WorldWideScience

Sample records for education recreation dance

  1. International Physical Education Recreation and Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This feature, consisting of 14 articles, looks at physical education from an international perspective. Programs in Nigeria, the USSR, Papua New Guinea, China, Denmark, West Germany, and Bahrain are explored. Exchange programs, culture shock, and barriers to understanding are discussed. The impact of the Olympic Games on Korea is analyzed. (MT)

  2. Completed Research in Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance; Including International Sources. Volume 27. 1985 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedson, Patty S., Ed.

    This compilation lists research completed in the areas of health, physical education, recreation, dance, and allied areas during 1984. The document is arranged in two parts. In the index, references are arranged under the subject headings in alphabetical order. Abstracts of master's and doctor's theses from institutions offering graduate programs…

  3. Teaching Dance to Educable Mentally Retarded Adolescents: A Curriculum Guide for Educators and Recreators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Cynthia D.

    The manual describes activities designed to teach dance to adolescents with mild mental retardation. It is explained that the manual can be used in a sequential 25-week course in a mini-approach, or as a special event or performance guide. Expected outcomes are considered, including increased self-confidence, improved peer cooperation, and…

  4. Dance Education in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Jae-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Despite a structured physical education system and related policies, dance education in Korea largely exists as a course in name only, without achieving its unique goals. It lacks standards within the physical education curriculum, which indicates that dance education is not conducted properly. Thus, the content and level of dance education vary…

  5. Dance Education Research and Supplementary Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Sandra, Comp.

    This bibliography presents listings in the following areas: assessment in dance education; attitudinal studies in dance education; dance certification, standards, status; dance curricula; dance education history; dance education and technology; dance education theory; dance teacher behaviors; dance teacher preparation; descriptions of dance…

  6. Dance learning in motion: global dance education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Ann Kipling; Koff, Susan R.; Meiners, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Reports indicate that dance-learning experiences provided for young people in and outside schools impact positively upon young people’s learning in schools, as well as in pre-service and professional development programs for those who teach dance in various settings. Support of major dance...... organizations as well as the goals of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) affirm the importance of dance education and encourage the research and practice to provide lifelong and intergenerational learning in, about and through dance education. This paper describes...... the results of a survey questionnaire, which captures the narratives and contexts from lived experiences of university students and graduates in formal, informal and non-formal settings and how those are experienced. This initial study confirmed the power of dance and the significance of dance in peoples...

  7. Remixing the Dance Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koff, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    Dance Education and Music Education are not the same, but are often considered together as Arts Education along with Theatre Education and Art Education. The history of Dance Education as a discipline is much shorter than Music Education, so Dance Education often looks to music education for leadership as well as scholarship. Remixing the…

  8. The Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Central District of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (Des Moines, IA, April 29-May 3, 1992). [Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James A., Ed.; Hoadley, Michael, Ed.

    This publication is designed to communicate the history and research activities of members of the Central District of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance. It presents summaries of 30 papers and conference presentations on such topics as pioneering physical educators; cholesterol in college football players;…

  9. Dance and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsell, Sonya E.; Bryant Davis, Kimberly E.

    2015-01-01

    Arts activities have been included in the educational curriculum of public schools for a number of years. Most often, course offerings in the arts consist of visual art, vocal music, and instrumental music classes. Although not as common, dance has also been included in the educational curriculum. Research and anecdotal evidence suggest that…

  10. Dance, Sexuality, and Education Today: Observations for Dance Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a comprehensive discussion of sexuality and dance education from multiple perspectives including public schools (K-12), private studios, conservatories, and higher education. Among innumerable potential topics emanating from this review of sexuality and dance education in the 21st century, this article focuses on today's…

  11. HCI challenges in Dance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.El Raheb

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dance learning is by nature multimodal, while dance practice presents a wide diversity across genres and contexts. Choreography and artistic contemporary dance performances have been using interactive technologies to support their creative process for several decades. Nevertheless the use of interactive technologies to support dance learning and education is still relatively immature and raises many challenges and interesting questions when it comes to choosing the appropriate human computer interaction methods. In this paper, we present the characteristics of dance teaching and learning in relation to interactive technology and we highlight the points/feedback that dance, as a field of mastering expressive movement, can bring to the design of whole-body interaction experiences.

  12. Shaping future directions for dance education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Ann Kipling; Koff, Susan R.; Meiners, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    for the maintenance and implementation of dance curricula in our schools. In this paper, ideas and successes may provide a platform from which to support and guide dance experiences for young people. Firstly, an outline of the results of a survey questionnaire that was sent to dance educators in selected countries...

  13. Decolonizing Dance Pedagogy: Application of Pedagogies of Ugandan Traditional Dances in Formal Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Dances from African communities are gradually getting incorporated into formal education at pre-tertiary and tertiary levels in the United States. Whereas strides have been made to embrace this artistic and cultural diversity, the instructional methodologies that are applied in teaching these dances are commonly founded on Western pedagogic canons…

  14. National Dance Education Organization: Building a Future for Dance Education in the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonbright, Jane; McGreevy-Nichols, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The field of dance arts education in the United States is in an entirely different place today than it was at the turn of the century. Much of this change is due to a convergence of events that involved: federal and state legislation, policy, and funding that supported dance in arts education; a forty-year transition of dance out of departments of…

  15. Wilderness Recreation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Jack K.

    1977-01-01

    A Wilderness Recreation Education program aims to: offer students an opportunity to be involved with direct learning in the outdoors; instill an understanding of ways to exist within and enjoy the wilderness environment; and develop an awareness of an appreciation for the need to conserve and maintain the wilderness environment for generations to…

  16. Benefits of Implementing a Dance Unit in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajek, Mary; Richards, K. Andrew R.; Ressler, James

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of participating in a dance curriculum, as well as how dance relates to the National Standards. It also provides insight into how physical educators can overcome the barriers to teaching dance in their programs.

  17. Moving Social Justice: Challenges, Fears and Possibilities in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug; Stinson, Susan W.

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores social justice commitments in dance pedagogy and dance education teacher preparation in the USA as developed through a series of conversations between two dance educators and former administrators in higher education. The authors examine the history of multiculturalism, multicultural practices in postsecondary dance, their…

  18. Critical Postcolonial Dance Pedagogy: The Relevance of West African Dance Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Banks, Ojeya

    2010-01-01

    This dance ethnography examines work conducted by the Dambe Project--a nonprofit organization that specializes in African performing arts education and mentorship. The study focuses on the implications of the organization's dance pedagogy in light of its postcolonial context and the importance of West African dance education in the United States.…

  19. The Correlates of Dance Education among Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Terra; Henninger, Erica; Chambliss, Catherine

    This investigation extends previous research on the benefits of dance education, by further exploring the correlates of participation in dance classes for adolescent girls. The survey evaluated self-esteem, body image, dance ability, and perceived quality of peer and parent relationships. Students with greater dance experience were expected to…

  20. Searching for Evidence: Continuing Issues in Dance Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews, analyzes, and reflects upon two important reports released in 2013, both discussing research evidence for the value of dance education or arts education more generally, among school-aged students. One report was created by a large dance education advocacy and support group in the USA, the National Dance Education Organization;…

  1. Dance in K through 12 Basic Education: adequacy of contemporary practices in dance teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Gisela Franken

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on dance teaching in K-12 basic education from a reflection about the relevant adoption of elements from post 1950’s artistic movement on dancing creative processes in a dialogue with authors as Hassan (1985, Silva (2005, and Rengel (2008. On this perspective, changes on dance teaching and learning practical attitudes are considered, resulting from postmodern dance transformations, such as: the reformulation of body concept, the conception of dance as a democratic, collective, and creative process and the progressively narrowed bounds between school artistic approaches and art forms developed outside of the school environment

  2. Dance Education Action Research: A Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author compares the practices, philosophy, and history of action research, also known as participatory action research, to the purposes and practices of dance education. The comparison yields connections in four categories, enhancing self-reflective teaching and curriculum design, taking responsibility for teaching outcomes,…

  3. Dance History Matters in British Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    In response to concerns about the place and nature of dance history in British higher education curricula, a database was compiled of representative but significant examples of modules which focused directly on the teaching and learning of history, or had history as a key component. An analysis is presented of these modules in terms of the place…

  4. Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP): A Model for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofras, Pamela Anderson; Emory-Maier, Ambre

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, North Carolina Dance Theatre, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School system joined forces to create a multidimensional, professional development program for dance professionals (teachers and artists) in the public schools called, The Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP). DEEP was designed…

  5. Alienation and Transformation: An International Education in Contemporary Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates experiences of an international education in dance. Through the narratives of seven female dance practitioners from the southern Mediterranean region, who have trained in contemporary dance in Western cultural contexts, a multiplicity of encounters are illustrated. Two key findings emerged from the dancers' experiences.…

  6. What? Me? Teach Dance? Background and Confidence of Primary Preservice Teachers in Dance Education across Five Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Bowie, Deirdre E.

    2013-01-01

    In primary schools across many countries, dance is now included within the arts key learning area with its own outcomes and content. But as future teachers of dance and other art forms, how do preservice generalist primary teachers perceive their background and confidence in relation to dance and dance education? This study investigates the…

  7. Dance Education Matters: Rebuilding Postsecondary Dance Education for Twenty-First Century Relevance and Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Postsecondary dance education is at a crucial juncture in its history in academe. Emerging from women's physical education programs in the 1930s, the profession's realignment with the arts broadly and arts-based education specifically has been characterized by ambitious goals and steady growth through the 1990s. However, a number of critical…

  8. Recreational Games for Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Recreational games can be incorporated into physical education programs to encourage play and activity among students during their leisure time. Students can play their own games during recess, before or after school, during intramural programs, or in their neighborhood with family and friends. This article describes five such games namely:…

  9. Dance Education in Singapore: Policy, Discourse, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Joey

    2018-01-01

    This article provides an overview of dance education in schools in Singapore with regard to physical education, co-curricular activity, initiatives by the National Arts Council's Arts Education unit, and pre-tertiary and tertiary dance programs. In an effort to gain a better understanding of how well the official discourse and the reality of…

  10. Dancing on Thin Ice: The Journey of Two Male Teacher Candidates Emerging as Professionals within a Teacher Education Dance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyn, Brenda; Campbell, Eric; McAvoy, Alekcei; Weimer, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Teacher candidates entering the world of curricula face the realities of teaching a variety of subjects, some more conceptually foreign than others. One challenging area for teacher candidates, particularly males, is in dance education (Gard, 2008; Kiley, 2010). A teacher's former dance experience, beliefs about who dances and why, personal…

  11. DANCE FOR CHILDREN: A FUNCTIONAL EDUCATION FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    children, to that neglected pillar of growth, the traditional dance, using dance for children ... Children are not left out of these emotional actions. They .... Teaching dance form among children (ages 6-12 years) will require the following steps or ...

  12. DANCE FOR CHILDREN: A FUNCTIONAL EDUCATION FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the society and, to maintain growth and development of the child. Dance was ... expression in space through body movements and other dance elements to ... enjoy music and dancing just like their parents or the adults in the society. Children ...

  13. Dance for children: a functional education for national growth | Suru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dance for children: a functional education for national growth. ... This statement of fact was discovered and aptly applied by the traditional societies of ... not just by the modern and acculturated child but, by parents and the government as well.

  14. New Challenges in 21st-Century Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassing, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    To become competent in today's society, individuals need multiliteracies. The 21st-century dancer needs to be an artist, choreographer, educator, and researcher who can meet challenges and make an impact within the profession, as well as across education, the arts, and society. As dance professionals assess how to utilize their resources better…

  15. Peeling Back the Skin of Racism: Real History and Race in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr-Berry, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Over a decade ago Julie Kerr-Berry wrote the editorial for this journal, "The Skin We Dance, The Skin We Teach: Appropriation of Black Content in Dance Education" (Kerr-Berry 2004). In it, she argued the importance of integrating multiple legacies into dance education, particularly into the historical narrative. She also contended that…

  16. Ideas Exchange: What Is the Role of Dance in the Secondary Physical Education Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, David G. (Comp.)

    2010-01-01

    This article presents ideas and views of educators regarding the role of dance in the secondary physical education program. One educator believes that dance education is an excellent complement to the traditional physical education program at the secondary level. Another educator defines physical education as the "art and science of human…

  17. Motivation towards dance within physical education according to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is qualitative study with the objective to analyse motivation towards dance by comparing two teaching methodologies within the education context, depending on gender. The self-report technique was applied with 47 students (29 girls and 18 boys) aged 14 to 16 years (14.84±0.48) from a secondary school in ...

  18. What "Dirty Dancing" Taught Me about Media Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxa, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects on her youthful viewing of "Dirty Dancing" on video against her parents' wishes as one example of the ineffectiveness of a protectionist approach to media. She offers ideas on how she and her students (pre-service and in-service educators) think through how to navigate selection of materials for effective media literacy…

  19. Dance-the-Music: an educational platform for the modeling, recognition and audiovisual monitoring of dance steps using spatiotemporal motion templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Amelynck, Denis; Leman, Marc

    2012-12-01

    In this article, a computational platform is presented, entitled "Dance-the-Music", that can be used in a dance educational context to explore and learn the basics of dance steps. By introducing a method based on spatiotemporal motion templates, the platform facilitates to train basic step models from sequentially repeated dance figures performed by a dance teacher. Movements are captured with an optical motion capture system. The teachers' models can be visualized from a first-person perspective to instruct students how to perform the specific dance steps in the correct manner. Moreover, recognition algorithms-based on a template matching method-can determine the quality of a student's performance in real time by means of multimodal monitoring techniques. The results of an evaluation study suggest that the Dance-the-Music is effective in helping dance students to master the basics of dance figures.

  20. Collaborative Inquiry in a Socially Shared Contextual Frame, Striving toward Sensible Knowledge Creation on Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytönen, Teija

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: The tradition of dance art in Finland is characterized by values such as individuality and uniqueness, and the professional practice is structured by competition and different kinds of hierarchies, which may also add color to the culture of dance teaching. One of the most noticeable elements within the dance education community…

  1. Heart Rates of Elementary Physical Education Students during the Dancing Classrooms Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-01-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4…

  2. Affective factors which relate to dance on secondary school level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation. Journal Home · ABOUT ... Motivation, stress, anxiety and self-concept are affective variables which may relate to dance performance. An empirical investigation ...

  3. Behavior Management in Physical Education, Recreation, and Sport: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavay, Barry

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography contains references specifically pertaining to physical education, recreation, or sport and to behavior management. The references are classified into areas of behavior management overview, reinforcement systems, motor performance, physical fitness, recreation, and sport. (MT)

  4. Creativity Education Model through Dance Creation for Students of Junior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malarsih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to realize dance as a real product of a dance education process. The product is packaged in a form of audio-visual as well as a scientific publication. As the benefit from this study, the product can be used by school and specifically by dance teacher as a guidance in conducting dance lesson at school. The study on the model of creativity education through the creation is being understood as a form of developmental research. As a developmental research, the research plan is initiated by analyzing the teaching material related to dance lesson, and relate it to the creativity education which has to be accomplished through dance lesson, specifically for Junior High School students. The study will be continued with theoretical/ conceptual analysis and observation which is related to creativity education through the dance creation. In the end of this study, model of creativity education through dance creation is produced, particularly for students of Junior High School level. Results of the study show that, in doing creativity activity through dance creation, the value of the dance as an art is not become the primary aim. Moreover, the main aim of this process is towards the creativity process itself. While producing and creating the dance, two major educational points are derived, which are: the creativity and product value in a form of dance. Based on background of the idea, through this pilot project, the creativity of creating dance for public schools students, especially Junior High School, is possible to be done and used as a dance creativity learning model in Junior High School. Two suggestions are formulated in this study: (1 it is suggested for dance teachers in public schools, in this context is Junior High School teachers, to set their teaching and learning process into the creativity education as it is implied in curriculum. (2 In order to achieve the creativity education itself, the dance creation as one of art subject

  5. Social, recreational and housing habits of residents of Selebi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... housing habits of residents of Selebi-Phikwe nickel – copper mining environment, Botswana. ... Primary data of residents obtained through the administration of ... African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance Vol.

  6. Program of Studies, Aesthetic Education: Dance, Drama/Theatre, Interrelated Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    Educational objectives and brief course descriptions are provided for dance, drama/theatre, and interrelated ARTS (Arts Resource Teams in Schools), Montgomery County Public School System, Rockville, Maryland. In grades K-12 dance and movement are part of the physical education department. Instruction emphasizes the potential of body movement for…

  7. Moving the School and Dancing Education: Case Study Research of K-5 Students' Experiences in a Dance Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Alison E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation chronicles the qualitative case study of a dance artist-in-residence at a diverse and inclusive K-5 school in an urban district, integrating science, social studies, physical education, music, and visual arts school curriculum and culminating in two public performances. This study focused on how students made meaning through this…

  8. Dancing through the School Day: How Dance Catapults Learning in Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kelly Mancini

    2013-01-01

    The necessity for engaging the body in learning, the need for students to move throughout the school day, and the positive effects that dance has on students' development are all good reasons for dance to be included in the elementary curriculum. There are many ways for teachers to integrate movement into the school day, using math, science,…

  9. The social representations of dance in physical education classes in the early years of primary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Schiebelbein Capri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey of social representations of dance in the context of School Physical Education. The survey was conducted in two city schools and two private schools in Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil. The observation and the questionnaire were the instruments used to collect data. Five teachers of Physical Education and 331 students of Primary Education (5th year of Primary Education took part in the research. The results indicate that the social representations of dance teachers are related to holidays and anniversaries of the school and students, to pleasure and to musical preference. The practice of dance in the school has room for choreographic creations, June Festival rehearsals, and school presentations.

  10. Health-Improving Potential of Dancing Exercises in Physical Education of Students of Higher Educational Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. М. Кравчук

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to determine the health-improving potential of dancing exercises used in physical education of female students of higher educational institutions.  Research methods: study and analysis of pedagogical, scientific and methodological literature on the subject matter of the research; observations, questionnaires, functional tests; statistical methods of data reduction. Conclusions. As part of the study, the use of dancing exercises in the physical education of female students of higher educational institutions proved contributing to a significant increase in the level of their physical health in general and improvement of some of its indicators, including strength and life indices, heart rate recovery time after 20 squats. Dancing exercises also boost spirits, improve health and activity of the female students, which the study proved statistically.

  11. Shake It Out! Belly Dance in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Jenée; Gurvitch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Belly dance is a folk dance with a history that can be traced back to the beginnings of civilization. It is a form of expression and movement that has been used for hundreds of years in religious ceremonies, birthing rituals, and social and familial gatherings in the Middle East. Students of belly dance can increase their muscular strength and…

  12. Music and movement education as a form of motivation in teaching Greek traditional dances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likesas, G; Zachopoulou, E

    2006-04-01

    Research has shown that motivation for participating in physical education, particularly in traditional dances, has decreased dramatically. The aim of this research was to examine whether a music and movement program would increase pleasure and intrinsic motivation of students in elementary education while teaching them Greek traditional dances. 232 students were divided into two groups, a trained group of 135 participants (72 boys, 63 girls) and a control group of 97 (53 boys, 44 girls). The trained group was taught using the music and movement teaching model of traditional dances. The control group was taught using the instructional or guided teaching method of traditional Greek dances. To measure effectiveness of the two methods was accomplished by the completion of McAuley's Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. Analysis of scores showed use of music and movement education had a positive effect on intrinsic motivation for dancing and active participation of students, especially of the trained boys' group.

  13. The Pedagogy of the Observed: How Does Surveillance Technology Influence Dance Studio Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    A local trend in commercial dance studio education is the implementation of real-time digital video surveillance. This case study explores how digital video cameras in the dance studio environment affect asymmetrical power relationships already present in the commercial studio setting, as well as how surveillance impacts feminist pedagogical…

  14. The Signature of the Moving Body: Agency and Embodied Education Ideologies of Dance Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophir, Hodel

    2016-01-01

    Through an ethnographic study of dance teachers in Israel, this article calls attention to the teaching body as an active social agent and introduces the concept of body signature. It examines the bodily comportment of three dance teachers, arguing for embodied education ideologies, and the ability of teachers to maneuver within these concepts and…

  15. Black Bodies in Dance Education: Charting a New Pedagogical Paradigm to Eliminate Gendered and Hypersexualized Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C. S'thembile

    2005-01-01

    To resist and transform gendered and hypersexualized assumptions and attitudes that cloud interpretations and devalue readings of black and brown bodies, dance educators cannot only facilitate agency for their students, but also help demonstrate an overarching concern for social justice and equality. Dance has the power to transform and redirect…

  16. Adapted Physical Education and Therapeutic Recreation in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel-Wise, D; Mears, B

    2004-01-01

    Adapted physical education is a mandated service, whereas therapeutic recreation and traditional recreation are considered related services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. In this article, the authors describe the distinctions between the services, recognition of need for referral, methods of assessment, sample…

  17. Curricular Space Allocated for Dance Content in Physical Education Teacher Education Programs: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Jenée Marie; Metzler, Mike

    2017-01-01

    This literature review examines curricular space allocated to activity based/movement content courses in Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) pre-service programs, specifically focusing on how dance content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge are addressed within those programs. This review includes original empirical research…

  18. Always Being on Your Toes: Elementary School Dance Teachers' Perceptions of Inclusion and Their Roles in Creating Inclusive Dance Education Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitomer, Michelle R.

    2017-01-01

    Teachers are key players in creating inclusive dance education environments. Guided by a conceptual framework of relational ethics, this qualitative study explored the perceptions and practices of four elementary school dance teachers teaching in public schools in two large school districts in Western Canada. Data collection involved interviews,…

  19. Women Faculty, Higher Education, and the Recreation/Leisure Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Karla A.; Harrolle, Michelle; Rich, Samantha; Moretz, Janell

    2012-01-01

    Women represent growing numbers of faculty members in higher education as well as in recreation/leisure departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the career development of women faculty in recreation-related areas and to offer implications for faculty development and the preparation of future faculty. Data were collected from women who…

  20. The Importance of Physical Literacy for Physical Education and Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Umut Davut

    2018-01-01

    As the basis of characteristics, qualifications, behaviors, awareness, knowledge and understanding of the development of healthy active living and physical recreation opportunities Physical Literacy (PL); has become a global concern in the fields of physical education and recreation since its first use as a term. Experts from different countries…

  1. A Study of Ethics Education within Therapeutic Recreation Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbett, Nancy; Brown-Welty, Sharon; O'Keefe, Cathy

    2002-01-01

    Explored the status of ethics education within therapeutic recreation. Researchers surveyed all entry-level undergraduate and graduate therapeutic recreation training programs in one state, examining responses for differences in content and delivery. Programs appeared consistent with regard to ethics instruction, integrating similar content…

  2. Moving to the Rhythm of Africa: A Case Study of a Tertiary Educator's Understanding of Multicultural Dance in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Australia is proud of its rich and varied array of the Arts depicting a range of cultural diversity formed by ongoing migration. Although the complex issues of dance, culture and identity are interconnected, forming a multicultural society in Australia, dance education is a powerful platform to transmit and promote togetherness where understanding…

  3. Dance and Essence: Reflections on Morality and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, Stuart

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that the self-actualizing and expressive nature of dance contributes to an intuitive sense of morality. Criticizes the body versus mind dualism and antibody bias implicit in the Western intellectual tradition. Contrasts the aggressive nature of sports with the expressive character of dance. (MJP)

  4. The body present: an experience in dance-education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller, Jussara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The attention to one’s own body brings perception of the present time and the now. The experience of body present is the main objective of the proposals in the classroom shared here; therefore the Dance-Education takes place as a consequence of this assumption. The pedagogical proposals are developed with improvisation strategies as a means of investigation. In other words, it is not expected to get in the scope of the allegiance of the manageable body, the submissive body exercised, trained and built by discipline. As a matter of fact, the body present by self-listening, drafts a way from inside to outside, tuned with the outward to the inward and also with the inward to the within which generates a broad network of perceptions. The body present emerges from this listening to of the body and the relationships that become established the practitioner. The student recognizes the unit bodymind, the soma with its amplitude of sensibilities in order to deconstruct the body seated and stagnated in its convictions and stabilized habits.

  5. Health Benefits of Outdoor Recreation: Implications for Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenstein, Donna; Ewert, Alan

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews literature related to the positive effects of outdoor education. The following dimensions of health, and the benefits associated with each, are discussed: emotional, social, physical, intellectual, and spiritual. A model of health benefits derived from outdoor recreation is presented, and implications for health education are…

  6. The Detroit Approach to Adapted Physical Education and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Bruce; Czapski, Stephen

    The report describes Detroit's Adaptive Physical Education Consortium Project in Michigan. Among the main objectives of the project are to coordinate all physical education and recreation services to the handicapped in the Detroit area; to facilitate the mainstreaming of capable handicapped individuals into existing "regular" physical…

  7. Dancing beyond exercise: young people's experiences in dance classes

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, SM; Komesaroff, P; Fensham, R

    2008-01-01

    Dance classes in urban settings may have a role in health-promotion programmes seeking to increase physical activity amongst young people. However, little is so far known about the motivations, experiences or health outcomes of those participating in dance classes. This qualitative study of young people attending recreational dance classes addressed motivations, the nature of the class experience, and implications for health and well-being. Data show that young dance participants' experiences...

  8. Dança e Animação Cultural: " Improvisações" Dance and Recreation: “Improvisations” Danza y Animación cultural: “Improvisaciones”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Entre nossas propostas de trabalho está a de melhor compreender os mecanismos e as peculiaridades da animação cultural. Para isso, temos investigado as especificidades das diferentes linguagens artísticas. Nosso objetivo neste artigo é apresentar reflexões sobre a incorporação da dança em projetos de animação cultural, partindo de um olhar crítico sobre o próprio estágio de organização da arte. Mais do que pensar um processo de educação pela dança, estamos interessados em refletir sobre a educação para a dança e seus desdobramentos, já que esse assunto tem sido pouco discutido no âmbito do campo acadêmico e nos debates sobre o lazer. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Dança - Animação cultural. One of our aims with this work is to better comprehend the mechanisms and specific features of recreation projects. In this effort, we have dedicated ourselves to investigating the specific features of each of the different artisitic languages. Our main aim with this article is to present our reflections upon the incorporation of dance in recreation projects, with an analytical look at the current organizational stage of this art. More than just thinking of a process of education through art, we are interested in reflecting upong education for dance and its outcomes, as we believe this has been a lesser discussed dimension of the issue in the academic field of Dance and Physical Education. We also want to reflect upon the field of leisure activities. KEY WORDS: Dance - Recreation. Entre nuestras propuestas de trabajo está la de mejor comprender los mecanismos y las peculiaridades de la animación cultural. Injerido en ese esfuerzo, nos hemos dedicado a investigar las especificidades de los diferentes lenguajes artísticos. Nuestro objetivo en ese artículo es presentar reflexiones sobre la incorporación de la danza en proyectos de animación cultural, a partir de una visión crítica sobre el propio ciclo de organización del arte. M

  9. Shall We Dance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Of all art forms, dance is experienced least and considered low-priority. Art educators and the NAEP's arts education framework view dance as essential for every child's complete development. The National Dance Association has set high standards. Baltimore and South Bronx programs are profiled. (MLH)

  10. Excerpts from the Dances of Haiti: Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Katherine

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the sociological and psychological functions of the different forms of traditional Haitian dance. Describes uses of dances for recreation and play, social solidarity, externalization of emotions or sexuality, worship, and artistic expression. (KH)

  11. Streaming Video to Enhance Students' Reflection in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijen, Ali; Lam, Ineke; Wildschut, Liesbeth; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation case study that describes the experiences of 15 students and 2 teachers using a video-based learning environment, DiViDU, to facilitate students' daily reflection activities in a composition course and a ballet course. To support dance students' reflection processes streaming video was applied as follows: video…

  12. Outdoor recreation-related outdoor education: scope of the research (1995-2010) 2

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Article made available with the permission of the New Zealand Journal of Outdoor Education. This is part two of an article on the scope of the New Zealand outdoor recreation-related outdoor education research published from January 1995 to June 2010. It draws on the literature covered the 2010 Sport and Recreation New Zealand-funded Outdoor Recreation Research Stocktake, which included outdoor education material. This part covers resources for outdoor recreation-related outdoor education, ...

  13. Peculiarities of Use of Dancing Exercises in Physical Education of Female High Schoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. М. Кравчук

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to ground and develop the methods of the use of dancing exercises at physical training classes in high school and to experimentally verify their effectiveness. Research methods. Theoretical ones: study and analysis of pedagogical, scientific and methodological literature on the problems under research; a complex of empirical research methods: research and experimental work, observations, questionnaires, testing; statistical methods of research and data reduction. Research results. The paper reveals the peculiarities of the use of dancing exercises at physical training classes in high school. It shows that dancing exercises can and must be part of the physical education of high schoolers to develop their strength, flexibility, endurance, coordination abilities and to cultivate movement culture, musicality, dancing abilities and aesthetic taste. The study proves that the use of dancing exercises of classical choreography, rhythmic gymnastics and health-improving aerobics at the physical training classes in high school helps increase the level of development of flexibility, strength and agility.

  14. Dancing in the Rain: Leading with Compassion, Vitality, and Mindfulness in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jerome T.

    2016-01-01

    "Dancing in the Rain" offers a lively and accessible guide aimed at helping education leaders thrive under pressure by developing the inner strengths of mindfulness and self-compassion, expressing emotions wisely, and maintaining a clear focus on the values that matter most. Jerome T. Murphy, a scholar and former dean who has written and…

  15. Mind the gap: reflections on the current provision of dance education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigates some of the 'gaps' that have emerged between the ideals of dance education and the reality of training institutions in South Africa, with specific reference to the Western Cape. Three areas of disparity have been identified and are discussed in great depth. The article not only aims to discuss and ...

  16. The Effect of 12 Weeks Dance Education on Physical Fitness Values At Mentally Retarded Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asena DORSAN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of 12 weeks of dance education on the values of physical fitness at children with mental retarded. 22 educable mentally retarded children from Dr. Günseli - Dr. Bülent Akınsal Secondary School and Working Sc hool participated in this study. Mentally Disabled children who participated voluntarily were grouped as the average age of 16.27± 1.00 year with11 people (9 males, 2females of the experimental group and the average age of 15.90± 0.83 year to 11people(7 males, 4 females as the control group. Participants in the experimental group was implemented 12 - weekdance education program including 2 days a week, 2 hours a day. Program contents included the basic posture correction, flexibility, ability to maintain a rhythm, motion diversity and self - expression skills, pair work and group work. Physical fitness values of experimental and control group were measured in before and after studies. After the 12 - week dance education, It was determined that there was st atistically significant differences in vertical jump, flexibility, sprint and balance parameters between the experimental and control groups.(p<0.05. In the study of comparing the experimental group in itself, statistically significant differences were fo und of the specified physical fitness parameters (p<0.01. As a result; physical fitness levels of the educable mentally retarded individuals who regularly participated in dance activities showed significant improvements. The results of this study, it was observed that after 12 - week education program there was more development of many physical fitness parameters in the experimental group than the control group and this revealed that the importance of dance education on educable mentally retarded children.

  17. Local habitats recreation in gardening as an environmental education tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Lopez, F.; Victoria-Cos, I. M.; Cos, J.; Sotomayor, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    A garden has been implanted at IMIDA facilities in La Alberca (Murcia) which recreates different habitats of Murcia Region, with two main objective: 1) to be used as a tool for environmental education, encouraging social awareness in habitats and flora species protection, and 2) to obtain relevant information for the use of regional wild flora in gardening, both for the ornamental interest of not extensively spread species, and its low eater irrigation needs. (Author)

  18. The Structure of t he Recreation Education in Higher Education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Murat KIZANLIKLI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available By the effects of intense industrialization, technology and working conditions, how people spend their limited free time became an important issue. The importance of using leisure time effect ively and efficiently has an importance and necessity for the education of recreation which can be defined as activities in which people spend their leisure time with satisfying and revitalizing doings. Recreation education, whose beginning is under the s port education, has started at faculties of tourism since 2009. This is a new field in tourism education in Turkey when it’s compared with the examples of the world. Thus, the main objective of this study is to investigate structure and current status of r ecreation education in higher education. For this purpose, dealing with the process of the recreational education, the present situation and the educational structure of the recreational education at higher schools in Turkey has been investigated. Also, re creation education was investigated with the structuring in undergraduate, graduate as well as tourism education and sports education. Besides, in order to put the recreation of recreation education with other disciplines, graduate theses have been investi gated by the programs. According to the data obtained, it has been found out that recreation education at undergraduate level was largely performed in Higher Schools of Physical Education and Sports and the theses prepared were organized under Graduate Sch ool of Natural and Applied Sciences and on Landscape Architecture. This study is aimed to be a resource that manages to compile wide range of information for the future studies.

  19. The Sacred or the Profane: The Challenge of Modern Dance in Religious Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The article addresses the utilization of modern dance compositional approaches in the development of sacred dance works. A brief history of sacred dance in the Western Church is traced as a foundation for students' stereotypical approaches to dance and religion. Also examined is the 20th Century modern dance choreographers' practice of…

  20. Creating Cultures of Teaching and Learning: Conveying Dance and Somatic Education Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Donna A.

    2015-01-01

    Often in teaching dance, methods of teaching and learning are silently embedded into dance classroom experiences. Unidentified and undisclosed pedagogic information has impacted the content of dance history; the perpetuation of authoritarian teaching practices within dance technique classes and in some dance classes deemed "somatics";…

  1. Professional Preparation in Physical Education and Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is the product of a conference of the American Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, the purpose of which was to revise professional preparation quidelines in dance, physical education, recreation education, and health and safety education. This report includes sections on physical education and coaching and on…

  2. Detailed Globes Enhance Education and Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Orbis World Globes creates inflatable globes-Earthballs-in many sizes that depict Earth as it is seen from space, complete with atmospheric cloud cover. Orbis designs and produces the most visually authentic replicas of Earth ever created, and NASA took notice of Orbis globes and employed a 16-inch diameter EarthBall for an educational film it made aboard the STS-45 shuttle mission. Orbis later collaborated with NASA to create two 16-foot diameter world globes for display at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, using more detailed satellite imagery. The satellite image now printed on all Orbis globes displays 1-kilometer resolution and is 21,600 by 43,200 pixels in size, and Orbis globes are otherwise meteorologically accurate, though the cloud cover has been slightly reduced in order for most of the landforms to be visible. Orbis also developed the exclusive NightGlow Cities feature, enabling EarthBalls to display the world's cities as they appear as the Earth revolves from daylight into night. Orbis inflatable globes are available in sizes from 1 to 100 feet in diameter, with the most common being the standard 16-inch and 1-meter diameter EarthBalls. Applications include educational uses from preschools to universities, games, and for a variety of display purposes at conferences, trade shows, festivals, concerts, and parades. A 16-foot diameter Orbis globe was exhibited at the United Nations' World Urban Forum, in Vancouver, Canada; the Space 2006 conference, in San Jose, California; and the X-Prize Cup Personal Spaceflight Exposition in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

  3. Non formal education in the teaching of peruvian dances among peruvian migrants in Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Benza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing migration of Peruvian citizens to Buenos Aires is a recent phenomenon, and the intensification of the development of organizations and their public presence are correlated with the participation in festivities, civic organizations and the like. This article is a preliminary report on research that focuses on Peruvian dance groups in Buenos Aires and that proposes to describe some of the ways that Peruvian folkdances are transmitted. I show how a process of non formal education is shaped by the interactions among dance groups and between them and representatives of the Peruvian Government in Buenos Aires; and how it is influenced by the need to «demonstrate through performance,» by ways of participating in the groups and by the previous knowledge of the dances that the performers bring with them. The analysis focuses on the microanalytic dimension of representations and practices of the dancers and directors of the dance groups. The fieldwork was carried out in the period 2005-2008 and focused on four groups of Peruvian folk dancers. The phenomena studied are shown to have great potential as intercultural mediators that transcend cultural manifestations to become mechanisms of consciousness raising that reach out to publics beyond the Peruvians themselves.

  4. The Effect of an Authentic Acute Physical Education Session of Dance on Elementary Students' Selective Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinna, P H; Stylianou, M; Dyson, B; Banville, D; Dryden, C; Colby, R

    2018-01-01

    There have been calls to test the potential benefits of different forms of physical activity (PA) to executive function, particularly in authentic settings. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute dance session within an existing physical education class on students' selective attention. The study employed a pre/posttest quasi-experimental design with a comparison group in one Aotearoa, New Zealand, primary school. Participants were 192 students (comparison group = 104 students) in Years 5 and 6. The intervention group participated in a dance-based physical education lesson while the comparison group continued their regular classroom work. PA during the physical education lesson was monitored using accelerometers. Selective attention was assessed at pretest and after the comparison/physical education sessions with the d2 Test of Attention. 2 × 2 ANOVA results suggested a significant time effect for all three measures, no significant group effects for any measures, and significant time by group interactions for TN and CP but not for E %. The intervention group improved significantly more than the comparison group for TN and CP. This study's findings suggest that existing school opportunities focused on cognitively engaging PA, such as dance, can improve aspects of students' selective attention.

  5. The Effect of an Authentic Acute Physical Education Session of Dance on Elementary Students’ Selective Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Kulinna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been calls to test the potential benefits of different forms of physical activity (PA to executive function, particularly in authentic settings. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute dance session within an existing physical education class on students’ selective attention. The study employed a pre/posttest quasi-experimental design with a comparison group in one Aotearoa, New Zealand, primary school. Participants were 192 students (comparison group = 104 students in Years 5 and 6. The intervention group participated in a dance-based physical education lesson while the comparison group continued their regular classroom work. PA during the physical education lesson was monitored using accelerometers. Selective attention was assessed at pretest and after the comparison/physical education sessions with the d2 Test of Attention. 2 × 2 ANOVA results suggested a significant time effect for all three measures, no significant group effects for any measures, and significant time by group interactions for TN and CP but not for E%. The intervention group improved significantly more than the comparison group for TN and CP. This study’s findings suggest that existing school opportunities focused on cognitively engaging PA, such as dance, can improve aspects of students’ selective attention.

