WorldWideScience

Sample records for educational environment affects

  1. Office Space: How Will Technology Affect the Education Office Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, C. William

    2009-01-01

    The office environment 10 years from now will be different from the one today. More office personnel will be organized around processes rather than functions. More work activities will be done by teams rather than individuals, and those teams will change over time, as will the nature of the work projects and the people who constitute the team. The…

  2. Educational Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Roger, Ed.

    This book presents examples of the United States' most innovative new educational facilities for decision makers developing educational facilities of the future. It showcases some of the most recent and significant institutional projects from a number of the United States' top architecture and design firms. The architecture and interior design…

  3. FACTORS AFFECTING TEACHING THE CONCEPT of RENEWABLE ENERGY in TECHNOLOGY ASSISTED ENVIRONMENTS AND DESIGNING PROCESSES in THE DISTANCE EDUCATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seda YUCEL

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy policies of today focus mainly on sustainable energy systems and renewable energy resources. Chemistry is closely related to energy recycling, energy types, renewable energy, and nature-energy interaction; therefore, it is now an obligation to enrich chemistry classes with renewable energy concepts and related awareness. Before creating renewable energy awareness, the factors thought to affect such awareness should be determined. Knowing these factors would facilitate finding out what to take into account in creating renewable energy awareness. In this study, certain factors thought to affect the development of renewable energy awareness were investigated. The awareness was created through a technology-assisted renewable energy module and assessed using a renewable energy assessment tool. The effects of the students’ self-directed learning readiness with Guglielmino (1977, inner-individual orientation, and anxiety orientation on the awareness were examined. These three factors were found to have significant effects on renewable energy, which was developed through technology utilization. In addition, based on the finding that delivering the subject of renewable energy in technology assisted environments is more effective, the criteria that should be taken into consideration in transforming this subject into a design model that is more suitable for distance education were identified.

  4. Assessing Educational Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Directions for Testing and Measurement, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Educational environment data derived from classroom settings strongly suggest the positive contribution that climate variables can make in accounting for learning performance. Such measures are not only related to productivity but may constitute criterion variables in and of themselves. (Author)

  5. Affective appraisal of virtual environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtkamp, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Interactive navigable 3D visualisations of built and natural environments have become commonplace in design and planning of urban environments and landscapes, and are regarded as potent prototyping and communication tools. In training applications, for instance for fire fighters, virtual

  6. 40 CFR 1502.15 - Affected environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Affected environment. 1502.15 Section 1502.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.15 Affected environment. The environmental impact statement shall succinctly describe the...

  7. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  8. Education within environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso Bermudez, Luis Ignacio

    1994-01-01

    At the end of 1993, for initiative of the Santillana Foundation, was carried out in Madrid (Spain) the monographic seventh week whose central topic was the Environmental Education. The reports presented in this great contest are compiled in the entitled document. o learn for the future: Environmental education - documents of a debate. The present article seeks to stand out some of the main conclusions of this forum and to analyze them by the light of our own educational and environmental reality. For anybody it is strange the unquestionable importance of the education along the man's existence and their constructive and transformation capacity of the society through the times. The knowledge is, therefore, the most valuable resource that has the society. The progress and the well-being communities are explained in great measure by the preparation, the assimilation of the technological changes and the scientific development undertaken by their own people

  9. Encountering Science Education's Capacity to Affect and Be Affected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Steve

    2016-01-01

    What might science education learn from the recent affective turn in the humanities and social sciences? Framed as a response to Michalinos Zembylas's article, this essay draws from selected theorizing in affect theory, science education and science and technology studies, in pursuit of diverse and productive ways to talk of affect within science…

  10. Perspectives in Theory: Anthology of Theorists affecting the Educational World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicking, Misty M., Ed.; Collins, Brian, Ed.; Fernett, Laura, Ed.; Taylor, Barbara, Ed.; Sutton, Kathleen, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    A compilation of research papers on theorists that affect the educational world are collected in this anthology. Twenty-one students, through the course of their education class, Social and Psychological Conditions of Learning--EDUC 320, researched and applied their knowledge in the elementary and secondary school environments. The contributing…

  11. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  12. Medical education and social environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Ahsan; Qayum, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Farooq, Umer; Shah, Awais Ali; Waqas, Muhammad; Rasool, Maleeha; Hameed, Sania; Kanwal, Rana; Azmat, Muneeba; Marwat, Saleem; Afridit, Faheem

    2014-01-01

    A positive learning environment and quality of course content have an imperative role in academic achievement of students. This study aims to assess students' point of view about the quality of education and social environment of a public sector medical college in Pakistan. Relative scarcity of data from students' perspective merited this study. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken at Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad, Pakistan, including 300 medical students from all five years of the MBBS course. Systematic random sampling was used with a kth interval of 4 for each class. Self-administered questionnaire was used and contained items related to academics, learning environment, learning resources, teaching methodologies and student-friendly activities. The data were analysed using SPSS-16. There were 265 respondents (88.3%) to the questionnaire with males accounting for 58.9% (n=156). In general students showed satisfaction with quality of content being taught; however there was discontent towards various academic and non- academic facilities provided to the students. Only 44.10% and 31.50% students reported provision of academic related facilities and interactive sessions as up to mark respectively; 83% students reported that undergraduate medical research was in need of improvement; 55.5% and 60.2% reported that facilities in hostel and recreational facilities needed improvement respectively; and 52.8% students stated presence of a healthy, student friendly, encouraging environment was not up to mark. Although course content and teaching methodologies are generally satisfactory, a healthy, student friendly, encouraging environment is vet to be created to help students foster their abilities completely.

  13. Identification of Factors Affecting Educational Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-04-19

    Apr 19, 2011 ... Economic Label, Self Concept, Training Environment, Health ... variables; consequently, the partial correlations between any pair of observed .... negative effects on educational performance based on data collected, we.

  14. Age Learning Factors Affecting Pilot Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, Brison

    This document, intended for pilot education and flight safety specialists, consists chiefly of a review of the literature on physiological factors that affect pilot education and an examination of environmental factors that should be scrutinized in order to improve the effectiveness of aviation learning facilities. The physiological factors…

  15. Considering Affective Responses towards Environments for Enhancing Location Based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Gartner, G.; Klettner, S.; Schmidt, M.

    2014-04-01

    A number of studies in the field of environmental psychology show that humans perceive and evaluate their surroundings affectively. Some places are experienced as unsafe, while some others as attractive and interesting. Experiences from daily life show that many of our daily behaviours and decision-making are often influenced by this kind of affective responses towards environments. Location based services (LBS) are often designed to assist and support people's behaviours and decision-making in space. In order to provide services with high usefulness (usability and utility), LBS should consider these kinds of affective responses towards environments. This paper reports on the results of a research project, which studies how people's affective responses towards environments can be modelled and acquired, as well as how LBS can benefit by considering these affective responses. As one of the most popular LBS applications, mobile pedestrian navigation systems are used as an example for illustration.

  16. The clinical learning environment in nursing education: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flott, Elizabeth A; Linden, Lois

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to report an analysis of the clinical learning environment concept. Nursing students are evaluated in clinical learning environments where skills and knowledge are applied to patient care. These environments affect achievement of learning outcomes, and have an impact on preparation for practice and student satisfaction with the nursing profession. Providing clarity of this concept for nursing education will assist in identifying antecedents, attributes and consequences affecting student transition to practice. The clinical learning environment was investigated using Walker and Avant's concept analysis method. A literature search was conducted using WorldCat, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases using the keywords clinical learning environment, clinical environment and clinical education. Articles reviewed were written in English and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1995-2014. All data were analysed for recurring themes and terms to determine possible antecedents, attributes and consequences of this concept. The clinical learning environment contains four attribute characteristics affecting student learning experiences. These include: (1) the physical space; (2) psychosocial and interaction factors; (3) the organizational culture and (4) teaching and learning components. These attributes often determine achievement of learning outcomes and student self-confidence. With better understanding of attributes comprising the clinical learning environment, nursing education programmes and healthcare agencies can collaborate to create meaningful clinical experiences and enhance student preparation for the professional nurse role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. SEARCH OF INNOVATION IN EDUCATION ENVIRONMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    B. Ece Şahin; Neslihan Dostoğlu

    2016-01-01

    In school design studying spatial qualities, which are in harmony with the education programmes’ goals, is important for creating physical conditions that support associated education process. In new learning approaches it is emphasized that there is no single learning method, that it is necessary to find different methods for learning in schools, and that there is a need to search for new education environments for learning. In this respect this study aims to examine new architectural exampl...

  18. Higher Education for Sustainability: Can Education Affect Moral Perceptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgendreher, Simon; Löfgren, Åsa

    2018-01-01

    A considerable literature looks at universities' approaches to integrating sustainable development into teaching and learning, but less is known about how Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) affects student attitudes, values and norms. To our knowledge, only a few studies have quantified such effects of changes in curricula. This study…

  19. Social environment affects juvenile dispersal in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaus, Marion; Michler, Stephanie P. M.; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Ubels, Richard; van der Velde, Marco; Komdeur, Jan; Both, Christiaan; Tinbergen, Joost M.; Wilson, Ken

    1. Habitat selection can affect individual fitness, and therefore, individuals are expected to assess habitat quality of potential breeding sites before settlement. 2. We investigated the role of social environment on juvenile dispersal behaviour in the great tit (Parus major). Two main

  20. Sibsize, Family Environment, Cognitive Performance, and Affective Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjoribanks, Kevin

    1976-01-01

    Incorporates measures of family environment (parent-child interaction) into research methodology to study the effects of sibsize (family size and birth order) on a child's cognitive performance and affective behavior. Provides tentative support for the confluence model of sibsize influences on children's behaviors. (RL)

  1. Factors Affecting Corporate Image from the Perspective of Distance Learning Students in Public Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Fábio Reis; Pelissari, Anderson Soncini

    2016-01-01

    New information technologies enable different interactions in the educational environment, affecting how the image of educational institutions adopting distance-learning programmes is perceived. This article identifies factors affecting the perception of corporate image from the viewpoint of distance-learning students at public higher education…

  2. CONSTRUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT SCHOOL-UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Petrovna Shatalova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study the key components of the development of constructive thinking of students on the basis of model building constructive educational environment school-University. It was conducted from a position of constructive approach in education, as a process of systemic-structural methodology of cognitive and creative activity of the student, promotes development and formation of various constructive qualities of the individual. The functions of constructive educational environment school-University aimed at developing constructive thinking of students, defined by its structural components and connections, shows the consistency of self-development of constructive thinking and job satisfaction the development of constructive skills. The findings reveal innovative possibilities of cooperation of schools and universities in the design and functioning model of constructive educatio-nal space that contributes to the development of constructive thinking of all its stakeholders.Purpose: measuring the effectiveness of the model constructive educational environment school-University aimed at the development of students.Methodology: the Programme of research included: (1 diagnosis of the development level of constructive thinking on the questionnaire developed in the context of the constructive theory of education, (2 augmented and revised by the author the diagnosis of satisfaction and importance model of constructive educational environment school-University by the method of G.A. Gagarin, as well as theoretical modeling, method of involved observation, formal teaching method.Results. The article introduces the concept of «constructive learning environments», which are considered in relation to the organization and conduct of joint activities of teachers, teachers and students. The authors give a theoretical comparative analysis of scientific works of colleagues in the context of the problem. Offer a brief

  3. Creating a Learning Environment for Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    Until recently discussions about improvement of educational quality have focussed on the teacher – it was as-sumed that by training the teacher you could increase the students’ learning outcome. Realising that other changes than better teaching were necessary to give the students more useful......? And the introduction of IT has highlighted the importance of the learning environment, but the focus has narrowly been on the physical environment. However, the mental frame-work is also very important. To assure educational quality it is necessary to take all these elements into account and consider the total...

  4. Learning Environment Facilitating Educational Achievements of Teenagers

    OpenAIRE

    Šūmane, Ilze

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The doctoral thesis of Ilze Šūmane in pedagogy science, school pedagogy sub-discipline ”Learning environment facilitating educational achievements of teenagers” was worked out in the Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Pedagogy, Psychology and Arts, University of Latvia, under the supervision of Dr.paed., professor Rudīte Andersone from2001 till 2011. The topicality of the research determined by the necessity to improve quality learning and education. During an effective study ...

  5. Prior Exposure and Educational Environment towards Entrepreneurial Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Soria-Barreto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is based on the responses to a questionnaire applied to 351 students of business management in Chile and Colombia. Through the analysis of structural equations on Ajzen’s model, we found that entrepreneurial education, the University environment, and the prior entrepreneurial exposure are mediated by the factors of the Ajzen`s model to generate entrepreneurial intention in higher education students. The results show that entrepreneurial education strengthens the perceived control of behavior and, with it, albeit in a differentiated way, the entrepreneurial intention of men and women. University environment affects entrepreneurial intention through attitude towards entrepreneurship; and finally, the work experience, used as one of the variables that measure prior entrepreneurial exposure, explains the entrepreneurial intention inversely through the subjective norms. We found that gender has a moderate effect on perceived control of behavior and entrepreneurial education. The scarce studies on the impact of the University environment and the mixed results of the entrepreneurial education and prior entrepreneurial exposure toward entrepreneurial intention show the necessity for further research. A second contribution is the opportunity to present new evidence about the relationship between University environment, entrepreneurial education and prior exposure to developing countries of South America, including the gender effect (moderator for entrepreneurial intention. It is important to note that most of the research in this area applies to developed countries, and some scholars suggest that extrapolating the results is not convenient.

  6. How the Physical Work Environment Can Affect Individual Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Johannsdottir, Thordis; Hansen, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Strategic Management The topic of this thesis is about how the physical work environment affects individual productivity, and with focus on productivity through the well-being aspect of individuals. The thesis has a theoretical approach with a pilot-exercise including a pilot experiment and questionnaire. This approach was chosen as the research question is comprehensive, and with the timeframe to complete this thesis. A theoretical approach gives the possibility to furt...

  7. AN ENVIRONMENT FOR EDUCATIONAL SERVICE COMMUNITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Spillner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In most global economies, there is a strong trend from agriculture and manufacturing towards service-orientation and tertiarisation: Services, products with value-added service solutions and, more recently, automated Internet service offerings seamlessly delivered through on-demand elastic cloud computing resources. In the affected societies, education is recognised as a key factor for maintaining the competitiveness. Specialised education about services is widely available, but tool support ...

  8. Environment, sustainability, and education policy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenzie, Marcia; Rickinson, Mark; Bengtssen, Stefan

    Introduction: This session is a two part symposium on the topic of environment and sustainability in relation to educational policy development, enactment, and analysis. This format is modeled on similar formats used in other international conferences, such as the Association of American...... and methodological approaches to policy and policy research. Some key questions to be addressed include:- What kinds of understandings of policy and policy research are informing work in environmental and sustainability education?- Are there interdisiplinary approaches to policy research that can be useful...... for furthering critical education policy analysis?- What are the relationships between policy development and its enactment or implementation? - To what extent has the environmental education field researched policy development and/or enactment?- What might environmental education research have to offer...

  9. Educational Ethnography in Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Victoria; Dooly, Melinda

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to answer some of the questions that emerge when carrying out educational ethnography in a blended learning environment. The authors first outline how Virtual Ethnography (VE) has been developed and applied by other researchers. Then, to better illustrate the approach, they describe a doctoral research project that implemented…

  10. The Development Of Virtual Educational Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken STEVENS

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of inter-school electronic networks has added a new dimension to education in Canada that has many implications for students who attend schools in rural communities. Collaborative internet-based teaching and learning and the creation of virtual classes within regional intranets now complement traditional on-site instruction in many schools that are located beyond major centres of population. Five stages in the advent of virtual educational environments can be identified starting with the introduction of computers in schools as a foundation for the development of collaborative teaching and learning environments. Inter-school collaboration in rural Canada and the extension of curriculum options for senior students has, in turn, provided a basis for the integration of virtual classes and traditional face to face instruction. Instruction in classes that are electronically-linked to other classes requires different skills from traditional face to face teaching and the development of new strategies and protocols. The implications of open and flexible teaching and learning for the future organization of classes, the preparation of teachers, articulation with higher education and in particular, regional economic development are now significant educational policy issues. The linking of virtual and face to face classes through cybercells is a possible next step in the development of virtual educational environments.

  11. Promoting the Affective Domain within Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade Higher Education Institutions have experienced tremendous growth in enrollments. To meet this demand, many higher education institutions have embraced online education and its requisite technologies. Online education has matured, and studies focusing on the cognitive domain indicate that distance education is as effective as the…

  12. Role of educational environment for students with health disadvantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silanteva T.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the inclusive environment's support practices promoting to basic purposes of inclusive education, i.e., involvement of a bigger number of students with health disabilities into society. The article regards a number of supporting models, which prepare students for transition into an inclusive class, contribute to successful adaptation in the classroom and affect social relations of students as connected with the way they are perceived and accepted by other people. We analyzed the methodological foundation of inclusive education, drawing on theoretical underpinnings of the inclusive model, and tried to observe their coincidences with the concepts of cultural-historical approach in psychology.

  13. Quality Of Educational Environment At Wah Medical College: Assessment By Using Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Robina; Ansar, Ambreen; Bibi, Anwar; Ramzan, Musarat; Munir, Arif; Zaheer, Amna; Ahmad, Afsa; Barlas, Aisha

    2017-01-01

    Educational environment not only has an impact on the students during the academic years but has its reflections throughout their medical career. The Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) is an internationally accepted useful tool to analyse undergraduate educational environments in the health professionals. The purpose of this study was to assess how students, across all the five years in a private medical college, perceive their educational environment. It was a cross sectional study, which used the DREEM inventory at Wah Medical College over the course of 6 months (January-June 2015). All 500 students were included in the study. The fifty items DREEM inventory, having the maximum score of two hundred indicating ideal educational environment was used for data collection. The questionnaire was completed by 400 undergraduate medical students (response rate 80%). The overall DREEM score was 122.63/200 (61.3%), indicating that the perception of the learning environment was more positive than negative. Among the highest scoring categories were students' participation in classes, relaxed atmosphere and confidence in passing the annual exams. However, many areas requiring improvement were also brought to attention. Overall, the student's perception of their learning environment at Wah Medical College was found to be positive. This study did bring to light some areas that could be improved upon. This should enable the faculty to adopt changes in their teaching methods to make the learning process more productive and enjoyable for future students.

  14. Poor sleep quality affects spatial orientation in virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Valera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is well known to have a significant impact on learning and memory. Specifically, studies adopting an experimentally induced sleep loss protocol in healthy individuals have provided evidence that the consolidation of spatial memories, as acquired through navigating and orienteering in spatial surroundings, is negatively affected by total sleep loss. Here, we used both objective and subjective measures to characterize individuals' quality of sleep, and grouped participants into either a poor (insomnia-like or normal (control sleep quality group. We asked participants to solve a wayfinding task in a virtual environment, and scored their performance by measuring the time spent to reach a target location and the number of wayfinding errors made while navigating. We found that participants with poor sleep quality were slower and more error-prone than controls in solving the task. These findings provide novel evidence that pre-existing sleep deficiencies in otherwise healthy individuals affects negatively the ability to learn novel routes, and suggest that sleep quality should be accounted for among healthy individuals performing experimental spatial orientation tasks in virtual environments.

  15. Does Education Affect Happiness? Evidence for Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunado, Juncal; de Gracia, Fernando Perez

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of education on happiness in Spain using individual-level data from the European Social Survey, by means of estimating Ordinal Logit Models. We find both direct and indirect effects of education on happiness. First, we find an indirect effect of education on happiness through income and labour status. That is, we…

  16. SYNTHETIC EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT – A FOOTPACE TO NEW EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga P. Pinchuk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the problems of introducing a synthetic learning environment in the practice of education. The modern views on the essence of the learning environment and its new forms based on information and communication technologies are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to a range of issues that are united in the English-language publications as a "synthetic environment", which is considered in two aspects – artificial environment and synthetic as is formed due to the synthesis of the real physical world and the results of simulation and modeling. There are considered issues of trends in usage of game-based learning and modeling as cognitive technologies, as well as of social networks as a synthetic environment of social development. Conclusions are drawn: synthetic learning environment becomes an independent subject of learning through the expansion of its content and didactic power, transformation of the individual as a recipient of knowledge into the synthesizing element of the educational process in the metaverse.

  17. Investigating the Experiential Impact of Sensory Affect in Contemporary Communication Design Studio Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshalsey, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The studio is the primary site for learning in specialist Communication Design education worldwide. Differing higher education institutions, including art schools and university campuses, have developed a varied range of studio environments. These diverse learning spaces inherently create a complex fabric of affects. In addition, Communication…

  18. Organizational Factors Affecting Legalization in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John W.

    Legalization here refers to the introduction into the educational system of new legal rules, emanating from outside the routine channels of educational management. It includes general legal rules from legislation, from the courts, or from higher administrative levels. The key to the definition is lack of integration of the new rules with the main…

  19. Workplace Environment Characteristics as Antecedents of Affective Well-being in the Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Waratta Authayarat; Hiroyuki Umemuro

    2012-01-01

    Workplace environment characteristics may positively or negatively evoke an individual’s affective experiences, and these experiences can influence affective experiences of others. This study investigates the relations between employees’ affective experiences and workplace environment characteristics. A questionnaire-based investigation was conducted with employees in Thai companies. Participants were asked to evaluate various aspects of their own workplace environments and their affective we...

  20. CHILDREN'S ENVIRONMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anette Boye; Laursen, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    in obligatory evaluations of physical, psychological and aesthetic environmental dimensions of learning and education. The present study aims to elucidate how professionals and children co-operate in order to develop 'best child environments' and further study the impact of children's perspectives on pedagogy...... in Denmark inspired by Montessori and Froebel pedagogical ideas.Danish ECE pedagogues practice with reference to a double concept of 'bildung'. They navigate towards personal development of the individual child as well as neoliberal management mechanisms with focus on objectives and competencies.......Danish pedagogues mention space and material conditions, psychological dimensions and to a less extent aesthetical dimensions such as play and artwork when they are asked to describe the best child environmental practice.Relevance for Nordic educational researchThe study offers practical knowledge regarding...

  1. Rethinking three long-established educational environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Alonso-Sanz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a descriptive research on the analysis of three public one-track schools, located in Alicante (Spain. The fieldwork for this research took an average of two months at each school. During this time, the general characteristics of each of the three schools, -their buildings, their classrooms, and their common areas- were studied in relation to their educational guidelines. Taken into consideration were the school’s aesthetic aspects such as: green spaces; lighting; colours; flexible learning spaces; the acoustical environment; smells; visuals; tidiness; and hygiene. The collaboration of the teachers and students allowed their profiles and their interpersonal relationships to be observed. Additionally, the pedagogic use of the classroom walls and the images displayed on them were also analysed. Finally, based upon each school’s characteristics, proposals to improve the connection between pedagogy and the school environment were recommended.

  2. Rain and Romanticism: The Environment in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor education provides an opportunity to engage with natural environments in ways that are distinct from other physical education teacher education (PETE) courses. This research examines how pre-service teachers (PSTs) within a PETE degree experienced "environment" on an outdoor education camp. Using self-study methodology and…

  3. The physical education lesson in Turkish primary schools: Affective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the study students' affective entry characteristics related to Physical Education lessons were examined based on three dimensions: interest towards the lesson, level of motivation in the lesson and educational gains. The study further aimed to investigate how these three dimensions were affected by the gender factor.

  4. A Case Study of an Affective Education Course in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Chiang; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the components of a framework for affective education implementation based on a positive psychology approach. A fifth grade class of 31 students in a public rural elementary school in Taiwan participated in a 13-week long affective education course that consisted of six units: Self-discovery, Love and…

  5. Education moderates the association between supermarket environment and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Christina; Ntani, Georgia; Inskip, Hazel; Barker, Mary; Cummins, Steven; Cooper, Cyrus; Moon, Graham; Baird, Janis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Supermarkets are a major source of food for many families. Knowledge of how educational attainment affects the relationship between the in-store environments of supermarkets and diet is needed. This study examined the relationship between maternal dietary quality and overall in-store supermarket environment, and assessed the effect modification of educational attainment. Methods Dietary quality z-scores were calculated for 829 mothers with young children using cross-sectional data collected in 2010-2011 from a 20-item food frequency questionnaire. Information about nine in-store factors (variety, price, quality, promotion, shelf placement, store placement, nutrition information, healthier alternatives and single fruit sale) on 12 foods known to discriminate between better and poorer dietary quality were collected from supermarkets and used to create a standardised ‘healthfulness’ z-score for each supermarket where mothers shopped. Results Multi-level unadjusted linear regression analysis completed in 2014-2015 showed that shopping at more healthful supermarkets was associated with better dietary quality (β=0.39 SD/SD; p=0.01; 95%CI: 0.10, 0.68). However, the relationship differed according to level of educational attainment (interaction p=0.006). Among mothers who left school at 16 years of age, those who shopped at less healthful supermarkets had poorer dietary quality (β=0.31 SD/SD; 95%CI: 0.07, 0.55). Among mothers with degrees, those who shopped at less healthful supermarkets had better dietary quality (β=-0.59 SD/SD; 95%CI: −1.19, 0.00). Conclusions Mothers with low educational attainment showed greater susceptibility to less healthful in-store environments than mothers with higher educational attainment who may be protected by greater psychological and financial resources. Policy initiatives to improve supermarket environments may be necessary to address dietary inequalities. PMID:27067035

  6. Education and the Relationship Between Supermarket Environment and Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Christina; Ntani, Georgia; Inskip, Hazel; Barker, Mary; Cummins, Steven; Cooper, Cyrus; Moon, Graham; Baird, Janis

    2016-08-01

    Supermarkets are a major source of food for many families. Knowledge of how educational attainment affects the relationship between in-store environments of supermarkets and diet is needed. This study examined the relationship between maternal dietary quality and overall in-store supermarket environment, and assessed the effect modification of educational attainment. Dietary quality z-scores were calculated for 829 mothers with young children using cross-sectional data collected in 2010-2011 from a 20-item food frequency questionnaire. Information about nine in-store factors (variety, price, quality, promotion, shelf placement, store placement, nutrition information, healthier alternatives, and single fruit sale) on 12 foods known to discriminate between better and poorer dietary quality were collected to create a standardized "healthfulness" z-score for each supermarket where mothers shopped. Multilevel unadjusted linear regression analysis completed in 2014-2015 showed that shopping at more-healthful supermarkets was associated with better dietary quality (β=0.39 SD/SD, p=0.01, 95% CI=0.10, 0.68). However, the relationship differed according to educational attainment (interaction, p=0.006). Among mothers who left school at age 16 years, those who shopped at less healthful supermarkets had poorer dietary quality (β=0.31 SD/SD, 95% CI=0.07, 0.55). Among mothers with degrees, those who shopped at less healthful supermarkets had better dietary quality (β=-0.59 SD/SD, 95% CI=-1.19, 0.00). Mothers with low educational attainment show greater susceptibility to less healthful in-store environments than mothers with higher educational attainment who may be protected by greater psychological and financial resources. Policy initiatives to improve supermarket environments may be necessary to address dietary inequalities. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mobile Education: Towards Affective Bi-modal Interaction for Adaptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthymios Alepis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One important field where mobile technology can make significant contributions is education. However one criticism in mobile education is that students receive impersonal teaching. Affective computing may give a solution to this problem. In this paper we describe an affective bi-modal educational system for mobile devices. In our research we describe a novel approach of combining information from two modalities namely the keyboard and the microphone through a multi-criteria decision making theory.

  8. Does Sibship Size Affect Educational Attainment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    This paper implements a test of the Resource Dilution Hypothesis (RDH) stating that sibship size has a negative causal effect on educational attainment. Most existing studies using conventional methods support the RDH. This paper implements an Instrumental Variable (IV) approach to testing...... the claim of a negative causal relationship between sibship size and educational attainment. Analyzing data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, the empirical analysis demonstrates, first, that conventional OLS regression estimates sibship size to have a negative effect on educational attainment equal...... to about one-tenth of a year of schooling per sibling. Second, when applying the IV method to account for potential endogeneity, the negative effect of sibship size increases substantially to about one-third of a year of schooling per sibling....

  9. Psychological biases affecting human cognitive performance in dynamic operational environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Kenichi; Reason, J.

    1999-01-01

    In order to identify cognitive error mechanisms observed in the dynamic operational environment, the following materials were analyzed giving special attention to psychological biases, together with possible cognitive tasks and these location, and internal and external performance shaping factors: (a) 13 human factors analyses of US nuclear power plant accidents, (b) 14 cases of Japanese nuclear power plant incidents, and (c) 23 cases collected in simulator experiments. In the resulting analysis, the most frequently identified cognitive process associated with error productions was situation assessment, and following varieties were KB processes and response planning, all of that were the higher cognitive activities. Over 70% of human error cases, psychological bias was affecting to cognitive errors, especially those to higher cognitive activities. In addition, several error occurrence patterns, including relations between cognitive process, biases, and PSFs were identified by the multivariate analysis. According to the identified error patterns, functions that an operator support system have to equip were discussed and specified for design base considerations. (author)

  10. Identification of Factors Affecting Educational Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three research instruments were used for the study namely, a questionnaire and two inventories. Data collected was analysed ... These were: Circumstances, Parental Authority, Socio- Economic Label, Self Concept, Training Environment, Health Characteristic and Socio-Economic Characteristic.These identified constructs ...

  11. Students’ Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ingeborg Placklé; Karen D. Könings; Wolfgang Jacquet; Katrien Struyven; Arno Libotton; Jeroen J. G. van Merriënboer; Nadine Engels

    2014-01-01

    If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument – the Inventory Powerful Learning Environments in Vocational Education - to measure students’ preferences on characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. W...

  12. Students Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Placklé, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument - the Inventory Powerful Learning Environments in Vocational Education - to measure studentsâ preferences on characteristics of powerful learning environments in voca-tional education. ...

  13. Affective Education for Visually Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Don C.; Gerler, Edwin R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of the Human Development Program (HDP) and the Developing Understanding of Self and Others (DUSO) program used with visually impaired children. Although HDP and DUSO affected the behavior of visually impaired children, they did not have any effect on children's attitudes toward school. (RC)

  14. Affective methodologies and experimenting with affirmative critiques of educational leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe

    concerns suitable methodologies for researching and experiments with affirmative critique of these new forms of educational leadership. In order not to just to ‘quote’, celebrate or reject this affective agenda, I ask how post-human, intra-active and performative approaches developed in Nordic feminist...... and anti-racist education studies may assist in experimenting with concepts and research formats, interrogate the (unforeseen) effects of affects and affective economies intertwined with new forms of educational leadership, and thereby formulate affirmative critiques of these new types of psy-leadership.......This paper will focus upon the identification of suitable and experimental methodologies for interrogating ‘the affective turn’ in European educational leadership. As an answer to the global GERM and the plea for improving learning outcomes, educational leadership in countries like Denmark seems...

  15. ARTIE: An Integrated Environment for the Development of Affective Robot Tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernón Cuadrado, Luis-Eduardo; Manjarrés Riesco, Ángeles; De La Paz López, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade robotics has attracted a great deal of interest from teachers and researchers as a valuable educational tool from preschool to highschool levels. The implementation of social-support behaviors in robot tutors, in particular in the emotional dimension, can make a significant contribution to learning efficiency. With the aim of contributing to the rising field of affective robot tutors we have developed ARTIE (Affective Robot Tutor Integrated Environment). We offer an architectural pattern which integrates any given educational software for primary school children with a component whose function is to identify the emotional state of the students who are interacting with the software, and with the driver of a robot tutor which provides personalized emotional pedagogical support to the students. In order to support the development of affective robot tutors according to the proposed architecture, we also provide a methodology which incorporates a technique for eliciting pedagogical knowledge from teachers, and a generic development platform. This platform contains a component for identiying emotional states by analysing keyboard and mouse interaction data, and a generic affective pedagogical support component which specifies the affective educational interventions (including facial expressions, body language, tone of voice,…) in terms of BML (a Behavior Model Language for virtual agent specification) files which are translated into actions of a robot tutor. The platform and the methodology are both adapted to primary school students. Finally, we illustrate the use of this platform to build a prototype implementation of the architecture, in which the educational software is instantiated with Scratch and the robot tutor with NAO. We also report on a user experiment we carried out to orient the development of the platform and of the prototype. We conclude from our work that, in the case of primary school students, it is possible to identify, without

  16. ARTIE: an Integrated Environment for the development of Affective Robot Tutors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis-Eduardo Imbernón Cuadrado

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade robotics has attracted a great deal of interest from teachers and researchers as a valuable educational tool from preschool to highschool levels. The implementation of social- support behaviours in robot tutors, in particular in the emotional dimension, can make a signicant contribution to learning efciency.With the aim of contributing to the rising eld of affective robot tutors we have developed ARTIE (Affective Robot Tutor Integrated Environment. We offer an architectural pattern which integrates any given educational software for primary school children with a component whose function is to identify the emotional state of the students who are interacting with the software, and with the driver of a robot tutor which provides personalized emotional pedagogical support to the students. In order to support the development of affective robot tutors according to the proposed architecture, we also provide a methodology which incorporates a technique for eliciting pedagogical knowledge from teachers, and a generic development platform. This platform contains a component for identiying emotional states by analysing keyboard and mouse interaction data, and a generic affective pedagogical support component which specifies the affective educational interventions (including facial expressions, body language, tone of voice,... in terms of BML (a Behavior Model Language for virtual agent specification files which are translated into actions of a robot tutor. The platform and the methodology are both adapted to primary school students. Finally, we illustrate the use of this platform to build a prototype implementation of the architecture, in which the educational software is instantiated with Scratch and the robot tutor with NAO. We also report on a user experiment we carried out to orient the development of the platform and of the prototype. We conclude from our work that, in the case of primary school students, it is possible to

  17. 49 CFR 520.5 - Guidelines for identifying major actions significantly affecting the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... significantly affecting the environment. 520.5 Section 520.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... significantly affecting the environment. (a) General guidelines. The phrase, “major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment,” as used in this part, shall be construed with a...

  18. Education Creates Welcoming Environment for Transgender Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Gridley, Samantha

    2016-08-01

    The ED often is the access point of choice for transgender patients who may be reluctant to interact with providers. Experts say there is a need for training and education of how to present a gender-affirming healthcare environment. Recommended steps include a review of policies, along with corresponding changes to electronic and paper intake forms to ensure that the language used is inclusive of all genders. While blanket discrimination may be declining, experts note that some providers are uncertain about how to interact with a transgender patient. It's always best to ask patients for their preferred name and pronoun and to repeat this exercise every three to six months for return patients, as gender identify can be fluid. To ease anxiety for transgender patients, consider developing a navigator program that will pair any transgender patient who requests the service with a trained advocate who can support and guide the patient through the system.

  19. School education on energy and environment problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imakita, Manami

    2005-01-01

    In Japanese school, elementary and junior- and senior-high, it is widely agreed that teaching of energy and environment is desirable, as has been adopted in a course of study of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. This paper reports the present state of affairs on these problems from elementary schools to high schools, describing of each school year or grade and each lessons separately. It contains the results of the author's investigation on curriculum and syllabus including some classroom practices and measurement of natural radioactivity and radiation with the help of adequate measuring instruments and visits to some related facilities. Methods of learning and teaching are also studied together with some future prospect. (S. Ohno)

  20. A Review of Research on Facebook as an Educational Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Selami

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a review of Facebook as an educational environment, as research on its use within education is relatively new. The study is categorized into six sections: Facebook users; reasons people use Facebook; harmful effects of Facebook; Facebook as an educational environment; Facebook's effects on culture, language,…

  1. Evaluation of Hybrid and Distance Education Learning Environments in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Cascales, Rosario; Walker, Scott L.; Reig-Ferrer, Abilio; Fernandez-Pascual, Maria Dolores; Albaladejo-Blazquez, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation and validation of the "Distance Education Learning Environments Survey" (DELES) for use in investigating the qualities found in distance and hybrid education psycho-social learning environments in Spain. As Europe moves toward post-secondary student mobility, equanimity in access to higher education,…

  2. Rearing environment affects development of the immune system in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inman, C.F.; Haverson, K.; Konstantinov, S.R.; Jones, P.H.; Harris, C.; Smidt, H.; Miller, B.; Bailey, M.; Stokes, C.

    2010-01-01

    P>Early-life exposure to appropriate microbial flora drives expansion and development of an efficient immune system. Aberrant development results in increased likelihood of allergic disease or increased susceptibility to infection. Thus, factors affecting microbial colonization may also affect

  3. Does Webinar-Based Financial Education Affect Knowledge and Behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carrie L.; Schumacher, Joel B.

    2016-01-01

    Using webinar delivery for Extension financial education programs allows educators to reach a broader range of clientele. It can, however, be difficult to gauge participants' learning of concepts in an online environment. Evaluations of two webinar series, one in Montana and the other in South Dakota, sought to determine the effectiveness of using…

  4. Students' Conception of Learning Environment and Their Approach to Learning and Its Implication on Quality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaineh, Matheas Shemelis

    2017-01-01

    Quality of education in higher institutions can be affected by different factors. It partly rests on the learning environment created by teachers and the learning approach students are employing during their learning. The main purpose of this study is to examine the learning environment at Mizan Tepi University from students' perspective and their…

  5. NOTE FOR EDITOR: Twitter As An Educational Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Selami AYDIN

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to present a review of Twitter as an educational environment, as research is relatively new. The reviewed studies have been categorized into three sections: Ø Reasons to use Twitter, Ø Twitter as an educational environment, and Ø some drawbacks. Twitter and language teaching and learning and Twitter and libraries were subtitled under the section of Twitter as an educational environment. To conclude, current literature reflects that Twitter has a positi...

  6. How the Non-Work Environment Can Affect Worker and Family Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittle, Chad

    2016-10-19

    Occupational health nurses are familiar with environmental exposures workers encounter in their workplaces. However, employees are only "on-the-job" about one third of each workday, with a multitude of potential exposures in other environments that can affect their health. This article addresses some of the major exposures employees encounter outside the workplace-air, water, and soil pollution, and hazardous wastes-including a discussion of several well-known national and international environmental incidents. The major sources of these pollutants and how they contaminate the environment were investigated. Finally, risk assessment and communication along with effective strategies for educating employees and the community are presented. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Implications of Affective and Social Neuroscience for Educational Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen major advances in cognitive, affective and social neuroscience that have the potential to revolutionize educational theories about learning. The importance of emotion and social learning has long been recognized in education, but due to technological limitations in neuroscience research techniques, treatment of these…

  8. 1HE SCIENTISTS WILL SAVE 1HE WORLD: Environment Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environment Education in An Alienated Society. Jaap Kuiper ... all: is it the input from science and scientists that will deliver the goods .... that the development of school curricula for. Zimbabwe was ..... In the case of informal or adult education,.

  9. Strategic guidelines of the educational interactive environment as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategic guidelines of the educational interactive environment as a basis to ... school and interactive technologies of education, pedagogical innovations, etc. ... and characterizing components of his conceptual model: motivational-target, ...

  10. Digital academia: How higher education is affected by digital technology

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksmo, Anton; Sundberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology in higher education is constantly evolving. Understanding the effects of digital technology is important for higher education institutions in order to make good investments of digital technology. Previous research has focused on learning, teaching or the organization and the relation between one of these aspects and digital technology, thereby missing a broader understanding of how materiality in digital technology affects higher education. In this study themed interviews w...

  11. Evaluation of hybrid and distance education learning environments in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer-Cascales, Rosario; Walker, Scott L.; Reig-Ferrer, Abilio; Fernández-Pascual, M. Dolores; Albaladejo-Blázquez, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation and validation of the Distance Education Learning Environments Survey (DELES) for use in investigating the qualities found in distance and hybrid education psycho-social learning environments in Spain. As Europe moves toward post-secondary student mobility, equanimity in access to higher education, and more standardised degree programs across the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) the need for a high quality method for continually assessing the excelle...

  12. Does source population size affect performance in new environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Matthew C; Fraser, Dylan J

    2014-01-01

    Small populations are predicted to perform poorly relative to large populations when experiencing environmental change. To explore this prediction in nature, data from reciprocal transplant, common garden, and translocation studies were compared meta-analytically. We contrasted changes in performance resulting from transplantation to new environments among individuals originating from different sized source populations from plants and salmonids. We then evaluated the effect of source population size on performance in natural common garden environments and the relationship between population size and habitat quality. In ‘home-away’ contrasts, large populations exhibited reduced performance in new environments. In common gardens, the effect of source population size on performance was inconsistent across life-history stages (LHS) and environments. When transplanted to the same set of new environments, small populations either performed equally well or better than large populations, depending on life stage. Conversely, large populations outperformed small populations within native environments, but only at later life stages. Population size was not associated with habitat quality. Several factors might explain the negative association between source population size and performance in new environments: (i) stronger local adaptation in large populations and antagonistic pleiotropy, (ii) the maintenance of genetic variation in small populations, and (iii) potential environmental differences between large and small populations. PMID:25469166

  13. Some effects of a modern university educational environment informatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Noskova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the effects that occur in the process of the educational environment informatization. The following effects were analyzed: information richness, openness, individualization of learning and collaboration. Examples of educational practice, illustrating the significant changes of the university educational environment associated with the manifestation of these effects, are presented. The aim of the pilot study carried out in Herzen University was to identify the attitude to the listed effects of teachers and students who are using information and communication technology in the educational interactions. The leading method of study were a series of surveys addressed to teachers and students. Groups of questions were related to basic information effects, manifested in the educational environment of the university. The total number of the survey participants is 200 students (bachelors and masters and 100 teachers, most actively using electronic environment for research, education and professional activities. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the results showed that information richness, spatial and temporal freedom of educational interactions are demanded by students, but at the same time, the data indicated a lack of systematic pedagogical support for the information and educational activities of students. A large part of students show a high autonomy in the information educational environment, but also demands implementing individualized information and communication educational request. Students and teachers are actively using a variety of information and communication opportunities of the electronic environment, but students’ activeness in the electronic environment is largely determined by the recommendations of teachers, rather than by a free choice of educational opportunities. The participants of the educational environment acquire a significant degree of freedom in relation to the time and place of interaction with

  14. Societal Changes Affecting Primary School Education after the Second World War in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksuniemi, Merja; Niemisalo, Sari

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate how changes in both foreign and domestic environments after the Second World War affected primary education and teacher training in Finland, the article presents a historical picture of the post-war reality of the school system, based on a review of sources that include laws, decrees, curricula, textbooks and previous research. The…

  15. Qualitative assessment of home environment across the different educational status of parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the home environment of preschool children among 6 villages in Ludhiana district in Punjab state, India. The sample included 120 children aged 3-5 years. Eight composite scales were used to measure the home environment: learning stimulation, language stimulation, physical environment, warmth and affection, academic stimulation, role modeling, variety of experience, and acceptance. The sample reflected four educational groups for the father (illiterate, primary, matric, and graduate) and three educational groups for the mother (illiterate, primary, and matric). Findings clearly indicate that graduate level parents provided a more enriched home environment than less educated and illiterate parents. Education was unrelated to warmth and affection or acceptance between parents and children. Educated mothers showed slightly more warmth and affection. The stimulation in the growth of language and learning stimulation was significantly greater among graduate parents. Mothers encouraged their children to speak correctly, whereas illiterate mothers did not realize the importance. The lesser physical environment among lower educated parents supports findings of R.K. Srivastava (1974) on the association between lower scholastic achievement and overcrowding in the home. The study included homes where parents had sufficient financial resources to provide a safe and adequate physical environment but did not do so.

