in a continuing medical education (CME) event on stroke prevention and management. An equivalence trial to determine if game-based learning was as effective as case-based learning in terms of attained knowledge levels. Game questions and small group cases were developed. Participants were randomized to either a game-based or a case-based group and took part in the event. Ontario provincial family medicine conference. Thirty-two family physicians and 3 senior family medicine residents attending the conference. Participation in either a game-based or a case-based CME learning group. Scores on 40-item immediate and 3-month posttests of knowledge and a satisfaction survey. Results from knowledge testing immediately after the event and 3 months later showed no significant difference in scoring between groups. Participants in the game-based group reported higher levels of satisfaction with the learning experience. Games provide a novel way of organizing CME events. They might provide more group interaction and discussion, as well as improve recruitment to CME events. They might also provide a forum for interdisciplinary CME. Using games in future CME events appears to be a promising approach to facilitate participant learning.

  20. `Whose Shoes?` Can an educational board game engage Ugandan men in pregnancy and childbirth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladur, Alice Norah; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Hundley, Vanora

    2018-03-27

    Men can play a significant role in reducing maternal morbidity and mortality in low-income countries. Maternal health programmes are increasingly looking for innovative interventions to engage men to help improve health outcomes for pregnant women. Educational board games offer a unique approach to present health information where learning is reinforced through group discussions supporting peer-to-peer interactions. A qualitative study with men from Uganda currently living in the UK on their views of an educational board game. Men were purposively sampled to play a board game and participate in a focus group discussion. The pilot study explored perceptions on whether a board game was relevant as a health promotional tool in maternal health prior to implementation in Uganda. The results of the pilot study were promising; participants reported the use of visual aids and messages were easy to understand and enhanced change in perspective. Men in this study were receptive on the use of board games as a health promotional tool and recommended its use in rural Uganda. This study provides preliminary data on the relevancy and efficacy of using board games in maternal health. Key messages from the focus group appeared to be that the board game is more than acceptable to fathers and that it needs to be adapted to the local context to make it suitable for men in rural Uganda.