  6. Dreams Do Come True: The Creation and Growth of a Recreational Dance Program for Children and Young Adults with Additional Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Nicole; Fletcher, Paula; Bryden, Pam

    2015-01-01

    There are many benefits to dance, both for typically developing individuals and for individuals with additional needs. The purpose of this narrative case study was to analyse a dance program for children and young adults with additional needs from the perspective of the program creator and primary dance instructor. Data collection occurred at two…

  7. The Jerusarema Dance of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Kariamu Welsh

    1985-01-01

    Traces the historical development of the Jerusarema, a traditional dance of the Shona of Zimbabwe, from its origins as a form of military defense to its present role in recreation and ceremony. Describes the Jerusarema, classifies it in relation to other African dance forms, and discusses how it is learned. (KH)

  8. The Effect of an Authentic Acute Physical Education Session of Dance on Elementary Students’ Selective Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Kulinna, P. H.; Stylianou, M.; Dyson, B.; Banville, D.; Dryden, C.; Colby, R.

    2018-01-01

    There have been calls to test the potential benefits of different forms of physical activity (PA) to executive function, particularly in authentic settings. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute dance session within an existing physical education class on students’ selective attention. The study employed a pre/posttest quasi-experimental design with a comparison group in one Aotearoa, New Zealand, primary school. Participants were 192 students (comparison ...

  9. Disrupting privilege, identity, and meaning: A reflexive dance of environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Alison Laurie

    By inviting educators from diverse backgrounds to participate in creative conversations, I had hoped to reflect on experiences that had helped construct our theories of environmental education, and inform practice. I sought consistency across the espoused ethics of co-participants, namely critical perspectives grounded in environmental justice. However, this quest was interrupted by a growing awareness of the interference of power dynamics between myself and the other participants, and of my own commitment to respect the stories being told. This narrative describes my "dance" of meaning making. The community dance examining privilege, identity and meaning is a study of how I may be contributing to the same oppressive situations I passionately strive to work against. Concepts of knowledge, power, and identity ebbed and flowed within stories drawn from the mountains of Tanzania to the hills of Colombia, and from the frozen shores of Kirkland Lake to the trout filled streams of Karman, Iran. Making meaning is itself an act of power and privilege, so I danced to make room for multiple understandings of these stories, of environmental education, and of research. This work offers an experience of disruption that raises questions and broadens the inclusion of people, ideas and other life into "accepted" research and pedagogical practices. Conventions embedded within research and education were disrupted throughout this reflexive process. As the author of this text, I was uncomfortable with the role of being the dominant voice, and consciously chose not to impose my interpretation on the stories shared by co-participants. The struggle to resist the very privilege in which my own education practice and this research process are so deeply steeped revealed normative forces that often threaten to undermine attempts by educators and researchers to act according to critical theories and environmental justice ethics. To accept the invitation to dance with the text is to step into

  10. Physical Education Cultures in Sweden: Fitness, Sports, Dancing … Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Håkan; Karlefors, Inger

    2015-01-01

    In a significant article from 1993, Crum describes the purpose of physical education (PE) as a "planned introduction into movement culture". In broad terms, this purpose is tantamount to the stated purpose of Swedish PE in national steering documents. Crum contends, however, that physical educators do not prioritise learning, which is…

  11. Career Education for Leisure Occupations: Curriculum Guidelines for Recreation, Hospitality, and Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    The guidelines suggested in this publication have been designed to assist educators in developing career education programs based on local needs and resources in the leisure career family for the occupational groups in recreation services, recreation resources, tourism, and amusement and entertainment. The basic approaches presented are applicable…

  12. Dance Specialists around the World--A Living History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musmon, Margaret; Welsh, Kariamu; Heath, Freddie-Lee; Minton, Sandra; Laverty, Mary Ann; Maeshiba, Naoko; Weeks, Sandy; Cardinal, Marita K.; Howton, Amy; Tavacioglu, Leyla

    2008-01-01

    Dance embraces the entire globe. Universities offer world dance classes to expose students to various styles and educators travel to different countries to experience how dance is viewed, performed, and taught in different cultures. In this article nine dance educators share their experiences of teaching and observing dance abroad. These accounts…

  13. Why Do You Dance? Development of the Dance Motivation Inventory (DMI)

    OpenAIRE

    Maraz, Aniko; Kir?ly, Orsolya; Urb?n, R?bert; Griffiths, Mark D.; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Dancing is a popular form of physical exercise and studies have show that dancing can decrease anxiety, increase self-esteem, and improve psychological wellbeing. The aim of the current study was to explore the motivational basis of recreational social dancing and develop a new psychometric instrument to assess dancing motivation. The sample comprised 447 salsa and/or ballroom dancers (68% female; mean age 32.8 years) who completed an online survey. Eight motivational factors were identified ...

  14. Non formal education in the teaching of peruvian dances among peruvian migrants in Buenos Aires

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Benza

    2009-01-01

    The increasing migration of Peruvian citizens to Buenos Aires is a recent phenomenon, and the intensification of the development of organizations and their public presence are correlated with the participation in festivities, civic organizations and the like. This article is a preliminary report on research that focuses on Peruvian dance groups in Buenos Aires and that proposes to describe some of the ways that Peruvian folkdances are transmitted. I show how a process of non formal education ...

  15. Dance for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Dance programs for older adults that encourage exercise and socializing are described in six articles. Program guidelines of the American Alliance Committee on Aging are explained, and other articles emphasize a movement education approach that may involve intergenerational contact. A dance program held in a worship setting is also discussed. (PP)

  16. Redesigning Pedagogy for Boys and Dance in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Robyne; Wrench, Alison

    2018-01-01

    Pedagogical practices in schooling bear a potential to impact on student success, achievement and engagement with schooling. This is especially the case for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, who are deeply dependent on schooling for their educational resources. Central to this paper are pedagogies for social justice and improved engagement…

  17. Regular Latin Dancing and Health Education may Improve Cognition of Late Middle-Aged and Older Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, David X.; Wilson, Robert; Aguiñaga, Susan; Vásquez, Priscilla; Fogg, Louis; Yang, Zhi; Wilbur, JoEllen; Hughes, Susan; Spanbauer, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Disparities exist between Latinos and non-Latino whites in cognitive function. Dance is culturally appropriate and challenges individuals physically and cognitively, yet the impact of regular dancing on cognitive function in older Latinos has not been examined. A two-group pilot trial was employed among inactive, older Latinos. Participants (N = 57) participated in the BAILAMOS© dance program or a health education program. Cognitive test scores were converted to z-scores and measures of global cognition and specific domains (executive function, episodic memory, working memory) were derived. Results revealed a group × time interaction for episodic memory (pdance group showed greater improvement in episodic memory than the health education group. A main effect for time for global cognition (pdance programs can positively influence episodic memory; and participation in structured programs may improve overall cognition among older Latinos. PMID:28095105

  18. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  19. The Legacy of Dance as a Democratizing Force in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Melissa

    Many believe that dance is a democratizing force in academia. Modern dance history is replete with feminist, homosexual, and racial liberation ideologies transcribed through body language. Experiences in planning cross-discipline courses suggest that, without dance, important aesthetic and sociopolitical ideas most fully revealed in nonverbal and…

  20. FAQ about Recreational Therapy (RT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recreation &Community Activities WHAT ARE A RECREATIONAL THERAPIST'S EDUCATION, QUALIFICATIONS, & CREDENTIALS? A qualified recreational therapist is someone who is nationally certified as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS), usually referred to as Recreational ...

  1. Natural areas and urban populations: communication and environmental education challenges and actions in outdoor recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah J. Chavez

    2005-01-01

    Challenges, opportunities, and actions exist in areas where large urban populations interface with natural areas, such as outdoor recreation sites in southern California. Challenges in the interface include intense recreation use, public safety issues, and complex information strategies. Research results on communications and environmental education offer opportunities...

  2. Outdoor recreation-related outdoor education: scope of the research (1995-2010) I

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Article made available with the permission of the New Zealand Journal of Outdoor Education. This article reports on the scope of the New Zealand outdoor recreationrelated outdoor education research literature published from January 1995 to June 2010. It draws on the literature covered by the 2010 Sport and Recreation New Zealand-funded Outdoor Recreation Research Stocktake, which included outdoor education material. This article is divided into two parts, both published in this issue of th...

  3. Review Symposium; Dancing on the Ceiling: A Study of Women Managers in Education, by Valerie Hall. London: Paul Chapman, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Valerie; Gronn, Peter; Jenkin, Mazda; Power, Sally; Reynolds, Cecilia

    1999-01-01

    Hall and four colleagues review "Dancing on the Ceiling: A Study of Women Managers in Education" (Paul Chapman, 1996). Reviewers agree that Hall's profiles of six British elementary and secondary women headteachers should improve readers' understanding of female managers' development and their preference for "soft,"…

  4. Students' perspectives on e-learning and the use of a virtual learning environment in dance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, Ä.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838446; Admiraal, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120226340; Wildschut, L.; Simons, P.R.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068032994

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out how dance students experienced learning in an international distance education program delivered in an e-learning format using a virtual learning environment platform. In order to organize the students’ experiences with the various learning assignments, we

  5. The Experience of Staging Nijinsky's "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune" in a Higher Education Dance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Tina

    2010-01-01

    This study documented the experiences of staging Vaslav Nijinsky's "L'Apres-midi d'un Faune" in a higher education dance program. The ballet was staged from Labanotation. Research questions focused on teaching and learning pedagogy, characterization of the process over time, experiences of the participants and teaching approaches. The project…

  6. Planning Facilities for Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This revised edition includes new material recommended by a panel of experts in the field of recreational planning. The following topics are covered: (1) the planning process; (2) indoor facilities; (3) outdoor facilities; (4) indoor and outdoor swimming pools; (5) encapsulated spaces and stadiums; (6) service areas; (7) recreation and park…

  7. Aesthetic aspects in meaning making - an explorative study of dance education in a PETE programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lundvall

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on how aesthetic aspects of experience are involved in meaning making within an educational setting of body movement practice. The study explores stories of how physical education student teachers feel when participating in a dance lesson, with attention given to aesthetic aspects of embodied experiences in relation to meaning making. The study draws on Dewey’s theory of experimental learning. Aesthetic experience is defined as the feeling of wholeness or fulfilment in the transaction taking place. The categorical analysis of content, inspired by pragmatic epistemology analyses, uses the operational concepts of gaps, encounters, and relations. Three categories of stories emerge linked by the resemblance of positive or negative feelings expressed. The aesthetic experiences seem to inform the students of the purpose of what is undertaken, how to value the experience, and how the meaning of the embodied experience is perceived.

  8. Science as Performance: Communicating and Educating through Theater, Music, and Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Brian B.

    2010-01-01

    Theater, music, dance, the literary and the visual arts can convey the joys and controversies of science. We describe a program at the Graduate Center entitled Science & the Arts which is designed to communicate to the public the excitement and wonder of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Over the past few years there have been major successes in communicating science to the public through the arts. This is especially evident in theater, film and opera with such recent plays as Copenhagen, the Oscar winning film A Beautiful Mind and the opera Doctor Atomic at the Met. The performance series Science & the Arts has been developed and tested at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) in mid-Manhattan for more than nine years, see http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart/ . We have established working relationships with actors, playwrights, dancers, choreographers, musicians, composers, artists and scientists who work at the intersection of science and the arts. In this presentation we will illustrate many of our collaborations in theater, dance, music and art. Faculty members, professionals and students from the university, other educational institutions, museums, theaters and government laboratories as well as the public with an interest science and arts programs should find this presentation of particular interest. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation, NSF PHY-0431660.

  9. Sexuality and Sexual Identity: Critical Possibilities for Teaching Dance Appreciation and Dance History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dils, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intersections of dance and sexuality and sexual identity are part of the critical discourse important to teaching dance appreciation and dance history. This essay presents aspects of my teaching practice, informed by current writings in queer studies, dance studies, education, and sociology. Awareness of potential classroom diversity helps…

  10. Dance Careers for the Next Decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, Mary Martha

    1984-01-01

    Dance educators need to be aware of current career trends and focus their programs on practical needs of their students. Teaching, dance journalism, therapy, and photography are career options for the dancer who is not a professional performer. (DF)

  11. Decolonizing Dance Curriculum in Higher Education: One Credit at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy-Brown, Nyama

    2014-01-01

    Most dance departments in the United States require rigorous study of traditional Western dance forms. This is common; many developed countries cultivate the art forms that reflect the aesthetics and philosophies of the majority culture in that nation. However, demographics in the United States have changed greatly over the past 50 years, with…

  12. Importance of Students' Views and the Role of Self-Esteem in Lessons of Creative Dance in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Claudia; Steinberg, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to capture the student's views in lessons of creative dance. A qualitative empirical research design was carried out using video-stimulated recall interviews. The participants in this study were 88 children (63 female and 25 male) between the ages of 9 and 11 years (M = 10.5, SD = 1.2) in physical education lessons. A…

  13. Dance Dynamics. Athletes & Dancers Training & Moving Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This series of articles explores the various ways in which training procedures in both dance and athletics are compatible. Topics include: traditional and adapted dance class structures and materials; the inclusion of dance in the physical education curriculum; and the physical fitness of dancers as compared to athletes. (JN)

  14. Using Dance To Integrate Exceptionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Geraldine A.; Launi, Barbara A.

    This conference presentation handout describes a program which uses dance therapy to integrate special education students with various disabilities. The 6-week program at a middle school involved having a professional dancer teach students traditional and modern dance methods as a means of expressing emotions, followed by teams of students…

  15. Authorships of habitual bodies dancing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    Dance is a mandatory part of physical education in Denmark and in this context imitation and improvisation are often used as if they are to be understood as dichotomies. In this paper I focus on analyzing how the students’ experience of the authorships of their dance-movements – whether improvise...

  16. The Contribution of Outdoor Recreation and Outdoor Education to the Economy of Scotland: Case Studies and Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and education contribute substantially to the Scottish economy. Outdoor recreation generates considerable tourism income, much of it in rural areas, and also extends the traditional tourist season. Outdoor education centers are significant employers in certain rural areas. In addition, "therapeutic" outdoor programs…

  17. DSI--Dance Scene Investigation: Exploring a Time in Dance History as Dancer, Choreographer, Historian, and Critic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear-Jones, Gwen

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief description of a dance program at the Old Donation Center Dance Education Program in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The mission of DSI--Dance Scene Investigation--is to nurture the full development of each student's dance potential through intense involvement in every aspect of the art. The program provides differentiated…

  18. Effects of dance on anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesté, A; Rust, J

    1984-06-01

    The study investigated the effects of modern dance on anxiety. State anxiety was assessed before and after a 3-mo. education programme, using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The target group followed a class in modern dance. Control groups were (1) a physical education group to control for the effects of exercise, (2) a music group to control for aesthetic sensitivity training, and (3) a mathematics group. Several concomitant variables were measured: age, sex, attitude towards dance, and previous experience in sport, dance, and relaxation. Dance training significantly reduced anxiety, but no control activities did so. Examination of the concomitant variables showed that the result could not be accounted for by any obvious artifacts.

  19. Proceedings of the 1975 Dallas-SPRE Institute. A Progressive Approach to Park and Recreation Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Donald C., Ed.

    This report is divided into three parts. The first part is the opening address. It argues for the importance of constructive leisure as a human need. The essay suggests that recreation educators need to learn from such humanistic psychologists as Abraham Maslow, who have studied what man needs to achieve self-actualization. The second part of the…

  20. Views of Students in the Department of Recreation and Sport Management on Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herguner, Gulten

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate viewpoints of students in recreation and sport management department on distance education, and the effects of sex, having computers and internet access at home, family's monthly income, district of the family, and students' level of class on these viewpoints. Survey method was used to carry out the study. The sample…

  1. Physical education, sport and recreation: A triad pedagogy of hope ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bloch (2009, 58), a previous advocate of Outcomes-based Education (OBE), states that schooling in SA is a national disaster. Quality holistic education that includes Physical Education (PE) and school sport should be the focal point of progress in developing countries. However, PE is worldwide in a political crisis and the ...

  2. Careers in Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sandra

    Trends in the current job market in the field of dance are identified, and aspects, such as personal qualifications, training requirements, income potential, and employment possibilities, are discussed. Employment opportunities in the professional world, the field of education, and the corporate environment are explored. Career opportunities for…

  3. Standing down Straight: Jump Rhythm Technique's Rhythm-Driven, Community-Directed Approach to Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenfeld, Billy

    2009-01-01

    "Standing down straight" means to stand on two feet with both stability and relaxation. Using standing down straight as the foundation of class work, Jump Rhythm Technique offers a fresh alternative to conventional systems of dance study. It bases its pedagogy on three behaviors: grounding the body so that it can move with power and efficiency,…

  4. Ballet, why and how? On the role of classical ballet in dance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, D.D.; Vos, M.

    2013-01-01

    Classical ballet is no longer the sole stimulus for today's audiences, as a fluid fusion of everything from ballet to Bollywood and from breakdancing to Latin represents how dance is consumed today. With the emergence of modern choreographers and new teaching styles, debate on the benefits of

  5. Improvising with Material in the Higher Education Dance Technique Class: Exploration and Ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    In this article the author, Rachel Rimmer, explores how improvisation can facilitate skills that are transferable to other areas of dance practice, enabling different areas of study to complement each other. The experimental forum of improvisation as an alternative method of learning technique is considered, contemplating the value of this…

  6. Colorado Multicultural Resources for Arts Education: Dance, Music, Theatre, and Visual Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassio, Charles J., Ed.

    This Colorado resource guide is based on the premise that the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) provide a natural arena for teaching multiculturalism to students of all ages. The guide provides information to Colorado schools about printed, disc, video, and audio tape visual prints, as well as about individuals and organizations that…

  7. The Relationship between Recreational Reading Habits, Knowledge of Contemporary Young Adult Literature and Anticipated Instructional Practices in Secondary Education Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodensteiner, Lacey

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of encouraging the development of recreational reading habits in secondary students, there is considerable evidence that many secondary schools implement instructional practices that negatively shape literary experiences. This study examined the recreational reading habits of secondary education majors, their knowledge of…

  8. Dance Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Nursing has been described as an art and a science. The scientific aspect of nursing can be learned in nursing school and in years of practice. However, the art of nursing is enriched by each nurse's connection with life experiences. The purpose of this article is to highlight my particular life experience with dance and to show how studying dance has helped me become the strong nursing leader I am today.

  9. Koula Pratsika and Her Dance School: Embracing Gender, Class and the Nation in the Formative Years of Contemporary Dance Education in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsintziloni, Steriani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a historical examination of the interplay between Koula Pratsika's dance school, its historical and social context and the formation of social categories of class, gender and nation in the 1930s as part of a greater project, that of the formation of upper class culture. This perspective reveals the…

  10. Dancing Aikido

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    to defend them-selves effectively. The incorporation of aikido-movement requires them to train to being able to adjust their sense of energy in their movement according to the energy sensed in the interaction with their actual partner attacking them. At the same time, aikido is practiced in a setting which......The martial art form of aikido can be related to the development of the dance genre of contact improvisation as well as to different kinds of dance training. Having this relation to dance practices in mind, the aim of this paper is to explore how an embodied sense of energy is developed...... in the interactional settings of aikido training. Methodologically, the exploration of aikido practices draws on auto-ethnographical methodologies and recent phenomenological discussions and explorations of interaction. In the training of aikido, practitioners focus on developing an embodied competence of how...

  11. Why do you dance? Development of the Dance Motivation Inventory (DMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraz, Aniko; Király, Orsolya; Urbán, Róbert; Griffiths, Mark D; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Dancing is a popular form of physical exercise and studies have show that dancing can decrease anxiety, increase self-esteem, and improve psychological wellbeing. The aim of the current study was to explore the motivational basis of recreational social dancing and develop a new psychometric instrument to assess dancing motivation. The sample comprised 447 salsa and/or ballroom dancers (68% female; mean age 32.8 years) who completed an online survey. Eight motivational factors were identified via exploratory factor analysis and comprise a new Dance Motivation Inventory: Fitness, Mood Enhancement, Intimacy, Socialising, Trance, Mastery, Self-confidence and Escapism. Mood Enhancement was the strongest motivational factor for both males and females, although motives differed according to gender. Dancing intensity was predicted by three motivational factors: Mood Enhancement, Socialising, and Escapism. The eight dimensions identified cover possible motives for social recreational dancing, and the DMI proved to be a suitable measurement tool to assess these motives. The explored motives such as Mood Enhancement, Socialising and Escapism appear to be similar to those identified in other forms of behaviour such as drinking alcohol, exercise, gambling, and gaming.

  12. Why do you dance? Development of the Dance Motivation Inventory (DMI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniko Maraz

    Full Text Available Dancing is a popular form of physical exercise and studies have show that dancing can decrease anxiety, increase self-esteem, and improve psychological wellbeing. The aim of the current study was to explore the motivational basis of recreational social dancing and develop a new psychometric instrument to assess dancing motivation. The sample comprised 447 salsa and/or ballroom dancers (68% female; mean age 32.8 years who completed an online survey. Eight motivational factors were identified via exploratory factor analysis and comprise a new Dance Motivation Inventory: Fitness, Mood Enhancement, Intimacy, Socialising, Trance, Mastery, Self-confidence and Escapism. Mood Enhancement was the strongest motivational factor for both males and females, although motives differed according to gender. Dancing intensity was predicted by three motivational factors: Mood Enhancement, Socialising, and Escapism. The eight dimensions identified cover possible motives for social recreational dancing, and the DMI proved to be a suitable measurement tool to assess these motives. The explored motives such as Mood Enhancement, Socialising and Escapism appear to be similar to those identified in other forms of behaviour such as drinking alcohol, exercise, gambling, and gaming.

  13. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  14. Smiljana Mandukic (1908-1992 Beginning of Modern Dance and Dance Expressionism in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Obradović

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Smiljana Mandukić (1908-1992 a dancer, choreographer, and teacher, was among those dancers who pioneering the modern dance in Serbia. The beginning of the 20th century brought new forms of art as the old ones were not sufficient to express new feelings and experiences, in that era of rapid technological progress. Mandukic was educated as a dancer in interwar Vienna, so she happened to be at the centre of Central European expressionist dance, free dance, at the time of her formation as a dancer. Smiljana acquired dance knowledge from her teachers, famous dancers and choreographers, Gertrud Bodenwieser, who developed her own style of modern expressionist dance, known as “Bodenwieser Viennise Style”, and Grete Wiesenthal, who was a member of the corps de ballet of the Hofoper in Vienna (Vienna Court Opera Ballet. Both her teachers were the representatives of “Ausdrukstanz” or “Neur Tanz”, and were rejected formalism and virtuosity of classical dance in favour of more natural movements. Like her pair, Maga Magazinovic (1882-1968, who introduced expressionist dance in Serbia, established the first school of modern dance in 1910, and founded the first modern dance group consisted of female dancers, Mandukic advocated for the importance of dance in education of female population. In the traditional, patriarchal Serbian society, she opened the second school of modern dance in 1931, and was the first artist who established a professional group of modern dance. Her greatest achievement was the creation of “epic-patriotic choreodrama”. The main goal of this article is to confirm that Smiljana Mandukic’s pioneer work in establishing modern dance in Serbia was the part of the European expressionist modern dance movement of the equal importance and significance not only when considering the Western Balkans but the broader European context.

  15. Engaging Youth through African-Derived Dance and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Kikora

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of African and African-derived dance and culture and highlights the physical health, dance education, historical, and cultural benefits of a school-based program that incorporates African dance as its core component. The article also includes the phases of the programming and brings attention to potential…

  16. Tracing Lines of Meaning: A Course Redesign for Dance Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enghauser, Rebecca Gose

    2012-01-01

    The 21st-century dance milieu demands that a dancer possess a highly diverse skill set, including effective teaching skills and a broader appreciation of a pedagogical orientation. It is vital that in preparing dance educators, we create opportunities for students to reflect on their dance learning histories and consequential beliefs about…

  17. Dance for Physically Disabled Persons: A Manual for Teaching Ballroom, Square, and Folk Dances to Users of Wheelchairs and Crutches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen

    The final booklet in a series on physical education and sports for the handicapped presents ideas for teaching dance to the physically disabled. Introductory sections consider the rehabilitation role of dance, physiological and psychological benefits, and facilities for dance instruction. Step-by-step suggestions are given for teaching ballroom…

  18. Exploring Dance Careers. A Student Guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Richard; Hansen, Mary Lewis

    One of six student guidebooks in a series of 11 arts and humanities career exploration guides for grade 7-12 teachers, counselors, and students, this student book on exploration of dance careers presents information on specific occupations in both performance careers and dance education. An introductory section describes the four different dance…

  19. Hunter College Dance Therapy Masters Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmais, Claire; White, Elissa Q.

    Described is development of the Hunter College dance therapy 18-month 30-credit masters program involving 33 adult students, (in two classes beginning in 1971 and 1972), an educational model, internship in psychiatric institutions, and preparation of instructional materials. The dance therapist is said to incorporate the psychiatric patient's…

  20. Dancing club

    CERN Multimedia

    Dancing club

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Dancing Club organizes a Tango workshop on Saturday 21 March and a West Coast and Boogie workshop on Saturday 18 April. These workshops are open to everyone in its B566 ballroom (See the poster). Furthermore, the club invites you to its Argentine Tango party on 20 March. These events are free and open to everyone. You bring something to eat and the club offers the drinks (non alcoholic).  

  1. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly Using interactivity to excite and educate children about butterflies and the National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lydia

    The National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden is a tropical rainforest that allows visitors to step into the world of butterflies, but lacks a more comprehensive educational element to teach visitors additional information about butterflies. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly is a thesis project designed to enhance younger visitors' experience of the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden with an interactive educational application that aligns with The Strong's mission of encouraging learning, creativity, and discovery. This was accomplished through a series of fun and educational games and animations, designed for use as a kiosk outside the garden and as a part of The Strong's website. Content, planning, and organization of this project has been completed through research and observation of the garden in the following areas: its visitors, butterflies, best usability practices for children, and game elements that educate and engage children. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly teaches users about the butterfly's life cycle, anatomy, and characteristics as well as their life in the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden. Through the use of the design programs Adobe Illustrator, Flash, and After Effects; the programming language ActionScript3.0; a child-friendly user interface and design; audio elements and user takeaways, Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly appeals to children of all ages, interests, and learning styles. The project can be viewed at lydiapowers.com/Thesis/FlutterByButterfly.html

  2. Physical Education and Transition Planning Experiences Relating to Recreation among Adults Who Are Deafblind: A Recall Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Kirk, T. Nicole; Justin A. Haegele

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Children who are deafblind have unique educational needs, especially when it comes to developing a foundation for recreation. This foundation includes a well-rounded physical education program. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of adults who are deafblind as they recall their involvement in physical…

  3. Dance movement therapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkou, Vicky; Meekums, Bonnie

    2017-02-03

    Dementia is a collective name for different degenerative brain syndromes which, according to Alzheimer's Disease International, affects approximately 35.6 million people worldwide. The latest NICE guideline for dementia highlights the value of diverse treatment options for the different stages and symptoms of dementia including non-pharmacological treatments. Relevant literature also argues for the value of interventions that acknowledge the complexity of the condition and address the person as a whole, including their physical, emotional, social and cognitive processes. At the same time, there is growing literature that highlights the capacity of the arts and embodied practices to address this complexity. Dance movement therapy is an embodied psychological intervention that can address complexity and thus, may be useful for people with dementia, but its effectiveness remains unclear. To assess the effects of dance movement therapy on behavioural, social, cognitive and emotional symptoms of people with dementia in comparison to no treatment, standard care or any other treatment. Also, to compare different forms of dance movement therapy (e.g. Laban-based dance movement therapy, Chacian dance movement therapy or Authentic Movement). Searches took place up to March 2016 through ALOIS, Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement's Specialized Register, which covers CENTRAL, a number of major healthcare databases and trial registers, and grey literature sources. We checked bibliographies of relevant studies and reviews, and contacted professional associations, educational programmes and experts from around the world. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language, including cross-over design and cluster-RCTs for inclusion. Studies considered had to include people with dementia, in any age group and in any setting, with interventions delivered by a dance movement therapy practitioner who (i) had received formal training (ii) was a dance movement

  4. Leadership Narratives in Postsecondary Dance Administration: Voices, Values and Gender Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug; Musil, Pamela S.

    2017-01-01

    Dance in the U.S. university finds its beginnings in the visionary leadership of women. Since the mid-1910s, dance faculty and students in higher education have been predominantly female. Gender in postsecondary dance today remains much the same, with the exception of dance leadership, which is increasingly male. This narrative inquiry is drawn…

  5. Dance: Verities, Values, Visions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorman, Joyce, Ed.; Harris, Dorothy, Ed.

    The Binational Dance Conference was organized into three focal themes--verities, values, and visions in dance--to emphasize the known and accepted worth and value of dance, and to stimulate through knowledge and idea exchange, imaginative directions for dance in the future of both the United States and Canada. This thematic structure is also the…

  6. DANCE MUSIC: GENDER ISSUES AND EMBODIMENT OF NATIONAL IDENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Viktorovna Sokovikova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on research of contemporary dance music this study analyzes how practices of, and discourse about, contemporary dance music contribute to the performance and embodiment of gender, and national identities. This article examines the articulation of gender and national identity in performance in the specific context of Russian contemporary male national dance. Dance in particular is a very interesting research setting for a subject as identity. Dance is located mostly outside of the daily life setting, therefore it enables another social framework with different social norms and rules than the ones applicable in daily life. Especially the identity axes of gender and national identity are provoked by national dances. To create insight and to understand the background and discourse of her research, the author presents the theoretical framework at first. Next her argument will be elucidated by the empirical chapters, which represent her findings in the field. At the end the author answers her research questions, as well as evaluating some existing theories on the topic, in her conclusion. The conclusion is that the bodies of dancers are cultural bodies and dance movements can be seen as scripts, which are culturally encoded and part of daily life. The body is the materialization of cultural definitions of femininity and masculinity, maleness and femaleness, and also materializes the dancer’s interpretation of them, as was stated by Aalten (1997. Namely, dancers create and recreate their gender and national identity inter-subjectively while dancing. Dance allow people to reclaim their humanity and is inscribed within the realm of feeling and emotion, The dancing body is a symbolic expression that may embody many notions of desire, hate, romance, anger, sexual climax. Dance, dance music and culture are intrinsically connected. Dancers and their dance practices reflect what exist in a society and culture, like how sexuality and gender are

  7. To the matter of the educated development of the construction industry of recreational territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermakov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational creation of the consumer quality of constructions, which is taking into account some cultural, historical and other, accepted for society development paradigms enters to replace mass sustainable development of the industry of a construction in case of development of the recreational territories around megalopolises, using intellectual systems in a construction, ecological, energy-saving technologies in increase in a consumer evaluation of quality. For the residential development of the recreational territories of cities it is important to provide not only complex conditions of their development, to keep their potential for future generations, providing their social-and-economic development, to consider national and climatic features, but also to use their potential opportunities and traditions of the people inhabiting them, rationally and economically. The educated development of the construction industry is the new term entered into the use of constructors, when the consumer quality of building and structures meets national preferences taking into account traditions and advanced achievements in the use of materials, architectural and project decisions, production technologies and climatic opportunities with the minimum damage to the environment. Its accomplishment assumes enhancement and introduction of local-and-standard regulation with implementation of innovative solutions.

  8. Development of Educational Programs for New Careers in Recreation Services for the Disabled. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Doris L.

    Paraprofessional recreation personnel in hospitals, extended care centers, homes for the aged, and recreation departments were surveyed to define their roles and functions. Visits to 28 job analysis sites helped to identify a total of 79 job tasks and functions. A working model for a career lattice in recreation, and suggested content for a…

  9. The Effect of Recreational Activities on the Self-Esteem and Loneliness Level of the Prisoners as an Alternative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Zekiye

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of recreational activities on the self-esteem and loneliness level of prisoners as an alternative education. Method: The sample of this research consisted of 23 female prisoners who were randomly selected in Kandira prison and detention house. As preliminary and final tests, these…

  10. Encores for Dance. Selected Articles on Dance III, 1968-77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Dennis J., Ed.

    The nature, role, and scope of the dance in the United States is the subject of this collection of articles. The philosophical, historical, socio-cultural, and educational perspectives of dance are considered in the first four chapters. The following five chapters focus primarily on considerations that should improve teaching techniques and…

  11. Dance and the Athlete: An Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, James L.

    1978-01-01

    Edward Villella, principal dancer of the New York City Ballet, has attempted to make professionals in physical education as well as athletes more aware of the great potential possessed within the interrelationship of dance and sport. (MM)

  12. Dancing on the Edge: A Self-Study Exploring Postcritical Possibilities in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Seemingly comfortable in my physical education teacher education (PETE) role as a critical pedagogue, I was abruptly jolted into considering post-paradigmatic possibilities through participation in a collaborative project that explored shifting conceptualisations of knowledge and learning in initial teacher education (ITE). The project sought to…

  13. In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this "Issues" column, "The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance" provides responses to the question: "In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?" Responses this month come from an assistant professor who says that:…

  14. Teaching Physiology of Exercise to Reluctant Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Exercise physiology seems to be a course that students love or hate. Many physical education students and others involved in the related areas of health, teaching, recreation, dance, athletic training, fitness, and motor learning and development find this course a requirement at some point in their curriculum. Inquiry-based learning is an…

  15. Using Your Strengths to Teach a Dance History Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angier, D. Chase

    2007-01-01

    Letting the dance work itself educate the student and conducting related experiential classes is an important foundation on which to build readings, discussions, written assignments, and projects. Dance educators can design the educational investigations to be fueled directly from the art and support the investigation with contextual information.…

  16. The Dancing Nurses and the Language of the Body: Training Somatic Awareness, Bodily Communication, and Embodied Professional Competence in Nurse Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Helle; Grøntved, Susanne Næsgaard; Kold Gravesen, Eva; Ilkjær, Ingeborg

    2015-09-01

    At first glance, dance and movement may appear foreign to the idea of nurse education. On closer inspection, it could be high time. The flow of words may stop, but the body is always in movement--always communicating. Still, the language of the body, and certainly movement, is an often overlooked potential in education. This is also true for nurse education: in spite of the often bodily close meetings with vulnerable and crisis-stricken patients. These meetings make great demands on the nurse to both contain own feelings and be able to "read" and understand patients' often only sense-based communication. This dimension of the nursing profession can be overwhelming, touching, and shocking for young nursing students. This research project examines, whether a course composed of theory, dance and movement lessons, and increased focus on the bodily communication between students and patients may be developmental for the nursing students' beginning embodied professionality. Results from the project have innovative educational potentials. They also give concrete indications of how nursing educations can develop new holistic anchored embodied training in a very accessible, as well as essential, ancient, and unavoidably present part of the nursing profession. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Bodily Connectedness in Motion : A Philosophy on Intercorporeity and the Art of Dance in Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. de Vos

    2017-01-01

    About the book: This volume has been brought together to generate new ideas and provoke discussion about what constitutes arts education in the twenty-first century, both within the institution and beyond. Art, Artists and Pedagogy is intended for educators who teach the arts from early childhood to

  18. A dance or a marriage? The relationship between education and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article deals with the debate in education and law circles about the convergence of the two fields of knowledge in an area conveniently called education law. It recognises that there is no universal acknowledgement of the existence of such a discipline. Although the article does not present a full scale analysis of the ...

  19. Learning surgically oriented anatomy in a student-run extracurricular club: an education through recreation initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Shahnoor M; Bodrogi, Andrew; Cristea, Octav; Johnson, Marjorie; McAlister, Vivian C

    2012-01-01

    Didactic and laboratory anatomical education have seen significant reductions in the medical school curriculum due, in part, to the current shift from basic science to more clinically based teaching in North American medical schools. In order to increase medical student exposure to anatomy, with clinical applicability, a student-run initiative called surgically oriented anatomy prosectors (SOAP) club was created within the extracurricular program at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. SOAP invites surgeons and residents from various surgical specialties to demonstrate, on a cadaver, a surgical procedure of their choosing. During the demonstration, the anatomy, as it relates to the surgical procedure, is discussed. The students then break into smaller groups to examine the relevant anatomy on the cadavers, during which time the discussion is broadened. The group continues the conversation in a social environment with refreshments. SOAP is one of the most popular extracurricular clubs with 65% of first and second year medical students registered as members. The high demand for SOAP, along with the positive participant feedback, may be due to its utilization of the principle of education through recreation, which seeks to provide opportunities for learning seamlessly throughout all facets of life. It also demonstrates the desire, amongst certain medical students, to learn applied anatomy, particularly within a surgical context. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Dance in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, E.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of my lecture is to give you an overview of the history of Dutch theatre dance. I will show you the richness of our dance landscape by the video examples. Dutch theatre dance has no long tradition and it is this lack of tradition that made dancers and choreographers curious for new elements

  1. Listening to your audience: developing an educational tool to assist with recreation planning on private lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Daniel van Dijk; Gary T. Green; Craig A. Miller

    2009-01-01

    The Georgia Forestry Commission in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service instituted the Forest Stewardship Program (FSP) in 1991. A growing component of the FSP is recreation, which is the component least understood by stewardship planners. A survey was developed to better understand the needs of planners with regard to developing forest recreation plans, and the...