  16. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN AFFECTS AND REPRESENTATIONS INVOLVED IN THE SCHOOL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Osti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assumes that the affective dimensions involves the process of planning and developing pedagogical practices and are an important factor in determining the nature of relations between the students and the various objects of knowledge. In this sense, the study aimed to analyze how students represent the affective aspects of both the teaching and learning process and what are their perceptions of the learning environment. The participants were 120 students of the 5th year of elementary school of public schools in the metropolitan region of Campinas, 60 of those students having satisfactory academic performance and 60 having learning disabilities. To gather the data, three instruments were used: “Psychopedagogical Educational Par Proof”, “AffectionsZanon Scale” and “Teacher Expectations Scale”. The results revealed that students with learning disabilities differ significantly from those with adequate performance. Students with learning difficulties establish fewer ties with the formal school learning and for their teachers and this portrays non-school situations while students with satisfactory performance have a better understanding of the expectations of their teachers and this shows that they have a more emotional relationship with the school environment. It is believed that this study contributes to the understanding of the relationship between the feelings experienced by students in the context of the classroom and its implications for the academic performance of the same. Keywords: Positive Psychology. Interpersonal relationships. Learning experiences.

  17. Attitudinal Variables Affecting Education Reforms and Quality of Primary Education in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenje, Aida; Nkata, James

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes the extent to which attitudinal variables affect the education reforms and subsequently the quality of primary education in Uganda. The paper is based on the views of a wide spectrum of different education stakeholders including: policy analysts, Members of Parliament (MPs), education officers, Headteachers, teaching staff,…

  18. Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heafner, Tina L., Ed.; Hartshorne, Richard, Ed.; Petty, Teresa, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of technology in classrooms is rapidly emerging as a way to provide more educational opportunities for students. As virtual learning environments become more popular, evaluating the impact of this technology on student success is vital. "Exploring the Effectiveness of Online Education in K-12 Environments" combines…

  19. Research Methods Identifying Correlation Between Physical Environment of Schools and Educational Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grėtė Brukštutė

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is analysing the research that was already carried out in order to determine correlation between a physical environment of schools and educational paradigms. While selecting materials for the analysis, the attention was focused on studies conducted in the USA and European countries. Based on these studies the methodological attitudes towards coherence of the education and spatial structures were tried to identify. Homogeneity and conformity of an educational character and a physical learning environment became especially important during changes of educational conceptions. The issue how educational paradigms affect the architecture of school buildings is not yet analysed in Lithuania, therefore the results of this research could actualize a theme on correlation between educational paradigms and the architecture of school buildings and form initial guidelines for the development of the modern physical learning environment.

  20. Designing for Automatic Affect Inference in Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Shazia; Robinson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Emotions play a significant role in healthy cognitive functioning; they impact memory, attention, decision-making and attitude; and are therefore influential in learning and achievement. Consequently, affective diagnoses constitute an important aspect of human teacher-learner interactions motivating efforts to incorporate skills of affect…

  1. Investment Analysis Of Environment Pollution In Educational Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbub Ullah Miyan; Abdus Salam; Md. Nuruzzaman; Sanjida Naznin

    2015-01-01

    Environment pollution has become one of the biggest concerns for the educational institutions in Bangladesh. Thinking not yet starts that environmental pollution has a connection with educational institutions which requires investment. Educational institutions are paying huge amount of money in order to clean the academic atmosphere. Due to unawareness and unconsciousness the environment of the institutions campus continuously polluting in many ways. This paper provides an outline of how diff...

  2. Leading factors in the formation of innovative education environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gulicheva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of forming innovative education environment at the universities along with the problem of ensuring long-term competitiveness of education services at both national and global markets. The management model of an innovative education environment is offered, with particular attention being paid to the development of innovative technologies of global education as well as education services’ export. Based on the statistical study of the dynamics in the number and composition of foreign students studying in Russia along with a comparative analysis of education costs at the universities-leaders of academic mobility, a forecast is presented concerning the development of the export of Russian universities’ knowledge while shaping the innovative education environment inside the country.

  3. Construction environment education development activity for children pre-school

    OpenAIRE

    MA. TRAN THI THUY NGA; MA. PHAM THI YEN

    2015-01-01

    Education motor development contribute to the comprehensive development of pre-school children. Building educational environment for young athletes develop in pre-school is one of many issues of concern in the current stage of pre-school education in Vietnam.

  4. Exploring perceptions of the educational environment among undergraduate physiotherapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Per J; Lindquist, Ingrid; Sundberg, Tobias; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Laksov, Klara B

    2014-07-19

    The aim of this study was to explore areas of strength and weakness in the educational environment as perceived by undergraduate physiotherapy students and to investigate these areas in relation to the respondents' demographic characteristics. This study utilized a cross-sectional study design and employed the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure, a 50-item, self-administered inventory relating to a variety of topics directly pertinent to educational environments. Convenience sampling was used, and the scores were compared across demographic variables. All undergraduate physiotherapy students in their first five terms of the programme in a major Swedish university were invited to participate in the study. A total of 222 students (80%) completed the inventory. With an overall score of 150/200 (75%), the students rated the educational environment in this institution as "more positive than negative". Two items consistently received deprived scores - authoritarian teachers and teaching with an overemphasis on factual learning. Students in term 4 differed significantly from others, and students with earlier university education experience perceived the atmosphere more negatively than their counterparts. There were no significant differences with regards to other demographic variables. This study provides valuable insight into how undergraduate physiotherapy students perceive their educational environment. In general, students perceived that their educational programme fostered a sound educational environment. However, some areas require remedial measures in order to enhance the educational experience.

  5. Students' Perception of Educational Environment of Medical Colleges in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurun Nahar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students' perceptions of their educational environment are a useful basis for modifying and improving the quality of educational environment. Educational environment is one of the most important factors determining the success of an effective curriculum. The quality of educational environment has been identified to be crucial for effective learning. Identifying the weakness of educational environment and understanding how students perceive the environment will help the institute to facilitate learning and to achieve better learning outcome. Objective: To explore students' perceptions of their educational environment and to find out gender differences in perception. Methods: It was a cross sectional descriptive study. Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM inventory was administered to 1903 medical students (studying in 3rd, 4th and 5th year MBBS course in 15 medical colleges of Bangladesh adopting purposive sampling. Results: The total mean score for all students was found positive (110/200. Students' perceptions of learning was positive (28/48, perceptions of teachers was moving in right direction (24/44, students academic self perception was positive (19.5/32. Students' perceptions of atmosphere was expressed as many issues need to change (24/48 and social self perceptions was not a nice place (14/28. Female students’ perceptions were significantly higher than male students. Conclusion: Remedial measure should be needed in the subscales of students’ perceptions of atmosphere and social self perceptions for further improvement. Findings from this study may give guideline to curricular planner and faculties/administrators of medical college for further improvement of educational environment. Key words: perception; educational environment; medical college  DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i2.7060BSMMU J 2010; 3(2: 97-102

  6. Does the Environment Responsibility Affect the Management Control System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hichem DKHILI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature suggests a problem emerging between management controls systems with the new responsibilities that companies must take into consideration. This study examines a system design management control tool orientation as behaviors that can overcome the uncertainties related to the environment and register the company in a voluntary approach which takes into account the environmental dimensions. A questionnaire survey sent to 306 Tunisian industrial companies was conducted. The results of the exploratory and confirmatory analysis are required. The results of the principal component factor analysis evidenced by Cronbach's alpha and KMO test, helped to cleanse the items selected from the literature. Similarly, the results of structural equations with indices of structural adjustment and parcimonies have devoted a good quality adjustment. Overall, findings suggest that most of the firm’s environment is uncertain, more tools to include in its environmental dimensions. On the other hand, the voluntary integration of an environmental approach is part of a strategy of cost leadership in the Tunisian industrial companies.

  7. The Audiologist in the Educational Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara L.

    1973-01-01

    Although the educational audiologist is a newcomer to the educational enviroment of hearing impaired children, he provides such essential services as adapting or modifying audiological tests and techniques traditionally used in clincial settings, thus more adequately defining and supplying acoustic needs. (Author/MC)

  8. A music educational environment for preschoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.E.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Retra, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of an interactive computer environment that envisions to contribute to young children's musical learning. The intent is to stimulate the child's inherent musical abilities by engaging the child in active musical interaction with the environment. The

  9. The Greenhouse Effect and Built Environment Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenall Gough, Annette; Gough, Noel

    The greenhouse effect has always existed. Without the greenhouse effect, Earth could well have the oven-like environment of Venus or the deep-freeze environment of Mars. There is some debate about how much the Earth's surface temperature will rise given a certain amount of increase in the amount of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous…

  10. Students’ Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Placklé

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument - the Inventory Powerful Learning Environments in Vocational Education - to measure students’ preferences on characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We investigated whether student preferences on the design of their learning environments are in line with what is described in the literature as beneficial for learning. Data of 544 students show that the preferences of students support most characteristics of PLEs in vocational education. Looking through the eyes of students, teachers have to challenge their students and encourage them to take their learning in their own hands. Adaptive learning support is needed. Remarkable, students do not prefer having reflective dialogues with teachers or peers.

  11. Arsenic-Microbe-Mineral Interactions in Mining-Affected Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Hudson-Edwards

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The toxic element arsenic (As occurs widely in solid and liquid mine wastes. Aqueous forms of arsenic are taken up in As-bearing sulfides, arsenides, sulfosalts, oxides, oxyhydroxides, Fe-oxides, -hydroxides, -oxyhydroxides and -sulfates, and Fe-, Ca-Fe- and other arsenates. Although a considerable body of research has demonstrated that microbes play a significant role in the precipitation and dissolution of these As-bearing minerals, and in the alteration of the redox state of As, in natural and simulated mining environments, the molecular-scale mechanisms of these interactions are still not well understood. Further research is required using traditional and novel mineralogical, spectroscopic and microbiological techniques to further advance this field, and to help design remediation schemes.

  12. Capital, Inequality and Education in Conflict-Affected Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-First Century" has brought the issue of inequality to the centre of political debate. This article explores contemporary research on the relationship between education and inequality in conflict-affected contexts with a view to seeing how Piketty's work speaks to these issues as a field of research and…

  13. State Outlook: Fiscal and State Policy Issues Affecting Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides a compilation of the issues affecting postsecondary education in America. The contents of this issue include: (1) Overview of Economic and Fiscal Dynamics; (2) Global and Domestic Growth Prospects; (3) Snapshot of Economic Indicators--November 2010; (4) Labor Market Conditions and Post-Recession Economic Impacts; (5)…

  14. Factors Affecting English Language Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong Thi; Warren, Wendy; Fehring, Heather

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports part of a study that aims to explore factors affecting the efficacy of non-major English teaching and learning in Vietnamese higher education through an investigation of classroom practices. Eight non-participant class observations were conducted at HUTECH University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The study's findings show that…

  15. Factors Affecting Students' Self-Efficacy in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dinther, Mart; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien

    2011-01-01

    Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning. This article investigates empirical literature…

  16. State Outlook: Fiscal and Public Policy Issues Affecting Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides a compilation of the issues affecting postsecondary education in America. The contents of this issue include: (1) Overview of Economic and Fiscal Policy Dynamics; (2) July 2010 Economic Snapshot; (3) State Economic Conditions and Budget Outlook; (4) State Budget Pressures; (5) State Budget Realignment Strategies; (6)…

  17. Factors affecting students' self-efficacy in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Mart van Dinther; Prof. dr. Mien Segers; Prof. dr. Filip Dochy

    2011-01-01

    Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning.

  18. Educator or Counselor? Navigating Uncertain Boundaries in the Clinical Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Annette M; Corcoran, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Nurse educators in the clinical environment experience great rewards and challenges in their work with undergraduate students. However, closely working with students can lead to the challenge of intervening with those who are emotionally distressed. How do nurse educators navigate the precarious and subtle territory between educating and counseling? This article briefly reviews how boundaries are explored in nursing. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate how nurse educators can determine when their support and education begins to move into the counseling role. Finally, future directions for nurse educators are suggested. Little research exists that examines how nurse educators navigate the boundaries between educator and counselor roles with students in clinical settings. Navigating between the educator and counselor roles with students experiencing emotional distress in clinical settings can be challenging for nurse educators. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Stem and ICT education in intelligent environments

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    This book combines information communication technology (ICT) with the creative interdisciplinary teaching approach known as STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). It introduces STEM and Creative Education and shows (through examples and creative activities) the importance and impact that ICT has for STEM and modern education.  The book describes the audio visual classroom, the use of the Internet, Social Networking and STEM, and provides STEM lessons for both the real and virtual worlds. Instructors will find this unique textbook to be very useful with students, of various ages, in creative education and engineering classes. This special book offers something for everyone. It serves as a guide for teachers in charge of science fairs and creative classes, especially those which require STEM education. It also includes activities to help develop creative thinking and problem-solving skills, and prepares students who plan to become teachers and mentors of the future. Readers in general can s...

  20. Family Environments and Children's Executive Function: The Mediating Role of Children's Affective State and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhong-Hua; Yin, Wen-Gang

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that inadequate family environments (family material environment and family psychosocial environment) are not only social problems but also factors contributing to adverse neurocognitive outcomes. In the present study, the authors investigated the relationship among family environments, children's naturalistic affective state, self-reported stress, and executive functions in a sample of 157 Chinese families. These findings revealed that in inadequate family material environments, reduced children's cognitive flexibility is associated with increased naturalistic negative affectivity and self-reported stress. In addition, naturalistic negative affectivity mediated the association between family expressiveness and children's cognitive flexibility. The authors used a structural equation model to examine the mediation model hypothesis, and the results confirmed the mediating roles of naturalistic negative affectivity and self-reported stress between family environments and the cognitive flexibility of Chinese children. These findings indicate the importance of reducing stress and negative emotional state for improving cognitive functions in children of low socioeconomic status.

  1. Anatomy education environment measurement inventory: A valid tool to measure the anatomy learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadie, Siti Nurma Hanim; Hassan, Asma'; Ismail, Zul Izhar Mohd; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Khan, Aaijaz Ahmed; Kasim, Fazlina; Yusof, Nurul Aiman Mohd; Manan Sulong, Husnaida Abdul; Tg Muda, Tg Fatimah Murniwati; Arifin, Wan Nor; Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri

    2017-09-01

    Students' perceptions of the education environment influence their learning. Ever since the major medical curriculum reform, anatomy education has undergone several changes in terms of its curriculum, teaching modalities, learning resources, and assessment methods. By measuring students' perceptions concerning anatomy education environment, valuable information can be obtained to facilitate improvements in teaching and learning. Hence, it is important to use a valid inventory that specifically measures attributes of the anatomy education environment. In this study, a new 11-factor, 132-items Anatomy Education Environment Measurement Inventory (AEEMI) was developed using Delphi technique and was validated in a Malaysian public medical school. The inventory was found to have satisfactory content evidence (scale-level content validity index [total] = 0.646); good response process evidence (scale-level face validity index [total] = 0.867); and acceptable to high internal consistency, with the Raykov composite reliability estimates of the six factors are in the range of 0.604-0.876. The best fit model of the AEEMI is achieved with six domains and 25 items (X 2  = 415.67, P education environment in Malaysia. A concerted collaboration should be initiated toward developing a valid universal tool that, using the methods outlined in this study, measures the anatomy education environment across different institutions and countries. Anat Sci Educ 10: 423-432. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Physics education students’ cognitive and affective domains toward ecological phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napitupulu, N. D.; Munandar, A.; Redjeki, S.; Tjasyono, B.

    2018-05-01

    Environmental education is become prominent in dealing with natural phenomena that occur nowadays. Studying environmental physics will lead students to have conceptual understanding which are importent in enhancing attitudes toward ecological phenomena that link directry to cognitive and affective domains. This research focused on the the relationship of cognitive and affective domains toward ecological phenomena. Thirty-seven Physics Education students participated in this study and validated sources of data were collected to eksplore students’ conceptual understanding as cognitive domain and to investigate students’ attitudes as affective domain. The percentage of cognitive outcome and affective outcome are explore. The features of such approaches to environmental learning are discussion through analysis of contribution of cognitive to develop the attitude ecological as affective outcome. The result shows that cognitive domains do not contribute significantly to affective domain toward ecological henomena as an issue trend in Central Sulawesi although students had passed Environmental Physics instruction for two semester. In fact, inferior knowledge in a way actually contributes to the attitude domain caused by the prior knowledge that students have as ombo as a Kaili local wisdom.

  3. Applying Google Translate in a higher education environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying Google Translate in a higher education environment: Translation products assessed. ... Five raters assessed the quality of the 36 translation products using Colina's assessment tool (2009). The results ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  4. MIGRATION EFFECTS ON THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminița\tCORBU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose to present the current migration patterns and consequences which they have on the economical and social life in Romania. Romania's integration in the European Union had numerous benefits, meaning that it opened gates to new jobs and to new systems of education. This paper aims to highlight the demographic, social, economical and educational effects of migration on the population of Romania. There is a social impact on the lives of migrant families, especially the temporary abandonment of minors by migrant parents, low academic achievement, early school leaving and adopting inadequately behaviors in society.

  5. "Ubuntu," "Ukama," Environment and Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines a moral education guided by African traditional values such as "ubuntu" and "ukama." It argues that "ubuntu" is not by definition speciesist, as some have claimed, but that it has strong ecocentric leanings, that is, if "ubuntu" is understood as a concrete expression of…

  6. Elearn: A Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Anna; Economides, Anastasios A.

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) that support collaboration are one of the new technologies that have attracted great interest. VLEs are learning management software systems composed of computer-mediated communication software and online methods of delivering course material. This paper presents ELearn, a collaborative VLE for teaching…

  7. Character Development in Business Education: A Comparison of Coeducational and Single-Sex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James H.; Ruhe, John; Lee, Monle; Rajadhyaksha, Ujvala

    2011-01-01

    This study questions the widely held assumption, particularly in the United States, that coeducation is best. Previous research supports the development of single-sex education for both female and male students. This study examines how the learning climate of the coeducation environment seems to affect the character development of female business…

  8. Close Encounters with the Turbulent Environment of Urban Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Arthur; Levey, Richard

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of urban education, public school educators must be joined by the public, legislators, business leaders, and social planners. These individuals will need to understand public policy priorities, as well as the social, economic, and political forces which define our present environment. (Author/GC)

  9. Students' Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placklé, Ingeborg; Könings, Karen D.; Jacquet, Wolfgang; Struyven, Katrien; Libotton, Arno; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument--the Inventory Powerful Learning…

  10. Software and Courseware for a Multimedia Educational Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Yves; Schwartz, Jacob

    Prepared for a 1984 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) conference, this report on the educational applications of new information technologies focuses primarily on the use of interactive audiovisual systems. Potential advantages of interactive multimedia educational environments are discussed and examples are given of…

  11. Ubiquitous Learning Environments in Higher Education: A Scoping Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Mari Aulikki; Haavisto, Elina; Liikanen, Eeva; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous learning and the use of ubiquitous learning environments heralds a new era in higher education. Ubiquitous learning environments enhance context-aware and seamless learning experiences available from any location at any time. They support smooth interaction between authentic and digital learning resources and provide personalized…

  12. Teamwork: Education for Entrants to the Environment Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Barry; Thomas, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Numerous reports over recent years emphasise the importance of teamwork training in undergraduate programs in environment education at tertiary level. This paper describes a project undertaken by a team of final year undergraduate environment students from four faculties at RMIT University in Australia working on a multi-disciplinary environment…

  13. MODELING OF INNOVATION EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF GENERAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION: THE SCIENTIFIC APPROACHES

    OpenAIRE

    Anzhelika D. Tsymbalaru

    2010-01-01

    In the paper the scientific approaches to modeling of innovation educational environment of a general educational institution – system (analysis of object, process and result of modeling as system objects), activity (organizational and psychological structure) and synergetic (aspects and principles).

  14. [Working environment and educational environment are two sides of the same coin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannegaard, Pia Nimann; Holm, Ellen Astrid

    2014-01-20

    Educational environment is of major importance for job satisfaction and it consists of several components including curriculum and values of the organization. Educational climate is the environment, as the individual physicians perceive it. Motivation is important for job satisfaction as well as for learning. Autonomy, responsibility, supervision, feedback are all important factors influencing motivation and learning. These factors must be supported through appropriate organization of work in hospital departments and in general practice.

  15. The impact of the educational environment on career choice and attitudes toward psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Rathi; Lim, Haikel A; Verma, Swapna; Kua, Ee Heok

    2015-05-01

    The educational environment may influence students' attitudes towards medical specialties, which in turn can affect specialty career choices. The present study sought to establish if perceptions of the educational environment in a psychiatry rotation influenced attitudinal changes towards psychiatry in medical students and impacts decisions about psychiatry as a career choice. The modified Attitudes to Psychiatry Scale, Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure, and questions specific to career choice in psychiatry were administered to 100 undergraduates in a psychiatry rotation. Significant improvements in attitudes toward psychiatry were highly correlated with the educational environment, particularly when it was perceived as providing inspiration and enabling students to recognize the merits of psychiatry and the effectiveness of treatment. However, there was a worsening trend in the stigma to psychiatry in the posting, and only the positive attitudinal change (but not educational environment) influenced a career choice in psychiatry. While the educational environment contributes towards positive attitudinal changes in a specialty rotation, stigma of psychiatry continues to be a limiting factor, which is, unfortunately, not clearly addressed in the curriculum. The findings support the urgent need for interventions in this area.

  16. VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. BOLBOACA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of communication and information technologies lead to the changes in continuing medical education by offering the possibility to move up-to-date medical information through Internet to the physicians. The main goal of this study was to create a virtual space for continuing medical education. In this context, a number of computer-assisted tools for instruction, evaluation and utilization in daily activity have been developed and integrated into a unitary system. The main imposed specifications of the system were accessibility, integrity, availability, and security.This report describes the characteristics of tables design and organization, and of system integration. The security level was imposed for assuring the accessibility of each physician to medical information useful in his or her activity and the knowledge database development.

  17. Secondary Vocational Education in Working Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvido Melink

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a successful project of secondary vocational education carried out by our school for the occupation of a toolmaker and a machinist for the companies Domel, Indramat and Niko in Železniki, considering the modern methods of teaching adults and having consistently adjusted timetable of the lectures in accordance with the working hours of the candidates and the production process respectively. Lectures, training and practical work in the workshop were performed in the company and school's workshops and laboratories. In the additional chapter the authors draw attention to the problems of payment for the teachers of technical s ubjects, who enter the education process with great working experience from companies but start here as beginners since the school regulations do not define such cases.

  18. DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION: Learning Through Artificial Teaching Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Reviewed by Özlem OZAN

    2009-01-01

    DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION:Learning Through Artificial Teaching EnvironmentsGibson, David, Ed.D.; Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA,SBN-10: 1605663239, ISBN-13: 9781605663234, p.514 Jan 2009Reviewed byÖzlem OZANFaculty of Education, Eskişehir Osmangazi University,Eskisehir-TURKEYSimulations in education, both for children and adults,become popular with the development of computer technology, because they are fun and engaging and allow learners to internalize knowledg...

  19. Education for Knowledge Society: Learning and Scientific Innovation Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander O. Karpov

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-active learning research-type environment is the fundamental component of the education system for the knowledge society. The purpose of the research is the development of conceptual bases and a constructional model of a cognitively active learning environment that stimulates the creation of new knowledge and its socio-economic application. Research methods include epistemic-didactic analysis of empirical material collected as a result of the study of research environments at school...

  20. Using a Feedback Environment to Improve Creative Performance: A Dynamic Affect Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Prior research on feedback and creative performance has neglected the dynamic nature of affect and has focused only on the influence of positive affect. We argue that creative performance is the result of a dynamic process in which a person experiences a phase of negative affect and subsequently enters a state of high positive affect that is influenced by the feedback environment. Hierarchical regression was used to analyze a sample of 264 employees from seven industry firms. The results indi...

  1. Steering of Educational Processes in a Digital Medium Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper; Paulsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    by systems theory we outline a more adequate way of teaching in the new medium environment – a teaching that can manage the new situation and use the new possibilities provided by the digital media. The argumentation builds on empirical findings from the action research project Socio Media Education (SME......This paper is about challenges to steering and leadership of educational interaction in classrooms provided by the new medium environment that comes with digital media. In the new medium environment, the old way of steering what is going on in the classroom appears not to work since...

  2. Using a Feedback Environment to Improve Creative Performance: A Dynamic Affect Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenxing; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Prior research on feedback and creative performance has neglected the dynamic nature of affect and has focused only on the influence of positive affect. We argue that creative performance is the result of a dynamic process in which a person experiences a phase of negative affect and subsequently enters a state of high positive affect that is influenced by the feedback environment. Hierarchical regression was used to analyze a sample of 264 employees from seven industry firms. The results indicate that employees' perceptions of a supportive supervisor feedback environment indirectly influence their level of creative performance through positive affect (t2); the negative affect (t1) moderates the relationship between positive affect (t2) and creative performance (t2), rendering the relationship more positive if negative affect (t1) is high. The change in positive affect mediates the relationship between the supervisor feedback environment and creative performance; a decrease in negative affect moderates the relationship between increased positive affect and creative performance, rendering the relationship more positive if the decrease in negative affect is large. The implications for improving the creative performances of employees are further discussed.

  3. Using a Feedback Environment to Improve Creative Performance: A Dynamic Affect Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Gong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Prior research on feedback and creative performance has neglected the dynamic nature of affect and has focused only on the influence of positive affect. We argue that creative performance is the result of a dynamic process in which a person experiences a phase of negative affect and subsequently enters a state of high positive affect that is influenced by the feedback environment. Hierarchical regression was used to analyze a sample of 264 employees from seven industry firms. The results indicate that employees’ perceptions of a supportive supervisor feedback environment indirectly influence their level of creative performance through positive affect (t2; the negative affect (t1 moderates the relationship between positive affect (t2 and creative performance (t2, rendering the relationship more positive if negative affect (t1 is high. The change in positive affect mediates the relationship between the supervisor feedback environment and creative performance; a decrease in negative affect moderates the relationship between increased positive affect and creative performance, rendering the relationship more positive if the decrease in negative affect is large. The implications for improving the creative performances of employees are further discussed.

  4. Constructing Affective Security in Children: Case Study in Educational Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margenat, Montserrat; Dalmau, Mariona; Vendrell, Roser; Ibarz, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    In line with Bowlby's theoretical approach, where he established a relationship between the quality of experiences lived in the first relationships and subsequent behaviours, we are carrying out a case study research project. The objectives are as follows: (1) To describe interactive patterns as observed in natural contexts and focusing on the…

  5. Educational environment of supplementary schools as a factor of formation of older preschooler`s creative-oriented personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Semenov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In article the author examines the role of the educational environment in forminga creatively directed personality of the child of the senior preschool age. It was found thateducational environment of out-of-school educational institution has a multicomponentstructure, which consists of interrelated components: creative, gaming, developmental,affective and emotional. Stated that the educational environment of out-of-school educationalinstitutionplays in society especially significant features that give us reason to consider it asan important factor in the formation of the creatively directed personality of the 5th year child.Prospects for further scientific researches are determined in studying the psychological andeducational of creative potential characteristics of personality of the pedagogue in out-ofschooleducational institution.Key words: educational environment of out-of-school educational institutions, thecreatively directed personality of the senior preschooler, components of the educationalenvironment, functions of the educational environment.

  6. How can context affect what strategies are effective in improving the working environment in small companies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Hasle, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Small companies include many different sectors and types of organisations. Additionally the small companies are affected by clients, authorities and other stakeholders. Some of these contextual factors have been proven to be of relevance to and affect the work environment management, e.......g. in cleaning companies, where many aspects of the working environment is decided by the client company, whose premises is cleaned by the cleaning company. Aim To discuss what factors in small companies´ context may affect the outcome of work environment interventions as a theoretical basis for evaluation...... of what factors that may have affected the outcome of work environment interventions and programs in small companies. Discussion The context is a convenient and simple term covering a multitude of factors and complex relations. It is unavoidable to discuss context when aiming at understanding small...

  7. How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guasch, Teresa; Espasa, Anna; Alvarez, Ibis; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Guasch, T., Espasa, A., Alvarez, I., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, 31 May). How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment? Presentation at a Learning & Cognition meeting, Open Universiteit in the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  8. An Investigation of Factors Affecting Multi-Task Performance in an Immersive Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Branscome, Teresa A; Grynovicki, Jock O

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study included in a series of investigations designed to increase fundamental knowledge and understanding of the factors affecting multi-task performance in a military environment...

  9. The role of environment design in an educational Multi-User Virtual Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papachristos, Nikiforos; Vrellis, Ioannis; Natsis, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results from an exploratory study conducted in an authentic educational situation with preservice education students enrolled in an undergraduate course, which was partially taught in Second Life. The study investigated the effect of environment design on presence, l...... necessary for all students to become familiar with the virtual environment and possible time losses due to technical issues. This study could act as support to construct and test hypotheses regarding the role of educational setting design in teaching and learning in MUVEs....

  10. Variables Affecting a Level of Practice and Quality of Educational Quality Assurance in Basic Education Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakkapong Prongprommarat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to study the Level of Practice and Quality of Educational Quality Assurance in Basic Education Schools of the Office of the Basic Education Commission. The sample consisted of 60 secondnary schools in Office of the basic Education Commission in the provinces of Chaiyaphum, Nakhon Ratchasima, Burirum, Surin and Khon Kaen were drawn by using proportionally with the number of teachers in each school. The data were collected by using (1 the questionnaire on the acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools. (2 the record form the external assessment of the office for National Education Standards and Quality Assessment, (3 the questionnaire on the director leadership, (2 test of the directors and teachers attitudes towards educational quality assurance, (5 test of the directors and teachers inquirying motive, (6 test of the directors and teachers working responsibility, and (7 the questionnaire on the directors and teachers cooperative. The statistical methods used to analysis the data were mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation and path analysis. The findings revealed that: 1. The level of acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools was at a high level. There was just a fairly difference in acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools. 2. The level of external quality assessment in basic education schools was at a good level. There was just a little difference in external quality assessment in basic education schools. 3. The variables affecting level of acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools were the level of the school directors attitudes towards educational quality assurance (β = 0.10, the level of the school directors working responsibility (β = 0.13, the level of the teacher attitudes towards educational quality assurance (β = 0.23 and the level of the teachers inquirying motive (β = 0.49 These four

  11. Students' Learning Environment and Education Quality in Faculty of Education of University of Tehran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Vaziri, Seyed Ali; Jafari, Ahmad; Alizadeh, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to review between students' learning environment and education quality. A non-experimental, quantitative, SPSS 17.0 research design was used to explore the relationship between background demographic characteristics, transformational, and transactional leadership styles, learning environment, and education quality.…

  12. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined.

  13. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  14. SOCIAL NETWORKS AS THE ENVIRONMENT EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojsław Czupryński

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the global Internet has changed the way the entire human population communicates. The internet has become a platform, where human societies build their lives, and traditional communication over the last few years has been replaced by social networks. Today, social networks are the subject of many debates concerning their advantages, disadvantages and the ideas of what they bring to the future. Portals are not only the way of communication, fun, an idea to spend free time, but also source of social and humanistic knowledge too. Against that, social media could be a huge risk for those who use them. The assigned job above discusses about the topic the detrimental effect what the social networks bring. A series of deviant behaviors caused by use of the portal is also presented in this report. Often they become a dysfunctional generator of actions that manifest themselves among the youth. Consequently, there was a need to take action to stop the growth of this phenomenon among young people. First of all the primary activities at this level are prevention and education in the family.

  15. Virtual Environments: Issues and Opportunities for Researching Inclusive Educational Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Kieron

    This chapter argues that virtual environments offer new research areas for those concerned with inclusive education. Further, it proposes that they also present opportunities for developing increasingly inclusive research processes. This chapter considers how researchers might approach researching some of these affordances. It discusses the relationship between specific features of inclusive pedagogy, derived from an international systematic literature review, and the affordances of different forms of virtual characters and environments. Examples are drawn from research in Second LifeTM (SL), virtual tutors and augmented reality. In doing this, the chapter challenges a simplistic notion of isolated physical and virtual worlds and, in the context of inclusion, between the practice of research and the research topic itself. There are a growing number of virtual worlds in which identified educational activities are taking place, or whose activities are being noted for their educational merit. These encompasses non-themed worlds such as SL and Active Worlds, game based worlds such as World of Warcraft and Runescape, and even Club Penguin, a themed virtual where younger players interact through a variety of Penguin themed environments and activities. It has been argued that these spaces, outside traditional education, are able to offer pedagogical insights (Twining 2009) i.e. that these global virtual communities have been identified as being useful as creative educational environments (Delwiche 2006; Sheehy 2009). This chapter will explore how researchers might use these spaces to investigative and create inclusive educational experiences for learners. In order to do this the chapter considers three interrelated issues: What is inclusive education?; How might inclusive education influence virtual world research? And, what might inclusive education look like in virtual worlds?

  16. Modeling higher education attractiveness to stand global environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Cezar Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inabilities to deal with the changing environment may lead Higher Education Institutions (HEI to loose institutional attractiveness. Digital transformation requires global insertion as essential feature to institutional attractiveness. Processes for international education seem to lack the links between real environmental trends and the internal capabilities to global education. HEI managers may approach endeavors to internationalize education combining ambidextrous strategy supported by consolidated resilience capabilities. The latest ones refer to building internal value attributes to increase institutional attractiveness assuring solid standing in the global environment. In this article, a theoretical essay, we approach the problem of creating resilience as a way of backing up ambidexterity to generate institutional attractiveness. The set of value attributes, on the other hand, may originate strategic routes to strengthen internal competences and to make the institution more attractive, as a dynamic capability.

  17. Reducing Risky Security Behaviours: Utilising Affective Feedback to Educate Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsay A. Shepherd

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the number of tools created to help end-users reduce risky security behaviours, users are still falling victim to online attacks. This paper proposes a browser extension utilising affective feedback to provide warnings on detection of risky behaviour. The paper provides an overview of behaviour considered to be risky, explaining potential threats users may face online. Existing tools developed to reduce risky security behaviours in end-users have been compared, discussing the success rates of various methodologies. Ongoing research is described which attempts to educate users regarding the risks and consequences of poor security behaviour by providing the appropriate feedback on the automatic recognition of risky behaviour. The paper concludes that a solution utilising a browser extension is a suitable method of monitoring potentially risky security behaviour. Ultimately, future work seeks to implement an affective feedback mechanism within the browser extension with the aim of improving security awareness.

  18. Sleep complaints affecting school performance at different educational levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, James F; Kwiatkowski, Carol F

    2010-01-01

    The clear association between reports of sleep disturbance and poor school performance has been documented for sleepy adolescents. This study extends that research to students outside the adolescent age grouping in an associated school setting (98 middle school students, 67 high school students, and 64 college students). Reported restless legs and periodic limb movements are significantly associated with lower GPA's in junior high students. Consistent with previous studies, daytime sleepiness was the sleep variable most likely to negatively affects high school students. Sleep onset and maintenance insomnia were the reported sleep variables significantly correlated with poorer school performance in college students. This study indicates that different sleep disorder variables negatively affect performance at different age and educational levels.

  19. Knowledge Engineering Aspects of Affective Bi-Modal Educational Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alepis, Efthymios; Virvou, Maria; Kabassi, Katerina

    This paper analyses the knowledge and software engineering aspects of educational applications that provide affective bi-modal human-computer interaction. For this purpose, a system that provides affective interaction based on evidence from two different modes has been developed. More specifically, the system's inferences about students' emotions are based on user input evidence from the keyboard and the microphone. Evidence from these two modes is combined by a user modelling component that incorporates user stereotypes as well as a multi criteria decision making theory. The mechanism that integrates the inferences from the two modes has been based on the results of two empirical studies that were conducted in the context of knowledge engineering of the system. The evaluation of the developed system showed significant improvements in the recognition of the emotional states of users.

  20. SLEEP COMPLAINTS AFFECTING SCHOOL PERFORMANCE AT DIFFERENT EDUCATIONAL LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Pagel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The clear association between reports of sleep disturbance and poor school performance has been documented for sleepy adolescents. This study extends that research to students outside the adolescent age grouping in an associated school setting (98 middle school students, 67 high school students, and 64 college students. Reported restless legs and periodic limb movements are significantly associated with lower GPA’s in junior high students. Consistent with previous studies, daytime sleepiness was the sleep variable most likely to negatively affects high school students. Sleep onset and maintenance insomnia were the reported sleep variables significantly correlated with poorer school performance in college students. This study indicates that different sleep disorder variables negatively affect performance at different age and educational levels.

  1. Use of holographic environment in business and educational application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, A.Q.K.; Shaikh, M.Z.; Khanzada, T.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Holographic environment is based on high-equipped Multimedia information systems. These are based on the evolving powers of computers to handle huge volume of information. Holographic environment is a simulated environment that allows the user to touch and interact with projections, which are derived from the distant real environment. A new communications technology is being developed that will facilitate to interact inside a simulated environment, even if you are thousands of miles apart. This is done with enhancing the electro-holography, which is the computer based generation of diffraction fringes from 3D input data and the display of the reconstructed object in real-time. This research paper presents the design and development of holographic environment for reduction of distances in business and educational applications. The Holographic Environment development with the use of multimedia information systems is discussed. In Particular the characteristics of holographic data and the current research results in the area of real time holographic display systems are spanned. The Technical components of holographic system are also encountered. Finally, issues of improvement in efficiency of Holographic Environments by compression of data are presented along with its utilization for educational and business applications. (author)

  2. THE HIGHLY DEVELOPED INFORMATION AND EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT AS A PRECONDITION OF EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM REORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. K. Khenner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper regards the development of the information and education environment of Russian universities as an important condition for successful reorganization of higher education. Taking as an example one of theUSuniversities, the author demonstrates the capacity of information education environment and its impact on the multilevel educational process. The comparative analysis of the existing information education environments of Russian an American universities reveals that such effective improvements as increasing number of students working on the individual curricula,__ implementation of the learning outcome monitoring, inclusive education, etc require immediate and substantial development of the information education environment of Russian universities. Both the development level and informational content of the environment in question remain unsatisfactory due to the financial, economic and staff related reasons. Consequently, the higher school reorganization is lagging behind retarded by the lack of synchronization between the attempts to improve the education quality and competitiveness on the one hand, and insufficient level of the information education environment characteristic of Russian universities on the other hand.

  3. Social Networks as Learning Environments for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.Cortés

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning is considered as a social activity, a student does not learn only of the teacher and the textbook or only in the classroom, learn also from many other agents related to the media, peers and society in general. And since the explosion of the Internet, the information is within the reach of everyone, is there where the main area of opportunity in new technologies applied to education, as well as taking advantage of recent socialization trends that can be leveraged to improve not only informing of their daily practices, but rather as a tool that explore different branches of education research. One can foresee the future of higher education as a social learning environment, open and collaborative, where people construct knowledge in interaction with others, in a comprehensive manner. The mobility and ubiquity that provide mobile devices enable the connection from anywhere and at any time. In modern educational environments can be expected to facilitate mobile devices in the classroom expansion in digital environments, so that students and teachers can build the teaching-learning process collectively, this partial derivative results in the development of draft research approved by the CONADI in “Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia”, "Social Networks: A teaching strategy in learning environments in higher education."

  4. Building multilingual learning environments in early years education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dodman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the early language development of children with particular reference to the importance of personal multilingualism and the reasons why this should be promoted in early years education. It is argued that such an objective is best achieved by building multilingual learning environments at the level of nursery and infant schools. The characteristics of such environments are described and ways of evaluating projects designed to build them are presented.

  5. Clinical Education Environment Experiences of Operating Room Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh khazaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The objective of medical education is to train competent and qualified workforce in order to provide services in various health environments. One of the important objectives of Operating Room students is to train workforce who can involve in patient’s health and recovery. Training these students should cause clinical ability and independent decision making during surgery. Since students during internship face with many problems, this study has been conducted to explore and describe the challenges and experiences.Methods: This qualitative study is a phenomenology that was conducted based on 20 students in the last semester of Operating Room associate’s degree with purposive sampling. Deep and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data and data were analyzed by content analysis method.Results: The findings in 5 main themes: (1 Physical space and equipment in the operating room, (2 The student’s position in operating room, (3 Integrating knowledge and action, (4 Managing education environment and 5- Student’s viewpoint about operating room and working in it.Conclusions: Interviews with students revealed the educational environment challenges with which they are faced during their study. Teachers can provide solutions to overcome the challenges and create a positive atmosphere for students' learning using results of this study and students may continue their interest in education and improve the quality of their education.Keywords: CLINICAL EDUCATION, OPERATING ROOM STUDENTS, CHALLENGE

  6. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  7. Exploring the educational potential of 3D virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Marc ESTEVE MON

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 3D virtual environments are advanced technology systems, with some potentialities in the teaching and learning process.In recent years, different institutions have promoted the acquisition of XXI century skills. Competences such as initiative, teamwork, creativity, flexibility or digital literacy.Multi-user virtual environments, sometimes called virtual worlds or 3D simulators, are immersive, interactive, customizable, accessible and programmable systems. This kind of environments allow to design educational complex activities to develop these key competences. For this purpose it’s necessary to set an appropriate teaching strategy to put this knowledge and skills into action, and design suitable mechanisms for registration and systematization. This paper analyzes the potential of these environments and presents two experiences in 3D virtual environments: (1 to develop teamwork and self-management skills, and (2 to assess digital literacy in preservice teachers.

  8. Individual Learner Differences In Web-based Learning Environments: From Cognitive, Affective and Social-cultural Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KOC

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Individual Learner DifferencesIn Web-based Learning Environments:From Cognitive, Affective and Social-cultural Perspectives Mustafa KOCPh.D Candidate Instructional TechnologyUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbana, IL - USA ABSTRACT Throughout the paper, the issues of individual differences in web-based learning, also known as online instruction, online training or distance education were examined and implications for designing distance education were discussed. Although the main purpose was to identify differences in learners’ characteristics such as cognitive, affective, physiological and social factors that affect learning in a web-enhanced environment, the questions of how the web could be used to reinforce learning, what kinds of development ideas, theories and models are currently being used to design and deliver online instruction, and finally what evidence for the effectiveness of using World Wide Web (WWW for learning and instruction has been reported, were also analyzed to extend theoretical and epistemogical understanding of web-based learning.