  2. Dance Therapy: Focus on Dance VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kathleen Criddle, Ed.

    This document is a collection of essays by various authors on the subject of dance therapy. Dance therapy, in the introduction of this document, is defined as a form of psychotherapy in which the therapist utilizes movement interaction as the primary means of accomplishing therapeutic goals. The document is divided into five parts: a)…

  3. Irish set dancing classes for people with Parkinson's disease: The needs of participants and dance teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Joanne; Bhriain, Orfhlaith Ní; Morris, Meg E; Volpe, Daniele; Clifford, Amanda M

    2016-08-01

    As the number of people diagnosed with Parkinson's disease increases, there is a need to develop initiatives that promote health and wellbeing and support self-management. Additionally, as exercise may slow physical decline, there is a need to develop methods that facilitate greater engagement with community-based exercise. The aim of this study is to examine the needs of (1) people with Parkinson's disease and (2) set dancing teachers to enable the development of participant-centred community set dance classes. A mixed methods study design was used. Two consensus group discussions using nominal group technique were held to (1) identify factors pertaining to the needs of people with Parkinson's disease from a set dance class and (2) the educational needs of set dancing teachers to enable them to teach set dancing to people with Parkinson's disease. Group discussions began with silent generation of ideas. A round-robin discussion and grouping of ideas into broader topic areas followed. Finally, participants ranked, by order of priority (1-5), the topic areas developed. Final data analysis involved summation of participants' ranking scores for each topic area. Rich information on the needs of people with Parkinson's disease from a dance class and the educational guidance sought by set dancing teachers was gathered. Topic areas developed include "teaching method" for set dances and "class environment". Accessing community exercise programmes is important for this population. The results of this study will inform the development of an educational resource on Parkinson's disease for set dancing teachers. This resource may facilitate a larger number of teachers to establish sustainable community set dancing classes for people with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Navigating hybridity: investigating the dance between culture and values within the cuban national education system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Byker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybridity is the dynamic relationship between local and global factors that push and pull on people and nations. Hybridity is deeply situated in socio-contextual factors, like cultural beliefs, education, and political systems, that aid and hinder a people’s navigation of globalized phenomena. Simply put, hybridity is how people and societies adapt to a changing world. This article examines the case of Cuba in response to hybridity. Specifically, the article’s purpose is to examine ways that the Cuban National Education System impacts how Cubans navigate the global march towards hybridity. The article reports on a focused ethnographic study of a week long education trip to Cuba during February 2013. The ethnography includes over 100 hours of data collection, including semi-structured interviews with 26 Cuban participants. The study uses Freire’s (1970 notion of “humanizing pedagogy” to analyze how the impact of the Cuban National Education System values in the context of Cuba and larger global context. The study found that three values in particular, amor, solidaridad, and conciencia de derechos y response, were deeply embedded in the Cuban National Education System and effect the way that Cubans navigate the complex hybridity that situates their island nation.

  5. The Dancing Brain: Structural and Functional Signatures of Expert Dance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Z. Burzynska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dance – as a ritual, therapy, and leisure activity – has been known for thousands of years. Today, dance is increasingly used as therapy for cognitive and neurological disorders such as dementia and Parkinson’s disease. Surprisingly, the effects of dance training on the healthy young brain are not well understood despite the necessity of such information for planning successful clinical interventions. Therefore, this study examined actively performing, expert-level trained college students as a model of long-term exposure to dance training. To study the long-term effects of dance training on the human brain, we compared 20 young expert female Dancers with normal body mass index with 20 age- and education-matched Non-Dancers with respect to brain structure and function. We used diffusion tensor, morphometric, resting state and task-related functional MRI, a broad cognitive assessment, and objective measures of selected dance skill (Dance Central video game and a balance task. Dancers showed superior performance in the Dance Central video game and balance task, but showed no differences in cognitive abilities. We found little evidence for training-related differences in brain volume in Dancers. Dancers had lower anisotropy in the corticospinal tract. They also activated the action observation network (AON to greater extent than Non-Dancers when viewing dance sequences. Dancers showed altered functional connectivity of the AON, and of the general motor learning network. These functional connectivity differences were related to dance skill and balance and training-induced structural characteristics. Our findings have the potential to inform future study designs aiming to monitor dance training-induced plasticity in clinical populations.

  6. The Dancing Brain: Structural and Functional Signatures of Expert Dance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Finc, Karolina; Taylor, Brittany K; Knecht, Anya M; Kramer, Arthur F

    2017-01-01

    Dance - as a ritual, therapy, and leisure activity - has been known for thousands of years. Today, dance is increasingly used as therapy for cognitive and neurological disorders such as dementia and Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, the effects of dance training on the healthy young brain are not well understood despite the necessity of such information for planning successful clinical interventions. Therefore, this study examined actively performing, expert-level trained college students as a model of long-term exposure to dance training. To study the long-term effects of dance training on the human brain, we compared 20 young expert female Dancers with normal body mass index with 20 age- and education-matched Non-Dancers with respect to brain structure and function. We used diffusion tensor, morphometric, resting state and task-related functional MRI, a broad cognitive assessment, and objective measures of selected dance skill (Dance Central video game and a balance task). Dancers showed superior performance in the Dance Central video game and balance task, but showed no differences in cognitive abilities. We found little evidence for training-related differences in brain volume in Dancers. Dancers had lower anisotropy in the corticospinal tract. They also activated the action observation network (AON) to greater extent than Non-Dancers when viewing dance sequences. Dancers showed altered functional connectivity of the AON, and of the general motor learning network. These functional connectivity differences were related to dance skill and balance and training-induced structural characteristics. Our findings have the potential to inform future study designs aiming to monitor dance training-induced plasticity in clinical populations.

  7. Dancing with Global Trends: Higher Education Policy and University Governance in Hong Kong, 1997-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, William Yat Wai; Tang, Hei-Hang Hayes

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the significance of global trends in higher education (HE) development in Hong Kong between 1997 and 2012. Two trends, massification and internationalisation, are considered key driving forces that shaped Hong Kong's HE policy during the period. The former refers to government measures to widen participation in HE. The latter…

  8. Recreational nitrous oxide use: Prevalence and risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nabben, Ton; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) is clinically used as a safe anesthetic (dentistry, ambulance, childbirth) and appreciated for its anti-anxiety effect. Since five years, recreational use of N2O is rapidly increasing especially in the dance and festival scene. In the UK, N2O is the second most

  9. Dance is more than therapy: Qualitative analysis on therapeutic dancing classes for Parkinson's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Priscila A; Slade, Susan C; McClelland, Jodie; Morris, Meg E

    2017-10-01

    To understand the benefits and limitations of therapeutic dancing classes for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and how best to design and implement classes. A stakeholder forum explored the opinions of 18 allied health clinicians, dance instructors, people with PD and caregivers. Data were thematically analysed and interpreted within a grounded theory framework. Four main themes were identified: (1) the need to consider the stage of disease progression when designing classes; (2) recognition that dance is more than just therapy; (3) the benefits of carefully selecting music to move by; (4) ways to design classes that are both feasible and engaging. These themes give rise to the theory that dancing classes can provide more than just therapeutic benefits. Dance affords creative expression and enables people to immerse themselves in the art-form, rather than focussing on the disease. The results highlight the benefits of enabling individuals with PD to be able to express themselves in a supportive environment that does not see them solely through the lens of Parkinson's. The feasibility of dance programs can be increased by educating dancing teachers about PD and the unique needs of people living with this condition. Well-structured dance classes can promote social-connectedness and joy, in addition to facilitating movement to music and physical activity. Consumers advised that careful planning of the classes and tailoring them to participant needs optimizes outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aesthetic Pleasure: a somaesthetic laboratory in a dance classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Medeiros Ribeiro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This text presents a reflection on the possibility of incorporating devices potentially able to evoke sensory experiences in dance education. Based on ethnoscenological studies, on literature review and on a careful observation of Thembi Rosa’s work, Verdades Inventadas, one could regard somaesthetics and affective proprioception as important notions to think about dance. Somaesthetics seem to promote the construction of identity in dance, due to its ability to evoke pleasure in movement, connecting the individual with action.

  11. Trans-Dance: Disciplinary Cross-Dressing and Integral Education in a Language and Sexuality Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Bronson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article showcases an integral approach to education through the lens of a transdisciplinary graduate-level class on Sexuality and Language. The graduate-level class was co-taught by two CIIS faculty whose backgrounds span the fields of social and cultural anthropology, psychology, sociology, social policy, linguistics, education and drama-centered expressive arts therapy. The class brought together students from six separate academic programs and drew from a wide array of performative and arts-based modes of inquiry to create a deep context through which to unpack the complex relationship(s between language and sexuality. These practices were interwoven with theoretical exposition and discussion in a hermeneutic spiral leading up to students’ planned research projects. This “disciplinary cross-dressing,” where diverse students and faculty engaged each others’ points of view rigorously in a common inquiry, created powerful teachable moments and served as the foundation for a transgressive mode of scholarship and advocacy.

  12. RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE DANCES: RECONSTRUCTION AND DANCE WORKSHOPS

    OpenAIRE

    Katarinčić, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    The numerous dance manual publications dating from the Renaissance and Baroque eras testify to the exceptional importance of the art of dance during those eras. From as early as the 15th century, they noted the history of dance, conduct while dancing and the style and technique of dancing. They contained information on the performance of individual steps, their combinations and the structure of the complete choreographies, as well as instructions on exemplary behaviour on the dance podium ...

  13. Merging science, engineering, and data with FUN: Recreational Drones in STEaM Education Activities and Science Fair Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.; Mooney, M. E.; Dahlman, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Recreational drones, also known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), provide an ideal platform for engaging students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) investigations for science fair projects, after-school clubs, and in-class activities. UAVs are very popular (estimate of >1 million received as gifts this past year), relatively inexpensive (Arduino board. This presentation will elaborate upon the year-long process of working with educators via webinars and a 1-day workshop at the 2016 ESIP summer meeting and beyond. It will also provide examples of student-led investigations, instructions for building the SABEL sensor package, insights gleaned from workshop feedback - and - the status of the new e-book compilation of student-focused activities using recreational drones to pursue STEM investigations!

  14. Vyučovací jednotky tance a tanečního aerobiku: Jak role žáka ovlivňuje pohybovou aktivitu dívek ve vyučovacím procesu Dance and aerobic dance in physical education lessons: The influence of the student's role on physical activity in girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Stratton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hlavním cílem školní tělesné výchovy je podporovat celoživotní pohybovou aktivitu (PA a zvyšovat pohybovou gramotnost dětí. Edukační proces je v tělesné výchově (TV naplňován pohybově aktivním zapojením žáků, a proto by měla být převážná část jednotek TV trávena aktivní pohybovou činností s odpovídajícím tělesným zatížením. Cílem této studie je zjistit, zda tělesné zatížení v jednotkách tance a aerobiku splňuje doporučení strávit alespoň 50 % času pohybovou aktivitou střední a vysoké intenzity (USDHHS, 2000 a zda role žáka v edukačním procesu ovlivňuje pohybovou aktivitu dívek. 241 děvčat absolvovalo program tvořený tradičními a progresivními vyučovacími jednotkami tance a aerobiku. Srdeční frekvence děvčat byla v průběhu vyučovacích jednotek monitorována systémem Team Polar. Děvčata trávila více než 50 % času pohybovou aktivitou střední a vysoké intenzity v tradičních i progresivních vyučovacích jednotkách tance i aerobiku. Výsledky této studie potvrzují, že zvýšená role žáka napomáhá plnit cíle TV, jako například odpovědnost za vlastní rozhodování a tvořivost, aniž by docházelo ke snižování pohybové aktivity ve vyučovacích jednotkách. The primary aim of physical education (PE is to promote lifelong physical activity (PA and to promote physical literacy in children. During classes children should learn through participation in physical activities and thus physical education lessons should be as active as possible. The aims of this study were firstly to compare physical load in dance and aerobic dance lessons to the recommendation of the minimum of 50% of class time being physically active (USDHHS, 2000 and secondly to identify how the students’ role in the educational process affects their engagement in PA. Two hundred and forty one girls completed the full program of dance and aerobic dance lessons. Heart rate

  15. Nordic Dance Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume identifies different kinds of dance activities and examines their distribution and modes of operation across and beyond the Nordic region. The focus of the research is on dance and how it moves between different locations, organizations and networks of individuals. The study integrates...... three complementary perspectives. One looks at the interplay between politics and larger global flows on the one hand and the movements of dance and dancers on the other. Another looks at the contribution of localized activities such as dance festivals, competitions and cultural mobility pro......-grammes to the transnational movements within dance. The third looks at the ways in which the impact of the transnational context is supported, resisted or commented upon either by the general public, in the dance itself or by the dancers themselves. The book presents a critical analysis of cul-tural location, relocation...

  16. The Negro Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Dunham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine Dunham’s The Negro Dance (1941 focuses on dances in the West Indies and on their similarities with North American dance forms rooted in African culture. Though backed up by the New Negro arguments of the time, it shows Dunham’s prominent elaboration of a dignified African-American art based on syncretic bodily practices, which anticipated theorizations in dance and cultural studies. By uniting a theoretical approach and performance ability, she also made methodological choices which, decades later, became standard practices in the field of dance anthropology. Moreover, she is now considered an ante litteram exponent of public or applied anthropology due to the fact that, by using various strategies, she managed to take anthropological knowledge out of the academic world and use it as an instrument for social transformation. The Negro Dance is introduced by Rossella Mazzaglia and followed by an afterword by Cristiana Natali and a biographical note by Marie-Christine Dunham Pratt.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF DANCE EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM ON THE MUSICALITY LEVEL OF 1st_YEAR STUDENTS OF FACULTY OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašin Badža

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with possibilities of contribution to experts and scientists in physical education in the field of studying music and musical culture. The aim of this research was to determine changes of musicality developed during experimental pro- gram of dance. The tendency was also to compare data obtained upon initial and final measurements on of musicality test, on a sample of 104 male students on the firsth year in Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Novi Sad. For assesment of musical and rhytmical abilities Seashore test was applied. According to obtained results differences in musical-rhytmical dimensions between initial and final measurements we- re p at the significance level of p=.01 respectively

  18. British Dance: Black Routes

    OpenAIRE

    Adair, C.; Burt, Ramsay, 1953-

    2016-01-01

    British Dance: Black Routes re-examines the distinctive contributions made to British dance by dancers who are Black. Covering the period 1946 to the present, it presents a radical re-reading of dancers and their companies, placing their achievements within a broader historical, cultural and artistic context. The result of a two year research project, British Dance and the African Diaspora, led by editors Christy Adair and Ramsay Burt, the collection looks at artists working with contempor...

  19. Identities and Dance Competition: Re/Discovering the Force from Within

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, JuanAnn

    2014-01-01

    The National Student Dance Competition is a significant annual event in the field of dance in Taiwan supervised by the Ministry of Education. Dance pupils who participate in this competition are under the influence of their instructors and thus tend to reproduce the same culture in their socialization process. By using the Bourdieuian concepts of…

  20. Hybrid Lives of Teaching and Artistry: A Study of Teaching Artists in Dance in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates teaching artists in the USA whose work is rooted in dance and dance-related disciplines. Teaching artists, although the descriptor itself remains both ambiguous and debated in the USA, provide a good deal of arts education delivery in K12 schools and afterschool programs. Based on survey data from a range of dance teaching…

  1. A Set of Descriptive Case Studies of Four Dance Faculty Members' Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Meredith; Erwin, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Dance faculty members come from a variety of backgrounds, which lead to varied knowledge bases and varied teaching practices. More information is needed about the current pedagogical practices of higher education dance faculty. This study sought to provide a description of four faculty members' pedagogical approaches to a dance technique class in…

  2. Proceedings of the Special Demonstration Workshop for Integrating Blind Children with Sighted Children into Ongoing Physical Education and Recreation Programs (Cleveland, Ohio, October 9-10, 1969).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninger, Walter B., Ed.

    A special education workshop (Cleveland, Ohio, October 9-10, 1969) for integrating blind children with sighted children into ongoing physical education and recreation programs is described. Physical education and blind children from the viewpoint of opthalmology, social and psychological aspects of blindness as they relate to participation in…

  3. Music and Dance Instruction in Basic Schools in Ghana: v ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated factors militating against the girl – child's music and dance education in basic schools in Ghana. The Population were music and dance teachers in Ghanaian pre-tertiary institutions, while purposive sampling technique was used to select the sample that covered all the 2005 of the 400 level music ...

  4. Moving Self: The Thread Which Bridges Dance and Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Lynn

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a study of the impact movement education has had on prospective dance and theatre practitioners--how they think about, perceive, and experience movement. The purpose is to discuss the concept "experience" as it relates to phenomena being considered during classes in dance improvisation and movement for theatre with the objective to…

  5. Interdisciplinary Working Practices: Can Creative Dance Improve Math?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, Cristina Rebelo; Monteiro, Elisabete; Melo, Filipe

    2018-01-01

    This study is integrated in the field of Dance in Education, focusing on the instrumentalist aspect of art. We focused on creative dance as a catalyst to learn Mathematics' contents. This interdisciplinary work can enhance the learning, as far as the understanding of Mathematics' concepts is achieved through the body and revealed by expressive and…

  6. Adversaries, Advocates, or Thoughtful Analysts? Some Lessons from Dance History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Argues that the arts demand careful analysis when providing a rationale for the inclusion of the arts in educational programs and policies. Provides information on the content and context of dance opposition and provides examples from dance history of issues that need to be addressed. (CMK)

  7. Toward Transformation: Digital Tools for Online Dance Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Mila

    2016-01-01

    Media advances have changed the ways in which we interact, communicate, teach, and learn. The growth of telecommunication, video sharing sites, specifically YouTube, and social media, have exponentially increased the number of people interested in dance and dance education. Technology presents new ways for students to think about their learning,…

  8. [Knowledge of students of tourism and recreation Academy of Physical Education on wild mushrooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwaluk, Paweł; Parnicki, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Prophylaxis of acute poisoning with mushrooms is justified because of the relatively high risk of death associated with these intoxications. Mushrooming in Poland has a long tradition and knowledge about mushrooms is usually passed on in families. In recent years the mushrooming becomes an organized form of recreation. Graduates of tourism and recreation should have a minimum of reliable knowledge about mushrooms, to ensure the safety of persons entrusted to their care. The knowledge of wild mushrooms among students of tourism and recreation was tested by means of questionnaire. Mushrooms gathered 108 out of 125 respondents. The primary source of knowledge about mushrooms for 84% of the mushrooms pickers were the parents. Up to 70% of respondents considered at least one of irrational methods useful to distinguish edible mushrooms from the poisonous. Thirteen percent of those polled believed that by simple means mushrooms may be deprived of their toxic properties. Knowledge of the only one deadly poisonous mushrooms growing in Poland was 53%. The tourism and recreation students must pass basic knowledge about mushrooms and identify reliable sources of knowledge in this field.

  9. Anticipated educational outcomes: a case study of the outdoor recreation consortium experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasong Wang; Alan Graefe

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study of an outdoor experiential learning program and examines its meaning for program participants. The research was conducted with 56 university students who participated in the Outdoor Recreation Consortium held at the Great Smoky Mountain Institute in Tremont, TN. A mixed-method comparative research approach, using both quantitative and...

  10. Recreation and Park Education Curriculum Catalog, 1974-1975 Biennial Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Society of Park and Recreation Educators, Arlington, VA.

    This catalog lists general, curriculum, and financial assistance information about park and recreation programs for 119 colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada. General information includes the location and mailing address of the institution, enrollment data, and tuition and fees. Curriculum information includes the program title,…

  11. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  12. Dances and Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Presents guidelines for teaching students about African culture via dances and games and for developing related activities to expand student learning experiences. Student activity pages describe how to do the Ghana national dance and how to play Mankala, a popular African game. (SM)

  13. Dance Critique as Signature Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    The curriculum of preprofessional university degree programs in dance typically comprise four components: theory and history, dance technique, creative process, and performance. This article focuses on critique in the modern dance technique and choreography components of the dance curriculum. Bachelor of Fine Arts programs utilize critique as a…

  14. Gender Differences in Motivation for Participation in Extra-Curricular Dance: Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steven David; Leyland, Sandra Darkings; Ling, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    A key influence on motivation to take part in lifelong physical activity is experience of physical education during the school years. Curriculum-based dance is important for providing a pathway into extra-curricular dance because, for many young people, physical education is their only opportunity to experience dance. A sample of 362 adolescents…

  15. The evolution of dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laland, Kevin; Wilkins, Clive; Clayton, Nicky

    2016-01-11

    Evidence from multiple sources reveals a surprising link between imitation and dance. As in the classical correspondence problem central to imitation research, dance requires mapping across sensory modalities and the integration of visual and auditory inputs with motor outputs. Recent research in comparative psychology supports this association, in that entrainment to a musical beat is almost exclusively observed in animals capable of vocal or motor imitation. Dance has representational properties that rely on the dancers' ability to imitate particular people, animals or events, as well as the audience's ability to recognize these correspondences. Imitation also plays a central role in learning to dance and the acquisition of the long sequences of choreographed movements are dependent on social learning. These and other lines of evidence suggest that dancing may only be possible for humans because its performance exploits existing neural circuitry employed in imitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Auto-ethnographical investigation of turning points in dance education – a method for creating awareness of one’s own pre-understanding in qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Ørbæk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an auto-ethnographical investigation of a pedagogical practice in creative dance education. This research is a part of the PhD-project “To create dance” in physical education teacher education based at The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences and The Norwegian National Graduate School in Teacher Education. The method used is based on life stories, and turning points are used as analytical tools. The turning point analysis highlights that an auto-ethnographical investigation is relevant when it comes to creating awareness of pre-understandings in the development of pedagogical experiences from one’s own research field. In addition, the article shows that the turning point analysis may contribute to increasing knowledge on how one’s own experience can change when narrated in new ways. Finally, the study shows that making use of auto-ethnography may also have value as a reflexive approach for becoming more conscious of one’s own research process.

  17. Operation Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Jeff; Schutz, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Parents who have a child with a disability often find that recreational activities can be anything but accessible. Time for recreation is drowned by the priorities of caring for a child's needs, and the "umph" to get out can feel like an insurmountable obstacle. The activities parents love and aspire to share with their child may seem like one…

  18. The caring dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, C

    2001-02-01

    As nursing and health care practice enter the new Millennium, practitioners are increasingly urged to pay attention to evidenced based practice to justify what they do. Yet the truth is, that within the caring dance, practitioners need to connect with more ancient sources of wisdom. Failure to do so leads to a life out of balance and a failure to dance well and fulfil the fundamental role of being a nurse. The paper draws exclusively on the work of Blackwolf and Gina Jones, as an example of such ancient wisdom to inform and inspire the caring dance.

  19. WHEN PROSE DANCES AND DANCE WALKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marques Gastão

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To Paul Valéry, prose follows the less action path, as in marching in a straight line, and poetry, as in dancing – in as much as it is a «system of acts» – it not only intends to go nowhere but it remains in its own realisation, creating its own purpose. Why then does his prose contain this commanded impulse, led by desire, and his poetry does not, since they are so often one and the same? In this essay, looking at works by Rainer Marie Rilke, Fernando Pessoa, António Vieira and Yvette K. Centeno, I develop the idea that, very often, to establish a distinction between genres can be impractical and useless, if one considers concepts such as march/walk and dance from a choreographic perspective. Even if it be a possible question and since it has nevertheless been the object of study by scholars of all times, why is it undertaken? Why can’t prose be danced to, and poetry marched to? Can the walking essence unconsciously dance?

  20. Definition of dance and dance movement therapy: overview of dance styles and their application for the scopes of the dance movement therapy in different countries and cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Di Dio, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    The master thesis discusses the areas of dance and dance movement therapy. Moreover it presents an overview of the artistic dance, which is applied for therapeutic treatment purposes. Furthermore, it defines concepts and dance genres that are present within different dance movement therapy approaches. Dance description is further elaborated in those chapters dedicated to the understanding and development of dance movement therapy. The thesis presents different dance genres and forms, whi...

  1. From Norway to the USA: "Anitra's Dance."

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson for middle school students that can be adapted for upper elementary or high school students. Explains that students compare two versions of the song "Anitra's Dance," a classical version by Edvard Grieg and a jazz version by Duke Ellington. States the lesson uses the Discipline-Based Music Education approach. (CMK)

  2. MAGA MAGAZINOVIC: THE MAIN CONCEPTS OF MODERN DANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Marijan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Marija Maga Magazinovic (Užice,1882- Belgrade, 1968, a choreographer, dancer, modern dance theorist, philosopher, feminist, librarian and journalist, was the founder of modern dance in Serbia. In her efforts to introduce modern dance, Magazinovic demanded emancipation of art, “pure” dance, a beauty of simple movements, which had no need for story, scenography, costume, even music, nothing but naked dancer’s body. Maga, who graduated philosophy at the Belgrade University in 1904, and was a journalist by vocation, working as the first woman journalist in the daily newspaper “Politica” as a columnist, also fought for women’s rights and emancipation. By bringing modern artistic view into the patriarchal Serbian society, she contributed to the social and cultural development, and to the understanding and adopting of the modern dance at the very time when it was developed and brought on stage in the West. Stemmed from the schools of Max Reinhardt and ballet school of Isadora Duncan, she brought their views and pedagogical methods to Serbia when she returned from Berlin and Munich to Belgrade, where she opened the first school of modern dance in 1910. She was the first to advocate for the necessity of female education, particularly of engaging girls in doing rhythmic gymnastics and dance as a form of bodily and spiritual education. Given that Marija Maga Magazinovic was the first who opened the door for the progress and changes in the fields of dance and women’s rights by bringing concepts of those movements, in which she directly participated, to Serbia, these concepts had to be explained. Therefore, the main goal of the paper is to examine these concepts, such as modern dance, rhythmic gymnastic, body culture, Ausdruckstanz, expressionism, and women emancipation, which is crucial if we want to understand early period of modern dance development, and to understand Magazinovic’s efforts and achievements and her place and historical

  3. Injuries in Irish dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Cynthia J; Tyson, Kesley D; Johnson, Victor M; Popoli, David M; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Micheli, Lyle J

    2013-12-01

    Irish dance is growing in popularity and competitiveness; however, very little research has focused specifically on this genre of dance. The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of dance injuries incurred by Irish dancers. A chart review was performed to identify all injuries associated with Irish dance seen in the sports medicine or orthopaedic clinics at the investigators' hospital over an 11-year period. "Injury" was defined as any dance-related pain or disorder that led to evaluation in the clinics. Survey data were also collected from study participants. Ultimately, 255 patients from over 30 different schools of dance were seen with injuries directly related (726 clinic visits) or partially related (199 visits) to Irish dance. Participants ranged in age from 4 to 47, with 95% (243/255) under the age of 19. These 255 patients received 437 diagnoses. Almost 80% of the injuries (348/437) were attributable to overuse, and 20.4% were acute and traumatic injuries (89/437). Ninety-five percent (95.9%) of injuries involved the hip or lower extremity. The most common sites were the foot (33.2%), ankle (22.7%), knee (19.7%), and hip (14.4%). Typical diagnoses were tendon injury (13.3%), apophysitis (11.4%), patellofemoral pain and instability (10.8%), stress injury (10.1%), and muscle injury (7.8%). The majority of traumatic injuries were seen in clinic within 3 weeks, but less than a quarter of overuse injuries were seen that quickly. The most common treatment, prescribed to 84.3% of patients, was physical therapy and home exercises, and the majority of dancers (64.3%) were able to return to full dance activity after injury.

  4. Sports dance artistic expression culture analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zegang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the sports dance has entered every stage of the people’s life, has become the public’s favorite sport. Sports dance has been well developed. This article mainly uses the literature material law to carry on the detailed analysis to the sports dance constitution, elaborated in detail the sports dance artistic expression. The composition of sports dance elements; sports dance is a form of dance art show; sports dance through the dance art can be divided into three aspects, namely, form, music, shape of the expressive force. In this paper, the study will be more in-depth excavation of the cultural connotation of sports dance, and promote the development of sports dance can be more comprehensive. In 20s of last century, Chinese Sports Dance Association officially joined the International Sports Dance Association, which also makes our country’s sports dance and international exchange more frequent. However, due to China’s sports dance sports dance learning time is not long, while learning is influenced by Chinese traditional culture, the sports dance movements are too conservative, there is a very large gap and international enthusiasm, bold and unrestrained, the pursuit of individual sports dance in the dance style, music and performance hand. Sports dance originated from abroad, it is produced in the daily life of people in foreign countries. China’s domestic sports dance players in learning dance at the same time, the production and the connotation of dance is not very understanding, therefore, it is difficult to better reflect the emotional expression of sports dance. Although the sports dance is a kind of similar to the competitive projects, but it is also a kind of dance culture, and to constitute a force from the dance art show a detailed study, detailed mining playing officer of sports dance performance further, reducing China’s sports dance and international sports dance gap.

  5. Effectiveness of health tourism application as the basis of health related recreational technology in primary school pupils’ physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Kashuba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to search effective methods of health tourism application in physical education of primary school age pupils. Матеріал: in the research 40 children participated, who were divided into control (9 boys and 11 girls and experimental (10 boys and 10 girls groups. We registered physical fitness, physical health, adaptation-reserve potentials and psychological state of primary school pupils. Results: specificities of health tourism means’ application as the basis of health-related recreational technology were determined. We found improvement of children’s health by 10%. Besides, we observed prevailing improvement of organism’s resistance to environmental unfavorable factors and indicators of psycho-emotional state. Conclusions: application of health tourism means increases organism’s functional potentials, physical health and psycho-emotional state of schoolchildren.

  6. Marketing communication of dancing school Luas Dancing School.

    OpenAIRE

    Vařechová, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Title: Marketing communication of dancing school Luas Dancing School. Objectives: This thesis is trying to come up with new and effective marketing communication for dancing school. It is based on the old propagation methods and trying to do it better with documents obtained from theoretical part. Methods: Methods we used for this thesis are interview with owner and founder of this dancing school and discussion with dancers of this school. Some of them are long term dancers and some of them a...

  7. [Dancing with Pointe Shoes: Characteristics and Assessment Criteria for Pointe Readiness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Eileen M; Exner-Grave, Elisabeth

    2017-12-01

    Training with pointe shoes is an integral part of professional dance education and ambitious hobby dancing. Pointe shoes - developed more than hundred years ago and almost unaltered since then - are highly specific and strike a balance between aesthetics, function, protection, and health care. Therefore, pointe readiness should be tested prior to all dance training or career training. Medical specialists are often confronted with this issue. Specific anatomical dance technique-orientated general conditional and coordinative preconditions as well as dance-technical prerequisites must be met by pointe readiness tests in order to keep traumatic injuries or long-term damage at a minimum. In addition to a (training) history, medical counselling sessions have come to include various tests that enable a reliable decision for or against pointe work. This article suggests adequate testing procedures (STT TEST), taking account of professional dancing as well as hobby dancing. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. The Effect of Recreational Activities on Self-Esteem Development of Girls in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayazit, Betül

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of recreational activities on self-esteem development of girls in adolescence. For this purpose, a total of 20 girls in adolescence period took part in the present study. Recreational activities program included bowling, patenga, orienteering, basketball, volleyball, badminton, ping-pong, dance, fun…

  9. Multiple Voices in Health, Sport, Recreation, and Physical Education Research: Revealing Unfamiliar Spaces in a Polyvocal Review of Qualitative Research Genres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Tim F.; Madill, Leanna E.; Bratseth, Chris D.; Cameron, Kathi A.; Coble, James D.; Nimmon, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to outline the potential genres of qualitative research that can be used to research the domains of health, sport, recreation, and physical education. Drawing on Denzin and Lincoln (2000) and Sparkes (2002a), and connecting to the work of six researchers, this article will present five genres of qualitative research…

  10. Pasteur's Quadrant: A Conceptual Framework for Bridging the "Great Divide" between Higher Education and Professional Practice in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Daniel L.; Schwab, Keri A.; Hendricks, William W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the intractability of the "great divide" between higher education and professional practice in parks, recreation, and tourism. We begin by drawing parallels between our field and other professional fields to demonstrate that the issue is not ours alone; indeed, it is common to most professional fields. We then…

  11. Sequins, sass, and sisterhood: an exploration of older women's belly dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Disempowering stereotypes plague public perceptions of older women's bodies, particularly within Western contemporary societies. Consequently, as women age, their bodies often become sources of shame, discomfort, and ridicule. Belly dance, as a form of recreative leisure, provides a unique and somewhat unexpected space for women to subvert such perceptions. Based on qualitative interviews with older American women who belly dance, this article examines the ways in which this form of recreation provides participants a means of (re)gaining mobility, (re)claiming social space, (re)building social support, and (re)defining what it means to be sensual later in life.

  12. Dance your way to fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000809.htm Dance your way to fitness To use the sharing features on this page, ... to rhythm and music. Many health clubs and fitness centers offer dance workout classes, such as Zumba. ...

  13. Cognitive Benefits of Social Dancing and Walking in Old Age: The Dancing Mind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merom, Dafna; Grunseit, Anne; Eramudugolla, Ranmalee; Jefferis, Barbara; Mcneill, Jade; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2016-01-01

    A physically active lifestyle has the potential to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, yet the optimal type of physical activity/exercise remains unclear. Dance is of special interest as it complex sensorimotor rhythmic activity with additional cognitive, social, and affective dimensions. To determine whether dance benefits executive function more than walking, an activity that is simple and functional. Two-arm randomized controlled trial among community-dwelling older adults. The intervention group received 1 h of ballroom dancing twice weekly over 8 months (~69 sessions) in local community dance studios. The control group received a combination of a home walking program with a pedometer and optional biweekly group-based walking in local community park to facilitate socialization. Executive function tests: processing speed and task shift by the Trail Making Tests, response inhibition by the Stroop Color-Word Test, working memory by the Digit Span Backwards test, immediate and delayed verbal recall by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and visuospatial recall by the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test (BVST). One hundred and fifteen adults (mean 69.5 years, SD 6.4) completed baseline and delayed baseline (3 weeks apart) before being randomized to either dance (n = 60) or walking (n = 55). Of those randomized, 79 (68%) completed the follow-up measurements (32 weeks from baseline). In the dance group only, "non-completers" had significantly lower baseline scores on all executive function tests than those who completed the full program. Intention-to-treat analyses showed no group effect. In a random effects model including participants who completed all measurements, adjusted for baseline score and covariates (age, education, estimated verbal intelligence, and community), a between-group effect in favor of dance was noted only for BVST total learning (Cohen's D Effect size 0.29, p = 0.07) and delayed recall (Cohen's D Effect size = 0

  14. Cognitive benefits of social dancing and walking in old age: the Dancing Mind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna eMerom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A physically active lifestyle has the potential to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, yet the optimal type of physical activity/exercise remains unclear. Dance is of special interest as it complex sensorimotor rhythmic activity with additional cognitive, social and affective dimensions. Objectives: to determine whether dance benefits executive function more than walking, an activity that is simple and functional. Methods: Two-arm randomised controlled trial among community-dwelling older adults. The intervention group received 1 hour of ballroom dancing twice weekly over 8 months (~69sessions in local community dance studios. The control group received a combination of a home walking program with a pedometer and optional biweekly group-based walking in local community park to facilitate socialisation. Main outcomes: Main outcomes: executive function tests: processing speed and task shift by the Trail Making Tests (TMT, response inhibition by the Stroop Colour-Word Test (SCWT, working memory by the Digit Span Backwards (DSB test, immediate and delayed verbal recall by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT and visuospatial recall by the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test (BVST. Results: One hundred and fifteen adults (69.5 years, SD6.4 completed baseline and delayed baseline (3 weeks apart before being randomised to either dance (n=60 or walking (n=55. Of those randomized, 79 (68% completed the follow-up measurements (32 weeks from baseline. In the dance group only, ‘non-completers’ had significant lower baseline scores on all executive function tests than those completed the full program. Intention-to-treat analyses showed no group effect. In a random effects model including participants who completed all measurements, adjusted for baseline score and covariates (age, education, estimated verbal intelligence, community, a between group effect in favour of dance was noted only for BVST total learning (Cohen’s D Effect size

  15. From Square Dance to Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Zoe

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author suggests a cross-curricular idea that can link with PE, dance, music and history. Teacher David Schmitz, a maths teacher in Illinois who was also a square dance caller, had developed a maths course that used the standard square dance syllabus to teach mathematical principles. He presents an intensive, two-week course…

  16. Speaking without words: Zorba's dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hnaraki Maria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthony Quinn 'teaching dance' on the island of Crete to the music of Mikis Theodorakis is a popular image that portrays Greeks as extremely emotional passionate and spontaneous. This paper shows the importance of dancing in Greek culture and how Greeks talk through their body by examining Kazantzakis character, Zorba, who 'has many things to say but would rather dance them'.