  9. DOES THE INSTITUTIONAL ENVIRONMENT AFFECT CSR DISCLOSURE? THE ROLE OF GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Miras Rodríguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyze whether the institutional environment has a direct effect on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR reporting practices or if this effect is explained by the influence of the institutional environment on Corporate Governance (CG mechanisms. To conduct our study, we focused on two countries that reflect different types of institutional environment: relation-based (Brazil and rule-based (Spain. Based on our results, we can affirm that the institutional environment influences CG mechanisms (Board Size and Reference Shareholder as well as companies’ CSR disclosure. Additionally, the CG mechanisms affected by the institutional environment also help to explain differences in CSR reporting practices. As relation-based societies evolve into rules-based environments, the information disclosed about CSR becomes more complex due to a strengthening of CG mechanisms.

  10. Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kravcik, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Klemke, R., & Kravčík, M. (2012). Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games. In S. Bocconi, R. Klamma, & Y. Bachvarova (Eds.), Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Pedagogically-driven Serious Games (PDSG 2012). In conjunction with the Seventh European

  11. The added value of Facility management in the educational environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, H.B.; Mobach, M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to define the added value of facility management (FM) in general and to develop a typology of facility services based on their added value in the educational environment. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a literature review and first

  12. The influence of reflexive educational environment on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of reflexive educational environment on students' reflection development in ... based on them) from which, as they integrate, a reflexive personality style is developed. ... (narrative, dialogical, cognitive and axiological) are the factors influencing the outcome of social adaptation. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  13. Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kravcik, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Klemke, R., & Kravčík, M. (2012, 18 September). Open 3D Environments for Competitive and Collaborative Educational Games. Presentation at S. Bocconi, R. Klamma, & Y. Bachvarova, Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Pedagogically-driven Serious Games (PDSG 2012). In conjunction with the

  14. Managing Complex Distance Education Projects in a Telework Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Mohamed; Cleveland-Innes, Marti; Wiseman, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The advances of communication technologies have allowed professionals to work on distance education projects in a telework environment. Managers of these projects must have the skills to manage the projects from a distance. They must be able to select the appropriate team members to work on the project, orient team members, and monitor team…

  15. Creative Learning Environments in Education--A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Dan; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Collier, Chris; Digby, Rebecca; Hay, Penny; Howe, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a systematic review of 210 pieces of educational research, policy and professional literature relating to creative environments for learning in schools, commissioned by Learning and Teaching Scotland (LTS). Despite the volume of academic literature in this field, the team of six reviewers found comparatively few empirical…

  16. Veterinary students' perceptions of their learning environment as measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Jacquelyn M; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Werre, Stephen R

    2014-03-24

    The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) has been widely used to evaluate the learning environment within health sciences education, however, this tool has not been applied in veterinary medical education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the DREEM tool in a veterinary medical program and to determine veterinary students' perceptions of their learning environment. The DREEM is a survey tool which quantitatively measures students' perceptions of their learning environment. The survey consists of 50 items, each scored 0-4 on a Likert Scale. The 50 items are subsequently analysed within five subscales related to students' perceptions of learning, faculty (teachers), academic atmosphere, and self-perceptions (academic and social). An overall score is obtained by summing the mean score for each subscale, with an overall possible score of 200. All students in the program were asked to complete the DREEM. Means and standard deviations were calculated for the 50 items, the five subscale scores and the overall score. Cronbach's alpha was determined for the five subscales and overall score to evaluate reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate construct validity. 224 responses (53%) were received. The Cronbach's alpha for the overall score was 0.93 and for the five subscales were; perceptions of learning 0.85, perceptions of faculty 0.79, perceptions of atmosphere 0.81, academic self-perceptions 0.68, and social self-perceptions 0.72. Construct validity was determined to be acceptable (p education programs. Four individual items of concern were identified by students. In this setting the DREEM was a reliable and valid tool to measure veterinary students' perceptions of their learning environment. The four items identified as concerning originated from four of the five subscales, but all related to workload. Negative perceptions regarding workload is a common concern of students in health education

  17. Evaluations of Students on Facebook as an Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Naci ÇOKLAR

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Taking cognizance of the transformation experienced in education technologies, the concept that comes into prominence in integration of ICTs to education process at present is web 2.0. The main philosophy of web 2.0 technologies is its contribution to content formation of users and high-level interaction between users. One of web 2.0 technologies used widely is social networking sites. In this study, educational use of Facebook, which is a social networking site, was assessed in terms of student views. To that end, 27 students were inserted to an interaction in Facebook environment as a part of a formal lesson for 2 months. The students appraised Facebook positively in aspects of dissemination of information, arousing interest, motivation, presenting interaction opportunity, whereas negatively in terms of being nested with entertainment, problem of control mechanism, excessive informational convergence. The students made suggestions about Facebook in terms of educational usage, providing teacher supervisions, introducing education in Facebook environment and including student performance in this environment into academic assessment process

  18. Evaluations of Students on Facebook as an Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Naci Çoklar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking cognizance of the transformation experienced in education technologies, the concept that comes into prominence in integration of ICTs to education process at present is web 2.0. The main philosophy of web 2.0 technologies is its contribution to content formation of users and high-level interaction between users. One of web 2.0 technologies used widely is social networking sites. In this study, educational use of Facebook, which is a social networking site, was assessed in terms of student views. To that end, 27 students were inserted to an interaction in Facebook environment as a part of a formal lesson for 2 months. The students appraised Facebook positively in aspects of dissemination of information, arousing interest, motivation, presenting interaction opportunity, whereas negatively in terms of being nested with entertainment, problem of control mechanism, excessive informational convergence. The students made suggestions about Facebook in terms of educational usage, providing teacher supervisions, introducing education in Facebook environment and including student performance in this environment into academic assessment process.

  19. CONCEPTUAL ASPECTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF INFORMATION EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT FOR THE TRAINING OF BACHELORS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Патимат Магомедовна Исаева

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes aspects of the implementation of information and educational environment in order to implement the priorities for the development and implementation of innovative distance learning technologies for the transition from a traditional institution in the model of the innovation Institute, which connects professional, cultural or scientific competence of bachelors. The essence of the problem ongoing research is the need to achieve efficiency new quality of education, i.e. the transition to a higher level of preparation of bachelors.In accordance with the requirements of Federal state educational standard of higher education in conditions of modernization of education, teacher’s professional work is increasingly associated with innovative research innovative research of the educational process.It was the introduction of electronic information-educational environment is one of the main directions for the preparation of future bachelors and forces to reconsider their views on the content of the educational system. Describes the experience of creation of information-educational environment of Pyatigorsk state linguistic University on the basis of Moodle. Thanks to the creation of information-educational environment in high schools, teachers, parents, and students aware of all the events of the learning process and in the world of science and, moreover, this system gives you the opportunity to maintain close communication with teachers and between students.

  20. Determination of Self-Development in the Vocational Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Zeer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the concept of vocational educational environment combining vocational training, professional development and professional world. The research is aimed at the self-determination analysis of an individual in the above environment. The authors observe the two existing trends of self-development analysis, corresponding with the subjective activity and culturally historical approaches. The empirical research results involve the students’ subjective individual characteristics and factors influencing the self-development strategy selection. The research findings prove the earlier hypothesis of the self- development phenomenon being determined by the two mutually conditioned factors: personal self-control ability and interrelation of the above mentioned components of the vocational educational environment. The authors make the conclusion that the self-development prospects are determined by the internal and external motivation, professional mobility and striving for success. The determination specificity of professional self- development, identified by the authors, can provide the psychological basis for future specialists training. 

  1. Moroccan medical students’ perceptions of their educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Belayachi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess students’ perceptions of their educational environment in the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Morocco, using the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Morocco, in which medical students’ perceptions of their educational environment were assessed using the DREEM criteria during the 2013-2014 academic years. The DREEM inventory encompasses 50 items divided into five subdomains: perceptions of learning, perceptions of teaching, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere, and social self-perceptions. The DREEM has a maximum score of 200, which would correspond to a perfect educational environment. The mean scores (±standard deviation of students’ responses were compared according to their year of study and gender. The responses of 189 postgraduate medical students were included. The mean total DREEM score was 90.8 (45.4%. The mean total scores for five subdomains were 21.2/48 (44.2%, 21.8/44 (49.6%, 13.1/32 (40.9%, 19.0/48 (39.6%, and 15.6/28 (55.7% respectively. Female students reported higher perceptions of teaching scores than males (P=0.002, and students in their fifth year of study reported significantly higher social self-perceptions scores than those in their fourth year (P=0.03. In this study of the oldest faculty of medicine in Morocco, students perceived the educational environment as having many problems.

  2. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN AFFECTS AND REPRESENTATIONS INVOLVED IN THE SCHOOL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia Osti; Ana Paula Porto Noronha

    2017-01-01

    This study assumes that the affective dimensions involves the process of planning and developing pedagogical practices and are an important factor in determining the nature of relations between the students and the various objects of knowledge. In this sense, the study aimed to analyze how students represent the affective aspects of both the teaching and learning process and what are their perceptions of the learning environment. The participants were 120 students of the 5th year of elementar...

  3. Application of Service Quality Model in Education Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ding Hooi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ideas on service quality stem from the West. The massive developments in research in the West are undeniable of their importance. This leads to the generation and development of new ideas. These ideas were subsequently channeled to developing countries. Ideas obtained were then formulated and used by these developing countries in order to obtain better approach in channeling service quality. There are ample to be learnt from the service quality model, SERVQUAL which attain high acceptance in the West. Service quality in the education system is important to guarantee the effectiveness and quality of education. Effective and quality education will be able to offer quality graduates, which will contribute to the development of the nation. This paper will discuss the application of the SERVQUAL model into the education environment.

  4. Steering of Educational Processes in a Digital Medium Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper; Paulsen, Michael Eric

    2016-01-01

    We are living in a period when new social structures arise in the communicative space and wake of digital media. This means that we must respond to a changing social world within all social spheres, including economy, work life, love relations and, last but not least, education. The issue we...... are dealing with in this article is how one should respond educationally to the new media situation. Or more precisely: What should or could Bildung (edification) be within the current environment of new media. It draws on Luhmann (2006), Biesta (2006), Klafki (2014) and Kant (1784), describing what Bildung...... is, seen from the point of view of the enlightenment tradition, and sets out to discuss and analyse how ideas of Bildung could be used in education today and tomorrow. The paper draws on empirical findings from the Socio Media Education Experiment, a Danish action research project in an upper...

  5. Effect of Family Education and Social Environment to Student Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charina Oktaviani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to know whether or not an influence of family education and social environment on the characteristics of students during the accounting lesson at class XI IPS SMA Negeri I Pati; to know whether or not an influence of social environment on the characteristics of students during the accounting lesson at class XI IPS SMA Negeri I Pati; and to know whether or not an influence between family education and social environment on the characteristics of students during the accounting lesson at class XI IPS SMA Negeri I Pati. The population in this research is 71 students of class XI SMA Negeri I Pati. Method of data analysis in this research consists of percentage descriptive analysis, descriptive statistic, prerequisite test covering normality test and linearity test, multiple linear regression analysis, classical assumption test covering multicollinearity test and heteroscedasticity test, hypothesis test covering simultaneous test (F, coefficient of simultaneous determination (R2, partial test (t, and partial determinant coefficient (r2. Results shows that family education and social environment both simultaneously and individually have positive impacts on the student characteristics.

  6. Maternal environment affects the genetic basis of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Froukje M; Ågren, Jon

    2015-02-01

    The genetic basis of seed dormancy, a key life history trait important for adaptive evolution in plant populations, has yet been studied only using seeds produced under controlled conditions in greenhouse environments. However, dormancy is strongly affected by maternal environmental conditions, and interactions between seed genotype and maternal environment have been reported. Consequently, the genetic basis of dormancy of seeds produced under natural field conditions remains unclear. We examined the effect of maternal environment on the genetic architecture of seed dormancy using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between two locally adapted populations of Arabidopsis thaliana from Italy and Sweden. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for dormancy of seeds produced in the greenhouse and at the native field sites of the parental genotypes. The Italian genotype produced seeds with stronger dormancy at fruit maturation than did the Swedish genotype in all three environments, and the maternal field environments induced higher dormancy levels compared to the greenhouse environment in both genotypes. Across the three maternal environments, a total of nine dormancy QTL were detected, three of which were only detected among seeds matured in the field, and six of which showed significant QTL × maternal environment interactions. One QTL had a large effect on dormancy across all three environments and colocalized with the candidate gene DOG1. Our results demonstrate the importance of studying the genetic basis of putatively adaptive traits under relevant conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Technological Factors, User Characteristics and Didactic Strategies in Educational Virtual Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsis, Antonios; Vrellis, Ioannis; Papachristos, Nikiforos

    2012-01-01

    Technological factors, user characteristics and didactic strategies do not function consistently across Educational Virtual Environments. This study investigates the impact of viewing condition and didactic strategy on attention allocation, suspension of disbelief, spatial presence, and learning...... outcomes in an Educational Virtual Environment concerning ancient Greek pottery. Our results show that the viewing condition does not affect attention allocation, suspension of disbelief, and spatial presence. Learning outcomes are better in the monoscopic viewing condition. Didactic strategy has an impact...... on suspension of disbelief and learning outcomes. Domain specific interest associates with higher level of attention allocation and spatial presence, while spatial presence is not related to learning outcomes. More research is needed in order to identify the role of each one of the above factors in Educational...

  8. "Shool Biotope" as science and environment educational tools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    2011-12-01

    We have very small artificial pond in elementary school and junior high school in Japan. There are small fish, aquatic insect, and plant, and we can easily check and study. Recently, this type very small artificial pond that we call "Biotope" has been reconsidered as educational tool for study about biology and ecology. We introduce the some cases of the elementary school in Shimane Prefecture, Japan. And then, we pick up some important good educational materials and methods and their problems. Shimane prefecture is the place where relatively much nature is left even in Japan, and children are favored in the opportunity which usually touches nature and study it. It thought about use for Biotope in the inside of school of such from the viewpoint of science and environment education. It is possible with Biotope in the inside of school that a fish, aquatic insect, and plant in Biotope and that's environment are observed for every day and for a long time. As for the teacher of the elementary and junior high schools, it is important to make a plan of Biotope corresponding to the subject and those contents of learning through the year. We define School-Biotope as a thing that a teacher recognizes that educational importance and to make the most of as an education subject intentionally.

  9. Education for Knowledge Society: Learning and Scientific Innovation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander O. Karpov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive-active learning research-type environment is the fundamental component of the education system for the knowledge society. The purpose of the research is the development of conceptual bases and a constructional model of a cognitively active learning environment that stimulates the creation of new knowledge and its socio-economic application. Research methods include epistemic-didactic analysis of empirical material collected as a result of the study of research environments at schools and universities; conceptualization and theoretical modeling of the cognitively active surrounding, which provides an infrastructure of the research-type cognitive process. The empirical material summarized in this work was collected in the research-cognitive space of the “Step into the Future” program, which is one of the most powerful systems of research education in present-day Russia. The article presents key points of the author's concept of generative learning environments and a model of learning and scientific innovation environment implemented at Russian schools and universities.

  10. Elementary Students' Affective Variables in a Networked Learning Environment Supported by a Blog: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Stéphane; Thériault, Pascale; Gagnon, Vincent; Lalancette, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    This study documents to what extent writing on a blog in a networked learning environment could influence the affective variables of elementary-school students' writing. The framework is grounded more specifically in theory of self-determination (Deci & Ryan, 1985), relationship to writing (Chartrand & Prince, 2009) and the transactional…

  11. Assessing the Utility of a Virtual Environment for Enhancing Facial Affect Recognition in Adolescents with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Esubalew; Crittendon, Julie; Zheng, Zhi; Swanson, Amy; Weitlauf, Amy; Warren, Zachary; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2014-01-01

    Teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched controls participated in a dynamic facial affect recognition task within a virtual reality (VR) environment. Participants identified the emotion of a facial expression displayed at varied levels of intensity by a computer generated avatar. The system assessed performance (i.e.,…

  12. Neural networks underlying affective states in a multimodal virtual environment: contributions to boredom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Anna Mathiak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of low perceptual stimulation or goal-directed behavior with a negative subjective evaluation may lead to boredom. This contribution to boredom may shed light on its neural correlates, which are poorly characterized so far. A video game served as simulation of free interactive behavior without interruption of the game’s narrative. Thirteen male German volunteers played a first-person shooter game (Tactical Ops: Assault on Terror during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Two independent coders performed the time-based analysis of the audio-visual game content. Boredom was operationalized as interaction of prolonged absence of goal-directed behavior with lowered affect in the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS.A decrease of positive affect correlated with response amplitudes in bilateral insular clusters extending into the amygdala to prolonged inactive phases in a game play and an increase in negative affect was associated with higher responses in bilateral ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Precuneus and hippocampus responses were negatively correlated with changes in negative affect.We describe for the first time neural contributions to boredom, using a video game as complex virtual environment. Further our study confirmed that positive and negative affect are separable constructs, reflected by distinct neural patterns. Positive affect may be associated with afferent limbic activity whereas negative affect with affective control.

  13. Research Into the Role of Students’ Affective Domain While Learning Geology in Field Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Existing research programs in field-based geocognition include assessment of cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains. Assessment of the affective domain often involves the use of instruments and techniques uncommon to the geosciences. Research regarding the affective domain also commonly results in the collection and production of qualitative data that is difficult for geoscientists to analyze due to their lack of familiarity with these data sets. However, important information about students’ affective responses to learning in field environments can be obtained by using these methods. My research program focuses on data produced by students’ affective responses to field-based learning environments, primarily among students at the introductory level. For this research I developed a Likert-scale Novelty Space Survey, which presents student ‘novelty space’ (Orion and Hofstien, 1993) as a polygon; the larger the polygons, the more novelty students are experiencing. The axises for these polygons correspond to novelty domains involving geographic, social, cognitive, and psychological factors. In addition to the Novelty Space Survey, data which I have collected/generated includes focus group interviews on the role of recreational experiences in geology field programs. I have also collected data concerning the motivating factors that cause students to take photographs on field trips. The results of these studies give insight to the emotional responses students have to learning in the field and are important considerations for practitioners of teaching in these environments. Collaborative investigations among research programs that cross university departments and include multiple institutions is critical at this point in development of geocognition as a field due to unfamiliarity with cognitive science methodology by practitioners teaching geosciences and the dynamic nature of field work by cognitive scientists. However, combining the efforts of cognitive

  14. Factors Affecting Research Environment at Syrian Business Faculties: A Student-Perceived Model

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    Bayan Khalifa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at investigating the factors that affect the research environment of business postgraduate students, particularly master students, from the perspective of these students. From the same perspective, it also aims at assessing these factors together with the quality of research environment. A questionnaire survey method was employed. The questionnaire was developed by academics from five business faculties based on relevant studies and was distributed to graduate students enrolled in all of the research business programs at the Faculty of Economics, Damascus University, ending up with 88 valid responses. To explore the factors that may affect research environment, exploratory factor analysis was employed. In addition, multiple regression analysis and t-test were applied to respond to the study purposes. Facilities and industry linkage come to be significant factors in the research environment. However, the results show insignificant impact for each of the research courses, networking, and research skills in the overall research environment. Variations in regard to the availability of these factors were identified with low level of availability for the facilities and industry linkage. The study is one of a kind that investigates factors affecting research environment of postgraduate students and particularly master students. Further and to the best of our knowledge, it is the first study that examines such factors in war conditions, which enables us to understand what students perceive as critical factors influencing their research performance in these conditions. Recommendations to policy makers are presented to develop strategies that respond to students’ concerns for a better research environment.

  15. POTENTIAL USE OF VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS IN DESIGN EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    SAGUN, Aysu

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the potential use of Virtual Environments (VE) in design education. Recently, the way the designers form their mental concepts, develop and test their design is enhanced with the new computer technologies. Computer generated VE has a great potential to be used in the design process and collaborative studies because they enable manipulation of simulated products as well as interaction of people with each other and the simulated space for communication and col...

  16. Implementation of Collaborative Learning in Higher Education Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Soetam Rizky Wicaksono

    2013-01-01

    The need of improvement in learning process, especially in higher education environment, has already begun a dilemma for many lecturers. Many experts has already agreed that one of the success factor in learning process improvement is creating collaboration among students. This pre-eliminary action research tried to implement collaborative learning from small groups using simple task and escalating into large group with more complicated collaborative framework. Although there is no quantific...

  17. The environment and the construction of meanings in elementary education

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    Patrícia Barbosa Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting about the possibility of multiple meanings (the polisemy, parallel to the practices that bring the mecanism of repetition (paraphrase, we investigated which meanings students in school can understand under the framework of environment. Also, we analyzed how reading and writing may contribute for the construction of these different possibilities of meanings about environment. We adopted the French Discourse Analysis (DA as a methodological and theoretical frame of work. In addition, under the influence of Science, Technology and Society (STS studies, with a objective of a broader, more critical and reflexive approach for the concept of environment. Through of an education proposal, with the central theme of the environment, we developed, from the influence of media materials in the school context, activities that are related to the presence of an opening for polysemy in the classroom. We find that the paraphrase has become common in many activities, a sense of movement affiliation, in which, sometimes, the students have joined an environment with mainly natural features, sometimes with a social environment. Thus, the background provided by STS concomitantly with the arguments based in our teaching objectives, were able to disrupt this discourses dynamics throughout the course of these activities

  18. ASPECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE TEACHER OF PHYSICAL CULTURE ARE IN INFORMATIVELY-EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Yuriy V. Dragnev

    2011-01-01

    In the article the aspects of professional development of future teacher of physical culture are examined in the informatively-educational environment of higher educational establishment. Importance of introduction of information and telecommunication technologies opens up in the sphere of higher education; the components of informatively-educational environment are given; a concept „Professional development” and „informatively-educational environment opens up”. Specified, that informative su...

  19. Goal Development Practices of Physical Therapists Working in Educational Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynarczuk, Kimberly D; Chiarello, Lisa A; Gohrband, Catherine L

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) describe the practices that school-based physical therapists use in developing student goals, and (2) identify facilitators and barriers to development of goals that are specific to participation in the context of the school setting. 46 school-based physical therapists who participated in a previous study on school-based physical therapy practice (PT COUNTS) completed a questionnaire on goal development. Frequencies and cross tabulations were generated for quantitative data. Open-ended questions were analyzed using an iterative qualitative analysis process. A majority of therapists reported that they frequently develop goals collaboratively with other educational team members. Input from teachers, related services personnel, and parents has the most influence on goal development. Qualitative analysis identified five themes that influence development of participation-based goals: (1) school-based philosophy and practice; (2) the educational environment, settings, and routines; (3) student strengths, needs, and personal characteristics; (4) support from and collaboration with members of the educational team; and (5) therapist practice and motivation. Goal development is a complex process that involves multiple members of the educational team and is influenced by many different aspects of practice, the school environment, and student characteristics.

  20. Experimental Evaluation of Internet of Things in the Educational Environment

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    Amr Elsaadany

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the trials of utilization of technology for the society, efforts have shown benefits of the ICT use in facilitating education from different perspectives based on different waves of technological change. The recent development in technologies has also resulted in change of user behavior and usage patterns towards different areas of life, and consequently in the area of education. A new wave of change has started and is expecting to proliferate with stronger connectivity and interoperability of various devices, named as the Internet of Things (IoT. The internet of things is expected to give strong impacts on different areas of life including healthcare, transportation, smart homes, smart campus, and more. Consequently, there are inherent benefits to the education environment that are not yet well established in literature. The paper studies the potential benefit and impact of the IoT evolution concept in both the physical and the virtual learning environment and suggests a paradigm with use case scenarios. The results of an experimental evaluation on the aspects of applying IoT technology in education are presented and discussed in order to verify the set of related hypotheses.

  1. The Management of Integrated Educational Environment Resources: The Factors to Be Considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalina, Yulia

    2010-01-01

    Today, as educational organisations have become large and complex systems, education managers play a greater role in developing the most efficient educational environment. This article analyses the strategic background for educational management in relation to creating a constructive educational environment aimed at supporting a sustainable…

  2. Open and Distance Education in Global Environment: Opportunities for Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. PULIST

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance education system in India has undergone many stages and phases of evolution before it really reached the stage of what is called open education, ICT-enabled education and global education. During these phases, it has assimilated different aspects of ICT with all applauds and has been able to go hand-in-hand with it transcending the national and regional boundaries. The distance education institutions have now started giving a serious thought to explore the possibility of cross-boarder expansion. The educational needs of the present society are changing very fast. The education is now being seen as an enabling tool for empowerment and all-round development of individuals. It is difficult for an institution to come up to all the educational requirements of the society. It is, therefore, time to collaborate rather than compete. Quality concern becomes a serious issue in such a situation. Consequently, globalization, internationalization, collaboration, networking have become the buzzwords of the day in distance education. In furtherance of this journey, Indira National Open University, INDIA organized an international conference on the theme “Open and Distance Education in Global Environment: Opportunities for Collaboration” under the aegis of International Council for Distance Education. The articles of the renowned educationists presented in the Conference have reserved their place in the volume under review. The volume is a repository of their experiences in the becoming of distance education all these years. The volume is spread over 32 chapters summed up into four major streams– internationalization are: collaboration and networking; ICT-enabled education; quality assurance; and distance education for development. The canvas of the volume covers the present scenario of open and distance education from the global perspective.The first part discusses as to how collaboration can be tamed to develop joint curriculum and deliver

  3. External built residential environment characteristics that affect mental health of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochodo, Charles; Ndetei, D M; Moturi, W N; Otieno, J O

    2014-10-01

    External built residential environment characteristics include aspects of building design such as types of walls, doors and windows, green spaces, density of houses per unit area, and waste disposal facilities. Neighborhoods that are characterized by poor quality external built environment can contribute to psychosocial stress and increase the likelihood of mental health disorders. This study investigated the relationship between characteristics of external built residential environment and mental health disorders in selected residences of Nakuru Municipality, Kenya. External built residential environment characteristics were investigated for 544 residents living in different residential areas that were categorized by their socioeconomic status. Medically validated interview schedules were used to determine mental health of residents in the respective neighborhoods. The relationship between characteristics of the external built residential environment and mental health of residents was determined by multivariable logistic regression analyses and chi-square tests. The results show that walling materials used on buildings, density of dwelling units, state of street lighting, types of doors, states of roofs, and states of windows are some built external residential environment characteristics that affect mental health of adult males and females. Urban residential areas that are characterized by poor quality external built environment substantially expose the population to daily stressors and inconveniences that increase the likelihood of developing mental health disorders.

  4. Undergraduate nursing students' experience related to their clinical learning environment and factors affecting to their clinical learning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkan, Burcu; Ordin, Yaprak; Yılmaz, Dilek

    2018-03-01

    Clinical education is an essential part of nursing education. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse students' experiences related to cinical learning environments, factors effecting to clinical learning process. Descriptive qualitative design was used in this study, and data were collected from 2nd class nursing student (n = 14). The study took the form of in-depth interviews between August-October 2015. The qualitative interviews were analyzed by using simple content analysis. Data were analyzed manually. Experiences nurse students are described five themes. The themes of the study are (1) effecting persons to clinical learning, (2) educational atmosphere, (3) students' personal charactering, (4) the impact of education in school, and (5) students' perceptions related to clinical learning. Participants stated that they experienced many difficulties during clinical learning process. All students importantly stated that nurse teacher is very effecting to clinical learning. This study contributes to the literature by providing data on beginner nursing student' experiences about clinical learning process. The data of this present study show to Turkish nursing student is affecting mostly from persons in clinical learning. The data of this present study will guide nurse teacher when they plan to interventions to be performed to support student during clinical learning process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Review of Affective Computing in Education/Learning: Trends and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Hung; Huang, Yueh-Min; Hwang, Jan-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Affect can significantly influence education/learning. Thus, understanding a learner's affect throughout the learning process is crucial for understanding motivation. In conventional education/learning research, learner motivation can be known through postevent self-reported questionnaires. With the advance of affective computing technology,…

  6. Institutional Guidance of Affective Bonding: Moral Values Development in Brazilian Military Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmeyer, Daniela Schmitz; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2016-09-01

    In this article, our aim is to analyze institutional practices guided to promote the development of moral values within the context of military education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers. From a cultural psychological approach, we discuss how social guidance within military culture operates at different levels of the affective-semiotic regulation of individuals, structuring complex experiences that give rise to hypergeneralized meaning fields regarding morality and military values. For this goal, we first introduce some theoretical topics related to values development, emphasizing their affective roots and role in the emergence, maintenance, amplification and attenuation of all relations between the person and the environment. Following a brief discussion on how social institutions try to promote changes in personal values, we provide an overview of values present in the military culture and socialization. Finally, the text focuses on the education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers, describing how practices related to different levels of affective-semiotic experience combine in order to promote the internalization and externalization of specific moral values. We conclude suggesting issues for future investigation.

  7. Relations Between Self-Reported and Linguistic Monitoring Assessments of Affective Experience in an Extreme Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan

    2018-03-01

    Approaches for monitoring psychosocial health in challenging environments are needed to maintain the performance and safety of personnel. The purpose of the present research was to examine the relationship between 2 candidate methods (self-reported and linguistics) for monitoring affective experience during extreme environment activities. A single-subject repeated-measures design was used in the present work. The participant was a 46-year-old individual scheduled to complete a self-supported ski expedition across Arctic Greenland. The expedition lasted 28 days, and conditions included severe cold, low stimulation, whiteouts, limited habitability, and threats to life and limb. During the expedition, the participant completed a daily self-report log including assessment of psychological health (perceptions of control and affect) and a video diary (emotion). Video diary entries were subjected to linguistic inquiry and word count analyses before the links between self-report and linguistic data across the expedition period were tested. Similarities in the pattern of self-reported and linguistic assessments emerged across the expedition period. A number of predictable correlations were identified between self-reported and linguistic assessments of affective/emotional experience. Overall, there was better agreement between self-reports and linguistic analytics for indicators of negative affect/emotion. Future research should build on this initial study to further test the links between self-reported affect and emotional states monitored via linguistics. This could help develop methods for monitoring psychological health in extreme environments and support organizational decision making. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE OF THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT WITH VIRTUAL MACHINE TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem D. Beresnev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of research. Information infrastructure for the training environment with application of technology of virtual computers for small pedagogical systems (separate classes, author's courses is created and investigated. Research technique. The life cycle model of information infrastructure for small pedagogical systems with usage of virtual computers in ARIS methodology is constructed. The technique of information infrastructure formation with virtual computers on the basis of process approach is offered. The model of an event chain in combination with the environment chart is used as the basic model. For each function of the event chain the necessary set of means of information and program support is defined. Technique application is illustrated on the example of information infrastructure design for the educational environment taking into account specific character of small pedagogical systems. Advantages of the designed information infrastructure are: the maximum usage of open or free components; the usage of standard protocols (mainly, HTTP and HTTPS; the maximum portability (application servers can be started up on any of widespread operating systems; uniform interface to management of various virtualization platforms, possibility of inventory of contents of the virtual computer without its start, flexible inventory management of the virtual computer by means of adjusted chains of rules. Approbation. Approbation of obtained results was carried out on the basis of training center "Institute of Informatics and Computer Facilities" (Tallinn, Estonia. Technique application within the course "Computer and Software Usage" gave the possibility to get half as much the number of refusals for components of the information infrastructure demanding intervention of the technical specialist, and also the time for elimination of such malfunctions. Besides, the pupils who have got broader experience with computer and software, showed better results

  9. G SUIT FOR EDUCATION AS AN ENVIRONMENT FOR STUDENTS OF EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Glazunova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Materials article analyzes the opportunities and benefits of using cloud services G Suite (Google Apps during the practical training of students. In the course of the study, an e-environment based on G Suit for Education was developed and its use for effective organization of information technology practice training. A model of e-learning environment for organizing group project work in Google Classroom-based training has been built. The design methodology is grounded as one of the most effective for the organization of educational practice in information technologies. The stages of realization of the project task during the educational practice, as well as the tools, the achieved competence, features of the activity of teachers and students at each stage are researched. Examples of tasks, resources and services that were used to achieve project results are given.The implementation of individual project implementation phases in the Google Classroom-based electronic environment has been demonstrated, in particular, project planning, adding new services in the electronic environment, collaborative work with documents, portfolio elements, student reflection. The results of the survey of students on the organization of educational practice using the method of projects and the e-environment based on the use of cloud services G Suite (Google Apps are analyzed.

  10. Challenges to neurology residency education in today's health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bega, Danny; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    Residency training has had to adapt to higher patient volumes, increased complexity of medical care, and the commercialized system of health care. These changes have led to a concerning culture shift in neurology. We review the relationship between the emerging health care delivery system and residency training, highlighting issues related to duty hours and work-life balance, the changing technological landscape, high patient volumes, and complex service obligations. We propose that the current challenges in health care delivery offer the opportunity to improve neurology residency through faculty development programs, bringing teaching back to the bedside, increasing resident autonomy, utilizing near-peer teaching, and rewarding educators who facilitate an environment of inquiry and scholarship, with the ultimate goal of better alignment between education and patient care. Ann Neurol 2016;80:315-320. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  11. G SUIT FOR EDUCATION AS AN ENVIRONMENT FOR STUDENTS OF EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Olena Glazunova; Olena Kuzminska; Tetyana Voloshyna; Taisia Sayapina; Valentyna Korolchuk

    2017-01-01

    Materials article analyzes the opportunities and benefits of using cloud services G Suite (Google Apps) during the practical training of students. In the course of the study, an e-environment based on G Suit for Education was developed and its use for effective organization of information technology practice training. A model of e-learning environment for organizing group project work in Google Classroom-based training has been built. The design methodology is grounded as one of the most effe...

  12. Energy, The Environment And Astronomy: Education And Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Bernadette; Doppmann, G.; Kalas, P.; Lacy, J.; Beck, T.; Marshall, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    The specter of global climate change is arguably the most pressing scientific, social and ethical issue of our time. Although the relatively small field of astronomy represents only a fraction of the total human carbon emissions, astronomers have a great potential, and therefore perhaps a great responsibility, to educate themselves and the public on this issue. In addition, the average per capita carbon emissions of professional astronomers are not small, and our profession can do much to reduce its energy consumption and maximize the cost-benefit ratio of our work. At the January AAS meeting, we are organizing a half-day splinter meeting titled "Energy, the Environment and Astronomy: Education and Action". The focus will be on energy conservation and education as it relates to professional astronomy. Education focuses on informing ourselves, our students and the general public with which we interact, about the real issues, the necessary actions, and the likely consequences of various energy consumption and carbon emission scenarios. Action focuses on effective energy conservation and renewable energy initiatives within professional astronomy. Air travel, solar energy at ground-based observatories, and Gemini's "Green Initiative” are among the topics that will be discussed. The splinter meeting will be open to all and will include expert speakers from outside astronomy, contributed talks by astronomers, and a discussion session.

  13. Dental Education Required for the Changing Health Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Margherita; González-Cabezas, Carlos; de Peralta, Tracy; Johnsen, David C

    2017-08-01

    To be able to meet the demands for care in 2040, dental graduates will need to address challenges resulting from the rapidly changing health care environment with knowledge and sets of skills to build on current standards and adapt to the future. The purposes of this article are to 1) analyze key challenges likely to evolve considerably between now and 2040 that will impact dental education and practice and 2) propose several sets of skills and educational outcomes necessary to address these challenges. The challenges discussed include changes in prevalence of oral diseases, dental practice patterns, materials and technologies, integrated medical-dental care, role of electronic health records, cultural competence, integrated curricula, interprofessional education, specialty-general balance, and web/cloud-based collaborations. To meet these challenges, the dental graduate will need skills such as core knowledge in basic and clinical dentistry, technical proficiency, critical thinking skills for lifelong learning, ethical and professional values, ability to manage a practice, social responsibility, and ability to function in a collegial intra- and interprofessional setting. Beyond the skills of the individual dentist will be the need for leadership in academia and the practice community. Academic and professional leaders will need to engage key constituencies to develop strategic directions and agendas with all parties pointed toward high standards for individual patients and the public at large. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  14. Building partnerships for healthy environments: research, leadership and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Susan; Kent, Jennifer; Lyons, Claudine

    2014-12-01

    As populations across the globe face an increasing health burden from rising rates of obesity, diabetes and other lifestyle-related diseases, health professionals are collaborating with urban planners to influence city design that supports healthy ways of living. This paper details the establishment and operation of an innovative, interdisciplinary collaboration that brings together urban planning and health. Situated in a built environment faculty at one of Australia's most prestigious universities, the Healthy Built Environments Program (HBEP) partners planning academics, a health non-government organisation, local councils and private planning consultants in a state government health department funded consortium. The HBEP focuses on three strategic areas: research, workforce development and education, and leadership and advocacy. Interdisciplinary research includes a comprehensive literature review that establishes Australian-based evidence to support the development, prioritisation and implementation of healthy built environment policies and practices. Another ongoing study examines the design features, social interventions and locational qualities that positively benefit human health. Formal courses, workshops, public lectures and e-learning develop professional capacity, as well as skills in interdisciplinary practice to support productive collaborations between health professionals and planners. The third area involves working with government and non-government agencies, and the private sector and the community, to advocate closer links between health and the built environment. Our paper presents an overview of the HBEP's major achievements. We conclude with a critical review of the challenges, revealing lessons in bringing health and planning closer together to create health-supportive cities for the 21st century.

  15. Mechanisms for Creating a Psychologically Safe Learning Environment in an Educational Institution of General Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonova O.I.,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available At the moment the question of how to create and maintain the psychological safety of the educational environment of the school is not sufficiently studied. Meanwhile, there has been proved its positive effect on the psychological health of students, their emotional and personal well-being, the formation of a meta-subjective and personal educational outcomes. This paper describes a study the purpose of which was to examine and verify empiricaly the features of management activities in the educational organization to create a psychologically safe learning environment. We studied personality traits of the Head of an educational organization by the procedure "Troubleshooting leadership abilities" (E. Zharikova, E. Krushelnytsky, techniques "Diagnosis of the level of burnout" (V.V. Boyko, methods of self-management style assessment (A.V. Agrashenkova, modified by E.P. Ilyin, and methods for rapid assessment of health, activity, mood (SAN. We proposed mechanisms to solve the problem of creating a comfortable and safe learning environment in the educational organization of general education

  16. The Designed Environment and How it Affects Brain Morphology and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golembiewski, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    The environment is inextricably related to mental health. Recent research replicates findings of a significant, linear correlation between a childhood exposure to the urban environment and psychosis. Related studies also correlate the urban environment and aberrant brain morphologies. These findings challenge common beliefs that the mind and brain remain neutral in the face of worldly experience. There is a signature within these neurological findings that suggests that specific features of design cause and trigger mental illness. The objective in this article is to work backward from the molecular dynamics to identify features of the designed environment that may either trigger mental illness or protect against it. This review analyzes the discrete functions putatively assigned to the affected brain areas and a neurotransmitter called dopamine, which is the primary target of most antipsychotic medications. The intention is to establish what the correlations mean in functional terms, and more specifically, how this relates to the phenomenology of urban experience. In doing so, environmental mental illness risk factors are identified. Having established these relationships, the review makes practical recommendations for those in public health who wish to use the environment itself as a tool to improve the mental health of a community through design. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. The psichomotricity in the sensorial-auditive special educative needs environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Yera-Díaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We hope this paper would motivate reflexion on professionals and specialists who work with special educative needs, especially those of a sensorial and auditive character, in order to find a solution for many children suffering these disorders. The study of psicomoticity in children with sensorial-auditive special educative needs, acquires a greater significance because it permits to become conscious about the reciprocal dependence of the mental children life, with the motor skills, based upon its three dimensions: cognitive, affective, and motor. By means of this research, we are looking forward to develop in children their motor potentials by sport activities. At the same time, linked with the educative environment, the active participation of school, family, and the community.

  18. Physical Learning Environment and its Suitability to the Objectives of Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobik, Mart

    2013-01-01

    The present article focuses on Technology Education teachers' opinions on the physical learning environment of Technology Education. The study compares and analyses the changes in the physical learning environment of Technology Education. Two questionnaire surveys (Study I and Study II) were carried out among teachers of Technology Education in…

  19. EDUCATION IN GLOBAL INFORMATION-COMMUNICATION AND ANTHROPOGENIC ENVIRONMENT: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND LIMITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey F. Sergeev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article answers the question of how to use global anthropogenic environments in order to create effective educational environment. We demonstrate both technological and didactic abilities and limits of modern environment-based technologies, and provide a new approach to the educational environment creation. 

  20. How Feelings of Safety at School Affect Educational Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna Lacoe

    2013-01-01

    Persistent racial and ethnic gaps in educational achievement have focused policy attention on school climate and safety as important elements of educational performance. In a special issue of Educational Researcher focused on safety and order in schools, Cornell and Mayer (2010) argue that school safety and school order are fundamental to studies of the achievement gap, teacher attrition, and student engagement. This paper represents the first large-scale analysis of how feelings of safety at...

  1. Motivating teacher and student engagement with the environment through renewable energy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirav Sanat

    Environmental and energy education is focused on fostering environmental behavior. This study investigates empirically if education leads to changes in environmental attitudes and subsequent environmentally significant behavior (ESB). The study contextualizes teachers' and students' motivation to engage in ESB within an environmental educational training framework. The results of structured questionnaires administered in Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwestern K-12 schools (n=214 for teachers and n=1498 for students) reveal that environmental attitudes are not a good predictor of teaching behavior but they do predict students' intent towards ESB. Teachers' energy attitudes are a better predictor in motivating them to teach while students are most responsive to their affective attitudes. The study finds that education does not play a significant role in changing environmental or energy attitudes of teachers and students. The study also advances a methodological tool for data collection that can expand the reach of evaluation instruments and measure learning across formal and informal audiences. It highlights how interactional technology can be readily utilized for future research and outreach in classrooms, nature learning centers, professional training programs, and museums. Overall, the work advances social-psychological understanding of how adults and youth respond to educational programming. It highlights the need to go beyond the cognitive shifts in affecting behavior. Curriculum based on environment might be necessary but is often not sufficient for changing environmental values. Finally, information and knowledge acquired must motivate the teachers' and students' desire and ability to conscientiously act, wherever necessary.

  2. DYNAMIC ITELLECTUAL SYSTEM OF PROCESS MANAGEMENT IN INFORMATION AND EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy F. Telnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the technology of application of dynamic intelligent process management system for integrated information-educational environment of university and providing the access for community in order to develop flexible education programs and teaching manuals based on multi-agent and service-oriented architecture. The article depicts the prototype of dynamic intelligent process management system using for forming of educational-methodic body. Efficiency of creation and usage of dynamic intelligent process management system is evaluated. 

  3. Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Microbiology of Molybdenum in Mining-Affected Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Frascoli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum is an essential element for life, with growing production due to a constantly expanding variety of industrial applications. The potentially harmful effects of Mo on the environment, and on human and ecosystem health, require knowledge of Mo behavior in mining-affected environments. Mo is usually present in trace amounts in ore deposits, but mining exploitation can lead to wastes with very high Mo concentrations (up to 4000 mg/kg Mo for tailings, as well as soil, sediments and water contamination in surrounding areas. In mine wastes, molybdenum is liberated from sulfide mineral oxidation and can be sorbed onto secondary Fe(III-minerals surfaces (jarosite, schwertmannite, ferrihydrite at moderately acidic waters, or taken up in secondary minerals such as powellite and wulfenite at neutral to alkaline pH. To date, no Mo-metabolising bacteria have been isolated from mine wastes. However, laboratory and in-situ experiments in other types of contaminated land have suggested that several Mo-reducing and -oxidising bacteria may be involved in the cycling of Mo in and from mine wastes, with good potential for bioremediation. Overall, a general lack of data is highlighted, emphasizing the need for further research on the contamination, geochemistry, bio-availability and microbial cycling of Mo in mining-affected environments to improve environmental management and remediation actions.

  4. Factors affecting sex education in the school system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, G W; Soon, R; Thomas, J M; Kaneshiro, B

    2011-06-01

    To describe the current status of school based sex education and to determine predictors of providing a comprehensive sex education curriculum. Cross-sectional mailed survey Hawaii Seventh and eighth grade health teachers Participants were surveyed regarding the content, quality, and influences on sex education for the 2007 to 2008 academic year. Measures of association (chi-square, ANOVA) and multiple logistic regression were used to determine predictors for teaching comprehensive sex education topics including sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy prevention. Approximately 80% of teachers incorporated some form of sex education into their curriculum and 54.4% of teachers incorporated a comprehensive education. Teachers indicated that personal values and the availability of curriculum had the greatest influence on the content of the curriculum. Specific factors which were associated with an increased likelihood of providing a comprehensive curriculum included teaching in a public school (public 66.7% versus private 34.6%, P = 0.01), receiving formal training in sex education (received training 77.8% versus did not receive training 50.0%, P = 0.03) and having contact with a student who became pregnant (contact 72.7% versus no contact 46.7%, P = 0.04). Although most teachers incorporate some form of sex education, only half incorporate a comprehensive curriculum. Personal values as well as teacher resources play an important role in the content of the curriculum. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Leadership Misplacement: How Can This Affect Institutions of Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor C. X.; Sedivy-Benton, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Well-reasoned leadership theories are described in many academic books, yet they may not apply specifically to practices in higher education. In higher education, the absence of tailored leadership theories is compounded by the lack of technical skills or leadership ethics, resulting in leadership issues that impact the organization. To illustrate…

  6. Variables Affecting Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmmed, Masud; Sharma, Umesh; Deppeler, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive education is a worldwide reform strategy intended to include students with different abilities in mainstream regular schools. Evidence from previous research shows that success in implementing effective inclusive teaching practices in the school is contingent on teachers' positive attitudes towards inclusive education. This study was…

  7. Does Participative Decision Making Affect Lecturer Performance in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukirno, D. S.; Siengthai, Sununta

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between participation and job performance has captured the interest of not only business researchers but also education researchers. However, the topic has not gained significant attention in the educational management research arena. The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the impact of participation in…

  8. Electronic Informational and Educational Environment as a Factor of Competence-Oriented Higher Pedagogical Education in the Sphere of Health, Safety and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerilova, Galina S.; Kartavykh, Marina A.; Ageeva, Elena L.; Veryaskina, Marina A.; Ruban, Elena M.

    2016-01-01

    The authors consider the question of computerisation in health, safety and environment teachers' training in the context of the general approaches and requirements of the Federal National Standard of Higher Education, which is realised through designing of electronic informational and educational environment. The researchers argue indispensability…

  9. How urban environment affects travel behavior? Integrated Choice and Latent Variable Model for Travel Schedules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Paix, Lissy; Bierlaire, Michel; Cherchi, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between urban environment and travel behaviour is not a new problem. Neighbourhood characteristics may affect mobility of dwellers in different ways, such as frequency of trips, mode used, structure of the tours, and so on. At the same time, qualitative issues related...... to the individual attitude towards specific behaviour have recently become important in transport modelling contributing to a better understanding of travel demand. Following this research line, in this paper we study the effect of neighbourhood characteristics in the choice of the type of tours performed, but we...... assume that neighbourhood characteristics can also affect the individual propensity to travel and hence the choice of the tours throughout the propensity to travel. Since the propensity to travel is not observed, we employ hybrid choice models to estimate jointly the discrete choice of tours...

  10. The educational environment of the undergraduate medical curriculum at Kuwait University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jumanah Karim,1 Becher Al-Halabi,2 Yousef Marwan,3 Hussain Sadeq,4 Ahmed Dawas,5 Dalia Al-Abdulrazzaq5 1Department of Pediatrics, Al-Amiri Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait; 2Department of Surgery, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopaedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait; 4Department of Pediatrics, Al-Adan Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait; 5Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences Center, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Educational environment of an institution affects the quality of learning. We aim to assess the educational environment of the undergraduate curriculum of Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University (FOMKU. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during April 2014. The validated Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM questionnaire was e-mailed to 607 students. Mean scores of the main domains of the questionnaire, and for each item, were calculated, and their association with the students’ background information was measured using Student’s t-test (P-value of ≤0.05 was considered as the cut-off level of significance. Results: Of 607 students, 117 (19.3% completed the questionnaire. The total mean score for DREEM was 108.7/200 (54.3%. The mean score for students’ perception of teaching, perception of teachers, academic self-perception, perception of atmosphere, and social self-perception were 25.2/48 (52.5%, 24.6/44 (55.9%, 18.4/32 (57.5%, 26.2/48 (54.5%, and 14.3/28 (51.0%, respectively. The highest mean score for an item of DREEM questionnaire was for “my accommodation is pleasant” (3.48±0.75, while the lowest was for “there is a good support system for students who get stressed” (0.88±0.86. The total mean score was not significantly different between the two phases of the curriculum, or among males and females; however, few significant differences among the main domains and items were noted. Conclusion

  11. Psychological factors of the readiness of teachers to ensure social security in the educational environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmeleva E.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The negative sociocultural transformations that are taking place in modern society and the resulting psychological transformation of personality and mode of life strongly require searching for ways of providing social safety to the next generation, with teachers being the implementers of this process. Teachers’ professionalism is determined by their willingness to solve personal and socially relevant problems, including the willingness to provide social security for other people, to thwart social risks, and to build constructive interpersonal relationships. The aim of our research was to reveal and to analyze the psychological factors affecting the readiness of teachers to ensure social security in educational environments. The environmental factors of social risk have been theoretically characterized. It has been shown that the essential factor in ensuring students’ social security is providing a safe social environment in educational institutions; such an environment provides the learners and the teachers with sociopsychological security and psychosocial well-being. The empirical part of our study was devoted to identifying negative social phenomena in the schools in the Ivanovo region (with the help of a questionnaire administered to 700 students and to identifying the personally and professionally important qualities of the teachers and the subjective psychological factors of their readiness to ensure social security in the educational environment (through interviewing 300 teachers; the administration of the questionnaires and the interviewing were followed by an assessment of their significance (with the help of a questionnaire administered to 140 teachers. Using factor analysis we identified the relevant indicators and grouped them into six factors of the readiness of teachers to ensure a safe educational environment. Relevant personal and professional qualities of teachers were revealed; these are the subjective factors of the

  12. Does Tax Evasion Affect Unemployment and Educational Choice ?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolm, Ann-Sofie; Larsen, Birthe

    2003-01-01

    While examining the macroeconomic effects of government taxand punishment policies, this paper develops a three-sector generalequilibrium model featuring matching frictions and worker-firm wagebargaining. Workers are assumed to differ in ability, and the choiceof education is determined endogenou...... to choose punishment rates so to more than fully counteractthe distortion created by the government's inability to tax theinformal sector.JEL-codes: H26, I21, J64Keywords: Tax evasion, underground economy, education, matching,unemployment....

  13. Litter environment affects behavior and brain metabolic activity of adult knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Crews

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the formative environment for social and anxiety-related behaviors is the family unit; in the case of rodents, this is the litter and the mother-young bond. A deciding factor in this environment is the sex ratio of the litter and, in the case of mice lacking functional copies of gene(s, the ratio of the various genotypes in the litter. Both Sex and Genotype ratios of the litter affect the nature and quality of the individual’s behavior later in adulthood, as well as metabolic activity in brain nuclei that underlie these behaviors. Mice were raised in litters reconstituted shortly after to birth to control for Sex ratio and Genotype ratio (wild type pups vs. pups lacking a functional estrogen receptor α. In both males and females the Sex and Genotype of siblings in the litter affected aggressive behaviors as well as patterns of metabolic activity in limbic nuclei in the social behavior network later in adulthood. Further, this pattern in males varied depending upon the Genotype of their brothers and sisters. Principal Components Analysis revealed two components comprised of several amygdalar and hypothalamic nuclei; the VMH showed strong correlations in both clusters, suggesting its pivotal nature in the organization of two neural networks.

  14. MARS: An Educational Environment for Multiagent Robot Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Casini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate robotics students often find it difficult to design and validate control algorithms for teams of mobile robots. This is mainly due to two reasons. First, very rarely, educational laboratories are equipped with large teams of robots, which are usually expensive, bulky, and difficult to manage and maintain. Second, robotics simulators often require students to spend much time to learn their use and functionalities. For this purpose, a simulator of multiagent mobile robots named MARS has been developed within the Matlab environment, with the aim of helping students to simulate a wide variety of control algorithms in an easy way and without spending time for understanding a new language. Through this facility, the user is able to simulate multirobot teams performing different tasks, from cooperative to competitive ones, by using both centralized and distributed controllers. Virtual sensors are provided to simulate real devices. A graphical user interface allows students to monitor the robots behaviour through an online animation.

  15. Factors Affecting Teachers' Adoption of Educational Computer Games: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebritchi, Mansureh

    2010-01-01

    Even though computer games hold considerable potential for engaging and facilitating learning among today's children, the adoption of modern educational computer games is still meeting significant resistance in K-12 education. The purpose of this paper is to inform educators and instructional designers on factors affecting teachers' adoption of…

  16. Experiences with a simulated learning environment - the SimuScape©: Virtual environments in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Thies

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Simulation as a tool for medical education has gained considerable importance in the past years. Various studies have shown that the mastering of basic skills happens best if taught in a realistic and workplace-based context. It is necessary that simulation itself takes place in the realistic background of a genuine clinical or in an accordingly simulated learning environment. METHODS: A panoramic projection system that allows the simulation of different scenarios has been created at the medical school of the Westphalian Wilhelms-University  Muenster/Germany. The SimuScape© is a circular training room of six meters in diameter and has the capacity to generate pictures or moving images as well as the corresponding background noises for medical students, who are then able to interact with simulated patients inside a realistic environment. RESULTS: About 1,000 students have been instructed using the SimuScape© in the courses of emergency medicine, family medicine and anesthesia. The SimuScape©, with its 270°-panoramic projection, gives the students the impression “of being right in the center of action”.  It is a flexible learning environment that can be easily integrated into curricular teaching and which is in full operation for 10 days per semester. CONCLUSION: The SimuScape© allows the establishment of new medical areas outside the hospital and surgery for simulation and it is an extremely adaptable and cost-effective utilization of a lecture room. In this simulated environment it is possible to teach objectives like self-protection and patient care during disturbing environmental influences in practice.

  17. Trends and driving forces of ecological training and education in the context of ecological education environment of the technical university

    OpenAIRE

    Danilenkova V. A.

    2017-01-01

    common patterns of ecological training and education in the technical university are analyzed in this article, their descriptions are defined. Driving forces of ecological training and education in the context of ecological education environment are discovered and proved. According to conducted research the author makes a proposition to point out at ecological risks as driving forces, searching for which improves the efficiency and effectiveness of ecological education environment. The resear...

  18. Heat and Moisture Transport and Storage Parameters of Bricks Affected by the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Jerman, Miloš; Keppert, Martin; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2018-05-01

    The effect of external environment on heat and moisture transport and storage properties of the traditional fired clay brick, sand-lime brick and highly perforated ceramic block commonly used in the Czech Republic and on their hygrothermal performance in building envelopes is analyzed by a combination of experimental and computational techniques. The experimental measurements of thermal, hygric and basic physical parameters are carried out in the reference state and after a 3-year exposure of the bricks to real climatic conditions of the city of Prague. The obtained results showed that after 3 years of weathering the porosity of the analyzed bricks increased up to five percentage points which led to an increase in liquid and gaseous moisture transport parameters and a decrease in thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of hygrothermal performance of building envelopes made of the studied bricks was done using both reference and weather-affected data. The simulated results indicated an improvement in the annual energy balances and a decrease in the time-of-wetness functions as a result of the use of data obtained after the 3-year exposure to the environment. The effects of weathering on both heat and moisture transport and storage parameters of the analyzed bricks and on their hygrothermal performance were found significant despite the occurrence of warm winters in the time period of 2012-2015 when the brick specimens were exposed to the environment.

  19. MANAGEMENT basic professional educational program IN THE CONDITIONS OF information and educational environment based on cloud TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Bryksina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the advantages of building information-educational environment of the basic professional educational program based on cloud technologies. Universal tool for building information-educational environment is Google Apps for Education services, which allows to organize the effective cooperation of all participants of the educational process, to plan collaborative activities, properly allocate resources and provide the solution of various learning tasks by necessary tools. Examples of using various Google-services in the organization of the collaborative activities of teachers of the department of applied informatics and information technologies in education of the Minin Nizhny Novgorod State Pedagogical University to improve implementation of the basic professional educational program in the direction of preparation "Information systems and technology". The core of the informational and educational environment of the basic professional educational program is Google-site that integrates different Google services and Google Apps applications.

  20. Experimenting with the virtual environment Moodle in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Ines; Dickman, Adriana

    2008-03-01

    The master's program in Physics Education of the Catholic University in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, includes the discipline ``Digital technologies in Physics education.'' The main goal of this discipline is to discuss the role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the process of learning-teaching science. We introduce our students to several virtual platforms, both free and commercial, discussing their functionality and features. We encourage our students to get in touch with computer tools and resources by planning their own computer based course using the Moodle platform. We discuss different patterns of virtual environment courses, whose proposals are centered mainly in the students, or teacher-centered or even system-centered. The student is free to choose between only one topic and a year course to work with, since their interests vary from learning something more about a specific subject to a complete e-learning course covering the entire school year. (The courses are available online in the address sitesinf01.pucmg.br/moodle. Participation only requires filling out an application form.) After three editions of this discipline, we have several courses available. We realize that students tend to focus on traditional methods, always preserving their role as knowledge-givers. In conclusion, we can say that, in spite of exhaustive discussion about autonomy involved with ICTs abilities, most of the students used the new virtual medium to organize traditional teacher-centered courses.

  1. A Framework for the Evaluation of CASE Tool Learnability in Educational Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapathi, Mali

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the research is to derive a framework for the evaluation of Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tool learnability in educational environments. Drawing from the literature of Human Computer Interaction and educational research, a framework for evaluating CASE tool learnability in educational environments is derived. The two main…

  2. Factors Affecting Native Hawaiian Student Persistence in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Dolwin Haunani Keanu

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the educational outcomes of 515 Native Hawaiian alumni who graduated between 1993 and 1995 from high schools throughout the State of Hawaii. The majority of students graduated from Kamehameha Schools, while the others received postsecondary financial aid from the Ke Alii Pauahi Foundation. Respondents were separated into two…

  3. Factors affecting the motivation of unemployed for education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Radovan

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested how well Ajzen in Fishbein's (1980 Theory of reasoned action (TRA predicted educational intentions and aspiration of the unemployed, who were enrolled in governmental funded educational programs. Study also explores the role of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997 as the third independent determinant of intention within the theory of reasoned action and its impact on motivation for further education. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 326 unemployed persons, aged from 16 to 49 years. It turned out that the only significant predictor variable are subjective norms, which had explained 38 % of the variance in intentions (p < 0.001, whereas attitudes toward behavior and self-efficacy did not achieve significance. On the other hand self-efficacy strongly influences individual's educational aspirations and expectations. The results of the study support the hypotheses, that external variables have stronger impact on person's goals, which are under a strong social influence, then on personal beliefs about instrumentality of behavior and perceived competence.

  4. Do English Teaching Materials Foster Foreign Language Education Affectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Ali

    2018-01-01

    The paper investigates the role of English language teaching materials in the creation of a classroom atmosphere conducive to foreign language education. In this study, teachers and students were given a questionnaire and later interviewed to elicit their ideas about the materials. The data was analyzed and the responses of teachers and students…

  5. Mindfulness-Based Interventions and the Affective Domain of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Thanks largely to the work of Kabat-Zinn and associates applications of mindfulness-based practices have grown exponentially over the last decade or so, particularly in the fields of education, psychology, psychotherapy and mind-body health. Having its origins in Buddhist traditions, the more recent secular and therapeutic applications of the…

  6. Factors Affecting Perceived Satisfaction with Facebook in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthawongs, Penjuree; Kanthawongs, Penjira; Chitcharoen, Chaisak

    2016-01-01

    [For full proceedings, see ED571332.]The aim of this study is to explore the impact of perspectives on Facebook in education and relational commitment towards perceived satisfaction with Facebook. The sample included 157 students of two private universities in Bangkok and Pathum Thani province of Thailand during April to May of academic year 2015…

  7. Teacher and Student Variables Affecting Special Education Evaluation and Referral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, Lorenzo Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Past research has revealed that African American/Black boys are referred for special education evaluation at disproportionately higher rates than boys of other racial/ethnic groups. This correlational study used survey methodology to examine whether student and teacher demographic variables predicted how likely a teacher would refer boy students…

  8. A Holistic Approach to Science Education: Disciplinary, Affective, and Equitable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rohit; Mehta, Swati; Seals, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we argue that science education is more than the high stakes, rigorous practices and methodology that students often find dull and uninspiring. We present that aesthetic and humanistic motivations, such as wonder, curiosity, and social justice, are also inherent reasons for doing science. In the MSUrbanSTEM program, we designed an…

  9. Elemental mercury: Its unique properties affect its behavior and fate in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Raymat, Hansell; Liu, Guangliang; Liriano, Carolina; Li, Yanbin; Yin, Yongguang; Shi, Jianbo; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) has different behavior in the environment compared to other pollutants due to its unique properties. It can remain in the atmosphere for long periods of time and so can travel long distances. Through air-surface (e.g., vegetation or ocean) exchange (dry deposition), Hg 0 can enter terrestrial and aquatic systems where it can be converted into other Hg species. Despite being ubiquitous and playing a key role in Hg biogeochemical cycling, Hg 0 behavior in the environment is not well understood. The objective of this review is to provide a better understanding of how the unique physicochemical properties of Hg 0 affects its cycling and chemical transformations in different environmental compartments. The first part focuses on the fundamental chemistry of Hg 0 , addressing why Hg 0 is liquid at room temperature and the formation of amalgam, Hg halide, and Hg chalcogenides. The following sections discuss the long-range transport of Hg 0 as well as its redistribution in the atmosphere, aquatic and terrestrial systems, in particular, on the sorption/desorption processes that occur in each environmental compartment as well as the involvement of Hg 0 in chemical transformation processes driven by photochemical, abiotic, and biotic reactions. - Highlights: • Unique property of Hg 0 make it to behave differently with other toxic metals. • Hg 0 is considered the only global metal pollutant due to its uniqueness. • Hg 0 can be easily transformed and efficiently redistributed in the environments. - A better understanding of the properties and behavior of Hg 0 is the key to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of mercury, a global pollutant in the environment.

  10. The Worldviews Network: Transformative Global Change Education in Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H.; Yu, K. C.; Gardiner, N.; McConville, D.; Connolly, R.; "Irving, Lindsay", L. S.

    2011-12-01

    Our modern age is defined by an astounding capacity to generate scientific information. From DNA to dark matter, human ingenuity and technologies create an endless stream of data about ourselves and the world of which we are a part. Yet we largely founder in transforming information into understanding, and understanding into rational action for our society as a whole. Earth and biodiversity scientists are especially frustrated by this impasse because the data they gather often point to a clash between Earth's capacity to sustain life and the decisions that humans make to garner the planet's resources. Immersive virtual environments offer an underexplored link in the translation of scientific data into public understanding, dialogue, and action. The Worldviews Network is a collaboration of scientists, artists, and educators focused on developing best practices for the use of immersive environments for science-based ecological literacy education. A central tenet of the Worldviews Network is that there are multiple ways to know and experience the world, so we are developing scientifically accurate, geographically relevant, and culturally appropriate programming to promote ecological literacy within informal science education programs across the United States. The goal of Worldviews Network is to offer transformative learning experiences, in which participants are guided on a process integrating immersive visual explorations, critical reflection and dialogue, and design-oriented approaches to action - or more simply, seeing, knowing, and doing. Our methods center on live presentations, interactive scientific visualizations, and sustainability dialogues hosted at informal science institutions. Our approach uses datasets from the life, Earth, and space sciences to illuminate the complex conditions that support life on earth and the ways in which ecological systems interact. We are leveraging scientific data from federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and our

  11. Mobile learning in resource-constrained environments: a case study of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Linxen, Sebastian; Gröhbiel, Urs; Jha, Anil Kumar; Burg, Günter

    2013-05-01

    The achievement of the millennium development goals may be facilitated by the use of information and communication technology in medical and health education. This study intended to explore the use and impact of educational technology in medical education in resource-constrained environments. A multiple case study was conducted in two Nepalese teaching hospitals. The data were analysed using activity theory as an analytical basis. There was little evidence for formal e-learning, but the findings indicate that students and residents adopted mobile technologies, such as mobile phones and small laptops, as cultural tools for surprisingly rich 'informal' learning in a very short time. These tools allowed learners to enhance (a) situated learning, by immediately connecting virtual information sources to their situated experiences; (b) cross-contextual learning by documenting situated experiences in the form of images and videos and re-using the material for later reflection and discussion and (c) engagement with educational content in social network communities. By placing the students and residents at the centre of the new learning activities, this development has begun to affect the overall educational system. Leveraging these tools is closely linked to the development of broad media literacy, including awareness of ethical and privacy issues.

  12. Telecommuting Academics Within an Open Distance Education Environment of South Africa: More Content, Productive, and Healthy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deon Harold Tustin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Outside an academic setting, telecommuting has become fairly popular in recent years. However, research on telecommuting practices within a higher education environment is fairly sparse, especially within the higher distance education sphere. Drawing on existing literature on telecommuting and the outcome of a valuation study on the success of an experimental telecommuting programme at the largest distance education institution in South Africa, this article presents discerning findings on telecommuting practices. In fact, the research builds on evolutionary telecommuting assessment methods of the direct or indirect effect (work based and affective impact (emotional on multiple stakeholder groups. This holistic approach allowed for comparative analysis between telecommuting and nontelecommuting academics with regard to the impact of telecommuting practices. The research reveals high levels of support for telecommuting practices that are associated with high levels of work productivity and satisfaction, lower levels of emotional and physical fatigue, and reduced work stress, frustration, and overload. The study also reveals higher levels of student satisfaction with academic support from telecommuters than nontelecommuters. Overall, the critique presents insightful findings on telecommuting practices within an academic setting, which clearly signal a potential for a shift in the office culture of higher distance education institutions in the years to come. The study makes a significant contribution to a limited collection of empirical research on telecommuting practices within the higher distance education sector and guides institutions in refining and/or redefining future telecommuting strategies or programmes.

  13. A structural regression model for relationship between indoor air quality with dissatisfaction of occupants in education environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hamid Reza; Yunos, Mohd Yazid Mohd; Ismail, Sumarni; Yaman, Maheran

    2017-12-01

    This paper analysis the effects of indoor air elements on the dissatisfaction of occupants in education of environments. Tries to find the equation model for increasing the comprehension about these affects and optimizes satisfaction of occupants about indoor environment. Subsequently, increase performance of students, lecturers and staffs. As the method, a satisfaction questionnaire (SQ) and measuring environment elements (MEE) was conducted, 143 respondents at five classrooms, four staff rooms and five lectures rooms were considered. Temperature, air velocity and humidity (TVH) were used as independent variables and dissatisfaction as dependent variable. The hypothesis was tested for significant relationship between variables, and analysis was applied. Results found that indoor air quality presents direct effects on dissatisfaction of occupants and indirect effects on performance and the highest effects fallowed by temperature. These results may help to optimize the quality of efficiency and effectiveness in education environments.

  14. Psychological resources of modern Russian adolescents’ resilience to violence in the educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baeva, Irina A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the personality’s psychological resources that ensure its resilience to negative effects of the social environment is a priority problem in modern society, science, and education, since we currently see a sharp increase in the number of factors that affect psychological hardiness and security. One of these is intensification of violent and aggressive forms of interaction in educational institutions. Such manifestations are especially dangerous in schools, since, by virtue of their age-specific features, students are the most vulnerable and they subsequently translate the acquired values and behaviors to society as a whole. The goal of this empirical study was to identify teenagers’ psychological resources that determine their resilience to various forms of psychological violence in the educational environment. The study covered four St. Petersburg high schools, with 437 teenagers aged from 16.5 to 17 (189 boys and 248 girls. A questionnaire was developed to divide the subjects into groups with high and low levels of protection (security against psychological violence in the educational environment. The questionnaire lists forms of psychological violence in the educational environment (identified by theoretical review that can occur in interpersonal communication between peers and between teachers and students. The respondents evaluated each item of the questionnaire in accordance with the proposed scale of frequency with which each form of violence occurred. Theoretical analysis determined that psychological violence is traumatic for the adolescent personality’s cognitive, emotional, and behavioral spheres. The teenagers’ psychological resources of resilience to violence in the educational environment were identified with the aid of psychodiagnostic methods addressing each of them. Our study allows us to conclude that the resources that ensure the teenager’s resilience to the negative effect of psychological violence

  15. Affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cetinic, M.; Diamanti, J.; Szeman, I.; Blacker, S.; Sully, J.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter historicizes four divergent but historically contemporaneous genres of affect theory – romantic, realist, speculative, and materialist. While critics credited with the turn to affect in the 1990s wrote largely in the wake of poststructuralism from the perspective of gender and queer

  16. Education tools for entrepreneurship creating an action-learning environment through educational learning tools

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Jaime; Vélez-Torres, Francisco; Rueda-Armengot, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This book examines education in entrepreneurship through an action-learning environment that employs various education tools, technology tools and pedagogical methods being implemented into university curriculums around the world. Entrepreneurship in all of its aspects, connotations, and applications has undoubtedly become a major force for new and sustainable wealth creation in both emerging and developed economies. This notion has been encouraging universities to incorporate entrepreneurship-related competencies into the curriculums of almost all subjects, as researchers, educators, and administrators alike acknowledge that students must be fully engaged and prepared to thrive in a society increasingly defined by innovation. In this context, the primary challenge consists in how to inspire or work beyond the mental limits in the classroom; to determine which learning platforms are required or useful to unlock and stimulate creativity and eliminate the human aversion to failure. Featuring contributions and c...

  17. INFORMATION EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT AS A PLATFORM FOR IMPLEMENTING BLENDED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla P. Kobysia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the organization of blended learning for students on the basis of information educational environment using electronic teaching methods courses. It was considered the use of modern information technology, interactive learning, the use of computer-oriented technologies for structuring educational information and presenting it in different formats, creating an electronic notebook - portfolio of student’s work on appropriate discipline. The portfolio does not only qualitatively assess the performance of students and their level of competence, but also intensify educational interests through the reflection of their professional activity, self-control and self-monitoring their achievement, analysis, reasoning and planning future actions, decisions, and finally changes personal success.

  18. Dysfunctional family environment in affected versus unaffected offspring of parents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Guilherme S; Moreira, Carolina R L; Kleinman, Ana; Nader, Edmir C G P; Gomes, Bernardo Carramão; Teixeira, Ana Maria A; Rocca, Cristiana C Almeida; Nicoletti, Mark; Soares, Jair C; Busatto, Geraldo F; Lafer, Beny; Caetano, Sheila C

    2013-11-01

    Children of parents with bipolar disorder (BD) are at heightened risk for developing mood and other psychiatric disorders. We proposed to evaluate the environment of families with at least one parent with BD type I (BDF) with affected offspring (aBDF) and unaffected offspring (uBDF) compared with control families without a history of DSM-IV Axis I disorder (CF). We used the Family Environment Scale (FES) to evaluate 47 BDF (aBDF + uBDF) and 30 CF. Parents were assessed through the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I). Diagnosis of the offspring was determined through the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children/Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL) interview. There were statistically significant differences between aBDF, uBDF and CF in cohesion (p = 0.003), intellectual-cultural orientation (p = 0.01), active-recreational orientation (p = 0.007), conflict (p = 0.001), control (p = 0.01), moral-religious emphasis (p = 0.01) and organization (p = 0.001). The aBDF showed higher levels of control (p = 0.02) when compared to the uBDF. Families with a BD parent presented more dysfunctional interactions among members. Moreover, the presence of BD or other psychiatric disorders in the offspring of parents with BD is associated with higher levels of control. These results highlight the relevance of psychosocial interventions to improve resilience and family interactions.

  19. Drivers of relationships affecting B2B firms in an e-commerce environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Samanta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the internet has created numerous opportunities for B2B marketing professionals to enhance current marketing practices, including electronic relationships. However, the investigation of e-relationships and the factors that influence e-relationships in an internet environment is scant. Further, there appears to be no investigation of this phenomenon within the context of Greek B2B Medium-sized firms (MSF. Τhe research problem investigated in this research is: “Which drivers in B2B e-commerce use affect inter-firm relationships in medium-sized B2B firms?”. A framework for B2B e-commerce relationships in a changing and globalized environment was synthesised and integrated with the literature about relationship marketing to arrive at the following research issues: “How do relationship marketing drivers affect the management of B2B e-relationships?”. An explanatory quantitative research approach was used and quantitative data was collected from B2B firms in Greece, which represents a case of e-commerce progress during the last six years. Regarding social exchange, some important differences emerge where cooperation between B2B e-commerce firms is concerned. Suppliers engaged in electronic commerce are more committed and oriented to a long-term relationship than buyers, based on both previous and current experience with them. Confidence in the relationships, consistency and honesty with their obligations and the exchange of reliable, trustworthy information and advisory services between firms are important factors in the development and establishment of their e-relationships. The main contribution of this research is the development of a theoretical framework for e-relationships in medium-sized Β2Β firms. That framework is the first rigorously researched step towards understanding the importance of these powerful streams of relationship drivers in total, and the business activity of e-marketing and electronic relationships.

  20. The geomagnetic environment in which sea turtle eggs incubate affects subsequent magnetic navigation behaviour of hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Davidoff, Kyla R; Mangiamele, Lisa A; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2014-09-22

    Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) use regional magnetic fields as open-ocean navigational markers during trans-oceanic migrations. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of this behaviour. As a first step towards investigating whether the magnetic environment in which hatchlings develop affects subsequent magnetic orientation behaviour, eggs deposited by nesting female loggerheads were permitted to develop in situ either in the natural ambient magnetic field or in a magnetic field distorted by magnets placed around the nest. In orientation experiments, hatchlings that developed in the normal ambient field oriented approximately south when exposed to a field that exists near the northern coast of Portugal, a direction consistent with their migratory route in the northeastern Atlantic. By contrast, hatchlings that developed in a distorted magnetic field had orientation indistinguishable from random when tested in the same north Portugal field. No differences existed between the two groups in orientation assays involving responses to orbital movements of waves or sea-finding, neither of which involves magnetic field perception. These findings, to our knowledge, demonstrate for the first time that the magnetic environment present during early development can influence the magnetic orientation behaviour of a neonatal migratory animal. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. The Conditions of the Environment as Factors Affecting the Social and Political Stability of Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Pedrazzini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, the different conditions of the environment which could affect the well-being of the populations living on it are taken into consideration and analysed. A specific attention is paid to the phenomenon of water reduction, land degradation and consequent desertification. Such a phenomenon is particularly worrying in selected regions of the world (the Mediterranean Region and Central Asia in which a combination of several factors including climate variations, pressure of populations and increased competition for the available resources have a direct consequence on the economical, social and political conditions of the population. In addition, migrations could also take place, increasing the instability of entire regions. A proper management of water resources and the preservation of land and soil resources are essential requisites to counteract the mentioned adverse effects. Such a management is frequently a transboundary concern since it might involve different regions and countries; this is an additional reason for debating the environment degradation issues at the international level and for increasing the awareness of the civil society, the policy makers and governments.

  2. Postgraduate residents' perception of the clinical learning environment; use of postgraduate hospital educational environment measure (PHEEM) in Pakistani context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Attia; Khan, Rehan Ahmed; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the perception of postgraduate residents about the clinical educational environment and to investigate the association of their perception with different specialities and years of residency. The study was conducted in August 2016 at The Children's Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan, and comprised postgraduate residents who were asked to complete postgraduate hospital educational environment measure questionnaire. The residents' individual perception scores were calculated and the means of both individual domain and global score of the questionnaire were compared by different specialities and different levels of residency training year. SPSS 20 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 160 residents who completed the questionnaire, 114(71.3%) were related to paediatric medicine. The residents perceived their educational environment positive with a global mean score of 88.16±14.18. Autonomy and teaching were rated most highly by paediatric diagnostic residents, i.e. 32.23±8.148 and 36.23±9.010, respectively. Social support was rated the highest by paediatric surgery residents 24.36±4.653. There was no significant difference of perception between different specialities (p=0.876) or different years of residency (p=0.474). Postgraduate hospital educational environment measure can be used to identify areas of strengths and weaknesses in a hospital environment. Educational environment of study site was more positive than negative.

  3. Adequacy of the Regular Early Education Classroom Environment for Students with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cherylee M.; Packer, Tanya L.; Passmore, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the classroom environment that students with visual impairment typically experience in regular Australian early education. Adequacy of the classroom environment (teacher training and experience, teacher support, parent involvement, adult involvement, inclusive attitude, individualization of the curriculum, physical…

  4. A Review of Obesity and Its Relationship with the Built Environment: Implications for Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is an important worldwide public health problem. Obesogenic environments have been associated with increasing rates of overweight and obesity. The relationship between obesity and the built environment, along with its implications for health education are discussed in this article.

  5. Towards needs-based work environments : Psychological needs affecting the use and appreciation of activity-based work environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jan Gerard Hoendervanger

    2015-01-01

    Activity-Based Working (ABW) is supported by work environments that combine hot-desking with a variety of workplaces, designed to support different types of activities. While the advantages of these work environments in terms of efficiency are undisputed, their effectiveness with respect to job

  6. Towards needs-based work environments: psychological needs affecting the use and appreciation of activity-based work environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendervanger, Jan Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Activity-Based Working (ABW) is supported by work environments that combine hot-desking with a variety of workplaces, designed to support different types of activities. While the advantages of these work environments in terms of efficiency are undisputed, their effectiveness with respect to job

  7. Chandra X-ray Data Analysis in Educational Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilsky, T.; Etkina, E.; Lestition, K.; Mandel, E.; Joye, W.

    2004-12-01

    Recent progress in both software and remote connectivity capabilities have made it possible for authentic data analysis tasks to be presented in a wide range of educational venues. No longer are precollege teachers and students, and interested members of the public limited by their lack of access to the scientific workstations and UNIX-based imaging and analytical software used by the research community. Through a suite of programs that couples a simplified graphical user interface using the "DS9" imaging software with a "virtual observatory" capability that processes the analytical algorithms used by X-ray astronomers, we can access archived Chandra observations and generate images, as well as light curves, energy spectra, power spectra and other common examples of science tasks. The system connects to a remote UNIX server, but the user may be sited on a PC or Mac platform. Furthermore, the use of VNC (a remote desktop display environment) allows a teacher to view, comment on and debug any analysis task in real time, from anywhere in the world, and across any computer platform. This makes these programs especially useful in distance learning settings. We have developed, tested and used these capabilities in a wide variety of educational arenas, from 4 week intensive courses in X-ray astronomy research techniques for precollege students and teachers, to one day teacher enrichment workshops, to modules of classroom activities suitable for precollege grade levels, using a variety of cosmic X-ray sources. Examples using archived Chandra observations will be presented demonstrating the flexibility and usefulness of these resources.

  8. Electrostatics in the environment: How they may affect health and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, K. S.; Simon, H. M. Ap; Bell, J. N. B.

    2008-12-01

    Lifestyles and the built environment have changed considerably during the past century and have greatly influenced the electric field, small air ion and charged submicron aerosol regimes to which individuals are often exposed. In particular the use of electrical items, synthetic materials/finishes and low humidity levels that can lead to the generation of high electrostatic charges, along with inadequate grounding protocols and building techniques which create 'Faraday cage'-like conditions, have all greatly altered the electromagnetic nature of the microclimates many people occupy for prolonged periods of time. It is suggested that the type, polarity and strengths of electric fields individuals are exposed to may affect their likelihood of succumbing to ill-health through influencing biological functioning, oxygen-uptake and retention rates of inhaled submicron contaminants to a far greater degree than previously realised. These factors can also influence the degree of local surface contamination and adhesion that occurs. It is further suggested that both health and work productivity can be affected by such factors, and that improved 'best practice' electro-hygiene/productivity protocols should be adopted wherever practical.

  9. Electrostatics in the environment: How they may affect health and productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, K S; ApSimon, H M; Bell, J N B [Centre for Environmental Policy, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: keith.jamieson02@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-12-01

    Lifestyles and the built environment have changed considerably during the past century and have greatly influenced the electric field, small air ion and charged submicron aerosol regimes to which individuals are often exposed. In particular the use of electrical items, synthetic materials/finishes and low humidity levels that can lead to the generation of high electrostatic charges, along with inadequate grounding protocols and building techniques which create 'Faraday cage'-like conditions, have all greatly altered the electromagnetic nature of the microclimates many people occupy for prolonged periods of time. It is suggested that the type, polarity and strengths of electric fields individuals are exposed to may affect their likelihood of succumbing to ill-health through influencing biological functioning, oxygen-uptake and retention rates of inhaled submicron contaminants to a far greater degree than previously realised. These factors can also influence the degree of local surface contamination and adhesion that occurs. It is further suggested that both health and work productivity can be affected by such factors, and that improved 'best practice' electro-hygiene/productivity protocols should be adopted wherever practical.

  10. Electrostatics in the environment: How they may affect health and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, K S; ApSimon, H M; Bell, J N B

    2008-01-01

    Lifestyles and the built environment have changed considerably during the past century and have greatly influenced the electric field, small air ion and charged submicron aerosol regimes to which individuals are often exposed. In particular the use of electrical items, synthetic materials/finishes and low humidity levels that can lead to the generation of high electrostatic charges, along with inadequate grounding protocols and building techniques which create 'Faraday cage'-like conditions, have all greatly altered the electromagnetic nature of the microclimates many people occupy for prolonged periods of time. It is suggested that the type, polarity and strengths of electric fields individuals are exposed to may affect their likelihood of succumbing to ill-health through influencing biological functioning, oxygen-uptake and retention rates of inhaled submicron contaminants to a far greater degree than previously realised. These factors can also influence the degree of local surface contamination and adhesion that occurs. It is further suggested that both health and work productivity can be affected by such factors, and that improved 'best practice' electro-hygiene/productivity protocols should be adopted wherever practical.

  11. Land of Misfit Toys: Mothers' Perceptions of Educational Environments for Their Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalvani, Priya

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, 19 mothers discussed the education of their children with Down syndrome. Mothers reflected on their expectations and perceptions of different educational environments, focussing particularly on their understanding of inclusive education. The findings suggest that mothers' beliefs and decisions related to the education of…

  12. Teaching in Informal Learning Environments as a Means for Promoting Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, Panayiotis; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    The idea of inclusive education has featured very highly in the educational priorities of many educational systems. However, the same educational systems are often criticised because of the failings of their teachers to respond to inclusive environments of learning, where all children, despite their different abilities, receive equal opportunities…

  13. SOFTWARE-TOOL PLATFORM OF DIDACTIC DESIGN OF INFORMATION LEARNING ENVIRONMENT IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.L. Shevchenko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Annotation In the article considered problems of theoretical meaning in the context of terminology that used in distance education, practical aspects of designing methods of didactic implementation and practical solutions as for to organization of information education environment and personal-oriented implementation of its educational process in secondary general education school.

  14. Highlighting the gap between critical outcomes requirements and built environment education in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ampofo-Anti, NL

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the discrepancies between current built environment education and Critical Outcomes requirements of the South African National Qualifications Framework (NQF)...

  15. A Survey of Educational Games as Interaction Design Tools for Affective Learning: Thematic Analysis Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Zarwina; Kamsin, Amirrudin; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2018-01-01

    A Computer game is the new platform in generating learning experiences for educational purposes. There are many educational games that have been used as an interaction design tool in a learning environment to enhance students learning outcomes. However, research also claims that playing video games can have a negative impact on student behavior,…

  16. Social factors affecting education quality of Iranian medical & dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarmand, A Hamid; Sabour, Siamak

    2014-09-01

    Positive social behavior of student is an important factor in the integrity of educational quality. Unbalanced behavior can disrupt the progress of students in learning. The present study evaluates the effect of social factors on education quality of dental and medical students. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 227 randomly selected students (109 dental and 118 medical). The questionnaire contained three domains of cultural collectivism, self-concept, and social adjustment adapted from California Test of Personality. It also included demographic questions like; field of study, gender and home city of residence. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version#19) software. Pearsons' correlation coefficient and independent t-test were used at the P-value of 0.05. Generally, girl students showed higher cultural collectivism (P=0.028) and social adjustment (P=0.04). On the contrary, boys were better in self-concept behavior (P=0.34). Home city of residence evidenced with no significant effect on any aspects of social attitudes of subjects. Pearsons' correlation coefficient test showed a weak correlation between cultural collectivism and self-concept (r=0.134, P=0.04) and between cultural collectivism and social adjustment, as well. (r=0.252, P=0.001) Independent t-test showed a significant difference between male and female students concerning cultural collectivism and social adjustment. Reliability of cultural collectivism, self-concept and social adjustment scales ranged from very good to moderate, α=0.83, α=0.63, and α=0.54 respectively. The results of this study indicated that female students show better cultural collectivism and social adjustment skills. It also proved that home city of residence has no significant effect upon social behavior of either medical or dental students.