  17. The Consumer and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication deals with recreation and leisure in American society. It is stated that the greater mobility of Americans, the increased time and money available for leisure time pursuits, the higher degree of educational level with accompanying wider interests, and the changing attitudes toward the balance between work and play are having…

  18. FORMING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS OF THE PROSPECTIVE HEADS OF CHILDREN'S DANCE GROUPS DURING THE CHOREOGRAPHIC ACTIVITIES IN THE COURSE "FOLK DANCE THEORY AND METHODOLOGY"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kotov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the urgent problem of contemporary art pedagogy – involvement to training future professional choreographic traditions of different nations. Addressing to this problem is caused by a number of socio-political events in Ukraine, mainstreaming of national and international education, integration of Ukrainian education with the European educational space, intensive development of domestic students’ intercultural communication with young people from different countries, which is the basis for updating national art education. Prospective choreographers, who are being training at pedagogical universities to manage children's dance groups, should actively be involved into creating their own productions of folk dance various genres. It promotes the formation of choreographers’ professional competence and pedagogical skills. The development of Georgian "Lezginka" is proposed – a joint creative work of the teacher and students who get higher education degree in SHEE “Donbass State Pedagogical University” (Bachelor's Degree. Development of the dance contains schematic drawings of dance figures, it is recommended for use in forming choreographers’ professional skills while studying the course "Folk Dance Theory and Methodology". The author admits that folklore material requires a cautious, respectful attitude. Therefore, modern folk stage dances are integrally to combine traditional choreographic manner with its new interpretations. The author believes the actual capture of different nations’ choreographic culture improves intercultural youth communication; involves future professionals into the traditions of different nations; form professional skills of managers of children’s dance groups. The author concluded that a dance always reflects consciousness of different nations; future choreographers should be aware of characteristic features of dances of different world nations so that on the basis of traditional

  19. Teaching at the interface of dance science and somatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Pamela; Wilson, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a combined scientific and somatic approach to teaching and learning about the body, and explains how it can be of benefit to dancers and dance educators. The study of the science of movement (kinesiology) and a somatic approach to teaching are initially defined and described as distinct entities; following this, a model for integration of the two is presented. The authors advocate for such a combination in order to enhance dancing.

  20. The Practical Application of Body-Mind Centering[R] (BMC) in Dance Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Martha

    2006-01-01

    Based in bodily awareness, somatic education has many points of relationship with dance education. Body-Mind Centering[R] (BMC), with some of its roots in Laban Movement Analysis/Bartenieff Fundamentals (LMA/BF), has a particularly easy link to dance. When studying Body-Mind Centering, the theoretical components are often taught through dance…

  1. Dance Movement as a Way to Help Children Affected by War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fran J.; Ranjbar, Azita; Dean, Colleen Hearn

    2006-01-01

    In the midst of the violence of the 21st century, many children fear that they or someone they know will lose a relative or friend through terrorism. Professionals in dance movement therapy, dance education, and physical education can help children to overcome their fears in order to feel safe and to build self-esteem. This article examines how…

  2. Sharing the dance -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jing; Ravn, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    In his recent works on daily face-to-face encounters, Zahavi claims that the phenomenon of sharing involves reciprocity. Following Zahavi’s line of thought, we wonder what exactly reciprocity amounts to and how the shared experience emerges from the dynamic process of interaction. By turning...... to the highly specialized field of elite sports dance, we aim at exploring the way in which reciprocity unfolds in intensive deliberate practices of movement. In our analysis, we specifically argue that the ongoing dynamics of two separate flows of movement constitute a shared experience of dancing together...

  3. Sports dance artistic expression culture analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zegang

    2017-01-01

    At present, the sports dance has entered every stage of the people’s life, has become the public’s favorite sport. Sports dance has been well developed. This article mainly uses the literature material law to carry on the detailed analysis to the sports dance constitution, elaborated in detail the sports dance artistic expression. The composition of sports dance elements; sports dance is a form of dance art show; sports dance through the dance art can be divided into three aspects, namely, fo...

  4. "Dance for Your Health": Exploring Social Latin Dancing for Community Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuliano, Joseph E.; Lutrick, Karen; Maez, Paula; Nacim, Erika; Reinschmidt, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    The goal of "Dance for Your Health" was to explore the relationship between social Latin dance and health as described by members of the Tucson social Latin dance community. Social Latin dance was selected because of the variety of dances, cultural relevance and popularity in Tucson, and the low-key, relaxed atmosphere. Dance has been…

  5. Culturally Inclusive Dance: Working with Chinese English Language Learners in the Dance Technique Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie A.

    2018-01-01

    Higher education is experiencing rapidly shifting demographics brought about by the expanding global economy. The influx of English Language Learners (ELLs) into U.S. dance classrooms is creating a shifting paradigm for students and instructors. According to Beth McMurtrie (2012), universities with increasing international enrollments recognize…

  6. If it takes two to tango, then why not teach both partners to dance? Collaboration instruction for all educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, P; Glomb, N

    1997-01-01

    Being able to collaborate effectively is important for teachers who work together to serve students with learning disabilities in general education classrooms. Effective collaboration requires that teachers have knowledge and skills in how to effectively communicate and share their technical expertise for the purpose of solving classroom problems and providing continuity across instructional settings. Although both special education and general education preparation programs provide preservice teachers with the technical expertise for their respective areas of certification, few programs provide both special education and general education majors with instruction in interpersonal communication skills and collaboration strategies. The purpose of this article is to suggest guidelines and strategies to help teacher preparation programs move toward collaboration instruction for all educators. Suggestions for what to teach and how to teach it are offered, as well as an overview of factors that influence the implementation of collaboration instruction for all educators.

  7. Examining Low-Impact Recreation Behavior--The Effects of Values, Attitudes and Timing of Educational Messaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian

    2016-01-01

    A considerable amount of previous research has documented the adverse impacts of recreation activities on the natural environment. These impacts, which include soil compaction and erosion, loss of vegetation and degraded wildlife habitat, can result in the severe degradation of ecosystem function and the quality of recreation experiences if left…

  8. Trends in international research presented through the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (1965-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Bradley J; Powell, Felicity M; Lee, Miyoung

    2009-09-01

    The extent of international research on the Research Consortium's program between 1965 and 2008 was documented. A total of 9,132 abstracts were reviewed, and 657 (7.19%) had an international component. Inclusion of international research ranged from a low of 1.97% in 1983 to a high of 14.24% in 2007. There was a decrease in the amount of international research presented between 1965 and 1983, after which there was an increase through 2008. Most growth was from increased contributions coming from researchers in Southeast Asia. In terms of general research topics, eight areas increased over the 44-year history reviewed, and five areas decreased. Seven recommendations are advanced for expanding the place and role of international research within the Research Consortium.

  9. Injury incidence in hip hop dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojofeitimi, S; Bronner, S; Woo, H

    2012-06-01

    Hip hop dance has rapidly become a popular international art form. There is limited information on injury patterns in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine injury incidence and patterns among three groups of hip hop dancers. Three hundred and twelve intermediate, advanced, and expert hip hop dancers were recruited at battles, dance conferences, clubs, and on dance related web sites within the United States and internationally. A Web-based survey was conducted over a 6-month period. Inclusion criteria included intermediate and advanced level dancers over the age of 13. Dancers were divided into three main categories: Breakers, Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Separate analysis of variances were used to compare injury pattern differences between groups. Two hundred and thirty-two dancers reported a total of 738 injuries. Five hundred and six of these (sustained by 205 dancers) were time-loss (TL) injuries. Annual injury incidence was 237% (162% involving TL). Lower extremity injuries were 52% and upper extremity injuries 32% of total injuries. Breakers had a higher injury incidence compared with Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Hip hop dancers report injury rates that are higher than other dance forms but similar to gymnastics. These dancers should be educated concerning injury prevention, biomechanics, and use of protective equipment. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Outdoor recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Bowker; Ashley Askew; H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsBy 2060, the number of southern adults participating in each of 10 different popular outdoor recreation activities is projected to increase. Depending on future demographic, economic, land use, and population changes, the activity demonstrating the least growth in participants is hunting (8–25 percent). The activity projected to...

  11. Straight into the Eyes - Jacek Łumiński and the Silesian Dance Theatre (1991-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Iwańska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The final decade of the 20th century was the turning-point for the development of Polish contemporary dance. In 1991 Jacek Łumiński established the Silesian Dance Theatre in Bytom. The theatre is said to be in the avant-garde of all activities related to contemporary dance development in Poland. It was J. Łumiński and his theatre who pioneered new trends in contemporary dance at the beginning of the nineties of the 20th century, at the same time they have conducted educational activity over the intervening twenty years. The aim of this article is to present the artistic and educational activity of the Silesian Dance Theatre of the recent twenty years. In the beginning the author presents a choreographic portrait of J. Łumiński, the founder and choreographer of the Silesian Dance Theatre, and creator of the Polish contemporary dance technique. Then an analysis of J. Łumiński’s dance style is carried out, and the review of the Silesian Dance Theatre’s choreographic attainments is presented. The final part of the article discusses the wide spectrum of educational activities undertaken in the field of contemporary professional dance by the Silesian Dance Theatre, and the phenomenon of the theatre on the Polish stage.

  12. Dance Like a Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, Alicia; Chessin, Debby; Deason, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    The authors represent the life cycle of the butterfly through writing, drawing, dance, and math. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (NGSS Lead States 2013) emphasize college and career readiness as well as critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students must develop a deep understanding of science concepts and engage in scientific…

  13. Doctors Can Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Anna; Kleiman, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Between 2008-2010 the School of Medicine at Queen's University Belfast funded and supported two unique and intensive three week interdisciplinary performance projects in which medical and drama students worked together to create an experimental dance theatre piece. One of the unique aspects of this collaboration was that the medical students who…

  14. Dance Theatre of Harlem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrides, Angelica

    1983-01-01

    Describes the emergence of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, which has united both aesthetic excellence and social purpose/community involvement since its founding in 1971. Reveals how current government policies have endangered its funding. Offers a critique of several productions, which showed a new emphasis on technique. (DMM)

  15. The dance of time

    CERN Document Server

    Aparici, Irene; Brokenbrow, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Winner at the 2014 Living Now Book Awards The Dance of Time is a book full of imagination and information, which will be useful for parents and teachers looking to accompany children on a different kind of journey through our solar system. Guided Reading Level: P, Lexile Level: 830L.

  16. Preferred Dance Tempo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia; Huron, David; Brod, Garvin

    2014-01-01

    In two experiments participants tuned a drum machine to their preferred dance tempo. Measurements of height, shoulder width, leg length, and weight were taken for each participant, and their sex recorded. Using a multiple regression analysis, height and leg length combined was found to be the bes...

  17. "Learning to Dance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the author, Nicole Keller, found that her writing grew richer and more honest as her understanding of movement and her own body evolved through an Introduction to Modern Dance course. For the first time in her life as an aspiring writer, she felt connected to art, literature, and her personal history in ways that…

  18. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  19. Preventing dance injuries: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell JA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey A Russell Division of Athletic Training, School of Applied Health Sciences and Wellness, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA Abstract: Dancers are clearly athletes in the degree to which sophisticated physical capacities are required to perform at a high level. The standard complement of athletic attributes – muscular strength and endurance, anaerobic and aerobic energy utilization, speed, agility, coordination, motor control, and psychological readiness – all are essential to dance performance. In dance, as in any athletic activity, injuries are prevalent. This paper presents the research background of dance injuries, characteristics that distinguish dance and dancers from traditional sports and athletes, and research-based perspectives into how dance injuries can be reduced or prevented, including the factors of physical training, nutrition and rest, flooring, dancing en pointe, and specialized health care access for dancers. The review concludes by offering five essential components for those involved with caring for dancers that, when properly applied, will assist them in decreasing the likelihood of dance-related injury and ensuring that dancers receive optimum attention from the health care profession: (1 screening; (2 physical training; (3 nutrition and rest; (4 specialized dance health care; and (5 becoming acquainted with the nature of dance and dancers. Keywords: dance, injuries, injury prevention, fitness, wellness, health

  20. Dance and sexuality: many moves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Judith Lynne

    2010-03-01

    This literature review of dance and sexual expression considers dance and religion, dance and sexuality as a source of power, manifestations of sexuality in Western theater art and social dance, plus ritual and non-Western social dance. Expressions of gender, sexual orientation, asexuality, ambiguity, and adult entertainment exotic dance are presented. Prominent concerns in the literature are the awareness, closeting, and denial of sexuality in dance; conflation of sexual expression and promiscuity of gender and sexuality, of nudity and sexuality, and of dancer intention and observer interpretation; and inspiration for infusing sexuality into dance. Numerous disciplines (American studies, anthropology, art history, comparative literature, criminology, cultural studies, communication, dance, drama, English, history, history of consciousness, journalism, law, performance studies, philosophy, planning, retail geography, psychology, social work, sociology, and theater arts) have explored dance and sexual expression, drawing upon the following concepts, which are not mutually exclusive: critical cultural theory, feminism, colonialism, Orientalism, postmodernism, poststructuralism, queer theory, and semiotics. Methods of inquiry include movement analysis, historical investigation, anthropological fieldwork, autoethnography, focus groups, surveys, and self-reflection or autobiographical narrative. Directions for future exploration are addressed.

  1. Psychophysiological responses to Salsa dance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guidetti

    Full Text Available Speculation exists whether dance provides physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits. Unfortunately, research to date has not addressed the affective and exertional responses to dance. These responses are of interest as positive affective and exertional responses experienced during physical activity may play an important role in predicting adherence. The present study aims to examine the psychophysiological responses of different Salsa dance styles. Ten pairs of dancers performed two different structured lessons of Salsa dance, including Typical Salsa and Rueda de Casino lessons, and a non-structured Salsa dance at a night club. Physiological responses (i.e., percent of heart rate reserve; %HRR were continuously assessed and perceived exertion and affective valence were rated every 15 min throughout the trials. %HRR responses differed between the Salsa dance styles (%HRR from 41.3 to 51.9%, and participants were dancing at intensities near their ventilatory threshold. Specifically, Typical Salsa lesson elicited lower %HRR responses than Rueda de Casino lesson (p 0.05. Surprisingly, exertional (from 8 to 11 and affective (from +3 to +5 responses were unaffected by Salsa dance styles (p > 0.05. These data support that different Salsa dance styles provide physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits, and perhaps more importantly, produce pleasurable experiences, which in turn might lead to an increase in adherence to Salsa dancing which likely provides exercise-like health benefits.

  2. A Poem in a Medium Not of Words: Music, Dance and Arts Education in Rabindranath Tagore's Santiniketan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent attempts to defend the role of the arts in education against the effects of policies based on utilitarian principles, this paper examines the arts educational writings and practical projects of Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) at Santiniketan in West Bengal, showing how they were motivated by a Romantic and Upanishadic philosophy…

  3. The Role of Leisure Education in Parks and Recreation. Research Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Irma; Taylor, Gayle A.

    1996-01-01

    This review of literature focuses on the need to balance work and leisure rather than choosing one over the other, noting that the American work ethic extols work rather than leisure. After discussing the role of work and leisure, the paper examines leisure education's role in understanding the relationship between the two. (SM)

  4. School Safety Policies With Emphasis on Physical Education, Athletics and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet outlines principles of hazard control, school accident problems, and the need for guidelines and policies. Suggested general school safety policies, guidelines for courses in safety education and for the provision of facilities and supplies, policies for the administration of first aid and emergency care, and procedures for reporting…

  5. Testing tools for outdoor recreation, environmental education, and stewardship: Allowing children to choose the rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Baird; Logan O. Park

    2014-01-01

    Engaging children in natural settings enhances learning, promotes early childhood development, and makes use of protected natural areas. Unfortunately, many schoolchildren, especially from economically disadvantaged areas, lack support for environmental education (EE) to develop skills and attitudes that increase rates of appropriate outdoor behaviors. Improved access...

  6. Anthropocentric and Ecocentric: An Application of Environmental Philosophy to Outdoor Recreation and Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Samuel; Simpson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Sometimes environmental philosophers write only for other environmental philosophers, and their insights on the nature-human relationship do not reach environmental educators and adventure programmers. This article investigates one aspect of environmental philosophy and the differences between anthropocentric and ecocentric thinking, and applies…

  7. (Re)creating Spaces for "uMunthu": Postcolonial Theory and Environmental Education in Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayira, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Colonialism goes beyond territorial conquest: it affects one's epistemological stance, worldviews and perceptions. Although most African countries gained independence in the 1960s, the impacts of colonialism continue to be present through modern-day globalization as a form of neocolonialism. Education systems in many countries in southern Africa…

  8. Ludopedagogia: recreational-educational care for pediatrics University Hospital São Francisco de Paula-Pelotas / RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivia Celoi Ferreira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The respective project seeks to present the university extension project of the Faculty of Pedagogy of the Catholic University of Pelotas, named "Ludopedagogia: recreational-educational care for pediatrics University Hospital São Francisco de Paula - Pelotas RS". The proposal relies on the view that the play, in the context of the infant playfulness, is a relevant factor to stimulate the processes of human development, to insert the child in moments of relaxation and promote cognitive abilities, as well as, soften the tensions caused by the hospital environment. The presence of the play and everything related to it is one of the factors that facilitate and provide the adaptation of the sick to the hospital environment. Therefore, it requires the presence of a responsible (teacher to mediate ludic experiences and create a link between the magic of play and familiar environment. Besides the presence of  this professional, the proposal aims at the participation of the family to create a welfare situation and proportionate the realization of exchanges, in this way, it’s possible to soften the emotional tension in hospital environment e promote strategies to the infant development.

  9. Effect of Folk Dance Training on Blood Oxidative Stress Level, Lipids, and Lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okdan Bora

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Folk dance is a form of physical activity which helps develop the ability to use the whole body in a coordinated way with music, and folk dancers’ characteristics vary according to the particular type of dance practised in a given geographic region. The aims of the study were to evaluate the effects of 12-week folk dance training on blood oxidative stress level, lipids, lipoproteins, as well as muscle damage markers and to define some physical and physiological properties of folk dancers. Material and methods. Thirty-eight healthy male folk dancers aged 21-28 years having an average of 11 years of dance training experience voluntarily participated in the study. All of the physical and physiological measurements and the blood analysis were performed twice, before and after the training period which focused on different regional dances (Caucasus, Bar, Zeybek, Spoon Dance, Thracian dances, and Horon. The training was done 2 hours per day (a total of 10 hours a week, during a 12-week-long period. Results. All the blood parameters were found to be within the specified reference ranges. The training programme had no significant effect on the blood lipid profile, whereas it was found to have positive effects on body fat (p ≤ 0.012, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak; p = 0.000, muscle damage markers (creatine kinase, Δ% = −19.6, and total antioxidant capacity (p ≤ 0.002. Conclusions. Regular folk dance training was found to have positive effects on body fat, VO2peak, blood total antioxidant capacity, and muscle damage markers. Based on these results, the community should be encouraged to perform folk dance as a recreational physical activity, and public awareness should be raised about the health benefits of practising folk dances.

  10. Towards a Developing Construct in Dance Education--Exploring the Relation of Emotional Intelligence to Teacher's Sense of Efficacy and Teaching Experience among Dance Education Student Teachers in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenn, Britta; Mulholland, Rosemary; Timmons, Wendy; Zanker, Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    Theories of emotional intelligence (EI) have already been applied successfully in the field of education, and EI has been found to predict different aspects of teaching such as influencing teachers' self-efficacy beliefs (TSEB). This study aims to explore potential associations between EI, TSEB, and length of teaching experience amongst dance…

  11. Therapeutic Dancing for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenna Pryscia Carvalho Aguiar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic dancing has been advocated as an effective adjunct to conventional physical therapies for people living with Parkinson's disease (PD. This systematic review evaluates studies on the outcomes of different dance genres on mobility and quality of life in PD. We searched databases including CINHAL (1982–2015, Medline (1922–2015, Scopus (1996–2015, Web of Science (2002–2015, Embase (2007–2015, PEDro (1999–2015 and the Cochrane Library (1996–2015. The key words were: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson*, Parkinsonism, dance, dance therapy, dance genres, safety, feasibility, and quality of life. Two independent investigators reviewed the texts. Only randomized controlled trials, quasirandomized controlled trials, and case series studies were included. There was emerging evidence that therapeutic dance can be safe and feasible for people with mild to moderately severe PD, with beneficial effects on walking, freezing of gait, and health related quality of life.

  12. Bulgarian folk dances at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    On Sunday 29 August, the Bulgarian folklore dance group Rhythm visited CERN. After their visit to the ATLAS visitor centre and the SM18 hall, they performed a show in the Pump Room, introducing CERN people to the musical traditions of their country.   The visit of the Bulgarian dance group was organized by Zornitsa Zaharieva, a member of the Beams Department, and Svejina Dimitrova, Director of the Varna Astronomical Observatory. “The students were enthusiastic about the opportunity to visit CERN”, says Zornitsa. “The idea of the performance came from the dance group itself, who wanted to express their gratitude for being given this chance”. The group, comprising around 25 children aged between 11 and 16 from the city of Varna, was hosted by the CERN Dancing Club. For their show, the young dancers, choreographed by Tashka Pavlova, performed traditional dances and songs from different Bulgarian regions. “As a member of the CERN Dancing Club com...

  13. Dance for Individuals With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapum, Jennifer L; Bar, Rachel J

    2016-03-01

    The movement and music associated with dance plays an important role in many individuals' lives and can become imprinted upon the body and mind. Dance is thus closely associated with memory because of these deep connections. Without conscious thought, dance has the potential to be initiated as individuals age. In the current article, the authors share narrative reflections about their experiences with, and the potential of, dance as an intervention for aging populations diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. They draw upon their experiences in working with the aging population and a dance program currently being developed by Canada's National Ballet School and Baycrest Health Sciences for individuals with dementia-related diseases in long-term care. The current article is structured as dialogue between the authors because it mimics dance as a dialogical encounter between movement and music, and/or between individuals. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Dancing on the deck of the Titanic? Adult education, the nation-state and new social movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2011-08-01

    This article begins with a discussion of the implications of CONFINTEA VI having been organised in Brazil - the author uses the term "Brazilian effect" - and the role of social movements challenging neoliberalism. Next, drawing from the experience of Latin America, this paper analyses the counter-hegemonic practice of the new social movements. The concluding section highlights the dilemmas faced by UNESCO in trying to create a democratic and efficient process of policy-making and institutional service in adult education in the nation-states. Furthermore, the proposal of popular education portrayed by the new social movements is described as a tool for empowerment. CONFINTEA VI's recommendation of moving from rhetoric to action in adult education programmes, practices and policies demands that we take the agendas of the new social movements in the post-neoliberalism era seriously.

  15. 75 FR 21138 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA); Request for Grant Proposals: DanceMotion USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    .... V.3d.2 Diversity, Freedom and Democracy Guidelines Pursuant to the Bureau's authorizing legislation... sense and encompass differences including, but not limited to ethnicity, race, gender, religion... educational and cultural exchange in countries whose people do not fully enjoy freedom and democracy,'' the...

  16. Metodika výuky moderního tanečního stylu street dance

    OpenAIRE

    Štěpánková, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    My dissertation is mainly targeted to all street dance lectors and teachers but is also for another people who are concerned about street dance education. Dissertation is writting about a street style history and is focused on creation of my own methodology proposal for an education of this style. Kids are really enjoying a lessons of street dance and the kind and level of this emjoyment is done by their age and level of performance.

  17. Attitudes of postmenopausal women toward interactive video dance for exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzitari, Marco; Greenlee, Adam; Hess, Rachel; Perera, Subashan; Studenski, Stephanie A

    2009-08-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is universally recommended, most adults are not regular exercisers. Interactive video dance is a novel form of PA in widespread use among young adults, but interest among adults is not known. Postmenopausal women are an appropriate target for interventions to promote PA because they have an increased risk of health problems related to sedentary behavior. We explored perceived advantages and disadvantages of video dance as a personal exercise option in postmenopausal women. Forty sedentary postmenopausal women (mean age +/- SD 57 +/- 5 years), were oriented in eight small groups to interactive video dance, which uses a force-sensing pad with directional panels: the player steps on the panels in response to arrows scrolling on a screen, synchronized to music. Perceived advantages and disadvantages were elicited through a nominal group technique (NGT) process. Participants generated 113 advantages and 71 disadvantages. The most frequently cited advantages were "it's fun" and "improves coordination" (seven of eight groups), the fact that challenge encourages progress (five of eight groups), the potential for weight loss (four of eight groups), and the flexibility of exercise conditions (three of eight groups). Concerns were the potentially long and frustrating learning process, cost (six of eight groups), and possible technical issues (two of eight groups). The recreational nature of interactive dance exercise was widely appealing to postmenopausal women and might help promote adherence to PA. Initial support to learn basic technical and movement skills may be needed.

  18. Dance as Aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hamrin

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The woman who founded Tenho-kötai-jingii-kyö, Kitamura Sayo (1900-1967, publicly announced in July 1945 that the world was coming to an end and that she had been chosen by the absolute deity Tensho Kotai Jingu to be the savior of the world. People began to gather to her banner, a religious organization was formed, and legal incorporation of the group as a religious juridical person took place in January 1947. Teaching that regret, desire, hatred, love and other emotional antipathies were the cause of all misfortune, the founder urged people to free themselves of such restraints by praying earnestly until they attained a state in which the self was completely forgotten. Since the members of the group perform a ritual dance and fall into an ecstatic condition at the group meetings, the movement is called the Dancing Religion.

  19. Doing a Dialogic Dance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    experience is that the use of visual and narrative methods is a dance with participants, which I conceptualize as a mutual meaning-making process that emerges in a specific context. In the discussion, I consider how I try to develop a dialogic dance inspired by a dialogic understanding of empowerment......In this panel presentation and paper, I draw on personal experience regarding the challenges of facilitating visually-oriented workshops for students and professionals. I critically examine and reflect on my core beliefs and values as a researcher and my roots in dialogic communication theory......, and phenomenological approaches to arts therapy. A general characteristic of using visual methods is that they promote emergence and transformation of meanings. Typically, many associations and metaphors emerge and alter rapidly as people work collaboratively with images and stories in a workshop setting. My...

  20. Challenges of Teaching Practice-Based Dance Art in Nigeria: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study argues that there is a noticeable gap between dance theory and praxis which appear to have mired the growth and development of dance education in the country. It uses the experience of the Federal University, Oye-Ekiti (FUOYE), to concretise its argument for a synergy of efforts by both formallytrained and ...

  1. The Familiar and the Foreign: Dance on the Historically Black College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebright, Wanda K. W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to illuminate the missing voices of historically black college and university dance programs in the national discussion on the history and development of dance in American higher education. The methodology included the selection of five subject schools that are historically black colleges and universities…

  2. Bursting Bubbles between Sand and Sea: Teaching Dance on the Edge of the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Krystel; Martin, Rosemary; Rowe, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    In July 2010, on the crest of "The Arab Spring," 28 independent dance teachers from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Malta, Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon, gathered in Bodrum, Turkey, for the Symposium on Dance Education in Arabic Speaking Countries. This article reflects on the symposium experience, examining the sociopolitical…

  3. Curriculum Revision in Practice: Designing a Liberal Arts Degree in Dance Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Dance programs in higher education offering both professional degrees (BFA) and liberal arts degrees (BA, BS) often focus most of their energy, attention, and resources to ever-increasing BFA programs. At the same time, liberal arts programs in dance often provide the real bread and butter of program headcounts, credit hours generated, and degrees…

  4. The Dance of the Magic Dragon: Embodied Knowledge in the Context of Transformative Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouvala, Maria; Magos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a dance-based research project conducted at the Department of Early Childhood Education of the University of Thessaly. The main aim of the project was to explore the possibilities of dance in understanding the self in relation to the world, under the perspective of the transformative learning theory. The methodology applied…

  5. Institutional Power: Identity, Politics, and Lived Experiences in the Dance License via Portfolio Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    In this research study, I examined how institutional power affected the experiences of two dance educators attempting to gain their K-12 dance teaching license in Minnesota. My research analyzed the ways in which candidates applying for the portfolio review process constructed, amended, or abandoned their identities as teachers/artists/individuals…

  6. Talent Identification and Development in Dance: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Imogen J.; Nordin-Bates, Sanna M.; Redding, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Talent identification and development processes are important components of many dance programmes, yet talent is notoriously difficult to define and its identification may rely on intuitive judgements. Taking a systematic approach to the study of dance talent could enable researchers and educators to better determine what talent actually "is," the…

  7. The socio-cultural implications of African music and dance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to discuss the socio-cultural implications of African music and dance. To this end, the paper looks at African music, African dance and human culture, kinds of dance, dance and the human body, dance and the society, the interrelationship between African music and dance, the importance of dance to the ...

  8. The Dance Within: A Pilot Project in Dance for the Handicapped and Teaching Dance for the Handicapped: A Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan Dance Association, Lansing.

    The Michigan Dance Association's Dance Project for the Handicapped is the subject of the two pamphlets that make up this document. The first pamphlet, "The Dance Within," describes the history, nature and goals of the Jackson Pilot Project, the first handicapped dance program in Michigan; it also offers suggestions on how to set up similar…

  9. Recreation of the european higher education area within the horizon of a wisdom society: Towards a new educational scenari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo JOVER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area (EHEA derived from the well-knownBologna process, has come to an end. Nevertheless, its implementation has brought asound introduction of the equally famous Knowledge Society and the democratizationof the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in education. All thesechanges have been critical to consummate the step from the mere knowledge to the moredesirable know how and, in this sense, improve the quality of higher education. In theselines, we would like to sum up the characteristics of the aforementioned change andtry to understand what could, or should, be the next aim to be achieved. Therefore, weadvocate moving towards a “Wisdom Society” that could allow to enhance knowledgeon ethical and moral principles and help us to achieve competence-based professionals,no doubt about it, but also critical and committed people who would value, above all,knowing how to be.

  10. Schools Integrate Dance into Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis may be an unlikely topic to inspire an opera or ballet, but in a 2nd grade classroom in Pikesville, Maryland, the children were asked to use dance to help them learn about that process. Small groups of pupils in this class at Fort Garrison Elementary School brainstormed to come up with dance movements to convey elements of…

  11. The Philippine "Hip Hop Stick Dance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a dance that blends the traditional cultural heritage of the Philippines with modern music and moves. "Hip Hop Stick Dance" incorporates Tinikling (the Philippine national dance) and Arnis (a Filipino style of martial arts) to create a contemporary combination of rhythm, dance, and fitness. It was designed to introduce…

  12. Aesthetic experience of dance performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Maja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the aesthetic experience of dance performances is investigated. The study includes construction of an instrument for measuring the aesthetic experience of dance performances and an investigation of the structure of both dancers’ and spectators’ aesthetic experience. The experiments are carried out during eight different performances of various dance forms, including classical ballet, contemporary dance, flamenco and folklore. Three factors of aesthetic experience of dance performances are identified: Dynamism, Exceptionality and Affective Evaluation. The results show that dancers’ aesthetic experience has a somewhat different factorial structure from that of the spectators’. Unlike spectators’ aesthetic experience, dancers’ aesthetic experience singles out the Excitement factor. The results are discussed within the context of dancers’ proprioception and spectators’ exteroception since these findings confirm the idea of a significant role of proprioception in dancers’ aesthetic experience.

  13. Recreational drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    The use of recreational drugs of abuse continues to expand without limitations to national boundaries, social status, race, or education. Beyond the prevalence of illicit drug use and dependence, their contribution to the global burden of disease and death are large and troubling. All medical providers should be aware of the evolving drugs of abuse and their medical and social consequences. In addition to heroin and stimulants such as cocaine and methamphetamine, new designer stimulants called "bath salts" and cannabinoids called "spice," along with the abuse of prescription drugs and volatile substances, are now widely recognized problems in many societies. The wide variety and continuingly expanding clinical manifestations of toxicity of recreational drugs of abuse is not widely appreciated by clinicians. This edition attempts to summarize six major classes of drugs of abuse and their clinical effects with special emphasis on their immunological and respiratory effects.

  14. What Does Dance History Have to Do with Dancing? Making College Dance History Usable for Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattner, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores methods for bringing dance history directly into the studio. It shows how the movement components that have proven successful in introductory courses can be extended to in-depth studies of dance history with dancers who have formal training. Through the example of a research project on the early work of George Balanchine, it…

  15. FORMING PROSPECTIVE PRIMAPY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ NATIONAL SELF-IDENTIFICATION IN THE COURSE “FOLK DANCE THEORY AND METHODOLOGY”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kotov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the urgent problem of contemporary art pedagogy – involvement to training future professional choreographic traditions of different nations. Addressing to this problem is caused by a number of socio-political events in Ukraine, mainstreaming of national and international education, integration of Ukrainian education with the European educational space, intensive development of domestic students’ intercultural communication with young people from different countries, which is the basis for updating national art education. Prospective choreographers, who are being training at pedagogical universities to manage children's dance groups, should actively be involved into creating their own productions of folk dance various genres. It promotes the formation of choreographers’ professional competence and pedagogical skills. The development of Ukrainian dance “Opryshky” is proposed – a joint creative work of the teacher and students who get higher education degree in SHEE “Donbass State Pedagogical University” (Bachelor's Degree. Development of the dance contains schematic drawings of dance figures, it is recommended for use in forming choreographers’ professional skills while studying the course "Folk Dance Theory and Methodology". The author admits that folklore material requires a cautious, respectful attitude. Therefore, modern folk stage dances are integrally to combine traditional choreographic manner with its new interpretations. The author believes the actual capture of different nations’ choreographic culture improves intercultural youth communication; involves future professionals into the traditions of different nations; form professional skills of managers of children’s dance groups. The author concluded that a dance always reflects consciousness of different nations; future choreographers should be aware of characteristic features of dances of different world nations so that on the basis of

  16. EL MOVIMIENTO INSTITUCIONALIZADO: DANZAS FOLKLÓRICAS ARGENTINAS, LA PROFESIONALIZACIÓN DE SU ENSEÑANZA / Institutionalized movement: professional education of argentine folk dances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Hirose

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available En 1948 se creó la Escuela Nacional de Danzas Folklóricas, como parte del Plan Quinquenal del primer gobierno de Juan D. Perón (1946-1952. Así se dio inicio a la profesionalización de la transmisión y difusión de las danzas folklóricas en su carácter de danzas nacionales, tarea que quedaría concretada con la formación de un cuerpo de profesores nacionales de danza. Este proceso suponía el establecimiento de criterios de selección y transformación de aquellas danzas que se consideraran adecuadas para dar materialidad, mediante coreografías, música, vestimenta y eventos, al sentimiento de la nacionalidad. El folklore académico, en pleno proceso de consolidación como disciplina científica, fue también funcional al proyecto nacional, proveyendo los criterios para la creación del repertorio de danzas que sería enseñado en Buenos Aires y transportado luego a las provincias.En este artículo nos proponemos describir el desarrollo histórico que posibilitó la institucionalización de la enseñanza de las danzas folklóricas en la Argentina, y los efectos de dicha institucionalización. Exploramos el rol que diversos grupos o individuos pertenecientes al ámbito político, cultural y/o académico, asignaron a la enseñanza de las danzas folklóricas en las diferentes etapas del proceso de construcción y fortalecimiento del estado-nación argentino.Palabras clave: danza; folklore; Argentina; docencia; peronismoAbstractIn 1948 Argentina’s National School of Folkloric Dances was created as a part of Juan D. Peron’s “Quinquennial Plan”, launched during his first administration. Thus, the transmission and diffusion of folkloric dances as national symbols began to be professionalized, the development of which was accomplish by the instruction of a troupe of national dance teachers. This process required a repertoire based on the selection and transformation of those dances considered to be adequate expressions of Argentine

  17. Drug use and nightlife: more than just dance music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Havere, Tina; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Lammertyn, Jan; Broekaert, Eric; Bellis, Mark

    2011-07-27

    Research over the last decade has focused almost exclusively on the association between electronic music and MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine or "ecstasy") or other stimulant drug use in clubs. Less attention has been given to other nightlife venues and music preferences, such as rock music or southern/funky music. This study aims to examine a broader spectrum of nightlife, beyond dance music. It looks at whether certain factors influence the frequency of illegal drug and alcohol use: the frequency of going to certain nightlife venues in the previous month (such as, pubs, clubs or goa parties); listening to rock music, dance music or southern and funky music; or sampling venues (such as, clubs, dance events or rock festivals). The question of how these nightlife variables influence the use of popular drugs like alcohol, MDMA, cannabis, cocaine and amphetamines is addressed. The study sample consisted of 775 visitors of dance events, clubs and rock festivals in Belgium. Study participants answered a survey on patterns of going out, music preferences and drug use. Odds ratios were used to determine whether the odds of being an illegal substance user are higher for certain nightlife-related variables. Furthermore, five separate ordinal regression analyses were used to investigate drug use in relation to music preference, venues visited during the last month and sampling venue. Respondents who used illegal drugs were 2.5 times more likely to report that they prefer dance music. Goa party visitors were nearly 5 times more likely to use illegal drugs. For those who reported visiting clubs, the odds of using illegal drugs were nearly 2 times higher. Having gone to a pub in the last month was associated with both more frequent alcohol use and more frequent illegal substance use. People who reported liking rock music and attendees of rock festivals used drugs less frequently. It was concluded that a more extended recreational environment, beyond dance clubs, is

  18. Drug use and nightlife: more than just dance music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broekaert Eric

    2011-07-01

    more extended recreational environment, beyond dance clubs, is associated with frequent drug use. This stresses the importance of targeted prevention in various recreational venues tailored to the specific needs of the setting and its visitors.