  17. Simulated learning environment (SLE) in audiology education: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzulkarnain, Ahmad Aidil Arafat; Wan Mhd Pandi, Wan Mahirah; Rahmat, Sarah; Zakaria, Nur 'Azzah

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review the relevant peer-review literature investigating the outcome of simulated learning environment (SLE) training in audiology education. A systematic review research design. Fifteen databases were searched with four studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Three of the four studies revealed positive findings for the use of an SLE (that is, the SLE group showed a higher post-training score compared to the traditional training group or a significantly higher post-training score than the non-training groups). One study revealed negative findings where the traditional training group showed a significantly higher post-training score than the SLE group. In addition, both the studies comparing post- and pre-training scores reported significantly higher post-training scores than the pre-training scores of the participants that underwent SLE training. Overall, this review supports the notions that SLE training is an effective learning tool and can be used for basic clinical training. This conclusion should be treated with caution, considering the limited numbers of studies published in this area and future research should be conducted to cope with the gaps highlighted in this review.

  18. A person-environment fit approach to volunteerism : Volunteer personality fit and culture fit as predictors of affective outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Voskuijl, Olga F.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a person-environment (P-E) fit approach to explaining volunteer satisfaction, affective commitment, and turnover intentions. It was hypothesized that personality fit would explain additional variance in volunteer affective outcomes above and beyond motives to volunteer. This

  19. Big Sib Students' Perceptions of the Educational Environment at the School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, using Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzuman, Hafiza; Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri; Chit, Som Phong

    2010-07-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among Big Sib students to explore their perceptions of the educational environment at the School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) and its weak areas using the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) inventory. The DREEM inventory is a validated global instrument for measuring educational environments in undergraduate medical and health professional education. The English version of the DREEM inventory was administered to all Year 2 Big Sib students (n = 67) at a regular Big Sib session. The purpose of the study as well as confidentiality and ethical issues were explained to the students before the questionnaire was administered. The response rate was 62.7% (42 out of 67 students). The overall DREEM score was 117.9/200 (SD 14.6). The DREEM indicated that the Big Sib students' perception of educational environment of the medical school was more positive than negative. Nevertheless, the study also revealed some problem areas within the educational environment. This pilot study revealed that Big Sib students perceived a positive learning environment at the School of Medical Sciences, USM. It also identified some low-scored areas that require further exploration to pinpoint the exact problems. The relatively small study population selected from a particular group of students was the major limitation of the study. This small sample size also means that the study findings cannot be generalised.

  20. What do faculty feel about teaching in this school? assessment of medical education environment by teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehnaz, Syed Ilyas; Arifulla, Mohamed; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Gomathi, Kadayam Guruswami

    2017-01-01

    Faculty members are major stakeholders in curriculum delivery, and positive student learning outcomes can only be expected in an educational environment (EE) conducive to learning. EE experienced by teachers includes all conditions affecting teaching and learning activities. As the EE of teachers indirectly influences the EE of students, assessment of teachers' perceptions of EE can highlight issues affecting student learning. These perceptions can also serve as a valuable tool for identifying faculty development needs. In this study, we have used the Assessment of Medical Education Environment by Teachers (AMEET) inventory as a tool to assess medical teachers' perceptions of the EE. The AMEET inventory was used to assess perceptions regarding various domains of EE by teachers teaching undergraduate students at the College of Medicine, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Median total, domain, and individual statement scores were compared between groups using Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Teaching-learning activities, learning atmosphere, collaborative atmosphere, and professional self-perceptions were identified as strengths of the EE while time allocated for various teaching-learning activities, preparedness of students, levels of student stress, learning atmosphere in hospital, and support system for stressed faculty members were areas necessitating improvement. The scores of faculty members teaching in basic medical sciences were found to be significantly higher than those in clinical sciences. The EE of this medical college was generally perceived as being positive by faculty although a few areas of concern were highlighted. Strengths and weaknesses of the EE from the teachers' point of view provide important feedback to curriculum planners, which can be used to improve the working environment of the faculty as well as facilitate a better direction and focus to faculty development programs being planned for the future.

  1. Dispositional Factors Affecting Motivation during Learning in Adult Basic and Secondary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellard, Daryl F.; Krieshok, Thomas; Fall, Emily; Woods, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that about a quarter of adult students separate from formal adult basic and secondary education (ABE/ASE) programs before completing one educational level. This retrospective study explores individual dispositional factors that affect motivation during learning, particularly students' goals, goal-directed thinking and action…

  2. Affective Education: Its Implications for Teaching a Communication Arts Course in the College English Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sada Mae

    This study reviews, analyzes, and summarizes the scientific research and professional literature pertaining to affective education (education concerned with the emotional needs of the learners) in order to determine its implications for a communication arts course in the English program. A review of the literature indicated that when the basic…

  3. The Importance of Social Learning Environment Factors for Affective Well-Being among Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idsoe, Ella Maria Cosmovici

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether perceived inclusion and exclusion with peers at school, as well as self-reported bullying exposure, affected positive and negative affect among 1161 students from grades five through seven. Positive affect was significantly, but only weakly, affected by perceived exclusion and inclusion. Negative affect was not related to…

  4. Surface coating affects behavior of metallic nanoparticles in a biological environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darija Domazet Jurašin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silver (AgNPs and maghemite, i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs are promising candidates for new medical applications, which implies the need for strict information regarding their physicochemical characteristics and behavior in a biological environment. The currently developed AgNPs and SPIONs encompass a myriad of sizes and surface coatings, which affect NPs properties and may improve their biocompatibility. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of surface coating on colloidal stability and behavior of AgNPs and SPIONs in modelled biological environments using dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering techniques, as well as transmission electron microscopy to visualize the behavior of the NP. Three dispersion media were investigated: ultrapure water (UW, biological cell culture medium without addition of protein (BM, and BM supplemented with common serum protein (BMP. The obtained results showed that different coating agents on AgNPs and SPIONs produced different stabilities in the same biological media. The combination of negative charge and high adsorption strength of coating agents proved to be important for achieving good stability of metallic NPs in electrolyte-rich fluids. Most importantly, the presence of proteins provided colloidal stabilization to metallic NPs in biological fluids regardless of their chemical composition, surface structure and surface charge. In addition, an assessment of AgNP and SPION behavior in real biological fluids, rat whole blood (WhBl and blood plasma (BlPl, revealed that the composition of a biological medium is crucial for the colloidal stability and type of metallic NP transformation. Our results highlight the importance of physicochemical characterization and stability evaluation of metallic NPs in a variety of biological systems including as many NP properties as possible.

  5. Microbial environment affects innate immunity in two closely related earthworm species Eisenia andrei and Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Dvořák

    Full Text Available Survival of earthworms in the environment depends on their ability to recognize and eliminate potential pathogens. This work is aimed to compare the innate defense mechanisms of two closely related earthworm species, Eisenia andrei and Eisenia fetida, that inhabit substantially different ecological niches. While E. andrei lives in a compost and manure, E. fetida can be found in the litter layer in forests. Therefore, the influence of environment-specific microbiota on the immune response of both species was followed. Firstly, a reliable method to discern between E. andrei and E. fetida based on species-specific primers for cytochrome c oxidase I (COI and stringent PCR conditions was developed. Secondly, to analyze the immunological profile in both earthworm species, the activity and expression of lysozyme, pattern recognition protein CCF, and antimicrobial proteins with hemolytic function, fetidin and lysenins, have been assessed. Whereas, CCF and lysozyme showed only slight differences in the expression and activity, fetidin/lysenins expression as well as the hemolytic activity was considerably higher in E. andrei as compared to E. fetida. The expression of fetidin/lysenins in E. fetida was not affected upon the challenge with compost microbiota, suggesting more substantial changes in the regulation of the gene expression. Genomic DNA analyses revealed significantly higher level of fetidin/lysenins (determined using universal primer pairs in E. andrei compared to E. fetida. It can be hypothesized that E. andrei colonizing compost as a new habitat acquired an evolutionary selection advantage resulting in a higher expression of antimicrobial proteins.

  6. All eggs are not equal: the maternal environment affects progeny reproduction and developmental fate in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C Harvey

    Full Text Available Maternal effects on progeny traits are common and these can profoundly alter progeny life history. Maternal effects can be adaptive, representing attempts to appropriately match offspring phenotype to the expected environment and are often mediated via trade-offs between progeny number and quality. Here we have investigated the effect of maternal food availability on progeny life history in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.The maternal environment affects both reproductive traits and progeny development. Comparisons of the progeny of worms from high and low maternal food environments indicates that low maternal food availability reduces progeny reproduction in good environments, increases progeny reproduction in poor environments and decreases the likelihood that progeny will develop as dauer larvae. These analyses also indicate that the effects on progeny are not a simple consequence of changes in maternal body size, but are associated with an increase in the size of eggs produced by worms at low maternal food availabilities.These results indicate that the maternal environment affects both progeny reproduction and development in C. elegans and therefore that all progeny are not equal. The observed effects are consistent with changes to egg provisioning, which are beneficial in harsh environments, and of changes to progeny development, which are beneficial in harsh environments and detrimental in benign environments. These changes in progeny life history suggest that mothers in poor quality environments may be producing larger eggs that are better suited to poor conditions.

  7. Growth and social behavior in a cichlid fish are affected by social rearing environment and kinship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Saskia; Thünken, Timo

    2014-04-01

    Living in groups is a widespread phenomenon in many animal taxa. The reduction of predation risk is thought to be an important cause for the formation of groups. Consequently, grouping behavior is particularly pronounced during vulnerable life stages, i.e., as juveniles. However, group living does not only provide benefits but also imposes costs on group members, e.g., increased competition for food. Thus, benefits of grouping behavior might not be evident when predation risk is absent. The adaptive significance of living and also developing in a group independent from predation risk has received relatively little attention although this might have important implications on the evolution and maintenance of group living. The first aim of the present study was to examine whether the social environment affects juvenile performance in the cichlid fish Pelvicachromis taeniatus and, secondly, whether kinship affects social behavior. Kin selection theory predicts benefits from grouping with kin. Here, we demonstrate that juveniles reared in a group grow on average faster compared to juveniles reared in isolation under standardized laboratory conditions without predation risk. Furthermore, we found significant differences in social behavior between juveniles reared in a group and reared in isolation. Fish reared in isolation were significantly more aggressive and less willing to shoal than group-reared fish. As expected, genetic relatedness influenced social behavior in group-reared fish as well: dyads of juveniles consisting of kin showed increased group cohesiveness compared to non-kin dyads. We discuss the potential benefits of group living in general and living with kin in particular.

  8. Perceptions of students in different phases of medical education of the educational environment: Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman NIA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nor Iza A Rahman, Aniza Abd Aziz, Zainal Zulkifli, Muhammad Arshad Haj, Farah Hanani Binti Mohd Nasir, Sharvina Pergalathan, Muhammad Ismail Hamidi, Salwani Ismail, Nordin Bin Simbak, Mainul Haque Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia Background: The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM was planned and designed to quantify the educational environment precisely for medical schools and health-related professional schools. DREEM is now considered a valid and reliable tool, which is globally accepted for measuring the medical educational environment. The educational environment encountered by students has an impact on satisfaction with the course of study, perceived sense of well-being, aspirations, and academic achievement. In addition to being measurable, the educational environment can also be changed, thus enhancing the quality of medical education and the environment, and the medical education process. The objective of this study was to assess the educational environment of the Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA undergraduate medical program from the students’ perspective. The study expected to explore UniSZA medical students’ overall perceptions, perceptions of learning, teachers, atmosphere, academic self-perception, and social self-perception using the DREEM questionnaire. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to study the perceptions of the students toward the educational environment of UniSZA as a new medical school, using the DREEM questionnaire. All medical students of UniSZA from Years I–V enrolled in the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery programs were the target population (n=270. Therefore, the universal sampling technique was used. The data were analyzed using the SPSS 20 software. This study obtained ethical clearance from the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UniSZA. Results: A total of 195 out of 270 students responded

  9. INTEGRATION OF AN INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY ON INFORMATION AND EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olessia R. Oleksyuk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors of article analyze the concepts associated with the processes of integration of software for the learning. The article contains ways of the integration institutional repository into educational environment of the universities. Authors are describing the experience of integration of DSpace system with the popular learning tools such as CMS Joomla!, LMS Moodle, UFD «Library». Integration of the specified tools is possible at the level of content and unification of access for users. The article contains opportunities of the integration DSpace and documents flow systems (based on Microsoft SharePoint. It is provided effective use of DSpace system at scientific and research work of students.

  10. Adult Students in the European Higher Educational Environment

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    N. G. Gordiyenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the issue of accessibility of higher education for adults – the people of various ages and social status. The author analyzes the educational policy of the European Union and its different members, and demonstrates the priority of the given issue. The Bologna agreement involves the reforms aimed at guaranteeing the lifelong education at any level.The interest to the adults education in the European Union results from the rising education requirements in the labor market; tough demographic situation and aging of professionals; redistribution of young people’s educational preferences; prolonged educational programs; flexible and consistent adult education policies in the European Union. Various approaches to interpreting a definition of the adult student are analyzed; classification according to students’ motivation and social status is given. 

  11. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Lorenzo; Frascarelli, Flaminia; Morasso, Pietro; Di Rosa, Giuseppe; Petrarca, Maurizio; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo

    2011-05-21

    It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be related not only to disturbance in

  12. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Rosa Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA, during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF, and a wash-out phase (WO in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected

  13. Developing an Augmented Reality Environment for Earth Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, M. J.; Skemer, P. A.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    The emerging field of augmented reality (AR) provides new and exciting ways to explore geologic phenomena for research and education. The primary advantage of AR is that it allows users to physically explore complex three-dimensional structures that were previously inaccessible, for example a remote geologic outcrop or a mineral structure at the atomic scale. It is used, for example, with OnSight software during tactical operations to plan the Mars Curiosity rover's traverses by providing virtual views to walk through terrain and the rover at true scales. This mode of physical exploration allows users more freedom to investigate and understand the 3D structure than is possible on a flat computer screen, or within a static PowerPoint presentation during a classroom lecture. The Microsoft HoloLens headset provides the most-advanced, mobile AR platform currently available to developers. The Fossett Laboratory for Virtual Planetary Exploration at Washington University in St. Louis has applied this technology, coupled with photogrammetric software and the Unity 3D gaming engine, to develop photorealistic environments of 3D geologic outcrops from around the world. The untethered HoloLens provides an ideal platform for a classroom setting as it allows for shared experiences of the holograms of interest, projecting them in the same location for all users to explore. Furthermore, the HoloLens allows for face-to-face communication during use that is important in teaching, a feature that virtual reality does not allow. Our development of an AR application includes the design of an online database of photogrammetric outcrop models curated for the current limitations of AR technology. This database will be accessible to both those wishing to submit models, and is free to those wishing to use the application for teaching, outreach or research purposes.

  14. Measuring the Medical School Educational Environment: Validating an Approach from Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Sarah A.; Alshehri, Abdulrahman F.; Erwin, T. Dary

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study is an empirical analysis of the female students' attitudes toward the medical educational environment and climate in the College of Medicine at King Khalid University. Setting: The Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was administered on the same day to 100 female students studying in the third…

  15. Personal Learning Environments in Higher Education Language Courses: An Informal and Learner-Centred Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakkonen, Ilona

    2011-01-01

    The chapter discusses the potential of personal learning environments (PLE) based on Web 2.0 applications for language courses in higher education (HE). This novel approach to the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education involves learners in the design of learning environments, tools and processes. The chapter begins…

  16. Seamless Learning Environments in Higher Education with Mobile Devices and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Victoria I.; Jääskelä, Päivikki; Häkkinen, Päivi; Juntunen, Merja; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Vesisenaho, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The use of seamless learning environments that have the potential to support lifelong learning anytime and anywhere has become a reality. In this sense, many educational institutions have started to consider introducing seamless learning environments into their programs. The aim of this study is to analyze how various educational university…

  17. The Potential of Simulated Environments in Teacher Education: Current and Future Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieker, Lisa A.; Rodriguez, Jacqueline A.; Lignugaris/Kraft, Benjamin; Hynes, Michael C.; Hughes, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    The future of virtual environments is evident in many fields but is just emerging in the field of teacher education. In this article, the authors provide a summary of the evolution of simulation in the field of teacher education and three factors that need to be considered as these environments further develop. The authors provide a specific…

  18. Health students’ expectations of the ideal educational environment: a qualitative research

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    TEAMUR AGHAMOLAEI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Educational environment is an important determinant of students’ behavior and its elements are associated with academic achievement and course satisfaction. The aim of this study was to determine students’ expectations of the ideal educational environment. Methods: This was a qualitative study with content analysis approach. Using a theoretical sampling method, we selected eight students from Health School of Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, studying health education, public health, environmental health, occupational health and medical entomology. To collect data, semi-structured interviews were used and continued until reaching data saturation. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Students' expectations of the ideal educational environment emerged in four main themes including school atmosphere, teaching, human aspects (with three subthemes including teachers, students, and school staff and nonhuman aspects (with two subthemes including educational equipment and physical environment. Conclusion: Educational environment is a multidimensional issue and to achieve an ideal educational environment, educational planners should meet the students' expectations of the school atmosphere, teaching, teachers, students, school staff, educational equipment and physical environment.

  19. Restoration of environments affected by residues from radiological accidents: Approaches to decision making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, jointly with the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Brazil, the Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Strahlenschutz, Germany, and with the collaboration of the European Commission, held a workshop in Rio de Janeiro and Goiania, Brazil, in August 1994, on the scientific basis for decision-making after radioactive contamination of an urban environment. This volume presents the proceedings of the workshop. Eighty-eight participants from 18 Member States and 39 organizations attended the workshop. The main thrust of the workshop was to foster information exchange on the scientific basis for intervention in a de facto situation created by an accident affecting an urban area and resulting in long term human radiation exposure. The venue of the workshop was particularly appropriate. Some years before, in September 1987, an accident involving a lost radioactive source had occurred in the city of Goiania, causing serious contamination and serious injuries and deaths among members of the public. The IAEA, in close collaboration with the Brazilian authorities and with the help of an international group of senior experts, drew up and published a comprehensive appraisal of that accident so that Member States might benefit from the lessons to be learned. In 1994, seven years after that fateful event, it was felt that the time was ripe to draw further lessons and to facilitate an exchange of ideas among experts.

  20. Restoration of environments affected by residues from radiological accidents: Approaches to decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, jointly with the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Brazil, the Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Strahlenschutz, Germany, and with the collaboration of the European Commission, held a workshop in Rio de Janeiro and Goiania, Brazil, in August 1994, on the scientific basis for decision-making after radioactive contamination of an urban environment. This volume presents the proceedings of the workshop. Eighty-eight participants from 18 Member States and 39 organizations attended the workshop. The main thrust of the workshop was to foster information exchange on the scientific basis for intervention in a de facto situation created by an accident affecting an urban area and resulting in long term human radiation exposure. The venue of the workshop was particularly appropriate. Some years before, in September 1987, an accident involving a lost radioactive source had occurred in the city of Goiania, causing serious contamination and serious injuries and deaths among members of the public. The IAEA, in close collaboration with the Brazilian authorities and with the help of an international group of senior experts, drew up and published a comprehensive appraisal of that accident so that Member States might benefit from the lessons to be learned. In 1994, seven years after that fateful event, it was felt that the time was ripe to draw further lessons and to facilitate an exchange of ideas among experts

  1. Evaluation and modeling of the parameters affecting fluoride toxicity level in aquatic environments by bioassay method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Shamsollahi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride exists in various forms in nature and water resources. , The rising level of fluoride in water resources due to discharge of industrial effluents can cause toxicity in aquatic organisms. To prevent toxicity, it is necessary to determine maximum fluoride toxicity as well as effluent discharge limits. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum fluoride toxicity and the factors affecting fluoride toxicity to provide a model in order to determine the effluent discharge limits. Methods: Daphnia magna bioassay in the absence of confounding factors was used to determine the maximum level of fluoride toxicity. Then, bioassay was repeated in the presence of the confounding factors (hardness, temperature and exposure time to determine their effects. Results: In the absence of intervening factors, fluoride LC50 levels determined after 24, 48 and 72 hours exposure were 4.9, 46.5 and 38.7 mg/l, respectively.. Also, the influence of confounding factors on LC50 values was reported significant by Minitab software. Conclusion: Increasing the water hardness reduced fluoride toxicity, and increasing the water temperature and exposure time increased fluoride toxicity in aquatic environments. Therefore, while determining the wastewater discharge limit in terms of fluoride concentration, it is essential to take the effect of confounding factors on fluoride toxicity into account in order to prevent toxicity in the open water resources.

  2. Laboratory Assessment of Forest Soil Respiration Affected by Wildfires under Various Environments of Russia

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    Evgeny Abakumov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon emission rates were estimated in the soils of three natural zones in Russia: forest-tundra, south-taiga, and forest-steppe. Postfire soils were found to be characterized by essential losses of soil C due to the combustion fire effect. Soils lost 3 or 5 parts of initial carbon content and showed an essential decrease in the C/N ratio during the fire effect. The pH values increased due to soil enrichment by ash during the fire events. CO2 emission rates were highest in natural soil samples, because the amount of organic matter affected by mineralization in those soils was higher than in natural ones. Simultaneously, the total values of mineralized carbon were higher in postfire soils because the SOM quality and composition were altered due to the fire effect. The only exception was in forest-tundra soils, where a high portion of dissolved organic compounds was released during the surface fire. The quality of initial SOM and intensity of the wildfire play the most important roles in the fate of SOM in postfire environments. Further study of CO2 emissions is needed to better characterize postfire SOM dynamics and develop an approach to model this process.

  3. Remobilization of Dry Matter, Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Durum Wheat as Affected by Genotype and Environment

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    Silvia Pampana

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were carried out to determine dry matter (DM, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P assimilation until anthesis and DM, N and P remobilization during grain filling in wheat. Twentyfive durum wheat (Triticum durum L. varieties were grown in Tuscany at Grosseto and at Arezzo. At Grosseto 76% of DM was assimilated during pre-anthesis while at Arezzo the amount was 81%. At Grosseto 44% and at Arezzo 35% of N was accumulated until anthesis, while 33% of P was stored until anthesis in both localities. Cultivar differences in DM and N remobilization were positively related to pre-anthesis dry matter and N content at anthesis (r > 0.74. Environmental contraints on carbon, N and P availability in the plant are crucial factors in determining grain yield and N and P content in grain, affecting both accumulation and remobilization. In the low rainfall site of Grosseto, most of the grain yield originated from dry matter accumulation, while in the wetter environment of Arezzo remobilization and accumulation contributed equally to grain yield. Conversely, at Grosseto grain N content relied most on remobilization and at Arezzo remobilization and accumulation contributed equally. Finally, at Grosseto and at Arezzo accumulation of P was the main source of grain P content.

  4. No effect of ambient odor on the affective appraisal of a desktop virtual environment with signs of disorder.

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    Alexander Toet

    Full Text Available Desktop virtual environments (VEs are increasingly deployed to study the effects of environmental qualities and interventions on human behavior and safety related concerns in built environments. For these applications it is essential that users appraise the affective qualities of the VE similar to those of its real world counterpart. Previous studies have shown that factors like simulated lighting, sound and dynamic elements all contribute to the affective appraisal of a desktop VE. Since ambient odor is known to affect the affective appraisal of real environments, and has been shown to increase the sense of presence in immersive VEs, it may also be an effective tool to tune the affective appraisal of desktop VEs. This study investigated if exposure to ambient odor can modulate the affective appraisal of a desktop VE with signs of public disorder.Participants explored a desktop VE representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism and crime, while being exposed to either room air or subliminal levels of unpleasant (tar or pleasant (cut grass ambient odor. Whenever they encountered signs of disorder they reported their safety related concerns and associated affective feelings.Signs of crime in the desktop VE were associated with negative affective feelings and concerns for personal safety and personal property. However, there was no significant difference between reported safety related concerns and affective connotations in the control (no-odor and in each of the two ambient odor conditions.Ambient odor did not affect safety related concerns and affective connotations associated with signs of disorder in the desktop VE. Thus, semantic congruency between ambient odor and a desktop VE may not be sufficient to influence its affective appraisal, and a more realistic simulation in which simulated objects appear to emit scents may be required to achieve this goal.

  5. Ways to implement a health protective educational environment in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykytyuk O.M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The features of organization and creation of health protective educational environment are exposed in higher institute. They foresee creation of the special terms for realization structurally of functional model of organization of students' healthy way of life. A model plugs in itself pedagogical, organizational, material and technical, sanitary-hygenic, informatively-methodical, skilled and financial economic terms. A questionnaire is conducted 95 students of 1-3 courses. It is set that the level of factors of risk for the health of students is high enough: prevalence of smoking is 47%, swizzles use more than 20%. It is discovered that the number of students with active physical activity makes not more than 45%. Most students consider that for the health they are responsible, ready and want to get information on forming of healthy way of life. Principles of organization of health protective behave to the features of organization of health protective of educational environment, nature protective, valeological, sequence, integration, pedagogical support, flexibility.

  6. How do health care education and training professionals learn about the environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, H R; Stein, D S; Schafer, D S

    1993-01-01

    Preparing for the health care system of the future includes the ability to abstract information from relevant sectors of the environment. This study looked at the way health care educators scan the environment and the relationship of scanning behavior to management style. Results indicate that education and training professionals focus on the regulatory and customer sectors of the environment more than the technological and sociopolitical sectors.

  7. EDUCATION REFORMS TOWARDS 21ST CENTURY SKILLS: TRANSFORMING STUDENTS' LEARNING EXPERIENCES THROUGH EFFECTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Harriet Wambui Njui

    2018-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on learning environments with a view to making recommendations on how teachers could create effective and high-quality learning environments that provide learners with transformative learning experiences as they go through the process of education. An effective learning environment is critical because quality education, which is essential to real learning and human development, is influenced by factors both inside and outside the classroom. Learning institutions ...

  8. Perceptions of students in different phases of medical education of the educational environment: Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nor Iza A; Aziz, Aniza Abd; Zulkifli, Zainal; Haj, Muhammad Arshad; Mohd Nasir, Farah Hanani Binti; Pergalathan, Sharvina; Hamidi, Muhammad Ismail; Ismail, Salwani; Simbak, Nordin Bin; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Background The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) was planned and designed to quantify the educational environment precisely for medical schools and health-related professional schools. DREEM is now considered a valid and reliable tool, which is globally accepted for measuring the medical educational environment. The educational environment encountered by students has an impact on satisfaction with the course of study, perceived sense of well-being, aspirations, and academic achievement. In addition to being measurable, the educational environment can also be changed, thus enhancing the quality of medical education and the environment, and the medical education process. The objective of this study was to assess the educational environment of the Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA) undergraduate medical program from the students’ perspective. The study expected to explore UniSZA medical students’ overall perceptions, perceptions of learning, teachers, atmosphere, academic self-perception, and social self-perception using the DREEM questionnaire. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted to study the perceptions of the students toward the educational environment of UniSZA as a new medical school, using the DREEM questionnaire. All medical students of UniSZA from Years I–V enrolled in the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery programs were the target population (n=270). Therefore, the universal sampling technique was used. The data were analyzed using the SPSS 20 software. This study obtained ethical clearance from the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UniSZA. Results A total of 195 out of 270 students responded. Respondents included 31% males and 69% females. The overall DREEM scores were significantly higher (Pstudents at UniSZA showed a positive perception of their educational environment. The new medical faculty, established for only a few years, has achieved an above-average, conducive educational environment for

  9. Multicultural environment in higher education: The knowledge and perceptions of medical teachers of UNIKL RCMP, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ATM Emdadul Haque

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background A clear majority of teaching staff in UniKL-RCMP are expatriates with different cultural backgrounds, and the university currently accepting international students with a different cultural background in addition to the local culturally diverse students. Aims The purpose was to determine the knowledge and awareness of the lecturers of Faculty of Medicine regarding multiculturalism and the importance in the medical profession. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. A questionnaire was developed based on the relevant demographic information and knowledge and awareness of the cultural issues and the validity was discussed with a survey expert. Results A total of 43 teachers took part in the survey. The respondents were mostly male, expatriate and had very fewer experiences in teaching students of different cultural background. The most important thing affecting teachers’ competence was their experience in teaching students of different culture, and the teachers with experience in teaching in a multicultural environment felt more competent than the ones without experience. Gender or teaching experience did not have a significant impact on their feeling of competence. However, the teachers believed that training on special education program might have helped them more than their educational background to help develop the cultural competence of the students from different cultural backgrounds. Conclusion This study showed that teachers need more training and experiences of the multicultural education program and to facilitate the development of cultural competence of students with cultural diversity, which should be taken into consideration in the faculty development activities.

  10. Problem-Based Educational Game Becomes Student-Centered Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodkroh, Pornpimon; Suwannatthachote, Praweenya; Kaemkate, Wannee

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based educational games are able to provide a fun and motivating environment for teaching and learning of certain subjects. However, most educational game models do not address the learning elements of problem-based educational games. This study aims to synthesize and to propose the important elements to facilitate the learning process and…

  11. Lessons from the Dust Bowl: Human-Environment Education on the Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jess

    2012-01-01

    This article documents regional demand for human-environment educational resources via assessment of public knowledge of the environmental crisis known as the Dust Bowl. The steadily eroding knowledge-base on the topic is discussed along with the desire for enhanced Dust Bowl educational resources. Regionally focused educational activities…

  12. Online Computer Games as Collaborative Learning Environments: Prospects and Challenges for Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Marina

    2009-01-01

    This study is aimed at presenting a critical overview of recent research studies on the use of educational online games as collaborative learning environments in Tertiary Education (TE), namely higher education and vocational training, with a view to identifying: a) the elements that online games should include in order to support fruitful and…

  13. BNU-LSVED: a multimodal spontaneous expression database in educational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Wei, Qinglan; He, Jun; Yu, Lejun; Zhu, Xiaoming

    2016-09-01

    In the field of pedagogy or educational psychology, emotions are treated as very important factors, which are closely associated with cognitive processes. Hence, it is meaningful for teachers to analyze students' emotions in classrooms, thus adjusting their teaching activities and improving students ' individual development. To provide a benchmark for different expression recognition algorithms, a large collection of training and test data in classroom environment has become an acute problem that needs to be resolved. In this paper, we present a multimodal spontaneous database in real learning environment. To collect the data, students watched seven kinds of teaching videos and were simultaneously filmed by a camera. Trained coders made one of the five learning expression labels for each image sequence extracted from the captured videos. This subset consists of 554 multimodal spontaneous expression image sequences (22,160 frames) recorded in real classrooms. There are four main advantages in this database. 1) Due to recorded in the real classroom environment, viewer's distance from the camera and the lighting of the database varies considerably between image sequences. 2) All the data presented are natural spontaneous responses to teaching videos. 3) The multimodal database also contains nonverbal behavior including eye movement, head posture and gestures to infer a student ' s affective state during the courses. 4) In the video sequences, there are different kinds of temporal activation patterns. In addition, we have demonstrated the labels for the image sequences are in high reliability through Cronbach's alpha method.

  14. Effects of environment and education on knowledge and attitude of nursing students towards leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, E; Julious, S; Salome, A; Jennifer, G; John, A S; Kannan, L; Richard, J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional comparative study was to find the effects of environment and education on knowledge and attitude of nursing students towards leprosy. Data were collected, using a pretested questionnaire, from the first year and third year students of a School of Nursing attached to a leprosy specialty hospital and also from a comparable School of Nursing attached to a general hospital. The results showed that trainees acquired more knowledge on leprosy during training in both schools of nursing. However, those trained in leprosy hospital environment had higher knowledge and attitude scores than those trained in general hospital environment. The attitude of the trainees attached to leprosy hospital was favourable even before they had formal training in leprosy. Those trained in the general hospital showed more favourable attitude after training compared to before training. School of Nursing attached to leprosy hospital provided an atmosphere conducive to learning and understanding more about leprosy. The trainees retained what was learnt because of regular association with patients affected by leprosy. For employment in hospital or community based services or research related to leprosy, nurses trained in a leprosy hospital would have added value of knowledge and attitude.

  15. DREEM on, dentists! Students' perceptions of the educational environment in a German dental school as measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapczuk, M S; Hugger, A; de Bruin, J; Ritz-Timme, S; Rotthoff, T

    2012-05-01

    The educational climate in which future doctors are trained is an important aspect of medical education. In contrast to human medicine, it has been rather neglected in dental educational research. The aim of the study was to supplement this lack by applying and validating the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) for the first time in a German-speaking sample of dental students. All dental students at the Medical Faculty of Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf were asked to complete a German adaptation of the DREEM and the Düsseldorf Mission Statement Questionnaire (DMSQ) in a paper-pencil survey. Data from 205 participants were analysed. Psychometric validation included analysis of item homogeneity and discrimination, test reliability, criterion and construct validity (convergent, factorial). DREEM item parameters were satisfactory, reliability (α = 0.87) and convergent validity (r = 0.66 with DMSQ) were also high. Factor analyses, however, yielded dimensions which did not fully correspond to the original DREEM subscales. Overall perception of the educational environment was positive (DREEM total score = 122.95 ± 15.52). Students in the clinical part of course rated the atmosphere more negatively, but their academic self-perception more positively than preclinical students. Showing satisfactory psychometric properties, DREEM proved suitable for assessing educational environments among dental students. Given the right circumstances, e.g., small and early clinically oriented classes, traditional curricula can generate positive environments. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Affordances of Learning Technologies in Higher Education Multicultural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Edilson

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of research has been conducted in higher education to investigate the affordances (action possibilities) and the influence information and communication technologies (ICT) may have on students' learning experiences and outcomes. Such studies have given rise to the implementation of a wide range of educational frameworks with a great deal…

  17. Education and Development in a Globalized Environment: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    This paper focuses on this important issue of the state of education in the ... not only the formalized form but also the informal learning process in the home and ... that education does not start and end at the doorsteps of the school. Rather ...

  18. Education and Development in a Globalized Environment: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Again, in the present globalized society in which every nation is connected to the other, education is perhaps the only instrument for people to adequately cope with the new trend. In most contemporary nation-states including Nigeria, the level of educational attainment vary across regions. Such discrepancy also exist within ...

  19. International Business Education in a Global Environment: A Conceptual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    The globalisation phenomenon poses a different set of challenges to the higher education system in countries around the world and requires that international business students be prepared to function professionally in an increasingly complex, interdependent, and dynamic economy. Understanding the educational implications of the…

  20. environments, peoiple and environmental education: a story of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    People's Education and Environmental Education as sensitising forums. ... You might think that I could have avoided this ex- planatory ... and 60's environmental change was already taking its toll. .... arguing from a biophysical, human survival perspec- tive that .... robot-in-rran then becomes servant rather than master, and ...

  1. Full Immersive Virtual Environment Cave[TM] in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limniou, M.; Roberts, D.; Papadopoulos, N.

    2008-01-01

    By comparing two-dimensional (2D) chemical animations designed for computer's desktop with three-dimensional (3D) chemical animations designed for the full immersive virtual reality environment CAVE[TM] we studied how virtual reality environments could raise student's interest and motivation for learning. By using the 3ds max[TM], we can visualize…

  2. Early Childhood Educators' Experiences in Their Work Environments: Shaping (Im)possible Ways of Being an Educator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the complex interrelations between educators' work environments and their experiences as an entryway for thinking differently about workforce stability and sustainability. Concepts of macro- and micropolitics (drawn from the work of Deleuze and Guattari) are used to explore one educator's experiences in…

  3. The Workplace as Learning Environment in Early Childhood Teacher Education: An Investigation of Work-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarby, Karen Marie Eid; Lindboe, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the workplace as a learning environment in work-based early childhood teacher education in Norway. The main question is: Which understandings of the workplace as a learning environment are to be found in regulations and policy documents, among students and among staff managers? Taking as the point of departure, a theoretical…

  4. Ubiquitous Working: Do Work Versus Non-work Environments Affect Decision-Making and Concentration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin P. Burmeister

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available New communication technologies and mobile devices have enabled knowledge workers to work independently of location and in more than one fixed environment (ubiquitous working. Previous research shows that physical environments can influence cognition and work performance. We manipulated environment (i.e., a virtual office as a typical work environment compared to a virtual garden as a non-work environment and time pressure (i.e., inducing time pressure vs. no time pressure in order to investigate whether the environment influences decision-making and concentration. N = 109 students participated in this laboratory experiment. We posited (a that a work environment would activate a work-related schema which in turn would enhance concentration performance and make decisions more risky compared to non-work environments and (b that the environmental effect is more pronounced if time pressure is present compared to conditions where no time pressure is present. We found modest hypothesis-confirming main effects of environment on decision-making and concentration but no interaction effect with time pressure. As we used an innovative methodology that entails several limitations, future research is needed to give insights into the process and to investigate whether results hold true for all types of work settings, work demands, or work activities.

  5. Ubiquitous Working: Do Work Versus Non-work Environments Affect Decision-Making and Concentration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Carolin P; Moskaliuk, Johannes; Cress, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    New communication technologies and mobile devices have enabled knowledge workers to work independently of location and in more than one fixed environment (ubiquitous working). Previous research shows that physical environments can influence cognition and work performance. We manipulated environment (i.e., a virtual office as a typical work environment compared to a virtual garden as a non-work environment ) and time pressure (i.e., inducing time pressure vs. no time pressure ) in order to investigate whether the environment influences decision-making and concentration. N = 109 students participated in this laboratory experiment. We posited (a) that a work environment would activate a work-related schema which in turn would enhance concentration performance and make decisions more risky compared to non-work environments and (b) that the environmental effect is more pronounced if time pressure is present compared to conditions where no time pressure is present. We found modest hypothesis-confirming main effects of environment on decision-making and concentration but no interaction effect with time pressure. As we used an innovative methodology that entails several limitations, future research is needed to give insights into the process and to investigate whether results hold true for all types of work settings, work demands, or work activities.

  6. Witnessing Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug's Strength and Struggle: The Affective Education of Reconciliation in Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korteweg, Lisa; Root, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Escalating environmental controversies are placing Indigenous peoples and First Nation communities at the front lines of protests, opposing unjust government policies and corporate actions. Yet, many environmental educators are not actively engaged or affectively learning about Indigenous Land struggles against Canada's colonial oppressions.…

  7. Associations between baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of educational environment and HESI scores and GPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Leslie K; Glaspie, Tina

    2014-06-01

    Students' perceptions of their educational environment have been found to be related to their approaches to learning and learning outcomes. Educational environment is just beginning to be researched in nursing education with the vast majority of studies focusing on the clinical educational environment. Perception of educational environment has been shown to influence student implementation of a specific learning style and influences educational outcomes such as program completion and GPA. There is a need for sound research that explores the relationship, if any, between perceptions of environment and outcomes. To explore the relationship between baccalaureate nursing student (BSN) perception of educational environment (SPEE) and objective learning outcomes. Retrospective correlational descriptive study. Private School of Nursing in the Southwest. Convenience sample of 62 graduating baccalaureate students. All graduating BSN students were invited to complete the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) through the online survey application Qualtrics. A total of 62 students completed the DREEM survey. These results were compared with each student's GPA and HESI score. A total of 62 students completed the survey for an overall response rate of 57%. There was no correlation between total SPEE and nursing grade point average (NGPA) or HESI exit scores. Based on this study at this institution, it appears that students' performance was not influenced by SPEE. One of the major implications of this study is the possibility that an "acceptable" SPEE (one that is neither exceptional nor terrible) may not significantly influence student outcomes. Exploring this relationship has theoretical as well as practical implications as educators seek to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions. Student perception of learning environment is measured in various ways at the majority of institutions. It has been assumed that an educational environment that is

  8. VIRTUAL EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT AS A TOOL FOR BOOSTING EFFICIENCY OF BASIC CURRICULUM AND NON-DEGREE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES IN UNIVERSITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ekareva, I.L.; Prigozhina, K.B.; Trostina, K.V.

    2016-01-01

    The article analyzes the role of distant learning technologies to provide accessible and competitive programs in universities. The aim of the article is to set an example of implementing distant learning technologies in universities, to identify the possible conditions of creating a virtual education environment providing continuity in the three-layer system of higher education (Bachelor, Master and postgraduate), as well as for non-degree educational services and supplementary professional t...

  9. Assessment of Educational Environment of Surgical Theatre at a Teaching Hospital of a Saudi University: Using Surgical Theatre Educational Environment Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Faisal Al-Qahtani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to determine how medical interns perceive the important factors of the learning environment the surgical theatre at the teaching hospital of the medical school, University of Dammam (UoD. The study also investigated the relationships between the learning environment and academic achievements. Finally, it determined the role and significance of gender on the above perceptions and relationships.Methods: The Surgical Theatre Educational Environment Measure (STEEM was used to identify the perceptions of interns on the most important factors prevalent in the surgical theatre as an educational environment. STEEM was administered to all interns during the period of June-September 2009. Ninety-one out of 145 students completed the questionnaire representing a response rate of 63%. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Version 17.Results: The STEEM was shown to be internally consistent for the assessment of the overall educational environment in the surgical theatre of UoD. The overall STEEM mean score was 110. For male and female students, the mean scores were 114 and 107 respectively. There were statistically significant gender differences in the perceptions of "learning opportunities" and "teaching and training". Females rated these subscales lower than males. There were no significant associations between academic achievements and perceptions of the educational environment.Conclusion: The interns perceived the learning environment of the surgical theatre as less than satisfactory. In comparison with the males; the perception of the females was less positive, particularly in the areas of learning opportunities, and teaching and training. The study also revealed some other problematic areas in the learning environment of surgical theatre of the teaching hospital of UoD. The results imply that there is much room for improvement. They also indicate that

  10. Environmental education in Saudi general environment system - an engineering perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulrahman Salih Hariri

    2006-01-01

    The Saudi Cabinet of Ministers approved the Saudi General Environment System (SGES) in 2001. This approval is considered a step forward towards preserving the environment in Saudi Arabia. One of the targets of this system is to make environmental planning as an un-replaceable part of every comprehensive development planning in all industrial, agricultural, and architectural sectors. Achieving such a target requires a specialized labor force. Therefore, College of Engineering should act positively and actively in disseminating environmental awareness among engineers since they play a major rule in development projects. A degree in environmental engineering is a must at present, which is not available yet at any university in Saudi Arabia. Details of a B. Sc degree in environmental engineering offered by two universities in USA, are discussed. The syllabus of a degree in environment engineering adapted for the Saudi environment and culture is outlined

  11. ARTIFICIAL AND NATURAL INTELLIGENCE IN ANTHROPOGENIC EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey F. Sergeev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present article we show the link between both artificial and natural intelligence and the system’s complexity during the life-cycle. Autopoetic’s type of living systems determines the differences between natural and artificial intelligence; artificial environments have an influence to the intelligence abilities development. We present the «diffusion intellect» concept where the diffusion intellect is considered as a synergistic unity of natural and artificial intellect in organized environments

  12. Comparison of the education effect in simulated environment with educational film on acquiring midwifery students\\' episiotomy skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Kalani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In clinical education, it is essential to prevent patients from injuries  by using the new educational approaches. Therefore, the students must be ready before involving in any procedures. This study aimed to determine the effect of education in simulated environment and instructional videos on the skills of the episiotomy among midwifery students. Methods: In this interventional study, at the beginning of the sixth term, all of the midwifery students, 30 students, were divided randomly into 3 groups. The education was taken place in simulated environment and using educational films without intervention. The training was performed on training mannequin. The film was prepared from this training and presented to each of the students in film group. A practical test done and the results recorded in check list. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean scores of students in performing an episiotomy based on all of the cases in 3 groups was statistically significant difference (p<0.001. But in comparing 3 groups of two, it was not found any statistically significant difference in all cases between the educational groups in simulated environment and educational film (p=0.975. Overall skill level of students on the basis of all the cases in the group without interference was lower than the other two groups. Conclusion: The educational film, which was designed, based on the scientific principles can be effective in gaining skills as a self-taught. Therefore, using the mentioned methods is recommended in clinical education planning.