  19. Drug use and nightlife: more than just dance music

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Research over the last decade has focused almost exclusively on the association between electronic music and MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine or "ecstasy") or other stimulant drug use in clubs. Less attention has been given to other nightlife venues and music preferences, such as rock music or southern/funky music. This study aims to examine a broader spectrum of nightlife, beyond dance music. It looks at whether certain factors influence the frequency of illegal drug and alcohol use: the frequency of going to certain nightlife venues in the previous month (such as, pubs, clubs or goa parties); listening to rock music, dance music or southern and funky music; or sampling venues (such as, clubs, dance events or rock festivals). The question of how these nightlife variables influence the use of popular drugs like alcohol, MDMA, cannabis, cocaine and amphetamines is addressed. Methods The study sample consisted of 775 visitors of dance events, clubs and rock festivals in Belgium. Study participants answered a survey on patterns of going out, music preferences and drug use. Odds ratios were used to determine whether the odds of being an illegal substance user are higher for certain nightlife-related variables. Furthermore, five separate ordinal regression analyses were used to investigate drug use in relation to music preference, venues visited during the last month and sampling venue. Results Respondents who used illegal drugs were 2.5 times more likely to report that they prefer dance music. Goa party visitors were nearly 5 times more likely to use illegal drugs. For those who reported visiting clubs, the odds of using illegal drugs were nearly 2 times higher. Having gone to a pub in the last month was associated with both more frequent alcohol use and more frequent illegal substance use. People who reported liking rock music and attendees of rock festivals used drugs less frequently. Conclusions It was concluded that a more extended recreational

  20. Reasons of Choosing Recreation Management Departments within the Body of Tourism Faculties and Expectations of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan YAVUZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is seen that the students graduating from Recreation department work in tourism sectors, but on the other hand, Recreation students can also work in industry and domestic administrations, school recreation, therapeutic recreation etc. This paper presents some solutions by determining that the Recreation administration program’s students’ expectations of future and sufficiency of their education and their happiness

  1. Nuclear Astrophysics at DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Schwantes, J.M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Hatarik, R.; Greife, U.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most interesting nuclear physics challenges is obtaining a detailed understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes of the elements. Knowledge about the stellar sites, and how they are governed by stellar evolution and cosmology are crucial in understanding the overall picture. Information on reaction rates for neutron- and charged-particle-induced reactions have a direct impact on existing stellar models. Except for the stable isotopes, very few neutron-induced reactions in the energy range of interest have been measured to date. DANCE measurements on stable and unstable isotopes will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements

  2. Service First: Embracing the Scholarship on Teaching and Learning through Active Engagement in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Keri; Greenwood, Brian; Dustin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we turn the tripartite responsibility of teaching, scholarship, and service inside out. Rather than considering service to be a poor stepchild to scholarship and teaching, we reason that service as engaged scholarship should be the centerpiece of academic life, especially in an applied discipline like parks, recreation, and…

  3. Space flight research relevant to health, physical education, and recreation: With particular reference to Skylab's life science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhuss, W. D.; Heusner, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    Data collected in the Skylab program relating to physiological stresses is presented. Included are routine blood measures used in clinical medicine as research type endocrine analyses to investigate the metabolic/endocrine responses to weightlessness. The daily routine of physical exercise, coupled with appropriate dietary intake, sleep, work, and recreation periods were considered essential in maintaining the crew's health and well being.

  4. Dance and the brain: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpati, Falisha J; Giacosa, Chiara; Foster, Nicholas E V; Penhune, Virginia B; Hyde, Krista L

    2015-03-01

    Dance is a universal form of human expression that offers a rich source for scientific study. Dance provides a unique opportunity to investigate brain plasticity and its interaction with behavior. Several studies have investigated the behavioral correlates of dance, but less is known about the brain basis of dance. Studies on dance observation suggest that long- and short-term dance training affect brain activity in the action observation and simulation networks. Despite methodological challenges, the feasibility of conducting neuroimaging while dancing has been demonstrated, and several brain regions have been implicated in dance execution. Preliminary work from our laboratory suggests that long-term dance training changes both gray and white matter structure. This article provides a critical summary of work investigating the neural correlates of dance. It covers functional neuroimaging studies of dance observation and performance as well as structural neuroimaging studies of expert dancers. To stimulate ongoing dialogue between dance and science, future directions in dance and brain research as well as implications are discussed. Research on the neuroscience of dance will lead to a better understanding of brain-behavior relationships and brain plasticity in experts and nonexperts and can be applied to the development of dance-based therapy programs. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. SCHOOL CONTEXT AND DANCE IN COLLECTIVE: CASE STUDY IN STATE COLLEGE MACHADO DE ASSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainã Silva Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research of a case study in State College Machado de Assis - CEMA, in order to analyze the school context and the reality of this dance school. The research is linked to the Institutional Program Initiation Purse in Teaching - PIBID, performed by scholarship students of the Bachelor's Degree in Dance at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology -IFG Goiás, Campus Aparecida de Goiânia - Goiás. From analysis of diagnostic, highlighted the need to investigate and analyze a project of this school, that it is the creation and actions of a dance group called Danç'art. The methodology of the research, theoretical and field, permeated by the study authors and researchers that supported and provoked reflections. Brings inherent notes related to the school context which helps to think about the dance by the bias of a critical overview. For greater understanding of the school context were made questionnaires for students, for dance teacher, teachers of other subjects besides the director and coordinators. These studies validate and enable greater understanding of the need for experience and expansion looks about the dance school. From the field research through observations and interviews applied by scholars, we can see a devaluation by managers and teachers from other areas, which unfolds into challenges and contradictions, so that actions aimed at dance to expand and efetivem critically and consistently. Another objective is to cause a provocation and investigate the reality of dance in this context, from the following questions: what prompted the dance teacher to create the group and what look professional regarding the teaching of dance? What is the perception and interest of students to participate and be part of the group? What is an interactive dance and what is its importance in the perspective of a group of dance? How to give the processes of teaching, creation and testing of the group? Understanding the design of this

  6. EXETRA Perspectives: Concepts in Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.; Edginton, Christopher R.

    Fifteen papers address issues in therapeutic recreation for disabled persons from the perspectives of practitioners, educators, and students. The following papers are presented. "Therapeutic Recreation Service: The Past and Challenging Present" (H. Sessoms); "Therapeutic Recreatiion in an Era of Limits: A Crisis...A Challenge... An Opportunity"…

  7. Occupational therapy's dance with diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Roxie M

    2002-01-01

    As the demographics of the United States continue to change and we become a more pluralistic society, the increased diversity of the occupational therapy workforce and our consumers calls for an examination of the profession's stance on multiculturalism and diversity. Using the metaphor of dance, this article identifies the dance partners as the organization's leaders and its members. A historical review of the profession from the 1940s to the present traces the partners' steps to determine which led the dance of diversity during the profession's development. In this review, I discovered that the period when the profession most effectively and productively explored issues of diversity was during the early- to mid-1990s--a time when the organization and its members worked in harmony. At that time, occupational therapy's dance with diversity flowed with rhythm and synchronicity.

  8. Chasing Ambiguity: Critical Reflections on Working with Dance Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This paper questions whether are we able to foster uncertainty and ambiguity within higher education arts programmes, specifically alongside current institutional demands and embedded pedagogies. If not, then what effect does this have on current dance graduates? I attend to these questions through critical reflections upon my work as a pedagogue,…

  9. SHINE for Girls: Innovating STEM Curriculum with Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hally, Tara; Sinha, Kirin

    2018-01-01

    SHINE for Girls, a nonprofit with the mission of empowering young women to value their own potential and capabilities within STEM fields, employs a unique curriculum that blends math with dance. They were selected as part of HundreED's 100 Global Education Innovations for 2017. In this article, Tara Hally, Director of Programming, and Kirin Sinha,…

  10. The Integration of Traditional Greek Dance in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartzonika, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    This paper researches the statutory educational regulations used as a foundation to introduce traditional Greek dance in the school curriculum and which transformed it into a taught subject with connections to the ideological-political and social conditions prevalent in Greece at the time. It particularly concerns the connection between the aims…

  11. Straight into the Eyes - Jacek Łumiński and the Silesian Dance Theatre (1991-2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Alicja Iwańska

    2012-01-01

    The final decade of the 20th century was the turning-point for the development of Polish contemporary dance. In 1991 Jacek Łumiński established the Silesian Dance Theatre in Bytom. The theatre is said to be in the avant-garde of all activities related to contemporary dance development in Poland. It was J. Łumiński and his theatre who pioneered new trends in contemporary dance at the beginning of the nineties of the 20th century, at the same time they have conducted educational activity over t...

  12. Divine service, music, sport, and recreation as medicinal in Australian asylums 1860s-1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Dolly

    2009-01-01

    Australian asylum records (circa 1860 to circa 1945) demonstrate that medical staff went to great lengths to provide recreation to suitable patients. This article examines how the demarcation of Australian institutional spaces along gender divisions was also mirrored by the gender-specific recreational activities provided in purpose-built facilities. Using Australian examples I demonstrate how the main forms of recreation-that is divine service, music and dance, and sport-were justified to governments on medical grounds. Some designated recreational spaces even offered select female and male patients the opportunity to mix under medical supervision. Recreation was therapeutic because of its psychological, physical, social, and moral benefits, and government authorities funded the construction of costly chapels, recreation halls, and sports grounds expressly for this medical purpose.

  13. How To Dance through Time. Volume V: Victorian Era Couple Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 55-minute VHS videotape is the fifth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It continues the tradition of the romance of the mid-19th century couple dances, focusing on Victorian era couple dances. The videotape offers 35 variations of the renowned 19th century couple dances, including the waltz, the polka, the galop,…

  14. Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonaro, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Recreational reading as a method of language learning has been a focus of investigation in second language education. This article considers recreational reading through the additional perspective of academic librarianship. Its purpose is to discover if recreational reading is a topic that lends itself to research through both perspectives. This…

  15. Sometimes … Dances … 'Do More' on the Page than They Ever Did on the Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curl, Gordon

    2018-01-01

    This critical review aims to expose the confusion that exists in professional arts criticism in general, and dance criticism in particular--with implications for dance education. The underlying principles of formalism are outlined and its strengths and weaknesses highlighted. A demand for more interpretive, theoretical and contextual criticism is…

  16. The Jig Experiment: Development and Evaluation of a Cultural Dance Active Video Game for Promoting Youth Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincker, Meg; Misner, Susan

    2017-01-01

    School physical education teachers promote fitness by offering children a variety of aerobic activities. Our interdisciplinary team developed a cultural dance active video game (AVG) and tested whether the AVG was equivalent to traditional face-to-face instructor lessons or hybrid instruction at dance mastery, increasing heart rates, and student…

  17. Negotiating the Rules of Engagement: Exploring Perceptions of Dance Technique Learning through Bourdieu's Concept of "Doxa"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a focus group discussion conducted with first year undergraduate dance students in March 2015. The focus group concluded a cycle of action research during which the researcher explored the use of enquiry-based learning approaches to teaching dance technique in higher education. Grounded in transformative and…

  18. Application of aesthetic, recreational forms of physical culture in the organizational and pedagogical techniques of school physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roters T.T.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of methodological analysis are presented in relation to introduction of organizational pedagogical technologies of leadthrough of the employments fixed, extracurricular and extracurricular. Directions of increase of interest and motivation of schoolboys are rotined to employments by physical exercises with the use of aesthetically beautiful forms of physical culture. It is indicated that modern organizational pedagogical technologies come forward the determinative of satisfaction of needs and interests of schoolboys. It is set that the aesthetic recreation forms of physical culture render assistance to the increase of interest and motivation to employments by physical exercises.

  19. The Evolution of Modern Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fran

    1988-01-01

    The article traces the impact of the modern dance movement from the early 1900s and its emphasis on creativity and self-expression on the professional and institutional development of dance therapy. (CB)

  20. Dance Theatre of Harlem: Inspiring the Deprived

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Henry

    1976-01-01

    The Dance Theatre of Harlem, which includes both a school and a publicly performing dance company, is described from its inception by its artistic director, Arthur Mitchell, to its current activities. Budgets, student characteristics, and philosophy are discussed. (LBH)

  1. SEMIOTICS IN INDIGENOUS DANCE PERFORMANCES: EKELEKE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    dance performance presents Ekwe people; situated in Isu local government ... Indigenous dance is not a luxury… it is part of each .... symbols for certain brand products in adverts. ... music, costumes, make-up, set lights and any other effects.

  2. The Dancing Picture - The Ritual Dance of Native Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Engelhart

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available What kind of message does -or did — the dance convey to the Native Australians? Several types of communication can be distinguished in ritual dance. There is the narrative aspect, i.e., the dramatization of a myth, or of certain social relations, there is an aspect of explanation, i.e., the visual performance of significant conditions, an expressive aspect of worship, and even an aspect of transmission, as when the body of the dancer is thought to mediate divine power to the audience. When a dancer is considered possessed, the boundaries between his human identity and the divine are wiped out. This last aspect leads us to the second item of interest regarding the ritual dance in Australia, an issue that has been discussed at length regarding masked dancers in other societies, i.e., the question of whether the dancer is identified with the being represented, or merely performs as an actor in a play. In this discussion, the very technique of dancing may have some explanatory faculty, at least as long as we are dealing with Native Australian ritual dance.

  3. Enhancement of Pleasure during Spontaneous Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Nicolò F.; Bellemare-Pepin, Antoine; Peretz, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Dancing emphasizes the motor expression of emotional experiences. The bodily expression of emotions can modulate the subjective experience of emotions, as when adopting emotion-specific postures and faces. Thus, dancing potentially offers a ground for emotional coping through emotional enhancement and regulation. Here we investigated the emotional responses to music in individuals without any prior dance training while they either freely danced or refrained from movement. Participants were also tested while imitating their own dance movements but in the absence of music as a control condition. Emotional ratings and cardio-respiratory measures were collected following each condition. Dance movements were recorded using motion capture. We found that emotional valence was increased specifically during spontaneous dance of groovy excerpts, compared to both still listening and motor imitation. Furthermore, parasympathetic-related heart rate variability (HRV) increased during dance compared to motor imitation. Nevertheless, subjective and physiological arousal increased during movement production, regardless of whether participants were dancing or imitating. Significant correlations were found between inter-individual differences in the emotions experienced during dance and whole-body acceleration profiles. The combination of movement and music during dance results in a distinct state characterized by acutely heightened pleasure, which is of potential interest for the use of dance in therapeutic settings. PMID:29238298

  4. Afro-American Music and Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Samuel A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Outlines the concurrent development of Black music and Black dance in the United States, and describes the interaction of the two genres throughout their mutually dependent evolutions. Traces the histories of the dances of African American culture, known collectively as "jazz dance," in relation to ragtime, jazz, and the blues. (AF)

  5. Dance/Movement Therapy. A Healing Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fran J.

    This book examines the field of dance therapy from its inception in the 1940's to the present. A detailed analysis is conducted of the theory and practice of the major pioneers. The book covers biographical reports and the influence of many dance therapy leaders. Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is discussed as well as dance therapy in specific…

  6. Embodied Subjectivities: Nine Young Women Talking Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flynn, Gabrielle; Pryor, Zoe; Gray, Tonia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine nine Australian young women's embodied experiences of dance. The young women were all amateur dancers involved in weekly jazz, tap, and ballet dance classes at the same dance studio. In this paper, embodiment is defined as multidimensional (Burkitt 1999). The authors explore the ways the corporeal and the…

  7. The Origins of the "Fanga" Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The "fanga" is a dance taught throughout the United States to children in elementary music classes, students in African dance classes, teachers in multicultural workshops, and professional dancers in touring ensembles. Although the history of the fanga is a path overgrown with myth, this article offers information about the dance's…

  8. A experiência do corpo na dança butô: indicadores para pensar a educação The body experience in the Butoh dance: pointers to reflect on education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Petrucia da Nóbrega

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo pretende-se refletir, apoiado em alguns ensaios de Merleau-Ponty e com base na fenomenologia, acerca do corpo e das narrativas e saberes que nele se anunciam na dança butô - modalidade que combina dança e teatro, criada no Japão na década de 1950. De modo geral, o corpo foi compreendido como elemento acessório no processo educativo, e essa compreensão ainda é predominante no contexto atual. Nossa reflexão tenta apontar outros caminhos de entendimento do corpo na educação, a partir de uma atitude que busca superar o instrumentalismo e ampliar as referências educativas, ao considerar a fenomenologia do corpo, e sua relação com o conhecimento sensível, como aquela capaz de amplificar a textura corpórea dos processos de conhecimento. Considerando a experiência do corpo na dança butô, apresentamos indicadores para pensar a educação, relacionados à experiência estética. Dentre eles destacamos: a plasticidade do corpo, a sua produção incessante de ressignificações, a sua abertura à inovação, a sua condição mutante, a sua ruptura com a mecanização gestual, a sua não dissociação entre homem e mundo, pensamento e sentimento. Todos esses aspectos que reúnem o saber recursivo, integrativo e criativo do corpo, são indicadores para pensarmos na educação, por tratar-se de uma nova possibilidade de leitura do real, a partir da linguagem do gesto, em que dialogam saberes e práticas inscritos na experiência corporal.Butoh has emerged as one of the genres in evidence within the contemporary scenario of Japanese dance-theatre aesthetics. The present text intends to reflect upon the body in the Butoh dance, the narratives and knowledges that it reveals, drawing from some of Merleau-Ponty writings and based on the phenomenological stance. Considering this aesthetic scenario, we approach the issue of rationality and its unfolding in education. Generally speaking, the body has been understood as an accessory in

  9. Care to dance?

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The second part of the artistic programme Collide@CERN was officially launched at the beginning of November. The initiative, a dance and performance award, is the result of a partnership between CERN, the City of Geneva and the Canton of Geneva.   From left to right: Sami Kanaan, Rolf Heuer, and Charles Beer. The project Collide@CERN was launched in September in the framework of CERN's new cultural policy (announced in an article published in Bulletin No. 50-51/2010). The project, whose main objective is to achieve a symbiosis between the imagination of artists and the creativity of scientists, features an artist-in-residence scheme that will run for three years. The Organization has concluded two cultural partnerships for the purpose: one with Ars Electronica Linz, an Austrian organisation specialising in the digital arts, which will sponsor a digital arts prize (see article published in Bulletin No. 37-38 earlier this year), and the other with the City and the Canton of Geneva, wh...

  10. Epilepsy is Dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-10-01

    In "Epilepsy is Dancing", in Antony and the Johnsons' album "The Crying Light"(2009), the lyrics and accompanying music video depicts an epileptic seizure in which the person is transferred to another beautiful and magical world. This may be called "enchanted epilepsy"; i.e., the experience of epilepsy as deeply nourishing and (positively) transforming, is conveyed not only in the lyrics but also the visual and auditory qualities of the video. The seizure in the video gives associations to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's dream". If epilepsy appears in music lyrics, the focus is mostly on negative aspects of the illness, such as horror, fear and repulsive sexuality associated with the fits [1,2]. Contradictory to these lyrics, Anthony and the Johnsons' song is an example of a positive portrayal of epilepsy. It is open to a multitude of meanings, emotional valence and appraisal of epilepsy. By widening the experiential range associated with epileptic seizures, these lyrics highlight the inherently construed nature of epileptic experience. The song stands out in several ways. First, it describes epilepsy in positive terms, prioritising the euphoric, ecstatic, potentially empowering and enhancing aspects of epileptic seizures. Second, the lyrics and accompanying video point to divine experiences associated with epileptic seizures. Through the lyrics and the music video we are, as an audience, able to sense a snicket of an epileptic seizure, but also the universal experience of loosing control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ecology, recreation and landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satchell, J E

    1983-01-01

    The article is dedicated to the problems of combining mass tourism in certain countries of Western Europe and environmental protection (OOS) requirements. The ecological damage from recreation is examined and the throughput of the medium is evaluated. The author proposes development of regulable, managable and controllable recreation use of natural resources and landscapes using selective advertising of the recreation sites.

  12. The dancing plague: a public health conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, L J; Cavanagh, J; Rankin, J

    1997-07-01

    The phenomenon of mass, frenzied dancing affected large populations in various parts of Europe from the thirteenth century and lasted, on and off, for three centuries. The exact aetiology of the Dancing Plague (or Dancing Mania) is still unclear. Retrospective historical review of this public health problem reveals claims for causative factors including demonic possession, epilepsy, the bite of a tarantula, ergot poisoning and social adversity. It seems unlikely that Dancing Mania resulted from a single cause but rather resulted from multiple factors combining with a predisposing cultural background and triggered by adverse social circumstances. Dancing Mania remains one of the unresolved mysteries of public health.

  13. Definitions of Outdoor Recreation and Other Associated Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Maurice L.

    This document defines terms related to outdoor recreation: (1) outdoor recreation includes activities that occur outdoors in an urban and man-made environment as well as those activities traditionally associated with the natural environment; (2) outdoor education is education in, about, and for the outdoors; (3) environmental education is an…

  14. Dancing in the 'Contact Zone'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Wulff

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In October 2002 I performed and exhibited Troppo Obscura: A Peepshow of Historical Perversity at the Performance Space as part of the multicultural Arts festival, Carnivale, in Sydney, Australia. Troppo Obscura is a multimedia installation that explores some aspects of the complex relationships between the West and Asia. The work looks at a large range of possibilities, from the colonial gaze through to personal relationships forged through artistic endeavor. This paper—the first of two extended mediations on the topic—focuses on one such personal relationship addressed in the installation, namely that between traditional master mask dancer Ibu Sawitri from Cirebon on the West coast of Java, Indonesia and myself, a Sydney based contemporary dancer and performance artist. Between 1992 and 1999, the year Ibu Sawitri passed away, I spent many long-term visits learning dance and living in Ibu Sawitri’s house in Losari. This essay focuses on Ibu Sawitri’s family and dance background and how she, the younger generation of dancers, the dance context, and the dance itself, have been transformed over time as a result of rapidly changing socio-historical conditions. In the second half of this paper I move the discussion to the broader issues of cross-cultural encounters in what Pratt terms the ‘contact zone’ (1992. This includes looking at dance as an embodied practice and its function in the ‘contact zone’ as well as dealing with Spivak’s debates about the subaltern voice in reference to my telling of Ibu Sawitri’s story, both in the installation and in text. A closer analysis of the dynamics of my dance with Ibu Sawitri in the ‘contact zone’ is addressed here.

  15. No Simple Answers: A Holistic Approach to Issues Concerning Obesity and African Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Xolani Rani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a growing health issue in South Africa that carries health risk detrimental to those living in Black townships. The author will argue that the use of South African traditional urban dances may be permissible option for replacing aerobics to help prevent and combat obesity. Christian missionaries, colonizers, Western education, urbanization, and apartheid have had negative impacts on South African traditional rural dances; however, South Africans who migrated to urban environments in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries transformed traditions under spatial and ideological constraints and created new South African traditional urban social dances. South African traditional urban social dances were created in urban environments, in slum yards and townships, and do not reach the same level of sacred ritual that South African traditional rural social dances do; thus, their use in Black townships to help fight obesity is a possibility that must be further researched. The use of South African traditional urban social dances may not only help prevent and reduce obesity, but also help build community, teach history, facilitate self-exploration in a holistic manner, and open doors for the youth of today to continue to transform traditional urban social dances to reflect the current realities they are experiencing in Black townships.

  16. A wheelchair-bound child integration in the class supported by dance workshops

    OpenAIRE

    Tegelj, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Expressed through the rhythm a dance is a body talk, a beauty of the art, even a sport where two or more bodies are synchronously intertwined. Dance liberates body and soul, it connects and brings happiness. Since 1996 Slovenia encourages physically disabled children to enroll in regular learning programs in primary schools. While it sets significant challenges to the educators it contributes greatly to a better acceptance of differences between children. For successful integration of ...

  17. The dancing nurses and the language of the body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Helle; Grøntved, Susanne Næsgaard; Graversen, Eva Kold

    2015-01-01

    At first glance, dance and movement may appear foreign to the idea of nurse education. On closer inspection, it could be high time. The flow of words may stop, but the body is always in movement—always communicating. Still, the language of the body, and certainly movement, is an often overlooked...... potential in education. This is also true for nurse education: in spite of the often bodily close meetings with vulnerable and crisis-stricken patients. These meetings make great demands on the nurse to both contain own feelings and be able to “read” and understand patients’ often only sense......-based communication. This dimension of the nursing profession can be overwhelming, touching, and shocking for young nursing students. This research project examines, whether a course composed of theory, dance and movement lessons, and increased focus on the bodily communication between students and patients may...

  18. The prevalence and natural history of urinary symptoms among recreational ketamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstock, Adam R; Mitcheson, Luke; Gillatt, David A; Cottrell, Angela M

    2012-12-01

    Study Type--Symptom prevalence (prospective cohort) Level of Evidence 1b. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Case series have described lower urinary tract symptoms associated with ketamine use including severe pain, frequency, haematuria and dysuria. Little is known regarding the frequency of symptoms, relationship of symptoms with dose and frequency of use and natural history of symptoms once the ketamine user has stopped. This study describes the prevalence of ketamine use in a population of recreational drug users in a dance music setting. It shows a dose-frequency relationship with ketamine use. It shows that urinary symptoms associated with recreational ketamine use may lead to a considerable demand on health resources in the primary-, secondary- and emergency-care settings. It shows that symptoms may improve once ketamine use is decreased. • To investigate the prevalence and natural history of urinary symptoms in a cohort of recreational ketamine users. • A purposeful sampling technique was used. • Between November 2009 and January 2010 participants were invited to undertake an on-line questionnaire promoted by a national dance music magazine and website. • Data regarding demographics and illicit drug-use were collected. • Among respondents reporting recent ketamine use, additional information detailing their ketamine use, experience of urinary symptoms and use of related healthcare services was obtained. • In all, 3806 surveys were completed, of which 1285 (33.8%) participants reported ketamine use within the last year. • Of the ketamine users, 17% were found to be dependent on the drug; 26.6% (340) of recent ketamine users reported experiencing urinary symptoms. • Urinary symptoms were significantly related to both dose of ketamine used and frequency of ketamine use. • Of 251 users reporting their experience of symptoms over time in relationship to their use of ketamine, 51% reported improvement in urinary symptoms

  19. Dancing and Parkinson’s disease: updates on this creative approach to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanahan J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Joanne Shanahan,1 Meg E Morris,2 Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain,3 Daniele Volpe,4 Amanda M Clifford1 1Department of Clinical Therapies, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Co. Limerick, Ireland; 2Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; 3Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Department of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Limerick, Co. Limerick, Ireland; 4Department of Neurorehabilitation, Casa di Cura Villa Margherita, Vicenza, Italy Introduction: Parkinson’s disease (PD is associated with slowness of movement and balance disturbance. Anxiety and social isolation are common and quality of life (QoL can be compromised. Dancing enables people with PD to participate in an enjoyable form of exercise within a group. This review provides an updated synthesis of the literature comparing dance to other interventions in people with PD. Methods: Six databases were electronically searched. Relevant articles were identified using inclusion criteria. Data on participants, the dance intervention, and outcomes were extracted from suitable articles. Results: Methodological limitations were evident in 13 included articles. The evidence reviewed suggests that dancing is enjoyable and can improve balance, motor function, and QoL. Further research is needed to determine the effect of dancing on cognition and depression in this population. Longer term dance interventions may be needed to achieve more meaningful benefits in mobility. Conclusion: Dancing can be a feasible and beneficial physical activity and improve the wellness of individuals with PD. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, dance, physical activity

  20. Young adults' recreational social environment as a predictor of ecstasy use initiation: findings of a population-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Andrew; Najman, Jake M; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Wells, Helene; Legosz, Margot; Kemp, Robert

    2013-10-01

    To examine prospectively the contribution of the recreational social environment to ecstasy initiation. Population-based retrospective/prospective cohort study. Data from screening an Australian young adult population to obtain samples of users and non-users of ecstasy. A sample of 204 ecstasy-naive participants aged 19-23 years was obtained, and a 6-month follow-up identified those who initiated ecstasy use. We assessed a range of predictors of ecstasy initiation, including elements of participants' social environment, such as ecstasy-using social contacts and involvement in recreational settings. More than 40% of ecstasy-naive young adults reported ever receiving ecstasy offers. Ecstasy initiation after 6 months was predicted independently by having, at recruitment, many ecstasy-using social contacts [adjusted relative risk (ARR) 3.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57, 6.34], attending electronic/dance music events (ARR 6.97, 95% CI: 1.99, 24.37), receiving an ecstasy offer (ARR 4.02, 95% CI: 1.23, 13.10), early cannabis use (ARR 4.04, 95% CI: 1.78, 9.17) and psychological distress (ARR 5.34, 95% CI: 2.31, 12.33). Adjusted population-attributable fractions were highest for ecstasy-using social contacts (17.7%) and event attendance (15.1%). In Australia, ecstasy initiation in early adulthood is associated predominantly with social environmental factors, including ecstasy-using social contacts and attendance at dance music events, and is associated less commonly with psychological distress and early cannabis use, respectively. A combination of universal and targeted education programmes may be appropriate for reducing rates of ecstasy initiation and associated harms. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. From Recreational to Functional Drug Use: The Evolution of Drugs in American Higher Education, 1960-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Ross D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of so-called cognitive-enhancing drugs is well documented in American higher education. There has been little historical analysis, however, specifically exploring the role of postsecondary institutions in this evolving drug narrative. This paper traces substance use and research trends in American higher education over…

  2. Developmental Trends in the Dance Performance of Children Age Six to Nine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Stephanie Lane

    2011-01-01

    Quality elementary physical education programs recognize the changing development and movement abilities of children (NASPE, 2007). Educational dance within these programs provides opportunities to engage in developmentally appropriate rhythmic activities. Research to date provides modest information for physical educators regarding what rhythmic…

  3. Leading by Design: A Collaborative and Creative Leadership Framework for Dance Integration in P-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Alison E.; Hellenbrand, Leah; McShane-Hellenbrand, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Mentorship, Integrated Curriculum, Collaboration, and Scholarship (MICCS) framework as an applicable model for transformative, creative, and curriculum-based K-12 dance education and arts integration. Developed and practiced by the authors--an artist/educator, a classroom teacher, and an arts education scholar and former…

  4. Meaning of dancing therapy in therapy of clients with psychological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    NĚMCOVÁ, Barbora

    2010-01-01

    Bachelor thesis deals with meaning and effects of Dance therapy in frame of medical therapy of clients with psychical disease. Theoretical part defines words like dance, movement and Dance therapy. This part also describes history of dance, meaning and aims of Dance therapy, its school, aims and divisions. Mensioned are person of dance therapist, personalities connected with dance and Dance therapy, target groups of clients suitable for Dance therapy, importance of Dance therapy for clients w...

  5. Ethnic Dance. The Origins of Jazz. A Curriculum Design for Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Karen W.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes the development, organization, goals, and activities of a course designed to trace the evolution of jazz dance and tie this dynamic dance form to the cultural experiences of African-Americans. (CB)

  6. How To Dance through Time. Volume III: The Majesty of Renaissance Dance. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 42-minute VHS videotape is the third in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It highlights the intricacies of an Italian court dance suite, which mirrors the episodic changes of courtship. Nido D'Amore" (The Nest of Love) exposes the technique for all the dance suites of the era, and features The Opening (which…

  7. African Dance Aesthetics in a K-12 Dance Setting: From History to Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sheila A.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites the reader to gain a deeper understanding of the aesthetics of African-based dance through the elements of tradition, transformation, and social justice. A discussion of the aesthetics of African dances within Africa and throughout the African diaspora opens the doors to present these dances in a K-12 setting, to explore a…

  8. [Therapeutic values of dance movement and its influence on psychomotor development of deaf persons as a form of socialization and integration with the environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Zofia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the work was to show to what extent esthetic education, mainly dance, influences the level of socialization of deaf persons, and how important the integration of the examined with the outside world is. The effectiveness of the Dance Theatre "Pinokio" of the J. Korczak Special Training and Educational Center in Przemyśl was verified by diagnostic soundings. Source material was also used in the study (chronicles, press articles, interviews with instructors of the ensemble). Young deaf people participated in dance practices with pleasure. The motivation of the young deaf people to enter the dance group was of mature character. They take part in dance activities because of their love to dance (70%), instructor's engagement (20%), and the health aspect (10%). The therapy effectiveness depended on how long they participated in the dance group. Deaf people who dance for a longer time (3 years 70%, 1 year 20%, 2 years 10%) had a more mature outlook on life, better school grades (80%), and started conversation with other people more easily (instructor's opinion). The self-consciousness of participants after practice manifested itself by relaxation (50%), joy (30%), and resolution in taking decisions (15%). Only 5% of the examined felt tired and fed-up. Polish choreo-therapeutists trust mainly their own intuition and also use information found in articles and publications, which, however, are not easily accessed. The scarcity of qualified therapeutic dancing instructors limits application of choreo-therapy on a wider scale.

  9. Recreational drugs. Societal and professional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari-Twadell, P A

    1991-06-01

    Recreational drug use presents a challenge to society and, in particular, the profession of nursing. Recreational drug use must be appreciated for the implications it presents for the episodes of abuse and development of chronic health problems. The effects and recreational use of volatile substances, cannabis, opioids, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, amphetamines, cocaine, psychedelics, and designer drugs as well as alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine must be acknowledged and understood if options for change are to be considered. The resultant cost of recreational drug use as well as health care implications, public safety, and prevention are significant issues society is faced with today. These issues will continue to be significant unless the current posture toward recreational drug use and abuse is addressed. The profession of nursing continues to be faced with the problems associated with recreational drug use not only through caring for clients, but immediately by the effects of recreational drug use on individual professional nurses. To respond effectively, nursing education and nursing research must be challenged to create an emphasis on this focus. Only through this type of multifocal approach will long-term substantial change be affected for the betterment of future generations.

  10. Differences in Itself: Redefining Disability through Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien Hermans

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings together two different terms: dance and disability. This encounter between dance and disability might be seen as an unusual, even conflicting, one since dance is traditionally dominated by aesthetic virtuosity and perfect, idealized bodies which are under optimized bodily control. However, recently there has been a growing desire within dance communities and professional dance companies to challenge binary thinking (beautiful-ugly, perfect-imperfect, valid-invalid, success-failure by incorporating an aesthetic of difference. The traditional focus of dance on appearance (shape, technique, virtuosity is replaced by a focus on how movement is connected to a sense of self. This notion of the subjective body not only applies to the dancer's body but also to disabled bodies. Instead of thinking of a body as a thing, an object (Körper that is defined by its physical appearance, dance is more and more seduced by the body as we sense it, feel it and live it (Leib. This conceptual shift in dance is illustrated by a theoretical analysis of The Cost of Living, a dance film produced by DV8.

  11. Virtual Dance and Motion-Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Boucher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A general view of various ways in which virtual dance can be understood is presented in the first part of this article. It then appraises the uses of the term “virtual” in previous studies of digital dance. A more in-depth view of virtual dance as it relates to motion-capture is offered, and key issues are discussed regarding computer animation, digital imaging, motion signature, virtual reality and interactivity. The paper proposes that some forms of virtual dance be defined in relation to both digital technologies and contemporary theories of virtuality.

  12. Exposing Whiteness in Higher Education: White Male College Students Minimizing Racism, Claiming Victimization, and Recreating White Supremacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan León

    2014-01-01

    This research critically examines racial views and experiences of 12 white men in a single higher education institution via semi-structured interviews. Participants tended to utilize individualized definitions of racism and experience high levels of racial segregation in both their pre-college and college environments. This corresponded to…

  13. Dance notations and robot motion

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    How and why to write a movement? Who is the writer? Who is the reader? They may be choreographers working with dancers. They may be roboticists programming robots. They may be artists designing cartoons in computer animation. In all such fields the purpose is to express an intention about a dance, a specific motion or an action to perform, in terms of intelligible sequences of elementary movements, as a music score that would be devoted to motion representation. Unfortunately there is no universal language to write a motion. Motion languages live together in a Babel tower populated by biomechanists, dance notators, neuroscientists, computer scientists, choreographers, roboticists. Each community handles its own concepts and speaks its own language. The book accounts for this diversity. Its origin is a unique workshop held at LAAS-CNRS in Toulouse in 2014. Worldwide representatives of various communities met there. Their challenge was to reach a mutual understanding allowing a choreographer to access robotics ...

  14. Power in Operation: A Case Study Focussing on How Subject-Based Knowledge Is Constrained by the Methods of Assessment in GCE A Level Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lorna

    2008-01-01

    The General Certificate of Education (GCE) A Level Dance specification, offered by the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance (AQA), is the only GCE course of study in the UK that focuses solely on dance. Acquisition of subject specific knowledge is a feature of its aims, while assessment, as constructed by its objectives, is assumed to be a…

  15. It Don't Mean a Thing if It Ain't Got Musicality: A Music-First Method for Teaching Historically Rooted Jazz Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebhard, Erinn

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a method for teaching jazz dance technique according to music concepts and prioritizing deep embodiment of music. This method addresses what can be seen as a disconnect between current practices and historical understanding in jazz dance today, a gap that can be bridged with education empowering students to make innovative…

  16. Sampling and estimating recreational use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy G. Gregoire; Gregory J. Buhyoff

    1999-01-01

    Probability sampling methods applicable to estimate recreational use are presented. Both single- and multiple-access recreation sites are considered. One- and two-stage sampling methods are presented. Estimation of recreational use is presented in a series of examples.

  17. Naturalistic music and dance: Cortical phase synchrony in musicians and dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poikonen, Hanna; Toiviainen, Petri; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2018-01-01

    Expertise in music has been investigated for decades and the results have been applied not only in composition, performance and music education, but also in understanding brain plasticity in a larger context. Several studies have revealed a strong connection between auditory and motor processes and listening to and performing music, and music imagination. Recently, as a logical next step in music and movement, the cognitive and affective neurosciences have been directed towards expertise in dance. To understand the versatile and overlapping processes during artistic stimuli, such as music and dance, it is necessary to study them with continuous naturalistic stimuli. Thus, we used long excerpts from the contemporary dance piece Carmen presented with and without music to professional dancers, musicians, and laymen in an EEG laboratory. We were interested in the cortical phase synchrony within each participant group over several frequency bands during uni- and multimodal processing. Dancers had strengthened theta and gamma synchrony during music relative to silence and silent dance, whereas the presence of music decreased systematically the alpha and beta synchrony in musicians. Laymen were the only group of participants with significant results related to dance. Future studies are required to understand whether these results are related to some other factor (such as familiarity to the stimuli), or if our results reveal a new point of view to dance observation and expertise.