  13. The Development of a Community Feeling Scale toward Online Distance Education Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Ilgaz

    2009-11-01

    members and satisfaction about the group activities (Rovai, 2000. By increasing the numbers and qualities of interactions in distance education programs, the community feeling in online mediums can be improved.By this aim the scale, which was based on Rovai, Wighting and Lucking's (2004 study, validity and reliability analyzes has been executed. The scale has been developed by the data which were obtained from 571 of the freshmen of the Ankara University Distance Education Program of Completion of Undergraduate in Faculty of Theology in 2007-2008 terms. At the end of the analysis the scale has been finalized with 6 items under 2 factors. As a result, in order to determine the community feeling of the learners who were registered to online distance education environments, a scale has been developed with validity and reliability studies. It is founded that keeping interaction between students by various tools such as discussion boards, chat modules or e-mails is important about prevention of students from social isolation, not being a member of the group in online distance education environments. The students who are being in interaction with each others will be more willing to participate in learning activities and won‟t tend to drop out as a result of feeling of alienation. This situation will affect students‟ achievement and satisfaction in a positive way.

  14. How Does the Public and Private University Environment Affect Students' Entrepreneurial Intention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canever, Mario Duarte; Barral, Maria Renata Martínez; Ribeiro, Felipe Garcia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the causal links between public and private university environments and the entrepreneurial intention (EI) of students. Design/methodology/approach: The impact of different university environments on the students' EI was checked using a model adapted from Krueger et al. (2000). The study comprised a…

  15. Mapping phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions affecting life-history traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutteling, E.W.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Bakker, J.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions (GEI) play an important role in the evolution of life histories. Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of plasticity and GEI provides insight into the underlying mechanisms of life-history changes in different environments. We used a

  16. Avoidance of Affect Mediates the Effect of Invalidating Childhood Environments on Borderline Personality Symptomatology in a Non-Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Bonnie A.; Francis, Andrew; Carr, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the Linehan (1993) proposal regarding associations between invalidating childhood environments, distress tolerance (e.g., avoidance of affect), and borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The sample consisted of 141 non-clinical participants (51 men, 89 women, one gender unknown), ranging in age from 18 to…

  17. Identification of ergonomic issues that affect workers in oilrigs in desert environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikdar, Ashraf A

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to conduct an assessment of ergonomic-related problems in oilrigs in a desert environment. A checklist, physical audit and medical records were used in the investigation. The results showed significant health, environment and work-related problems that could be attributed to ergonomic deficiencies in the work system of the oilrig. Some major ergonomic issues identified were hard physical work, back pain, discomfort, hot environment, long shift, and diverse schedule. Ninety-four percent of the employees perceived the workday as very long, 79% were dissatisfied with the work schedule, while 61% of the employees perceived the summer work environment as extremely hot. Ergonomics should be considered in the work system design so as to reduce or eliminate problems in oilrigs in hot desert environments.

  18. Societal Factors Affecting Communication and Cooperation Between Industry and Accounting Education at Castleton State College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Bryan L.

    The purpose of the practicum was to determine the societal factors existing in the accounting industry and accounting education, with the aim of integrating the changing regulations and environment of the industry into the classroom at Castleton State College (Vermont). A group of certified public accountants were surveyed by Likert scale to learn…

  19. Organization of educational process as a part of the information environment of the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оksana S. Savelyeva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The questions concerning the insurance of openness and transparency of the educational process, monitoring the provision of educational services and the quality of learning within a unified information environment of Odessa National Polytechnic University are considered. It is proposed to consider the organization of the educational process as a major component of the educational process, that is a system of activities covering the distribution of the academic load between departments, recruitment of teachers, the formation of class schedules, consultation, final control and state certification. The analysis and the forming of set of parameters are carried out, the main components of the functional subsystem "The organization of educational process" as one of the components of the information environment of university are identified. Building a system hierarchically ensures the effective management of subsystems of organization of educational process and interaction between participants of the educational process and allows the system to change quickly if it is necessary.

  20. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO ORGANIZATION OF SAFE INFORMATION AND EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Privalov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the tendencies of modern higher education is the ubiquitous use of information and communication technologies. At the same time, the functioning of the electronic information and educational environment (IEE of the university should be based on the means of IEE and the condition of its information security.The aim of the research is conceptualization of a problem of the rational organization of the safe information and education environment of higher education institution wherein reliable protection of its infrastructure, the personal and unique information of a pupil and teacher and virtual space of their educational interaction is provided.Methodology and research methods. System-based approach is a key approach to organization of safe educational environment of the university. From the point of view of authors, personal-activity and functional approaches are expedient while designing and development of a safe IEE. Socio-historical and theoretical-methodological analysis, modeling, research and synthesis of experience of effective application of the systems approach in educational professional organizations are used.Results and scientific novelty. The concept «safe information educational environment of the university» is specified wherein the first word has to express a predominant quality of the system. Creating a safe information environment in educational professional organizations provides a convenient and safe educational environment in the process of professional training of university students. The components and directions for the organization of the safe IEE are highlighted. Practical recommendations for its design and successful functioning are given.Practical significance. The materials of the present research can be demanded by managers and administrative employees of educational organizations. 

  1. Organisational Factors Affecting Policy and Programme Decision Making in a Public Health Policy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardo, Pauline; Collie, Alex; Livingstone, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Organisational factors can affect the success of interventions aimed at increasing research use. Research is needed to identify organisational factors affecting research use in specific public health policy contexts. Qualitative interviews with decision makers from a specific public health context identified a range of organisational factors that…

  2. Searching for a crack to let environment light in: ecological biopolitics and education for sustainable development discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Annette

    2017-12-01

    This article traces the shifts in environmental education discourses from the 1972 UN Conference on the Human Environment, to the 2012 UN Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development, and beyond through a biopolitical lens. Each of the earlier shifts is reflected in environmental, sustainability and science education policies and curricula—but what of the most recent shifts at Rio+20 and in UNESCO's (2014) Roadmap for Implementing the Global Action Programme on Education for Sustainable Development? The article examines how the ecological version of politics emerged and then became integrated into technocentric biopolitics and how this shift affected the shaping of environmental, sustainability and science education policies and curricula. In particular, the article analyzes the shifting biopolitical interfaces that have occurred between "natural environment" and "society"—from a goal of preserving the natural foundations of life to a focus on exploiting these foundations, modifying and transforming the environment through scientific and technological means—and the manifestations of this in Australian curriculum documents.

  3. Classroom Environment in the Implementation of an Innovative Curriculum Project in Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Mercedes; Pias, Rosa; Membiela, Pedro; Dapia, Dolores

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the perceptions of students, teachers, and external observers in order to study the influence of classroom environment on the implementation of an innovative project in science education. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  4. A Virtual Environment based Serious Game to Support Health Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Gomes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available APEX was developed as a framework for ubiquitous computing (ubicomp prototyping through virtual environments. In this paper the framework is used as a platform for developing a serious game designed to instruct and to inform. The paper describes the Asthma game, a game aimed at raising awareness among children of asthma triggers in the home. It is designed to stimulate a healthier life-style for those with asthma and respiratory problems. The game was developed as the gamification of a checklist for the home environment of asthma patients.

  5. Health sciences students’ perception of the educational environment of KLE University, India as measured with the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan A. Sunkad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the educational environment of the health sciences programs of KLE University, Belgaum, Karnataka, India, to identify their strengths and weaknesses, and to suggest strategies to improve the educational environment to be on par with global standards. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM questionnaire, filled out by 914 of the 1,004 students (91.0% who were majoring in medicine, dentistry, nursing, physiotherapy, and public health. The data were analysed according to the DREEM guidelines. Responses were received from 914 students, of whom 34.03% were men and 65.9% were women. The majority (67.1% of students were 20-24 years of age. The mean overall DREEM score was 120.21±22.4 (maximum, 200 and approached the normal distribution (Lilliefors test, P<0.01. The DREEM scores of each group of students were as follows: dental, 125.0; medical, 122.4; public health, 121.0; physiotherapy, 117.0; and nursing, 116.3. Male students had more positive perceptions than female students (P<0.05, and postgraduate students had more positive perceptions than undergraduate students (P<0.05. The overall DREEM score (120.21 indicates that the educational environment was found to be more positive than negative.

  6. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes : Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a)

  7. Population Validity for Educational Data Mining Models: A Case Study in Affect Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocumpaugh, Jaclyn; Baker, Ryan; Gowda, Sujith; Heffernan, Neil; Heffernan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT)-enhanced research methods such as educational data mining (EDM) have allowed researchers to effectively model a broad range of constructs pertaining to the student, moving from traditional assessments of knowledge to assessment of engagement, meta-cognition, strategy and affect. The automated…

  8. Outdoor Experiential Environmental Education: An Adult-Centred Intervention for the Affective Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur-Berberoglu, Emel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the impact of an outdoor experiential environmental education (OEEE) programme on the affective domain of adult participants--namely, in-service teachers from Turkey. Data collection methods such as; psychodrama, non-participant observation, open-ended questions and content analysis were used within a…

  9. Higher Education as the Catalyst of Recovery in Conflict-Affected Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Sansom; Barakat, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the role of higher education in the recovery of conflict-affected societies and argues that while the sector is typically a very low reconstruction priority, it has the potential, if addressed strategically, to act as a catalyst for effective and sustainable post-war recovery. The article begins by contextualising higher…

  10. "Affection in Education": Edward Carpenter, John Addington Symonds and the Politics of Greek Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Josephine Crawley; Brooke, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines Edward Carpenter's 1899 essay on education that defended the value of powerful same-sex attachments, either between older and younger boys or between teachers and pupils, in the context of Victorian ideologies of same-sex affection. Linda Dowling has described how "a homosexual counterdiscourse able to justify male love in…

  11. Affective Education: A Teacher's Manual to Promote Student Self-Actualization and Human Relations Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Thomas R.

    This teacher's manual presents affective education as a program to promote student self-actualization and human relations skills. Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Erik Erikson's life stages of psychosocial development form the conceptual base for this program. The goals and objectives of this manual are concerned with problem-solving…

  12. Factors Affecting Individual Education Demand at the Entrance to University: Adnan Menderes University Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpkaya, Ruhi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the factors affecting individual education demands at the entrance to university. The research is in survey model. The universe of the study consists of 1630 freshmen at the faculties and vocational schools of Adnan Menderes University, Aydin. 574 students from 7 schools were included in the sample. The…

  13. Embodied Brains, Social Minds, Cultural Meaning: Integrating Neuroscientific and Educational Research on Social-Affective Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Gotlieb, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Social-affective neuroscience is revealing that human brain development is inherently social--our very nature is organized by nurture. To explore the implications for human development and education, we present a series of interdisciplinary studies documenting individual and cultural variability in the neurobiological correlates of emotional…

  14. We Feel, Therefore We Learn: The Relevance of Affective and Social Neuroscience to Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Damasio, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience are highlighting connections between emotion, social functioning, and decision making that have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of the role of affect in education. In particular, the neurobiological evidence suggests that the aspects of cognition that we recruit most heavily in schools, namely…

  15. Perceptions of Educational Barriers Affecting the Academic Achievement of Latino K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examined different factors affecting the perceptions of barriers in academic achievement of Latino K-12 students. The study used data from 1,508 participants who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino heritage in the 2004 National Survey of Latinos: Education, compiled by the Pew Hispanic Center between August 7 and…

  16. A Resource and Reference Bibliography in Early Childhood Education and Developmental Psychology: The Affective Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Ronald, Comp.; Coopersmith, Stanley, Comp.

    This bibliography provides a comprehensive listing of the reference literature in early childhood (ages 2-9) psychology and education dealing with the affective domain. Categories such as achievement motivation; aggression; anger and frustration; character and moral development; creativity; games; and social behavior are included. One of the 27…

  17. Using Rasch Measurement for the Development and Use of Affective Assessments in Science Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergeld, Toni A.; Johnson, Carla C.

    2014-01-01

    With the demand for quality quantitative instruments in the field of science education rising, additional measures of currently unassessed affective variables need to be constructed. In this study, we discuss the survey creation and evaluation process of the STEM Awareness Community Survey (SACS) through an application of Liu's (Liu, X.,…

  18. Student perception of the educational environment in regular and bridging nursing programs in Saudi Arabia using the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nozha, Omar Mansour; Fadel, Hani T

    2017-01-01

    Taibah University offers regular nursing (RNP) and nursing bridging (NBP) bachelor programs. We evaluated student perception of the learning environment as one means of quality assurance. To assess nursing student perception of their educational environment, to compare the perceptions of regular and bridging students, and to compare the perceptions of students in the old and new curricula. Cross-sectional survey. College of Nursing at Taibah University, Madinah, Saudi Arabia. The Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) instrument was distributed to over 714 nursing students to assess perception of the educational environment. Independent samples t test and Pearson's chi square were used to compare the programs and curricula. The DREEM inventory score. Of 714 students, 271 (38%) were RNP students and 443 (62%) were NBP students. The mean (standard deviation) DREEM score was 111 (25). No significant differences were observed between the programs except for the domain "academic self-perceptions" being higher in RNP students (P .05). Nursing students generally perceived their learning environment as more positive than negative. Regular students were more positive than bridging students. Students who experienced the new curriculum were more positive towards learning. The cross-sectional design and unequal gender and study level distributions may limit generalizability of the results. Longitudinal, large-scale studies with more even distributions of participant characteristics are needed.

  19. Interaction in Distance Education Environments: A Trend Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Serçin; Yilmaz, Ayse Bagriacik; Dikmen, Cemal Hakan; Ermis, Ugur Ferhat; Gürbüz, Onur

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the trend concerning interaction in distance education between the years 2011 and 2015. According to this aim, 544 articles in the databases of EBSCO, Scopus, and Web of Science were examined. The examination has been conducted on the basis of various variables including year, country, number of authors,…

  20. Educating Part-Time MBAs for the Global Business Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, W. Alan

    2008-01-01

    To be successful managers in the business world of the 21st century, MBA students must acquire global skills of business acumen, reflection, cultural sensitivity, and multi-cultural teamwork. Developing these skills requires international experience, but educating part-time MBAs creates a special challenge demanding both rigor and efficiency. This…

  1. The Educational Environment as a Means for Overcoming Youth Extremism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panina, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    During Russia's societal transition extremist behavior by young people shows signs of increasing. An extra effort is required on the part of Russian educators to try to contain this phenomenon. The increasing extremist activity on the part of young people is linked to a particular stage of the development of society. It appears that youth…

  2. Multi-User Virtual Environments Fostering Collaboration in Formal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Blas, Nicoletta; Paolini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about how serious games based on MUVEs in formal education can foster collaboration. More specifically, it is about a large case-study with four different programs which took place from 2002 to 2009 and involved more than 9,000 students, aged between 12 and 18, from various nations (18 European countries, Israel and the USA). These…

  3. From the Ground Up: Art in American Built Environment Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoil, Joanne K.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a case for teaching children about local architecture. Describes a specific example called the Kentucky Project as a humanist approach to built environmental education that enabled middle and high school students to study their architectural heritage through a program of videos and related teaching materials. (CMK)

  4. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  5. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinka Kuijpers; dr. Frans Meijers

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  6. PROFICIENT CONSTITUTION FOR ONLINE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT USING FEEDBACK ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rajagopal Devarajan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern world learners want to get more knowledge about their respective field which they like. The Learner just has to implement the knowledge using which they are learnt. This implementation has been used in the modern world. Learners are like to study in within the term they like to learn supplementary bunch. This requirement has been fulfilled by the online education system. The online Educational System provides the Notes, Books, Audio and Video Lectures, Manuals, Presentations etc., learners are expecting more apart from the contents or the learners are not willing to study which were provided by the online Educational System. The online Educational system provider has to know about the Learners satisfaction level, which has been evaluated by the Learners feedback. The feedback analysis has been evaluated by the selected criteria. Each criterion has some scoring options. Using this option, the learners will give the feedback to the particular subject trainer through the scoring options. Finally, feedback scores are evaluated and  give the advice to the trainer to implement the new techniques for giving the training. This operation is instructing the trainer to implement and update their teaching skills.

  7. Transition of Navajo Special Education Students in a Rural Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowsley, Virginia; Dugi, Audrelia; Gonnie, Pat; Heimbecker, Connie; Jennings, Marianne; Medina, Catherine; Sorgnit, Heather; Watt, Carolyn; Prater, Greg

    The Kayenta Unified School District (KUSD)(Arizona) transition program helps prepare Dine (Navajo) special education students for postsecondary opportunities within their own communities and outside the Navajo Reservation. The senior transition class entails a year-long course that focuses on the application process for tribal and federal…

  8. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in PBL Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Ryberg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the design and development of mobile technologies to support students’ collaboration in groups during project periods in a problem oriented and project based learning environment. The study will take departure in the group work of students in the faculty of Humanities, Aalborg...

  9. The Use of Virtual Learning Environment in Chinese Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢苑苑

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyzes the current condition of the use of virtual learning environment (VLE) in Zhejiang University of Chinese Medicine. It is indicated that students show a positive attitude toward this technology, but the use of it fails to meet stu-dents’perception. In light of this, recommendations are made with a view to enhance the use of VLE.

  10. Acoustical Environments. Educational Facilities Review Series Number 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Alan M.

    This review surveys documents and journal articles previously announced in RIE and CIJE that deal with the principles and techniques of sound transmission and control, particularly as they relate to school environments. School planners and administrators are advised that excessive acoustical insulation costs may be avoided by early decisions…

  11. Jacob: An Educational Agent in a Virtual Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, A.; Evers, M.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Weigand, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Jacob Project involves the construction of a virtual environment where an animated human-like agent called Jacob gives instruction to the user. The project focuses on three issues: the software engineering aspects of building a virtual reality system, the integration of natural language

  12. Knowing and Using Your Environment. Environmental Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topeka Public Schools, KS.

    This unit is intended to help students become aware of overall relationships and interactions that exist between the various segments of the environment. The unit consists of four topics: (1) Geology--The geological history of the earth as illustrated by fossils; (2) Plants and Animals--the role and interactions of plants and animals in the…

  13. Relevance of Education & Training in a Business Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Jo Ann M.

    Today's workplace must employ knowledgeable, flexible, efficient, and adaptable workers who are lifelong learners. Adult learners need to be updated on the latest changes in the structure of the business environment. Business programs must respond to corporate and personal development needs by designing curriculum that embraces the management…

  14. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in PBL Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Ryberg, Thomas

    This study is about the design and development of mobile technologies to support students’ collaboration in groups during project periods in a problem oriented and project based learning environment. The study will take departure in the group work of students in the faculty of Humanities, Aalborg...

  15. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Interactive Learning Environments," 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Steven S.; Andrews, Carolyn; Harris, Scott P.; Lloyd, Adam; Turley, Chad; West, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the journal "Interactive Learning Environments" to discover trends from 2004-2013. The authors looked at trends in article topics, research methods, authorship, citations, keyword frequencies, phrase counts of article abstracts, and article citations according to Google Scholar. Evidence is provided of the journal's…

  16. The International Marketing Environment: Textbook Content versus Educators' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidou, Leonidas C.; Kaminarides, John S.; Panayides, Photis

    2007-01-01

    The article analyzes the content of 18 international marketing academic textbooks with regard to factors comprising the global marketing environment. Three broad categories of factors are identified, the macro (i.e., physical, demographic, and socio-cultural), meso (i.e., economic, political-legal, and technological), and micro (i.e.,…

  17. DREEM and beyond; studies of the educational environment as a means for its enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, S R; Whelan, B; Murdoch-Eaton, D G

    2007-05-01

    Educational environment makes an important contribution to student learning. The DREEM (Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure) questionnaire is a validated instrument for assessing educational environment, but used alone it has little value for identifying means of remediation of poor aspects of environment. This study used qualitative analysis, in association with the DREEM questionnaire, to evaluate the educational environment across all five years of a large undergraduate medical school, and identify areas for change to enhance student experience. The DREEM questionnaire was administered to 968 undergraduate students, together with an open question asking for suggested changes to current medical school practices. Items of concern highlighted by this study were further defined through qualitative analysis, using focus groups, email questionnaires and introduction of Stressful Incident reporting. Through responses to the open question, two items with low scores on the DREEM questionnaire were identified as requiring remediation. Focus groups and email questionnaires were used to define the underlying causes of poor scores, which varied by student year group. Stress resulting from experiences on clinical placement was highlighted by some students, but on closer investigation found to be rare. Remedial steps to improve student support are described. The qualitative data have substantially enhanced questionnaire interpretation, and allowed actions to address common causes for student dissatisfaction to be undertaken. This combined methodology is recommended to other institutions wishing to improve the educational environment, and thus the overall quality of educational provision.

  18. Perception of the educational environment by medical students undergoing a curricular transition in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaimed, Manal; Thalib, Lukman; Doi, Suhail A R

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the students' perceptions of the educational environment in a medical school undergoing curricular transition from a traditional to a problem-based learning (PBL) program in the academic year 2006-2007. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) was used to evaluate perception of the educational environment. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify the factors related to educational environment perception that differ between students following a traditional curriculum to those following a PBL program at Kuwait University Medical School. Mean DREEM score was 53%. When students moved from the traditional curriculum to the PBL system, Academic Self-Perception deteriorated, while Perception of Atmosphere improved. Academic Self-Perception deteriorated because conventional strategies of learning were perceived as no longer useful, while Perception of Atmosphere improved because of increased relevance of the studies. Our findings suggest that curricular changes require careful planning and thinking, with particular attention upon how they influence the educational climate. When new teaching strategies are introduced, new factors that may lead students to develop an adverse perception of their educational environment may be introduced as well. Identification of such factors can lead to an improved educational outcome. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Brief psycho-education affects circadian variability in nicotine craving during cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosen, Elizabeth; Woody, Sheila R

    2013-09-01

    Nicotine cravings are a key target of smoking cessation interventions. Cravings demonstrate circadian variation during abstinence, often peaking during the morning and evening hours. Although some research has also shown diurnal variation in the efficacy of nicotine replacement medications, little research has examined how brief psychosocial interventions affect temporal patterns of craving during abstinence. The present study examined the impact of two brief psycho-education interventions on circadian variations in cravings during a 24-h period. 176 adult smokers interested in quitting participated in two lab sessions. During the first session, participants received (a) mindfulness psycho-education that encouraged acceptance of cravings as a normal, tolerable part of quitting that people should not expect to perfectly control, (b) standard cessation psycho-education, or (c) no psycho-education. Half the sample initiated a cessation attempt the following day. Dependent variables were assessed using ecological momentary assessment (24-h of monitoring, immediately after first lab session) and questionnaires four days later. Partially consistent with hypotheses, both forms of psycho-education were associated with differential diurnal variation in cravings during cessation. Relative to those receiving no psycho-education, standard smoking cessation psycho-education decreased morning cravings. Psycho-education encouraging acceptance of cravings was associated with lower craving in both the morning and evening, albeit only among successfully abstinent smokers. Results demonstrate that brief non-pharmacological interventions can affect circadian craving patterns during smoking cessation. Further investigation of mechanisms of change and of the impact of psycho-education on cessation outcomes is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PRACTICAL ASPECTS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey F. Rodionov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach is offered to development of the informational and educational environment of high technical school,based on deep integration of electronic educational content with methods and tools for the engineering problemssolving. The application program interface (API is used asthe main integration instrument, which modern Its have.

  1. Augmented Reality Environments in Learning, Communicational and Professional Contexts in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Gutiérrez, Jorge; Meneses Fernández, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores educational and professional uses of augmented learning environment concerned with issues of training and entertainment. We analyze the state-of-art research of some scenarios based on augmented reality. Some examples for the purpose of education and simulation are described. These applications show that augmented reality can…

  2. When Creative Problem Solving Strategy Meets Web-Based Cooperative Learning Environment in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai Wen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facing highly competitive and changing environment, cultivating citizens with problem-solving attitudes is one critical vision of education. In brief, the importance of education is to cultivate students with practical abilities. Realizing the advantages of web-based cooperative learning (web-based CL) and creative problem solving…

  3. Developing a learning environment on realistic mathematics education for Indonesian student teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zulkardi, Z.

    2002-01-01

    The CASCADE-IMEI study was started to explore the role of a learning environment (LE) in assisting mathematics student teachers learning Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) as a new instructional approach in mathematics education in Indonesia. The LE for this study has been developed and evaluated

  4. Students' Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placklé, Ingeborg; Könings, Karen D.; Jacquet, Wolfgang; Struyven, Katrien; Libotton, Arno; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument - the Inventory Powerful Learning…

  5. Student characteristics and learning environment interactions in mathematics and physics education: a resource perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brekelmans, M.; van den Eeden, P.; Terwel, J.; Wubbels, Th.

    1997-01-01

    In two studies, one on secondary mathematics education, the other on secondary physics education, data were collected on students' cognitive achievement and characteristics of students and their learning environment. In this chapter the findings of the two studies are brought together in secondary

  6. Problem-Based Learning and Problem-Solving Tools: Synthesis and Direction for Distributed Education Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Robert S.; Deek, Fadi P.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the design and implementation of problem-solving tools used in programming instruction are complementary with both the theories of problem-based learning (PBL), including constructivism, and the practices of distributed education environments. Examines how combining PBL, Web-based distributed education, and a problem-solving…

  7. How Building Principals Made Sense of Free and Appropriate Public Education in the Least Restrictive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbera, Meagan J.; Pazey, Barbara L.; Lashley, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Confusion among school leaders regarding how to interpret and implement special education legislation, and specific federal and state policies and mandates such as a free and appropriate public education (FAPE), in the least restrictive environment (LRE) at the school-site level has existed since the 1970s and continues to exist. This…

  8. Distance Education, Disciplinary Environments and Deep Learning: A Quantitative Exploration of Faculty Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Many institutions have increasingly turned to distance education as a way to meet student and institutional needs while living within a constantly shrinking budget. While distance education has the potential to meet many resource-based challenges, its presence provides additional challenges to the faculty who direct the learning environment and…

  9. Telecommuting Academics within an Open Distance Education Environment of South Africa: More Content, Productive, and Healthy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Deon Harold

    2014-01-01

    Outside an academic setting, telecommuting has become fairly popular in recent years. However, research on telecommuting practices within a higher education environment is fairly sparse, especially within the higher distance education sphere. Drawing on existing literature on telecommuting and the outcome of a valuation study on the success of an…

  10. State of the art of using virtual reality technologies in built environment education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keenaghan, G.; Horvath, I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on our major findings concerning the application of virtual reality technologies in built environment education (BEE). In addition to an analysis of the current trends and developments in current virtual reality technologies and systems, it also evaluates their educational

  11. Energy, environment, and policy choices: Summer institutes for science and social studies educators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marek, E.A.; Chiodo, J.J.; Gerber, B.L.

    1997-06-01

    The Center for Energy Education (CEE) is a partnership linking the University of Oklahoma, Close Up Foundation and Department of Energy. Based upon the theme of energy, environment and public policy, the CEE`s main purposes are to: (1) educate teachers on energy sources, environmental issues and decisionmaking choices regarding public policy; (2) develop interdisciplinary curricula that are interactive in nature (see attachments); (3) disseminate energy education curricula; (4) serve as a resource center for a wide variety of energy education materials; (5) provide a national support system for teachers in energy education; and (6) conduct research in energy education. The CEE conducted its first two-week experimentially-based program for educators during the summer of 1993. Beginning at the University of Oklahoma, 57 teachers from across the country examined concepts and issues related to energy and environment, and how the interdependence of energy and environment significantly influences daily life. During the second week of the institute, participants went to Washington, D.C. to examine the processes used by government officials to make critical decisions involving interrelationships among energy, environment and public policy. Similar institutes were conducted during the summers of 1994 and 1995 resulting in nearly 160 science and social studies educators who had participated in the CEE programs. Collectively the participants represented 36 states, the Pacific Territories, Puerto Rico, and Japan.

  12. New Approaches and Trends in the Philosophy of Educational Technology for Learning and Teaching Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Ismail; Ziatdinov, Rushan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss instructional design and technology (IDT) model strategies for developing learning and teaching environments, based on philosophical approaches to educational technology theory. The study begins with a discussion of IDT models to define the history of educational technology or instructional technology…

  13. Creating a Learner-Centered Environment in Nursing Education: An Immersion Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Susan H.; Floyd, Evelyn; Hewett, Beverly J.; Lewis, Nicole C.; Walker, Eldon H.

    2010-01-01

    A call for change in nursing education has been issued in order to prepare the nurse of the future in a changing health care delivery system with increasing complexity. The learning environment is changing, including the faculty role. Innovative research-based pedagogies are suggested as a way to challenge traditional nursing education. The…

  14. Natural hazards education in global environment leaders education programme for designing a low-carbon society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Soo; Yamashita, Takao; Fujiwara, Akimasa

    2010-05-01

    Global environmental leader (GEL) education programme at graduate school for international development and cooperation (IDEC) in Hiroshima University is an education and training programme for graduate students especially from developing countries in Asian region to build and enhance their ability to become international environmental leaders. Through this programme, they will participate in regular course works and other activities to learn how to cope with the various environment and resource management issues from global to regional scales toward a low-carbon society via multi-disciplinary approaches considering sustainable development and climate change. Under this GEL programme, there are five different research sub-groups as follows assuming a cause-effect relationship among interacting components of social, economic, and environmental systems; 1) urban system design to prevent global warming, 2) wise use of biomass resources, 3) environmental impact assessment, 4) policy and institutional design, and 5) development of environmental education programs. Candidate students of GEL programme belong to one of the five research sub-groups, perform their researches and participate in many activities under the cross-supervisions from faculty members of different sub-groups. Under the third research group for environmental impact assessment, we use numerical models named as regional environment simulator (RES) as a tool for research and education for assessing the environmental impacts due to natural hazards. Developed at IDEC, Hiroshima University, RES is a meso-scale numerical model system that can be used for regional simulation of natural disasters and environmental problems caused by water and heat circulation in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. RES has three components: i) atmosphere-surface waves-ocean part, ii) atmosphere-land surface process-hydrologic part, and iii) coastal and estuarine part. Each part is constructed with state-of-the-art public

  15. Interactive effects of 5-HTTLPR genotype and rearing environment on affective attitude towards own infant in Japanese mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Erika; Doi, Hirokazu; Nagai, Tomoko; Ikeda, Satoko; Shinohara, Kauyuki

    2017-05-15

    Maternal positive attitude towards one's own infant is the cornerstone of effective parenting. Previous research has revealed an influence of both genetic and environmental factors on maternal parenting behavior, but little is known of the potential gene-environment interaction in shaping a mother's affective attitude. To address this gap, we investigated the effect of a mother's childhood rearing environment and a serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) on affective attitude towards her infant. Our analyses found an interactive effect between rearing environment and 5-HTTLPR genotype on maternal attitude. Specifically, a poor rearing environment (characterized by low maternal care and high paternal overprotection) decreased positive attitude towards one's own infant in mothers with homozygous short allele genotype. In contrast, this detrimental effect was almost eliminated in long allele carriers. Altogether, our results indicate that the 5-HTTLPR gene moderates the influence of experienced rearing environment on maternal parental behavior in a manner consistent with the notion that the short 5-HTTLPR allele amplifies environmental influence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. How to Steer and Lead Educational Processes in a Digital Medium Environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    This paper is about challenges to steering and leadership of educational interaction in classrooms provided by the new medium environment that comes with digital media. In the new medium environment, the old way of steering what is going on in the classroom appears not to work any more since...

  17. Creativity in Technology Education Facilitated through Virtual Reality Learning Environments: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli; Page, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation Education (IE) is a new subject area in Icelandic schools. The aim of the subject is to train students to identify the needs and problems in their environment and to develop solutions: a process of ideation. This activity has been classroom based but now a Virtual Reality Learning Environment technology (VRLE) has been designed to…

  18. Development and Validation of the Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljahni, Areej; Al-Begain, Khalid; Skinner, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Part of ongoing research into the efficacy of blended learning in higher education within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The need for, and development of, a Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) are explained. This new instrument assesses student perceptions across five core aspects of blended learning environments: Infrastructure,…

  19. Understanding Personal Learning Environment Perspectives of Thai International Tourism and Hospitality Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyong, Siriwan; Sharafuddin, Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a periodic research conducted in developing a personal learning environment for Thailand's higher education students with English as medium of instruction. The objective of the first phase in this research was to understand the personal learning environment perspectives of Thai International tourism and hospitality higher…

  20. Validation of a Spanish Version of the Distance Education Learning Environments Survey (DELES) in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pascual, Maria Dolores; Ferrer-Cascales, Rosario; Reig-Ferrer, Abilio; Albaladejo-Blázquez, Natalia; Walker, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the validity of the Spanish version of the Distance Education Learning Environments Survey (Sp-DELES). This instrument assesses students' perceptions of virtual learning environments using six scales: Instructor Support, Student Interaction and Collaboration, Personal Relevance, Authentic Learning, Active…

  1. Level of Intrinsic Motivation of Distance Education Students in e-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Mehmet; Kilinç, Hakan; Yüzer, Tevfik Volkan

    2018-01-01

    According to researches, motivation that initiates and sustains behaviour is one of the most significant components of learning in any environment. Accordingly, level of intrinsic motivation triggers and sustains the interest of the open and distance education students when it comes to learning on their own in e-learning environments. Despite a…

  2. A Model Supported Interactive Virtual Environment for Natural Resource Sharing in Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbalios, N.; Ioannidou, I.; Tzionas, P.; Paraskeuopoulos, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a realistic 3D model supported virtual environment for environmental education, that highlights the importance of water resource sharing by focusing on the tragedy of the commons dilemma. The proposed virtual environment entails simulations that are controlled by a multi-agent simulation model of a real ecosystem consisting…

  3. Web Environments for Group-Based Project Work in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andernach, J.A.; van Diepen, N.M.; Collis, Betty; Andernach, Toine

    1997-01-01

    We discuss problems confronting the use of group-based project work as an instructional strategy in higher education and describe two courses in which course-specific World Wide Web (Web) environments have evolved over a series of course sequences and are used both as tool environments for

  4. Mismatch of Cultural Dimensions in an Urban Medical Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Malone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify cultural dimensions and their potential mismatches between attending physicians and their residents and medical students. Methods. We surveyed faculty and students, both undergraduates and postgraduate resident physicians, at the SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, using Hofstede’s VSM-08 questionnaire, and calculated cultural dimensions, including the Power-Distance Index (PDI, Individualism (IDV, Masculinity (MAS, Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI, and Long-term Outlook (LTO. Correlations between faculty and student demographic data and cultural dimensions were calculated (SPSS. Results. There were 237 student and resident respondents and 96 faculty respondents. Comparing all faculty and student respondents, significant differences were found in four of five cultural dimensions, with faculty scoring higher in MAS, and lower in PDI, IDV, UAI, and LTO. Conclusions. These differences may be important in the design and implementation of a medical educational curriculum, and, particularly, in the measurement and evaluation of educational outcomes.

  5. Pilot research on a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulikova, Tatyana I.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world, the environment of any educational institution represents a spectrum of ethnic groups and subcultures: a multicultural educational environment. Pupils who are aware of their national identity often demonstrate intolerance toward students of other nationalities, which threatens pupils’ psychological safety. In this article, we present the results of pilot research examining the level of a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment and identifying the criteria that influence a pupil’s psychological safety. The research sample comprised 127 pupils aged 13–14 years from different schools living in various places that differed by the type of settlement, industrial development and level of science and culture. We isolated the following criteria for a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment: satisfaction with the educational environment, protection from psychological abuse and self-confidence. According to pupils, the essential characteristics of safety in the educational environment, regardless of school category and type, are being able to ask for help, protection of personal dignity, interactions with other students, and self-respect. Empirical data reveal the current status of the psychological safety of the entire sample group (n = 127 and compare indices of psychological safety in the educational institutions under study. Analysis of the results of our research indicates that protecting a pupil’s personality in the multicultural educational environment has the greatest influence on his/her psychological safety. In addition, a comfortable psychological atmosphere, mutual aid and support of pupils and low levels of classmates’ and coevals’ aggression positively influence the protection experience.

  6. Virtual Trondheim: A Virtual Environment for Tourism and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jose, Dawn Alphonse

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether educational activities in tourism can be supported by virtual reality technologies, using virtual world frameworks. Settings of virtual world of SecondLife and a recent Virtual Reality technology known as Oculus Rift were used in the thesis work with the city of Trondheim as the main context. Theoretical studies on Virtual Reality systems were conducted and data for the research were obtained through empirical studies condu...

  7. Telecommuting Academics Within an Open Distance Education Environment of South Africa: More Content, Productive, and Healthy?

    OpenAIRE

    Deon Harold Tustin

    2014-01-01

    Outside an academic setting, telecommuting has become fairly popular in recent years. However, research on telecommuting practices within a higher education environment is fairly sparse, especially within the higher distance education sphere. Drawing on existing literature on telecommuting and the outcome of a valuation study on the success of an experimental telecommuting programme at the largest distance education institution in South Africa, this article presents discerning findings on tel...

  8. Are Genetics and Environment Substitutes or Complements in Affecting Entrepreneurial Choice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zunino, Diego

    Recent twin and adoption studies have shown that genes matter for entrepreneurial choice. This related study addresses how a genetic predisposition to entrepreneurship interacts with the (entrepreneurship friendliness of the) environment, using a dataset of Italian twins. In particular, we study ...... a role, and that a favorable environment to entrepreneurship selects those with higher predisposition rather than simply increasing the rate of self-employment....... whether the genetic effect is different across genders, based on the stylized fact that barriers to entrepreneurship entry are stronger for females than for males. Using regression analysis, the study confirms earlier findings showing substantial genetic effects. More interestingly, the study finds...

  9. The performance of select universities of medical sciences based on the components affecting medical education [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tayebi Arasteh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Every educational institution requires an evaluation system in order to find out about the quality and desirability of its activities, especially if it is a complex and dynamic environment. The present study was conducted to evaluate the educational performance of schools affiliated to Alborz University of Medical Sciences to help improve their performance. Methods: This descriptive analytical study was conducted in six schools affiliated to Alborz University of Medical Sciences in April 2016-October 2016 and October 2016-April 2017. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: self-assessment by service executives across schools, and external assessment in person by the university’s expert staff. The study tools included the components, criteria and desirable standards of educational performance in ten categories. Data were analyzed in SPSS. Results: The results obtained showed that, in April-October 2016, the highest performance evaluation scores pertained to the "secure testing" and "rules and regulations" components and the lowest to the "packages for reform and innovation in education" and "the school action plan" components. In October 2016-April 2017, the highest scores pertained to "workforce empowerment" and "secure testing" and the lowest to "faculty affairs" and "electronic education management system". Conclusions: Offering a balanced portrayal of the actual performance of schools using the right performance indicators in two consecutive periods can help further motivate the superior schools and encourage the weaker schools to strive harder. Competition among schools to get a higher score in the components affecting medical education helps mobilize them to move toward reform and improvement.

  10. Does solar radiation affect the growth of tomato seeds relative to their environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Kristi

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to sequentially study and analyze the data collected from the germination and growth of irradiated Rutgers Supreme tomato seeds to adult producing plants. This experiment will not use irradiated seeds as a control as I plan to note growth in artificial verses natural environment as the basic experiment.

  11. Social environment affects the life history tactic of a phoretic mite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehring, Volker; Müller, Josef K

    2009-01-01

    Phoretic animals use their hosts for travelling to habitat patches suitable for reproduction. Some species, such as the mite Poecilochirus carabi, are phoretic as juveniles and cannot leave their habitat once they reach adulthood. Previous work has shown that mites exercise choice over the habitat...... influence of the social environment on a phoretic's habitat choice and life history....

  12. Re/assembling "Innovative" Learning Environments: Affective Practice and Its Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Dianne; Morrison, Carol

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we argue that the interest being taken by governments in establishing innovative learning environments (ILEs) in schools relies on a conception of space as a largely neutral arena. In consequence, relations of space and power inherent in the infrastructural shift to ILEs tend to drop from view. Adopting an assemblage approach to…

  13. How Gene-Environment Interaction Affects Children's Anxious and Fearful Behavior. Science Briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study "Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction in Predicting Behavioral Inhibition in Middle Childhood" (N. A. Fox, K E. Nichols, H. A. Henderson, K. Rubin, L. Schmidt, D. Hamer, M. Ernst, and D. S.…

  14. Factors Affecting the Design and Development of a Personal Learning Environment: Research on Super-Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Helene; Kop, Rita

    2011-01-01

    After speculation in literature about the nature of Personal Learning Environments, research in the design and development of PLEs is now in progress. This paper reports on the first phase of the authors' research on PLE, the identification process of what potential users would consider important components, applications, and tools in a PLE. The…

  15. FACTORS AFFECTING COLORED DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sunlight-absorbing (colored) component of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in aquatic environments is widely distributed in freshwaters and coastal regions where it influences the fate and transport of toxic organic substances and biologically-important metals such as mercury,...

  16. INTEGRATIVE PROPERTIES OF LIBRARY FUNCTIONS: IMPLEMENTATION IN THE EDUCATIONAL ELECTRONIC ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Л. Бірюкова

    2017-02-01

    In our opinion, the use of distance education programs primarily to build interaction of educational and library establishments in the electronic environment. To achieve this goal, through the interaction of the system Library Education created and signed to the practice of teaching subjects at the Documentation and information activities department Odessa National Polytechnic University methodological development, there are student groups whose work promotes the assimilation of theoretical material in practice, just in the information institution, adapting to the professional environment, provided the possibility of passing the full production and pre-diploma practice.

  17. PSYCHOLOGICAL- PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS OF PROVIDING OF THE AVAILABLE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Ivanovich Shutenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes psychological and pedagogical bases for carrying out successful integration of children with disabilities in general education system. Relying on the principle of a complementarity, authors develop the model of such integration in the form of the adaptive educational environment, represent the leading components of the organization of such environment (valeological, personal- focused, axiological, hermeneutical, interindividual, and also a number of the important pedagogical and psychological principles of its functioning in logic of fruitful socialization of children with disabilities in educational process.

  18. Ensuring the Security of the Educational Environment: Cases of US, Russia and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly V. Kabernik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with security, including informational, educational environment. The article considers experience of the United States and Europe, including specific examples. Given a classification of the major threats and they are allocated on the basis of foreign and domestic experience. The article also determines the range of problems actually facing educational institutions and regularly described in special reports on the subject. Provides an overview of a set of measures designed to regulate access to inappropriate content, with special attention given to the phenomenon of social networks that put new challenges in ensuring security of the educational environment.

  19. A FUNCTIONAL MODEL OF COMPUTER-ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF A POST-DEGREE PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna R. Kolos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study substantiates the need for a systematic study of the functioning of computer-oriented learning environment of a post-degree pedagogical education; it is determined the definition of “functional model of computer-oriented learning environment of a post-degree pedagogical education”; it is built a functional model of computer-oriented learning environment of a post-degree pedagogical education in accordance with the functions of business, information and communication technology, academic, administrative staff and peculiarities of training courses teachers.

  20. Analysis of Effect of Education Entrepreneurship and Family Environment Towards Interest Students Entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Periansya Periansya

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze the effect of entrepreneurship education and family environment on entrepreneurial interest. The population in this research is State Polytechnic of Sriwijaya Palembang student.. Sampling technique uses sampling proportional technique. Sample consists of 375 students. Analysis method uses double linear regression analysis technique. The result shows that partially entrepreneurship education, family environment gives a positive and significant effect on entrepreneurial interest of State Polytechnic of Sriwijaya. Simultaneously, entrepreneurship education and family environment gives a positive and significant effect on entrepreneurial interest.. The conclusions in this research that the education needs to be orientating on practice, case study, and invite interviewees from companies or industries. The existence of industrial practice based on student competency also can enhance knowledge and insight of students where

  1. Experiential-Based Climate Change Education: Fostering Students' Knowledge and Motivation towards the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Mohd Ali Khan, Nur Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most important environmental issues affecting our society today and we need to educate the citizens about the impact on human lives. An attempt was made to integrate experiential-based climate change education into the teaching and learning of secondary school Biology lessons on the topic of "Endangered…

  2. Storage facilities for radioactive waste in tertiary education environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, G.; Benke, G.

    1994-01-01

    The research and teaching endeavors of the university environment generate an assortment of radioactive waste that is unique in the range of isotopes and activities present, although the physical quantities of the waste may not be large. Universities may also be subject to unexpected, close public scrutiny of their operations due to the diverse nature of the university campus. This is rarely the case for other generators of radioactive waste. The experience of Monash University in formulating solutions for long term storage of radioactive waste is examined with respect to design, location and administration of the waste stores that were finally constructed. 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  3. Educational complex of light-colored modeling of urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko Vladimir E.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms, methodological tools and structure of a training complex of light-colored modeling of the urban environment are developed in this paper. The following results of the practical work of students are presented: light composition and installation, media facades, lighting of building facades, city streets and embankment. As a result of modeling, the structure of the light form is determined. Light-transmitting materials and causing characteristic optical illusions, light-visual and light-dynamic effects (video-dynamics and photostatics, basic compositional techniques of light form are revealed. The main elements of the light installation are studied, including a light projection, an electronic device, interactivity and relationality of the installation, and the mechanical device which becomes a part of the installation composition. The meaning of modern media facade technology is the transformation of external building structures and their facades into a changing information cover, into a media content translator using LED technology. Light tectonics and the light rhythm of the plastics of the architectural object are built up through point and local illumination, modeling of the urban ensemble assumes the structural interaction of several light building models with special light-composition techniques. When modeling the social and pedestrian environment, the lighting parameters depend on the scale of the chosen space and are adapted taking into account the visual perception of the pedestrian, and the atmospheric effects of comfort and safety of the environment are achieved with the help of special light compositional techniques. With the aim of realizing the tasks of light modeling, a methodology has been created, including the mechanisms of models, variability and complementarity. The perspectives of light modeling in the context of structural elements of the city, neuropsychology, wireless and bioluminescence technologies are proposed

  4. Communication, support and psychosocial work environment affecting psychological distress among working women aged 20 to 39 years in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    HONDA, Ayumi; DATE, Yutaka; ABE, Yasuyo; AOYAGI, Kiyoshi; HONDA, Sumihisa

    2015-01-01

    When compared with their older counterparts, younger women are more likely to have depressive symptoms because they more often experience interrupted work history and a heavy childrearing burden. The purposes of the present study were 1) to investigate the possible association of psychosocial work environment with psychological distress and 2) to examine the way by which communication and support in the workplace affect to psychological distress among young women. We studied 198 women aged 20...

  5. Educational environment and approaches to learning of undergraduate nursing students in an Indonesian school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochmawati, Erna; Rahayu, Gandes Retno; Kumara, Amitya

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to assess students' perceptions of their educational environment and approaches to learning, and determine if perceptions of learning environment associates with approaches to learning. A survey was conducted to collect data from a regional private university in Indonesia. A total of 232 nursing students completed two questionnaires that measured their perceptions of educational environment and approaches to learning. The measurement was based on Dundee Ready Education Environment Measurement (DREEM) and Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST). Five learning environments dimensions and three learning approaches dimensions from two measures were measured. The overall score of DREEM was 131.03/200 (SD 17.04), it was in the range considered to be favourable. The overall score is different significantly between years of study (p value = 0.01). This study indicated that the majority of undergraduate nursing students' adopt strategic approach (n = 139. 59.9%). The finding showed that perceived educational environment significantly associated with approaches to learning. This study implicated the need to maintain conducive learning environment. There is also a need to improve the management of learning activities that reflect the use of student-centered learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A qualitative exploration of chiropractic and physiotherapy teachers' experiences and conceptualizations of the educational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Per J.; Liljedahl, Matilda; Lindquist, Ingrid; Laksov, Klara Bolander

    2018-01-01

    Objective: There has been increasing scholarly interest in the role of environments in health care professional education, and the value of these has been widely acknowledged as an influential factor in educational quality. However, little is known about how teachers experience the environment, and there is a recognizable absence of a perspective from chiropractic and physiotherapy faculties. The aim of this study was to explore and contrast chiropractic and physiotherapy teachers' experiences and conceptualizations of the meaning of the educational environment. Methods: In this qualitative study, we performed semistructured interviews with 14 teachers, purposefully selected to obtain richness, variation, and breadth in the data. The data were analyzed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Results: The most noteworthy findings were, first, that chiropractic teachers experienced the meaning of the environment as motivating a vocational practice and modeling ideal, supporting and managing stressed students, and including students in the community of chiropractors. Physiotherapy teachers experienced the meaning of the environment as putting the pedagogical vision into practice, balancing students' expectations, and providing the prerequisites to grow within the profession. Second, both groups of teachers held common conceptualizations of the constituents of the environment as physical, organizational, relational, communicational, and pedagogical; however, they attached different connotations to these dimensions. Conclusion: The findings conveyed a variance in the experience of the meaning of the educational environment that can be attributed to contextual and cultural differences. PMID:29257707

  7. An unstable social environment affects sex ratio in guinea pigs : an adaptive maternal effect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemme, Kristina; Kaiser, Sylvia; von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Wewers, Dirk; Groothuis, Ton; Sachser, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary theory suggests that offspring sex should be adjusted to environmental conditions in order to maximize future reproductive success. In several animal taxa environmental factors indeed affect the secondary sex ratio. In humans, changes in the sex ratio at birth have been associated with

  8. Parents and Early Life Environment Affect Behavioral Development of Laying Hen Chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.; Bolhuis, J.E.; Kemp, B.; Groothuis, T.G.G.; Rodenburg, T.B.

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) in commercial laying hens is a maladaptive behavior which is associated with anxiety traits. Many experimental studies have shown that stress in the parents can affect anxiety in the offspring, but until now these effects have been neglected in addressing the problem of

  9. Parents and early life environment affect behavioral development of laying hen chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Elske N. de; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Kemp, Bas; Groothuis, Ton G.G.; Rodenburg, T. Bas

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) in commercial laying hens is a maladaptive behavior which is associated with anxiety traits. Many experimental studies have shown that stress in the parents can affect anxiety in the offspring, but until now these effects have been neglected in addressing the problem of

  10. A Case Study on the Perceptions of Educators on the Penetration of Personal Learning Environments in Typical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Armakolas, Stefanos; Mikroyannidis, Alexander; Panagiotakopoulos, Christos; Panousopoulou, Theofania

    2016-01-01

    Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) help students manage and take control of their own learning. As such, the PLE promotes self-regulation in learning and allows learners to aggregate, manipulate and share digital artefacts within a flexible and versatile online space. This paper presents a case study in Greece, concerning an investigation about the penetration of PLEs in typical education. In particular, this case study aims at investigating the perceptions of educators about PLEs and thei...

  11. Information-educational environment with adaptive control of learning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modjaev, A. D.; Leonova, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent years, a new scientific branch connected with the activities in social sphere management developing intensively and it is called "Social Cybernetics". In the framework of this scientific branch, theory and methods of management of social sphere are formed. Considerable attention is paid to the management, directly in real time. However, the decision of such management tasks is largely constrained by the lack of or insufficiently deep study of the relevant sections of the theory and methods of management. The article discusses the use of cybernetic principles in solving problems of control in social systems. Applying to educational activities a model of composite interrelated objects representing the behaviour of students at various stages of educational process is introduced. Statistical processing of experimental data obtained during the actual learning process is being done. If you increase the number of features used, additionally taking into account the degree and nature of variability of levels of current progress of students during various types of studies, new properties of students' grouping are discovered. L-clusters were identified, reflecting the behaviour of learners with similar characteristics during lectures. It was established that the characteristics of the clusters contain information about the dynamics of learners' behaviour, allowing them to be used in additional lessons. The ways of solving the problem of adaptive control based on the identified dynamic characteristics of the learners are planned.

  12. Management of the assisted instruction environment in economic higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana REVEIU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The world has entered the Knowledge Age. Information Technology is gradually turning the world into an Information Highway Network. The development of technology has greatly accelerated the international flow of information, capital and commodities and speeded the growth of economic integration. At the same time, the cycle of technological development and commercialization is becoming shorter and shorter [Zhouying, 1999]. Information technology is bringing rapid and profound changes to higher education, as it has to virtually every process in our society. Productivity often suffers because is difficult and timeconsuming to conduct a team effort. A portal solution base on SharePoint Portal Server can greatly facilitate the process of bringing knowledge teachers together as a team to achieve educational goals by providing a single point to access: automated essential day-to-day email communication, management of contacts, calendars, and instant messages, shared facilities to allow small teams of teachers to contribute to team and project-focused Web site, track tasks and events, shortened web-publishing cycles by linking collaboration and publishing processes.

  13. Affective Architecture. Film as a Sensory Transference Tool and an Intimacy Projection Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Munck; Farsø, Mads

    2016-01-01

    , with our bodies, perceive space and project space. Through an analysis of two films, it points to the medium of film as both a tool and an environment, based on Gernot Böhme’s ‘Raum leiblicher Anwesenheit (Böhme 2006). These films illustrate how the film’s picture frame becomes almost like a skin......This paper elucidates how film may offer itself as a tool for both the representation and conception of space that can strengthen an alternative, phenomenological and transcendental position in architecture. The paper underscores that the film camera can work as a kind of amplifier of how we...... and through its surface and sound projects both a site and a near-sensual experience simultaneously. The medium of film as both tool and an environment thereby supports an extended sensory-intimate reflection on outer experiences and inner sensations that – in its audio-visual and time...

  14. Graphene oxide in the water environment could affect tetracycline-antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Zhang, Guo-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the influence of new materials like nanoparticles in the water environment on biological substances has been widely studied. Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) represent a new type of pollutant in the environment. Graphene oxide (GO), as a nano material, because of its unique structure, may have an impact on antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARB) and ARGs; however the research in this area is rarely reported. Therefore, this study mainly investigated the effects of GO on bacterial antibiotic resistance. The results showed that GO had a limited effect on ARB inactivation. A high concentration of GO (>10 mg/L) can damage resistant plasmids to reduce bacterial resistance to antibiotics, but low concentrations of GO (antibiotic resistance needs further investigation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Keeping quality of raisins as affected by irradiation, storage environments and combination treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, B.; Afridi, S.; Durrani, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Influence of irradiation and storage environments on the quality of raisins was investigated during storage at room temperature for six months. Storage environment included: packaging in clear polyethylene bags in the presence of normal air, nitrogen and vacuum. Insect infestation appeared after two months storage and reached to 5.8, 8.6, 11.7 and 25.8% in the control samples stored in normal air for 3, 4, 5 and 6 months storage, respectively. No infestation was observed in vacuum nitrogen and packed samples. In irradiated samples no infestation was observed during storage in normal air and also vacuum and nitrogen packed samples. Raisin samples packed under vacuum were better in quality than other treatments. (author)

  16. An Investigation of Factors Affecting Multi-Task Performance in an Immersive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    in Team Sports . Personality and Individual Differences July 1998, 25 (1), 119- 128. Potosky, D. A Field Study of Computer Efficacy Beliefs as an...vacation I like to engage in active sports rather than just lie around. ____ 60. I’ll try anything once. ____ 61. I often feel unsure of myself...heart rate variability ( HRV ). • To identify non-invasive psychological and physiological measures of cognitive readiness in a multi-task environment

  17. Changes in a middle school food environment affect food behavior and food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordell, Doug; Daratha, Kenn; Mandal, Bidisha; Bindler, Ruth; Butkus, Sue Nicholson

    2012-01-01

    Increasing rates of obesity among children ages 12 to 19 years have led to recommendations to alter the school food environment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are associations between an altered school food environment and food choices of middle school students both in and outside of school. In a midsized western city, two of six middle schools allowed only bottled water in vending machines, only milk and fruit on à la carte menus, and offered a seasonal fruit and vegetable bar. Three years after the intervention was initiated, seventh- and eighth-grade students attending the two intervention schools and four control middle schools were surveyed about their food choices. A total of 2,292 surveys were completed. Self-reported frequency of consumption for nine food groups in the survey was low; consumption was higher outside than in school. Boys consumed more milk than girls although girls consumed more fruits and vegetables. Significant socioeconomic differences existed. Compared with students who paid the full lunch fee, students qualifying for free and reduced-price meals consumed more milk and juice in schools but less outside school; more candy and energy drinks in school; and more sweet drinks, candy, pastries, and energy drinks outside school. Students in intervention schools were 24% more likely to consume milk outside school, 27% less likely to consume juice in school, and 56% less likely to consume sweet pastries in school. There were no differences in fruit and vegetable consumption reported by children in control and intervention schools. Overall, there was a positive association between a modified school food environment and student food behavior in and outside school. Policies related to the school food environment are an important strategy to address the obesity epidemic in our country. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Built environment affecting visitors' walking choice in commercial areas? - A study with GPS experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Y.; Yoon, H.

    2016-12-01

    Retail location is one of the most critical factors explaining the success of store operations. Store owners prefer to choose locations with high visibility and convenient transportation, which might be likely reasons for higher pedestrian volume, hence larger chance to capture impulse shoppers, resulting in more profits. While researches have focused on discerning relationship between pedestrian route choice and physical environments via indirect measures such as survey questionnaire and interviews, recent technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS) enables collecting direct and precise waking route data. In this study, we investigate the physical environments in which pedestrians prefer to be in commercial district, and further analyze if such locations encompass stores with higher store revenues. The primary method is GPS experiment and travel diary for over hundred visitors of the study site, Hongik University commercial areas in Seoul, South Korea, and statistical analysis, Structural Equation Model (SEM). With SEM, we could assess endogenous latent variables indicating built environments, such as Density, Diversity, Destination Accessibility, Design, and Retail Attraction, and exogenous latent variable, the pedestrian walking choice, based on the observation of pedestrian volume and walking speed. Observed variables include the number of stores, building uses, kind of retail, and pedestrian volume, and walking speed. This research will shed light on planning commercial districts, emphasizing the role of pedestrian walking in the success of retail business, and providing a clue on how to encourage pedestrian visitation by improving physical environment. This work is supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (No. 2015R1C1A2A01055615)

  19. Practice education learning environments: the mismatch between perceived and preferred expectations of undergraduate health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; McKenna, Lisa; Palermo, Claire; McCall, Louise; Roller, Louis; Hewitt, Lesley; Molloy, Liz; Baird, Marilyn; Aldabah, Ligal

    2011-11-01

    Practical hands-on learning opportunities are viewed as a vital component of the education of health science students, but there is a critical shortage of fieldwork placement experiences. It is therefore important that these clinical learning environments are well suited to students' perceptions and expectations. To investigate how undergraduate students enrolled in health-related education programs view their clinical learning environments and specifically to compare students' perception of their 'actual' clinical learning environment to that of their 'preferred/ideal' clinical learning environment. The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) was used to collect data from 548 undergraduate students (55% response rate) enrolled in all year levels of paramedics, midwifery, radiography and medical imaging, occupational therapy, pharmacy, nutrition and dietetics, physiotherapy and social work at Monash University via convenience sampling. Students were asked to rate their perception of the clinical learning environment at the completion of their placements using the CLEI. Satisfaction of the students enrolled in the health-related disciplines was closely linked with the five constructs measured by the CLEI: Personalization, Student Involvement, Task Orientation, Innovation, and Individualization. Significant differences were found between the student's perception of their 'actual' clinical learning environment and their 'ideal' clinical learning environment. The study highlights the importance of a supportive clinical learning environment that places emphasis on effective two-way communication. A thorough understanding of students' perceptions of their clinical learning environments is essential. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Influence of Education and Home Environment on the Cognitive Outcomes of Preschool Children in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Biedinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Educational inequality is a well-established topic among the scientific community in Western countries. Major individual differences emerge well before children arrive at school. Therefore the following analysis deals with the explanation of early differences in cognitive outcomes. However, there is not much research done in Germany. The main question is if the strong effect of the educational background and the home environment on their outcomes and on the improvement exists as well. To test this, data of the project “Preschool Education and Educational Careers among Migrant Children” was used. The results of structural equation models confirm that the home environment and the education of the parents are important for children's outcomes at the age of 3 to 4. In addition both factors also play a major role for the explanation of the improvement of the cognitive abilities. The results show that in Germany the home environment and parental education are important predictors of cognitive abilities. As a main result the study shows that it is very important to control for earlier abilities of the children and to encourage low educated parents to be active with their children, since in that way they can compensate for their lower educational background.

  1. Shared Environment Estimates for Educational Attainment: A Puzzle and Possible Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Jeremy; Jao, Yu-Han

    2017-02-01

    Classical behavioral genetics models for twin and other family designs decompose traits into heritability, shared environment, and nonshared environment components. Estimates of heritability of adult traits are pervasively observed to be far higher than those of shared environment, which has been used to make broad claims about the impotence of upbringing. However, the most commonly studied nondemographic variable in many areas of social science, educational attainment, exhibits robustly high estimates both for heritability and for shared environment. When previously noticed, the usual explanation has emphasized family resources, but evidence suggests this is unlikely to explain the anomalous high estimates for shared environment of educational attainment. We articulate eight potential complementary explanations and discuss evidence of their prospective contributions to resolving the puzzle. In so doing, we hope to further consideration of how behavioral genetics findings may advance studies of social stratification beyond the effort to articulate specific genetic influences. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Support System in Distance Education:Factors Affecting Achievements Among Women Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozhan M IDRUS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The Support System in Distance Education:Factors Affecting Achievements Among Women Learners Hanafi ATAN Zuraidah A. RAHMAN Omar MAJID Noraida A. GHANIRozhan M IDRUS School of Distance EducationUniversiti Sains Malaysia11800 Penang, MALAYSIA ABSTRACT Distance education has the potential to contribute to the enhancement of women’s development by overcoming not only temporal and spatial barriers but familial commitments as well. It brings education to their home and allows women to learn at their individual pace, seek skills for individual development and at the same time, enables them to fulfill family responsibilities. An important element of distance education is the provision of the learner support system that provides students the access to learning resources and means of communication that would facilitate the array of educational activities and exposure to various other guidance and advisories. This paper reports on the study undertaken to elucidate the dimensions of the support system provided by the School of Distance Education (SDE, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM to its women learners that would have significant impact on their achievements. The factorial analysis conducted revealed that the role of the faculty is the main contributing factor affecting these achievements, followed by the provision of the intensive course, the electronic portal, video conferencing and to a much lesser extent, the existence of the regional centres. The implications of this study are discussed with the view of improving the support system provided by the institution and the need to put into action the necessary strategies to further improve the achievement of the women learners.

  3. Stress-Preventive Management Competencies, Psychosocial Work Environments, and Affective Well-Being: A Multilevel, Multisource Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Cristian

    2018-01-01

    The Management Competencies for Preventing and Reducing Stress at Work framework represents one of the few tailored models of leadership for work stress prevention purposes, but it has never been empirically evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether supervisors’ stress-preventive management competencies, as measured by the Stress Management Competencies Indicator Tool (SMCIT), are related to employees’ affective well-being through psychosocial work environmental factors. To this end, multilevel structural equation modelling (MSEM) was developed and tested, including data provided by both supervisors and employees. Supervisors (n = 84) self-assessed their stress-preventive management competencies (i.e., being respectful and responsible, managing and communicating existing and future work, reasoning and managing difficult situations, and managing the individual within the team) with a previously validated reduced version of the SMCIT. The supervised employees (n = 584) rated job content (e.g., job demands) and work context (e.g., role clarity) psychosocial factors and their job-related affective well-being. Supervisors’ job-related affective well-being was also included in the tested model. The results revealed that the stress-preventive competencies factor was related to employees’ affective well-being through the psychosocial work environment only when the latter was operationalized by means of contextual work factors. Supervisors’ affective well-being was related to their stress-preventive competencies, but it was not related to employees’ affective well-being. We discuss the implications of the results obtained. PMID:29495360

  4. Stress-Preventive Management Competencies, Psychosocial Work Environments, and Affective Well-Being: A Multilevel, Multisource Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toderi, Stefano; Balducci, Cristian

    2018-02-26

    The Management Competencies for Preventing and Reducing Stress at Work framework represents one of the few tailored models of leadership for work stress prevention purposes, but it has never been empirically evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether supervisors' stress-preventive management competencies, as measured by the Stress Management Competencies Indicator Tool (SMCIT), are related to employees' affective well-being through psychosocial work environmental factors. To this end, multilevel structural equation modelling (MSEM) was developed and tested, including data provided by both supervisors and employees. Supervisors ( n = 84) self-assessed their stress-preventive management competencies (i.e., being respectful and responsible, managing and communicating existing and future work, reasoning and managing difficult situations, and managing the individual within the team) with a previously validated reduced version of the SMCIT. The supervised employees ( n = 584) rated job content (e.g., job demands) and work context (e.g., role clarity) psychosocial factors and their job-related affective well-being. Supervisors' job-related affective well-being was also included in the tested model. The results revealed that the stress-preventive competencies factor was related to employees' affective well-being through the psychosocial work environment only when the latter was operationalized by means of contextual work factors. Supervisors' affective well-being was related to their stress-preventive competencies, but it was not related to employees' affective well-being. We discuss the implications of the results obtained.

  5. The education, the environment and the quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodado Noriega, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Through the PNUD, the United Nations defines the human development as the process by means of which the options or opportunities it plows enlarged for those individuals. Among them, those that are considered essential they are: to live a long and healthy life, to acquire knowledge through the education and to have access to the necessary resources to enjoy a worthy life. According to this focus, the development process should create a favorable atmosphere so that people, either individual or collectively, they can cultivate to fullness its capacities and to find reasonable opportunities to use them in a productive and creative life. In the definition of human development it is not considered the environmental dimension that constitutes an integral part of the quality of life of the current and future generations explicitly; the author also treats topics about environmental ethics and of the quality of the teaching

  6. Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, A.D.; Turnbull, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the hydrocarbon resources of the North Sea has resulted in both offshore and onshore environmental repercussions, involving the existing physical attributes of the sea and seabed, the coastline and adjoining land. The social and economic repercussions of the industry were equally widespread. The dramatic and speedy impact of the exploration and exploitation of the northern North Sea resources in the early 1970s, on the physical resources of Scotland was quickly realised together with the concern that any environmental and social damage to the physical and social fabric should be kept to a minimum. To this end, a wide range of research and other activities by central and local government, and other interested agencies was undertaken to extend existing knowledge on the marine and terrestrial environments that might be affected by the oil and gas industry. The outcome of these activities is summarized in this paper. The topics covered include a survey of the marine ecosystems of the North Sea, the fishing industry, the impact of oil pollution on seabirds and fish stocks, the ecology of the Scottish coastline and the impact of the petroleum industry on a selection of particular sites. (author)

  7. Ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation in educational environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Takao; Otsubo, Tomonobu; Ikke, Satoshi; Taguchi, Noriko; Takeda, Rie

    2005-01-01

    By chance, we measured gamma dose rates in our school, and around the JCO Tokai Plant during the criticality on September 30 in 1999, with our GM survey meter. At that time, we made sure to estimate the position of criticality reaction (source point), and the source intensity of criticality reaction, with our own data, measured along the public roads, route 6 and local road 62. The intensity of gamma dose rates along the road was analyzed as Lorentz functions. At the time, there were no environmental radiation data about the criticality accident, or all the data, especially radioactivity and dose rates around the JCO Tokai Plant, was closed to the public. Recently, we are interested in the intensity of non-ionizing radiation, especially extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field, and electric field, in our environment. We adopted the same method to analyze the source position and source intensity of an ELF magnetic field and electric behind a wall. (author)

  8. Evaluation and modeling of the parameters affecting fluoride toxicity level in aquatic environments by bioassay method

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Reza Shamsollahi; Hadi asady; Amir Hossein Mahvi; Zahra zolghadr

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fluoride exists in various forms in nature and water resources. , The rising level of fluoride in water resources due to discharge of industrial effluents can cause toxicity in aquatic organisms. To prevent toxicity, it is necessary to determine maximum fluoride toxicity as well as effluent discharge limits. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum fluoride toxicity and the factors affecting fluoride toxicity to provide a model in order to determine the effluent discha...

  9. CRITERIA OF LANGUAGE AND PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT SELECTION FOR USE IN THE CAPACITY OF EDUCATIONAL AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro H. Shevchuk

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of educational aids is to a large degree treated to be determinative in provision with its efficiency. The languages and programming environments are stated in the article as those that belong to educational aids. The criteria and backgrounds of their selection for educational purpose at the lessons of programming at comprehensive school are treated in the article. The examples of principle characteristics comparison of Pascal and C# are also cited. The article points at the necessity of further analysis of programming languages sampling for use as educational aids in teaching programming.

  10. Toward re-thinking science education in terms of affective practices: reflections from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumova, Shakhnoza; Tippins, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Rational and operationalized views of science and what it means for teachers and students to know and enact legitimate science practices have dominated science education research for many decades (Fusco and Barton in J Res Sci Teach 38(3):337-354, 2001. doi: 10.1002/1098-2736(200103)38:33.0.CO;2-0). Michalinos Zembylas challenges historically prevalent dichotomies of mind/body, reason/emotion, and emotion/affect, calling researchers and educators to move beyond the Cartesian dualisms, which have perpetuated a myth of scientific objectivity devoid of bias, subjectivity and emotions. Zembylas (Crit Stud Teach Learn 1(1):1-21, 2013. doi: 10.14426/cristal.v1i1.2) contends that the role of emotions and affect are best understood as relational and entangled in epistemological, cultural, and historical contexts of education, which represent contested sites of control and resistance. We argue that Zembylas' work is pivotal since "theoretical frames of reference for doing research in science education…[and] what constitutes knowledge and being within a particular frame" carry material bearings over the enactments of science teaching and learning (Kyle in J Res Sci Teach 31:695-696, 1994, p. 321. doi: 10.1002/tea.3660310703). In this paper, we hold cogen dialogue about how re-thinking notions of emotion and affect affords us, both science educators and researchers, to re-envision science education beyond cognitive and social frames. The framing of our dialogue as cogen builds on Wolff-Michael Roth and Kenneth Tobin's (At the elbows of another: learning to teach through coteaching. Peter Lang Publishing, New York, 2002) notion of cogenerative dialogue. Holding cogen is an invitation to an openly dialogic and safe area, which serves as a space for a dialogic inquiry that includes radical listening of situated knowledges and learning from similarities as well as differences of experiences (Tobin in Cult Stud Sci Educ, in review, 2015). From our situated experiences reforms

  11. How revealing rankings affects student attitude and rerformance in a peer review learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Lagkas, Thomas D.; Demetriadis, Stavros N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the possible benefits as well as the overall impact on the behaviour of students within a learning environment, which is based on double-blinding reviewing of freely selected peer works. Fifty-six sophomore students majoring in Informatics and Telecommunications Engi....... The students that participated in the other two conditions were provided with their usage information (logins, peer work viewed/reviewed, etc.), while members of the last group could also have access to ranking information about their positioning in their group, based on their usage data. According to our...

  12. The development of a haptic virtual reality environment to study body image and affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Line; Bouchard, Stephane; Chebbi, Brahim; Wei, Lai; Monthuy-Blanc, Johana; Boulanger, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of a preliminary study testing the effect of participants' mood rating on visual motor performance using a haptic device to manipulate a cartoonish human body. Our results suggest that moods involving high arousal (e.g. happiness) produce larger movements whereas mood involving low arousal (e.g. sadness) produce slower speed of performance. Our results are used for the development of a new haptic virtual reality application that we briefly present here. This application is intended to create a more interactive and motivational environment to treat body image issues and for emotional communication.

  13. Physiotherapy and pharmacy students perception of educational environment in a medical university from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Aamir Raoof; Ali, Bahadur; Kiyani, Mubin Mustafa; Ahmed, Imran; Memon, Attiq-Ur-Rehman; Feroz, Jam

    2018-01-01

    To assess and compare the perceptions of the educational environment between physiotherapy and pharmacy students in a public-sector medical university. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Peoples University of Medical and Health Sciences for Women, Nawabshah, Pakistan, and comprised undergraduate physiotherapy and pharmacy students. The Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure questionnaire was used to assess the perceptions of students about their educational environment. Global and subscale scores were computed and compared between the respondents. Pphysiotherapy students, the mean global score was 124.9±14.0 while it was 131.7±18.9 for pharmacy students (p=0.16). The domain scores were comparable for both specialties (p>0.05). There was no significance difference in the global and domain scores for preclinical and clinical years in the students (p>0.05). However, in the physiotherapy students, the global and domain scores for Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure were significantly lower in clinical than preclinical students (pstudents' social self-perception (p>0.05). Students were overall positive about their educational environment.

  14. A psychometric evaluation of the University of Auckland General Practice Report of Educational Environment: UAGREE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleton, Kyle; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Henning, Marcus; Jones, Rhys; Shulruf, Boaz

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an instrument (University of Auckland General Practice Report of Educational Environment: UAGREE) with robust psychometric properties that measured the educational environment of undergraduate primary care. The questions were designed to incorporate measurements of the teaching of cultural competence. Following a structured consensus process and an initial pilot, a list of 55 questions was developed. All Year 5 and 6 students completing a primary care attachment at Auckland University were invited to complete the questionnaire. The results were analysed using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis resulting in a 16-item instrument. Three factors were identified explaining 53% of the variance. The items' reliability within the factors were high (Learning: 0.894; Teaching: 0.871; Cultural competence: 0.857). Multiple groups analysis by gender; and separately across ethnic groups did not find significant differences between groups. UAGREE is a specific instrument measuring the undergraduate primary care educational environment. Its questions fit within established theoretical educational environment frameworks and the incorporation of cultural competence questions reflects the importance of teaching cultural competence within medicine. The psychometric properties of UAGREE suggest that it is a reliable and valid measure of the primary care education environment.

  15. Organization of Teacher’s Professional Activity in Conditions of Innovative Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubov Kartashova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of organization of teacher’s professional activity in innovative educational environment is revealed in the article. The fundamental definitions of the concept of "innovative educational environment" in different aspects are determined. The analysis of researches of primary school teacher’s training in Ukraine and highly developed countries of the world is witnessed a number of contradictions that outlined necessity to generate the innovative (information educational environment. Effective organizational and methodical decision in formation of competitive teacher is the introduction subject "Methods of organization of teacher’s professional activity in conditions of innovative educational environment" to educational process of primary school teacher’s training. Its aim, objectives, information scope, requirements to level of mastering of content component, methods and forms of monitoring and evaluation of students’ competency have been revealed. The course is based on designed innovative IT-based (cloudy-oriented environment of pedagogical training of primary school teachers, and cloudy-oriented products are integrated in it, that will make the learning process interactive: OneNote, Skype, GoogleDisk, SkyDrive, teacher’s personal website, OneNote. The managing of students’ mastering process of pedagogical subjects is performed at lessons and using teacher’s electronic classroom

  16. Teachers' and postgraduate nursing students' experience of the educational environment in Iran: A qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajihosseini, Fatemeh; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Hosseini, Meimanat; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2017-08-01

    The learning environment has a significant role in determining nursing students' academic achievements and course satisfaction. Creating a proper educational environment is therefore necessary for improving the quality of teaching and learning, and for delivering competent graduates to society. The present study was conducted to explore teachers' and postgraduate nursing students' experience of the educational environment in Iran. This qualitative study uses an inductive approach and conventional content analysis. Data were collected through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with seven PhD students, seven faculty members (directors) and two focus groups comprising of fourteen master's students in total, selected from three major universities in Tehran, Iran. Seven subcategories were extracted from the data, including the organizational context, interactive climate, teachers' competency, student appreciation, research centeredness, educational guidance and professionalism. The educational environment of postgraduate nursing programs in Iran encompasses different dimensions that can serve as both key points for educational environment evaluators and as guidelines for officials at different levels, to modify the weaknesses and improve the strengths of the system.

  17. Teachers’ and postgraduate nursing students’ experience of the educational environment in Iran: A qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajihosseini, Fatemeh; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Hosseini, Meimanat; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background The learning environment has a significant role in determining nursing students’ academic achievements and course satisfaction. Creating a proper educational environment is therefore necessary for improving the quality of teaching and learning, and for delivering competent graduates to society. Objective The present study was conducted to explore teachers’ and postgraduate nursing students’ experience of the educational environment in Iran. Methods This qualitative study uses an inductive approach and conventional content analysis. Data were collected through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with seven PhD students, seven faculty members (directors) and two focus groups comprising of fourteen master’s students in total, selected from three major universities in Tehran, Iran. Results Seven subcategories were extracted from the data, including the organizational context, interactive climate, teachers’ competency, student appreciation, research centeredness, educational guidance and professionalism. Conclusion The educational environment of postgraduate nursing programs in Iran encompasses different dimensions that can serve as both key points for educational environment evaluators and as guidelines for officials at different levels, to modify the weaknesses and improve the strengths of the system. PMID:28979741

  18. How sequestration cuts affect primary care physicians and graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Bindiya; Coffin, Janis

    2013-01-01

    On April 1, 2013, sequestration cuts went into effect impacting Medicare physician payments, graduate medical education, and many other healthcare agencies. The cuts range from 2% to 5%, affecting various departments and organizations. There is already a shortage of primary care physicians in general, not including rural or underserved areas, with limited grants for advanced training. The sequestration cuts negatively impact the future of many primary care physicians and hinder the care many Americans will receive over time.

  19. "DREEM" comes true - Students′ perceptions of educational environment in an Indian medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H S Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The accomplishment and contentment of students depends upon their educational environment. Very few studies in India have looked at the impact of educational environment on students, there are few such studies in our country despite having a large number of medical schools. Objective: This study was performed to assess the undergraduate students′ perceptions of medical education in general and educational environment in our medical school in particular. Materials and Methods: The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM, a validated inventory was distributed among undergraduate students in final Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS (2010-2011 and students who were undergoing internship (2010-2011 and various scores were calculated and the means were compared using Mann-Whitney test. Results: The mean total DREEM score was found to be 121.5/200 for final MBBS students (n = 115 and 118.4/200 (n = 109 for the internship batch students. There was no statistically significant difference between the scores of the two batches. The overall DREEM score for our Medical School during the academic year 2010-2011 (for the final MBBS and internship batch was 120/200 (n = 224, which showed that the students′ perceptions were more positive. Conclusion: The study showed that the students′ perception of the educational environment was positive. There was no statistically significant difference between the scores of the two batches (final MBBS and internship. This study helped us to introspect and identify remediable areas in the educational environment of our medical school and hence we could suggest some measures to modify them.

  20. Relation of perceptions of educational environment with mindfulness among Chinese medical students: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Perceived educational environment influences academic outcomes, such as academic achievement, students’ behaviors, well-being, socio-emotional adjustment and explicit self-esteem. Mindfulness is a set of skills that are beneficial to physical and mental health. Recently, it has been increasingly discussed about its usefulness in education, but little research has explored whether mindfulness can predict perceptions of educational environment. The aim of this study was to explore Chinese medical students’ perceptions of learning environment and their relationship with mindfulness. Methods: Medical students at the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University (N=431 completed the Chinese version of Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM-C and the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills (KIMS-C. One year later, a subgroup of the cohort (N=231 completed the DREEM-C again. Independent-samples t-test, variance analysis, correlation analysis, and hierarchical multiple regression (HMR were conducted. Results: DREEM-C total and subscales scores were net positive, but with room for improvement. Perceptions differed in relation to gender, academic year, and age. KIMS-C scores correlated with DREEM-C scores. The predictive effect persisted 1 year later. Conclusions: Medical students had net-positive perceptions about their learning environment. Higher mindfulness scores were associated with greater satisfaction with the environment and this association showed persistence.

  1. The Effects of a Rational-Emotive Affective Education Program for High-Risk Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaConte, Michael A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated effects of participation in developmentally appropriate affective education program. Middle school students (n=23), identified as high risk for dropping out and also as learning disabled or emotionally disturbed, were assigned to experimental and control conditions. Participants in affective education group met for 15 weeks.…

  2. Factors Affecting Online Impulse Buying: Evidence from Chinese Social Commerce Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Akram

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available First, the purpose of this study is to examine the impact of situational variables, scarcity and serendipity, on online impulse buying (OIB in Chinese social commerce (SC environment. Second, the study further assesses the moderating role of five dimensions of hedonic shopping value. Data were gathered from 671 online shoppers who come from two metropolitan cities of China, Beijing, and Shanghai. Structure equation modeling utilized was generated by AMOS 23 version to test the study hypotheses. The results confirm that situational factors positively influence the online impulse buying among Chinese online shoppers in SC environment. Four dimensions of hedonic shopping value (social shopping, relaxation shopping, adventure shopping and idea shopping positively moderate the relationship between serendipity and OIB; value shopping is insignificant with moderation effect. The finding is helpful to the online retailers and SC web developers by recommending them to take the scarcity and serendipity in their consideration. These factors have the potential to motivate the consumers to initiate the hedonic shopping aptitude to urge to buy impulsively. Unlike the previous work which remained unsuccessful in incorporating all factors into one study, this study has incorporated irrational and unplanned consumption along with rational and planned one in the same research.

  3. Social environment as a factor affecting exploration and learning in pre-juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlinska, Klaudia; Stryjek, Rafał; Chrzanowska, Anna; Pisula, Wojciech

    2018-05-17

    Stress associated with social isolation in early life can lead to disturbances in the emotional regulation in adult rats. However, there are no reports on the impact of isolation from the mother while providing contact with peers. Under such conditions, young individuals have the opportunity to interact with others, are able to develop social behaviour, etc. Yet, there is no stimulation and care provided by the mother. We examined the relative impact of maternal contact and sibling contact in the rarely studied pre-juvenile (3rd and 4th week post birth) period on subsequent development. An experiment was designed to compare the impact of different social environments on the animals' behaviour in adulthood. There were three breeding conditions: young with mother, young with peers, and standard breeding conditions. Adult rats were subjected to a T-Maze test to measure the level of exploratory behaviour. Spatial learning was assessed by placing water bottles in the side corridors. The analysis revealed that a distorted environment during the development process has a negative impact on the rats' emotional regulation and a subtle effect on related aspects of adaptive behaviours (i.e. exploration). In the pre-juvenile period, to some degree, contact with peers may be complementary to the mother's influence. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Early social environment affects the endogenous oxytocin system: a review and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eAlves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous oxytocin plays an important role in a wide range of human functions including birth, milk ejection during lactation and facilitation of social interaction. There is increasing evidence that both variations in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR and concentrations of oxytocin are associated with differences in these functions. The causes for the differences that have been observed in tonic and stimulated oxytocin release remain unclear. Previous reviews have suggested that across the life course, these differences may be due to individual factors, e.g. genetic variation (of the OXTR, age or sex, or be the result of early environmental influences such as social experiences, stress or trauma partly by inducing epigenetic changes. This review has three aims. First, we briefly discuss the endogenous oxytocin system, including physiology, development, individual differences and function. Secondly, current models describing the relationship between the early life environment and the development of the oxytocin system in humans and animals are discussed. Finally, we describe research designs that can be used to investigate the effects of the early environment on the oxytocin system, identifying specific areas of research that need further attention.

  5. Peers and teachers as sources of relatedness perceptions, motivation, and affective responses in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Anne; Duncheon, Nicole; McDavid, Lindley

    2009-12-01

    Research has demonstrated the importance of relatedness perceptions to self-determined motivation in physical education. Therefore, studies have begun to examine the social factors contributing to feelings of relatedness. The purpose of this study was to examine teacher (perceived emotional support) and peer (acceptance, friendship quality) relationship variables to feelings of relatedness, motivation, and affective responses in junior high physical education students (N = 411). Results revealed that perceived relatedness mediated the relationship between variables and self-determined motivation and related directly to the amount of enjoyment and worry students experienced. These findings demonstrate that relationships with both teachers and peers are important for students' relatedness perceptions, motivation, enjoyment, and worry in physical education.