  18. Naturalistic music and dance: Cortical phase synchrony in musicians and dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiviainen, Petri; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2018-01-01

    Expertise in music has been investigated for decades and the results have been applied not only in composition, performance and music education, but also in understanding brain plasticity in a larger context. Several studies have revealed a strong connection between auditory and motor processes and listening to and performing music, and music imagination. Recently, as a logical next step in music and movement, the cognitive and affective neurosciences have been directed towards expertise in dance. To understand the versatile and overlapping processes during artistic stimuli, such as music and dance, it is necessary to study them with continuous naturalistic stimuli. Thus, we used long excerpts from the contemporary dance piece Carmen presented with and without music to professional dancers, musicians, and laymen in an EEG laboratory. We were interested in the cortical phase synchrony within each participant group over several frequency bands during uni- and multimodal processing. Dancers had strengthened theta and gamma synchrony during music relative to silence and silent dance, whereas the presence of music decreased systematically the alpha and beta synchrony in musicians. Laymen were the only group of participants with significant results related to dance. Future studies are required to understand whether these results are related to some other factor (such as familiarity to the stimuli), or if our results reveal a new point of view to dance observation and expertise. PMID:29672597

  19. Preventive effects of group dance movement therapy on participants of oriental dance courses

    OpenAIRE

    Jevšenak, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    The connection of mind and body as well as the impact of physical activity on mental state of the person is defined in the theoretical part of the thesis. It featured dance as an expressive means of non-verbal communication in the therapeutic process in the group and stressed the importance of creativity in dance expression. It has given a historical overview of the role of women in dance and described the therapeutic characteristics of oriental dance. In addition to presenting dance - moveme...

  20. Kazakh Traditional Dance Gesture Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussipbekov, A. K.; Amirgaliyev, E. N.; Hahn, Minsoo

    2014-04-01

    Full body gesture recognition is an important and interdisciplinary research field which is widely used in many application spheres including dance gesture recognition. The rapid growth of technology in recent years brought a lot of contribution in this domain. However it is still challenging task. In this paper we implement Kazakh traditional dance gesture recognition. We use Microsoft Kinect camera to obtain human skeleton and depth information. Then we apply tree-structured Bayesian network and Expectation Maximization algorithm with K-means clustering to calculate conditional linear Gaussians for classifying poses. And finally we use Hidden Markov Model to detect dance gestures. Our main contribution is that we extend Kinect skeleton by adding headwear as a new skeleton joint which is calculated from depth image. This novelty allows us to significantly improve the accuracy of head gesture recognition of a dancer which in turn plays considerable role in whole body gesture recognition. Experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed method and that its performance is comparable to the state-of-the-art system performances.

  1. La ciudad: una obra de teatro dirigida por los niños y niñas de Medellín / Recreational-Educational Multimedia Parafernalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Villa Agudelo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafernalia es un material multimedial lúdico-educativo, creado para reforzar y apoyar los procesos de enseñanza y de aprendizaje de las Ciencias Sociales, específicamente en el grado Segundo de la educación Básica Primaria. Su objetivo, más que sustituir los contenidos de esta materia, es generar preguntas y propuestas que dinamicen la enseñanza, incentivando la participación directa de los estudiantes con los conocimientos a los que son expuestos. En este documento, se proponen acciones que posibiliten el máximo aprovechamiento de esta herramienta educativa en la generación de aprendizajes significativos de los estudiantes, quienes juegan a ser unos famosos directores de teatro, que ponen en escena lo que imaginan, conocen, averiguan, aprenden y sueñan, acerca de la relación entre el territorio que habitan y perciben como cercano (Medellín, y los temas que normalmente estudian en la asignatura de Ciencias Sociales. Parafernalia is a recreational-educational multimedia, created to strength and support all the Social Sciences teaching-learning processes, specifically of elementary school second grade. More than substitute this subject’s contents, it aims to generate questions and proposals to dynamise the training processes, inviting the children to relate directly with the knowledge they’re exposed to. This document suggests actions that make the most of this educational tool, regarding the creation of meaningful learning in the students, whom play being famous theater directors, putting on stage all they imagine, know, learn, find and dream, about the relationship between the territory they live in and feel as close (Medellín, and the topics they usually learn in Social Sciences subject.

  2. Teachers as Agents of Change in Curricular Reform: The Position of Dance Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Justine

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a recent large-scale survey of Physical Education (PE) teachers' perceptions of teaching dance and compares them to results of a study completed 10 years previously [MacLean, J. (2007). A longitudinal study to ascertain the factors that impact on the confidence of undergraduate physical education student teachers…

  3. Race and Repression in a Dance Routine: A Response to Ramaekers and Vlieghe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Stefan Ramaekers and Joris Vlieghe's "Infants, childhood and language in Agamben and Cavell: education as transformation" is an insightful discussion of an important facet of educational experience. In the article, they consider a Fred Astaire dance sequence from the 1953 Vincente Minnelli film, "The Band Wagon," in combination…

  4. Dance and Music in "Gangnam Style": How Dance Observation Affects Meter Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Myun; Barrett, Karen Chan; Kim, Yeonhwa; Lim, Yeoeun; Lee, Kyogu

    2015-01-01

    Dance and music often co-occur as evidenced when viewing choreographed dances or singers moving while performing. This study investigated how the viewing of dance motions shapes sound perception. Previous research has shown that dance reflects the temporal structure of its accompanying music, communicating musical meter (i.e. a hierarchical organization of beats) via coordinated movement patterns that indicate where strong and weak beats occur. Experiments here investigated the effects of dance cues on meter perception, hypothesizing that dance could embody the musical meter, thereby shaping participant reaction times (RTs) to sound targets occurring at different metrical positions.In experiment 1, participants viewed a video with dance choreography indicating 4/4 meter (dance condition) or a series of color changes repeated in sequences of four to indicate 4/4 meter (picture condition). A sound track accompanied these videos and participants reacted to timbre targets at different metrical positions. Participants had the slowest RT's at the strongest beats in the dance condition only. In experiment 2, participants viewed the choreography of the horse-riding dance from Psy's "Gangnam Style" in order to examine how a familiar dance might affect meter perception. Moreover, participants in this experiment were divided into a group with experience dancing this choreography and a group without experience. Results again showed slower RTs to stronger metrical positions and the group with experience demonstrated a more refined perception of metrical hierarchy. Results likely stem from the temporally selective division of attention between auditory and visual domains. This study has implications for understanding: 1) the impact of splitting attention among different sensory modalities, and 2) the impact of embodiment, on perception of musical meter. Viewing dance may interfere with sound processing, particularly at critical metrical positions, but embodied familiarity with

  5. Dancing with Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Lilia

    2008-01-01

    Teachers in traditional bilingual settings confront strict program requirements under the guise of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), excessive assessment demands (state, district and program assessments in both English and Spanish), and negative attitudes about bilingual education from many in the political and public spheres. Since 1998, the passage…

  6. Some Problems in the Aesthetics of Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, David N.

    1975-01-01

    Author considered the two-horned dilemma the teacher of dance is faced with concerning the aesthetic quality of her art; in the first case is the insistence on the importance of individual emotional response and secondly is the problem of being rational in one's approach to teaching dance. (Author/RK)

  7. Body Image in the Dance Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    Although some research has shown that dance enhances body image and self-esteem, other research shows that it sometimes has the opposite effect and causes dancers to develop a negative body image and even eating disorders. In dance, body image is not only about maintaining a certain weight; it can also refer to specific perceived body flaws.…

  8. Courage and Power: Dancing in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Suzan

    2002-01-01

    This article explores continuing professional development. I teach in a community college where 93% of the students are black and Latino. I am a Caucasian teacher, and my background is primarily modern and jazz dance. In recent years I have been studying African and Latin dance forms, so that I can address the deep hunger my students have to learn…

  9. [Dance/movement therapy in oncological rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Elana G; Helmes, Almut; Weis, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Dance/movement therapy may be defined as a psychosocial and body-oriented art therapy, which uses dance for the expression of emotional and cognitive issues. Dance/movement therapy is an important intervention for cancer patients to enhance coping strategies. There are only few studies investigating dance therapy with cancer patients. The present study investigates effects of dance/movement therapy (n = 115) in the setting of inpatient rehabilitation based on a pre-post design with a control group as well as a follow-up 3 months later. Standardized questionnaires measuring quality of life, anxiety and depression, and self-concept (EORTC QLQ-C30, HADS, FSKN) were used. In addition, at the end of the inpatient rehabilitation program subjective expectations of the dance/movement therapy and the patients' subjective evaluation of the benefits of the intervention were measured by a new developed questionnaire. As process factors of dance/movement therapy, expression of emotions, enhancement of self-esteem, development of the personality, vitality, getting inner balance, and getting in touch with the body have been identified. In terms of quality of life and psychological well-being, the results showed significant improvements with medium to large effect sizes. Even though those effects may not be attributed to the intervention alone, the analysis of the data and the patients' subjective statements help to reveal therapeutic factors and process characteristics of dance/movement therapy within inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Enlivening Dance History Pedagogy through Archival Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Tresa

    2012-01-01

    Dance archives can bring students into contact with historical subjects through artifacts of the past. This article advocates the use of archival projects in undergraduate dance history courses, arguing that such hands-on learning activities give students dynamic and interactive experiences of history. The author describes a creative project she…

  11. The Value of Biomechanical Research in Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, D. A.

    Simple observation of dance movement, while very useful, can lead to misconceptions, about the physical realities of dance movement, that make learning difficult. This gap between reality and understanding can be reduced by the application of biomechanical techniques such as cinematography, electromyography, and force-plate analysis. Biomechanical…

  12. Dance/Movement Therapy: A Unique Career Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeniox, Leslie Flint

    Dance and movement therapy is a form of psychotherapy that uses the body, dance, and movement as the primary mediums for the therapeutic process. Dance is a fundamental art form that involves the body as an instrument of self-expression; movement is a universal means of learning and communicating. Dance and movement therapy is the…

  13. Ramogi Dance and Luo Cultural Values | Odwar | Humanities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specifically the study describes the dance performance with a view to analyze the dance vocabulary so as to provide an interpretation of how the dance movements enact the Luo cultural values. This study is based on personal interview with two Ramogi performers and my observation of the dance performance during ...

  14. Learning to Learn: A Hidden Dimension within Community Dance Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie

    2013-01-01

    This article explores ways of learning experienced by university dance students participating in a community dance project. The students were unfamiliar with community-based practices and found themselves needing to remediate held attitudes about dance. How the students came to approach their learning within the dance-making process drew on…

  15. Restaurant 1: dance theatre for a day

    CERN Document Server

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    On Tuesday 31 July, CERN’s Restaurant 1 transformed into a dance studio for the duration of a public rehearsal. The performers from the dance troupe of Geneva choreographer Gilles Jobin, CERN’s current artist in residence, presented their 2011 creation, Spider Galaxies. The result: a voyage of bodies suspended between art and science.   Just two months after the choreographer’s “Strangels” invaded the library, the same bodies returned to take over another iconic CERN space: Restaurant 1. While a black floor covering was spread over the dance floor, bordered on three sides by the glass partitions overlooking the terrace, the four dancers warmed up. Gilles Jobin, the first prize winner of the “Collide@CERN” competition held last March in the dance/performance category, briefly introduced the dance that would follow, called Spider Galaxies. The piece, created in 2011, features four dancers moving to music...

  16. O Conteúdo "Dança" em aulas de educação física: temos o que ensinar? Dance in School Physical Education Classes: do We Have Anything to Teach? El Contenido Danza en Clases de Educación Física: ¿Qué Tenemos para Enseñar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Analisamos a dança como conteúdo nas aulas de Educação Física escolar por reconhecermos a ausência de discussões sobre o assunto. Apesar de a dança estar presente na escola, seja na Educação Física, seja na Educação Artística/Arte Educação, ela é descontextualizada da discussão sobre seleção cultural, realizada pelos currículos escolares. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Dança - Educação Física - Prática pedagógica. We have analyzed dance as a content in School Physical Education Classes. We understand that there is a lack of discussion on dance as a content to be approached in the school environment. We recognize its presence at school, either via Physical Education classes or via Art Education classes. Its presence, however, occurs out of the context of the discussion about cultural selection, undertaken by the school syllabi. This study is part of the dissertation “Knowledge in the school syllabi: the content dance in physical education classes on an analytical perspective”. KEY WORDS: Dance - Physical Education - Pedagogical practice. Analizamos la danza como contenido en las clases de Educación Física Escolar. Delimitamos el contenido Danza, en nuestra investigación, por reconocer la ausencia de discusiones sobre ésta como contenido a ser tratado en el espacio escolar. Reconocemos su presencia en la escuela, o por vía Educación Física, o por Educación Artística/Arte Educación. Esta presencia, sin embargo, es descontextualizada de la discusión sobre la selección cultural, realizada por los currículos escolares. El estudio es parte constitutiva de la disertación “El conocimiento en el currículo escolar: el contenido danza en clases de Educación Física en la perspectiva crítica”. PALABRAS CLAVE: Danza - Educación Física - Práctica pedagógica.

  17. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    recreation, activities, and preferred outdoor recreation areas) between the minority and majority populations and related these differences to the ethnic minorities’ cultural background. The second paper presents the empirical work of this thesis, which is based on a survey of adolescents’ outdoor recreation....... In the UK the focus on underrepresented groups seems closely related to the focus on equality for access, while specific focus on access for ethnic minorities is not addressed in the forest and nature legislation and the national forest programs in Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands. Paper 4 proposes...

  18. Recreational nitrous oxide use: Prevalence and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nabben, Ton; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) is clinically used as a safe anesthetic (dentistry, ambulance, childbirth) and appreciated for its anti-anxiety effect. Since five years, recreational use of N2O is rapidly increasing especially in the dance and festival scene. In the UK, N2O is the second most popular recreational drug after cannabis. In most countries, nitrous oxide is a legal drug that is widely available and cheap. Last month prevalence of use among clubbers and ravers ranges between 40 and almost 80 percent. Following one inhalation, mostly from a balloon, a euphoric, pleasant, joyful, empathogenic and sometimes hallucinogenic effect is rapidly induced (within 10 s) and disappears within some minutes. Recreational N2O use is generally moderate with most users taking less than 10 balloons of N2O per episode and about 80% of the users having less than 10 episodes per year. Side effects of N2O include transient dizziness, dissociation, disorientation, loss of balance, impaired memory and cognition, and weakness in the legs. When intoxicated accidents like tripping and falling may occur. Some fatal accidents have been reported due to due to asphyxia (hypoxia). Heavy or sustained use of N2O inactivates vitamin B12, resulting in a functional vitamin B12 deficiency and initially causing numbness in fingers, which may further progress to peripheral neuropathy and megaloblastic anemia. N2O use does not seem to result in dependence. Considering the generally modest use of N2O and its relative safety, it is not necessary to take legal measures. However, (potential) users should be informed about the risk of vitamin B12-deficiency related neurological and hematological effects associated with heavy use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Dance, art and top performance sport with specific injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Boni; van de Wiel, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Professional theatre dance has high and specific physical demands, comparable to top sport. Dance injuries are often caused by faulty technique due to compensation for physical limitations. Knowledge of these limitations and professional teaching can prevent many problems. Dance injuries mostly involve the lower limbs, especially the ankles and knees. Dance injuries require that the medical professional has knowledge of dance technique and respects the passion of the dancer. The advice to stop dancing has hardly ever to be given. Scientific, prospective dance medical research is recommended.

  20. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the…

  1. Recreational Angler Attitudes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Fisheries implemented a national survey of saltwater recreational anglers beginning in February 2013. The survey was implemented in six regions including the...

  2. Recreational Boating Statistics 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  3. Recreational Boating Statistics 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  4. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 28.00 Learn More Coverage of Recreational Therapy: Rules and Regulations (3rd Edition) Non Member Price: $45.00 Member Price: ... Web Feedback — We'd love to hear from you. Contact us at webmaster@ ...

  5. Recreational Boating Statistics 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  6. Elbrus – chronology, recreation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Bershov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to conduct research of the historical and geographical factors of becoming and development of the Elbrus region as a center of tourism and mountaineering, to consider the use of mountain and natural complexes for active rest, to give a recreational assessment of the use of mountain natural complexes. Material & Methods: analysis of literature sources, analysis of documents, organizational analysis. Results: the historical and geographical analysis of the mountain-natural territory of the Elbrus region is carried out, the recreational assessment of the use of mountain natural complexes for active recreation is displed. Conclusions: analysis of the spatial assessment of the recreational and tourism-mountaineering potential of mountain natural territorial systems, allows choosing the safest and most attractive routes and classifying them according to complexity and safety.

  7. Attitudes towards recreational hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2017-01-01

    a negative attitude to recreational hunting. Older respondents and rural residents had more positive attitudes towards hunting than younger and urban residents. Some of the conditions under which hunting occurs affected attitudes negatively, especially the hunting of farm-reared and released game birds...... to the commercial aspect of hunting and this could result in tighter regulation with further effects on management practices. Management Implications The public opinions and public preferences concerning recreational hunting are complex. However, this study revealed some factors relevant for regulatory...... and managerial development in relation to outdoor recreation: age (younger respondents were least supportive of hunting), urbanisation (living in an urban environment enhanced negative attitudes), compatibility of recreational hunting with other outdoor leisure activities....

  8. Outdoor Recreation Sites Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The RECSITES data layer contains a wide range of recreational sites in Vermont. This point data layer includes parks, ski areas, boat access points, and many other...

  9. Expanding & strengthening outdoor recreation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter S. Hopkins

    1971-01-01

    Though the Forest Service has pioneered in outdoor recreation research, the funding for recreation research has been inadequate. Specific needs for research are outlined. There is a need to define recreation and recreation research in terms that busy legislators can understand.

  10. Land of a Couple of Dances: Global and Local Influences on Freestyle Play in Dance Dance Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces successful and unsuccessful attempts to shape the meanings of the video game Dance Dance Revolution, specifically with reference to what "dancing" means in this context, as the game moves between various interested parties - game developers, players, Internet forum participants, and other media producers. Drawing on Actor-Network Theory and the network analyses of Manuel Castells, the paper reconstructs the forces shaping players' stylistic decisions through an analysis of dance game machines and software, and of a single forum thread on DDRFreak.com, a major website in the dance game community. The paper asks who decides how DDR players dance and at what times? Are the decisions about play made in the development meeting, the arcade, competitions, online or around the home console? Globally, how do some regions or groups emerge as experts or leaders in play style? Analysis indicates that within the United States, Californian players from major cities dominate discussion, supported by the global flows of people, resources, and capital through the state. The dominant players support their stated norms for play through recourse to mainstream conceptions of masculinity, rap music and associated styles of dance.

  11. The Analysis of Topeng Sinok Dance in Brebes Regency

    OpenAIRE

    Sintho Rukmi, Dinar Ayu; -, Indriyanto

    2015-01-01

    Topeng Sinok dance is the characteristic art of Brebes regency. This dance tells about the typical women in Brebes who are hard-working. Beauty, flexibility, and elegance do not reduce their love for nature and farming. This dance is a combination of Cirebon, Banyumas, and Surakarta style. The dance is basically aiming at showing that women from the border areas of Central and West Java are not spoiled, whiny, and lazy. Topeng Sinok dance is performed beautifully, elegant, and swift. This pap...

  12. MDMA, cortisol, and heightened stress in recreational ecstasy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Andrew C; Montgomery, Cathy; Wetherell, Mark A; Downey, Luke A; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    Stress develops when an organism requires additional metabolic resources to cope with demanding situations. This review will debate how recreational 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') can increase some aspects of acute and chronic stress in humans. Laboratory studies on the acute effects of MDMA on cortisol release and neurohormone levels in drug-free regular ecstasy/MDMA users have been reviewed, and the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in chronic changes in anxiety, stress, and cognitive coping is debated. In the laboratory, acute ecstasy/MDMA use can increase cortisol levels by 100-200%, whereas ecstasy/MDMA-using dance clubbers experience an 800% increase in cortisol levels, because of the combined effects of the stimulant drug and dancing. Three-month hair samples of abstinent users revealed cortisol levels 400% higher than those in controls. Chronic users show heightened cortisol release in stressful environments and deficits in complex neurocognitive tasks. Event-related evoked response potential studies show altered patterns of brain activation, suggestive of increased mental effort, during basic information processing. Chronic mood deficits include more daily stress and higher depression in susceptible individuals. We conclude that ecstasy/MDMA increases cortisol levels acutely and subchronically and that changes in the HPA axis may explain why recreational ecstasy/MDMA users show various aspects of neuropsychobiological stress.

  13. A systematic review of recreation patterns and preferences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students with physical disabilities at higher education institutions are often excluded from recreational activities due to lack of appropriate inclusive integration programmes. This study systematically reviewed literature that identified recreational patterns and preferences of students with physical disabilities to provide ...

  14. An Examination of Perceived Constraints to Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.T. Green; J.M. Bowker; X. Wang; H.K. Cordell; Cassandra Y. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether different social and marginalized groups in American society (minorities, women, rural dwellers, immigrants, low income, less educated) perceive more constraints or barriers to outdoor recreation participation than White middle-class males. Logistic regressions were applied to data from the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment...

  15. Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations." It is divided into four units: recreational resources for education, employment, and professional opportunities; barbering and cosmetology; mortuary science; hotel-motel management. Each unit is…

  16. Dance therapy for individuals with Parkinson's disease: improving quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackney ME

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Madeleine E Hackney,1–3 Crystal G Bennett4,5 1Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation R&D Center of Excellence, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Birmingham-Atlanta VA Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Decatur, GA, USA; 3Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Nursing, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, USA; 5Department of Adult and Elderly Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Parkinson's disease (PD affects mobility and health-related quality of life (HRQOL, through a neurodegenerative disease process. Drugs and pharmacology do not fully address motor, cognitive, and psychosocial symptoms; therefore, adjunctive therapies have been researched for their efficacy at addressing these issues. One form of exercise, dance, has received attention because recent studies have demonstrated dance's ability to improve mobility and HRQOL in people with PD. The purpose of this integrative review was to present evidence supporting or refuting improved HRQOL in individuals with PD after participation in a dance- or music-based movement intervention. Potential mechanisms of HRQOL improvement are offered. Search terms including "Parkinson's disease", "dance", "quality of life", "exercise", "dance/movement therapy", and "music" were entered in groupings into PubMed, CINAHL®, EMBASE™, PsycINFO®, Web of Science™, and the Cochrane Library databases. Papers were included if they were randomized controlled trials, pilot studies, or case reports that were related to HRQOL and dance/movement and/or specifically related to determining the mechanisms potentially underlying dance effects. To date, the available research has been inconclusive in demonstrating that dance has a positive impact on HRQOL; however, further research is required. This review suggests that, at the very least, dance has the potential to impact the

  17. Merging the arts of song and dance: New methodical options for teaching students within the disciplines of song and dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Karen Hagen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To learn, acquire knowledge, and develop skills is an embodied process. In this article, the authors argue that merging the fields of song and dance is dependent on a deeper understanding of how the mind and the body interact, and they utilize the concept of enactive cognition to explain these processes. The authors maintain that students need insight into these processes in order to improve their learning and, consequently, their performance. Retrospective examples taken from three educational situations within the musical theatre context elucidate the discussion of the concepts of alignment and breathing. These frequently used concepts are often a source of confusion and misunderstanding for the student. To alleviate this, a stronger, interdisciplinary dialogue among the singing and dance teachers who are involved in the genre of musical theatre needs to be developed. The authors suggest collaborative teaching as a means to develop the teaching methods and as the pathway to attaining a common base when integrating the skills of singing and dancing.

  18. Self-Reported Injury and Management in a Liberal Arts College Dance Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPasquale, Sarah; Becker, Nicole; Green, Sarah; Sauers, Kim

    2015-12-01

    Dancers often view injuries as a necessary sacrifice for participating in their art form. The purpose of this research was to determine the frequency and patterns of injury in a non-conservatory, liberal arts dance environment. These data may enable dance departments to provide more effective health resources. Dancers registered in technique courses in a liberal arts dance department (including ballet, modern, tap, and jazz) completed an injury questionnaire immediately following the occurrence of any dance-related injury over the course of one semester. Out of 168 students registered in the department, 46 injuries were reported throughout the semester. The greatest rate of injury was in September and December with 0.95 and 0.65 injuries reported per day, respectively. 89.1% of participants indicated that they would use a direct-access, on-campus physical therapist or athletic trainer if available, though 45.7% of injured participants indicated that they would seek treatment off campus. Dancers in a liberal arts collegiate program may train at a higher intensity during the semester than summer break, which likely accounts for the high incidence of injury in September. Of those injured, most planned on self-treating, but none planned on missing class. Pre-semester screening and post-semester cross-training education should be implemented in liberal arts dance programs to help decrease the rate of injury seen when returning to dance following prolonged time off from dancing. Additionally, direct access to physical therapy or athletic training treatment would likely be utilized by these students if available.

  19. [Kapoera--popular dance or martial art?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Y; Ravid, A; Ben Avraham, R; Soffer, D; Aladgem, D

    1997-01-15

    Kapoera, a combination of acrobatics and coordinated athletic movement, is believed to have been introduced to South America during the 19th century by transported African slaves. The dance does not involve intentional physical contact, but during 6 months, 3 patients were admitted here for injuries induced by the forceful movements of this dance. 2 underwent exploratory laparotomy that revealed bowel perforations and 1 suffered a comminuted nasal bone fracture. Medical personnel should be familiar with the potential hazards of this dance and martial art.

  20. Annual in Therapeutic Recreation. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael E., Ed.; Card, Jaclyn A., Ed.

    This volume focuses on therapeutic recreation, as a subject of inquiry and as a treatment tool. The 11 articles include original field based research, program development initiatives, issue and theory of practice papers, and original tutorials in assessment and research. The article titles are: "The Role of Leisure Education with Family…

  1. INFLUENCE OF TRADITIONAL DANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS ON DYNAMIC BALANCE OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY: A SHORT REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tsimaras Vasileios

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional dance is gaining popularity as an intervention choice for improving poor balance ability of people with intellectual disability (ID. Balance improvement for individuals with ID through dance provides opportunities for participation in sport activities and promotes independent living. This short review provides in brief research evidence of dynamic balance improvement as measured by means of a balance deck in duration of 30, 45, and 60 sec intervals, highlighting the need to incorporate traditional dance programs in Physical Education (PE lessons applied on participants with ID. Overall, traditional dances provide emotional and cognitive interaction that has a direct positive effect on quality of life and successful motor performance of individuals with ID.

  2. INFLUENCE OF TRADITIONAL DANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS ON DYNAMIC BALANCE OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY: A SHORT REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios K. Tsimaras

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional dance is gaining popularity as an intervention choice for improving poor balance ability of people with intellectual disability (ID. Balance improvement for individuals with ID through dance provides opportunities for participation in sport activities and promotes independent living. This short review provides in brief research evidence of dynamic balance improvement as measured by means of a balance deck in duration of 30, 45, and 60 sec intervals, highlighting the need to incorporate traditional dance programs in Physical Education (PE lessons applied on participants with ID. Overall, traditional dances provide emotional and cognitive interaction that has a direct positive effect on quality of life and successful motor performance of individuals with ID.

  3. Social Dancing for Successful Ageing: Models for Health, Happiness and Social Inclusion amongst Senior Citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Skinner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article presents findings from a qualitative study of social dancing for successful ageing amongst senior citizens in three locales: in Blackpool (GB, around Belfast (NI, and in Sacramento (US. Findings also attest to the social, psychological and health benefits of social dancing amongst senior citizens. They also articulate three different social dancing models: social dance as tea dance (Sacramento, social dance as practice dance (Blackpool, social dance as motility (Belfast and environs.

  4. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    recreation, activities, and preferred outdoor recreation areas) between the minority and majority populations and related these differences to the ethnic minorities’ cultural background. The second paper presents the empirical work of this thesis, which is based on a survey of adolescents’ outdoor recreation...... often reported using green areas to “drink beer with friends” and “do sunbathing”. The third paper reflects on the different national approaches towards ethnic minorities’ access to natural areas, in four example-countries Germany, Denmark, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. This was done through....... In the UK the focus on underrepresented groups seems closely related to the focus on equality for access, while specific focus on access for ethnic minorities is not addressed in the forest and nature legislation and the national forest programs in Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands. Paper 4 proposes...

  5. Dancing In-between Spaces: An Auto-Ethnographic Exploration of an "Abhinaya" Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaktikar, Aadya

    2016-01-01

    The questions that this paper poses are placed at the intersection of a Liberal Arts approach to education and the pedagogy of traditional Indian dance forms. These questions are explored through my ongoing pedagogical experiment with teaching the art of "abhinaya" in the university classroom. This paper charts the journey of exploring…

  6. What Can You Teach with Electronic Dance Music? A Music Teacher's Guide to EDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halick, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Music teachers, who are working to develop students' musicianship skills, often focus on exposing students to new styles and genres of music. These initiatives encourage students to analyze, develop opinions, create, and perform music they may not normally hear. The purpose of this article is to introduce music educators to Electronic Dance Music…

  7. The Performing Arts: Music, Dance, and Theater in the Early Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralek, Derry

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mimi Brodsky Chenfeld, a longtime early childhood teacher, author, teacher educator, and advocate for integrating the arts with every aspect of the curriculum. In this interview, Chenfeld shares her thoughts about the performing arts: music, dance, and theater. She explains why it is important for young…

  8. Effects of Active Videogame and Sports, Play, and Active Recreation for Kids Physical Education on Children's Health-Related Fitness and Enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Haichun

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of a Kinect active videogame (AVG) and the Sports, Play, and Active Recreation for Kids (SPARK) intervention in improving children's health-related fitness and physical activity (PA) enjoyment. A total of 65 students from both third and fourth grade in a rural elementary school participated in the study. The third graders (N = 29, mean age = 9.1 years, 10 boys, mean body mass index [BMI] = 20.1) were assigned to a SPARK physical education group, while the fourth graders (N = 36, mean age = 10.2 years, 15 boys, mean BMI = 20.3) were enrolled in the Kinect AVG group. The intervention lasted for 6 weeks, with each week including three practice sessions (∼40 minutes per session). All participants were measured on their health-related fitness by testing their performance in the 15-m Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER), curl-ups, and push-ups both before and after the interventions. Participants' PA enjoyment was measured immediately after the first and last session's practice. Various ANCOVA tests were conducted to analyze the intervention effects on the changes of health-related fitness performances and enjoyment while controlling for baseline values, gender, and BMI. Various MANOVA tests were used to examine the intervention effects on PA levels during three practice sessions. Participants in AVG group had greater improvement in 15-m PACER test (P < 0.001), as well as PA enjoyment (P < 0.05), than those in SPARK group. The AVG group generated higher light PA and lower sedentary time for three (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001) and two sessions (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001), respectively. In addition, the AVG group accumulated higher moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for the first session (P < 0.01), while the SPARK group generated higher MVPA for the third session (P < 0.001). No MVPA difference was found between groups for another session. A

  9. Designing Reflection and Symmetry Learning by Using Math Traditional Dance in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yullys Helsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innovation of education is an important point of Pendidikan Matematika Realistik Indonesia (PMRI, one of them through traditional dance as a context of national cultural. Dance that collaborated with concept of mathematics, it is called Math Traditional Dance. This research aims to produce learning line (specific the material of reflection and symmetry. The research method used is design research that consisted of preparing for the experiments, teaching experiments, and retrospective analysis. Data collected through observation, interviews, documentation and field notes. This research was conducted with 22 students in MIN 2 Palembang. From the try out that is obtained from the formal to the informal learning described in the learning process, so that support learning process of mirroring and symmetry for the students in grade four in elementary school.

  10. Smart Kinesthetic Measurement Model in Dance Composision

    OpenAIRE

    Triana, Dinny Devi

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to discover a model of assessment that could measure kinesthetic intelligence in arranging a dance from several related variable, both direct variable and indirect variable. The research method used was a qualitative method using path analysis to determine the direct and indirect variable; therefore, the dominant variable that supported the measurement model of kinesthetic intelligence in arranging dance could be discovered. The population used was the students of the art ...

  11. Dance movement therapy and falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Maggi, Stefania; Schofield, Patricia; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-08-01

    Falls are a leading cause of morbidity, healthcare use and mortality. Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people and previous research has suggested that it may improve various health outcomes in this population, including balance, gait and muscle performance. A systematic review of the potential benefits of dance on falls and fear of falling is lacking. Thus, we conducted a systematic review considering all randomized controls trials (RCTs) investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. Major databases were searched from inception until 1 March 2017 and a total of 10 RCTs were identified, which included a total of 680 people (n=356 dance, n=324 control). Overall, the mean age of the samples was 69.4 years, and 75.2% were female. Across four RCTs, dance therapy reduced falls versus usual care in only one study. Dance therapy improved fear of falling in two out of three included RCTs. There were no serious adverse events reported in the RCTs. In summary, we found a paucity of studies investigating the effect of dance on falls and fear of falling and the evidence base is preliminary and equivocal. Given the heterogeneity of the included samples and interventions, in addition to the short-term follow-up, no firm conclusions can be drawn. However, dance appears to be safe and, given its popularity and demonstrated benefits on other health/wellbeing outcomes in older adults, it is important that future research considers its potential benefits on falls/fear of falling in older age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Current and Future Research at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Rusev, G.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-01

    An overview of the current experimental program on measurements of neutron capture and neutron induced fission at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is presented. Three major projects are currently under way: 1) high precision measurements of neutron capture cross sections on Uranium isotopes, 2) research aimed at studies of the short-lived actinide isomer production in neutron capture on 235U and 3) measurements of correlated data of fission observables. New projects include developments of auxiliary detectors to improve the capability of DANCE. We are building a compact, segmented NEUtron detector Array at DANCE (NEUANCE), which will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array. It will provide experimental information on prompt fission neutrons in coincidence with the prompt fission gamma-rays measured by 160 BaF2 crystals of DANCE. Unique correlated data will be obtained for neutron capture and neutron-induced fission using the DANCE-NEUANCE experimental set up in the future.

  13. Art, dance, and music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Rosalie Rebollo

    2004-11-01

    Art, dance, and music therapy are a significant part of complementary medicine in the twenty-first century. These creative arts therapies contribute to all areas of health care and are present in treatments for most psychologic and physiologic illnesses. Although the current body of solid research is small compared with that of more traditional medical specialties, the arts therapies are now validating their research through more controlled experimental and descriptive studies. The arts therapies also contribute significantly to the humanization and comfort of modern health care institutions by relieving stress, anxiety, and pain of patients and caregivers. Arts therapies will greatly expand their role in the health care practices of this country in the twenty-first century.

  14. Perceptions of physical education and sports teachers towards folk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to the teachers' specialties. Subsequent to the teachers who specialised in folk dance, the teachers who had the most positive attitude towards folk dance were the teachers in the martial arts (wrestling, judo, boxing, taekwondo) group. Keywords: Attitudes/Perceptions; Folk dance; Physical education; Sport; Teachers.

  15. Illnesses and deaths among persons attending an electronic dance-music festival - New York City, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridpath, Alison; Driver, Cynthia R; Nolan, Michelle L; Karpati, Adam; Kass, Daniel; Paone, Denise; Jakubowski, Andrea; Hoffman, Robert S; Nelson, Lewis S; Kunins, Hillary V

    2014-12-19

    Outdoor electronic dance-music festivals (EDMFs) are typically summer events where attendees can dance for hours in hot temperatures. EDMFs have received increased media attention because of their growing popularity and reports of illness among attendees associated with recreational drug use. MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is one of the drugs often used at EDMFs. MDMA causes euphoria and mental stimulation but also can cause serious adverse effects, including hyperthermia, seizures, hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, and multiorgan failure. In this report, MDMA and other synthetic drugs commonly used at dance festivals are referred to as "synthetic club drugs." On September 1, 2013, the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) received reports of two deaths of attendees at an EDMF (festival A) held August 31-September 1 in NYC. DOHMH conducted an investigation to identify and characterize adverse events resulting in emergency department (ED) visits among festival A attendees and to determine what drugs were associated with these adverse events. The investigation identified 22 cases of adverse events; nine cases were severe, including two deaths. Twenty-one (95%) of the 22 patients had used drugs or alcohol. Of 17 patients with toxicology testing, MDMA and other compounds were identified, most frequently methylone, in 11 patients. Public health messages and strategies regarding adverse health events might reduce illnesses and deaths at EDMFs.

  16. Qualitative analysis of motivation towards dancing within the context ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Usuario

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation, 2016, 38(2): 1 ... received instruction by means of the creative inquiry technique. .... Students had to write down their thoughts and reflections, by answering to the following ..... International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity,.

  17. Dancing Thoughts: An Examination of Children's Cognition and Creative Process in Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine children's cognition within the creative process in dance and to examine how dance making affects cognitive development in children. Data on children's thinking were gathered from fifth graders participating in an artist-in-residence program in a public school in Pennsylvania. Both the inquiry and the data…

  18. Directory of National Recreation Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Thirty national recreation organizations serving individuals with disabilities are listed, along with addresses and telephone numbers. Sample recreational activities covered include Boy Scouts and Girls Scouts, various wheelchair sports, skiing, golfing, and horticultural therapy. (JDD)

  19. The construction of the Black dance/African Peoples' dance section in Britain: Issues arising for the conceptualisation of related choreographic and dance practices

    OpenAIRE

    Adewole, Funmi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will discuss the construction of the Black dance/African Peoples’ Dance sector (APD) in Britain in the 1990s. The debate about the definition of the terms Black dance and African peoples’ dance is shown to be part and parcel of the quest for appropriate infrastructure to sustain the work of black dancers and those using African and Diasporan dance forms and aesthetics in their productions. I argue therefore that a fuller understanding of this field of practice can only be gained ...

  20. Marketing therapeutic recreation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, B E

    1984-01-01

    The use of marketing strategies can enhance the delivery of therapeutic recreation services. This article discusses how agencies can adapt marketing techniques and use them to identify potential markets, improve image, evaluate external pressures, and maximize internal strengths. Four variables that can be controlled and manipulated in a proposed marketing plan are product, price, place and promotion.

  1. Why Model Recreation Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Kerri Cahill; Marilyn Hof

    2005-01-01

    As the demographics of public land recreational visitors change, planners and managers of public lands face the challenge of protecting resources while providing high quality visitor experiences. Because our political environment demands ever more reliance on scientific data and transparent decisionmaking, planners and managers need better tools to help them understand...

  2. Children's recreational physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemperman, A.D.A.M.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored children's participation in recreational (physical) activities and the extent to which this participation was influenced by individual and household socio-demographics and characteristics of the social and physical environment. Travel and activity diaries were used to collect

  3. 'Shall We Dance'? Older Adults' Perspectives on the Feasibility of a Dance Intervention for Cognitive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Papathomas, Anthony; Foster, Jonathan; Quested, Eleanor; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2017-12-28

    We explored perceptions of social dance as a possible intervention to improve cognitive functioning in older adults with subjective memory complaints. Thirty participants (19 female; M age = 72.6; SD=8.2) took part in the study. This included 21 participants who had self-reported subjective memory complaints and 9 spouses who noticed spousal memory loss. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Three main themes were constructed: 1) dance seen as a means of promoting social interaction; 2) chronic illness as a barrier and facilitator to participation; 3) social dance representing nostalgic connections to the past. Overall, the participants were positive about the potential attractiveness of social dance to improve cognitive and social functioning and other aspects of health. It is important in future research to examine the feasibility of a social dance intervention among older adults with subjective memory complaints.

  4. Substitution in recreation choice behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    George L. Peterson; Daniel J. Stynes; Donald H. Rosenthal; John F. Dwyer

    1985-01-01

    This review discusses concepts and theories of substitution in recreation choice. It brings together the literature of recreation research, psychology, geography, economics, and transportation. Parallel and complementary developments need integration into an improved theory of substitution. Recreation decision behavior is characterized as a nested or sequential choice...

  5. Job satisfaction among recreation practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Parks; Andrew Holdnak

    2002-01-01

    Job satisfaction among recreation professionals can be affected by many working conditions. This study has investigated the impact fourteen variables had on the job satisfaction of recreation practitioners. The sample consisted of 106 responses from members of the Resort and Commercial Recreation Association (RCRA). The results of the regression analysis for job...

  6. Between the Dance Studio and the Social Dance Floor: On Solidarity and Practices of Mutuality in Swing Dance Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Kravanja

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the dynamics of actualization of solidarity and hierarchical relations in contemporary swing dance communities. It shows how these communities are based on a specific solidarity ideology, at least it terms of dealing with processes of their institutionalization, commercialization and establishing of formal dance hierarchies. However, when we take into view the swing dancers themselves, diverse practices of mutuality become evident. In contrast to the formal solidarity discourses and practices, the latter are much more heterogeneous and as such more interesting for anthropological discussion, for they establish solidarity and hierarchical relations apart from wider mobilization movements of the swing dance industry, and many of them implicitly resist institutionalization. The thesis arising from this case study is that the practices of mutuality are not always in complementary relation with discourses of solidarity. On the contrary, they often bypass the major solidarity flows and, paradoxically, contribute most efficiently to the actual solidarity of vital parts of the swing communities. The author discusses the subject on the basis of six years of active participation in different Slovene swing dance scenes and occasional presence at international swing dance events in different European cities.

  7. Historical aspects of Belly Dance and its practice in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz Kussunoki, Sandra Aparecida [UNESP; Aguiar, Carmen Maria [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    Dance is regarded as one of the oldest art forms, which is based on evidence from prehistoric paintings found in caves; man expressed himself through body language prior to the development of spoken and written forms of communication. Dance was then used during important events, common to their era and culture, and often in religious rituals, to ensure good harvests - their economic activity. Belly-dance appeared approximately eight thousand years B. C. E. as a sacred dance firstly practiced ...

  8. Musical meaning and social significance : techno triggers for dancing

    OpenAIRE

    Gadir, Tami Ester

    2014-01-01

    Electronically-produced dance music has only recently achieved as much visibility in the global pop music industry as ‘live’ or instrumental pop. Yet the fascination of cultural scholars and sociologists with dance music predates its rise as a product of mass culture. Much of this interest derives from early associations of dance music with marginalised groups and oppositional ideologies. It therefore follows that many explorations of dance music focus on the ways in which tech...

  9. Applying Recreation Survey Results to Recreation Planning for Water-Based Recreation Areas in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett Duncan; John Mintz; Douglas Rischbieter; John Baas

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on identifying applications of recreation survey results in the context of water-based recreation planning. Recreation researchers have sometimes been criticized for conducting research that is weak in applied value (Cordell 1999). The paper also focuses on the important, but sometimes forgotten role that private entities play (e.g., Pacific Gas and...

  10. It takes two: the influence of dance partners on the perceived enjoyment and benefits during participation in partnered ballroom dance classes for people with Parkinson's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Dorit; Robison, Judy; Fitton, Carolyn; Hulbert, Sophia; Roberts, Lisa; Wiles, Rose; Pickering, Ruth; Roberts, Helen; Ashburn, Ann

    2018-08-01

    To explore the views of people with Parkinson's and their dance partners on the influence and issues surrounding dancing with an able-bodied dance partner during partnered ball room dance classes. In depth, semi-structured interviews explored purposively selected participants' experiences and views about dance classes. Fourteen people with Parkinson's and their dance partners (six spouses, two friends/relatives, five volunteers) were interviewed within a month of completing the 10-week dance class program. Data were analyzed thematically. Generally, those partnered with a spouse or an experienced dancer, or when dance couples were able to develop good rapport, gained greater enjoyment and sense of achievement from dance classes in comparison to couples who did not enjoy dancing together or had clashing approaches to dance. Managing and negotiating who would "lead" in a dance was challenging for dance couples particularly among male people with Parkinson's. People with Parkinson's experience of the dance classes were influenced by the relationship and compatibility with their dance partner. Dance partnerships may impact on recruitment, enjoyment, outcome and continued participation in dance classes. Potential effects of partnerships should be analyzed and reported in studies evaluating the outcomes of dance classes. Implications for rehabilitation We recommend that health professionals consider involving spouses in Parkinson's dance classes as this may improve recruitment, adherence, enjoyment and overall outcome of the dance classes. If volunteers are needed, aim to recruit those who already have good dancing ability, convey a love of dancing and have the sensitivity and social skills to interact positively with the person with Parkinson's. Consider dance partnership issues when advertising and promoting dance classes. Address partnership issues through open communication and by changing partners if the dance partnership is not working well.

  11. Analysis of the dance of native Isan artists for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakawat Petatano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative investigation to analyse native dance in North-eastern Thailand. There were three objectives for this investigation, which were to study the history of Isan folk dance, current dance postures and ways to conserve the current dance postures of Isan folk artists. Research tools were interview, observation, participation, focus group discussion and workshop. The purposively selected research sample was composed of 3 groups of national artists. The findings show that Isan folk dancer shave their own unique dancing styles. Each artist has his or her own identity, which is constructed based on personal experience of dancing and singing. Mor lam is a dance used to accompany traditional Isansung poetry. Modern dance postures have been adapted from the traditional forms. Dance postures have been adapted from three primary sources: traditional literature, the ethnic and Lanchang dancing in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and rhythmic Khon Kaen compositions. The conclusions of this investigation suggest that preservation of the dancing arts and postures should centre on the incorporation of new knowledge, as well as the continuation of traditional dance postures. Further research is required for people interested in performing arts conservation in other provinces and other traditional performing arts.

  12. Sensation, Perception, and Choice in the Dance Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    There are many reasons to teach dance as part of the broader curriculum. This article focuses on using dance as a way to foster critical thinking. In this conceptual article, I draw from the National Standards goals that were in line with my own framework of dance as uniquely engaging the three different sensory systems of exteroception,…

  13. Projecting Nigerian Image through the Globalization of Her Dances ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The historical methodology is employed. The findings of this paper is that Nigerian dances have not benefited from globalization because, many of our dances and dance patterns have been stolen and repackaged to us as Western Euro-America cultural products. The paper therefore posits that Nigerians should take their ...

  14. Festival Works to Save Pioneering Dances by Black Choreographers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemiller, Lawrence

    1988-01-01

    The American Dance Festival has begun a three-year effort to encourage scholars to delve into the history and influences of black modern dance, and the Ford Foundation has promised $300,000 to the project. Some express concern about separating black choreography from other American dance. (MSE)

  15. An Examination of Critical Approaches to Interdisciplinary Dance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    As artists seek new ways to reflect an increasingly digital and global culture, theatrical dance in the UK and Europe has seen a growing collaboration and cross-fertilisation between forms of dance, theatre, visual art, film and technology. As the boundaries between artistic disciplines continue to blur, it seems clear that dance audiences need to…

  16. Emotions and Feelings in a Collaborative Dance-Making Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhiainen, Leena; Hamalainen, Soili

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks into the significance emotions and feelings can have in a collaborative dance-making process. This is done by introducing a narrative based on a dance pedagogy student's writings. They contain observations of her experiences on being the facilitating choreographer in a dance-making process involving a cross-artistic group of…

  17. Transforming Dance History: The Lost History of Rehearsals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, Stuart

    1989-01-01

    Explains that an important aspect of dance history is lost by not recording dance rehearsals. Argues that recording rehearsals can reveal the creative process and illuminate the environment that engendered this art form. Concludes that a transformed dance history will influence curriculum development. (GG)

  18. Critical Postcolonial Dance Recovery and Pedagogy: An International Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Ojeya Cruz

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how the historical punishment of the dancing body in (post)colonial contexts has been a measure for controlling the mind and undertaking effective cultural imperialism. I bring to focus the striking global dance movement to revitalise oppressed dance forms, in an effort to do what Tuhiwai Smith calls "the recovery of…

  19. An Introduction to the Dance of India, China, Korea, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Beate; Gordon, Joseph

    The general aim of this booklet is to assist those who desire to increase their knowledge and appreciation of Asian cultures and, more specifically, to provide an additional dimension to the Asia Society's Dance Demonstration Program. Dance history, philosophical ideas of religion, accompanying rituals, the relationship of dance to music, and…

  20. Sport and active recreation injuries in Australia: evidence from emergency department presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.; Valuri, G.; Ozanne-Smith, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the rise in specialist clinical services for the management of sports and active recreation injury, many patients attend hospital emergency departments for treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe sports injury cases presented to selected hospital emergency departments around Australia for the period 1989-1993. METHODS: Routinely collected emergency department injury presentation data from the Australian National Injury Surveillance Unit were examined. Data on 98,040 sports and active recreation emergency department presentations were analysed. Sports and active recreation activities were ranked according to frequency of presentation. Relative proportions of injury type and body region injured were determined. Data are presented separately for children (15 years of age). RESULTS: Among the 10 activities that most commonly led to a sports or active recreation injury presentation for all ages were cycling, Australian football, basketball, soccer, cricket, netball, and rugby. For children, injuries were also commonly associated with roller skating/blading, skateboarding, and trampolining. Hockey, martial arts, and dancing injuries were frequent in adults. Most sporting injuries occurred during organised competition or practice whereas the active recreation injuries occurred in a variety of settings. Fractures, strains, and sprains, particularly to the lower and upper extremities, were common types of injury. CONCLUSION: The rich, but nevertheless limited, information available about sports and active recreation injuries from data collected in emergency departments indicates that these activities are a common context for injury at the community level in Australia. 


 PMID:9773170

  1. Sport and active recreation injuries in Australia: evidence from emergency department presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C; Valuri, G; Ozanne-Smith, J

    1998-09-01

    Despite the rise in specialist clinical services for the management of sports and active recreation injury, many patients attend hospital emergency departments for treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe sports injury cases presented to selected hospital emergency departments around Australia for the period 1989-1993. Routinely collected emergency department injury presentation data from the Australian National Injury Surveillance Unit were examined. Data on 98,040 sports and active recreation emergency department presentations were analysed. Sports and active recreation activities were ranked according to frequency of presentation. Relative proportions of injury type and body region injured were determined. Data are presented separately for children (15 years of age). Among the 10 activities that most commonly led to a sports or active recreation injury presentation for all ages were cycling, Australian football, basketball, soccer, cricket, netball, and rugby. For children, injuries were also commonly associated with roller skating/blading, skateboarding, and trampolining. Hockey, martial arts, and dancing injuries were frequent in adults. Most sporting injuries occurred during organised competition or practice whereas the active recreation injuries occurred in a variety of settings. Fractures, strains, and sprains, particularly to the lower and upper extremities, were common types of injury. The rich, but nevertheless limited, information available about sports and active recreation injuries from data collected in emergency departments indicates that these activities are a common context for injury at the community level in Australia.

  2. Lower extremity kinetics in tap dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Lester; Bronner, Shaw; Agraharasamakulam, Sujani; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi

    2010-01-01

    Tap dance is a unique performing art utilizing the lower extremities as percussion instruments. In a previous study these authors reported decreased injury prevalence among tap dancers compared to other dance and sports participants. No biomechanical analyses of tap dance exist to explain this finding. The purpose of the current pilot study was to provide a preliminary overview of normative peak kinetic and kinematic data, based on the hypothesis that tap dance generates relatively low ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments. Six professional tap dancers performed four common tap dance sequences that produced data captured by the use of a force platform and a five-camera motion analysis system. The mean vertical ground reaction force for all sequences was found to be 2.06+/-0.55 BW. Mean peak sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane joint moments (hip, knee, and ankle) ranged from 0.07 to 2.62 N.m/kg. These small ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments support our hypothesis, and may explain the relatively low injury incidence in tap dancers. Nevertheless, the analysis is highly complex, and other factors remain to be studied and clarified.

  3. The effect of dance training on menstrual function in collegiate dancing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, W W; Wong, M W; Chan, K M

    1995-08-01

    A total of 98 dancing students from a collegiate school of dancing were studied through interview using a highly structured questionnaire to elicit details of the duration and intensity of dance training, menstrual patterns and musculoskeletal injuries sustained during training; 70 (72%) of these dancing students were eumenorrhoeic, while 15 (15.4%) had oligomenorrhoea. Thirteen (13.4%) either had amenorrhoea for over 90 days at the time of the study, or were on hormonal treatment because of amenorrhoea for over 3 months in the past 1 year. Those who were amenorrhoeic had longer training hours per week when compared with eumenorrhoeic and oligomenorrhoeic students. Both oligomenorrhoeic and amenorrhoeic students had a lower body mass index (18.25 kg/m2 and 18.26 kg/m2 versus 19.45 kg/m2, p dance, modern dance and musical theatre dance students as well as a significantly lower average body mass index. These data suggest a proportional correlation between menstrual dysfunction and proneness to musculoskeletal injuries in training, which could be explained by a hormonal mechanism.

  4. Nordic urban nature recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Scott; Lindhjem, Henrik; Zandersen, Marianne

    the associated nonmarket welfare benefits. The study stresses the need to collect user data to better understand visitation patterns, which can be combined with valuation methods to provide evidence of economic benefits associated with e.g., hiking, cycling, skiing, paddling and other recreation activities. Once......The Nordic countries continue to experience growth of urban areas, which provides benefits like economic growth, but also imposes economic costs in terms of reduced ecosystem services. This report focuses on urban nature recreation and highlights economic methods and data that can help capture...... these benefits are visible, decision-makers will have a better basis to balance economic growth with the environmental costs it imposes on urban ecosystem services....

  5. Cotidiano e Dança na periferia: reflexões para uma prática educativa Daily Life and Dance in the Outskirts: Reflexions for an Educational Practice Cuotidiano y Danza en la Periferia: Reflexiones para una Práctica Educativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available O estudo envolve uma pesquisa na comunidade periférica Shangri-Lá, município de Goiânia, onde foram efetuadas intervenções, observações e entrevistas com crianças e mães participantes de um projeto de educação ambiental. Embasados no referencial teórico de Agnes Heller e Newton Duarte, procuramos identificar e discutir o cotidiano e os preconceitos referentes à dança oriundos na comunidade, com o intuito de promover reflexões pertinentes à prática educativa. Neste sentido, a construção de comportamentos e pensamentos com respeito à dança é analisada em processo de relações com diferentes meios e instituições. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Cotidiano - Preconceito - Dança - Educação. This study involves a research work carried out in a neighborhood named “Shangri-lá”, located in the outskirts of town. In this community, we interacted, observed, and interviewed children and their mothers as they took part in an Environmental Education project. I have based my research on the theoretical works of Agnes Heller and Newton Duarte,and I try to identify and discuss daily life and prejudicial ideas about dance that exist in this community, in order to promote reflexions about educational practices. In this sense, theconstruction of behavioral patterns and thoughts about dance are analyzed in the process of establishing links with diffent media and institutions. KEY WORDS: Daily Life - Prejudice - Dance - Education. El estudio envuelve una investigación en la comunidad periférica shangri-lá. En esta comunidad, intervenciones, observaciones y entrevistas fueron efectuadas con niños y madres participantes de un proyecto de Educación Ambiental. Baseándose en el referencial teórico de Agnes Heller y Newton Duarte, busco identificar y discutir lo cotidiano y los prejuicios referentes a la danza oriundos en la comunidad, con el propósito de promover reflexiones pertinentes a la práctica educativa. En este sentido, la

  6. Genetic control of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) dance language: segregating dance forms in a backcrossed colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R N; Oldroyd, B P; Barron, A B; Crozier, R H

    2002-01-01

    We studied the genetic control of the dance dialects that exist in the different subspecies of honey bees (Apis mellifera) by observing the variation in dance form observed in a backcross between two lines that showed widely different dance dialects. To do this we generated the reciprocal of the cross performed by Rinderer and Beaman (1995), thus producing phenotypic segregation of dance forms within a single colony rather than between colonies. Our results are consistent with Rinderer and Beaman (1995) in that inheritance of the transition point from round dancing --> waggle dancing is consistent with control by a single locus with more than one allele. That is, we found one dance type to be dominant in the F(1), and observed a 1:1 segregation of dance in a backcross involving the F(1) and the recessive parent. However, we found some minor differences in dance dialect inheritance, with the most significant being an apparent reversal of dominance between our cross (for us "black" is the dominant dialect) and that of Rinderer and Beaman (1995) (they report "yellow" to be the dominant dialect). We also found that our black bees do not perform a distinct sickle dance, whereas the black bees used by Rinderer and Beaman (1995) did perform such a dance. However, our difference in dominance need not contradict the results of Rinderer and Beaman (1995), as there is no evidence that body color and dominance for dance dialect are linked.

  7. Washington Alexandria Architecture Center students merge creative concepts of dance and space to design dance studio in Arlington

    OpenAIRE

    Micale, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    Elements of dance and dance-theatre -- including movement and exercise, flowing costumes, and expressive lighting --inspired students in the Architecture Master's design studio at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center to imagine innovative ways of merging public and private space for a dance studio in nearby Arlington.

  8. The aesthetic interpretation on Wooden Drum Dancing of Wa people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youfeng Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Wa nationality, a typical ethnic group in Yunnan province, is an ancient one lives across Yunnan. The main residences of it are border area beside northern Yunnan and the Wa States in Burma. Among all the Wa dances, Wooden Drum Dancing leads a vital position, and it is also a symbolic dancing in the culture of Wa people. The feature of Wooden Drum Dancing is that every action expending by the beats of wooden drum, namely, first the wooden drum, then the Wooden Drum Dancing. Dancing is an important content in the life of Wa people, and the aesthetics of life comes from dancing, so they present their value on worship by the form of dancing. This article is going to interpret the aesthetic standard on Wa people’s Wooden Drum Dancing by the view of aesthetics, and come into a conclude that the inspiration of such dancing came from practice and their worship to nature and ancestor. The Wooden Drum Dancing displays totally the tough air and solidarity of Wa people, which also presents the fair society of them. The Wooden Drum Dancing is an enriched art that Wa People took from particle life, so dancing of Wa is often classified into the aesthetic area of plain. The information of people’s living situation displayed by Wa dancing also conveys their rich emotions. The sense of beauty within Wooden Drum Dancing will give others a solemn feeling. The formal beauty is displayed by the rhythm of upper part of body, and the power beauty is displayed by the rhythm of the lower part of body.

  9. Dance Dance Revolution: Usapin ng Laro at Sayaw sa Panahon ng Globalisasyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jema M. Pamintuan

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dance Dance Revolution (DDR Machine is becoming a favorite game among the youth and even the not-so-young. While much has been written on the mechanics and popularity of the game, this essay aims to probe into the DDR phenomenon as a parallel tool and response to the changes brought about by technology and the age of globalization. The individual's relationship with the machine, with his audience, and with the larger society will be documented and juxtaposed with the activities of a global village. The cultural implications of the DDR will also be discussed, especially how the game itself revolutionized our traditional concept of game and dance.

  10. Philosophy---Aesthetics---Education: Reflections on Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tyson

    2007-01-01

    The Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben is known for his interest in the problem of "biopower," arguing that political political and philosophical questions of the moment concern the connections between life and power. He is diametrically opposed to Alain Badiou, a leading French intellectual, for whom the central question concerns not so much…

  11. Dance All Night: Motivation in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges that teachers of adolescents face is the necessity to motivate them. This article begins with an overview of motivational theories and then focuses on process theory and its application in the middle school and high school classrooms. An effective teacher can create motivation in students by forming relationships with…

  12. Self psychology and the modern dance choreographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Carol M

    2009-04-01

    Theory and research methodology of self psychology are integrated with the experiences of modern dance choreographers to investigate the importance of creativity, art making, and aesthetics in mental health and our everyday lives. Empathy, as aesthetically based, is explored to understand the capacity of the arts to unite us in our humanity. Connections between aesthetic development, creativity, and infant patterns of learning are drawn. The influence of sensual and exploration/assertion motivational systems upon the contemporary choreographer are highlighted, leading to an understanding of the selfobject function of sensation and movement for the dance artist. Through an examination of the moment to moment ritualized experiences of studio work, the creative process in making dances is discussed. Ultimately understanding creativity and aesthetically based empathy inform our delineation of mental health and the need for aesthetic experience in everyday life.

  13. Aggressive behavior prevention in a dance duet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Gant

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the features of aggression and the main directions of prevention of aggressive forms of behavior, among athletes engaged in sports dancing in the preliminary basic training. Material & Methods: analysis of scientific and methodological literature, "Personal aggressiveness and conflictness". Results: a theoretical analysis of the problem of aggressive behavior in sports dance duets. Level of aggressiveness of athletes of sports dances at the stage of preliminary basic training is determined. Reasons for the formation of aggressive behavior among young athletes are revealed. Areas of preventive and psychocorrectional work with aggressive athletes are singled out. Conclusion: a high level of aggression was detected in 19 (31,67% of the study participants. Determinants of aggressive behavior in sport ballroom pair appear particularly family upbringing style and pedagogical activity of the trainer. Correction of aggressive behavior of young athletes should have a complex systemic character and take into account the main characterological features of aggressive athletes.

  14. Education Related to Tourism Received by Polish Tourism and Recreation Students in Childhood and Adolescence and its Impact on their Tourism Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelan Aneta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. If activity related to tourism is planned effectively and performed in a responsible way, it can satisfy many human needs. In order to make it possible for members of modern society to fully benefit from tourism, however, it is necessary to undertake action aimed at promoting tourism, fostering its development, stimulating the need to travel, and helping tourists adopt certain habits. The aim of the study was to collect information concerning the impact of family, school, and community organisations on the tourism activity of students of tourism and recreation.

  15. Dance as a therapy for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Gurbuz; Ogce, Filiz

    2005-01-01

    Even though the field of medicine has developed tremendously, the wide variety of cancer is still among chronic and life threatening disease today. Therefore, the specialists constantly research and try every possible way to find cure or preventive ways to stop its further development. For this reason, studies concerning the chronic disease such as cancer have been spread to many different fields. In this regard, many other alternative ways besides medicine, are used in prevention of cancer. Nutritional therapy, herbal therapy, sportive activities, art therapy, music therapy, dance therapy, imagery, yoga and acupuncture can be given as examples. Among these, dance/movement therapy which deals with individuals physical, emotional, cognitive as well as social integration is widely used as a popular form of physical activity. The physical benefits of dance therapy as exercise are well documented. Studies have shown that physical activity is known to increase special neurotransmitter substances in the brain (endorphins), which create a state of well-being. And total body movement such as dance enhances the functions of other body systems, such as circulatory, respiratory, skeletal, and muscular systems. Regarding its unique connection to the field of medicine, many researches have been undertaken on the effects of dance/movement therapy in special settings with physical problems such as amputations, traumatic brain injury, and stroke, chronic illnesses such as anorexia, bulimia, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, AIDS, and arthritis. Today dance/movement therapy is a well recognized form of complementary therapy used in hospitals as well as at the comprehensive clinical cancer centres.

  16. What is it dance can do?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    presented in this paper are based on a synthesis of the results of all three reports. The surveys presented in report 3 indicates that an impressing high percentage (87 and 98) of the participants evaluate that the dance practices are social in a ‘high’ or ‘very high’ degree. Drawing on a combination...... of observations and interviews with participants and the dancers teaching in courses and projects, report 1 and 2 present and analyse participants’ experiences running behind the surveys. In each their ways, these two reports bring to the fore that participating in the dance activities is, first of all, a matter...

  17. The Analysis of Topeng Sinok Dance in Brebes Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Ayu Sintho Rukmi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Topeng Sinok dance is the characteristic art of Brebes regency. This dance tells about the typical women in Brebes who are hard-working. Beauty, flexibility, and elegance do not reduce their love for nature and farming. This dance is a combination of Cirebon, Banyumas, and Surakarta style. The dance is basically aiming at showing that women from the border areas of Central and West Java are not spoiled, whiny, and lazy. Topeng Sinok dance is performed beautifully, elegant, and swift. This paper purposes to uncover the meaning behind Topeng Sinok dance movement. This study implements qualitative method that uses qualitative descriptive approach. The data collection process was conducted by using observation, documentation, and interview techniques. Further, the data were analysed by using dance data analysis by following the steps of (1 identifying and describing components; (2 understanding; (3 interpreting; and (4 evaluating. The data were then validated by using triangulation.

  18. Legal Protection Against The Dance Creator In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to find out and to analyze the ideal legal protection so it can encourage the creator of dance in developing a creation in the field of dance and to find out and to analyze and to get the concept of legal protection of copyright in the field of dance after the enactment of Act No. 28 of 2014 concerns Copyright. This research is empirical juridical. The technique of collecting legal material is conducted through interviews questionnaires to respondents and literature study i.e by collecting various documents in the form of primary secondary and tertiary legal materials. The results of research showed that 1. Dance is a part of copyright associated with diverse art and culture owned by the Indonesian certainly dance produced by consume energy thoughts time and cost by Dance Creator with regard to the creation the state has given protection of dance creator for art as stipulated in Article 40 letter e of Act No. 28 of 2014 as an expression of respect and appreciation to the Dance Creator 2 In association with the regulation on the protection of creative works of art dance regulated in Act No. 28 of 2014 the creator of dance argues is very important to give the protection of dance creator for their copyrighted works particularly their rights as a creator of dance i.e moral and economic rights. Giving moral and economic rights cannot be felt fully by the creator of dance this is due to the creator of dance does not have an institutions that will accommodate the creativity of creators that useful for their welfare.

  19. Gilles Jobin Final residency lecture - Collision between dance and physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Doser, Michael; Dimou, Maria; Jobin, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to the final public lecture about collisions between dance and physics by the first winner of Collide@CERN Geneva, the choreographer Gilles Jobin. The event marks the end of his residency and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 6th November at 1800. Doors open at 17.30 Programme 18.00 - Opening address by Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director General, Ariane Koek, CERN Cultural Specialist, Sami Kanaan, Administrative Councilor in charge of the Department of Culture and Sport of the City of Geneva, and Charles Beer, Vice President of the State Council in charge of the Department of Education, Culture and Sport. 18.30 - Presentation by Gilles Jobin (Switzerland) of his residency experience at CERN with live demonstrations with his dancers 19.15 - Discussion on CERN as a Place of Collisions and Interventions between Dance and Physics with Gilles Jobin (Switzerland) and CERN scientists Maria Dimo...

  20. O encontro entre dança e educação somática como uma interface de questionamento epistemológico sobre as teorias do corpo The encounter of dance and somatic education as a new epistemological interface on body theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa Domenici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, destaco a sinergia entre a educação somática e a dança, como um subespaço de produção de conhecimento qualificado sobre o corpo. Considero que as práticas de educação somática possibilitaram novos caminhos de investigação e criação, alterando profundamente os modos de fazer dança, para além da clássica epistemologia mecanicista em que se pauta o treinamento corporal tradicional. Minha hipótese é de que essa zona híbrida entre arte e ciência vem desestabilizando concepções importantes, tais como memória, cognição, movimento, hábito, natureza, cultura, entre outros, produzindo importantes subsídios na direção de novas epistemologias sobre o corpo.This article focuses on the collaboration between somatic education and dance as a sub-space for production of qualified knowledge on the body. It is argued that the practices of somatic education have provided new kinds of investigation and creation, making significant changes in the ways of making dance and producing new aesthetic concepts that present other ideas than the ones from the classical mechanist epistemology. Our hypothesis is that this hybrid zone between art and science has been mobilizing important conceptions, such as memory, cognition, movement, habit, nature, and culture, among others, producing an important support for new epistemologies on the body.

  1. Dancing for Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Trial of Irish Set Dancing Compared With Usual Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Joanne; Morris, Meg E; Bhriain, Orfhlaith Ni; Volpe, Daniele; Lynch, Tim; Clifford, Amanda M

    2017-09-01

    To examine the feasibility of a randomized controlled study design and to explore the benefits of a set dancing intervention compared with usual care. Randomized controlled design, with participants randomized to Irish set dance classes or a usual care group. Community based. Individuals with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) (N=90). The dance group attended a 1.5-hour dancing class each week for 10 weeks and undertook a home dance program for 20 minutes, 3 times per week. The usual care group continued with their usual care and daily activities. The primary outcome was feasibility, determined by recruitment rates, success of randomization and allocation procedures, attrition, adherence, safety, willingness of participants to be randomized, resource availability, and cost. Secondary outcomes were motor function (motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale), quality of life (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39), functional endurance (6-min walk test), and balance (mini-BESTest). Ninety participants were randomized (45 per group). There were no adverse effects or resource constraints. Although adherence to the dancing program was 93.5%, there was >40% attrition in each group. Postintervention, the dance group had greater nonsignificant gains in quality of life than the usual care group. There was a meaningful deterioration in endurance in the usual care group. There were no meaningful changes in other outcomes. The exit questionnaire showed participants enjoyed the classes and would like to continue participation. For people with mild to moderately severe PD, set dancing is feasible and enjoyable and may improve quality of life. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A contribuição da dança do ventre para a educação corporal, saúde física e mental de mulheres que freqüentam uma academia de ginástica e dança La contribución de la danza del vientre para la educación corporal, salud física y mental de mujeres que van a la academia de gimnasia y danza The contribution of belly dance to body education, physical and mental health of women who go to the gym or dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Peto Abrão

    2005-04-01

    open questions. The analysis of their answers demonstrated that belly dance is beneficial for an integral education that values life, improving these women's health and quality of life.

  3. Senior Dance Experience, Cognitive Performance, and Brain Volume in Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Niemann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is positively related to cognitive functioning and brain volume in older adults. Interestingly, different types of physical activity vary in their effects on cognition and on the brain. For example, dancing has become an interesting topic in aging research, as it is a popular leisure activity among older adults, involving cardiovascular and motor fitness dimensions that can be positively related to cognition. However, studies on brain structure are missing. In this study, we tested the association of long-term senior dance experience with cognitive performance and gray matter brain volume in older women aged 65 to 82 years. We compared nonprofessional senior dancers (n=28 with nonsedentary control group participants without any dancing experience (n=29, who were similar in age, education, IQ score, lifestyle and health factors, and fitness level. Differences neither in the four tested cognitive domains (executive control, perceptual speed, episodic memory, and long-term memory nor in brain volume (VBM whole-brain analysis, region-of-interest analysis of the hippocampus were observed. Results indicate that moderate dancing activity (1-2 times per week, on average has no additional effects on gray matter volume and cognitive functioning when a certain lifestyle or physical activity and fitness level are reached.

  4. Designing Reflection and Symmetry Learning by Using Math Traditional Dance in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yullys Helsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innovation of education is an important point of Pendidikan Matematika Realistik Indonesia (PMRI, one of them through traditional dance as a context of national cultural. Dance that collaborated with concept of mathematics, it is called Math Traditional Dance. This research aims to produce learning line (specific the material of reflection and symmetry. The research method used is design research that consisted of preparing for the experiments, teaching experiments, and retrospective analysis. Data collected through observation, interviews, documentation and field notes. This research was conducted with 22 students in MIN 2 Palembang. From the try out that is obtained from the formal to the informal learning described in the learning process, so that support learning process of mirroring and symmetry for the students in grade four in elementary school.Key words: PMRI, math traditional dance, design research, learning path, mirroring and symmetry DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.782.79-94

  5. Factors affecting dance exercise performance in students at a special needs school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukiko; Hiramoto, Izumi; Kodama, Hideya

    2017-09-01

    In Japan, dance exercise has been introduced as a compulsory element of health and physical education, but there is a considerable discrepancy in the levels of performance among students with intellectual disability (ID) at special needs schools. The aim of this study was therefore to identify the factors affecting the performance of dance exercise in students with ID. A 4 month dance exercise program was implemented for junior high school students at a special needs school, and the performance of 32 students at 22 sessions was assessed quantitatively according to calorie use during exercise and performance proficiency score. The measures were compared according to gender, age, body mass index, diagnosis, and development quotient (DQ) score. Performance in many students improved with repetition and reached the highest attainment level at around the third month. Male gender and older age had a significant positive impact on calorie use, whereas diagnosis of Down syndrome and higher DQ score had a significant positive impact on proficiency score. Four students with poor performance were all female students with autism. This study provides some possible explanations for differences in the levels of dance performance among students with ID. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Conditioning Methodologies for DanceSport: Lessons from Gymnastics, Figure Skating, and Concert Dance Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outevsky, David; Martin, Blake Cw

    2015-12-01

    Dancesport, the competitive branch of ballroom dancing, places high physiological and psychological demands on its practitioners, but pedagogical resources in these areas for this dance form are limited. Dancesport competitors could benefit from strategies used in other aesthetic sports. In this review, we identify conditioning methodologies from gymnastics, figure skating, and contemporary, modern, and ballet dance forms that could have relevance and suitability for dancesport training, and propose several strategies for inclusion in the current dancesport curriculum. We reviewed articles derived from Google Scholar, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Taylor & Francis Online, and Web of Science search engines and databases, with publication dates from 1979 to 2013. The keywords included MeSH terms: dancing, gymnastics, physiology, energy metabolism, physical endurance, and range of motion. Out of 47 papers examined, 41 papers met the inclusion criteria (validity of scientific methods, topic relevance, transferability to dancesport, publication date). Quality and validity of the data were assessed by examining the methodologies in each study and comparing studies on similar populations as well as across time using the PRISMA 2009 checklist and flowchart. The relevant research suggests that macro-cycle periodization planning, aerobic and anaerobic conditioning, range of motion and muscular endurance training, and performance psychology methods have potential for adaptation for dancesport training. Dancesport coaches may help their students fulfill their ambitions as competitive athletes and dance artists by adapting the relevant performance enhancement strategies from gymnastics, figure skating, and concert dance forms presented in this paper.

  7. Prosthetics Making Sense: Dancing the Technogenetic Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Manning

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Explorations of new technologies and dance often focus on the difficulty of locating gesture-as-such. For the practitioners of dance and technology the exploration of movement is intrinsically related to how to locate where a movement begins and ends in order to map its coordinates within a sensitive system. Yet, the question "What is a gesture? (and how can the computer recognize one?" may direct the techno-dance process toward establishing a kind of grammar of movement that would — paradoxically — be more likely to tie the body to some pre-established understanding of how it actualizes. "Mapping" gesture risks breaking movement into bits of assimilable data, of replicating the very conformity the computer software is seeking to get beyond. Instead of mapping gesture-as-such, this paper therefore begins somewhere else. It seeks to explore the technogenetic potential of the wholeness of movement, including its "unmappable" virtuality. The unmappable — within a computer software program — is the aspect of movement I call pre-acceleration, a virtual becoming — a tendency toward movement — through which a displacement takes form. If a vocabulary of gesture is to be reclaimed as part of what can be stimulated in the encounter between dance and new technology, it must be done through the continuum of movement, through the body's technogenetic emergence in the realm of the virtual becoming of pre-acceleration.

  8. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Chadwick, M.B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M.M.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T.N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J.L.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on {sup 235}U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomeric states in {sup 236}U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables. (orig.)