  6. Habitats as complex odour environments: how does plant diversity affect herbivore and parasitoid orientation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Wäschke

    Full Text Available Plant diversity is known to affect success of host location by pest insects, but its effect on olfactory orientation of non-pest insect species has hardly been addressed. First, we tested in laboratory experiments the hypothesis that non-host plants, which increase odour complexity in habitats, affect the host location ability of herbivores and parasitoids. Furthermore, we recorded field data of plant diversity in addition to herbivore and parasitoid abundance at 77 grassland sites in three different regions in Germany in order to elucidate whether our laboratory results reflect the field situation. As a model system we used the herb Plantago lanceolata, the herbivorous weevil Mecinus pascuorum, and its larval parasitoid Mesopolobus incultus. The laboratory bioassays revealed that both the herbivorous weevil and its larval parasitoid can locate their host plant and host via olfactory cues even in the presence of non-host odour. In a newly established two-circle olfactometer, the weeviĺs capability to detect host plant odour was not affected by odours from non-host plants. However, addition of non-host plant odours to host plant odour enhanced the weeviĺs foraging activity. The parasitoid was attracted by a combination of host plant and host volatiles in both the absence and presence of non-host plant volatiles in a Y-tube olfactometer. In dual choice tests the parasitoid preferred the blend of host plant and host volatiles over its combination with non-host plant volatiles. In the field, no indication was found that high plant diversity disturbs host (plant location by the weevil and its parasitoid. In contrast, plant diversity was positively correlated with weevil abundance, whereas parasitoid abundance was independent of plant diversity. Therefore, we conclude that weevils and parasitoids showed the sensory capacity to successfully cope with complex vegetation odours when searching for hosts.

  7. The level of hopelessness in the students of an occupational education center and affecting factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Erhan Deveci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this survey was to define the hopelessness levels in the students of an occupational education center and the definition of the factors affecting them.Materials and methods: The survey is a descriptive type and was made among 630 students who have been taking an apprenticeship, foremanship and proficiency education at an Occupational Education Centre. The whole universe was included in the survey. A questionnaire of a question set, which is made up of health, social and demographic variables and the factors thought to be related with hopelessness and also of Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS was carried out among 600 students.Results: Totally 88.7% of the students are male, 11.3% are female and their mean age was 20.04 ± 6.0 years. Of all, 83.7% were taking foremanship education; 9.5% apprenticeship education and 6.8% were taking a proficiency education. The average point of BHS was found as 7.31 ± 3.78 (min: 1, max: 19. The rate of the students whose BHS point is ≥10 is 26.2%. The level of hopelessness was found higher among the men who worked more than five days a week, changed jobs, works more than eight hours, don’t like their jobs, had chronic illnesses and smoking and taking alcohol (p<0.05. Also, perception of their health situation goes from positive to negative parallel to increasing hopelessness (p<0.05.Conclusion: Hopelessness mean point of the students was low. But, approximately one per four students’ BHS point is ≥10. Psychological help or guiding activities can be organized, after evaluating the factors affecting their hopelessness.

  8. Viewing medium affects arm motor performance in 3D virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sandeep K; Levin, Mindy F

    2011-06-30

    2D and 3D virtual reality platforms are used for designing individualized training environments for post-stroke rehabilitation. Virtual environments (VEs) are viewed using media like head mounted displays (HMDs) and large screen projection systems (SPS) which can influence the quality of perception of the environment. We estimated if there were differences in arm pointing kinematics when subjects with and without stroke viewed a 3D VE through two different media: HMD and SPS. Two groups of subjects participated (healthy control, n=10, aged 53.6 ± 17.2 yrs; stroke, n=20, 66.2 ± 11.3 yrs). Arm motor impairment and spasticity were assessed in the stroke group which was divided into mild (n=10) and moderate-to-severe (n=10) sub-groups based on Fugl-Meyer Scores. Subjects pointed (8 times each) to 6 randomly presented targets located at two heights in the ipsilateral, middle and contralateral arm workspaces. Movements were repeated in the same VE viewed using HMD (Kaiser XL50) and SPS. Movement kinematics were recorded using an Optotrak system (Certus, 6 markers, 100 Hz). Upper limb motor performance (precision, velocity, trajectory straightness) and movement pattern (elbow, shoulder ranges and trunk displacement) outcomes were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVAs. For all groups, there were no differences in endpoint trajectory straightness, shoulder flexion and shoulder horizontal adduction ranges and sagittal trunk displacement between the two media. All subjects, however, made larger errors in the vertical direction using HMD compared to SPS. Healthy subjects also made larger errors in the sagittal direction, slower movements overall and used less range of elbow extension for the lower central target using HMD compared to SPS. The mild and moderate-to-severe sub-groups made larger RMS errors with HMD. The only advantage of using the HMD was that movements were 22% faster in the moderate-to-severe stroke sub-group compared to the SPS. Despite the similarity in

  9. Viewing medium affects arm motor performance in 3D virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Sandeep K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2D and 3D virtual reality platforms are used for designing individualized training environments for post-stroke rehabilitation. Virtual environments (VEs are viewed using media like head mounted displays (HMDs and large screen projection systems (SPS which can influence the quality of perception of the environment. We estimated if there were differences in arm pointing kinematics when subjects with and without stroke viewed a 3D VE through two different media: HMD and SPS. Methods Two groups of subjects participated (healthy control, n = 10, aged 53.6 ± 17.2 yrs; stroke, n = 20, 66.2 ± 11.3 yrs. Arm motor impairment and spasticity were assessed in the stroke group which was divided into mild (n = 10 and moderate-to-severe (n = 10 sub-groups based on Fugl-Meyer Scores. Subjects pointed (8 times each to 6 randomly presented targets located at two heights in the ipsilateral, middle and contralateral arm workspaces. Movements were repeated in the same VE viewed using HMD (Kaiser XL50 and SPS. Movement kinematics were recorded using an Optotrak system (Certus, 6 markers, 100 Hz. Upper limb motor performance (precision, velocity, trajectory straightness and movement pattern (elbow, shoulder ranges and trunk displacement outcomes were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVAs. Results For all groups, there were no differences in endpoint trajectory straightness, shoulder flexion and shoulder horizontal adduction ranges and sagittal trunk displacement between the two media. All subjects, however, made larger errors in the vertical direction using HMD compared to SPS. Healthy subjects also made larger errors in the sagittal direction, slower movements overall and used less range of elbow extension for the lower central target using HMD compared to SPS. The mild and moderate-to-severe sub-groups made larger RMS errors with HMD. The only advantage of using the HMD was that movements were 22% faster in the moderate-to-severe stroke sub

  10. Instruments evaluating the quality of the clinical learning environment in nursing education: A systematic review of psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansutti, Irene; Saiani, Luisa; Grassetti, Luca; Palese, Alvisa

    2017-03-01

    The clinical learning environment is fundamental to nursing education paths, capable of affecting learning processes and outcomes. Several instruments have been developed in nursing education, aimed at evaluating the quality of the clinical learning environments; however, no systematic review of the psychometric properties and methodological quality of these studies has been performed to date. The aims of the study were: 1) to identify validated instruments evaluating the clinical learning environments in nursing education; 2) to evaluate critically the methodological quality of the psychometric property estimation used; and 3) to compare psychometric properties across the instruments available. A systematic review of the literature (using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines) and an evaluation of the methodological quality of psychometric properties (using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments guidelines). The Medline and CINAHL databases were searched. Eligible studies were those that satisfied the following criteria: a) validation studies of instruments evaluating the quality of clinical learning environments; b) in nursing education; c) published in English or Italian; d) before April 2016. The included studies were evaluated for the methodological quality of the psychometric properties measured and then compared in terms of both the psychometric properties and the methodological quality of the processes used. The search strategy yielded a total of 26 studies and eight clinical learning environment evaluation instruments. A variety of psychometric properties have been estimated for each instrument, with differing qualities in the methodology used. Concept and construct validity were poorly assessed in terms of their significance and rarely judged by the target population (nursing students). Some properties were rarely considered (e.g., reliability, measurement error

  11. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Logistics engineering education from the point of view environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányai, Ágota

    2010-05-01

    A new field of MSc programme offered by the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics of the University of Miskolc is represented by the programme in logistics engineering. The Faculty has always laid great emphasis on assigning processes connected with environment protection and globalisation issues the appropriate weight in its programmes. This is based on the fact that the Faculty has initiated and been involved in a great number of research and development projects with a substantial emphasis on the fundamental principles of sustainable development. The objective of the programme of logistics engineering is to train engineers who, in possession of the science, engineering, economic, informatics and industrial, transportation technological knowledge related to the professional field of logistics, are able to analyse, design, organise, and control logistics processes and systems (freight transportation, materials handling, storage, commissioning, loading, purchasing, distribution and waste management) as well as to design and develop machinery and equipment as the elements of logistic systems and also to be involved in their manufacture and quality control and are able to control their operation. The programme prepares its students for performing the logistics management tasks in a company, for creative participation in solving research and development problems in logistics and for pursuing logistics studies in doctoral programmes. There are several laboratories available for practice-oriented training. The 'Integrated Logistics Laboratory' consists of various fixed and mobile, real industrial, i.e. not model-level equipment, the integration of which in one system facilitates not only the presentation, examination and development of the individual self-standing facilities, but the study of their interaction as well in terms of mechatronics, engineering, control engineering, informatics, identification technology and logistics. The state

  13. Psychometric properties of the postgraduate hospital educational environment measure in an Iranian hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokoohi, Shahrzad; Hossein Emami, Amir; Mohammadi, Aeen; Ahmadi, Soleiman; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Students' perceptions of the educational environment are an important construct in assessing and enhancing the quality of medical training programs. Reliable and valid measurement, however, can be problematic - especially as instruments developed and tested in one culture are translated for use in another. This study sought to explore the psychometric properties of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) for use in an Iranian hospital training setting. We translated the instrument into Persian and ensured its content validity by back translation and expert review prior to administering it to 127 residents of Urmia University of Medical Science. Overall internal consistency of the translated measure was good (a=0.94). Principal components analysis revealed five factors accounting for 52.8% of the variance. The Persian version of the PHEEM appears to be a reliable and potentially valid instrument for use in Iranian medical schools and may find favor in evaluating the educational environments of residency programs nationwide.

  14. Exploring talent development environments –inspirations to medical education at doctoral level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    Introduction: Doctoral students may be considered some of our most talented students. In order to maintain high quality in doctoral education we should be aware of optimizing the talent development environment in which the students develop their competencies. In this paper we explore the features...... has been on cognitive skills of individual talents and to a minor degree on institutional conditions and constraints within talent development environments. However, recent studies on talent development in sport recognize ‘talent’ as a social construction (1) and institutional and environmental...... features playing a decisive role in talent development (2). Our research question is: do concepts and models for talent development environments in sport apply to medical education at doctoral level? Considering the uniqueness of the two domains (they refer to different overall social fields: education...

  15. Realigning government action with public health evidence: the legal and policy environment affecting sex work and HIV in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruskin, Sofia; Pierce, Gretchen Williams; Ferguson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The HIV epidemic has shed light on how government regulation of sex work directly affects the health and well-being of sex workers, their families and communities. A review of the public health evidence highlights the need for supportive legal and policy environments, yet criminalisation of sex work remains standard around the world. Emerging evidence, coupled with evolving political ideologies, is increasingly shaping legal environments that promote the rights and health of sex workers but even as new legislation is created, contradictions often exist with standing problematic legislation. As a region, Asia provides a compelling example in that progressive HIV policies often sit side by side with laws that criminalise sex work. Data from the 21 Asian countries reporting under the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV in 2010 were analysed to provide evidence of how countries' approach to sex-work regulation might affect HIV-related outcomes. Attention to the links between law and HIV-related outcomes can aid governments to meet their international obligations and ensure appropriate legal environments that cultivate the safe and healthy development and expression of sexuality, ensure access to HIV and other related services and promote and protect human rights.

  16. ANALYSIS OF DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL APPROACHES TO THE ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES IN THE ELECTRONIC NETWORK ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana N. Noskova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: human activities related to the use of information are being transformed under the influence of computer technology. Variable solutions to information problems are emerging; demands and require¬ments for the competence are changing on the labour market. Educational practices are destined to form a new learning behaviour for the 21st century, adopting lifelong learning strategy. The main purpose of the article is to answer the question as to how to transform existing pedagogical theory and practice under current conditions of electronic environment. Publishing of this article is coherent with concept of the journal Integration of Education, analyzing Russian and world experience in the development of education systems. This approach is important for dissemination and implementation in practice. This article explores the challenges of information technology and technical support of the educational process in universities and schools. The study of these issues is in the field of view of the journa l. Materials and Methods: the paper elaborates on the results of domestic and international educational theory and practice, comparison methods, drawing on student’s survey in the framework of international research in the field of e-learning in higher education institutions. Results: the main approaches, applied to the formulation of educational practices in the electronic environ-ment, were analyzed. The most topical national approaches include system, activity, polysubject (dialogical, context, and dialogical ones. Among international approaches self-directed learning, educational communication strategies, experiential learning, training in partnership, collaborative learning, learning in online communities, situational training were analyzed. Specifics of electronic educational interactions with distributed in time and space activities of teachers and students, create the preconditions for the implementation of new educational

  17. Seigradi: dancing in a real-virtual environment. Affects and movement in Santasangre’s work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Magnini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is inspired by a reflection on the work of the Italian artistic research project Santasangre and comes in particular from the analysis of Seigradi, one part of a trilogy of performances entitled Studi per un teatro apocalittico: a unique experiment in which light sources, holographic images, sounds and a dancing body fuse in real time. Calling into question the notions of tactile-kinesthetic body (M. Sheets-Johnstone and kinetic melody (A.R. Luria, from which emerges the idea of an intimate connection between affects and movement, the aim of this paper is to discuss some topics related to the relationship between choreographer and dancer (including the potential absence of it through an analysis of dance transmission’s mechanisms focused on various approaches concerning the use of digital technologies in contemporary dance.

  18. Factors affecting the transfer of radionuclides from the environment to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golmakani, S.; Moghaddam, V.M.; Hosseini, T.

    2008-01-01

    Much of our food directly or indirectly originates from plant material; thus, detailed studies on plant contamination processes are an essential part of international environmental research. This overview attempts to identify and describe the most important parameters and processes affecting the behaviour of radionuclide transfer to plants. Many parameters influence these processes. These parameters are related to: (1) plant, (2) soil, (3) radionuclide, (4) climate and (5) time. Often there is no boundary between the factors and they are linked to each other. Knowledge of important factors in radionuclide transfer to plants can help to assess and prevent radiological exposure of humans. This knowledge can also help to guide researches and modelling related to transfer of radionuclides to food chain. (authors)

  19. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING WIND-ENERGY POTENTIAL IN LOW BUILT-UP URBAN ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÁZÁR I.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available his study is concerned with the examination of roughness factor affecting wind potential in low built-up urban areas (e.g. subdivision, light industrial area. The test interval is the transition between summer and winter, as a secondary wind maximum period. The ten-minute data-pairs empirical distribution was approached by several theoretical distributions where a fitting test research was also performed. Extrapolation to higher levels is possible by defining the Hellmann exponent. The wind speed in respective height and the specific wind power are derived from it. Knowing the daily progress of the Hellmann exponent value, more accurate estimation can be given of the wind potential calculated to different heights according to the measuring point. The results were compared to the surface cover of the surrounding area as well as to the literary alpha values.

  20. From The Human-Environment Theme Towards Sustainability – Danish Geography and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2013-01-01

    Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions....... In this article it is examined dialectically how the changing climate and the paradigm of sustainability have been dealt with in Danish geographical university education. It is shown how curriculum programs in higher geographical education have taken different approaches to address issues of sustainability...... and climate change and how geographers articulate their role and function as knowledge on human-environment interactions changes. The analysis of the geographical education reveal that geographers’ find their discipline contribute considerably to ESD, and thus the human environment theme seems...

  1. Exploring the environment of clinical baccalaureate nursing students' education in Iran; A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefy, Alireza; Yazdannik, Ahmad reza; Mohammadi, Sepideh

    2015-12-01

    Today's students are the nurses of tomorrow. They need appropriate clinical learning opportunities in order to shape their professional identity, attitudes and values. Despite undeniable progresses of nursing education in Iran, the quality of the clinical education in Iran is not favorable. There is a need to explore the environment of clinical baccalaureate nursing students' education for developing, maintaining and enhancing the quality of clinical program. This is a qualitative study and was conducted based on content analysis multimethod design. Data were collected by individual interviews, focus groups and direct observations. 54 nursing students and 8 clinical educators from the four geographically diverse universities in the Iran composed the study sample. A purposive sampling was used. Five themes were emerged from data analysis including; ambiguity in the nursing care role, routine-based nursing care, uncritical and dependent thinking climate, incompetency of clinical educators and patient education as important component of nursing. The findings of this study describe a clearer understanding of the real environment of the clinical education in Iran. All of themes that emerged from the study play an important role in student learning and nursing education. It is crucial to pay more attention to reconsider care concept as an operational component of nursing, maximize meaningful learning opportunities, reevaluate clinical instructor as role models and prepare effective operational plan to combine theoretical and evidence based knowledge with clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors Affecting ICT Adoption among Distance Education Students Based on the Technology Acceptance Model--A Case Study at a Distance Education University in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Negin Barat

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) into education systems is an active program and movement in education that illustrates modern education and enables an all-encompassing presence in the third millennium; however, prior to applying ICT, the factors affecting the adoption and use of these technologies should be…

  3. TECHNOLOGY AND METHODS OF CREATING WEB-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FOR HUMANITIES EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вилена Александровна Брылева

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to describe the structure of web environment in frames of new educational paradigm in teaching Humanities, to clarify the scientifical and practical importance of using Web 2.0 technologies in higher education. This problem is of great importance due to the necessity of integration of modern IT into educational environment which needs to develop new methods of teaching.The model of educational environment presented in the article is based on the integration of LMS Moodle and PLE Mahara. The authors define the functional modules and means of the environment, describe its didactic qualities, organization requirements and usage advantages. The methodic model of teaching English worked out by the authors supposes step-by-step formation of professional as well as informational competence necessary to any modern specialist. The effectiveness of the model is verified by experiental learning, based on individual and group forms of work on educational site of Institute of Philology and Intercultural Communication of Volgograd State university.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-8

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHER COMP ETENCES IN CREATING POWERFUL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS IN VOCATIONAL SECONDARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge PLACKLÉ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At the end of Vocational Secondary Education students should be able to solve authentic problems individually and in group. Powerful learning environments could enforce these learning processes. Research question: “Which critical desirable design principles can we define to create a powerful learning environment in Secondary Vocational Education ? Method: We combine different perspectives of teachers, students and researchers to build a shared model of learning environments, which will be perceived as more powerful by all stakeholders. Based on literature we selected design principles followed by organizing focus groups with teacher educators and teachers to further adapt these principles. Preliminary results: We determined eight design pr inciples: Authenticity learning environment, differentiation, adapted evaluation, self-directed learning, problem solving, teamwork, shared responsibility design learning environment and (labour identity develop ment. Each principle has been further clarified in indicators. This study is part of a larger research project in developing teacher competences in creating powe rful learning enviro nments in Vocational Secondary Education.

  5. Notes on the modes of regulation in virtual environments for education

    OpenAIRE

    Nei Antonio Nunes; André Luis da Silva Leite

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss some aspects that involve the presence of new technologies in education, with a focus on regulation modes in distance learning environments. We start from the idea that the current development and spread of virtual education do not guarantee any intrinsic value that exempts to be surveyed and thus entered into a broad debate aimed at reflecting on the impact of the inclusion of new technologies in the Brazilian society. According to Michel Foucault's analyses referen...

  6. Education and working life: VET adults' problem-solving skills in technology-rich environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hämäläinen, Raija; Wever, Bram De; Malin, Antero; Cincinnato, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly-advancing technological landscape in the European workplace is challenging adults’ problem-solving skills. Workers with vocational education and training need flexible abilities to solve problems in technology-rich work settings. This study builds on Finnish PIAAC data to understand adults’ (N=4503) skills for solving problems in technology-rich environments. The results indicate the critical issue that more than two thirds of adults with vocational education and train...

  7. State of the Art of Using Virtual Reality Technologies in Built Environment Education.

    OpenAIRE

    Keenaghan, Garrett; Horváth, Imre

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on our major findings concerning the application of virtual reality technologies in built environment education (BEE). In addition to an analysis of the current trends and developments in current virtual reality technologies and systems, it also evaluates their educational usability and effectiveness in the mirror of the literature. First, a reasoning model is introduced, which is used as a structuring skeleton of the paper. The context of the analysis is learning experienc...

  8. Sustainability and Built Environment: The role of Higher Education in Architecture and Building Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Emilia Conte

    2016-01-01

    The sustainability paradigm implies a cultural shift in order to really change the world and society. Education, and specifically higher education, plays the crucial role of preparing students to be not only responsible citizens but also actors and promoters of processes and actions for a sustainable development. This is important in general and even more significant in architecture and engineering fields, as those students will be the designers of the built environment of tomorrow.This paper...

  9. PREFERENCES ON INTERNET BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS IN STUDENT-CENTERED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal CUBUKCU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, educational systems are being questionned to find effective solutions to problems that are being encountered, and discussions are centered around the ways of restructuring systems so as to overcome difficulties. As the consequences of the traditional teaching approach, we can indicate that the taught material is not long-lasting but easily forgotten, that students do not sufficiently acquire the knowledge and skills that are aimed at developing, and that students lack transferring their knowledge to real life. In our current situation, individuals prefer to use educational resources where and when they want, based on their individual skills and abilities. Throughout the world, because the internet infrastructure has developed quite rapidly, it has been offered as an alternative way for a rich learning and teaching environment. This study aims at determining teacher candidates’ preferences regarding internet-based learning environments in student-centered education by involving the teacher candidates enrolled at Osmangazi University, Faculty of Education, Primary School Teaching, Mathematics Teaching and Computer and Educational Technologies Education programmes. This study is a descriptive study. The data collection scale consists of the “Constructivist Internet-based Education of Science Scale (CILES-S”. The sample group of teacher candidates in the study showed differences with respect to their preferences regarding internet-based learning in student-centered education. The candidates scored higher in the internet-based learning environments of Cognitive Development and Critical Judgement. The lowest average scores of the sample group were observed in the internet-based learning environment of Episthemologic awareness.

  10. Factors affecting metacognition of undergraduate nursing students in a blended learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2014-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine the influence of demographic, learning involvement and learning performance variables on metacognition of undergraduate nursing students in a blended learning environment. A cross-sectional, correlational survey design was adopted. Ninety-nine students invited to participate in the study were enrolled in a professional nursing ethics course at a public nursing college. The blended learning intervention is basically an assimilation of classroom learning and online learning. Simple linear regression showed significant associations between frequency of online dialogues, the Case Analysis Attitude Scale scores, the Case Analysis Self Evaluation Scale scores, the Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale scores, and Metacognition Scale scores. Multiple linear regression indicated that frequency of online dialogues, the Case Analysis Self Evaluation Scale and the Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale were significant independent predictors of metacognition. Overall, the model accounted for almost half of the variance in metacognition. The blended learning module developed in this study proved successful in the end as a catalyst for the exercising of metacognitive abilities by the sample of nursing students. Learners are able to develop metacognitive ability in comprehension, argumentation, reasoning and various forms of higher order thinking through the blended learning process. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Environment education for taking of decision. One challenge for the sector cuban cooperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladys Garrido Cervera

    2015-12-01

    The present work have like purpose demonstrate the importance that reviewer include the environment theme in the process of taking of decisions in the farming cooperative to make up the aspect 133 of the economic politic and social in the new Cuban economic model. To do that one analysis about the environment education and the relationship tighten what have with the cooperative development for the guarantee of good practice, guarantee real one development sustainable.

  12. Changes of the soil environment affected by fly ash dumping site of the electric power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerzy; Gwizdz, Marta; Jamroz, Elzbieta; Debicka, Magdalena; Kocowicz, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    In this study the effect of fly ash dumping site of the electric power plant on the surrounding soil environment was investigated. The fly ash dumping site collect wastes form brown coal combustion of Belchatow electric power station, central Poland. The dumping site is surrounding by forest, where pine trees overgrow Podzols derived from loose quartz sands. The soil profiles under study were located at a distance of 50, 100, 400 and 500 m from the dumping site, while control profiles were located 8 km away from the landfill. In all horizons of soil profiles the mpain hysico-chemical and chemical properties were determined. The humic substances were extracted from ectohumus horizons by Shnitzer's method, purified using XAD resin and freeze-dried. The fulvic acids were passed through a cation exchange column and freeze-dried. Optical density, elemental composition and atomic ratios were determined in the humic and fulvic acids. Organic carbon by KMnO4 oxidation was also determined in the organic soil horizons. The fly ash from the landfill characterized by high salinity and strong alkaline reaction (pH=10), which contributed significantly to the changes of the pH values in soils horizons. The alkalization of soils adjacent to the landfill was found, which manifested in increasing of pH values in the upper soil horizons. The impact of the landfill was also noted in the changes of the soil morphology of Podzols analysed. As a result of the alkalization, Bhs horizons have been converted into a Bs horizons. Leaching of low molecular humus fraction - typical for podzolization - has been minimized as a result of pH changes caused by the impact of the landfill, and originally occurring humic substances in the Bhs horizon (present in the control profiles) have been probably transported out of the soil profile and then into the groundwater.

  13. Nitrogen and dry matter dynamics in linseed as affected by the nitrogen level and genotype in a Mediterranean environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dordas, Christos A.

    2012-01-01

    Linseed or oilseed flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important source of edible and industrial vegetable oil and is grown widely in temperate regions around the world. Nitrogen, one of the most important nutrients for linseed, is often applied for higher yield and better quality. However, the effects of N level on dry matter and N accumulation, partitioning, and retranslocation have not yet been identified in linseed. A two-year field study was therefore conducted to determine the effects of N level on dry matter, N accumulation, partitioning, and retranslocation of three linseed cultivars (Livia, Lirina, Creola) grown in a Mediterranean environment under rain-fed conditions. It was found that N fertilization increased biomass at anthesis by an average of 47% and at maturity by an average of 38%, compared with the control. N fertilization increased the dry matter partitioning in leaves + flowers and stems at anthesis, and also in leaves + capsule vegetative components, stems, and seeds at maturity. Dry matter translocation was affected by N fertilization, growing season, and by the interaction between growing season and N treatment. In addition, N fertilization increased N retranslocation from the vegetative parts of the plant to the seed. Moreover, the N uptake by seeds was more affected by the seed yield and less affected by the seed N concentration. The present study indicates that N fertilization affects dry matter and N translocation in linseed. -- Highlights: ► Dry matter translocation was affected by N fertilization, year, and their interaction. ► HI was affected by N fertilization while NHI was not. ► N fertilization increased N retranslocation from the vegetative parts to the seed.

  14. Does the environment affect suicide rates in Spain? A spatiotemporal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santurtún, Maite; Santurtún, Ana; Zarrabeitia, María T

    2017-06-05

    Suicide is an important public health problem, it represents one of the major causes of unnatural death, and there are many factors that affect the risk of suicidal behaviour. The present study analyzes the temporal and spatial variations of mortality by suicide in Spain and its relationship with gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. A retrospective study was performed, in which deaths by suicide, sex and age group in 50 Spanish provinces between 2000 and 2012 were analyzed. The annual trend of suicide mortality was assessed using Kendall's tau-b correlation coefficient. Seasonality and monthly and weekly behaviour were evaluated by performing the ANOVA test and the Bonferroni adjustment. Finally, the relationship between GDP per capita and suicide was studied. Between 2000 and 2012, 42,905adult people died by suicide in Spain. The annual average incidence rate was 95 suicides per million population. The regions located in the south and in the northwest of the country registered the highest per capita mortality rates. There is a decreasing trend in mortality by suicide over the period studied (CC=-.744; P=.0004) in adults over the age of 64, and a seasonal behaviour was identified with summer maximum and autumn minimum values (f=.504; P<.0001). The regions with the highest GDP per capita showed the lowest mortality by suicide (r=-.645; P<.0001) and the relationship is stronger among older age groups. Mortality by suicide does not follow a homogenous geographical distribution in Spain. Mortality in men was higher than in women. Over the period of study, there has been a decrease in mortality by suicide in Spain in adults over the age of 64. The seasonal cycle of suicides and the inverse relationship with GDP per capita found in this study, provide information which may be used as a tool for developing prevention and intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Education for Sustainable Development (ESD): The Turn away from "Environment" in Environmental Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopnina, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the implications of the shift of environmental education (EE) towards education for sustainable development (ESD) in the context of environmental ethics. While plural perspectives on ESD are encouraged both by practitioners and researchers of EE, there is also a danger that such pluralism may sustain dominant political…

  16. Popular Education for the Environment: Building Interest in the Educational Dimension of Social Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, James

    2005-01-01

    Community-based environmental education is an important part of the sustainability project. Along with regulation and market-based instruments, adult learning and education in non-formal settings consistently features in the sustainability strategies advocated and implemented by government, community and industry entities. Community-situated…

  17. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. Results: No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Conclusion: Based on the students’ perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered. PMID:27683645

  18. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Based on the students' perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered.

  19. Educational virtual environments: A ten-year review of empirical research (1999-2009)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikropoulos, Tassos; Natsis, Antonios

    2011-01-01

    This study is a ten-year critical review of empirical research on the educational applications of Virtual Reality (VR). Results show that although the majority of the 53 reviewed articles refer to science and mathematics, researchers from social sciences also seem to appreciate the educational...... value of VR and incorporate their learning goals in Educational Virtual Environments (EVEs). Although VR supports multisensory interaction channels, visual representations predominate. Few are the studies that incorporate intuitive interactivity, indicating a research trend in this direction. Few...

  20. Climate change may affect fish through an interaction of parental and juvenile environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelson, J. M.; Munday, P. L.; McCormick, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    Changes to tropical sea surface temperature and plankton communities are expected to occur over the next 100 years due to climate change. There is a limited understanding of how these environmental changes are likely to impact coral reef fishes, especially in terms of population replenishment through the quality of progeny produced. The present study investigated the effect that elevated sea water temperature and changes to food availability may have on the production of offspring by the reef fish Acanthochromis polyacanthus (Pomacentridae), as well as the performance of progeny in environments of varying food availability. An orthogonal design of three water temperatures and two food availabilities (high and low ration) was used, with water temperatures being the current-day average for the collection location (28.5 °C), +1.5 °C (30.0 °C) and +3.0 °C (31.5 °C), representing likely temperatures by 2100. Generally, an increase in the water temperature for adults resulted in a reduction in the size, weight and amount of yolk possessed by newly hatched offspring. Offspring whose parents were maintained under elevated temperature (30.0 °C high ration) had lower survival than offspring produced by parents at the current-day temperature (28.5 °C high ration) at 15 days post-hatching, but only when juveniles were reared under conditions of low food availability. In contrast, by 30 days post-hatching, the growth and condition of these offspring produced by parents held under elevated temperature (30.0 °C high ration) were the best of all treatment groups in all levels of juvenile food availability. This result illustrates the potential for initial parental effects to be modified by compensatory growth early in life (within 1 month) and that parental effects are not necessarily long lasting. These findings suggest that the performance of juvenile reef fish in future ocean conditions may not only depend on initial parental effects, but the interaction between their

  1. METHODS OF STATISTICAL MONITORING OF PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION WORK OF SOCIAL EDUCATORS IN PERSONAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr M. Korniiets

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the application of social services WEB 2.0 for personal learning environment creation that is used for professional orientation work of social educator. The feedback is must be in personal learning environment for the effective professional orientation work. This feedback can be organized through statistical monitoring. The typical solution for organizing personal learning environment with built-in statistical surveys and statistical data processing is considered in the article. The possibilities of the statistical data collection and processing services on the example of Google Analytics are investigated.

  2. Educational renewal of physician training in Australia and New Zealand: Multiple educational innovations in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udemans, Rebecca; Stokes, Marie-Louise; Rigby, Louise; Khanna, Priya; Christiansen, Jonathan

    2018-03-21

    The Royal Australasian College of Physicians is renewing its specialty training programs and shifting towards competency-based medical education. Our aim is to improve the quality and rigor of training and graduate outcomes, and promote high standards of physician practice to serve the health of patients, families, and communities in a changing healthcare environment. We are progressing holistic change and multiple educational innovations in a complex environment. Numerous stakeholders, a disparate training landscape and a largely volunteer supervisor workforce pose challenges in supporting effective implementation. This paper describes our progress and experience with three key components of our education renewal program: curricular renewal, a new selection process and faculty development. It offers reflections on the practical challenges, lessons learned and factors critical for success. Our experience highlights opportunities for training organizations to maximize their influence over workplace training experiences and outcomes by taking a systems approach to the design, delivery and evaluation of the components of education renewal. We found that design, development and delivery of our multiple educational innovations have benefited from co-design approaches, progressive and concurrent development, continual exploration of new strategies, and implementation as soon as viable with a commitment to iterative improvements over time.

  3. Experiencing Nature through Immersive Virtual Environments: Environmental Perceptions, Physical Engagement, and Affective Responses during a Simulated Nature Walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Calogiuri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available By combining physical activity and exposure to nature, green exercise can provide additional health benefits compared to physical activity alone. Immersive Virtual Environments (IVE have emerged as a potentially valuable supplement to environmental and behavioral research, and might also provide new approaches to green exercise promotion. However, it is unknown to what extent green exercise in IVE can provide psychophysiological responses similar to those experienced in real natural environments. In this study, 26 healthy adults underwent three experimental conditions: nature walk, sitting-IVE, and treadmill-IVE. The nature walk took place on a paved trail along a large river. In the IVE conditions, the participants wore a head-mounted display with headphones reproducing a 360° video and audio of the nature walk, either sitting on a chair or walking on a manually driven treadmill. Measurements included environmental perceptions (presence and perceived environmental restorativeness – PER, physical engagement (walking speed, heart rate, and perceived exertion, and affective responses (enjoyment and affect. Additionally, qualitative information was collected through open-ended questions. The participants rated the IVEs with satisfactory levels of ‘being there’ and ‘sense of reality,’ but also reported discomforts such as ‘flatness,’ ‘movement lag’ and ‘cyber sickness.’ With equivalent heart rate and walking speed, participants reported higher perceived exertion in the IVEs than in the nature walk. The nature walk was associated with high enjoyment and enhanced affect. However, despite equivalent ratings of PER in the nature walk and in the IVEs, the latter were perceived as less enjoyable and gave rise to a poorer affect. Presence and PER did not differ between the two IVEs, although in the treadmill-IVE the negative affective responses had slightly smaller magnitude than in the sitting-IVE. In both the IVEs, the negative

  4. Development of interest in training by creation emotional and comfortable educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Shentsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Russian education system is in continuous process of modernization today. Changes in the Russian society, policy and economy exert direct impact on this process. These changes define those conditions in which it is necessary to gain knowledge, abilities and mastering professional activity, and further to carry out labor professional activity by the young specialist. In addition, an important role in this process is played by motivation, and one of the main motives is interest in training.At the initial stage, we have made an experiment, by questioning the 1-year students, which has shown that the students of the university at the beginning of the educational activity have poor interest in training and this subsequently entails not fully mastering the educational programs.Researches of psychologists (B. Ananyev, A. Arkhipov, L. Bozhovich, L. Gordon, V. Ivanov, A. Kovalyov, A. Leontyev, N. Morozova, V. Myasishchev, S. Rubenstein, B. Teplov, etc., teachers (V. Belikov, R. Gilman, M. Duranov, V. Zhernov, T. Klimova, Ya. Komensky, O. Lesher, John Locke, A. Markova, V. Maximova, V. Ushachev, K. Ushinsky, O. Shentsova, G. Schukina, etc. show that interest is the important motive, which contributes to the effective development of different types of activity and stimulates the student on activity performance.The purpose of this work – consideration of tools for the emotional and comfortable educational environment as the pedagogical condition, contributing to the development of students’ interest in training at universities.In the main part of the paper, development of students’ interest in training at universities is considered. Pedagogical approach to a solution consists of the following: to present in pedagogical process a possibility of interesting aspects of the educational activity; to excite and constantly maintain the students’ state of active interest by educational processes; to purposefully form and develop interest as the valuable

  5. THE USE OF ONTOLOGIES OF EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Буров

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Object of study - an ontology for educational purposes and theirimpact on the effectiveness of training. Purpose -substantiation the feasibility of using ontologies of educational purposes for the formation learningenvironment of specialists in the field of aviation. The method of study - an analysis of existing methods and meansofforming an ontology for educational purposes, in particular by the method of structuring the domain and the methodof generalization. The main aspects of the formation of knowledge bases for educational purposes with the useof ontologies are considered. The approaches and means of forming domains of knowledge bases based on ontologiesare described. Shaped ergonomic requirements for content and form of ontologies for educational purposes. It isestablished that the introduction and use of ontologies for educational purposes requires a much larger audience insearch of independence and mastery of new knowledge that provides a high level of intensification of educationalprocess, as well asincrease the efficiency of the educational process by intensifyingand enhancing learning andcognitive activities, giving her the creative direction of research that is a prerequisite for more effective learning

  6. Factors Related to Resilience of Academically Gifted Students in the Chinese Cultural and Educational Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjie; Cheung, Hoi Yan; Fan, Xitao; Wu, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    This study examined variables in three domains (personal, parent support, and peer support) for their relationships with the resilience of academically gifted students in the Chinese cultural and educational environment. The participants were 484 academically gifted students in two highly competitive secondary schools (so-called "key"…

  7. Information Technology-Based Innovation in International Marketing Education: An Exploration of Two Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Rudolf R.; Haghirian, Parissa; Yu, Shasha

    2009-01-01

    Information technology (IT) innovations have and continue to have a significant impact on international marketing practice and customer interactions. With the marketing environment becoming increasingly dependent on technology, marketing teaching in higher education faces a challenging task of effectively leveraging technology in diverse learning…

  8. Executive Perceptions on International Education in a Globalized Environment: The Travel Industry's Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, J. Mark; Katsioloudes, Marios I.

    2004-01-01

    Research on globalization has determined travel executives' perceptions of the psychological implications brought about by an interconnected global environment and the implications on international education. With the concepts of Clyne and Rizvi (1998) and Pittaway, Ferguson, and Breen (1998) on the value of cross-cultural interaction as a…

  9. Climate Change Education: Quantitatively Assessing the Impact of a Botanical Garden as an Informal Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellmann, Daniela; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Although informal learning environments have been studied extensively, ours is one of the first studies to quantitatively assess the impact of learning in botanical gardens on students' cognitive achievement. We observed a group of 10th graders participating in a one-day educational intervention on climate change implemented in a botanical garden.…

  10. The Habitability Framework: Linking Human Behavior and Physical Environment in Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiser, Wolfgang F. E.; Taylor, Anne

    1983-01-01

    The concept of environmental design cybernetics is explained, and its use by special educators and architects in creating learning environments is discussed. A proposed habitability framework is defined, and its applications to buildings and building occupants/users are offered. Research on architectural design applied to special education…

  11. Framing and Enhancing Distributed Leadership in the Quality Management of Online Learning Environments in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Dale; Palmer, Stuart; Gosper, Maree; Sankey, Michael; Allan, Garry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of senior leadership interviews in a nationally funded project on distributed leadership in the quality management of online learning environments (OLEs) in higher education. Questions were framed around the development of an OLE quality management framework and the situation of the characteristics of…

  12. Nursing Students' Perceptions of the Educational Learning Environment in Pediatric and Maternity Courses Using DREEM Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusaad, Fawzia El Sayed; Mohamed, Hanan El-Sayed; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational surroundings is one of the most vital factors in figuring out the fulfillment of an powerful curriculum and gaining of knowledge. Aim: To compare students' perceptions of the academic learning environment in Pediatric and Maternity courses using DREEM Questionnaire. Design: This is a comparative study. Subjects: Five…

  13. Educational Online Technologies in Blended Tertiary Environments: A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuapawa, Kimberley N.

    2013-01-01

    This is a review of the literature surrounding five popular media-rich educational online technologies (EOTs) currently being used by educationalists to support blended learning within tertiary environments. This review considers the following EOTs: 1) connective media, 2) interactive gaming, 3) virtual worlds, 4) web conferencing and 5) learning…

  14. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the PhD project on Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environment which aims to understand how students gain benefit from using mobile devices in the aspect of project work collaboration. It demonstrates research questions, theoretical perspective...

  15. Creating a Dialogic Environment for Transformative Science Teaching Practices: Towards an Inclusive Education for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaga-Peña, Cristina G.; Sandoval-Ríos, Marisol; Torres-Frías, José; López-Suero, Carolina; Lozano Garza, Adrián; Dessens Félix, Maribel; González Maitland, Marcelino; Ibanez, Jorge G.

    2018-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design and application of a teacher training strategy to promote the inclusive education of students with disabilities in the science classroom, through the creation of adult learning environments grounded on the principles of dialogic learning. Participants of the workshop proposal consisted of a group of twelve teachers…

  16. Television Viewing, Educational Quality of the Home Environment, and School Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Angela Teresa; Kurtz-Costes, Beth

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined relationships among children's television viewing, school readiness, parental employment, and the home environment's educational quality. Thirty low-income parents completed surveys. Their preschoolers completed IQ and school readiness assessments. Television viewing adversely related to school readiness and the home…

  17. Out of School Learning Environments in Social Studies Education: A Phenomenological Research with Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçu, Ersin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine the remarks of teacher candidates on the place and importance of out of school learning environments in Social Studies education. Phenomenological method, which is one of the qualitative research designs, was used in this study. The work group of the study consists of 73 teacher candidates who conduct out…

  18. Nature and the Outdoor Learning Environment: The Forgotten Resource in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal studies now confirm the economic, academic, and social importance of high-quality early childhood education. At the same time, a substantial body of research indicates that an outdoor learning and play environment with diverse natural elements advances and enriches all of the domains relevant to the development, health, and well-being…

  19. Leading the Quality Management of Online Learning Environments in Australian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Dale; Palmer, Stuart; Munro, Judy; Solomonides, Ian; Gosper, Maree; Hicks, Margaret; Sankey, Michael; Allan, Garry; Hollenbeck, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the findings of the first year of a nationally funded Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) project on the quality management of online learning environments by and through distributed leadership. The project is being undertaken by five Australian universities with major commitments to online and distance education.…

  20. Education in Multicultural Environment--Teaching/Learning Support Activities (On the Example of Georgia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malazonia, David; Maglakelidze, Shorena; Chiabrishvili, Nino; Chiabrishvili, Maia

    2017-01-01

    The National Curricula of Georgia emphasises the importance of intercultural education only in a declarative way. This article investigates how specific activities can contribute to the development of intercultural competences in a diverse environment. We conclude that additional training resources are critical for the development of those…