  9. Movement and Dance on the Sea Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Mary Arnold

    1985-01-01

    Describes the role of movement and dance in the lives of Blacks living on the Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia. Claims that the isolation of this area helps preserve its Africanicity and culture. Focuses particularly on the uses of rhythmic chanting in worship and in children's games. (KH)

  10. Pathfinders on Black Dance in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Loriene, Ed.

    This is a compilation of 18 pathfinders (i.e., a bibliographic instruction aid) on black dance in America, prepared by graduate students in the "Information Resources in the Humanities" and the "Information Resources in the Social Sciences" classes in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of…

  11. The Lion or Dancing the Linguistic Animal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theodoridou, Danae

    2014-01-01

    During the discussion on Dance and Politics at Southbank Center, London, in November 2010, Xavier Le Roy suggested that ‘We should look at him as we would look at the lion in the zoo, only of course the lion would not talk to us’. Later that evening he presented his work Low Pieces (2009–2011).

  12. Dancing with the regulations - Part Deux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the United States has long been subjected to two very similar regulations depending upon the location. Disposal sites located on Department of Energy (DOE) Reservations are subject to DOE Order 5820.2A open-quotes Radioactive Waste Management,close quotes while disposal sites located elsewhere are subject to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation 10 CFR 61 open-quotes Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste.close quotes While life was not necessarily good, there was only one sheet of music to dance to. Recently a new player, named CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act), has ridden into those DOE towns, and for those whose disposal facilities lie within or adjacent to Superfund sites, she has brought along a different drum to dance to. This paper discusses the differences and similarities between the different dance partners and their associated musical scores (i.e., the performance assessment (PA) required by the DOE order and the baseline risk assessment (BRA) required by CERCLA). The paper then provides a brief discussion on the latest dancer to cut in: the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). This discussion should help to alleviate the confusion while dancing on the LLW disposal regulatory ballroom floor

  13. Dancing with the regulations - Part Deux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, R.L. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the United States has long been subjected to two very similar regulations depending upon the location. Disposal sites located on Department of Energy (DOE) Reservations are subject to DOE Order 5820.2A {open_quotes}Radioactive Waste Management,{close_quotes} while disposal sites located elsewhere are subject to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation 10 CFR 61 {open_quotes}Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste.{close_quotes} While life was not necessarily good, there was only one sheet of music to dance to. Recently a new player, named CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act), has ridden into those DOE towns, and for those whose disposal facilities lie within or adjacent to Superfund sites, she has brought along a different drum to dance to. This paper discusses the differences and similarities between the different dance partners and their associated musical scores (i.e., the performance assessment (PA) required by the DOE order and the baseline risk assessment (BRA) required by CERCLA). The paper then provides a brief discussion on the latest dancer to cut in: the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). This discussion should help to alleviate the confusion while dancing on the LLW disposal regulatory ballroom floor.

  14. The Honeybee Dance-Language Controversy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    some sceptics who believe that the dance that the foragers do perform may have no ... is often credited with being the prime mover in making humans what they are. ... of naive workers from its colony to a newly found source of food. After decades of .... a mechanical "robot" bee that talks to the real bees through a computer ...

  15. Componente educativo-recreativo-asociativo en estrategias promotoras de salud bucal en preescolares Educational-recreational-associative element of promotion strategies for oral health in children of preschool education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Julia Álvarez Montero

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la integración del componente educativo-recreativo-asociativo en las estrategias mediadoras de promoción de salud bucal implementadas en el Preescolar Fuerzas Armadas de Cooperación, Maracaibo, Venezuela. El estado de salud-enfermedad bucal se determinó en una muestra de 32 niños evaluando la caries inicial y manifiesta e índices de placa y gingival. Se conocieron las concepciones de salud bucal de los padres, posteriormente se diseñaron y aplicaron actividades para lograr la resignificación de los conceptos y obtener la adopción de conductas observables en padres y niños, empleando actividades lúdicas, recursos visuales y prácticas guiadas de higiene bucal. Se concluye que el estado de salud bucal de los niños mejoró significativamente luego del aprendizaje obtenido, lo cual se relacionó directamente con las acciones mediadoras implementadas y el compromiso asumido por los padres y docentes. Se recomienda la metodología empleada para planificar nuevas experiencias de enseñanza-aprendizaje.This paper analyzed the integration of the educational-recreational-associative element into the oral health-promoting strategies implemented in the preschool education center named “Fuerzas Armadas de Cooperación”, Maracaibo, Venezuela. The condition of oral health-disease was determined in a sample of 32 children by evaluating initial and manifest caries along with plaque and gingival indexes. The oral health conceptions of the parents were learned, afterwards, some activities were designed and carried out to come to a re-definition of concepts and to achieve adoption of observable behaviours in parents and their children alike by holding games and usisng visual resources and guided practices in oral hygiene. It was concluded that the oral health condition of children improved significantly after the required learning, which directly related with the implemented actions and the commitment by parents and professors. This

  16. Dancing for Healthy Aging: Functional and Metabolic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Krause, Mauricio; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2018-02-10

    Context • Dancing has been used as a form of exercise to improve functional and metabolic outcomes during aging. The field lacks randomized, clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating metabolic outcomes related to dance interventions, but dancing may be a form of exercise that could induce positive effects on the metabolic health of older adults. However, primary studies seem very heterogonous regarding the trial designs, characteristics of the interventions, the methods for outcomes assessments, statistical powers, and methodological quality. Objective • The current research team intended to review the literature on the use of dance as a form of intervention to promote functional and metabolic health in older adults. Specifically, the research team aimed to identify and describe the characteristics of a large range of studies using dance as an intervention, summarizing them and putting them into perspective for further analysis. Design • The research team searched the following data sources-MEDLINE, Cochrane Wiley, Clinical Trials.gov, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDRO), and the Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS)-for RCTs, quasi-experimental studies, and observational trials that compared the benefits of any style of dancing, combined with other exercises or alone, to nonexercising controls and/or controls practicing other types of exercise. Setting • The study took place at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Porto Alegre, Brazil). Participants were aging individuals, >55 y, both with or without health conditions. Interventions • Interventions should be supervised, taking form as group classes, in a dance setting environment. Dance styles were divided into 5 categories for the review: (1) cultural dances developed by groups of people to reflect the roots of a certain region, such as Greek dance; (2) ballroom dance (ie, dances with partners performed socially or competitively in a ballroom, such as foxtrot

  17. Physics and the Art of Dance - Understanding Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swope, Kenneth Laws

    2005-03-01

    Written by a physicist with professional dance training, Physics and the Art of Dance explains how dancers can achieve better, safer performances through an understanding of physics in motion. Using simple, non-technical terms, Kenneth Laws combines his knowledge of both physics and dance to describe how the laws of gravity, momentum, and energy affect dancing bodies. The book explores the natural laws that govern the subtleties of balance, the techniques of leaps and pirouettes, and the impressive lifts and turns executed by ballet partners. Finally, Laws offers insight into two current discussions in the dance world--the effect of body size on ballet technique, and the relationship between science and the art of dance. Beautiful, original stop-action photographs by Martha Swope, along with clear diagrams, illustrate the concepts described in the text. Plus, an intriguing "puzzler" at the beginning of each chapter provides an engaging entree into the topics presented. For those who want a more advanced understanding of the physics, extensive appendices are provided. This new book combines the best features of Laws's widely acclaimed The Physics of Dance and Physics, Dance, and the Pas de Deux by Laws and Cynthia Harvey. Its expert application of the basic principles of physics to the art of dance will be an invaluable resource for dancers and dance instructors and will open a new level of appreciation for lovers of the form. It will also appeal to physicists who seek to include the arts in their scientific pursuits.

  18. More than just dancing: experiences of people with Parkinson's disease in a therapeutic dance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Stephanie; DeFaria, Anne Marie; O'Dwyer, Casey; Pankiw, Elana; Simic Bogler, Jennifer; Teixeira, Suzanne; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Evans, Cathy

    2017-06-01

    To understand why individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) participate in a community-based therapeutic dance program and to explore its influence on perceived physical, social and emotional well-being of participants. A qualitative descriptive design was employed using one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Individuals with PD who participated in the Dancing with Parkinson's program were recruited from two locations. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, de-identified and then placed into NVivo 10 software for analysis. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive analysis method to generate a coding scheme. Group discussion facilitated development of overarching themes. Ten participants' responses revealed that the dance program allows for self-improvement and regaining identity through disease self-management. Positive influences of socialization arose through the class, decreasing isolation and improving quality of life. Participants communicate through music and dance to enhance connection with others. Dancing with Parkinson's classes allow for re-development of the social self, which can increase sense of enjoyment in life. Dance programs provide opportunities for social interaction, non-verbal communication and self-improvement, reestablishing self-identity and a sense of usefulness. This study provides unique insight into the experience of participating in a dance program from the perspective of individuals with PD. Implications for rehabilitation Dance is emerging as a strategy to address the physical and psychosocial effects of Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known regarding participants' perceptions of community-based therapeutic dance programs for PD. This study found that Dancing with Parkinson's (DWP) facilitated an improvement in social participation, resulting in decreased isolation and improved quality of life. Participation in the DWP program can facilitate a positive change in perspective and attitude toward a PD

  19. Lightning injuries in sports and recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Eric M; Howard, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The powers of lightning have been worshiped and feared by all known human cultures. While the chance of being struck by lightning is statistically very low, that risk becomes much greater in those who frequently work or play outdoors. Over the past 2 yr, there have been nearly 50 lightning-related deaths reported within the United States, with a majority of them associated with outdoor recreational activities. Recent publications primarily have been case studies, review articles, and a discussion of a sixth method of injury. The challenge in reducing lightning-related injuries in organized sports has been addressed well by both the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association in their guidelines on lightning safety. Challenges remain in educating the general population involved in recreational outdoor activities that do not fall under the guidelines of organized sports.

  20. Superior sensory, motor, and cognitive performance in elderly individuals with multi-year dancing activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a progressive decline of mental and physical abilities. Considering the current demographic changes in many civilizations there is an urgent need for measures permitting an independent lifestyle into old age. The critical role of physical exercise in mediating and maintaining physical and mental fitness is well-acknowledged. Dance, in addition to physical activity, combines emotions, social interaction, sensory stimulation, motor coordination and music, thereby creating enriched environmental conditions for human individuals. Here we demonstrate the impact of multi-year (average 16.5 years amateur dancing (AD in a group of elderly subjects (aged 65 to 84 years as compared to education-, gender- and aged-matched controls (CG having no record of dancing or sporting activities. Besides posture and balance parameters, we tested reaction times, motor behavior, tactile and cognitive performance. In each of the different domains investigated, the AD group had a superior performance as compared to the non-dancer CG group. Analysis of individual performance revealed that the best participants of the AD group were not better than individuals of the CG group. Instead, the AD group lacked individuals showing poor performance, which was frequently observed for the CG group. This observation implies that maintaining a regular schedule of dancing into old age can preserve cognitive, motor and perceptual abilities and prevent them from degradation. We conclude that the far-reaching beneficial effects found in the AD group make dance, beyond its ability to facilitate balance and posture, a prime candidate for the preservation of everyday life competence of elderly individuals.

  1. B.A.I.L.A. - A Latin dance randomized controlled trial for older Spanish-speaking Latinos: Rationale, design, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, David X.; Wilbur, JoEllen; Hughes, Susan; Berbaum, Michael L.; Wilson, Robert; Buchner, David M.; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has documented health benefits, but older Latinos are less likely to engage in leisure time PA than older non-Latino whites. Dance holds promise as a culturally appropriate form of PA that challenges individuals physically and cognitively. This paper describes a randomized controlled trial that will test the efficacy of BAILAMOS©, a 4-month Latin dance program followed by a 4-month maintenance program, for improving lifestyle PA and health outcomes. Older adults (n = 332), aged 55+, Latino/Hispanic, Spanish speaking, with low PA levels, and at risk for disability will be randomized to one of two programs, a dance program or health education control group. BAILAMOS© is a 4-month program that meets two times per week for one hour per session. Dance sessions focus on instruction, including four styles of dance, and couples dancing. Bi-monthly “Fiestas de Baile” (dance parties) are also included, in which participants dance and practice what they have learned.. Monthly 1-hour discussion sessions utilize a Social Cognitive framework and focus on knowledge, social support, and self-efficacy to increase lifestyle PA. The health education control group will meet one time per week for two hours per session. Primary outcomes including PA changes and secondary outcomes including self-efficacy, physical function, cognitive function, and disability will be assessed at baseline, 4, and 8 months. It is hypothesized that PA, self-efficacy, physical function, cognitive function, and functional limitations and disability scores will be significantly better in the BAILAMOS© group at 4 and 8 months compared to the control group. PMID:24969395

  2. "Here We Go 'Round the Mulberry Bush": Problematizing "Progress" in Ontario's Elementary School Dance Curriculum: 1900 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nancy R.; Lathrop, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    Educational scholars agree that the relationship between curriculum development and practice is mitigated by complex political and cultural agendas (Goodson 1984; Vertinsky 2007). As a performing art form and physical activity, dance does not easily fit within the context of a typical school subject and is a site for ontological and…

  3. Mood after various brief exercise and sport modes: aerobics, hip-hop dancing, ice skating, and body conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwoon; Kim, Jingu

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the potential psychological benefits of brief exercise and sport activities on positive mood alterations, 45 Korean high school and 232 undergraduate students enrolled in physical education and stress management classes voluntarily participated and were randomly assigned to one of four activities: aerobic exercise, body conditioning, hip-hop dancing, and ice skating. Mood changes from before to after exercise (2 pm to 3 pm) were measured based on a Korean translation of the Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale. The findings suggested that the aerobics and hip-hop dancing groups rated positive well-being higher than the body conditioning and ice skating groups. Immediately after exercise, psychological distress was rated lower in the aerobics and hip-hop dancing groups, as was fatigue.

  4. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect.

  5. THE DANCING SCULPTURES OF THE 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel ALMELEK ISMAN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dance has been an indispensable element of human life for centuries. Painters and sculptors have created the dynamism of dance steps either on the canvas or stone with the same excitement. Charits, Nymphs, Bacchantes and Satyrs, the Greek and Roman mythological figures who attract attention with their dances have been a source of inspiration for artists. In this research, the dancing sculptures of the 19th century which is an interesting period in European art because of its witnessing of long term styles like Neoclassicism and Romanticism and short term movements such as Realism and Impressionism are examined. Examples of sculptures which brings dance to life before and after the 19th century have also been mentioned. The likenesses as well as dissimilarities in the way the arts of painting and sculpture approach to the theme of dance has been briefly evaluated.

  6. Genic control of honey bee dance language dialect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderer, T E; Beaman, L D

    1995-10-01

    Behavioural genetic analysis of honey bee dance language shows simple Mendelian genic control over certain dance dialect differences. Worker honey bees of one parent colony (yellow) changed from round to transition dances for foraging distances of 20 m and from transition to waggle dances at 40 m. Worker bees of the other parent colony (black) made these shifts at 30 m and 90 m, respectively. F1 colonies behaved identically to their yellow parent, suggesting dominance. Progeny of backcrossing between the F1 generation and the putative recessive black parent assorted to four classes, indicating that the dialect differences studied are regulated by genes at two unlinked loci, each having two alleles. Honey bee dance communication is complex and highly integrated behaviour. Nonetheless, analysis of a small element of this behaviour, variation in response to distance, suggests that dance communication is regulated by subsets consisting of simple genic systems.

  7. Paradigms of Communication in Performance and Dance Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Popa Blanariu, Nicoleta

    2015-01-01

    In her article "Paradigms of Communication in Performance and Dance Studies" Nicoleta Popa Blanariu approaches from an interdisciplinary perspective the measure in which performing arts (theater, music, ballet, Indian classical dance, folk dance, etc.), as well as ritual performance constitute a corpus that may be analysed by means of theoretical and conceptual tools in communication studies and semiotics. Popa Blanariu analyses the relation between signification and communication in performi...

  8. Dance in the British South Asian diaspora: redefining classicism

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez y Royo, Alessandra

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses South Asian dance forms and genres in Britain, one of the major locations of the South Asian diaspora. It addresses issues of "classicism," "neoclassicism" and "contemporaneity" in South Asian dancing, particularly important as in the British context availability of public funding depends on the artists demonstrating an innovative engagement with their own practice. The author focuses, as a specific case study, on the work, Moham, choreographed and danced as a solo by bha...

  9. Why, when and where did honey bee dance communication evolve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie eI'Anson Price

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis sp. are the only known bee genus that uses nest-based communication to provide nest-mates with information about the location of resources, the so-called dance language. Successful foragers perform waggle dances for high quality food sources and suitable nest-sites during swarming. However, since many species of social insects do not communicate the location of resources to their nest-mates, the question of why the dance language evolved is of ongoing interest. We review recent theoretical and empirical research into the ecological circumstances that make dance communication beneficial in present day environments. This research suggests that the dance language is most beneficial when food sources differ greatly in quality and are hard to find. The dances of extant honey bee species differ in important ways, and phylogenetic studies suggest an increase in dance complexity over time: species with the least complex dance were the first to appear and species with the most complex dance are the most derived. We review the fossil record of honey bees and speculate about the time and context (foraging vs. swarming in which spatially referential dance communication might have evolved. We conclude that there are few certainties about when the dance language first appeared; dance communication could be older than 40 million years and, thus, predate the genus Apis, or it could be as recent as 20 million years when extant honey bee species diverged during the early Miocene. The most parsimonious scenario assumes it evolved in a sub-tropical to temperate climate, with patchy vegetation somewhere in Eurasia.

  10. The role of sports training and recreation at self-efficacy perception of adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ivančič, Hani

    2013-01-01

    In the following diploma the role of a sports training and a sports recreation for the perception of adolescents’ self-efficacy is presented. In the theoretical part the self-efficacy theory and its placement into adolescence are described as well as all three kinds of sports workout (sports training, sports recreation and sports education), connection between sport and adolescence and sport’s influence on the self-efficacy. In the empirical part the role of the sports training and recreat...

  11. Dancing as an Intervention Tool for People with Dementia: A Mini-Review Dancing and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Research studies show a positive impact of physical activities such as dancing on the improvement of cognitive reserves of people with dementia. The purpose of this study is to explore dancing efficacy on people with dementia and list the key benefits and limitations of dancing therapy for these people. The methods used in this study include a method of literature review of available Englishwritten sources with respect to the dancing therapy and dementia in the acknowledged databases Pub- Med, Web of Science, Springer, and Scopus, and a method of comparison and evaluation of their findings. The findings of this mini review confirm positive efficacy of dancing therapy on cognitive, physical, emotional and social performance of people with dementia. More randomized controlled clinical trials should be conducted in this field, as well as other non-pharmacological therapies should be employed in order to holistically contribute to the prevention and treatment of dementia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Dancing attraction: followers of honey bee tremble and waggle dances exhibit similar behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Lam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The function of the honey bee tremble dance and how it attracts signal receivers is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that tremble followers and waggle followers exhibit the same dance-following behavior. If correct, this could unify our understanding of dance following, provide insight into dance information transfer, and offer a way to identify the signal receivers of tremble dance information. Followers showed similar initial attraction to and tracking of dancers. However, waggle dancers were faster than tremble dancers, and follower-forward, -sideways, and -angular velocities were generally similar to the velocities of their respective dancers. Waggle dancers attracted followers from 1.3-fold greater distances away than tremble dancers. Both follower types were attracted to the lateral sides of dancers, but tremble followers were more attracted to the dancer's head, and waggle followers were more attracted to the dancer's abdomen. Tremble dancers engaged in 4-fold more brief food exchanges with their followers than waggle dancers. The behaviors of both follower types are therefore relatively conserved. Researchers can now take the next steps, observing tremble followers to determine their subsequent behaviors and testing the broader question of whether follower attraction and tracking is conserved in a wide range of social insects.

  13. Dance on cortex: enhanced theta synchrony in experts when watching a dance piece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poikonen, Hanna; Toiviainen, Petri; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2018-03-01

    When watching performing arts, a wide and complex network of brain processes emerge. These processes can be shaped by professional expertise. When compared to laymen, dancers have enhanced processes in observation of short dance movement and listening to music. But how do the cortical processes differ in musicians and dancers when watching an audio-visual dance performance? In our study, we presented the participants long excerpts from the contemporary dance choreography of Carmen. During multimodal movement of a dancer, theta phase synchrony over the fronto-central electrodes was stronger in dancers when compared to musicians and laymen. In addition, alpha synchrony was decreased in all groups during large rapid movement when compared to nearly motionless parts of the choreography. Our results suggest an enhanced cortical communication in dancers when watching dance and, further, that this enhancement is rather related to multimodal, cognitive and emotional processes than to simple observation of dance movement. © 2018 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Traces across the body: influence of music-dance synchrony on the observation of dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolhouse, Matthew Harold; Lai, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies investigating entrainment and person perception, synchronized movements were found to enhance memory for incidental person attributes. Although this effect is robust, including in dance, the process by which it is actuated are less well understood. In this study, two hypotheses are investigated: that enhanced memory for person attributes is the result of (1) increased gaze time between in-tempo dancers; and/or (2) greater attentional focus between in-tempo dancers. To explore these possible mechanisms in the context of observing dance, an eye-tracking study was conducted in which subjects watched videos of pairs of laterally positioned dancers; only one of the dancers was synchronized with the music, the other being asynchronous. The results were consistent with the first hypothesis-music-dance synchrony gives rise to increased visual inspection times. In addition, there was a preference for upper-body fixations over lower-body fixations across both synchronous and asynchronous conditions. A subsequent, single-dancer eye-tracking study investigated fixations across different body regions, including head, torso, legs and feet. Significantly greater dwell times were recorded for head than torso and legs; feet attracted significantly less dwell time than any other body region. Lastly, the study sought to identify dance gestures responsible for torso- and head-directed fixations. Specifically we asked whether there are features in dance that are specially designed to direct an observer's gaze towards the face-the main "communicative portal" with respect to the transmission of intent, affect and empathy.

  15. Dance floors as injury risk: analysis and evaluation of acute injuries caused by dance floors in professional dance with regard to preventative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Eileen M; Mill, Helmgard; Wanke, Alice; Davenport, Jaqueline; Koch, Franziska; Groneberg, David A

    2012-09-01

    A dance floor is often the only support of movements in dance. A dance floor surface that shows deficiencies, can result in acute injuries and chronic problems. Although the significance of an adequate dance floor is well known, there is still a lack of differentiated analyses of dance floor-related acute injuries. This study presents data on acute injuries exclusively caused by the dance floor. The data were obtained from standardized work accident reports from consultants (F 1000), documentary accident records from all Berlin theatres, a state ballet school (n=2,281), and case records from the Berlin State Accident Insurance (UKB) covering a period of 17 years. All analyses and descriptive statistics were conducted with Excel 2007 and SPSS 18. Dance floor surfaces were the causative factor in 12.8% of all accidents (n=291, female 183, male 108). Almost two thirds (62.6%) of all accidents in professional dancers happened on stage, and almost half (49.5%) occurred during performances. As for causative factors, 53.1% of the professional dancers (P) and 42.5% of the dance students (S) claimed that the floor had been "too slippery," with "getting stuck" or (tripping) as the second most common problem (P 18.4%, S 11.3%). Of the injured dancers, 41.8% were older than 30 years and can therefore be categorized as experienced. Dance floors play a significant role in the occurrence of acute injuries, even in experienced dancers. Performances on stage seem to be a particular risk. However, injury prevention measures should include all work locations (P) as well as non-dance-specific locations (S).

  16. Neurological implications and neuropsychological considerations on folk music and dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Vittorio A; Riva, Michele A

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and neuropsychological aspects of folk music and traditional dance have been poorly investigated by historical and scientific literature. Some of these performances could be indeed the manifestation of latent pathological conditions or the expression of liberation rituals. This chapter aimed at analyzing the relationships between traditional dance, folk music, and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Since ancient times, dance has been used in the individual or collective as treatment of some diseases, including epilepsy and movement disorders (dyskinesia, chorea, etc.). Dionysia in Ancient Greece, St. Vitus dance in the Middle Age, tarantism and other traditional dances of southern Italy and of non-Western countries might be credited as curative rituals of these neurological and psychiatric conditions. During the nineteenth century, dance was also used for the treatment of psychiatric patients; the relationship between dance and insanity could also be reflected in classical ballets and music of that period. Nowadays, neuropsychiatric manifestations could also be evidenced in modern dances (mass fainting at rock concerts, flash mobs); some ballroom dances are commonly used for the rehabilitation of patients suffering from neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. Interdisciplinary research on these subjects (ethnomusicology and cultural anthropology, clinical neurology and dynamic psychology, neuroradiology and neurophysiology, and socioneurology and neuromusicology) should be increased. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Proposal of an Algorithm to Synthesize Music Suitable for Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Hirofumi; Nakatani, Mie; Nishida, Shogo

    This paper proposes an algorithm for synthesizing music suitable for emotions in moving pictures. Our goal is to support multi-media content creation; web page design, animation films and so on. Here we adopt a human dance as a moving picture to examine the availability of our method. Because we think the dance image has high affinity with music. This algorithm is composed of three modules. The first is the module for computing emotions from an input dance image, the second is for computing emotions from music in the database and the last is for selecting music suitable for input dance via an interface of emotion.

  18. In a spin: the mysterious dancing epidemic of 1518.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, John C

    2008-09-01

    In 1518, one of the strangest epidemics in recorded history struck the city of Strasbourg. Hundreds of people were seized by an irresistible urge to dance, hop and leap into the air. In houses, halls and public spaces, as fear paralyzed the city and the members of the elite despaired, the dancing continued with mindless intensity. Seldom pausing to eat, drink or rest, many of them danced for days or even weeks. And before long, the chronicles agree, dozens were dying from exhaustion. What was it that could have impelled as many as 400 people to dance, in some cases to death?

  19. Sing, dance, play and be mindful [presentation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lucey, Jim

    2014-04-09

    Increasingly good evidence emerges of the positive benefits of sport, exercise, music, dance and mindfulness-based stress reduction in the building of the mental strength necessary to overcome these troubled times. The integrity of our mental health is challenged as each of us is threatened by calamity. Groups and teams, community’s and clubs are effective means of collective support. And positive mental health skills and attitudes are associated with greater individual wellbeing and with longer and happier life. Mental health is the resource which will empower recovery in us and in our economy. Modern neuroscience is proving the centrality of the brain in positive wellbeing. The evidence shows that human recovery is enhanced by music and dance and by song and by exercise, and by mindfulness. That is why we mustn’t wait any longer to lead mentally healthy lives. In Ireland we must not wait any longer to be happy.\\r\

  20. The scent of the waggle dance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Thom

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The waggle dance of honey bee (Apis mellifera L. foragers communicates to nest mates the location of a profitable food source. We used solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to show that waggle-dancing bees produce and release two alkanes, tricosane and pentacosane, and two alkenes, Z-(9-tricosene and Z-(9-pentacosene, onto their abdomens and into the air. Nondancing foragers returning from the same food source produce these substances in only minute quantities. Injection of the scent significantly affects worker behavior by increasing the number of bees that exit the hive. The results of this study suggest that these compounds are semiochemicals involved in worker recruitment. By showing that honey bee waggle dancers produce and release behaviorally active chemicals, this study reveals a new dimension in the organization of honey bee foraging.

  1. EFFECTS OF DANCE AND MUSIC THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Saroj Kothari

    2017-01-01

    Arts have consistently been part of life as well as healing throughout the history of humankind. Today, expressive therapies have an increasingly recognized role in mental health, rehabilitation and medicine. The expressive therapies are defined as the use of art, music, dance/movement drama, poetry/creative writing, play and sand play within the context of psychotherapy, counseling, rehabilitation or health care. Through the centuries, the healing nature of these expressive therapies has bee...

  2. Encouraging Recreational Reading (The Printout).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1988-01-01

    Describes computer software, including "The Electronic Bookshelf" and "Return to Reading," which provides motivation for recreational reading in various ways, including: quizzes, games based on books, and whole language activities for children's literature and young adult fiction. (MM)

  3. Massachusetts Recreational Fishing Demand Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stated preference choice experiment data were collected in 2012 from Massachuestts saltwater recreational fishermen. Saltwater anglers fishing in Massachusetts (MA)...

  4. Indian music and dance for inclusive development: A reflection on the Republic of Mauritius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Pudaruth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to argue, prove and demonstrate that Indian Music and Dance have a crucial role to play in the overall development of the Republic of Mauritius. Following intensive and extensive literature search, and field study, the author shows that cultural and economic values inherent in these art-forms, if soundly and systematically explored, identified and leveraged, have the potential to create and enhance human, cultural, artistic and social capitals through arts education, besides contributing to economic development by generating jobs and earnings through the establishment of Indian Music and Dance Industries in the country. The author further argues that it is incumbent upon the government to formulate and deliver informed, evidence-based cultural policies to guide thoughts and actions in the arts, culture and economic sectors. Largely, the arguments are based on the experiences of different countries, especially those of India, and the findings of researchers in the field.

  5. Original article Subjective and objective determinants of the satisfaction from the cooperation in a dance couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Budnik-Przybylska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Dance is an extremely complicated sports discipline, which combines features of the “original” form of dance associated with the expression of self and one’s emotions while maintaining the qualities of a competitive sport. It is particularly important for the cooperation of a couple to develop a relationship during training so that the partners feel satisfaction from working with each other, but are also pleased with the results in the discipline in which they train. The aim of this study was to analyse the factors responsible for the satisfaction with cooperation in a couple, which included, among other things, the dance level, degree of involvement and responsibility of each partner for the development of the couple. Participants and procedure The study involved 30 dance couples aged 13-26 years (M = 16.48, SD = 2.16. Participants completed two questionnaires (Own Poll and the Dyadic Trust Scale [DTS] and provided demographic information in a quiet environment, usually at their education or training facilities. Results The results indicated the importance of their own and perceived partner involvement in the development of the couple for the satisfaction from the success in the sport. It is surprising, however, that the results reveal no association between dance experience and satisfaction of practising sport analysed in the study. Conclusions Satisfaction plays an important role in relationships of pair dancers. In dancing, satisfaction may derive from subjective rather than objective factors, mainly those related to the relationship in the couple.

  6. Examining African American and white outdoor recreation participation after demographic standardization on selected characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    James E. Christensen; John F. Dwyer

    1995-01-01

    The "marginality" explanation of differences between the outdoor recreation participation of African Americans and Whites was evaluated using demographic standardization of age, income, and education for a sample of African American and White Illinois residents. After standardization, African America/White differences in outdoor recreation participation were...

  7. Theoretical and methodological approaches to the problem of students' health in algorithms of recreation measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaytzev V.P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article is expounded about health and its basic constituents: physical, psychical and social. Description is given to physical development of man and its physical preparedness, physical form and trained, physical activity and functional readiness. Opinions and looks of scientists, teachers and doctors are presented on determination of health of man, including student. All of these symptoms are taken into account from point of recreation measures. Description of determination of recreation, physical recreation and other concept of recreation systems is given. It is shown historical information about both determination of health and recreation, and also participation of higher educational establishments of physical culture of Ukraine, Russia and Poland, which is working under this problem, in determination of health and recreation.

  8. Questioning Trends in University Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This article revisits ideas put forward at the beginning of an academic career and discusses the ways in which time and experience within academe has shifted the author's perspective. Specifically, focusing on the balance of artistic thinking with the widely perceived need to justify the arts in higher education, the author explores questions…

  9. Promoting physical activity with a school-based dance mat exergaming intervention: qualitative findings from a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burges Watson, Duika; Adams, Jean; Azevedo, Liane B; Haighton, Catherine

    2016-07-20

    Physical activity is critical to improving health and well-being in children. Quantitative studies have found a decline in activity in the transition from primary to secondary education. Exergames (active video games) might increase physical activity in adolescents. In January 2011 exergame dance mat systems were introduced in to all secondary schools across two local authority districts in the UK. We performed a quasi-experimental evaluation of a natural experiment using a mixed methods design. The quantitative findings from this work have been previously published. The aim of this linked qualitative study was to explore the implementation of the dance mat scheme and offer insights into its uptake as a physical activity intervention. Embedded qualitative interviews at baseline and 12 month follow-up with purposively selected physical education teachers (n = 20) and 25 focus groups with a convenience sample of pupils (n = 120) from five intervention schools were conducted. Analysis was informed by sociology of translation approach. At baseline, participants (both teachers and pupils) reported different expectations about the dance mats and how they could be employed. Variation in use was seen at follow-up. In some settings they were frequently used to engage hard to reach groups of pupils. Overall, the dance mats were not used routinely to increase physical activity. However there were other unanticipated benefits to pupils such as improved reaction time, co-ordination and mathematic skills. The use of dance mats was limited in routine physical education classes because of contextual issues (school/government policy) technological failures (batteries/updates) and because of expectations about how and where they could be used. Our linked quantitative study (previously published) suggested that the dance mats were not particularly effective in increasing physical activity, but the qualitative results (reported here) show that the dance mats were not used

  10. Promoting physical activity with a school-based dance mat exergaming intervention: qualitative findings from a natural experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duika Burges Watson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is critical to improving health and well-being in children. Quantitative studies have found a decline in activity in the transition from primary to secondary education. Exergames (active video games might increase physical activity in adolescents. In January 2011 exergame dance mat systems were introduced in to all secondary schools across two local authority districts in the UK. We performed a quasi-experimental evaluation of a natural experiment using a mixed methods design. The quantitative findings from this work have been previously published. The aim of this linked qualitative study was to explore the implementation of the dance mat scheme and offer insights into its uptake as a physical activity intervention. Methods Embedded qualitative interviews at baseline and 12 month follow-up with purposively selected physical education teachers (n = 20 and 25 focus groups with a convenience sample of pupils (n = 120 from five intervention schools were conducted. Analysis was informed by sociology of translation approach. Results At baseline, participants (both teachers and pupils reported different expectations about the dance mats and how they could be employed. Variation in use was seen at follow-up. In some settings they were frequently used to engage hard to reach groups of pupils. Overall, the dance mats were not used routinely to increase physical activity. However there were other unanticipated benefits to pupils such as improved reaction time, co-ordination and mathematic skills. The use of dance mats was limited in routine physical education classes because of contextual issues (school/government policy technological failures (batteries/updates and because of expectations about how and where they could be used. Conclusions Our linked quantitative study (previously published suggested that the dance mats were not particularly effective in increasing physical activity, but the qualitative

  11. Dancing with Down Syndrome: A Phenomenological Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Nicole; Bryden, Pamela J.; Fletcher, Paula C.

    2015-01-01

    "Dance for individuals with Down syndrome has many benefits; however, there is little research on this topic." Down syndrome is the most common "genetic condition," resulting in psychological, physical, and social impairments. There is research to suggest that dance may be a beneficial activity for people with Down syndrome;…

  12. Dancing Earthquake Science Assists Recovery from the Christchurch Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Candice J.; Quigley, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010-2012 Christchurch (Canterbury) earthquakes in New Zealand caused loss of life and psychological distress in residents throughout the region. In 2011, student dancers of the Hagley Dance Company and dance professionals choreographed the performance "Move: A Seismic Journey" for the Christchurch Body Festival that explored…

  13. Dance Movement Therapy: A Healing Art. [Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fran J.

    The concern of this text is the need that many individuals have for nonverbal, primarily physical forms of expression, and how this need has fueled the development of a new psychomotor discipline. The book treats the theory and practice of dance therapy, and examines the entire field from its inception through the present. Dance therapy, the use…

  14. Dance/Movement Therapy with Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Veronica

    This outline profiles two programs that use dance/movement therapy to help students with low self-esteem, poor body image, poor self-control, lack of trust in others, difficulty identifying and expressing feelings, and poor interpersonal relating skills. Students referred for dance/movement therapy services are assessed for appropriateness, and…

  15. Tanko Bushi: Designing a Japanese-American Dance Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Terry; Werner, Peter; Williams, Lori H.; Crump, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    Many folk dances reflect the everyday activities of the people, celebrating the commonplace through physical forms of expression. The traditional Japanese folk dance, Tanko Bushi, is still performed in Japan and among Japanese-Americans today, and its theme of coal mining makes it relatable to many cultures around the world. With its traditional…

  16. Lakota Sioux Indian Dance Theatre. Cuesheet for Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John C.; And Others

    This performance guide provides students with an introduction to Lakota Sioux history and culture and to the dances performed by the Lakota Sioux Indian Dance Theatre. The Lakota Sioux believe that life is a sacred circle in which all things are connected, and that the circle was broken for them in 1890 by the massacre at Wounded Knee. Only in…

  17. The "Highly Satisfied" Teaching Artist in Dance: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug; Anderson, Mary Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This case study is drawn from the authors' ongoing international study of teaching artists in dance and theatre. The study takes an in-depth look at teaching artists' artistic and academic preparation in dance and theatre, entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and assessment of their work, and their professional development,…

  18. Drug addiction therapy. A dance to the music of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodison, L; Schafer, H

    1999-10-21

    Dance therapy can play a useful role in the treatment and rehabilitation of women with drug addiction. It works by raising self-esteem through an improved relationship with the body, giving women the strength to help combat their habit. The benefits of dance therapy for women at the detox unit of Holloway Prison have been confirmed by prison staff.

  19. Is Dance a Sport?: A Twenty-First-Century Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a new debate which has emerged for dancers. For many years dancers debated dance as art versus entertainment. This age-old debate still exists without a consensus, yet there is suddenly a new generation of dancers with a fresh debate. Legions of young performers are fervently proclaiming that their dance is actually a sport.…

  20. Using Dance to Deepen Student Understanding of Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Candice; Linder, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an example of a collaborative effort between a dance specialist and four third-grade classroom teachers at an arts magnet school. They developed a dance and geometry integration project including implementation strategies, assessment tools, and reflections completed by both the classroom teacher and the third-grade students.…